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Sample records for central metabolism genes

  1. Characterization of physiological responses to 22 gene knockouts in Escherichia coli central carbon metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Christopher P; Gonzalez, Jacqueline E; Sandoval, Nicholas R; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the impact of gene knockouts on cellular physiology, and metabolism in particular, is centrally important to quantitative systems biology and metabolic engineering. Here, we present a comprehensive physiological characterization of wild-type Escherichia coli and 22 knockouts of enzymes in the upper part of central carbon metabolism, including the PTS system, glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway and Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Our results reveal significant metabolic changes that are affected by specific gene knockouts. Analysis of collective trends and correlations in the data using principal component analysis (PCA) provide new, and sometimes surprising, insights into E. coli physiology. Additionally, by comparing the data-to-model predictions from constraint-based approaches such as FBA, MOMA and RELATCH we demonstrate the important role of less well-understood kinetic and regulatory effects in central carbon metabolism. PMID:27212692

  2. From the selfish gene to selfish metabolism: revisiting the central dogma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2014-03-01

    The standard representation of the Central Dogma (CD) of Molecular Biology conspicuously ignores metabolism. However, both the metabolites and the biochemical fluxes behind any biological phenomenon are encrypted in the DNA sequence. Metabolism constrains and even changes the information flow when the DNA-encoded instructions conflict with the homeostasis of the biochemical network. Inspection of adaptive virulence programs and emergence of xenobiotic-biodegradation pathways in environmental bacteria suggest that their main evolutionary drive is the expansion of their metabolic networks towards new chemical landscapes rather than perpetuation and spreading of their DNA sequences. Faulty enzymatic reactions on suboptimal substrates often produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), a process that fosters DNA diversification and ultimately couples catabolism of the new chemicals to growth. All this calls for a revision of the CD in which metabolism (rather than DNA) has the leading role. PMID:24419968

  3. Investigating the effects of perturbations to pgi and eno gene expression on central carbon metabolism in Escherichia coli using 13 C metabolic flux analysis

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    Usui Yuki

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has long been recognized that analyzing the behaviour of the complex intracellular biological networks is important for breeding industrially useful microorganisms. However, because of the complexity of these biological networks, it is currently not possible to obtain all the desired microorganisms. In this study, we constructed a system for analyzing the effect of gene expression perturbations on the behavior of biological networks in Escherichia coli. Specifically, we utilized 13 C metabolic flux analysis (13 C-MFA to analyze the effect of perturbations to the expression levels of pgi and eno genes encoding phosphoglucose isomerase and enolase, respectively on metabolic fluxes. Results We constructed gene expression-controllable E. coli strains using a single-copy mini F plasmid. Using the pgi expression-controllable strain, we found that the specific growth rate correlated with the pgi expression level. 13 C-MFA of this strain revealed that the fluxes for the pentose phosphate pathway and Entner-Doudoroff pathway decreased, as the pgi expression lelvel increased. In addition, the glyoxylate shunt became active when the pgi expression level was almost zero. Moreover, the flux for the glyoxylate shunt increased when the pgi expression level decreased, but was significantly reduced in the pgi-knockout cells. Comparatively, eno expression could not be decreased compared to the parent strain, but we found that increased eno expression resulted in a decreased specific growth rate. 13 C-MFA revealed that the metabolic flux distribution was not altered by an increased eno expression level, but the overall metabolic activity of the central metabolism decreased. Furthermore, to evaluate the impact of perturbed expression of pgi and eno genes on changes in metabolic fluxes in E. coli quantitatively, metabolic sensitivity analysis was performed. As a result, the perturbed expression of pgi gene had a great impact to the

  4. Integrated in silico Analyses of Regulatory and Metabolic Networks of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 Reveal Relationships between Gene Centrality and Essentiality

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    Hyun-Seob Song

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria dynamically relay environmental inputs to intracellular adaptations through a coordinated adjustment of photosynthetic efficiency and carbon processing rates. The output of such adaptations is reflected through changes in transcriptional patterns and metabolic flux distributions that ultimately define growth strategy. To address interrelationships between metabolism and regulation, we performed integrative analyses of metabolic and gene co-expression networks in a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Centrality analyses using the gene co-expression network identified a set of key genes, which were defined here as “topologically important.” Parallel in silico gene knock-out simulations, using the genome-scale metabolic network, classified what we termed as “functionally important” genes, deletion of which affected growth or metabolism. A strong positive correlation was observed between topologically and functionally important genes. Functionally important genes exhibited variable levels of topological centrality; however, the majority of topologically central genes were found to be functionally essential for growth. Subsequent functional enrichment analysis revealed that both functionally and topologically important genes in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 are predominantly associated with translation and energy metabolism, two cellular processes critical for growth. This research demonstrates how synergistic network-level analyses can be used for reconciliation of metabolic and gene expression data to uncover fundamental biological principles.

  5. Profiling of genes central to human mitochondrial energy metabolism following low intensity laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houreld, Nicolette N.; Masha, Roland; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2012-09-01

    Background: Wound healing involves three overlapping phases: inflammation, granulation and tissue remodelling. If this process is disrupted, delayed wound healing ensues, a common complication seen in diabetic patients. Low intensity laser irradiation (LILI) has been found to promote healing in such patients. However, the exact mechanisms of action are poorly understood. Purpose: This study aimed to profile the expression of key genes involved in mitochondrial respiration. Materials and Methods: Diabetic wounded fibroblast cells were exposed to a wavelength of 660 nm and a fluence of 5 J/cm2 and incubated for 30 min. Total RNA was isolated and 1 μg reverse transcribed into cDNA which was used for real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array analysis. The array contained genes important for each of the mitochondrial complexes involved in the electron transport chain (ETC). Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were also determined post-irradiation by ATP luminescence. Results: Genes involved in complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase), COX6B2 and COX6C, and PPA1 which is involved in complex V (ATP synthase) were significantly up-regulated. There was a significant increase in ATP levels in diabetic wounded cells post-irradiation. Discussion and Conclusion: LILI stimulates the ETC at a transcriptional level, resulting in an increase in ATP. This study helps understand the mechanisms of LILI in diabetic wound healing, and gives information on activation of genes in response to LILI.

  6. Evidence for Central Regulation of Glucose Metabolism*

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, Michelle; Kehlenbrink, Sylvia; Hawkins, Meredith

    2013-01-01

    Evidence for central regulation of glucose homeostasis is accumulating from both animal and human studies. Central nutrient and hormone sensing in the hypothalamus appears to coordinate regulation of whole body metabolism. Central signals activate ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, thereby down-regulating glucose production, likely through vagal efferent signals. Recent human studies are consistent with this hypothesis. The contributions of direct and central inputs to metabolic regulat...

  7. Novel genes in LDL metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    transporters G5 and G8, Niemann-Pick C1-Like protein 1, sortilin-1, ABO blood-group glycosyltransferases, myosin regulatory light chain-interacting protein and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase have all consistently been associated with LDL cholesterol levels and/or coronary artery disease in GWAS. Whole......-exome sequencing and 'exome chip' studies have additionally suggested several novel genes in LDL metabolism including insulin-induced gene 2, signal transducing adaptor family member 1, lysosomal acid lipase A, patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 5 and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2. Most of...... cholesterol. Novel genes in LDL metabolism will improve our understanding of mechanisms in LDL metabolism, and may lead to the identification of new drug targets to reduce LDL cholesterol levels....

  8. Differential effects of Th1, monocyte/macrophage and Th2 cytokine mixtures on early gene expression for molecules associated with metabolism, signaling and regulation in central nervous system mixed glial cell cultures

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    Studzinski Diane

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytokines secreted by immune cells and activated glia play central roles in both the pathogenesis of and protection from damage to the central nervous system (CNS in multiple sclerosis (MS. Methods We have used gene array analysis to identify the initial direct effects of cytokines on CNS glia by comparing changes in early gene expression in CNS glial cultures treated for 6 hours with cytokines typical of those secreted by Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes and monocyte/macrophages (M/M. Results In two previous papers, we summarized effects of these cytokines on immune-related molecules, and on neural and glial related proteins, including neurotrophins, growth factors and structural proteins. In this paper, we present the effects of the cytokines on molecules involved in metabolism, signaling and regulatory mechanisms in CNS glia. Many of the changes in gene expression were similar to those seen in ischemic preconditioning and in early inflammatory lesions in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, related to ion homeostasis, mitochondrial function, neurotransmission, vitamin D metabolism and a variety of transcription factors and signaling pathways. Among the most prominent changes, all three cytokine mixtures markedly downregulated the dopamine D3 receptor, while Th1 and Th2 cytokines downregulated neuropeptide Y receptor 5. An unexpected finding was the large number of changes related to lipid metabolism, including several suggesting a switch from diacylglycerol to phosphatidyl inositol mediated signaling pathways. Using QRT-PCR we validated the results for regulation of genes for iNOS, arginase and P glycoprotein/multi-drug resistance protein 1 (MDR1 seen at 6 hours with microarray. Conclusion Each of the three cytokine mixtures differentially regulated gene expression related to metabolism and signaling that may play roles in the pathogenesis of MS, most notably with regard to mitochondrial function and neurotransmitter

  9. Metabolic syndrome and central retinal artery occlusion

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    Kosanović-Jaković Natalija

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The accumulation of risk factors for central retinal artery occlusion can be seen in a single person and might be explained by the metabolic syndrome. Case report. We presented the case of a 52-year-old man with no light perception in his right eye. The visual loss was monocular and painless, fundoscopy showed central retinal artery occlusion and the laboratory investigation showed the raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 105 mm/h and the raised C-reactive protein of 22 mg/l. Specific laboratory investigations and fluorescein angiography excluded the presence of vasculitis, collagen vascular diseases, hypercoagulable state and antiphospholipid syndrome. Conclusion. The patient met all the five of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP criteria for the metabolic syndrome: hypertension, abnormal lipid profile, abnormal glucose metabolism, obesity and hyperuricemia. Measurement of C-reactive protein is useful for the assessment of therapeutic systemic effect on any abnormality in the metabolic syndrome. Individual therapy for all risk factors in the metabolic syndrome is necessary to prevent complications such as cardiovascular, retinal vascular diseases and stroke.

  10. The Central Carbon and Energy Metabolism of Marine Diatoms

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    Adriano Nunes-Nesi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are heterokont algae derived from a secondary symbiotic event in which a eukaryotic host cell acquired an eukaryotic red alga as plastid. The multiple endosymbiosis and horizontal gene transfer processes provide diatoms unusual opportunities for gene mixing to establish distinctive biosynthetic pathways and metabolic control structures. Diatoms are also known to have significant impact on global ecosystems as one of the most dominant phytoplankton species in the contemporary ocean. As such their metabolism and growth regulating factors have been of particular interest for many years. The publication of the genomic sequences of two independent species of diatoms and the advent of an enhanced experimental toolbox for molecular biological investigations have afforded far greater opportunities than were previously apparent for these species and re-invigorated studies regarding the central carbon metabolism of diatoms. In this review we discuss distinctive features of the central carbon metabolism of diatoms and its response to forthcoming environmental changes and recent advances facilitating the possibility of industrial use of diatoms for oil production. Although the operation and importance of several key pathways of diatom metabolism have already been demonstrated and determined, we will also highlight other potentially important pathways wherein this has yet to be achieved.

  11. Metabolic syndrome and central retinal artery occlusion

    OpenAIRE

    Kosanović-Jaković Natalija; Petrović Lidija; Risimić Dijana; Milenković Svetislav; Matić Danica

    2005-01-01

    Background. The accumulation of risk factors for central retinal artery occlusion can be seen in a single person and might be explained by the metabolic syndrome. Case report. We presented the case of a 52-year-old man with no light perception in his right eye. The visual loss was monocular and painless, fundoscopy showed central retinal artery occlusion and the laboratory investigation showed the raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 105 mm/h and the raised C-reactive protein of 22 mg/l. ...

  12. Transcript abundance on its own cannot be used to infer fluxes in central metabolism

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    Jörg eSchwender

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made to define the extent to which metabolic flux in central plant metabolism is reflected by changes in the transcriptome and metabolome, based on an analysis of in vitro cultured immature embryos of two oilseed rape (Brassica napus accessions which contrast for seed lipid accumulation. Metabolic flux analysis was used to constrain a flux balance metabolic model which included 671 biochemical and transport reactions within the central metabolism. This highly confident flux information was eventually used for comparative analysis of flux versus transcript (metabolite. Metabolite profiling succeeded in identifying 79 intermediates within the central metabolism, some of which differed quantitatively between the two accessions and displayed a significant shift corresponding to flux. An RNA-Seq based transcriptome analysis revealed a large number of genes which were differentially transcribed in the two accessions, including some enzymes/proteins active in major metabolic pathways. With a few exceptions, differential activity in the major pathways (glycolysis, TCA cycle, amino acid and fatty acid synthesis was not reflected in contrasting abundances of the relevant transcripts. The conclusion was that transcript abundance on its own cannot be used to infer metabolic activity/fluxes in central plant metabolism. This limitation needs to be borne in mind in evaluating transcriptome data and designing metabolic engineering experiments.

  13. C. elegans Metabolic Gene Regulatory Networks Govern the Cellular Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Emma; Walhout, Albertha J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Diet greatly impacts metabolism in health and disease. In response to the presence or absence of specific nutrients, metabolic gene regulatory networks sense the metabolic state of the cell and regulate metabolic flux accordingly, for instance by the transcriptional control of metabolic enzymes. Here we discuss recent insights regarding metazoan metabolic regulatory networks using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, including the modular organization of metabolic gene regulatory networks, the prominent impact of diet on the transcriptome and metabolome, specialized roles of nuclear hormone receptors in responding to dietary conditions, regulation of metabolic genes and metabolic regulators by microRNAs, and feedback between metabolic genes and their regulators. PMID:24731597

  14. Dynamics in the Central Plant Cell Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Ampofo-Asiama, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    As part of their development, plants have acquired adaptive mechanisms to cope with different stress situations they encounter in their environment. These adaptive mechanisms include the ability to alter their metabolism when faced with extreme environmental conditions such as low oxygen. In higher plants, oxygen (O2) availability is important for energy production through respiratory metabolism. Under conditions where O2 becomes limiting, respiratory metabolism can be impeded leading to impa...

  15. Rewriting central metabolism for carbon conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Bogorad, Igor Walter

    2015-01-01

    The efficient use of carbon sources is a core objective in metabolic engineering and biorefinery. Most approaches have focused on optimizing naturally occurring pathways to improve titer, productivity, and yield. However, certain inherent limitations cannot be surpassed if natural pathways are used. Here we designed two synthetic metabolic pathways, Non-Oxidative Glycolysis (NOG) and Methanol Condensation Cycle (MCC) for the utilization of sugar and methanol, respectively. We also created a ...

  16. Apolipoprotein gene involved in lipid metabolism

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    Rubin, Edward; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2007-07-03

    Methods and materials for studying the effects of a newly identified human gene, APOAV, and the corresponding mouse gene apoAV. The sequences of the genes are given, and transgenic animals which either contain the gene or have the endogenous gene knocked out are described. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene are described and characterized. It is demonstrated that certain SNPs are associated with diseases involving lipids and triglycerides and other metabolic diseases. These SNPs may be used alone or with SNPs from other genes to study individual risk factors. Methods for intervention in lipid diseases, including the screening of drugs to treat lipid-related or diabetic diseases are also disclosed.

  17. Metabolic gene polymorphism frequencies in control populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garte, Seymour; Gaspari, Laura; Alexandrie, Anna-Karin;

    2001-01-01

    Using the International Project on Genetic Susceptibility to Environmental Carcinogens (GSEC) database containing information on over 15,000 control (noncancer) subjects, the allele and genotype frequencies for many of the more commonly studied metabolic genes (CYP1A1, CYP2E1, CYP2D6, GSTM1, GSTT1...

  18. A central role of abscisic acid in stress-regulated carbohydrate metabolism.

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    Stefan Kempa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abiotic stresses adversely affect plant growth and development. The hormone abscisic acid (ABA plays a central role in the response and adaptation to environmental constraints. However, apart from the well established role of ABA in regulating gene expression programmes, little is known about its function in plant stress metabolism. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an integrative multiparallel approach of metabolome and transcriptome analyses, we studied the dynamic response of the model glyophyte Arabidopsis thaliana to ABA and high salt conditions. Our work shows that salt stress induces complex re-adjustment of carbohydrate metabolism and that ABA triggers the initial steps of carbon mobilisation. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings open new perspectives on how high salinity and ABA impact on central carbohydrate metabolism and highlight the power of iterative combinatorial approaches of non-targeted and hypothesis-driven experiments in stress biology.

  19. Making metabolism accessible and meaningful: is the definition of a central metabolic dogma within reach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRossa, Robert A

    2015-04-01

    Intermediary metabolism, a dominant research area before the emergence of molecular biology, is attracting renewed interest for fundamental and applied reasons as documented here. Nonetheless, the field may appear to be a thicket precluding entry to all but the most determined. Here we present a metabolic overview that makes this important and fascinating area accessible to a broad range of the molecular biological and biotechnological communities that are being attracted to biological problems crying out for metabolic solutions. This is accomplished by identifying seven key concepts, a so-called metabolic central dogma, that provide a core understanding analogous to the "Central Dogma of Molecular Biology" which focused upon maintenance and flow of genetic information. PMID:25515796

  20. Comparative gene expression of intestinal metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ho-Chul; Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Cho, Hee-Jung; Yi, Hee; Cho, Soo-Min; Lee, Dong-Goo; Abd El-Aty, A M; Kim, Jin-Suk; Sun, Duxin; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the expression profiles of drug-metabolizing enzymes in the intestine of mouse, rat and human. Total RNA was isolated from the duodenum and the mRNA expression was measured using Affymetrix GeneChip oligonucleotide arrays. Detected genes from the intestine of mouse, rat and human were ca. 60% of 22690 sequences, 40% of 8739 and 47% of 12559, respectively. Total genes of metabolizing enzymes subjected in this study were 95, 33 and 68 genes in mouse, rat and human, respectively. Of phase I enzymes, the mouse exhibited abundant gene expressions for Cyp3a25, Cyp4v3, Cyp2d26, followed by Cyp2b20, Cyp2c65 and Cyp4f14, whereas, the rat showed higher expression profiles of Cyp3a9, Cyp2b19, Cyp4f1, Cyp17a1, Cyp2d18, Cyp27a1 and Cyp4f6. However, the highly expressed P450 enzymes were CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP4F3, CYP2C18, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP3A7, CYP11B1 and CYP2B6 in the human. For phase II enzymes, glucuronosyltransferase Ugt1a6, glutathione S-transferases Gstp1, Gstm3 and Gsta2, sulfotransferase Sult1b1 and acyltransferase Dgat1 were highly expressed in the mouse. The rat revealed predominant expression of glucuronosyltransferases Ugt1a1 and Ugt1a7, sulfotransferase Sult1b1, acetyltransferase Dlat and acyltransferase Dgat1. On the other hand, in human, glucuronosyltransferases UGT2B15 and UGT2B17, glutathione S-transferases MGST3, GSTP1, GSTA2 and GSTM4, sulfotransferases ST1A3 and SULT1A2, acetyltransferases SAT1 and CRAT, and acyltransferase AGPAT2 were dominantly detected. Therefore, current data indicated substantial interspecies differences in the pattern of intestinal gene expression both for P450 enzymes and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. This genomic database is expected to improve our understanding of interspecies variations in estimating intestinal prehepatic clearance of oral drugs. PMID:19746353

  1. Niche-specific regulation of central metabolic pathways in a fungal pathogen

    OpenAIRE

    Barelle, Caroline J; Priest, Claire L; MacCallum, Donna M.; Gow, Neil AR; Odds, Frank C; Brown, Alistair JP

    2006-01-01

    Summary To establish an infection, the pathogen Candida albicans must assimilate carbon and grow in its mammalian host. This fungus assimilates six-carbon compounds via the glycolytic pathway, and two-carbon compounds via the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis. We address a paradox regarding the roles of these central metabolic pathways in C. albicans pathogenesis: the glyoxylate cycle is apparently required for virulence although glyoxylate cycle genes are repressed by glucose at concentra...

  2. Coordinations between gene modules control the operation of plant amino acid metabolic networks

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    Galili Gad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Being sessile organisms, plants should adjust their metabolism to dynamic changes in their environment. Such adjustments need particular coordination in branched metabolic networks in which a given metabolite can be converted into multiple other metabolites via different enzymatic chains. In the present report, we developed a novel "Gene Coordination" bioinformatics approach and use it to elucidate adjustable transcriptional interactions of two branched amino acid metabolic networks in plants in response to environmental stresses, using publicly available microarray results. Results Using our "Gene Coordination" approach, we have identified in Arabidopsis plants two oppositely regulated groups of "highly coordinated" genes within the branched Asp-family network of Arabidopsis plants, which metabolizes the amino acids Lys, Met, Thr, Ile and Gly, as well as a single group of "highly coordinated" genes within the branched aromatic amino acid metabolic network, which metabolizes the amino acids Trp, Phe and Tyr. These genes possess highly coordinated adjustable negative and positive expression responses to various stress cues, which apparently regulate adjustable metabolic shifts between competing branches of these networks. We also provide evidence implying that these highly coordinated genes are central to impose intra- and inter-network interactions between the Asp-family and aromatic amino acid metabolic networks as well as differential system interactions with other growth promoting and stress-associated genome-wide genes. Conclusion Our novel Gene Coordination elucidates that branched amino acid metabolic networks in plants are regulated by specific groups of highly coordinated genes that possess adjustable intra-network, inter-network and genome-wide transcriptional interactions. We also hypothesize that such transcriptional interactions enable regulatory metabolic adjustments needed for adaptation to the stresses.

  3. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Shewanella spp. Reveals Evolutionary Robustness in Central Carbon Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Martin, Hector Garcia; Dehal, Paramvir S.; Deutschbauer, Adam; Llora, Xavier; Meadows, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-08-19

    Shewanella spp. are a group of facultative anaerobic bacteria widely distributed in marine and fresh-water environments. In this study, we profiled the central metabolic fluxes of eight recently sequenced Shewanella species grown under the same condition in minimal med-ium with [3-13C] lactate. Although the tested Shewanella species had slightly different growth rates (0.23-0.29 h31) and produced different amounts of acetate and pyruvate during early exponential growth (pseudo-steady state), the relative intracellular metabolic flux distributions were remarkably similar. This result indicates that Shewanella species share similar regulation in regard to central carbon metabolic fluxes under steady growth conditions: the maintenance of metabolic robustness is not only evident in a single species under genetic perturbations (Fischer and Sauer, 2005; Nat Genet 37(6):636-640), but also observed through evolutionary related microbial species. This remarkable conservation of relative flux profiles through phylogenetic differences prompts us to introduce the concept of metabotype as an alternative scheme to classify microbial fluxomics. On the other hand, Shewanella spp. display flexibility in the relative flux profiles when switching their metabolism from consuming lactate to consuming pyruvate and acetate.

  4. Functional analysis of lipid metabolism genes in wine yeasts during alcoholic fermentation at low temperature

    OpenAIRE

    María López-Malo; Estéfani García-Ríos; Rosana Chiva; José Manuel Guillamon

    2014-01-01

    Wine produced by low-temperature fermentation is mostly considered to have improved sensory qualities. However few commercial wine strains available on the market are well-adapted to ferment at low temperature (10 – 15°C). The lipid metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a central role in low temperature adaptation. One strategy to modify lipid composition is to alter transcriptional activity by deleting or overexpressing the key genes of lipid metabolism. In a previous study, we identi...

  5. Metabolic regulation and maximal reaction optimization in the central metabolism of a yeast cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasbawati, Gunawan, A. Y.; Hertadi, R.; Sidarto, K. A.

    2015-03-01

    Regulation of fluxes in a metabolic system aims to enhance the production rates of biotechnologically important compounds. Regulation is held via modification the cellular activities of a metabolic system. In this study, we present a metabolic analysis of ethanol fermentation process of a yeast cell in terms of continuous culture scheme. The metabolic regulation is based on the kinetic formulation in combination with metabolic control analysis to indicate the key enzymes which can be modified to enhance ethanol production. The model is used to calculate the intracellular fluxes in the central metabolism of the yeast cell. Optimal control is then applied to the kinetic model to find the optimal regulation for the fermentation system. The sensitivity results show that there are external and internal control parameters which are adjusted in enhancing ethanol production. As an external control parameter, glucose supply should be chosen in appropriate way such that the optimal ethanol production can be achieved. For the internal control parameter, we find three enzymes as regulation targets namely acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, and alcohol dehydrogenase which reside in the acetaldehyde branch. Among the three enzymes, however, only acetaldehyde dehydrogenase has a significant effect to obtain optimal ethanol production efficiently.

  6. Maternal-Fetal Metabolic Gene-Gene Interactions and Risk of Neural Tube Defects

    OpenAIRE

    Lupo, Philip J.; Mitchell, Laura E; Canfield, Mark A.; Shaw, Gary M.; Olshan, Andrew F.; Finnell, Richard H.; Zhu, Huiping

    2013-01-01

    Single-gene analyses indicate that maternal genes associated with metabolic conditions (e.g., obesity) may influence the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs). However, to our knowledge, there have been no assessments of maternal-fetal metabolic gene-gene interactions and NTDs. We investigated 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms among 7 maternal metabolic genes (ADRB3, ENPP1, FTO, LEP, PPARG, PPARGC1A, and TCF7L2) and 2 fetal metabolic genes (SLC2A2 and UCP2). Samples were obtained from 737 NTD c...

  7. Transcript abundance on its own cannot be used to infer fluxes in central metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Jörg eSchwender; Christina eKönig; Matthias eKlapperstück; Nicolas eHeinzel; Eberhard eMunz; Inga eHebbelmann; Jordan O. Hay; Peter eDenolf; Stefanie De Bodt; Henning eRedestig; Evelyne eCaestecker; Peter M. Jakob; Ljudmilla eBorisjuk; Hardy eRolletschek

    2014-01-01

    An attempt has been made to define the extent to which metabolic flux in central plant metabolism is reflected by changes in the transcriptome and metabolome, based on an analysis of in vitro cultured immature embryos of two oilseed rape (Brassica napus) accessions which contrast for seed lipid accumulation. Metabolic flux analysis was used to constrain a flux balance metabolic model which included 671 biochemical and transport reactions within the central metabolism. This highly confident fl...

  8. Transcript abundance on its own cannot be used to infer fluxes in central metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Schwender, Jörg; König, Christina; Klapperstück, Matthias; Heinzel, Nicolas; Munz, Eberhard; Hebbelmann, Inga; Jordan O. Hay; Denolf, Peter; De Bodt, Stefanie; Redestig, Henning; Caestecker, Evelyne; Peter M. Jakob; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Rolletschek, Hardy

    2014-01-01

    An attempt has been made to define the extent to which metabolic flux in central plant metabolism is reflected by changes in the transcriptome and metabolome, based on an analysis of in vitro cultured immature embryos of two oilseed rape (Brassica napus) accessions which contrast for seed lipid accumulation. Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) was used to constrain a flux balance metabolic model which included 671 biochemical and transport reactions within the central metabolism. This highly confid...

  9. Expression data on liver metabolic pathway genes and proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Mooli Raja Gopal Reddy; Chodisetti Pavan Kumar; Malleswarapu Mahesh; Manchiryala Sravan Kumar; Jeyakumar, Shanmugam M

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the expression data on various metabolic pathways of liver with special emphasize on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthesis, both at gene and protein levels. The data were obtained to understand the effect of vitamin A deficiency on the expression status (both gene and protein levels) of some of the key factors involved in lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, triglyceride secretion, long chain PUFA, resolvin D1 synthesis, gl...

  10. Biochemical Hypermedia: Glucose as a Central Molecule in Metabolism

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    J.K. Sugai

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The technologies of information, together with education resources, have been pointed out as a solution to the improvement of teaching approach, but they still claim for programs to fulfill the demands of didactic materials. So, a biochemical software was developed aiming to contribute for the better understanding of the glycolysis. It was prepared with the help of concept maps, ISIS Draw, ADOBE Photoshop and FLASH MX Program. The introduction screen shows a teacher in a theater presenting glucose as a central molecule in the metabolism of animals, plants and many microorganisms. She invites for a better knowledge of glucose through a view of its discovery and its metabolism. A step by step animation process shows the interaction of glucose in aerobic conditions with the enzymes of the glycolytic pathways and its products. An explanation text of each enzyme catalytic process is provided by links. A static pathway is always available through a link. The fates of pyruvate yielding lactic acid and ethanol under anaerobic conditions are shown as well. The overall reactions of gluconeogenesis and the functional significance of this pathway are presented. The experimental treatment involved the presentation of this hypermedia for Nutrition undergraduate students (UFSC as a tool for better comprehension of the theme. The students revealed that it was extremely effective in promoting the understanding of the enzymatic mechanisms involved in glycolysis. This suggests that there is a significant added value in employing the software as an instructional effort to enhance student’s abilities to understand biochemical pathways.

  11. Neural-metabolic coupling in the central visual pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ralph D; Li, Baowang

    2016-10-01

    Studies are described which are intended to improve our understanding of the primary measurements made in non-invasive neural imaging. The blood oxygenation level-dependent signal used in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) reflects changes in deoxygenated haemoglobin. Tissue oxygen concentration, along with blood flow, changes during neural activation. Therefore, measurements of tissue oxygen together with the use of a neural sensor can provide direct estimates of neural-metabolic interactions. We have used this relationship in a series of studies in which a neural microelectrode is combined with an oxygen micro-sensor to make simultaneous co-localized measurements in the central visual pathway. Oxygen responses are typically biphasic with small initial dips followed by large secondary peaks during neural activation. By the use of established visual response characteristics, we have determined that the oxygen initial dip provides a better estimate of local neural function than the positive peak. This contrasts sharply with fMRI for which the initial dip is unreliable. To extend these studies, we have examined the relationship between the primary metabolic agents, glucose and lactate, and associated neural activity. For this work, we also use a Doppler technique to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) together with neural activity. Results show consistent synchronously timed changes such that increases in neural activity are accompanied by decreases in glucose and simultaneous increases in lactate. Measurements of CBF show clear delays with respect to neural response. This is consistent with a slight delay in blood flow with respect to oxygen delivery during neural activation.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574310

  12. Central versus peripheral cardiovascular risk in metabolic syndrome

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    J.KevinShoemaker

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS; i.e. 3 of 5 of the following risk factors (RFs: elevated blood pressure, waist circumference, triglycerides, blood glucose or reduced HDL are thought to be prone to serious cardiovascular disease and there is debate as to whether the disease begins in the peripheral vasculature or centrally. This study investigates hemodynamics, cardiac function/morphology, as well as mechanical properties of the central (heart, carotid artery and peripheral (total peripheral resistance, forearm vascular bed vasculature in individuals without (1-2 RFs; n=28, or with (≥3 RFs; n=46 MetS. After adjustments for statin and blood pressure medication use, those with MetS had lower mitral valve E/A ratios (<3 RFs: 1.24±0.07; ≥3 RFs: 1.01±0.04; P=0.025, and higher total peripheral resistance index (<3 RFs: 48±2 mmHg/L/min/m2; ≥3 RFs: 53±2 mmHg/L/min/m2; P=0.04. There were no differences in heart size, carotid artery measurements, cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity, pulse wave velocity, stroke volume index, or cardiac output index due to MetS after adjustments for statin and blood pressure medication use. In a separate analysis, the use of statins was associated with increased inertia in the brachial vascular bed, increased HbA1c and decreased LDL cholesterol. The independent use of anti-hypertensive medication was associated with decreased predicted VO2max, triglycerides, diastolic blood pressure, interventricular septum thickness, calculated left ventricle mass, left ventricle posterior wall thickness, and left ventricle pre-ejection period, but increased carotid stiffness, HDL cholesterol, and heart rate. These data imply that both a central cardiac effect and a peripheral effect of vascular resistance are expressed in MetS. These data also indicate that variance in between-group responses due to pharmacological treatments are important factors to consider in studying cardiovascular changes in these individuals.

  13. Metabolic flux balance analysis and the in silico analysis of Escherichia coli K-12 gene deletions

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    Edwards Jeremy S

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing and bioinformatics are producing detailed lists of the molecular components contained in many prokaryotic organisms. From this 'parts catalogue' of a microbial cell, in silico representations of integrated metabolic functions can be constructed and analyzed using flux balance analysis (FBA. FBA is particularly well-suited to study metabolic networks based on genomic, biochemical, and strain specific information. Results Herein, we have utilized FBA to interpret and analyze the metabolic capabilities of Escherichia coli. We have computationally mapped the metabolic capabilities of E. coli using FBA and examined the optimal utilization of the E. coli metabolic pathways as a function of environmental variables. We have used an in silico analysis to identify seven gene products of central metabolism (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, TCA cycle, electron transport system essential for aerobic growth of E. coli on glucose minimal media, and 15 gene products essential for anaerobic growth on glucose minimal media. The in silico tpi-, zwf, and pta- mutant strains were examined in more detail by mapping the capabilities of these in silico isogenic strains. Conclusions We found that computational models of E. coli metabolism based on physicochemical constraints can be used to interpret mutant behavior. These in silica results lead to a further understanding of the complex genotype-phenotype relation. Supplementary information: http://gcrg.ucsd.edu/supplementary_data/DeletionAnalysis/main.htm

  14. Exhaustive Analysis of a Genotype Space Comprising 10(15 Central Carbon Metabolisms Reveals an Organization Conducive to Metabolic Innovation.

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    Sayed-Rzgar Hosseini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available All biological evolution takes place in a space of possible genotypes and their phenotypes. The structure of this space defines the evolutionary potential and limitations of an evolving system. Metabolism is one of the most ancient and fundamental evolving systems, sustaining life by extracting energy from extracellular nutrients. Here we study metabolism's potential for innovation by analyzing an exhaustive genotype-phenotype map for a space of 10(15 metabolisms that encodes all possible subsets of 51 reactions in central carbon metabolism. Using flux balance analysis, we predict the viability of these metabolisms on 10 different carbon sources which give rise to 1024 potential metabolic phenotypes. Although viable metabolisms with any one phenotype comprise a tiny fraction of genotype space, their absolute numbers exceed 10(9 for some phenotypes. Metabolisms with any one phenotype typically form a single network of genotypes that extends far or all the way through metabolic genotype space, where any two genotypes can be reached from each other through a series of single reaction changes. The minimal distance of genotype networks associated with different phenotypes is small, such that one can reach metabolisms with novel phenotypes--viable on new carbon sources--through one or few genotypic changes. Exceptions to these principles exist for those metabolisms whose complexity (number of reactions is close to the minimum needed for viability. Increasing metabolic complexity enhances the potential for both evolutionary conservation and evolutionary innovation.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus redirects central metabolism to increase iron availability.

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    David B Friedman

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis is significantly influenced by the iron status of the host. However, the regulatory impact of host iron sources on S. aureus gene expression remains unknown. In this study, we combine multivariable difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry with multivariate statistical analyses to systematically cluster cellular protein response across distinct iron-exposure conditions. Quadruplicate samples were simultaneously analyzed for alterations in protein abundance and/or post-translational modification state in response to environmental (iron chelation, hemin treatment or genetic (Deltafur alterations in bacterial iron exposure. We identified 120 proteins representing several coordinated biochemical pathways that are affected by changes in iron-exposure status. Highlighted in these experiments is the identification of the heme-regulated transport system (HrtAB, a novel transport system which plays a critical role in staphylococcal heme metabolism. Further, we show that regulated overproduction of acidic end-products brought on by iron starvation decreases local pH resulting in the release of iron from the host iron-sequestering protein transferrin. These findings reveal novel strategies used by S. aureus to acquire scarce nutrients in the hostile host environment and begin to define the iron and heme-dependent regulons of S. aureus.

  16. The Sinorhizobium meliloti RNA chaperone Hfq influences central carbon metabolism and the symbiotic interaction with alfalfa

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    Jiménez-Zurdo José I

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial Hfq protein is able to interact with diverse RNA molecules, including regulatory small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs, and thus it is recognized as a global post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression. Loss of Hfq has an extensive impact in bacterial physiology which in several animal pathogens influences virulence. Sinorhizobium meliloti is a model soil bacterium known for its ability to establish a beneficial nitrogen-fixing intracellular symbiosis with alfalfa. Despite the predicted general involvement of Hfq in the establishment of successful bacteria-eukaryote interactions, its function in S. meliloti has remained unexplored. Results Two independent S. meliloti mutants, 2011-3.4 and 1021Δhfq, were obtained by disruption and deletion of the hfq gene in the wild-type strains 2011 and 1021, respectively, both exhibiting similar growth defects as free-living bacteria. Transcriptomic profiling of 1021Δhfq revealed a general down-regulation of genes of sugar transporters and some enzymes of the central carbon metabolism, whereas transcripts specifying the uptake and metabolism of nitrogen sources (mainly amino acids were more abundant than in the wild-type strain. Proteomic analysis of the 2011-3.4 mutant independently confirmed these observations. Symbiotic tests showed that lack of Hfq led to a delayed nodulation, severely compromised bacterial competitiveness on alfalfa roots and impaired normal plant growth. Furthermore, a large proportion of nodules (55%-64% elicited by the 1021Δhfq mutant were non-fixing, with scarce content in bacteroids and signs of premature senescence of endosymbiotic bacteria. RT-PCR experiments on RNA from bacteria grown under aerobic and microoxic conditions revealed that Hfq contributes to regulation of nifA and fixK1/K2, the genes controlling nitrogen fixation, although the Hfq-mediated regulation of fixK is only aerobiosis dependent. Finally, we found that some of the recently

  17. Investigation into the flux distribution of central carbon metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum using principal component analysis

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    Shang Chuanyu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Central carbon metabolism is the main source of energy required by organisms and it provides precursors for other in vivo metabolic processes. The flux flowing through the pathways involved in central carbon metabolism characterizes its biological function and genetic readout between species or environments. In recent years, using a 13C tracer technique, researchers have measured the flux of central carbon metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum under a variety of nutritional and environmental changes or genetic modifications. However, there is no integrated and comparative analysis of these measured flux values. In this study, the flux values of central carbon metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum that were obtained in other recent studies were consolidated. A preliminary examination of the distribution characteristics of flux values in each metabolic pathway was conducted and the regression relationship between different fluxes was investigated. The principal components of the flux vector were further extracted and aggregated based on the components, and the general features of flux distribution of central carbon metabolism as well as the influence of environmental and genetic factors on the flux distribution were determined. This study provides a foundation for further investigation into the flux distribution and regulation characteristics of central carbon metabolism.

  18. Identifying lipid metabolism genes in pig liver after clenbuterol administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiuyue; Zhang, Jin; Guo, Wei; Zhao, Yiqiang; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Li, Ning

    2012-01-01

    Clenbuterol is a repartition agent (beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist) that can decrease fat deposition and increase skeletal muscle growth at manageable dose. To better understand the molecular mechanism of Clenbuterol's action, GeneChips and real-time PCR were used to compare the gene expression profiles of liver tissue in pigs with/without administration of Clenbuterol. Metabolism effects and the global gene expression profiles of liver tissue from Clenbuterol-treated and untreated pigs were conducted. Function enrichment tests showed that the differentially expressed genes are enriched in glycoprotein protein, plasma membrane, fatty acid and amino acid metabolic process, and cell differentiation and signal transduction groups. Pathway mining analysis revealed that physiological pathways such as MAPK, cell adhesion molecules, and the insulin signaling pathway, were remarkably regulated when Clenbuterol was administered. Gene prioritization algorithm was used to associate a number of important differentially expressed genes with lipid metabolism in response to Clenbuterol. Genes identified as differentially expressed in this study will be candidates for further investigation of the molecular mechanisms involved in Clenbuterol's effects on adipose and skeletal muscle tissue. PMID:22652664

  19. Pleiotropic genes for metabolic syndrome and inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraja, Aldi T; Chasman, Daniel I; North, Kari E;

    2014-01-01

    , PDXDC1, FTO, MC4R and TOMM40. Based on large data evidence, we conclude that inflammation is a feature of MetS and several gene variants show pleiotropic genetic associations across phenotypes and might explain a part of MetS correlated genetic architecture. These findings warrant further functional...

  20. Adipose tissue gene expression and metabolic health of obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S K; Ma, L; Sharma, N K

    2015-05-01

    Obese subjects with a similar body mass index (BMI) exhibit substantial heterogeneity in gluco- and cardiometabolic heath phenotypes. However, defining genes that underlie the heterogeneity of metabolic features among obese individuals and determining metabolically healthy and unhealthy phenotypes remain challenging. We conducted unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue transcripts from 30 obese men and women ⩾40 years old. Despite similar BMIs in all subjects, we found two distinct subgroups, one metabolically healthy (group 1) and one metabolically unhealthy (group 2). Subjects in group 2 showed significantly higher total cholesterol (P=0.005), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P=0.006), 2-h insulin during oral glucose tolerance test (P=0.015) and lower insulin sensitivity (SI, P=0.029) compared with group 1. We identified significant upregulation of 141 genes (for example, MMP9 and SPP1) and downregulation of 17 genes (for example, NDRG4 and GINS3) in group 2 subjects. Intriguingly, these differentially expressed transcripts were enriched for genes involved in cardiovascular disease-related processes (P=2.81 × 10(-11)-3.74 × 10(-02)) and pathways involved in immune and inflammatory response (P=8.32 × 10(-5)-0.04). Two downregulated genes, NDRG4 and GINS3, have been located in a genomic interval associated with cardiac repolarization in published GWASs and zebra fish knockout models. Our study provides evidence that perturbations in the adipose tissue gene expression network are important in defining metabolic health in obese subjects. PMID:25520251

  1. Return to the fetal gene program: A suggested metabolic link to gene expression in the heart

    OpenAIRE

    Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Sen, Shiraj; Vela, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    A hallmark of cardiac metabolism before birth is the predominance of carbohydrate use for energy provision. After birth, energy substrate metabolism rapidly switches to the oxidation of fatty acids. This switch accompanies the expression of “adult” isoforms of metabolic enzymes and other proteins. However, in a variety of pathophysiologic conditions, including hypoxia, ischemia, hypertrophy, atrophy, diabetes, and hypothyroidism, the postnatal heart returns to the “fetal” gene program. These ...

  2. Ontogeny of hepatic energy metabolism genes in mice as revealed by RNA-sequencing.

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    Helen J Renaud

    Full Text Available The liver plays a central role in metabolic homeostasis by coordinating synthesis, storage, breakdown, and redistribution of nutrients. Hepatic energy metabolism is dynamically regulated throughout different life stages due to different demands for energy during growth and development. However, changes in gene expression patterns throughout ontogeny for factors important in hepatic energy metabolism are not well understood. We performed detailed transcript analysis of energy metabolism genes during various stages of liver development in mice. Livers from male C57BL/6J mice were collected at twelve ages, including perinatal and postnatal time points (n = 3/age. The mRNA was quantified by RNA-Sequencing, with transcript abundance estimated by Cufflinks. One thousand sixty energy metabolism genes were examined; 794 were above detection, of which 627 were significantly changed during at least one developmental age compared to adult liver. Two-way hierarchical clustering revealed three major clusters dependent on age: GD17.5-Day 5 (perinatal-enriched, Day 10-Day 20 (pre-weaning-enriched, and Day 25-Day 60 (adolescence/adulthood-enriched. Clustering analysis of cumulative mRNA expression values for individual pathways of energy metabolism revealed three patterns of enrichment: glycolysis, ketogenesis, and glycogenesis were all perinatally-enriched; glycogenolysis was the only pathway enriched during pre-weaning ages; whereas lipid droplet metabolism, cholesterol and bile acid metabolism, gluconeogenesis, and lipid metabolism were all enriched in adolescence/adulthood. This study reveals novel findings such as the divergent expression of the fatty acid β-oxidation enzymes Acyl-CoA oxidase 1 and Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a, indicating a switch from mitochondrial to peroxisomal β-oxidation after weaning; as well as the dynamic ontogeny of genes implicated in obesity such as Stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 and Elongation of very long chain fatty

  3. A role for gene duplication and natural variation of gene expression in the evolution of metabolism.

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    Daniel J Kliebenstein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most eukaryotic genomes have undergone whole genome duplications during their evolutionary history. Recent studies have shown that the function of these duplicated genes can diverge from the ancestral gene via neo- or sub-functionalization within single genotypes. An additional possibility is that gene duplicates may also undergo partitioning of function among different genotypes of a species leading to genetic differentiation. Finally, the ability of gene duplicates to diverge may be limited by their biological function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test these hypotheses, I estimated the impact of gene duplication and metabolic function upon intraspecific gene expression variation of segmental and tandem duplicated genes within Arabidopsis thaliana. In all instances, the younger tandem duplicated genes showed higher intraspecific gene expression variation than the average Arabidopsis gene. Surprisingly, the older segmental duplicates also showed evidence of elevated intraspecific gene expression variation albeit typically lower than for the tandem duplicates. The specific biological function of the gene as defined by metabolic pathway also modulated the level of intraspecific gene expression variation. The major energy metabolism and biosynthetic pathways showed decreased variation, suggesting that they are constrained in their ability to accumulate gene expression variation. In contrast, a major herbivory defense pathway showed significantly elevated intraspecific variation suggesting that it may be under pressure to maintain and/or generate diversity in response to fluctuating insect herbivory pressures. CONCLUSION: These data show that intraspecific variation in gene expression is facilitated by an interaction of gene duplication and biological activity. Further, this plays a role in controlling diversity of plant metabolism.

  4. Metabolic design based on a coupled gene expression-metabolic network model of tryptophan production in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Joachim W; Mauch, Klaus; Reuss, Matthias; Gilles, Ernst D; Kremling, Andreas

    2004-10-01

    The presumably high potential of a holistic design approach for complex biochemical reaction networks is exemplified here for the network of tryptophan biosynthesis from glucose, a system whose components have been investigated thoroughly before. A dynamic model that combines the behavior of the trp operon gene expression with the metabolic network of central carbon metabolism and tryptophan biosynthesis is investigated. This model is analyzed in terms of metabolic fluxes, metabolic control, and nonlinear optimization. We compare two models for a wild-type strain and another model for a tryptophan producer. An integrated optimization of the whole network leads to a significant increase in tryptophan production rate for all systems under study. This enhancement is well above the increase that can be achieved by an optimization of subsystems. A constant ratio of control coefficients on tryptophan synthesis rate has been identified for the models regarding or disregarding trp operon expression. Although we found some examples where flux control coefficients even contradict the trends of enzyme activity changes in an optimized profile, flux control can be used as an indication for enzymes that have to be taken into account in optimization. PMID:15491865

  5. Identification of regeneration-associated genes after central and peripheral nerve injury in the adult rat

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    Brook Gary A

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that neurons of the peripheral nervous system have the capacity to regenerate a severed axon leading to functional recovery, whereas neurons of the central nervous system do not regenerate successfully after injury. The underlying molecular programs initiated by axotomized peripheral and central nervous system neurons are not yet fully understood. Results To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the process of regeneration in the nervous system, differential display polymerase chain reaction has been used to identify differentially expressed genes following axotomy of peripheral and central nerve fibers. For this purpose, axotomy induced changes of regenerating facial nucleus neurons, and non-regenerating red nucleus and Clarke's nucleus neurons have been analyzed in an intra-animal side-to-side comparison. One hundred and thirty five gene fragments have been isolated, of which 69 correspond to known genes encoding for a number of different functional classes of proteins such as transcription factors, signaling molecules, homeobox-genes, receptors and proteins involved in metabolism. Sixty gene fragments correspond to genomic mouse sequences without known function. In situ-hybridization has been used to confirm differential expression and to analyze the cellular localization of these gene fragments. Twenty one genes (~15% have been demonstrated to be differentially expressed. Conclusions The detailed analysis of differentially expressed genes in different lesion paradigms provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the process of regeneration and may lead to the identification of genes which play key roles in functional repair of central nervous tissues.

  6. Differential selection on carotenoid biosynthesis genes as a function of gene position in the metabolic pathway: a study on the carrot and dicots.

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    Jérémy Clotault

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selection of genes involved in metabolic pathways could target them differently depending on the position of genes in the pathway and on their role in controlling metabolic fluxes. This hypothesis was tested in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway using population genetics and phylogenetics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Evolutionary rates of seven genes distributed along the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, IPI, PDS, CRTISO, LCYB, LCYE, CHXE and ZEP, were compared in seven dicot taxa. A survey of deviations from neutrality expectations at these genes was also undertaken in cultivated carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus, a species that has been intensely bred for carotenoid pattern diversification in its root during its cultivation history. Parts of sequences of these genes were obtained from 46 individuals representing a wide diversity of cultivated carrots. Downstream genes exhibited higher deviations from neutral expectations than upstream genes. Comparisons of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates between genes among dicots revealed greater constraints on upstream genes than on downstream genes. An excess of intermediate frequency polymorphisms, high nucleotide diversity and/or high differentiation of CRTISO, LCYB1 and LCYE in cultivated carrot suggest that balancing selection may have targeted genes acting centrally in the pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results are consistent with relaxed constraints on downstream genes and selection targeting the central enzymes of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway during carrot breeding history.

  7. Maternal-fetal metabolic gene-gene interactions and risk of neural tube defects.

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    Lupo, Philip J; Mitchell, Laura E; Canfield, Mark A; Shaw, Gary M; Olshan, Andrew F; Finnell, Richard H; Zhu, Huiping

    2014-01-01

    Single-gene analyses indicate that maternal genes associated with metabolic conditions (e.g., obesity) may influence the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs). However, to our knowledge, there have been no assessments of maternal-fetal metabolic gene-gene interactions and NTDs. We investigated 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms among 7 maternal metabolic genes (ADRB3, ENPP1, FTO, LEP, PPARG, PPARGC1A, and TCF7L2) and 2 fetal metabolic genes (SLC2A2 and UCP2). Samples were obtained from 737 NTD case-parent triads included in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study for birth years 1999-2007. We used a 2-step approach to evaluate maternal-fetal gene-gene interactions. First, a case-only approach was applied to screen all potential maternal and fetal interactions (n = 76), as this design provides greater power in the assessment of gene-gene interactions compared to other approaches. Specifically, ordinal logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for each maternal-fetal gene-gene interaction, assuming a log-additive model of inheritance. Due to the number of comparisons, we calculated a corrected p-value (q-value) using the false discovery rate. Second, we confirmed all statistically significant interactions (q < 0.05) using a log-linear approach among case-parent triads. In step 1, there were 5 maternal-fetal gene-gene interactions with q < 0.05. The "top hit" was an interaction between maternal ENPP1 rs1044498 and fetal SLC2A2 rs6785233 (interaction OR = 3.65, 95% CI: 2.32-5.74, p = 2.09×10(-8), q=0.001), which was confirmed in step 2 (p = 0.00004). Our findings suggest that maternal metabolic genes associated with hyperglycemia and insulin resistance and fetal metabolic genes involved in glucose homeostasis may interact to increase the risk of NTDs. PMID:24332798

  8. Fatty Acids in Energy Metabolism of the Central Nervous System

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    Alexander Panov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we analyze the current hypotheses regarding energy metabolism in the neurons and astroglia. Recently, it was shown that up to 20% of the total brain’s energy is provided by mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids. However, the existing hypotheses consider glucose, or its derivative lactate, as the only main energy substrate for the brain. Astroglia metabolically supports the neurons by providing lactate as a substrate for neuronal mitochondria. In addition, a significant amount of neuromediators, glutamate and GABA, is transported into neurons and also serves as substrates for mitochondria. Thus, neuronal mitochondria may simultaneously oxidize several substrates. Astrocytes have to replenish the pool of neuromediators by synthesis de novo, which requires large amounts of energy. In this review, we made an attempt to reconcile β-oxidation of fatty acids by astrocytic mitochondria with the existing hypothesis on regulation of aerobic glycolysis. We suggest that, under condition of neuronal excitation, both metabolic pathways may exist simultaneously. We provide experimental evidence that isolated neuronal mitochondria may oxidize palmitoyl carnitine in the presence of other mitochondrial substrates. We also suggest that variations in the brain mitochondrial metabolic phenotype may be associated with different mtDNA haplogroups.

  9. Invariability of Central Metabolic Flux Distribution in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Under Environmental or Genetic Perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie; Martin, Hector Garcia; Deutschbauer, Adam; Feng, Xueyang; Huang, Rick; Llora, Xavier; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-04-21

    An environmentally important bacterium with versatile respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, displayed significantly different growth rates under three culture conditions: minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 3 hrs), salt stressed minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 6 hrs), and minimal medium with amino acid supplementation (doubling time {approx}1.5 hrs). {sup 13}C-based metabolic flux analysis indicated that fluxes of central metabolic reactions remained relatively constant under the three growth conditions, which is in stark contrast to the reported significant changes in the transcript and metabolite profiles under various growth conditions. Furthermore, ten transposon mutants of S. oneidensis MR-1 were randomly chosen from a transposon library and their flux distributions through central metabolic pathways were revealed to be identical, even though such mutational processes altered the secondary metabolism, for example, glycine and C1 (5,10-Me-THF) metabolism.

  10. Physiologic and metabolic safety of butyrylcholinesterase gene therapy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Vishakantha; Gao, Yang; Geng, Liyi; LeBrasseur, Nathan K; White, Thomas A; Parks, Robin J; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2014-07-16

    In continuing efforts to develop gene transfer of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) as therapy for cocaine addiction, we conducted wide-ranging studies of physiological and metabolic safety. For that purpose, mice were given injections of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector or helper-dependent adenoviral (hdAD) vector encoding human or mouse BChE mutated for optimal cocaine hydrolysis. Age-matched controls received saline or AAV-luciferase control vector. At times when transduced BChE was abundant, physiologic and metabolic parameters in conscious animals were evaluated by non-invasive Echo-MRI and an automated "Comprehensive Laboratory Animal Monitoring System" (CLAMS). Despite high vector doses (up to 10(13) particles per mouse) and high levels of transgene protein in the plasma (∼1500-fold above baseline), the CLAMS apparatus revealed no adverse physiologic or metabolic effects. Likewise, body composition determined by Echo-MRI, and glucose tolerance remained normal. A CLAMS study of vector-treated mice given 40 mg/kg cocaine showed none of the physiologic and metabolic fluctuations exhibited in controls. We conclude that neither the tested vectors nor great excesses of circulating BChE affect general physiology directly, while they protect mice from disturbance by cocaine. Hence, viral gene transfer of BChE appears benign and worth exploring as a therapy for cocaine abuse and possibly other disorders as well. PMID:24892251

  11. Novel genes underlying beta cell survival in metabolic stress

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Himadri; Farouk, Mohammed; Bose, Barish Baran; Singh, Prabhakar

    2013-01-01

    Relative insulin deficiency, in response to increased metabolic demand (obesity, genetic insulin resistance, pregnancy and aging) lead to Type2 diabetes. Susceptibility of the type 2 diabetes has a genetic basis, as a subset of people with risk factors (obesity, Insulin Resistance, pregnancy), develop Type2 Diabetes. We aimed to identify ‘cluster’ of overexpressed genes, underlying increased beta cell survival in diabetes resistant C57BL/6J ob/ob mice (compared to diabetes susceptible BTBR ob...

  12. Role of energy metabolism in the brown fat gene program

    OpenAIRE

    Minwoo eNam; Marcus eCooper

    2015-01-01

    In murine and human brown adipose tissue (BAT), mitochondria are powerful generators of heat that safely metabolize fat, a feature that has great promise in the fight against obesity and diabetes. Recent studies suggest that the action of mitochondria extend beyond their conventional role as generators of heat. There is mounting evidence that impaired mitochondrial respiratory capacity is accompanied by attenuated expression of Ucp1 and other BAT-selective genes, implying that mitochondria ex...

  13. Maternal obesity affects fetal neurodevelopmental and metabolic gene expression: a pilot study.

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    Andrea G Edlow

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: One in three pregnant women in the United States is obese. Their offspring are at increased risk for neurodevelopmental and metabolic morbidity. Underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We performed a global gene expression analysis of mid-trimester amniotic fluid cell-free fetal RNA in obese versus lean pregnant women. METHODS: This prospective pilot study included eight obese (BMI≥30 and eight lean (BMI<25 women undergoing clinically indicated mid-trimester genetic amniocentesis. Subjects were matched for gestational age and fetal sex. Fetuses with abnormal karyotype or structural anomalies were excluded. Cell-free fetal RNA was extracted from amniotic fluid and hybridized to whole genome expression arrays. Genes significantly differentially regulated in 8/8 obese-lean pairs were identified using paired t-tests with the Benjamini-Hochberg correction (false discovery rate of <0.05. Biological interpretation was performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and the BioGPS gene expression atlas. RESULTS: In fetuses of obese pregnant women, 205 genes were significantly differentially regulated. Apolipoprotein D, a gene highly expressed in the central nervous system and integral to lipid regulation, was the most up-regulated gene (9-fold. Apoptotic cell death was significantly down-regulated, particularly within nervous system pathways involving the cerebral cortex. Activation of the transcriptional regulators estrogen receptor, FOS, and STAT3 was predicted in fetuses of obese women, suggesting a pro-estrogenic, pro-inflammatory milieu. CONCLUSION: Maternal obesity affects fetal neurodevelopmental and metabolic gene expression as early as the second trimester. These findings may have implications for postnatal neurodevelopmental and metabolic abnormalities described in the offspring of obese women.

  14. Metabolic and transcriptional response of central metabolism affected by root endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica under salinity in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Mohammad Reza; Ghabooli, Mehdi; Khatabi, Behnam; Hajirezaei, Mohammad Reza; Schweizer, Patrick; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2016-04-01

    The root endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica enhances plant adaptation to environmental stress based on general and non-specific plant species mechanisms. In the present study, we integrated the ionomics, metabolomics, and transcriptomics data to identify the genes and metabolic regulatory networks conferring salt tolerance in P. indica-colonized barley plants. To this end, leaf samples were harvested at control (0 mM NaCl) and severe salt stress (300 mM NaCl) in P. indica-colonized and non-inoculated barley plants 4 weeks after fungal inoculation. The metabolome analysis resulted in an identification of a signature containing 14 metabolites and ions conferring tolerance to salt stress. Gene expression analysis has led to the identification of 254 differentially expressed genes at 0 mM NaCl and 391 genes at 300 mM NaCl in P. indica-colonized compared to non-inoculated samples. The integration of metabolome and transcriptome analysis indicated that the major and minor carbohydrate metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, and ethylene biosynthesis pathway might play a role in systemic salt-tolerance in leaf tissue induced by the root-colonized fungus. PMID:26951140

  15. The brain at work: a cerebral metabolic manifestation of central fatigue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Secher, Niels H

    2007-11-15

    Central fatigue refers to circumstances in which strength appears to be limited by the ability of the central nervous system to recruit motoneurons. Central fatigue manifests when the effort to contract skeletal muscles is intense and, thus, is aggravated when exercise is performed under stress, whereas it becomes attenuated following training. Central fatigue has not been explained, but the cerebral metabolic response to intense exercise, as to other modalities of cerebral activation, is a reduction in its "metabolic ratio" (MR), i.e., the brain's uptake of oxygen relative to that of carbohydrate. At rest the MR is close to 6 but during intense whole-body exercise it decreases to less than 3, with the uptake of lactate becoming as important as that of glucose. It remains debated what underlies this apparent inability of the brain to oxidize the carbohydrate taken up, but it may approach approximately 10 mmol glucose equivalents. In the case of exercise, a concomitant uptake of ammonium for formation of amino acids may account for only approximately 10% of this "extra" carbohydrate taken up. Also, accumulation of intermediates in metabolic pathways and compartmentalization of metabolism between astrocytes and neurons are avenues that have to be explored. Depletion of glycogen stores and subsequent supercompensation during periods of low neuronal activity may not only play a role but also link brain metabolism to its function. PMID:17394258

  16. Genetic analysis of central carbon metabolism unveils an amino acid substitution that alters maize NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity.

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    Nengyi Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Central carbon metabolism (CCM is a fundamental component of life. The participating genes and enzymes are thought to be structurally and functionally conserved across and within species. Association mapping utilizes a rich history of mutation and recombination to achieve high resolution mapping. Therefore, applying association mapping in maize (Zea mays ssp. mays, the most diverse model crop species, to study the genetics of CCM is a particularly attractive system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a maize diversity panel to test the CCM functional conservation. We found heritable variation in enzyme activity for every enzyme tested. One of these enzymes was the NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH, E.C. 1.1.1.41, in which we identified a novel amino-acid substitution in a phylogenetically conserved site. Using candidate gene association mapping, we identified that this non-synonymous polymorphism was associated with IDH activity variation. The proposed mechanism for the IDH activity variation includes additional components regulating protein level. With the comparison of sequences from maize and teosinte (Zea mays ssp. Parviglumis, the maize wild ancestor, we found that some CCM genes had also been targeted for selection during maize domestication. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate the efficacy of association mapping for dissecting natural variation in primary metabolic pathways. The considerable genetic diversity observed in maize CCM genes underlies heritable phenotypic variation in enzyme activities and can be useful to identify putative functional sites.

  17. Systems approaches to unraveling plant metabolism: identifying biosynthetic genes of secondary metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiering, Martin J; Kaur, Bhavneet; Parsons, James F; Eisenstein, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of useful compounds produced by plant secondary metabolism has stimulated broad systems biology approaches to identify the genes involved in their biosynthesis. Systems biology studies in non-model plants pose interesting but addressable challenges, and have been greatly facilitated by the ability to grow and maintain plants, develop laboratory culture systems, and profile key metabolites in order to identify critical genes involved their biosynthesis. In this chapter we describe a suite of approaches that have been useful in Actaea racemosa (L.; syn. Cimicifuga racemosa, Nutt., black coshosh), a non-model medicinal plant with no genome sequence and little horticultural information available, that have led to the development of initial gene-metabolite relationships for the production of several bioactive metabolites in this multicomponent botanical therapeutic, and that can be readily applied to a wide variety of under-characterized medicinal plants. PMID:24218220

  18. Central Pathways Integrating Metabolism and Reproduction in Teleosts

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    Md eShahjahan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Energy balance plays an important role in the control of reproduction. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms connecting the two systems are not well understood especially in teleosts. The hypothalamus plays a crucial role in the regulation of both energy balance and reproduction, and contains a number of neuropeptides, including gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH, orexin, neuropeptide-Y (NPY, ghrelin, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP, α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH, cholecystokinin (CCK, 26RFa, nesfatin, kisspeptin, and gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH. These neuropeptides are involved in the control of energy balance and reproduction either directly or indirectly. On the other hand, synthesis and release of these hypothalamic neuropeptides are regulated by metabolic signals from the gut and the adipose tissue. Furthermore, neurons producing these neuropeptides interact with each other, providing neuronal basis of the link between energy balance and reproduction. This review summarizes the advances made in our understanding of the physiological roles of the hypothalamic neuropeptides in energy balance and reproduction in teleosts, and discusses how they interact with GnRH, kisspeptin, and pituitary gonadotropins to control reproduction in teleosts.

  19. Hox gene regulation in the central nervous system of Drosophila

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    Maheshwar Gummalla

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hox genes specify the structures that form along the anteroposterior (AP axis of bilateria. Within the genome, they often form clusters where, remarkably enough, their position within the clusters reflects the relative positions of the structures they specify along the AP axis. This correspondence between genomic organization and gene expression pattern has been conserved through evolution and provides a unique opportunity to study how chromosomal context affects gene regulation. In Drosophila, a general rule, often called “posterior dominance”, states that Hox genes specifying more posterior structures repress the expression of more anterior Hox genes. This rule explains the apparent spatial complementarity of Hox gene expression patterns in Drosophila. Here we review a noticeable exception to this rule where the more-posteriorly expressed Abd-B hox gene fails to repress the more-anterior abd-A gene in cells of the central nervous system (CNS. While Abd-B is required to repress ectopic expression of abd-A in the posterior epidermis, abd-A repression in the posterior CNS is accomplished by a different mechanism that involves a large 92kb long non-coding RNA (lncRNA encoded by the intergenic region separating abd-A and Abd-B (the iab8ncRNA. Dissection of this lncRNA revealed that abd-A is repressed by the lncRNA using two redundant mechanisms. The 1st mechanism is mediated by a microRNA (mir-iab-8 encoded by intronic sequence within the large iab8-ncRNA. Meanwhile, the second mechanism seems to involve transcriptional interference by the long iab-8 ncRNA on the abd-A promoter. Recent work demonstrating CNS-specific regulation of genes by ncRNAs in Drosophila, seem to highlight a potential role for the iab-8-ncRNA in the evolution of the Drosophila hox complexes

  20. Functional analysis of lipid metabolism genes in wine yeasts during alcoholic fermentation at low temperature

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    María López-Malo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Wine produced by low-temperature fermentation is mostly considered to have improved sensory qualities. However few commercial wine strains available on the market are well-adapted to ferment at low temperature (10 – 15°C. The lipid metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a central role in low temperature adaptation. One strategy to modify lipid composition is to alter transcriptional activity by deleting or overexpressing the key genes of lipid metabolism. In a previous study, we identified the genes of the phospholipid, sterol and sphingolipid pathways, which impacted on growth capacity at low temperature. In the present study, we aimed to determine the influence of these genes on fermentation performance and growth during low-temperature wine fermentations. We analyzed the phenotype during fermentation at the low and optimal temperature of the lipid mutant and overexpressing strains in the background of a derivative commercial wine strain. The increase in the gene dosage of some of these lipid genes, e.g., PSD1, LCB3, DPL1 and OLE1, improved fermentation activity during low-temperature fermentations, thus confirming their positive role during wine yeast adaptation to cold. Genes whose overexpression improved fermentation activity at 12°C were overexpressed by chromosomal integration into commercial wine yeast QA23. Fermentations in synthetic and natural grape must were carried out by this new set of overexpressing strains. The strains overexpressing OLE1 and DPL1 were able to finish fermentation before commercial wine yeast QA23. Only the OLE1 gene overexpression produced a specific aroma profile in the wines produced with natural grape must.

  1. Suppression of the External MitochondrialNADPH Dehydrogenase, NDB1, in Arabidopsisthaliana Affects Central Metabolism andVegetative Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent oxidation of cytosolic NADPH is mediated by NDB1, which is an external type II NADPHdehydrogenase in the plant mitochondrial electron transport chain. Using RNA interference, the NDB1 transcript wassuppressed by 80% in Arabidopsis thaliana plants, and external Ca2+-dependent NADPH dehydrogenase activity becameundetectable in isolated mitochondria. This was linked to a decreased level of NADP+ in rosettes of the transgenic lines.Sterile-grown transgenic seedlings displayed decreased growth specifically on glucose, and respiratory metabolism of 14C-glucose was increased. On soil, NDBl-suppressing plants had a decreased vegetative biomass, but leaf maximumquantum efficiency of photosystem Ⅱ and CO2 assimilation rates, as well as total respiration, were similar to the wild-type. The in vivo alternative oxidase activity and capacity were also similar in all genotypes. Metabolic profiling revealeddecreased levels of sugars, citric acid cycle intermediates, and amino acids in the transgenic lines. The NDBl-suppressioninduced transcriptomic changes associated with protein synthesis and glucosinolate and jasmonate metabolism. Thetranscriptomic changes also overlapped with changes observed in a mutant lacking ABAINSENSITIVE4 and in A. thalianaoverexpressing stress tolerance genes from rice. The results thus indicate that A. thaliana NDB1 modulates NADP(H)reduction levels, which in turn affect central metabolism and growth, and interact with defense signaling.

  2. Identifying genes and gene networks involved in chromium metabolism and detoxification in Crambe abyssinica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zulfiqar, Asma, E-mail: asmazulfiqar08@yahoo.com [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, 270 Stockbridge Road, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Paulose, Bibin, E-mail: bpaulose@psis.umass.edu [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, 270 Stockbridge Road, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Chhikara, Sudesh, E-mail: sudesh@psis.umass.edu [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, 270 Stockbridge Road, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Dhankher, Om Parkash, E-mail: parkash@psis.umass.edu [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, 270 Stockbridge Road, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Chromium pollution is a serious environmental problem with few cost-effective remediation strategies available. Crambe abyssinica (a member of Brassicaseae), a non-food, fast growing high biomass crop, is an ideal candidate for phytoremediation of heavy metals contaminated soils. The present study used a PCR-Select Suppression Subtraction Hybridization approach in C. abyssinica to isolate differentially expressed genes in response to Cr exposure. A total of 72 differentially expressed subtracted cDNAs were sequenced and found to represent 43 genes. The subtracted cDNAs suggest that Cr stress significantly affects pathways related to stress/defense, ion transporters, sulfur assimilation, cell signaling, protein degradation, photosynthesis and cell metabolism. The regulation of these genes in response to Cr exposure was further confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Characterization of these differentially expressed genes may enable the engineering of non-food, high-biomass plants, including C. abyssinica, for phytoremediation of Cr-contaminated soils and sediments. - Highlights: > Molecular mechanism of Cr uptake and detoxification in plants is not well known. > We identified differentially regulated genes upon Cr exposure in Crambe abyssinica. > 72 Cr-induced subtracted cDNAs were sequenced and found to represent 43 genes. > Pathways linked to stress, ion transport, and sulfur assimilation were affected. > This is the first Cr transcriptome study in a crop with phytoremediation potential. - This study describes the identification and isolation of differentially expressed genes involved in chromium metabolism and detoxification in a non-food industrial oil crop Crambe abyssinica.

  3. Gene expression in plant lipid metabolism in Arabidopsis seedlings.

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    An-Shan Hsiao

    Full Text Available Events in plant lipid metabolism are important during seedling establishment. As it has not been experimentally verified whether lipid metabolism in 2- and 5-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings is diurnally-controlled, quantitative real-time PCR analysis was used to investigate the expression of target genes in acyl-lipid transfer, β-oxidation and triacylglycerol (TAG synthesis and hydrolysis in wild-type Arabidopsis WS and Col-0. In both WS and Col-0, ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN3 (ACBP3, DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE1 (DGAT1 and DGAT3 showed diurnal control in 2- and 5-day-old seedlings. Also, COMATOSE (CTS was diurnally regulated in 2-day-old seedlings and LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE6 (LACS6 in 5-day-old seedlings in both WS and Col-0. Subsequently, the effect of CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1 and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY from the core clock system was examined using the cca1lhy mutant and CCA1-overexpressing (CCA1-OX lines versus wild-type WS and Col-0, respectively. Results revealed differential gene expression in lipid metabolism between 2- and 5-day-old mutant and wild-type WS seedlings, as well as between CCA1-OX and wild-type Col-0. Of the ACBPs, ACBP3 displayed the most significant changes between cca1lhy and WS and between CCA1-OX and Col-0, consistent with previous reports that ACBP3 is greatly affected by light/dark cycling. Evidence of oil body retention in 4- and 5-day-old seedlings of the cca1lhy mutant in comparison to WS indicated the effect of cca1lhy on storage lipid reserve mobilization. Lipid profiling revealed differences in primary lipid metabolism, namely in TAG, fatty acid methyl ester and acyl-CoA contents amongst cca1lhy, CCA1-OX, and wild-type seedlings. Taken together, this study demonstrates that lipid metabolism is subject to diurnal regulation in the early stages of seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  4. Central obesity measurements predict metabolic syndrome in a retrospective cohort study of postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Rosety-Rodríguez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The various diagnostic classifications in the literature concur as regards the important role of abdominal obesity in the onset and progression of metabolic syndrome. Accordingly, this study was aimed at clarifying whether central obesity measurements assessed by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA may predict metabolic syndrome in Spanish postmenopausal women. Material and methods: This historical cohort study included a total of 1326 postmenopausal women aged > 45 years old who had routinely undergone DXA to measure their bone mineral density between january 2006 and january 2011. The regions of interest (ROI envisaged in our study by using DXA were the lumbar regions L1-L4 and L4-L5. At the same time, they underwent a complete medical examination including personal medical history assessment, biochemical blood analysis, blood pressure measurement and anthropometrical evaluation. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed attending to the criteria established by National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NECP-ATP-III. Results: During the observation period, 537 women, representing 40.5% of the total studied, met the diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome. L1-L4 and L4-L5 abdominal fat mass determinations were associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in all regression models tested, showing an increasing gradient from the lowest to highest quintile. Conclusion: Central adiposity measurements assessed by DXA, especially L1-L4 region of interest, could be considered a powerful predictor of metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women.

  5. Enzymatic passaging of human embryonic stem cells alters central carbon metabolism and glycan abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badur, Mehmet G.; Zhang, Hui; Metallo, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    To realize the potential of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in regenerative medicine and drug discovery applications, large numbers of cells that accurately recapitulate cell and tissue function must be robustly produced. Previous studies have suggested that genetic instability and epigenetic changes occur as a consequence of enzymatic passaging. However, the potential impacts of such passaging methods on the metabolism of hESCs have not been described. Using stable isotope tracing and mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, we have explored how different passaging reagents impact hESC metabolism. Enzymatic passaging caused significant decreases in glucose utilization throughout central carbon metabolism along with attenuated de novo lipogenesis. In addition, we developed and validated a method for rapidly quantifying glycan abundance and isotopic labeling in hydrolyzed biomass. Enzymatic passaging reagents significantly altered levels of glycans immediately after digestion but surprisingly glucose contribution to glycans was not affected. These results demonstrate that there is an immediate effect on hESC metabolism after enzymatic passaging in both central carbon metabolism and biosynthesis. HESCs subjected to enzymatic passaging are routinely placed in a state requiring re-synthesis of biomass components, subtly influencing their metabolic needs in a manner that may impact cell performance in regenerative medicine applications. PMID:26289220

  6. Vitamin D metabolic pathway genes and pancreatic cancer risk.

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    Hannah Arem

    Full Text Available Evidence on the association between vitamin D status and pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. This inconsistency may be partially attributable to variation in vitamin D regulating genes. We selected 11 vitamin D-related genes (GC, DHCR7, CYP2R1, VDR, CYP27B1, CYP24A1, CYP27A1, RXRA, CRP2, CASR and CUBN totaling 213 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and examined associations with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Our study included 3,583 pancreatic cancer cases and 7,053 controls from the genome-wide association studies of pancreatic cancer PanScans-I-III. We used the Adaptive Joint Test and the Adaptive Rank Truncated Product statistic for pathway and gene analyses, and unconditional logistic regression for SNP analyses, adjusting for age, sex, study and population stratification. We examined effect modification by circulating vitamin D concentration (≤50, >50 nmol/L for the most significant SNPs using a subset of cohort cases (n = 713 and controls (n = 878. The vitamin D metabolic pathway was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (p = 0.830. Of the individual genes, none were associated with pancreatic cancer risk at a significance level of p<0.05. SNPs near the VDR (rs2239186, LRP2 (rs4668123, CYP24A1 (rs2762932, GC (rs2282679, and CUBN (rs1810205 genes were the top SNPs associated with pancreatic cancer (p-values 0.008-0.037, but none were statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Associations between these SNPs and pancreatic cancer were not modified by circulating concentrations of vitamin D. These findings do not support an association between vitamin D-related genes and pancreatic cancer risk. Future research should explore other pathways through which vitamin D status might be associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

  7. Control of Proteobacterial Central Carbon Metabolism by the HexR Transcriptional Regulator. A Case Study in Shewanella oneidensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyn, Semen; Li, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Qijing; Novichkov, Pavel; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Yang, Chen; Osterman, Andrei L.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2011-08-17

    Bacteria exploit multiple mechanisms for controlling central carbon metabolism (CCM). Thus, a bioinformatic analysis together with some experimental data implicated HexR transcriptional factor as a global CCM regulator in some lineages of Gammaproteobacteria operating as a functional replacement of Cra regulator characteristic of Enterobacteriales. In this study we combined a large-scale comparative genomic reconstruction of HexRcontrolled regulons in 87 species of Proteobacteria with the detailed experimental analysis of HexR regulatory network in Shewanella oneidensis model system. Although nearly all of the HexR-controlled genes are associated with CCM, remarkable variations were revealed in the scale (from 1-2 target operons in Enterobacteriales up to 20 operons in Aeromonadales) and gene content of HexR regulons between 11 compared lineages. A predicted 17-bp pseudo-palindrome with a consensus tTGTAATwwwATTACa, was confirmed as HexR-binding motif for 15 target operons (comprising 30 genes) by in vitro binding assays. The negative effect of the key CCM intermediate, 2-keto-3-deoxy-6- phosphogluconate, on the DNA-regulator complex formation was verified. A dual mode of HexR action on various target promoters, repression of genes involved in catabolic pathways and activation of gluconeogenic genes, was for the first time predicted by the bioinformatc analysis and experimentally verified by changed gene expression pattern in S. oneidensis AhexR mutant. Phenotypic profiling revealed the inability of this mutant to grow on lactate or pyruvate as a single carbon source. A comparative metabolic flux analysis of wild-type and mutant strains of S. oneidensis using 13Clactate labeling and GC-MS analysis confirmed the hypothesized HexR role as a master regulator of gluconeogenic flux from pyruvate via the transcriptional activation of phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PpsA).

  8. Integration of Metabolic Modeling with Gene Co-expression Reveals Transcriptionally Programmed Reactions Explaining Robustness in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puniya, Bhanwar Lal; Kulshreshtha, Deepika; Mittal, Inna; Mobeen, Ahmed; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Robustness of metabolic networks is accomplished by gene regulation, modularity, re-routing of metabolites and plasticity. Here, we probed robustness against perturbations of biochemical reactions of M. tuberculosis in the form of predicting compensatory trends. In order to investigate the transcriptional programming of genes associated with correlated fluxes, we integrated with gene co-expression network. Knock down of the reactions NADH2r and ATPS responsible for producing the hub metabolites, and Central carbon metabolism had the highest proportion of their associated genes under transcriptional co-expression with genes of their flux correlated reactions. Reciprocal gene expression correlations were observed among compensatory routes, fresh activation of alternative routes and in the multi-copy genes of Cysteine synthase and of Phosphate transporter. Knock down of 46 reactions caused the activation of Isocitrate lyase or Malate synthase or both reactions, which are central to the persistent state of M. tuberculosis. A total of 30 new freshly activated routes including Cytochrome c oxidase, Lactate dehydrogenase, and Glycine cleavage system were predicted, which could be responsible for switching into dormant or persistent state. Thus, our integrated approach of exploring transcriptional programming of flux correlated reactions has the potential to unravel features of system architecture conferring robustness. PMID:27000948

  9. Bridging the gap between gene expression and metabolic phenotype via kinetic models

    OpenAIRE

    Vital-Lopez, Francisco G; Wallqvist, Anders; Reifman, Jaques

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the close association between gene expression and metabolism, experimental evidence shows that gene expression levels alone cannot predict metabolic phenotypes, indicating a knowledge gap in our understanding of how these processes are connected. Here, we present a method that integrates transcriptome, fluxome, and metabolome data using kinetic models to create a mechanistic link between gene expression and metabolism. Results We developed a modeling framework to construct ...

  10. Metabolic and mitogenic transduction cascades in skeletal muscle : Implications for exercise effects on glucose metabolism and gene regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Mei

    2003-01-01

    Level of physical activity is linked to improved glucose homeostasis. The molecular signaling mechanisms by which insulin and exercise/muscle contractions lead to increased glucose transport and metabolism and gene expression have not been completely elucidated. The overall aim of this thesis was to identify novel regulatory mechanisms governing exercisesensitive signaling pathways to glucose metabolism and gene transcription in skeletal muscle. Components of the insulin (IR...

  11. Comparative genomics and functional study of lipid metabolic genes in Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yuru; Zou, Xiaoju; Ding, Yihong; Wang, Haizhen; Wu, Xiaoyun; Liang, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal models are indispensable to understand the lipid metabolism and lipid metabolic diseases. Over the last decade, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has become a popular animal model for exploring the regulation of lipid metabolism, obesity, and obese-related diseases. However, the genomic and functional conservation of lipid metabolism from C. elegans to humans remains unknown. In the present study, we systematically analyzed genes involved in lipid metabolism in the C. eleg...

  12. Flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in Geobactermetallireducens during reduction of solubleFe(III)-NTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Chakraborty, Romy; Garcia-Martin, Hector; Chu,Jeannie; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the carbon fluxes in the central metabolism ofGeobacter metallireducens strain GS-15 using 13C isotopomer modeling.Acetate labeled in the 1st or 2nd position was the sole carbon source,and Fe-NTA was the sole terminal electron acceptor. The measured labeledacetate uptake rate was 21 mmol/gdw/h in the exponential growth phase.The resulting isotope labeling pattern of amino acids allowed an accuratedetermination of the in vivo global metabolic reaction rates (fluxes)through the central metabolic pathways using a computational isotopomermodel. The tracer experiments showed that G. metallireducens containedcomplete biosynthesis pathways for essential metabolism, and this strainmight also have an unusual isoleucine biosynthesis route (usingacetyl-CoA and pyruvate as the precursors). The model indicated that over90 percent of the acetate was completely oxidized to CO2 via a completetricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle while reducing iron. Pyruvate carboxylaseand phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase were present under theseconditions, but enzymes in the glyoxylate shunt and malic enzyme wereabsent. Gluconeogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway were mainlyemployed for biosynthesis and accounted for less than 3 percent of totalcarbon consumption. The model also indicated surprisingly highreversibility in the reaction between oxoglutarate and succinate. Thisstep operates close to the thermodynamic equilibrium possibly becausesuccinate is synthesized via a transferase reaction, and the conversionof oxoglutarate to succinate is a rate limiting step for carbonmetabolism. These findings enable a better understanding of therelationship between genome annotation and extant metabolic pathways inG. metallireducens.

  13. Improving metabolic flux predictions using absolute gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Dave

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constraint-based analysis of genome-scale metabolic models typically relies upon maximisation of a cellular objective function such as the rate or efficiency of biomass production. Whilst this assumption may be valid in the case of microorganisms growing under certain conditions, it is likely invalid in general, and especially for multicellular organisms, where cellular objectives differ greatly both between and within cell types. Moreover, for the purposes of biotechnological applications, it is normally the flux to a specific metabolite or product that is of interest rather than the rate of production of biomass per se. Results An alternative objective function is presented, that is based upon maximising the correlation between experimentally measured absolute gene expression data and predicted internal reaction fluxes. Using quantitative transcriptomics data acquired from Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures under two growth conditions, the method outperforms traditional approaches for predicting experimentally measured exometabolic flux that are reliant upon maximisation of the rate of biomass production. Conclusion Due to its improved prediction of experimentally measured metabolic fluxes, and of its lack of a requirement for knowledge of the biomass composition of the organism under the conditions of interest, the approach is likely to be of rather general utility. The method has been shown to predict fluxes reliably in single cellular systems. Subsequent work will investigate the method’s ability to generate condition- and tissue-specific flux predictions in multicellular organisms.

  14. Photorespiratory metabolism: genes, mutants, energetics, and redox signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Bloom, Arnold J; Queval, Guillaume; Noctor, Graham

    2009-01-01

    Photorespiration is a high-flux pathway that operates alongside carbon assimilation in C(3) plants. Because most higher plant species photosynthesize using only the C(3) pathway, photorespiration has a major impact on cellular metabolism, particularly under high light, high temperatures, and CO(2) or water deficits. Although the functions of photorespiration remain controversial, it is widely accepted that this pathway influences a wide range of processes from bioenergetics, photosystem II function, and carbon metabolism to nitrogen assimilation and respiration. Crucially, the photorespiratory pathway is a major source of H(2)O(2) in photosynthetic cells. Through H(2)O(2) production and pyridine nucleotide interactions, photorespiration makes a key contribution to cellular redox homeostasis. In so doing, it influences multiple signaling pathways, particularly those that govern plant hormonal responses controlling growth, environmental and defense responses, and programmed cell death. The potential influence of photorespiration on cell physiology and fate is thus complex and wide ranging. The genes, pathways, and signaling functions of photorespiration are considered here in the context of whole plant biology, with reference to future challenges and human interventions to diminish photorespiratory flux. PMID:19575589

  15. Effects of sex and site on amino acid metabolism enzyme gene expression and activity in rat white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriarán, Sofía; Agnelli, Silvia; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. White adipose tissue (WAT) shows marked sex- and diet-dependent differences. However, our metabolic knowledge of WAT, especially on amino acid metabolism, is considerably limited. In the present study, we compared the influence of sex on the amino acid metabolism profile of the four main WAT sites, focused on the paths related to ammonium handling and the urea cycle, as a way to estimate the extent of WAT implication on body amino-nitrogen metabolism. Experimental Design. Adult female and male rats were maintained, undisturbed, under standard conditions for one month. After killing them under isoflurane anesthesia. WAT sites were dissected and weighed. Subcutaneous, perigonadal, retroperitoneal and mesenteric WAT were analyzed for amino acid metabolism gene expression and enzyme activities. Results. There was a considerable stability of the urea cycle activities and expressions, irrespective of sex, and with only limited influence of site. Urea cycle was more resilient to change than other site-specialized metabolic pathways. The control of WAT urea cycle was probably related to the provision of arginine/citrulline, as deduced from the enzyme activity profiles. These data support a generalized role of WAT in overall amino-N handling. In contrast, sex markedly affected WAT ammonium-centered amino acid metabolism in a site-related way, with relatively higher emphasis in males' subcutaneous WAT. Conclusions. We found that WAT has an active amino acid metabolism. Its gene expressions were lower than those of glucose-lipid interactions, but the differences were quantitatively less important than usually reported. The effects of sex on urea cycle enzymes expression and activity were limited, in contrast with the wider variations observed in other metabolic pathways. The results agree with a centralized control of urea cycle operation affecting the adipose organ as a whole. PMID:26587356

  16. Identification of C4 photosynthesis metabolism and regulatory-associated genes in Eleocharis vivipara by SSH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Taiyu; Ye, Rongjian; Fan, Xiaolei; Li, Xianghua; Lin, Yongjun

    2011-09-01

    This is the first effort to investigate the candidate genes involved in kranz developmental regulation and C(4) metabolic fluxes in Eleocharis vivipara, which is a leafless freshwater amphibious plant and possesses a distinct culms anatomy structure and photosynthetic pattern in contrasting environments. A terrestrial specific SSH library was constructed to investigate the genes involved in kranz anatomy developmental regulation and C(4) metabolic fluxes. A total of 73 ESTs and 56 unigenes in 384 clones were identified by array hybridization and sequencing. In total, 50 unigenes had homologous genes in the databases of rice and Arabidopsis. The real-time quantitative PCR results showed that most of the genes were accumulated in terrestrial culms and ABA-induced culms. The C(4) marker genes were stably accumulated during the culms development process in terrestrial culms. With respect to C(3) culms, C(4) photosynthesis metabolism consumed much more transporters and translocators related to ion metabolism, organic acids and carbohydrate metabolism, phosphate metabolism, amino acids metabolism, and lipids metabolism. Additionally, ten regulatory genes including five transcription factors, four receptor-like proteins, and one BURP protein were identified. These regulatory genes, which co-accumulated with the culms developmental stages, may play important roles in culms structure developmental regulation, bundle sheath chloroplast maturation, and environmental response. These results shed new light on the C(4) metabolic fluxes, environmental response, and anatomy structure developmental regulation in E. vivipara. PMID:21739352

  17. Identifying genes and gene networks involved in chromium metabolism and detoxification in Crambe abyssinica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium pollution is a serious environmental problem with few cost-effective remediation strategies available. Crambe abyssinica (a member of Brassicaseae), a non-food, fast growing high biomass crop, is an ideal candidate for phytoremediation of heavy metals contaminated soils. The present study used a PCR-Select Suppression Subtraction Hybridization approach in C. abyssinica to isolate differentially expressed genes in response to Cr exposure. A total of 72 differentially expressed subtracted cDNAs were sequenced and found to represent 43 genes. The subtracted cDNAs suggest that Cr stress significantly affects pathways related to stress/defense, ion transporters, sulfur assimilation, cell signaling, protein degradation, photosynthesis and cell metabolism. The regulation of these genes in response to Cr exposure was further confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Characterization of these differentially expressed genes may enable the engineering of non-food, high-biomass plants, including C. abyssinica, for phytoremediation of Cr-contaminated soils and sediments. - Highlights: → Molecular mechanism of Cr uptake and detoxification in plants is not well known. → We identified differentially regulated genes upon Cr exposure in Crambe abyssinica. → 72 Cr-induced subtracted cDNAs were sequenced and found to represent 43 genes. → Pathways linked to stress, ion transport, and sulfur assimilation were affected. → This is the first Cr transcriptome study in a crop with phytoremediation potential. - This study describes the identification and isolation of differentially expressed genes involved in chromium metabolism and detoxification in a non-food industrial oil crop Crambe abyssinica.

  18. Interspecific and interploidal gene flow in Central European Arabidopsis (Brassicaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgensen Marte H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effects of polyploidisation on gene flow between natural populations are little known. Central European diploid and tetraploid populations of Arabidopsis arenosa and A. lyrata are here used to study interspecific and interploidal gene flow, using a combination of nuclear and plastid markers. Results Ploidal levels were confirmed by flow cytometry. Network analyses clearly separated diploids according to species. Tetraploids and diploids were highly intermingled within species, and some tetraploids intermingled with the other species, as well. Isolation with migration analyses suggested interspecific introgression from tetraploid A. arenosa to tetraploid A. lyrata and vice versa, and some interploidal gene flow, which was unidirectional from diploid to tetraploid in A. arenosa and bidirectional in A. lyrata. Conclusions Interspecific genetic isolation at diploid level combined with introgression at tetraploid level indicates that polyploidy may buffer against negative consequences of interspecific hybridisation. The role of introgression in polyploid systems may, however, differ between plant species, and even within the small genus Arabidopsis, we find very different evolutionary fates when it comes to introgression.

  19. ALS: A bucket of genes, environment, metabolism and unknown ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zufiría, Mónica; Gil-Bea, Francisco Javier; Fernández-Torrón, Roberto; Poza, Juan José; Muñoz-Blanco, Jose Luis; Rojas-García, Ricard; Riancho, Javier; de Munain, Adolfo López

    2016-07-01

    The scientific scenario of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has dramatically changed since TDP-43 aggregates were discovered in 2006 as the main component of the neuronal inclusions seen in the disease, and more recently, when the implication of C9ORF72 expansion in familial and sporadic cases of ALS and frontotemporal dementia was confirmed. These discoveries have enlarged an extense list of genes implicated in different cellular processes such as RNA processing or autophagia among others and have broaden the putative molecular targets of the disease. Some of ALS-related genes such as TARDBP or SOD1 among others have important roles in the regulation of glucose and fatty acids metabolism, so that an impairment of fatty acids (FA) consumption and ketogenic deficits during exercise in ALS patients would connect the physiopathology with some of the more intriguing epidemiological traits of the disease. The current understanding of ALS as part of a continuum with other neurodegenerative diseases and a crossroads between genetic, neurometabolic and environmental factors represent a fascinating model of interaction that could be translated to other neurodegenerative diseases. In this review we summarize the most relevant data obtained in the ten last years and the key lines for future research in ALS. PMID:27236050

  20. C677T gene polymorphism of MTHFR and metabolic syndrome: response to dietary intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Di Renzo, Laura; Marsella, Luigi Tonino; Sarlo, Francesca; Soldati, Laura; Gratteri, Santo; Abenavoli, Ludovico; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2014-01-01

    Background Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphisms were found associated with body mass index (BMI)-defined obesity and lean mass. The aim of our study was to examine the role of the C677T MTHFR gene polymorphism in the response to diet in the management of metabolic syndrome. We investigated the body composition and metabolic factor changes after an hysocaloric balanced diet (HBD), in Italian obese women affected by metabolic syndrome (MS). Methods Forty four obese wom...

  1. Integration of Posttranscriptional Gene Networks into Metabolic Adaptation and Biofilm Maturation in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Qu, Yue; Harrison, Paul F.; Lo, Tricia L.; Quenault, Tara; Dagley, Michael J.; Bellousoff, Matthew; Powell, David R; Beilharz, Traude H.; Traven, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Candida albicans is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen. Although both commensalism and pathogenesis depend on metabolic adaptation, the regulatory pathways that mediate metabolic processes in C. albicans are incompletely defined. For example, metabolic change is a major feature that distinguishes community growth of C. albicans in biofilms compared to suspension cultures, but how metabolic adaptation is functionally interfaced with the structural and gene regulatory change...

  2. Analysis of gene evolution and metabolic pathways using the Candida Gene Order Browser

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, David A

    2010-05-10

    Abstract Background Candida species are the most common cause of opportunistic fungal infection worldwide. Recent sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of Candida genomic data. We have developed the Candida Gene Order Browser (CGOB), an online tool that aids comparative syntenic analyses of Candida species. CGOB incorporates all available Candida clade genome sequences including two Candida albicans isolates (SC5314 and WO-1) and 8 closely related species (Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Debaryomyces hansenii, Pichia stipitis, Candida guilliermondii and Candida lusitaniae). Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also included as a reference genome. Results CGOB assignments of homology were manually curated based on sequence similarity and synteny. In total CGOB includes 65617 genes arranged into 13625 homology columns. We have also generated improved Candida gene sets by merging\\/removing partial genes in each genome. Interrogation of CGOB revealed that the majority of tandemly duplicated genes are under strong purifying selection in all Candida species. We identified clusters of adjacent genes involved in the same metabolic pathways (such as catabolism of biotin, galactose and N-acetyl glucosamine) and we showed that some clusters are species or lineage-specific. We also identified one example of intron gain in C. albicans. Conclusions Our analysis provides an important resource that is now available for the Candida community. CGOB is available at http:\\/\\/cgob.ucd.ie.

  3. Impact of xylose and mannose on central metabolism of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, J.P.

    2005-07-01

    In this study, understanding of the central metabolism was improved by quantification of metabolite concentrations, enzyme activities, protein abundances, and gene transcript concentrations. Intracellular fluxes were estimated by applying stoichiometric models of metabolism. The methods were applied in the study of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in two separate projects. A xylose project aimed at improved utilization of D- xylose as a substrate for, e.g., producing biomaterial- based fuel ethanol. A mannose project studied the production of GDP-mannose from D-mannose in a strain lacking the gene for phosphomannose isomerase (PMI40 deletion). Hexose, D-glucose is the only sugar more abundant than pentose D-xylose. D-xylose is common in hardwoods (e.g. birch) and crop residues (ca. 25% of dry weight). However, S. cerevisiae is unable to utilize D- xylose without a recombinant pathway where D-xylose is converted to Dxylulose. In this study D-xylose was converted in two steps via xylitol: by D-xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase encoded by XYL1 and XYL2 from Pichia stipitis, respectively. Additionally, endogenous xylulokinase (XKS1) was overexpressed in order to increase the consumption of D-xylose by enhancing the phosphorylation of D-xylulose. Despite of the functional recombinant pathway the utilization rates of D xylose still remained low. This study proposes a set of limitations that are responsible for the low utilization rates of D-xylose under microaerobic conditions. Cells compensated for the cofactor imbalance, caused by the conversion of D-xylose to D- xylulose, by increasing the flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and by shuttling NADH redox potential to mitochondrion to be oxidized in oxidative phosphorylation. However, mitochondrial NADH inhibits citrate synthase in citric acid cycle, and consequently lower flux through citric acid cycle limits oxidative phosphorylation. Further, limitations in the uptake of D- xylose, in the

  4. Quantitative Multilevel Analysis of Central Metabolism in Developing Oilseeds of Oilseed Rape During In Vitro Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwender, Jorg [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hebbelmann, Inga [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Heinzel, Nicholas [Leibniz Inst. of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Gatersleben (Germany); Hildebrandt, Tatjana [Univ. of Hannover (Germany); Rogers, Alistair [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Naik, Dhiraj [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Indian Inst. of Advanced Research Koba, Gujarat (India); Klapperstuck, Matthias [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Braun, Hans -Peter [Univ. of Hannover (Germany); Schreiber, Falk [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Univ. Halle-Wittenberg, Melbourne (Australia); Denolf, Peter [Bayer CropScience (Belgium); Borisjuk, Ljudmilla [Leibniz Inst. of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Gatersleben (Germany); Rolletschek, Hardy [Leibniz Inst. of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Gatersleben (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Seeds provide the basis for many food, feed, and fuel products. Continued increases in seed yield, composition, and quality require an improved understanding of how the developing seed converts carbon and nitrogen supplies into storage. Current knowledge of this process is often based on the premise that transcriptional regulation directly translates via enzyme concentration into flux. In an attempt to highlight metabolic control, we explore genotypic differences in carbon partitioning for in vitro cultured developing embryos of oilseed rape (Brassica napus). We determined biomass composition as well as 79 net fluxes, the levels of 77 metabolites, and 26 enzyme activities with specific focus on central metabolism in nine selected germplasm accessions. We observed a tradeoff between the biomass component fractions of lipid and starch. With increasing lipid content over the spectrum of genotypes, plastidic fatty acid synthesis and glycolytic flux increased concomitantly, while glycolytic intermediates decreased. The lipid/starch tradeoff was not reflected at the proteome level, pointing to the significance of (posttranslational) metabolic control. Enzyme activity/flux and metabolite/flux correlations suggest that plastidic pyruvate kinase exerts flux control and that the lipid/starch tradeoff is most likely mediated by allosteric feedback regulation of phosphofructokinase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Also, quantitative data were used to calculate in vivo mass action ratios, reaction equilibria, and metabolite turnover times. Compounds like cyclic 3',5'-AMP and sucrose-6-phosphate were identified to potentially be involved in so far unknown mechanisms of metabolic control. This study provides a rich source of quantitative data for those studying central metabolism..

  5. Quantitative Multilevel Analysis of Central Metabolism in Developing Oilseeds of Oilseed Rape during in Vitro Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwender, Jörg; Hebbelmann, Inga; Heinzel, Nicolas; Hildebrandt, Tatjana; Rogers, Alistair; Naik, Dhiraj; Klapperstück, Matthias; Braun, Hans-Peter; Schreiber, Falk; Denolf, Peter; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Rolletschek, Hardy

    2015-07-01

    Seeds provide the basis for many food, feed, and fuel products. Continued increases in seed yield, composition, and quality require an improved understanding of how the developing seed converts carbon and nitrogen supplies into storage. Current knowledge of this process is often based on the premise that transcriptional regulation directly translates via enzyme concentration into flux. In an attempt to highlight metabolic control, we explore genotypic differences in carbon partitioning for in vitro cultured developing embryos of oilseed rape (Brassica napus). We determined biomass composition as well as 79 net fluxes, the levels of 77 metabolites, and 26 enzyme activities with specific focus on central metabolism in nine selected germplasm accessions. Overall, we observed a tradeoff between the biomass component fractions of lipid and starch. With increasing lipid content over the spectrum of genotypes, plastidic fatty acid synthesis and glycolytic flux increased concomitantly, while glycolytic intermediates decreased. The lipid/starch tradeoff was not reflected at the proteome level, pointing to the significance of (posttranslational) metabolic control. Enzyme activity/flux and metabolite/flux correlations suggest that plastidic pyruvate kinase exerts flux control and that the lipid/starch tradeoff is most likely mediated by allosteric feedback regulation of phosphofructokinase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Quantitative data were also used to calculate in vivo mass action ratios, reaction equilibria, and metabolite turnover times. Compounds like cyclic 3',5'-AMP and sucrose-6-phosphate were identified to potentially be involved in so far unknown mechanisms of metabolic control. This study provides a rich source of quantitative data for those studying central metabolism. PMID:25944824

  6. Gene regulatory and metabolic adaptation processes of Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL12T during oxygen depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laass, Sebastian; Kleist, Sarah; Bill, Nelli; Drüppel, Katharina; Kossmehl, Sebastian; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Klein, Johannes; Rohde, Manfred; Bartsch, Annekathrin; Wittmann, Christoph; Schmidt-Hohagen, Kerstin; Tielen, Petra; Jahn, Dieter; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2014-05-01

    Metabolic flexibility is the key to the ecological success of the marine Roseobacter clade bacteria. We investigated the metabolic adaptation and the underlying changes in gene expression of Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL12(T) to anoxic life by a combination of metabolome, proteome, and transcriptome analyses. Time-resolved studies during continuous oxygen depletion were performed in a chemostat using nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor. Formation of the denitrification machinery was found enhanced on the transcriptional and proteome level, indicating that D. shibae DFL12(T) established nitrate respiration to compensate for the depletion of the electron acceptor oxygen. In parallel, arginine fermentation was induced. During the transition state, growth and ATP concentration were found to be reduced, as reflected by a decrease of A578 values and viable cell counts. In parallel, the central metabolism, including gluconeogenesis, protein biosynthesis, and purine/pyrimidine synthesis was found transiently reduced in agreement with the decreased demand for cellular building blocks. Surprisingly, an accumulation of poly-3-hydroxybutanoate was observed during prolonged incubation under anoxic conditions. One possible explanation is the storage of accumulated metabolites and the regeneration of NADP(+) from NADPH during poly-3-hydroxybutanoate synthesis (NADPH sink). Although D. shibae DFL12(T) was cultivated in the dark, biosynthesis of bacteriochlorophyll was increased, possibly to prepare for additional energy generation via aerobic anoxygenic photophosphorylation. Overall, oxygen depletion led to a metabolic crisis with partly blocked pathways and the accumulation of metabolites. In response, major energy-consuming processes were reduced until the alternative respiratory denitrification machinery was operative. PMID:24648520

  7. Central metabolic pathways of Aureobasidium pullulans CGMCC1234 for pullulan production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Long; Liu, Chang; Tong, Qunyi; Ma, Meihu

    2015-12-10

    With the purpose of understanding the metabolic network of Aureobasidium pullulans, the central metabolic pathways were confirmed by the activities of the key enzymes involved in different pathways. The effect of different iodoacetic acid concentrations on pullulan fermentation was also investigated in this paper. The activities of phosphofructokinases and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase existed in A. pullulans CGMCC1234, whereas 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate aldolase activity was not detected. We proposed that the central metabolic pathways of A. pullulans CGMCC1234 included EMP and PPP, but no ED. Pullulan production declined fast as the iodoacetic acid increased, while cell growth offered upgrade firstly than descending latter tendency. Compared to the control group, the ratio of ATP/ADP of 0.60 mM iodoacetic acid group was lower at different stages of pullulan fermentation. The findings revealed that low concentration of iodoacetic acid might impel carbon flux flow toward the PPP, but reduce the flux of the EMP. PMID:26428132

  8. Effects of adenosine metabolism in astrocytes on central nervous system oxygen toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-liang; Zhang, Ya-nan; Wang, Zhong-zhuang; Xu, Wei-gang; Li, Run-ping; Zhang, Jun-dong

    2016-03-15

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is widely used in military operations, especially underwater missions. However, prolonged and continuous inhalation of HBO can cause central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT), which greatly limits HBO's application. The regulation of astrocytes to the metabolism of adenosine is involved in epilepsy. In our study, we aimed to observe the effects of HBO exposure on the metabolism of adenosine in the brain. Furthermore, we aimed to confirm the possible mechanism underlying adenosine's mediation of the CNS-OT. Firstly, anesthetized rats exposed to 5 atm absolute HBO for 80 min. The concentrations of extracellular adenosine, ATP, ADP, and AMP were detected. Secondly, free-moving rats were exposed to HBO at the same pressure for 20 min, and the activities of 5'-nucleotidase and ADK in brain tissues were measured. For the mechanism studies, we observed the effects of a series of different doses of drugs related to adenosine metabolism on the latency of CNS-OT. Results showed HBO exposure could increase adenosine content by inhibiting ADK activity and improving 5'-nucleotidase activity. And adenosine metabolism during HBO exposure may be a protective response against HBO-induced CNS-OT. Moreover, the improvement of adenosine concentration, activation of adenosine A1R, or suppression of ADK and adenosine A2AR, which are involved in the prevention of HBO-induced CNS-OT. This is the first study to demonstrate HBO exposure regulated adenosine metabolism in the brain. Adenosine metabolism and adenosine receptors are related to HBO-induced CNS-OT development. These results will provide new potential targets for the termination or the attenuation of CNS-OT. PMID:26806404

  9. Role of phosphate in the central metabolism of two lactic acid bacteria-a comparative systems biology approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levering, J.; Musters, M.W.J.M.; Bekker, M.; Bellomo, D.; Fiedler, T.; Vos, de W.M.; Hugenholtz, F.; Kreikemeyer, B.; Kummer, U.; Teusink, B.

    2012-01-01

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria survive in distinct environments, but show common metabolic characteristics. Here we studied the dynamic interactions of the central metabolism in Lactococcus lactis, extensively used as a starter culture in the dairy industry, and Streptococcus pyogenes, a human patho

  10. Role of phosphate in the central metabolism of two lactic acid bacteria - a comparative systems biology approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Levering; M.W. Musters; M. Bekker; D. Bellomo; T. Fiedler; W.M. de Vos; J. Hugenholtz; B. Kreikemeyer; U. Kummer; B. Teusink

    2012-01-01

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria survive in distinct environments, but show common metabolic characteristics. Here we studied the dynamic interactions of the central metabolism in Lactococcus lactis, extensively used as a starter culture in the dairy industry, and Streptococcus pyogenes, a human patho

  11. Effects of ambient and preceding temperatures and metabolic genes on flight metabolism in the Glanville fritillary butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Swee Chong; Oksanen, Alma; Mattila, Anniina L K; Lehtonen, Rainer; Niitepõld, Kristjan; Hanski, Ilkka

    2016-02-01

    Flight is essential for foraging, mate searching and dispersal in many insects, but flight metabolism in ectotherms is strongly constrained by temperature. Thermal conditions vary greatly in natural populations and may hence restrict fitness-related activities. Working on the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia), we studied the effects of temperature experienced during the first 2 days of adult life on flight metabolism, genetic associations between flight metabolic rate and variation in candidate metabolic genes, and genotype-temperature interactions. The maximal flight performance was reduced by 17% by 2 days of low ambient temperature (15 °C) prior to the flight trial, mimicking conditions that butterflies commonly encounter in nature. A SNP in phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi) had a significant association on flight metabolic rate in males and a SNP in triosephosphate isomerase (Tpi) was significantly associated with flight metabolic rate in females. In the Pgi SNP, AC heterozygotes had higher flight metabolic rate than AA homozygotes following low preceding temperature, but the trend was reversed following high preceding temperature, consistent with previous results on genotype-temperature interaction for this SNP. We suggest that these results on 2-day old butterflies reflect thermal effect on the maturation of flight muscles. These results highlight the consequences of variation in thermal conditions on the time scale of days, and they contribute to a better understanding of the complex dynamics of flight metabolism and flight-related activities under conditions that are relevant for natural populations living under variable thermal conditions. PMID:26658138

  12. Central and Metabolic Effects of High Fructose Consumption: Evidence from Animal and Human Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Stoianov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fructose consumption has increased dramatically in the last 40 years, and its role in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome has been implicated by many studies. It is most often encountered in the diet as sucrose (glucose and fructose or high-fructose corn syrup (55% fructose. At high levels, dietary exposure to fructose triggers a series of metabolic changes originating in the liver, leading to hepatic steatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance, and decreased leptin sensitivity. Fructose has been identified to alter biological pathways in other tissues including the central nervous system (CNS, adipose tissue, and the gastrointestinal system. Unlike glucose, consumption of fructose produces smaller increases in the circulating satiety hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1, and does not attenuate levels of the appetite suppressing hormone ghrelin. In the brain, fructose contributes to increased food consumption by activating appetite and reward pathways, and stimulating hypothalamic AMPK activity, a nutrient-sensitive regulator of food intake. Recent studies investigating the neurophysiological factors linking fructose consumption and weight gain in humans have demonstrated differential activation of brain regions that govern appetite, motivation and reward processing. Compared to fructose, glucose ingestion produces a greater reduction of hypothalamic neuronal activity, and increases functional connectivity between the hypothalamus and other reward regions of the brain, indicating that these two sugars regulate feeding behavior through distinct neural circuits. This review article outlines the current findings in fructose-feeding studies in both human and animal models, and discusses the central effects on the CNS that may lead to increased appetite and food intake. Keywords: Fructose, Metabolic syndrome, Appetite, Central nervous system

  13. Co-regulation of metabolic genes is better explained by flux coupling than by network distance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Notebaart

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To what extent can modes of gene regulation be explained by systems-level properties of metabolic networks? Prior studies on co-regulation of metabolic genes have mainly focused on graph-theoretical features of metabolic networks and demonstrated a decreasing level of co-expression with increasing network distance, a naïve, but widely used, topological index. Others have suggested that static graph representations can poorly capture dynamic functional associations, e.g., in the form of dependence of metabolic fluxes across genes in the network. Here, we systematically tested the relative importance of metabolic flux coupling and network position on gene co-regulation, using a genome-scale metabolic model of Escherichia coli. After validating the computational method with empirical data on flux correlations, we confirm that genes coupled by their enzymatic fluxes not only show similar expression patterns, but also share transcriptional regulators and frequently reside in the same operon. In contrast, we demonstrate that network distance per se has relatively minor influence on gene co-regulation. Moreover, the type of flux coupling can explain refined properties of the regulatory network that are ignored by simple graph-theoretical indices. Our results underline the importance of studying functional states of cellular networks to define physiologically relevant associations between genes and should stimulate future developments of novel functional genomic tools.

  14. Co-regulation of metabolic genes is better explained by flux coupling than by network distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notebaart, Richard A; Teusink, Bas; Siezen, Roland J; Papp, Balázs

    2008-01-01

    To what extent can modes of gene regulation be explained by systems-level properties of metabolic networks? Prior studies on co-regulation of metabolic genes have mainly focused on graph-theoretical features of metabolic networks and demonstrated a decreasing level of co-expression with increasing network distance, a naïve, but widely used, topological index. Others have suggested that static graph representations can poorly capture dynamic functional associations, e.g., in the form of dependence of metabolic fluxes across genes in the network. Here, we systematically tested the relative importance of metabolic flux coupling and network position on gene co-regulation, using a genome-scale metabolic model of Escherichia coli. After validating the computational method with empirical data on flux correlations, we confirm that genes coupled by their enzymatic fluxes not only show similar expression patterns, but also share transcriptional regulators and frequently reside in the same operon. In contrast, we demonstrate that network distance per se has relatively minor influence on gene co-regulation. Moreover, the type of flux coupling can explain refined properties of the regulatory network that are ignored by simple graph-theoretical indices. Our results underline the importance of studying functional states of cellular networks to define physiologically relevant associations between genes and should stimulate future developments of novel functional genomic tools. PMID:18225949

  15. Integration of gene expression data into genome-scale metabolic models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkesson, M.; Förster, Jochen; Nielsen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    gene expression from chemostat and batch cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were combined with a recently developed genome-scale model, and the computed metabolic flux distributions were compared to experimental values from carbon labeling experiments and metabolic network analysis. The integration...... of expression data resulted in improved predictions of metabolic behavior in batch cultures, enabling quantitative predictions of exchange fluxes as well as qualitative estimations of changes in intracellular fluxes. A critical discussion of correlation between gene expression and metabolic fluxes is......A framework for integration of transcriptome data into stoichiometric metabolic models to obtain improved flux predictions is presented. The key idea is to exploit the regulatory information in the expression data to give additional constraints on the metabolic fluxes in the model. Measurements of...

  16. Preferential use of central metabolism in vivo reveals a nutritional basis for polymicrobial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Alteri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The human genitourinary tract is a common anatomical niche for polymicrobial infection and a leading site for the development of bacteremia and sepsis. Most uncomplicated, community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI are caused by Escherichia coli, while another bacterium, Proteus mirabilis, is more often associated with complicated UTI. Here, we report that uropathogenic E. coli and P. mirabilis have divergent requirements for specific central pathways in vivo despite colonizing and occupying the same host environment. Using mutants of specific central metabolism enzymes, we determined glycolysis mutants lacking pgi, tpiA, pfkA, or pykA all have fitness defects in vivo for P. mirabilis but do not affect colonization of E. coli during UTI. Similarly, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway is required only for P. mirabilis in vivo. In contrast, gluconeogenesis is required only for E. coli fitness in vivo. The remarkable difference in central pathway utilization between E. coli and P. mirabilis during experimental UTI was also observed for TCA cycle mutants in sdhB, fumC, and frdA. The distinct in vivo requirements between these pathogens suggest E. coli and P. mirabilis are not direct competitors within host urinary tract nutritional niche. In support of this, we found that co-infection with E. coli and P. mirabilis wild-type strains enhanced bacterial colonization and persistence of both pathogens during UTI. Our results reveal that complementary utilization of central carbon metabolism facilitates polymicrobial disease and suggests microbial activity in vivo alters the host urinary tract nutritional niche.

  17. A novel role for central ACBP/DBI as a regulator of long-chain fatty acid metabolism in astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouyakdan, Khalil; Taïb, Bouchra; Budry, Lionel;

    2015-01-01

    Diazepam-Binding Inhibitor, a secreted peptide acting as an allosteric modulator of the GABAA receptor. However, its role in central LCFA metabolism remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated ACBP cellular expression, ACBP regulation of LCFA intracellular metabolism, FA profile, and FA......Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that binds intracellular acyl-CoA esters. Several studies have suggested that ACBP acts as an acyl-CoA pool former and regulates long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) metabolism in peripheral tissues. In the brain, ACBP is known as...... response to palmitate in hypothalamic astrocytes. Collectively, these findings reveal for the first time that central ACBP acts as a regulator of LCFA intracellular metabolism in astrocytes. Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) or diazepam-binding inhibitor is a secreted peptide acting centrally as a GABAA...

  18. No Association of SNPs in One-Carbon Metabolism Genes with Prostate Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Victoria L; Rodriguez, Carmen; Sun, Juzhong; Talbot, Jeffrey T.; Michael J Thun; Eugenia E Calle

    2008-01-01

    One-carbon metabolism mediates the inter-conversion of folates for the synthesis of precursors used in DNA synthesis, repair and methylation. Inadequate folate nutrition or compromised metabolism can disrupt these processes and facilitate carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated associations of 39 candidate SNPs in nine one-carbon metabolism genes with risk of prostate cancer using 1,144 cases and 1,144 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort. None of these SNPs we...

  19. Comparative genomic reconstruction of transcriptional networks controlling central metabolism in the Shewanella genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovaleva Galina

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-scale prediction of gene regulation and reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria is one of the critical tasks of modern genomics. The Shewanella genus is comprised of metabolically versatile gamma-proteobacteria, whose lifestyles and natural environments are substantially different from Escherichia coli and other model bacterial species. The comparative genomics approaches and computational identification of regulatory sites are useful for the in silico reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria. Results To explore conservation and variations in the Shewanella transcriptional networks we analyzed the repertoire of transcription factors and performed genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors and their DNA binding sites, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Forty five regulons were newly inferred from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in the Enterobacteria and Pseudomonas spp.. Multiple variations in regulatory strategies between the Shewanella spp. and E. coli include regulon contraction and expansion (as in the case of PdhR, HexR, FadR, numerous cases of recruiting non-orthologous regulators to control equivalent pathways (e.g. PsrA for fatty acid degradation and, conversely, orthologous regulators to control distinct pathways (e.g. TyrR, ArgR, Crp. Conclusions We tentatively defined the first reference collection of ~100 transcriptional regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The resulting regulatory network contains ~600 regulated genes per genome that are mostly involved in metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, metals, and stress responses. Several reconstructed regulons including NagR for N-acetylglucosamine catabolism were experimentally validated in S

  20. Identification and transcriptional profiling of Pseudomonas putida genes involved in furoic acid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furfural (2-furaldehyde) is a furan formed by dehydration of pentose sugars. Pseudomonas putida Fu1 metabolizes furfural through a pathway involving conversion to 2-oxoglutarate, via 2-furoic acid and Coenzyme A intermediates. To identify genes involved in furan metabolism, two P. putida transposo...

  1. Integrating Kinetic Model of E. coli with Genome Scale Metabolic Fluxes Overcomes Its Open System Problem and Reveals Bistability in Central Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad A Mannan

    Full Text Available An understanding of the dynamics of the metabolic profile of a bacterial cell is sought from a dynamical systems analysis of kinetic models. This modelling formalism relies on a deterministic mathematical description of enzyme kinetics and their metabolite regulation. However, it is severely impeded by the lack of available kinetic information, limiting the size of the system that can be modelled. Furthermore, the subsystem of the metabolic network whose dynamics can be modelled is faced with three problems: how to parameterize the model with mostly incomplete steady state data, how to close what is now an inherently open system, and how to account for the impact on growth. In this study we address these challenges of kinetic modelling by capitalizing on multi-'omics' steady state data and a genome-scale metabolic network model. We use these to generate parameters that integrate knowledge embedded in the genome-scale metabolic network model, into the most comprehensive kinetic model of the central carbon metabolism of E. coli realized to date. As an application, we performed a dynamical systems analysis of the resulting enriched model. This revealed bistability of the central carbon metabolism and thus its potential to express two distinct metabolic states. Furthermore, since our model-informing technique ensures both stable states are constrained by the same thermodynamically feasible steady state growth rate, the ensuing bistability represents a temporal coexistence of the two states, and by extension, reveals the emergence of a phenotypically heterogeneous population.

  2. Nur77 coordinately regulates expression of genes linked to glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, Lily C.; Zhang, Zidong; Pei, Liming; Saito, Tsugumichi; Tontonoz, Peter; Pilch, Paul F.

    2007-01-01

    Innervation is important for normal metabolism in skeletal muscle, including insulin-sensitive glucose uptake. However, the transcription factors that transduce signals from the neuromuscular junction to the nucleus and affect changes in metabolic gene expression are not well defined. We demonstrate here that the orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 is a regulator of gene expression linked to glucose utilization in muscle. In vivo, Nur77 is preferentially expressed in glycolytic compared to oxidativ...

  3. The role of sugars and sugar metabolism genes (sucrose synthase) in arabidopsis thaliana seed development

    OpenAIRE

    Odunlami, Benjamin Oladipo

    2009-01-01

    Seed development in Arabidopsis thaliana, has been studied at several levels. However, little has been done to study the role of sugar metabolism genes in seed pod development in this species. As the fertilized egg progresses to a mature seed, the sugars composition during different stages of the developing changes. These changes are related to metabolic processes in the developing seeds, but also to the activity of sucrose- converting and transporting genes, active at the interphase between ...

  4. Reconstruction of metabolic pathways by the exploration of gene expression data with factor analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, David Allen

    2001-01-01

    Microarray gene expression data for thousands of genes in many organisms is quickly becoming available. The information this data can provide the experimental biologist is powerful. This data may provide information clarifying the regulatory linkages between genes within a single metabolic pathway, or alternative pathway routes under different environmental conditions, or provide information leading to the identification of genes for selection in animal and plant genetic improvement program...

  5. Polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism as maternal risk factors for Down syndrome in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-shuai WANG; Fu-yuan QIAO; Ling FENG; Juan-juan LV

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between genetic polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase reductase (MTRR), the central enzymes in folate metabolism that affects DNA methylation and synthesis, and the risk of Down syndrome in China. Methods: Genomic DNA was isolated from the peripheral lymphocytes of 64 mothers of children with Down syndrome and 70 age matched control subjects. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism were used to examine the polymorphisms of MTHFR 677C→T, MTRR 66A→G and the relationship between these genotypes and the risk of Down syndrome was analyzed. Results: The results show that the MTHFR 677C→T polymorphism is more prevalent among mothers of children with Down syndrome than among control mothers, with an odds ratio of 3.78 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.78~8.47). In addition, the homozygous MTRR 66A→G polymorphism was independently associated with a 5.2-fold increase in estimated risk (95% CI, 1.90~14.22). The combined presence of both polymorphisms was associated with a greater risk of Down syndrome than the presence of either alone, with an odds ratio of 6.0 (95% CI, 2.058~17.496).The two polymorphisms appear to act without a multiplicative interaction. Conclusion: MTHFR and MTRR gene mutation alleles are related to Down syndrome, and CT, TT and GG gene mutation types increase the risk of Down syndrome.

  6. Three factors underlying incorrect in silico predictions of essential metabolic genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palsson Bernhard O

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The indispensability of certain genes in an organism is important for studies of microorganism physiology, antibiotic targeting, and the engineering of minimal genomes. Time and resource intensive genome-wide experimental screens can be conducted to determine which genes are likely essential. For metabolic genes, a reconstructed metabolic network can be used to predict which genes are likely essential. The success rate of these predictions is less than desirable, especially with regard to comprehensively locating essential genes. Results We show that genes that are falsely predicted to be non-essential (for growth share three characteristics across multiple organisms and growth media. First, these genes are on average connected to fewer reactions in the network than correctly predicted essential genes, suggesting incomplete knowledge of the functions of these genes. Second, they are more likely to be blocked (their associated reactions are prohibited from carrying flux in the given condition than other genes, implying incomplete knowledge of metabolism surrounding these genes. Third, they are connected to less overcoupled metabolites. Conclusion The results presented herein indicate genes that cannot be correctly predicted as essential have commonalities in different organisms. These elucidated failure modes can be used to better understand the biology of individual organisms and to improve future predictions.

  7. Evidence for a link between tail biting and central monoamine metabolism in pigs (Sus scrofa domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valros, Anna; Palander, Pälvi; Heinonen, Mari; Munsterhjelm, Camilla; Brunberg, Emma; Keeling, Linda; Piepponen, Petteri

    2015-05-01

    Tail biting in pigs is a major welfare problem within the swine industry. Even though there is plenty of information on housing and management-related risk factors, the biological bases of this behavioral problem are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible link between tail biting, based on behavioral recordings of pigs during an ongoing outbreak, and certain neurotransmitters in different brain regions of these pigs. We used a total of 33 pigs at a farm with a long-standing problem of tail biting. Three equally big behavioral phenotypic groups, balanced for gender and age were selected, the data thus consisting of 11 trios of pigs. Two of the pigs in each trio originated from the same pen: one tail biter (TB) and one tail biting victim (V). A control (C) pig was selected from a pen without significant tail biting in the same farm room. We found an effect of tail biting behavioral phenotype on the metabolism of serotonin and dopamine, with a tendency for a higher 5-HIAA level in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of TB compared to the other groups, while V pigs showed changes in both serotonin and dopamine metabolism in the striatum (ST) and limbic cortex (LC). Trp:BCAA and Trp:LNAA correlated positively with serotonin and 5-HIAA in the PFC, but only in TB pigs. Furthermore, in both ST and LC, several of the neurotransmitters and their metabolites correlated positively with the frequency of bites received by the pig. This is the first study indicating a link between brain neurotransmission and tail biting behavior in pigs with TB pigs showing a tendency for increased PFC serotonin metabolism and V pigs showing several changes in central dopamine and serotonin metabolism in their ST and LC, possibly due to the acute stress caused by being bitten. PMID:25728243

  8. Diet-gene interactions between dietary fat intake and common polymorphisms in determining lipid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, D.

    2009-07-01

    Current dietary guidelines for fat intake have not taken into consideration the possible genetic differences underlying the individual variability in responsiveness to dietary components. Genetic variability has been identified in humans for all the known lipid metabolism-related genes resulting in a plethora of candidate genes and genetic variants to examine in diet-gene interaction studies focused on fat consumption. Some examples of fat-gene interaction are reviewed. These include: the interaction between total intake and the 14C/T in the hepatic lipase gene promoter in determining high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) metabolism; the interaction between polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and the 5G/A polymorphism in the APOA1 gene plasma HDL-C concentrations; the interaction between PUFA and the L162V polymorphism in the PPARA gene in determining triglycerides and APOC3 concentrations; and the interaction between PUFA intake and the -1131T>C in the APOA5 gene in determining triglyceride metabolism. Although hundreds of diet-gene interaction studies in lipid metabolism have been published, the level of evidence to make specific nutritional recommendations to the population is still low and more research in nutrigenetics has to be undertaken. (Author) 31 refs.

  9. Daily rhythms in expression of genes of hepatic lipid metabolism in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica B Betancor

    Full Text Available In mammals, several genes involved in liver lipid and cholesterol homeostasis are rhythmically expressed with expression shown to be regulated by clock genes via Rev-erb 1α. In order to elucidate clock gene regulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L., the orphan nuclear receptor Rev-erb 1α was cloned and 24 h expression of clock genes, transcription factors and genes involved in cholesterol and lipid metabolism determined in liver of parr acclimated to a long-day photoperiod, which was previously shown to elicit rhythmic clock gene expression in the brain. Of the 31 genes analysed, significant daily expression was demonstrated in the clock gene Bmal1, transcription factor genes Srebp1, Lxr, Pparα and Pparγ, and several lipid metabolism genes Hmgcr, Ipi, ApoCII and El. The possible regulatory mechanisms and pathways, and the functional significance of these patterns of expression were discussed. Importantly and in contrast to mammals, Per1, Per2, Fas, Srebp2, Cyp71α and Rev-erb 1α did not display significant daily rhythmicity in salmon. The present study is the first report characterising 24 h profiles of gene expression in liver of Atlantic salmon. However, more importantly, the predominant role of lipids in the nutrition and metabolism of fish, and of feed efficiency in determining farming economics, means that daily rhythmicity in the regulation of lipid metabolism will be an area of considerable interest for future research in commercially important species.

  10. Transcriptome analysis reveals a major impact of JAK protein tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2 on the expression of interferon-responsive and metabolic genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovarik Pavel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2, a central component of Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT signaling, has major effects on innate immunity and inflammation. Mice lacking Tyk2 are resistant to endotoxin shock induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, and Tyk2 deficient macrophages fail to efficiently induce interferon α/β after LPS treatment. However, how Tyk2 globally regulates transcription of downstream target genes remains unknown. Here we examine the regulatory role of Tyk2 in basal and inflammatory transcription by comparing gene expression profiles of peritoneal macrophages from Tyk2 mutant and wildtype control mice that were either kept untreated or exposed to LPS for six hours. Results Untreated Tyk2-deficient macrophages exhibited reduced expression of immune response genes relative to wildtype, in particular those that contain interferon response elements (IRF/ISRE, whereas metabolic genes showed higher expression. Upon LPS challenge, IFN-inducible genes (including those with an IRF/ISRE transcription factor binding-site were strongly upregulated in both Tyk2 mutant and wildtype cells and reached similar expression levels. In contrast, metabolic gene expression was strongly decreased in wildtype cells upon LPS treatment, while in Tyk2 mutant cells the expression of these genes remained relatively unchanged, which exaggerated differences already present at the basal level. We also identified several 5'UR transcription factor binding-sites and 3'UTR regulatory elements that were differentially induced between Tyk2 deficient and wildtype macrophages and that have not previously been implicated in immunity. Conclusions Although Tyk2 is essential for the full LPS response, its function is mainly required for baseline expression but not LPS-induced upregulation of IFN-inducible genes. Moreover, Tyk2 function is critical for the downregulation of metabolic genes upon immune challenge, in particular

  11. Systems mapping of metabolic genes through control theory☆

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Guodong; Kong, Lan; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Chenguang; Wu, Rongling

    2013-01-01

    The formation of any complex phenotype involves a web of metabolic pathways in which one chemical is transformed through the catalysis of enzymes into another. Traditional approaches for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) are based on a direct association analysis between DNA marker genotypes and end-point phenotypes, neglecting the mechanistic processes of how a phenotype is formed biochemically. Here, we propose a new dynamic framework for mapping metabolic QTLs (mQTLs) responsible for ...

  12. Model-guided identification of gene deletion targets for metabolic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochado, Ana Rita; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb

    2014-01-01

    Identification of metabolic engineering strategies for rerouting intracellular fluxes towards a desired product is often a challenging task owing to the topological and regulatory complexity of metabolic networks. Genome-scale metabolic models help tackling this complexity through systematic consideration of mass balance and reaction directionality constraints over the entire network. Here, we describe how genome-scale metabolic models can be used for identifying gene deletion targets leading to increased production of the desired product. Vanillin production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used as a case study throughout this chapter. PMID:24744040

  13. Elucidation of primary metabolic pathways in Aspergillus species: Orphaned research in characterizing orphan genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2014-01-01

    cellular function. However, several methods can be employed to use the metabolic networks in tandem with comparative genomics to accelerate functional assignment of genes in primary metabolism. In particular, gaps in metabolic pathways can be used to assign functions to orphan genes. In this review...

  14. Effects of ambient and preceding temperatures and metabolic genes on flight metabolism in the Glanville fritillary butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Swee Chong; Oksanen, Alma; Mattila, Anniina L.K.; Lehtonen, Rainer; Niitepõld, Kristjan; Hanski, Ilkka

    2016-01-01

    Flight is essential for foraging, mate searching and dispersal in many insects, but flight metabolism in ectotherms is strongly constrained by temperature. Thermal conditions vary greatly in natural populations and may hence restrict fitness-related activities. Working on the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia), we studied the effects of temperature experienced during the first 2 days of adult life on flight metabolism, genetic associations between flight metabolic rate and variation in candidate metabolic genes, and genotype–temperature interactions. The maximal flight performance was reduced by 17% by 2 days of low ambient temperature (15 °C) prior to the flight trial, mimicking conditions that butterflies commonly encounter in nature. A SNP in phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi) had a significant association on flight metabolic rate in males and a SNP in triosephosphate isomerase (Tpi) was significantly associated with flight metabolic rate in females. In the Pgi SNP, AC heterozygotes had higher flight metabolic rate than AA homozygotes following low preceding temperature, but the trend was reversed following high preceding temperature, consistent with previous results on genotype–temperature interaction for this SNP. We suggest that these results on 2-day old butterflies reflect thermal effect on the maturation of flight muscles. These results highlight the consequences of variation in thermal conditions on the time scale of days, and they contribute to a better understanding of the complex dynamics of flight metabolism and flight-related activities under conditions that are relevant for natural populations living under variable thermal conditions. PMID:26658138

  15. Role of a liver fatty acid-binding protein gene in lipid metabolism in chicken hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, G L; Na, W; Wang, Y X; Zhang, H F; Li, H; Wang, Q G

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the role of the chicken liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) gene in lipid metabolism in hepatocytes, and the regulatory relationships between L-FABP and genes related to lipid metabolism. The short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference vector with L-FABP and an eukaryotic expression vector were used. Chicken hepatocytes were subjected to shRNA-mediated knockdown or L-FABP cDNA overexpression. Expression levels of lipid metabolism-related genes and biochemical parameters were detected 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 h after transfection with the interference or overexpression plasmids for L-FABP, PPARα and L-BABP expression levels, and the total amount of cholesterol, were significantly affected by L-FABP expression. L-FABP may affect lipid metabolism by regulating PPARα and L-BABP in chicken hepatocytes. PMID:25966259

  16. Identification of genes specifically required for the anaerobic metabolism of benzene in Geobacter metallireducens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Tian; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Chaurasia, Akhilesh Kumar;

    2014-01-01

    Although the biochemical pathways for the anaerobic degradation of many of the hydrocarbon constituents in petroleum reservoirs have been elucidated, the mechanisms for anaerobic activation of benzene, a very stable molecule, are not known. Previous studies have demonstrated that Geobacter...... metallireducens can anaerobically oxidize benzene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor and that phenol is an intermediate in benzene oxidation. In an attempt to identify enzymes that might be involved in the conversion of benzene to phenol, whole-genome gene transcript abundance was...... compared in cells metabolizing benzene and cells metabolizing phenol. Eleven genes had significantly higher transcript abundance in benzene-metabolizing cells. Five of these genes had annotations suggesting that they did not encode proteins that could be involved in benzene metabolism and were not further...

  17. Bisphenol A effects on gene expression in adipocytes from children: association with metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menale, Ciro; Piccolo, Maria Teresa; Cirillo, Grazia; Calogero, Raffaele A; Papparella, Alfonso; Mita, Luigi; Del Giudice, Emanuele Miraglia; Diano, Nadia; Crispi, Stefania; Mita, Damiano Gustavo

    2015-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a xenobiotic endocrine-disrupting chemical. In vitro and in vivo studies have indicated that BPA alters endocrine-metabolic pathways in adipose tissue, which increases the risk of metabolic disorders and obesity. BPA can affect adipose tissue and increase fat cell numbers or sizes by regulating the expression of the genes that are directly involved in metabolic homeostasis and obesity. Several studies performed in animal models have accounted for an obesogen role of BPA, but its effects on human adipocytes - especially in children - have been poorly investigated. The aim of this study is to understand the molecular mechanisms by which environmentally relevant doses of BPA can interfere with the canonical endocrine function that regulates metabolism in mature human adipocytes from prepubertal, non-obese children. BPA can act as an estrogen agonist or antagonist depending on the physiological context. To identify the molecular signatures associated with metabolism, transcriptional modifications of mature adipocytes from prepubertal children exposed to estrogen were evaluated by means of microarray analysis. The analysis of deregulated genes associated with metabolic disorders allowed us to identify a small group of genes that are expressed in an opposite manner from that of adipocytes treated with BPA. In particular, we found that BPA increases the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the expression of FABP4 and CD36, two genes involved in lipid metabolism. In addition, BPA decreases the expression of PCSK1, a gene involved in insulin production. These results indicate that exposure to BPA may be an important risk factor for developing metabolic disorders that are involved in childhood metabolism dysregulation. PMID:25878060

  18. Identification of a Perchlorate Reduction Genomic Island with Novel Regulatory and Metabolic Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Melnyk, Ryan A.; Engelbrektson, Anna; Clark, Iain C.; Carlson, Hans K.; Byrne-Bailey, Kathy; Coates, John D.

    2011-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the genomes of four dissimilatory (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria has revealed a genomic island associated with perchlorate reduction. In addition to the characterized metabolic genes for perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, the island contains multiple conserved uncharacterized genes possibly involved in electron transport and regulation.

  19. Identification of a perchlorate reduction genomic island with novel regulatory and metabolic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Ryan A; Engelbrektson, Anna; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Byrne-Bailey, Kathy; Coates, John D

    2011-10-01

    A comparative analysis of the genomes of four dissimilatory (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria has revealed a genomic island associated with perchlorate reduction. In addition to the characterized metabolic genes for perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, the island contains multiple conserved uncharacterized genes possibly involved in electron transport and regulation. PMID:21856823

  20. Modeling the Contribution of Allosteric Regulation for Flux Control in the Central Carbon Metabolism of E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Daniel; Herrgard, Markus; Rocha, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Modeling cellular metabolism is fundamental for many biotechnological applications, including drug discovery and rational cell factory design. Central carbon metabolism (CCM) is particularly important as it provides the energy and precursors for other biological processes. However, the complex...

  1. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotring, V. E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2011-01-01

    Most administered pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver and exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. Additionally, it has been previous noted that pre-exposure to small radiation doses seems to confer protection against later and larger radiation doses. This protective power of pre-exposure has been called a priming effect or radioadaptation. This study is an effort to examine the drug metabolizing effects of radioadaptation mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses.

  2. Oral facial clefts and gene polymorphisms in metabolism of folate/one-carbon and vitamin A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyles, Abee L; Wilcox, Allen J; Taylor, Jack A;

    2009-01-01

    child had either cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) or cleft palate only (CPO), and no other major defects. We analyzed 108 SNPs and one insertion in 29 genes involved in folate/one-carbon metabolism and 68 SNPs from 16 genes involved in vitamin A metabolism. Using the Triad Multi......An increased risk of facial clefts has been observed among mothers with lower intake of folic acid or vitamin A around conception. We hypothesized that the risk of clefts may be further moderated by genes involved in metabolizing folate or vitamin A. We included 425 case-parent triads in which the......-Marker (TRIMM) approach we performed SNP, gene, chromosomal region, and pathway-wide association tests of child or maternal genetic effects for both CL/P and CPO. We stratified these analyses on maternal intake of folic acid or vitamin A during the periconceptional period. As expected with this high number of...

  3. Central leptin insufficiency syndrome: an interactive etiology for obesity, metabolic and neural diseases and for designing new therapeutic interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Kalra, Satya P.

    2007-01-01

    This review critically reappraises recent scientific evidence concerning central leptin insufficiency versus leptin resistance formulations to explain metabolic and neural disorders resulting from subnormal or defective leptin signaling in various sites in the brain. Research at various fronts to unravel the complexities of the neurobiology of leptin is surveyed to provide a comprehensive account of the neural and metabolic effects of environmentally-imposed fluctuations in leptin availabilit...

  4. Changes in Liver Metabolic Gene Expression after Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, C. P.; Wotring, Virginia E.

    2012-01-01

    The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand any effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments.

  5. Exhaustive analysis of a genotype space comprising 1015 central carbon metabolisms reveals an organization conducive to metabolic innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseini, Sayed-Rzgar; Barve, Aditya; Wagner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    All biological evolution takes place in a space of possible genotypes and their phenotypes. The structure of this space defines the evolutionary potential and limitations of an evolving system. Metabolism is one of the most ancient and fundamental evolving systems, sustaining life by extracting energy from extracellular nutrients. Here we study metabolism's potential for innovation by analyzing an exhaustive genotype-phenotype map for a space of 10(15) metabolisms that encodes all possible su...

  6. Exhaustive Analysis of a Genotype Space Comprising 10(15 )Central Carbon Metabolisms Reveals an Organization Conducive to Metabolic Innovation.

    OpenAIRE

    Sayed-Rzgar Hosseini; Aditya Barve; Andreas Wagner

    2015-01-01

    All biological evolution takes place in a space of possible genotypes and their phenotypes. The structure of this space defines the evolutionary potential and limitations of an evolving system. Metabolism is one of the most ancient and fundamental evolving systems, sustaining life by extracting energy from extracellular nutrients. Here we study metabolism's potential for innovation by analyzing an exhaustive genotype-phenotype map for a space of 10(15) metabolisms that encodes all possible su...

  7. Coordinated Regulation of Gene Expression for Carotenoid Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Hu Sun; Cheng-Qian Liu; Yuan-Yuan Hui; Wen-Kai Wu; Zhi-Gang Zhou; Shan Lu

    2010-01-01

    Carotenoids are important plant pigments for both light harvesting and photooxidation protection.Using the model system of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii,we characterized the regulation of gene expression for carotenoid metabolism by quantifying changes in the transcript abundance of dxs,dxr and ipi in the plastidic methylerythritol phosphate pathway and of ggps,psy,pds,lcyb and bchy,directly involved in carotenoid metabolism,under different photoperiod,light and metabolite treatments.The expression of these genes fluctuated with light/dark shifting.Light treatment also promoted the accumulation of transcripts of all these genes.Of the genes studied,dxs,ggps and lcyb displayed the typical circadian pattern by retaining a rhythmic fluctuation of transcript abundance under both constant light and constant dark entrainments.The expression of these genes could also be regulated by metabolic intermediates.For example,ggps was significantly suppressed by a geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate supplement and ipi was upregulated by isopentenyl pyrophosphate.Furthermore,CrOr,a C.reinhardtii homolog of the recently characterized Or gene that accounts for carotenoid accumulation,also showed co-expression with carotenoid biosynthetic genes such as pds and lcyb.Our data suggest a coordinated regulation on carotenoid metabolism in C.reinhardtii at the transcriptional level.

  8. No association between type 1 diabetes and genetic variation in vitamin D metabolism genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Steffen U; Mortensen, Henrik B; Carstensen, Bendix; Fenger, Mogens; Thuesen, Betina H; Husemoen, Lotte; Bergholdt, Regine; Brorsson, Caroline; Pociot, Flemming; Linneberg, Allan; Svensson, Jannet

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin D, certain single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the vitamin D-receptor (VDR) gene and vitamin D metabolism genes have been associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D). OBJECTIVE: We wanted to examine if the most widely studied SNPs in genes important for production, transport...... siblings). RESULTS: We did not demonstrate association with T1D for SNPs in the following genes: CYP27B1, VDR, GC, CYP2R1, DHCR7, and CYP24A1. Though, variants in the GC gene were significantly associated with 25(OH)D levels in the joint model. CONCLUSION: Some of the most examined SNPs in vitamin D...

  9. Fungal metabolic gene clusters – caravans traveling across genomes and environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hughes Wisecaver

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic gene clusters (MGCs, physically co-localized genes participating in the same metabolic pathway, are signature features of fungal genomes. MGCs are most often observed in specialized metabolism, having evolved in individual fungal lineages in response to specific ecological needs, such as the utilization of uncommon nutrients (e.g., galactose and allantoin or the production of secondary metabolic antimicrobial compounds and virulence factors (e.g., aflatoxin and melanin. A flurry of recent studies has shown that several MGCs, whose functions are often associated with fungal virulence as well as with the evolutionary arms race between fungi and their competitors, have experienced horizontal gene transfer (HGT. In this minireview, after briefly introducing HGT as a source of gene innovation, we examine the evidence for HGT’s involvement on the evolution of MGCs and, more generally of fungal metabolism, enumerate the molecular mechanisms that mediate such transfers and the ecological circumstances that favor them, as well as discuss the types of evidence required for inferring the presence of HGT in MGCs. The currently available examples indicate that transfers of entire MGCs have taken place between closely related fungal species as well as distant ones and that they sometimes involve large chromosomal segments. These results suggest that the HGT-mediated acquisition of novel metabolism is an ongoing and successful ecological strategy for many fungal species.

  10. An association between TRP64ARG polymorphism of the B3 adrenoreceptor gene and some metabolic disturbances

    OpenAIRE

    Abilova Samai S; Zalesskaya Yulia V; Moldokeeva Cholpon B; Lunegova Olga S; Kerimkulova Alina S; Mirrakhimov Aibek E; Sovhozova Nurmira A; Aldashev Almaz A; Mirrakhimov Erkin M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Backgrounds B3 adrenoreceptors (ADRB3) are abundant in adipose tissue and play the role in its metabolism and lipolysis. Some variants of the ADRB3 gene may predispose subjects for the development obesity and metabolic abnormalities in the setting of modern sedentary lifestyle. ADRB3 gene polymorphism association with metabolic disturbances has never been studied before in the ethnic Kyrgyz population. Aim To study an association between Trp64Arg polymorphism of the ADRB3 and metabol...

  11. Phylogenomic Study of Lipid Genes Involved in Microalgal Biofuel Production—Candidate Gene Mining and Metabolic Pathway Analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Barada Kanta Mishra; Bikram Kumar Parida; Prasanna Kumar Panda; Namrata Misra

    2012-01-01

    Optimizing microalgal biofuel production using metabolic engineering tools requires an in-depth understanding of the structure-function relationship of genes involved in lipid biosynthetic pathway. In the present study, genome-wide identification and characterization of 398 putative genes involved in lipid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Volvox carteri, Ostreococcus lucimarinus, Ostreococcus tauri and Cyanidioschyzon merolae was undertaken on the basis of their...

  12. Lack of differential pattern in central adiposity and metabolic syndrome in Barrett's esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Healy, L A

    2012-02-01

    Obesity is an established risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma, although the mechanism is unclear. A pathway from reflux to inflammation through metaplasia is the dominant hypothesis, and an added role relating to visceral adiposity and the metabolic syndrome has been mooted in Barrett\\'s esophagus (BE) patients. Whether BE differs from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in obesity and metabolic syndrome profiles is unclear, and this was the focus of this study. Patients with proven BE or GERD were randomly selected from the unit data registry and invited to attend for metabolic syndrome screening, anthropometry studies including segmental body composition analysis, and laboratory tests including fasting lipids, insulin, and C-reactive protein. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. One hundred and eighteen BE patients and 113 age- and sex-matched GERD controls were studied. The incidence of obesity (body mass index >30 kg\\/m(2)) was 36% and 38%, respectively, with the pattern of fat deposition predominantly central and an estimated trunk fat mass of 13 and 14 kg, respectively. Using the NCEP criteria, metabolic syndrome was significantly more common in the BE cohort (30% vs 20%, P < 0.05), but there was no significant difference using IDF criteria (42% vs 37%, P= 0.340). Central obesity and the metabolic syndrome are common in both Barrett\\'s and GERD cohorts, but not significantly different, suggesting that central obesity and the metabolic syndrome does not per se impact on the development of BE in a reflux population. In BE, the importance of obesity and the metabolic syndrome in disease progression merits further study.

  13. Gene networks from DNA microarray data: centrality and lethality

    OpenAIRE

    Provero, P.

    2002-01-01

    We construct a gene network based on expression data from DNA microarray experiments, by establishing a link between two genes whenever the Pearson's correlation coefficient between their expression profiles is higher than a certain cutoff. The resulting connectivity distribution is compatible with a power-law decay with exponent ~1, corrected by an exponential cutoff at large connectivity. The biological relevance of such network is demonstrated by showing that there is a strong statistical ...

  14. High-throughput and combinatorial gene expression on a chip for metabolism-induced toxicology screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Seok Joon; Lee, Dong Woo; Shah, Dhiral A; Ku, Bosung; Jeon, Sang Youl; Solanki, Kusum; Ryan, Jessica D; Clark, Douglas S; Dordick, Jonathan S; Lee, Moo-Yeal

    2014-01-01

    Differential expression of various drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) in the human liver may cause deviations of pharmacokinetic profiles, resulting in interindividual variability of drug toxicity and/or efficacy. Here, we present the 'Transfected Enzyme and Metabolism Chip' (TeamChip), which predicts potential metabolism-induced drug or drug-candidate toxicity. The TeamChip is prepared by delivering genes into miniaturized three-dimensional cellular microarrays on a micropillar chip using recombinant adenoviruses in a complementary microwell chip. The device enables users to manipulate the expression of individual and multiple human metabolizing-enzyme genes (such as CYP3A4, CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP1A2, CYP2E1 and UGT1A4) in THLE-2 cell microarrays. To identify specific enzymes involved in drug detoxification, we created 84 combinations of metabolic-gene expressions in a combinatorial fashion on a single microarray. Thus, the TeamChip platform can provide critical information necessary for evaluating metabolism-induced toxicity in a high-throughput manner. PMID:24799042

  15. Phylogenomic study of lipid genes involved in microalgal biofuel production-candidate gene mining and metabolic pathway analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Namrata; Panda, Prasanna Kumar; Parida, Bikram Kumar; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2012-01-01

    Optimizing microalgal biofuel production using metabolic engineering tools requires an in-depth understanding of the structure-function relationship of genes involved in lipid biosynthetic pathway. In the present study, genome-wide identification and characterization of 398 putative genes involved in lipid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Volvox carteri, Ostreococcus lucimarinus, Ostreococcus tauri and Cyanidioschyzon merolae was undertaken on the basis of their conserved motif/domain organization and phylogenetic profile. The results indicated that the core lipid metabolic pathways in all the species are carried out by a comparable number of orthologous proteins. Although the fundamental gene organizations were observed to be invariantly conserved between microalgae and Arabidopsis genome, with increased order of genome complexity there seems to be an association with more number of genes involved in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis and catabolism. Further, phylogenomic analysis of the genes provided insights into the molecular evolution of lipid biosynthetic pathway in microalgae and confirm the close evolutionary proximity between the Streptophyte and Chlorophyte lineages. Together, these studies will improve our understanding of the global lipid metabolic pathway and contribute to the engineering of regulatory networks of algal strains for higher accumulation of oil. PMID:23032611

  16. Comparison of Multiple Gene Assembly Methods for Metabolic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chenfeng; Mansoorabadi, Karen; Jeffries, Thomas

    A universal, rapid DNA assembly method for efficient multigene plasmid construction is important for biological research and for optimizing gene expression in industrial microbes. Three different approaches to achieve this goal were evaluated. These included creating long complementary extensions using a uracil-DNA glycosylase technique, overlap extension polymerase chain reaction, and a SfiI-based ligation method. SfiI ligation was the only successful approach for assembling large DNA fragments that contained repeated homologous regions. In addition, the SfiI method has been improved over a similar, previous published technique so that it is more flexible and does not require polymerase chain reaction to incorporate adaptors. In the present study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes TAL1, TKL1, and PYK1 under control of the 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase promoter were successfully ligated together using multiple unique SfiI restriction sites. The desired construct was obtained 65% of the time during vector construction using four-piece ligations. The SfiI method consists of three steps: first a SfiI linker vector is constructed, whose multiple cloning site is flanked by two three-base linkers matching the neighboring SfiI linkers on SfiI digestion; second, the linkers are attached to the desired genes by cloning them into SfiI linker vectors; third, the genes flanked by the three-base linkers, are released by SfiI digestion. In the final step, genes of interest are joined together in a simple one-step ligation.

  17. Gene coexpression analysis reveals complex metabolism of the monoterpene alcohol linalool in Arabidopsis flowers.

    OpenAIRE

    Ginglinger, J.-F.; Boachon, B.; Hofer, R.; Paetz, C.; Kollner, T. G.; Miesch, L.; Lugan, R.; Baltenweck, R.; Mutterer, J.; Ullmann, P.; Beran, F.; Claudel, P.; Verstappen, F.; Fischer, M. J. C.; Karst, F

    2013-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 family encompasses the largest family of enzymes in plant metabolism, and the functions of many of its members in Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Gene coexpression analysis pointed to two P450s that were coexpressed with two monoterpene synthases in flowers and were thus predicted to be involved in monoterpenoid metabolism. We show that all four selected genes, the two terpene synthases (TPS10 and TPS14) and the two cytochrome P450s (CYP71B31 and CYP76C3), are simu...

  18. Polymorphisms in fatty acid metabolism-related genes are associated with colorectal cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeft, B.; Linseisen, J.; Beckmann, L.; Muller-Decker, K.; Canzian, F.; Husing, A.; Kaaks, R.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Jakobsen, M.U.; Overvad, K.; Hansen, R.D.; Knuppel, S.; Boeing, H.; Trichopoulou, A.; Koumantaki, Y.; Trichopoulos, D.; Berrino, F.; Palli, D.; Panico, S.; Tumino, R.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B.; van Duijnhoven, F.J.B.; van Gils, C.H.; Peeters, P.H.; Dumeaux, V.; Lund, E.; Castano, J.M.H.; Munoz, X.; Rodriguez, L.; Barricarte, A.; Manjer, J.; Jirstrom, K.; Van Guelpen, B.; Hallmans, G.; Spencer, E.A.; Crowe, F.L.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.; Morois, S.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Chajes, V.; Jenab, M.; Boffetta, P.; Vineis, P.; Mouw, T.; Norat, T.; Riboli, E.; Nieters, A.

    2010-01-01

    as contributing factor to colon carcinogenesis. We examined the association between genetic variability in 43 fatty acid metabolism-related genes and colorectal risk in 1225 CRC cases and 2032 controls participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Three......Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignant tumor and the fourth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The crucial role of fatty acids for a number of important biological processes suggests a more in-depth analysis of inter-individual differences in fatty acid metabolizing genes...

  19. Identification of genes and networks driving cardiovascular and metabolic phenotypes in a mouse F2 intercross.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M J Derry

    Full Text Available To identify the genes and pathways that underlie cardiovascular and metabolic phenotypes we performed an integrated analysis of a mouse C57BL/6JxA/J F2 (B6AF2 cross by relating genome-wide gene expression data from adipose, kidney, and liver tissues to physiological endpoints measured in the population. We have identified a large number of trait QTLs including loci driving variation in cardiac function on chromosomes 2 and 6 and a hotspot for adiposity, energy metabolism, and glucose traits on chromosome 8. Integration of adipose gene expression data identified a core set of genes that drive the chromosome 8 adiposity QTL. This chromosome 8 trans eQTL signature contains genes associated with mitochondrial function and oxidative phosphorylation and maps to a subnetwork with conserved function in humans that was previously implicated in human obesity. In addition, human eSNPs corresponding to orthologous genes from the signature show enrichment for association to type II diabetes in the DIAGRAM cohort, supporting the idea that the chromosome 8 locus perturbs a molecular network that in humans senses variations in DNA and in turn affects metabolic disease risk. We functionally validate predictions from this approach by demonstrating metabolic phenotypes in knockout mice for three genes from the trans eQTL signature, Akr1b8, Emr1, and Rgs2. In addition we show that the transcriptional signatures for knockout of two of these genes, Akr1b8 and Rgs2, map to the F2 network modules associated with the chromosome 8 trans eQTL signature and that these modules are in turn very significantly correlated with adiposity in the F2 population. Overall this study demonstrates how integrating gene expression data with QTL analysis in a network-based framework can aid in the elucidation of the molecular drivers of disease that can be translated from mice to humans.

  20. Unraveling algal lipid metabolism: Recent advances in gene identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozin-Goldberg, Inna; Cohen, Zvi

    2011-01-01

    Microalgae are now the focus of intensive research due to their potential as a renewable feedstock for biodiesel. This research requires a thorough understanding of the biochemistry and genetics of these organisms' lipid-biosynthesis pathways. Genes encoding lipid-biosynthesis enzymes can now be identified in the genomes of various eukaryotic microalgae. However, an examination of the predicted proteins at the biochemical and molecular levels is mandatory to verify their function. The essential molecular and genetic tools are now available for a comprehensive characterization of genes coding for enzymes of the lipid-biosynthesis pathways in some algal species. This review mainly summarizes the novel information emerging from recently obtained algal gene identification. PMID:20709142

  1. Metabolic flux determination using carbon 13 NMR. Application to normal and tumoral cells from central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon 13 NMR constitutes a potent tool to study cellular metabolism by the use of 13C enriched substrates. Analyzes of 13C NMR spectra recorded from acidic cell extracts lead to the evaluation of specific enrichment of various metabolites. On the other hand, the measure of homonuclear 13C-13C spin coupling gives information on the different isotopomers for a given molecule. Mathematical models were different isotopomers for a given molecule. Mathematical models were developed to interpret the NMR data in terms of metabolic fluxes through the metabolic network of interest. Various models established in our laboratory are presented. These models were applied to metabolic studies of cultured central nervous system cells as rat cerebellar astrocytes and granule cells, and the C6 glioma cell line. (authors). 17 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy in inherited metabolic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Wagemaker (Gerard)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAfter more than 20 years of development, lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy has entered the stage of initial clinical implementation for immune deficiencies and storage disorders. This brief review summarizes the development and applications, focusing on the lysosomal enzyme

  3. The Association of Glucose Metabolism and Eigenvector Centrality in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaanse, Sofie M; Wink, Alle Meije; Tijms, Betty M; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Verfaillie, Sander C J; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Boellaard, Ronald; Scheltens, Philip; van Berckel, Bart N M; Barkhof, Frederik

    2016-02-01

    Both fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG) positron emission tomography, examining glucose metabolism, and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI), using covarying blood oxygen levels, can be used to explore neuronal dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Both measures are reported to identify similar brain regions affected in AD patients. The spatial overlap and association of [(18)F]FDG with rs-fMRI in AD patients and controls were examined to investigate whether these two measures are associated, and if so, to what extent. For 24 AD patients and 18 controls, [(18)F]FDG and rs-fMRI data were available. [(18)F]FDG standardized uptake value ratios (SUVr), with cerebellar gray matter (GM) as reference tissue, were calculated. Eigenvector centrality (EC) mapping was used to spatially analyze the functional brain network. Group differences were calculated for [(18)F]FDG and eigenvector centrality mapping (ECM) values in four cortical regions (occipital, parietal, frontal, and temporal) and across voxels, with age, gender, and GM as covariates. Correlation of [(18)F]FDG with ECM was calculated within groups. Both lowered [(18)F]FDG SUVr and EC values were seen in the parietal and occipital cortex of AD patients. However, [(18)F]FDG yielded more robust and widespread brain areas affected in AD patients; hypometabolism was also observed in the temporal cortex and regions within frontal brain areas. Poor spatial overlap of both measures was observed. No associations were found between local [(18)F]FDG SUVr and ECM. In conclusion, agreement of [(18)F]FDG and ECM in AD patients seems moderate at best. [(18)F]FDG was most accurate in distinguishing AD patients from controls. PMID:26414628

  4. Horizontal gene transfer of an entire metabolic pathway between a eukaryotic alga and its DNA virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, Adam; Pagarete, António; de Vargas, Colomban; Allen, Michael J; Read, Betsy; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Ogata, Hiroyuki

    2009-08-01

    Interactions between viruses and phytoplankton, the main primary producers in the oceans, affect global biogeochemical cycles and climate. Recent studies are increasingly revealing possible cases of gene transfers between cyanobacteria and phages, which might have played significant roles in the evolution of cyanobacteria/phage systems. However, little has been documented about the occurrence of horizontal gene transfer in eukaryotic phytoplankton/virus systems. Here we report phylogenetic evidence for the transfer of seven genes involved in the sphingolipid biosynthesis pathway between the cosmopolitan eukaryotic microalga Emiliania huxleyi and its large DNA virus EhV. PCR assays indicate that these genes are prevalent in E. huxleyi and EhV strains isolated from different geographic locations. Patterns of protein and gene sequence conservation support that these genes are functional in both E. huxleyi and EhV. This is the first clear case of horizontal gene transfer of multiple functionally linked enzymes in a eukaryotic phytoplankton-virus system. We examine arguments for the possible direction of the gene transfer. The virus-to-host direction suggests the existence of ancient viruses that controlled the complex metabolic pathway in order to infect primitive eukaryotic cells. In contrast, the host-to-virus direction suggests that the serial acquisition of genes involved in the same metabolic pathway might have been a strategy for the ancestor of EhVs to stay ahead of their closest relatives in the great evolutionary race for survival. PMID:19451591

  5. DIFFERENTIAL EXPRESSION OF GENES INVOLVED IN METABOLISM BETWEEN TUMORIGENITIC HUMAN LEUKEMIA CELL LINES K562 AND K562-n

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕书晴; 许小平; 夏放; 居小萍; 李瑶; 应康; 毛裕民

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the molecular mechanism of different tumorigenicity in nude mice of human leukemia cell lines K562-n and K562. Methods: To analyze the genes differently expressed between K562 and K562-n cells by using cDNA microarray technique. Results: Among the 12800 genes detected, some genes involved in material metabolism and material transport were differently expressed between K562-n and K562 cells. These genes include homo sapiens placenta-specific ATP-binding cassette transporter gene, dihydrodiol dehydrogenase gene, hepatic dihydrodiol dehydrogenase gene, NAD-dependent methylene tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase cyclohydrolase, lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase, alpha gene, argininosuccinate lyase gene, mitochondrial isocitrtate dehydrogenase, adhesion protein SQM1 gene, dimethylarginine dimethylamino-hydrolase gene, M1 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase and farnesyl pyrophosphate synthetase gene. Conclusion: The high tumorigenicity of K562-n cells is related to the different expression of some genes concerned with cell metabolism and material transpoert.

  6. The functional gene composition and metabolic potential of coral-associated microbial communities

    OpenAIRE

    Yanying Zhang; Juan Ling; Qingsong Yang; Chongqing Wen; Qingyun Yan; Hongyan Sun; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou Shi; Jizhong Zhou; Junde Dong

    2015-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of coral-associated microbes has been extensively examined, but some contention remains regarding whether coral-associated microbial communities are species-specific or site-specific. It is suggested that corals may associate with microbes in terms of function, although little is known about the differences in coral-associated microbial functional gene composition and metabolic potential among coral species. Here, 16S rRNA Illumina sequencing and functional gene arr...

  7. Genome-wide analysis of the structural genes regulating defense phenylpropanoid metabolism in Populus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Tsai, Chung-Jui [Michigan Technological University; Harding, Scott A [Michigan Technological University; Lindroth, richard L [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Yuan, Yinan [Michigan Technological University

    2006-01-01

    Salicin-based phenolic glycosides, hydroxycinnamate derivatives and flavonoid-derived condensed tannins comprise up to one-third of Populus leaf dry mass. Genes regulating the abundance and chemical diversity of these substances have not been comprehensively analysed in tree species exhibiting this metabolically demanding level of phenolic metabolism. Here, shikimate-phenylpropanoid pathway genes thought to give rise to these phenolic products were annotated from the Populus genome, their expression assessed by semiquantitative or quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and metabolic evidence for function presented. Unlike Arabidopsis, Populus leaves accumulate an array of hydroxycinnamoyl-quinate esters, which is consistent with broadened function of the expanded hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA transferase gene family. Greater flavonoid pathway diversity is also represented, and flavonoid gene families are larger. Consistent with expanded pathway function, most of these genes were upregulated during wound-stimulated condensed tannin synthesis in leaves. The suite of Populus genes regulating phenylpropanoid product accumulation should have important application in managing phenolic carbon pools in relation to climate change and global carbon cycling.

  8. Coordinated Expression of Phosphoinositide Metabolic Genes during Development and Aging of Human Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley I Rapoport

    Full Text Available Phosphoinositides, lipid-signaling molecules, participate in diverse brain processes within a wide metabolic cascade.Gene transcriptional networks coordinately regulate the phosphoinositide cascade during human brain Development and Aging.We used the public BrainCloud database for human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to examine age-related expression levels of 49 phosphoinositide metabolic genes during Development (0 to 20+ years and Aging (21+ years.We identified three groups of partially overlapping genes in each of the two intervals, with similar intergroup correlations despite marked phenotypic differences between Aging and Development. In each interval, ITPKB, PLCD1, PIK3R3, ISYNA1, IMPA2, INPPL1, PI4KB, and AKT1 are in Group 1, PIK3CB, PTEN, PIK3CA, and IMPA1 in Group 2, and SACM1L, PI3KR4, INPP5A, SYNJ1, and PLCB1 in Group 3. Ten of the genes change expression nonlinearly during Development, suggesting involvement in rapidly changing neuronal, glial and myelination events. Correlated transcription for some gene pairs likely is facilitated by colocalization on the same chromosome band.Stable coordinated gene transcriptional networks regulate brain phosphoinositide metabolic pathways during human Development and Aging.

  9. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also influenced by body composition — people with more muscle and less fat generally have higher BMRs. previous continue Things That Can Go Wrong With Metabolism Most of the time your metabolism works effectively ...

  10. Metabolic Network Constrains Gene Regulation of C4 Photosynthesis: The Case of Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robaina-Estévez, Semidán; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Engineering C3 plants to increase their efficiency of carbon fixation as well as of nitrogen and water use simultaneously may be facilitated by understanding the mechanisms that underpin the C4 syndrome. Existing experimental studies have indicated that the emergence of the C4 syndrome requires co-ordination between several levels of cellular organization, from gene regulation to metabolism, across two co-operating cell systems—mesophyll and bundle sheath cells. Yet, determining the extent to which the structure of the C4 plant metabolic network may constrain gene expression remains unclear, although it will provide an important consideration in engineering C4 photosynthesis in C3 plants. Here, we utilize flux coupling analysis with the second-generation maize metabolic models to investigate the correspondence between metabolic network structure and transcriptomic phenotypes along the maize leaf gradient. The examined scenarios with publically available data from independent experiments indicate that the transcriptomic programs of the two cell types are co-ordinated, quantitatively and qualitatively, due to the presence of coupled metabolic reactions in specific metabolic pathways. Taken together, our study demonstrates that precise quantitative coupling will have to be achieved in order to ensure a successfully engineered transition from C3 to C4 crops. PMID:26903529

  11. Metabolic Network Constrains Gene Regulation of C4 Photosynthesis: The Case of Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robaina-Estévez, Semidán; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2016-05-01

    Engineering C3 plants to increase their efficiency of carbon fixation as well as of nitrogen and water use simultaneously may be facilitated by understanding the mechanisms that underpin the C4 syndrome. Existing experimental studies have indicated that the emergence of the C4 syndrome requires co-ordination between several levels of cellular organization, from gene regulation to metabolism, across two co-operating cell systems-mesophyll and bundle sheath cells. Yet, determining the extent to which the structure of the C4 plant metabolic network may constrain gene expression remains unclear, although it will provide an important consideration in engineering C4 photosynthesis in C3 plants. Here, we utilize flux coupling analysis with the second-generation maize metabolic models to investigate the correspondence between metabolic network structure and transcriptomic phenotypes along the maize leaf gradient. The examined scenarios with publically available data from independent experiments indicate that the transcriptomic programs of the two cell types are co-ordinated, quantitatively and qualitatively, due to the presence of coupled metabolic reactions in specific metabolic pathways. Taken together, our study demonstrates that precise quantitative coupling will have to be achieved in order to ensure a successfully engineered transition from C3 to C4 crops. PMID:26903529

  12. Elementary Flux Mode Analysis Revealed Cyclization Pathway as a Powerful Way for NADPH Regeneration of Central Carbon Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Rui

    Full Text Available NADPH regeneration capacity is attracting growing research attention due to its important role in resisting oxidative stress. Besides, NADPH availability has been regarded as a limiting factor in production of industrially valuable compounds. The central carbon metabolism carries the carbon skeleton flux supporting the operation of NADPH-regenerating enzyme and offers flexibility in coping with NADPH demand for varied intracellular environment. To acquire an insightful understanding of its NADPH regeneration capacity, the elementary mode method was employed to compute all elementary flux modes (EFMs of a network representative of central carbon metabolism. Based on the metabolic flux distributions of these modes, a cluster analysis of EFMs with high NADPH regeneration rate was conducted using the self-organizing map clustering algorithm. The clustering results were used to study the relationship between the flux of total NADPH regeneration and the flux in each NADPH producing enzyme. The results identified several reaction combinations supporting high NADPH regeneration, which are proven to be feasible in cells via thermodynamic analysis and coincident with a great deal of previous experimental report. Meanwhile, the reaction combinations showed some common characteristics: there were one or two decarboxylation oxidation reactions in the combinations that produced NADPH and the combination constitution included certain gluconeogenesis pathways. These findings suggested cyclization pathways as a powerful way for NADPH regeneration capacity of bacterial central carbon metabolism.

  13. Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008255 Serum adiponectin level declines in the elderly with metabolic syndrome.WU Xiaoyan(吴晓琰),et al.Dept Geriatr,Huashan Hosp,Fudan UnivShanghai200040.Chin J Geriatr2008;27(3):164-167.Objective To investigate the correlation between ser-um adiponectin level and metabolic syndrome in the elderly·Methods Sixty-one subjects with metabolic syndrome and140age matched subjects without metabolic

  14. Clopidogrel metabolism related gene polymorphisms in Chinese patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯广迅

    2013-01-01

    Objective To detect the single nucleotide polymorphisms of clopidogrel metabolism related genes(CYP2C19,ABCB1 and PON1) in Chinese patients with acute coronary syndrome(ACS) by genotype analysis. Methods Genetic analysis was performed in patients admitted to

  15. Quantitative trait analysis of yeast biodiversity yields novel gene tools for metabolic engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubmann, Georg; Foulquié-Moreno, Maria R.; Nevoigt, Elke; Duitama, Jorge; Meurens, Nicolas; Pais, Thiago M.; Mathé, Lotte; Saerens, Sofie; Nguyen, Huyen Thi Thanh; Swinnen, Steve; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Concilio, Luigi; de Troostembergh, Jean-Claude; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2013-01-01

    Engineering of metabolic pathways by genetic modification has been restricted largely to enzyme-encoding structural genes. The product yield of such pathways is a quantitative genetic trait. Out of 52 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains phenotyped in small-scale fermentations, we identified strain CBS6

  16. Prevalence of Central Obesity among Adults with Normal BMI and Its Association with Metabolic Diseases in Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Rui; Gao, Chunshi; Jiang, Lingling; Lv, Xin; Song, Yuanyuan; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of central obesity among adults with normal BMI and its association with metabolic diseases in Jilin Province, China. Methods A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 in Jilin Province of China. Information was collected by face to face interview. Descriptive data analysis and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of prevalence/frequency were conducted. Log-binomial regression analyses were used to find the independent factors associated with central obesity and to explore the adjusted association between central obesity and metabolic diseases among adults with normal BMI. Results Among the adult residents with normal BMI in Jilin Province, 55.6% of participants with central obesity self-assessed as normal weight and 27.0% thought their body weight were above normal. 12.7% of central obesity people took methods to lose weight, while 85.3% didn’t. Female, older people and non-manual worker had higher risk to be central obesity among adults with normal BMI. Hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia were significantly associated with central obesity among adults with normal BMI, the PRs were 1.337 (1.224–1.461), 1.323 (1.193–1.456) and 1.261 (1.152–1.381) separately when adjusted for gender, age and BMI. Conclusions Hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia were significantly associated with central obesity among adults with normal BMI in Jilin Province, China. The low rates of awareness and control of central obesity among adults with normal BMI should be improved by government and health department. PMID:27467819

  17. Prolactin gene expression in primary central nervous system tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendes Graziella Alebrant

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolactin (PRL is a hormone synthesized in both the pituitary gland and extrapituitary sites. It has been associated with the occurrence of neoplasms and, more recently, with central nervous system (CNS neoplasms. The aim of this study was to evaluate prolactin expression in primary central nervous system tumors through quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry (IH. Results Patient mean age was 49.1 years (SD 15.43, and females accounted for 70% of the sample. The most frequent subtype of histological tumor was meningioma (61.5%, followed by glioblastoma (22.9%. Twenty cases (28.6% showed prolactin expression by immunohistochemistry, most of them females (18 cases, 90%. Quantitative real-time PCR did not show any prolactin expression. Conclusions Despite the presence of prolactin expression by IH, the lack of its expression by quantitative real-time PCR indicates that its presence in primary tumors in CNS is not a reflex of local production.

  18. Gestational diabetes mellitus epigenetically affects genes predominantly involved in metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchat, Stephanie-May; Houde, Andrée-Anne; Voisin, Grégory; St-Pierre, Julie; Perron, Patrice; Baillargeon, Jean-Patrice; Gaudet, Daniel; Hivert, Marie-France; Brisson, Diane; Bouchard, Luigi

    2013-09-01

    Offspring exposed to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have an increased risk for chronic diseases, and one promising mechanism for fetal metabolic programming is epigenetics. Therefore, we postulated that GDM exposure impacts the offspring's methylome and used an epigenomic approach to explore this hypothesis. Placenta and cord blood samples were obtained from 44 newborns, including 30 exposed to GDM. Women were recruited at first trimester of pregnancy and followed until delivery. GDM was assessed after a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test at 24-28 weeks of pregnancy. DNA methylation was measured at>485,000 CpG sites (Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips). Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was conducted to identify metabolic pathways epigenetically affected by GDM. Our results showed that 3,271 and 3,758 genes in placenta and cord blood, respectively, were potentially differentially methylated between samples exposed or not to GDM (p-values down to 1 × 10(-06); none reached the genome-wide significance levels), with more than 25% (n = 1,029) being common to both tissues. Mean DNA methylation differences between groups were 5.7 ± 3.2% and 3.4 ± 1.9% for placenta and cord blood, respectively. These genes were likely involved in the metabolic diseases pathway (up to 115 genes (11%), p-values for pathways = 1.9 × 10(-13)diabetes mellitus p = 4.3 × 10(-11)). Among the differentially methylated genes, 326 in placenta and 117 in cord blood were also associated with newborn weight. Our results therefore suggest that GDM has epigenetic effects on genes preferentially involved in the metabolic diseases pathway, with consequences on fetal growth and development, and provide supportive evidence that DNA methylation is involved in fetal metabolic programming. PMID:23975224

  19. Icariin Is A PPARα Activator Inducing Lipid Metabolic Gene Expression in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Fu Lu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Icariin is effective in the treatment of hyperlipidemia. To understand the effect of icariin on lipid metabolism, effects of icariin on PPARα and its target genes were investigated. Mice were treated orally with icariin at doses of 0, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, or clofibrate (500 mg/kg for five days. Liver total RNA was isolated and the expressions of PPARα and lipid metabolism genes were examined. PPARα and its marker genes Cyp4a10 and Cyp4a14 were induced 2-4 fold by icariin, and 4-8 fold by clofibrate. The fatty acid (FA binding and co-activator proteins Fabp1, Fabp4 and Acsl1 were increased 2-fold. The mRNAs of mitochondrial FA β-oxidation enzymes (Cpt1a, Acat1, Acad1 and Hmgcs2 were increased 2-3 fold. The mRNAs of proximal β-oxidation enzymes (Acox1, Ech1, and Ehhadh were also increased by icariin and clofibrate. The expression of mRNAs for sterol regulatory element-binding factor-1 (Srebf1 and FA synthetase (Fasn were unaltered by icariin. The lipid lysis genes Lipe and Pnpla2 were increased by icariin and clofibrate. These results indicate that icariin is a novel PPARα agonist, activates lipid metabolism gene expressions in liver, which could be a basis for its lipid-lowering effects and its beneficial effects against diabetes.

  20. Metabolic regulation of Escherichia coli and its phoB and phoR genes knockout mutants under phosphate and nitrogen limitations as well as at acidic condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimizu Kazuyuki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phosphorus compounds serve as major building blocks of many biomolecules, and have important roles in signal transduction. The phosphate is involved in many biochemical reactions by the transfer of phosphoryl groups. All living cells sophisticatedly regulate the phosphate uptake, and survive even under phosphate-limiting condition, and thus phosphate metabolism is closely related to the diverse metabolism including energy and central carbon metabolism. In particular, phosphorylation may play important roles in the metabolic regulation at acidic condition and nitrogen limiting condition, which typically appears at the late growth phase in the batch culture. Moreover, phosphate starvation is a relatively inexpensive means of gene induction in practice, and the phoA promoter has been used for overexpression of heterologous genes. A better understanding of phosphate regulation would allow for optimization of such processes. Results The effect of phosphate (P concentration on the metabolism in Escherichia coli was investigated in terms of fermentation characteristics and gene transcript levels for the aerobic continuous culture at the dilution rate of 0.2 h-1. The result indicates that the specific glucose consumption rate and the specific acetate production rate significantly increased, while the cell concentration decreased at low P concentration (10% of the M9 medium. The increase in the specific glucose uptake rate may be due to ATP demand caused by limited ATP production under P-limitation. The lower cell concentration was also caused by less ATP production. The less ATP production by H+-ATPase may have caused less cytochrome reaction affecting in quinone pool, and caused up-regulation of ArcA/B, which repressed TCA cycle genes and caused more acetate production. In the case of phoB mutant (and also phoR mutant, the fermentation characteristics were less affected by P-limitation as compared to the wild type where the Pho

  1. Altered Levels of Aroma and Volatiles by Metabolic Engineering of Shikimate Pathway Genes in Tomato Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vered Tzin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum fruit is an excellent source of antioxidants, dietary fibers, minerals and vitamins and therefore has been referred to as a “functional food”. Ripe tomato fruits produce a large number of specialized metabolites including volatile organic compounds. These volatiles serve as key components of the tomato fruit flavor, participate in plant pathogen and herbivore defense, and are used to attract seed dispersers. A major class of specialized metabolites is derived from the shikimate pathway followed by aromatic amino acid biosynthesis of phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan. We attempted to modify tomato fruit flavor by overexpressing key regulatory genes in the shikimate pathway. Bacterial genes encoding feedback-insensitive variants of 3-Deoxy-D-Arabino-Heptulosonate 7-Phosphate Synthase (DAHPS; AroG209-9 and bi-functional Chorismate Mutase/Prephenate Dehydratase (CM/PDT; PheA12 were expressed under the control of a fruit-specific promoter. We crossed these transgenes to generate tomato plants expressing both the AroG209 and PheA12 genes. Overexpression of the AroG209-9 gene had a dramatic effect on the overall metabolic profile of the fruit, including enhanced levels of multiple volatile and non-volatile metabolites. In contrast, the PheA12 overexpression line exhibited minor metabolic effects compared to the wild type fruit. Co-expression of both the AroG209-9 and PheA12 genes in tomato resulted overall in a similar metabolic effect to that of expressing only the AroG209-9 gene. However, the aroma ranking attributes of the tomato fruits from PheA12//AroG209-9 were unique and different from those of the lines expressing a single gene, suggesting a contribution of the PheA12 gene to the overall metabolic profile. We suggest that expression of bacterial genes encoding feedback-insensitive enzymes of the shikimate pathway in tomato fruits provides a useful metabolic engineering tool for the modification of

  2. Metagenomic analysis revealed highly diverse microbial arsenic metabolism genes in paddy soils with low-arsenic contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ke-Qing; Li, Li-Guan; Ma, Li-Ping; Zhang, Si-Yu; Bao, Peng; Zhang, Tong; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2016-04-01

    Microbe-mediated arsenic (As) metabolism plays a critical role in global As cycle, and As metabolism involves different types of genes encoding proteins facilitating its biotransformation and transportation processes. Here, we used metagenomic analysis based on high-throughput sequencing and constructed As metabolism protein databases to analyze As metabolism genes in five paddy soils with low-As contents. The results showed that highly diverse As metabolism genes were present in these paddy soils, with varied abundances and distribution for different types and subtypes of these genes. Arsenate reduction genes (ars) dominated in all soil samples, and significant correlation existed between the abundance of arr (arsenate respiration), aio (arsenite oxidation), and arsM (arsenite methylation) genes, indicating the co-existence and close-relation of different As resistance systems of microbes in wetland environments similar to these paddy soils after long-term evolution. Among all soil parameters, pH was an important factor controlling the distribution of As metabolism gene in five paddy soils (p = 0.018). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study using high-throughput sequencing and metagenomics approach in characterizing As metabolism genes in the five paddy soil, showing their great potential in As biotransformation, and therefore in mitigating arsenic risk to humans. PMID:26736050

  3. Growth of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in human plasma: impacts on virulence and metabolic gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Marie-Laure; Chauvaux, Sylvie; Dessein, Rodrigue; Laurans, Caroline; Frangeul, Lionel; Lacroix, Céline; Schiavo, Angèle; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Foulon, Jeannine; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Médigue, Claudine; Carniel, Elisabeth; Simonet, Michel; Marceau, Michaël

    2008-01-01

    Background In man, infection by the Gram-negative enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is usually limited to the terminal ileum. However, in immunocompromised patients, the microorganism may disseminate from the digestive tract and thus cause a systemic infection with septicemia. Results To gain insight into the metabolic pathways and virulence factors expressed by the bacterium at the blood stage of pseudotuberculosis, we compared the overall gene transcription patterns (the transcriptome) of bacterial cells cultured in either human plasma or Luria-Bertani medium. The most marked plasma-triggered metabolic consequence in Y. pseudotuberculosis was the switch to high glucose consumption, which is reminiscent of the acetogenic pathway (known as "glucose overflow") in Escherichia coli. However, upregulation of the glyoxylate shunt enzymes suggests that (in contrast to E. coli) acetate may be further metabolized in Y. pseudotuberculosis. Our data also indicate that the bloodstream environment can regulate major virulence genes (positively or negatively); the yadA adhesin gene and most of the transcriptional units of the pYV-encoded type III secretion apparatus were found to be upregulated, whereas transcription of the pH6 antigen locus was strongly repressed. Conclusion Our results suggest that plasma growth of Y. pseudotuberculosis is responsible for major transcriptional regulatory events and prompts key metabolic reorientations within the bacterium, which may in turn have an impact on virulence. PMID:19055764

  4. Growth of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in human plasma: impacts on virulence and metabolic gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coppée Jean-Yves

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In man, infection by the Gram-negative enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is usually limited to the terminal ileum. However, in immunocompromised patients, the microorganism may disseminate from the digestive tract and thus cause a systemic infection with septicemia. Results To gain insight into the metabolic pathways and virulence factors expressed by the bacterium at the blood stage of pseudotuberculosis, we compared the overall gene transcription patterns (the transcriptome of bacterial cells cultured in either human plasma or Luria-Bertani medium. The most marked plasma-triggered metabolic consequence in Y. pseudotuberculosis was the switch to high glucose consumption, which is reminiscent of the acetogenic pathway (known as "glucose overflow" in Escherichia coli. However, upregulation of the glyoxylate shunt enzymes suggests that (in contrast to E. coli acetate may be further metabolized in Y. pseudotuberculosis. Our data also indicate that the bloodstream environment can regulate major virulence genes (positively or negatively; the yadA adhesin gene and most of the transcriptional units of the pYV-encoded type III secretion apparatus were found to be upregulated, whereas transcription of the pH6 antigen locus was strongly repressed. Conclusion Our results suggest that plasma growth of Y. pseudotuberculosis is responsible for major transcriptional regulatory events and prompts key metabolic reorientations within the bacterium, which may in turn have an impact on virulence.

  5. Changes in muscle gene expression related to metabolism according to growth potential in young bulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Carine; Cassar-Malek, Isabelle; Renand, Gilles; Hocquette, Jean-François

    2009-06-01

    To analyse the effects of genetic selection in favour of high muscle development on muscle gene expression, oligonucleotide microarrays were used to compare the transcriptome of Longissimusthoracis muscle from 15- and 19-month-old Charolais bull calves divergently selected for high (H) or low (L) muscle growth. Transcriptome data revealed that about two thirds of the genes involved in glycolysis were up-regulated at 15 and at 19months of age in H animals. Lastly, some differentially expressed genes were associated with muscle mass in the carcass (FGF6, PLD2) independently of fat deposition and meat quality. Selection for muscle growth potential is associated with modified expression of some genes involved in growth, and also with increased expression of genes involved in glycolysis. Furthermore, this change in muscle metabolism is likely to be dissociated from fat deposition and beef quality, providing new criteria for genetic selection in favour of muscle growth. PMID:20416758

  6. Integration of Posttranscriptional Gene Networks into Metabolic Adaptation and Biofilm Maturation in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Qu, Yue; Harrison, Paul F; Lo, Tricia L; Quenault, Tara; Dagley, Michael J; Bellousoff, Matthew; Powell, David R; Beilharz, Traude H; Traven, Ana

    2015-10-01

    The yeast Candida albicans is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen. Although both commensalism and pathogenesis depend on metabolic adaptation, the regulatory pathways that mediate metabolic processes in C. albicans are incompletely defined. For example, metabolic change is a major feature that distinguishes community growth of C. albicans in biofilms compared to suspension cultures, but how metabolic adaptation is functionally interfaced with the structural and gene regulatory changes that drive biofilm maturation remains to be fully understood. We show here that the RNA binding protein Puf3 regulates a posttranscriptional mRNA network in C. albicans that impacts on mitochondrial biogenesis, and provide the first functional data suggesting evolutionary rewiring of posttranscriptional gene regulation between the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans. A proportion of the Puf3 mRNA network is differentially expressed in biofilms, and by using a mutant in the mRNA deadenylase CCR4 (the enzyme recruited to mRNAs by Puf3 to control transcript stability) we show that posttranscriptional regulation is important for mitochondrial regulation in biofilms. Inactivation of CCR4 or dis-regulation of mitochondrial activity led to altered biofilm structure and over-production of extracellular matrix material. The extracellular matrix is critical for antifungal resistance and immune evasion, and yet of all biofilm maturation pathways extracellular matrix biogenesis is the least understood. We propose a model in which the hypoxic biofilm environment is sensed by regulators such as Ccr4 to orchestrate metabolic adaptation, as well as the regulation of extracellular matrix production by impacting on the expression of matrix-related cell wall genes. Therefore metabolic changes in biofilms might be intimately linked to a key biofilm maturation mechanism that ultimately results in untreatable fungal disease. PMID:26474309

  7. Integration of Posttranscriptional Gene Networks into Metabolic Adaptation and Biofilm Maturation in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoti Verma-Gaur

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Candida albicans is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen. Although both commensalism and pathogenesis depend on metabolic adaptation, the regulatory pathways that mediate metabolic processes in C. albicans are incompletely defined. For example, metabolic change is a major feature that distinguishes community growth of C. albicans in biofilms compared to suspension cultures, but how metabolic adaptation is functionally interfaced with the structural and gene regulatory changes that drive biofilm maturation remains to be fully understood. We show here that the RNA binding protein Puf3 regulates a posttranscriptional mRNA network in C. albicans that impacts on mitochondrial biogenesis, and provide the first functional data suggesting evolutionary rewiring of posttranscriptional gene regulation between the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans. A proportion of the Puf3 mRNA network is differentially expressed in biofilms, and by using a mutant in the mRNA deadenylase CCR4 (the enzyme recruited to mRNAs by Puf3 to control transcript stability we show that posttranscriptional regulation is important for mitochondrial regulation in biofilms. Inactivation of CCR4 or dis-regulation of mitochondrial activity led to altered biofilm structure and over-production of extracellular matrix material. The extracellular matrix is critical for antifungal resistance and immune evasion, and yet of all biofilm maturation pathways extracellular matrix biogenesis is the least understood. We propose a model in which the hypoxic biofilm environment is sensed by regulators such as Ccr4 to orchestrate metabolic adaptation, as well as the regulation of extracellular matrix production by impacting on the expression of matrix-related cell wall genes. Therefore metabolic changes in biofilms might be intimately linked to a key biofilm maturation mechanism that ultimately results in untreatable fungal disease.

  8. Interaction Between the Central and Peripheral Effects of Insulin in Controlling Hepatic Glucose Metabolism in the Conscious Dog

    OpenAIRE

    Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Kraft, Guillaume; Smith, Marta S.; Farmer, Ben; Neal, Doss; Williams, Phillip E.; Lautz, Margaret; Farmer, Tiffany; Donahue, E. Patrick; Cherrington, Alan D.; Edgerton, Dale S.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of hypothalamic insulin action to the regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism in the presence of a normal liver/brain insulin ratio (3:1) is unknown. Thus, we assessed the role of central insulin action in the response of the liver to normal physiologic hyperinsulinemia over 4 h. Using a pancreatic clamp, hepatic portal vein insulin delivery was increased three- or eightfold in the conscious dog. Insulin action was studied in the presence or absence of intracerebroventricularl...

  9. PI3K: An Attractive Candidate for the Central Integration of Metabolism and Reproduction

    OpenAIRE

    Maricedes eAcosta-Martinez

    2012-01-01

    In neurons, as in a variety of other cell types, the enzyme phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) is a key intermediate that is common to the signaling pathways of a number of peripheral metabolic cues, including insulin and leptin, which are well known to regulate both metabolic and reproductive functions. In this article, I explore the possibility that PI3K is a key integrator of metabolic and neural signals regulating gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)/luteinizing hormone (LH) release a...

  10. Naturally Occurring Variations in the Human Cholinesterase Genes: Heritability and Association with Cardiovascular and Metabolic Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Valle, Anne M.; Radić, Zoran; Rana, Brinda K.; Mahboubi, Vafa; Wessel, Jennifer; Shih, Pei-an Betty; Rao, Fangwen; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Taylor, Palmer

    2011-01-01

    Cholinergic neurotransmission in the central and autonomic nervous systems regulates immediate variations in and longer-term maintenance of cardiovascular function with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity that is critical to temporal responsiveness. Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), largely confined to the liver and plasma, subserves metabolic functions. AChE and BChE are found in hematopoietic cells and plasma, enabling one to correlate enzyme levels in whole blood with hereditary traits in twi...

  11. Expression analysis in response to drought stress in soybean: Shedding light on the regulation of metabolic pathway genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães-Dias, Fábia; Neves-Borges, Anna Cristina; Viana, Antonio Americo Barbosa; Mesquita, Rosilene Oliveira; Romano, Eduardo; de Fátima Grossi-de-Sá, Maria; Nepomuceno, Alexandre Lima; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers; Alves-Ferreira, Márcio

    2012-06-01

    Metabolomics analysis of wild type Arabidopsis thaliana plants, under control and drought stress conditions revealed several metabolic pathways that are induced under water deficit. The metabolic response to drought stress is also associated with ABA dependent and independent pathways, allowing a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms in this model plant. Through combining an in silico approach and gene expression analysis by quantitative real-time PCR, the present work aims at identifying genes of soybean metabolic pathways potentially associated with water deficit. Digital expression patterns of Arabidopsis genes, which were selected based on the basis of literature reports, were evaluated under drought stress condition by Genevestigator. Genes that showed strong induction under drought stress were selected and used as bait to identify orthologs in the soybean genome. This allowed us to select 354 genes of putative soybean orthologs of 79 Arabidopsis genes belonging to 38 distinct metabolic pathways. The expression pattern of the selected genes was verified in the subtractive libraries available in the GENOSOJA project. Subsequently, 13 genes from different metabolic pathways were selected for validation by qPCR experiments. The expression of six genes was validated in plants undergoing drought stress in both pot-based and hydroponic cultivation systems. The results suggest that the metabolic response to drought stress is conserved in Arabidopsis and soybean plants. PMID:22802708

  12. SNPs in transporter and metabolizing genes as predictive markers for oxaliplatin treatment in colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kap, Elisabeth J; Seibold, Petra; Scherer, Dominique; Habermann, Nina; Balavarca, Yesilda; Jansen, Lina; Zucknick, Manuela; Becker, Natalia; Hoffmeister, Michael; Ulrich, Alexis; Benner, Axel; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2016-06-15

    Oxaliplatin is frequently used as part of a chemotherapeutic regimen with 5-fluorouracil in the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC). The cellular availability of oxaliplatin is dependent on metabolic and transporter enzymes. Variants in genes encoding these enzymes may cause variation in response to oxaliplatin and could be potential predictive markers. Therefore, we used a two-step procedure to comprehensively investigate 1,444 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from these pathways for their potential as predictive markers for oxaliplatin treatment, using 623 stage II-IV CRC patients (of whom 201 patients received oxaliplatin) from a German prospective patient cohort treated with adjuvant or palliative chemotherapy. First, all genes were screened using the global test that evaluated SNP*oxaliplatin interaction terms per gene. Second, one model was created by backward elimination on all SNP*oxaliplatin interactions of the selected genes. The statistical procedure was evaluated using bootstrap analyses. Nine genes differentially associated with overall survival according to oxaliplatin treatment (unadjusted p values analysis we show an improvement of the prediction error of 3.7% in patients treated with oxaliplatin. Several variants in genes involved in metabolism and transport could thus be potential predictive markers for oxaliplatin treatment in CRC patients. If confirmed, inclusion of these variants in a predictive test could identify patients who are more likely to benefit from treatment with oxaliplatin. PMID:26835885

  13. Immunosuppressive activity enhances central carbon metabolism and bioenergetics in myeloid-derived suppressor cells in vitro models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammami Ines

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tumor microenvironment contains a vast array of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines that alter myelopoiesis and lead to the maturation of immunosuppressive cells known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs. Incubating bone marrow (BM precursors with a combination of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin-6 (IL-6 generated a tumor-infiltrating MDSC-like population that impaired anti-tumor specific T-cell functions. This in vitro experimental approach was used to simulate MDSC maturation, and the cellular metabolic response was then monitored. A complementary experimental model that inhibited L-arginine (L-Arg metabolizing enzymes in MSC-1 cells, an immortalized cell line derived from primary MDSCs, was used to study the metabolic events related to immunosuppression. Results Exposure of BM cells to GM-CSF and IL-6 activated, within 24 h, L-Arg metabolizing enzymes which are responsible for the MDSCs immunosuppressive potential. This was accompanied by an increased uptake of L-glutamine (L-Gln and glucose, the latter being metabolized by anaerobic glycolysis. The up-regulation of nutrient uptake lead to the accumulation of TCA cycle intermediates and lactate as well as the endogenous synthesis of L-Arg and the production of energy-rich nucleotides. Moreover, inhibition of L-Arg metabolism in MSC-1 cells down-regulated central carbon metabolism activity, including glycolysis, glutaminolysis and TCA cycle activity, and led to a deterioration of cell bioenergetic status. The simultaneous increase of cell specific concentrations of ATP and a decrease in ATP-to-ADP ratio in BM-derived MDSCs suggested cells were metabolically active during maturation. Moreover, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK was activated during MDSC maturation in GM-CSF and IL-6–treated cultures, as revealed by the continuous increase of AMP-to-ATP ratios and the phosphorylation of AMPK. Likewise, AMPK activity was

  14. Candidate gene study to investigate the genetic determinants of normal variation in central corneal thickness

    OpenAIRE

    Dimasi, David P.; Kathryn P Burdon; Hewitt, Alex W; Savarirayan, Ravi; Healey, Paul R.; Mitchell, Paul; Mackey, David A.; Craig, Jamie E

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The genetic component underlying variation in central corneal thickness (CCT) in the normal population remains largely unknown. As CCT is an identified risk factor for open-angle glaucoma, understanding the genes involved in CCT determination could improve our understanding of the mechanisms involved in this association. Methods To identify novel CCT genes, we selected eight different candidates based on a range of criteria. These included; aquaporin 1 (AQ1), aquaporin 5 (AQ5), decori...

  15. Effects of Radiation and Dietary Iron on Expression of Genes and Proteins Involved in Drug Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, K. M.; Wotring, V. E.

    2014-01-01

    Liver function, especially the rate of metabolic enzyme activities, determines the concentration of circulating drugs and the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand any effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Dietary factors and exposure to radiation are aspects of spaceflight that are potential oxidative stressors and both can be modeled in ground experiments. In this experiment, we examined the effects of high dietary iron and low dose gamma radiation (individually and combined) on the gene expression of enzymes involved in drug metabolism, redox homeostasis, and DNA repair. METHODS All procedures were approved by the JSC Animal Care and Use Committee. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups (n=8); control, high Fe diet (650 mg iron/kg), radiation (fractionated 3 Gy exposure from a Cs- 137 source) and combined high Fe diet + radiation exposure. Animals were euthanized 24h after the last treatment of radiation; livers were removed immediately and flash -frozen in liquid nitrogen. Expression of genes thought to be involved in redox homeostasis, drug metabolism and DNA damage repair was measured by RT-qPCR. Where possible, protein expression of the same genes was measured by western blotting. All data are expressed as % change in expression normalized to reference gene expression; comparisons were then made of each treatment group to the sham exposed/ normal diet control group. Data was considered significant at p< 0

  16. Anaerobic central metabolic pathways active during polyhydroxyalkanoate production in uncultured cluster 1 Defluviicoccus enriched in activated sludge communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burow, Luke C; Mabbett, Amanda N; Borrás, Luis; Blackall, Linda L

    2009-09-01

    A glycogen nonpolyphosphate-accumulating organism (GAO) enrichment culture dominated by the Alphaproteobacteria cluster 1 Defluviicoccus was investigated to determine the metabolic pathways involved in the anaerobic formation of polyhydroxyalkanoates, carbon storage polymers important for the proliferation of microorganisms in enhanced biological phosphorus removal processes. FISH-microautoradiography and post-FISH fluorescent chemical staining confirmed acetate assimilation as polyhydroxyalkanoates in cluster 1 Defluviicoccus under anaerobic conditions. Chemical inhibition of glycolysis using iodoacetate, and of isocitrate lyase by 3-nitropropionate and itaconate, indicated that carbon is likely to be channelled through both glycolysis and the glyoxylate cycle in cluster 1 Defluviicoccus. The effect of metabolic inhibitors of aconitase (monofluoroacetate) and succinate dehydrogenase (malonate) suggested that aconitase, but not succinate dehydrogenase, was active, providing further support for the role of the glyoxylate cycle in these GAOs. Metabolic inhibition of fumarate reductase using oxantel decreased polyhydroxyalkanoate production. This indicated reduction of fumarate to succinate and the operation of the reductive branch of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which is possibly important in the production of the polyhydroxyvalerate component of polyhydroxyalkanoates observed in cluster 1 Defluviicoccus enrichment cultures. These findings were integrated with previous metabolic models for GAOs and enabled an anaerobic central metabolic pathway model for polyhydroxyalkanoate formation in cluster 1 Defluviicoccus to be proposed. PMID:19622073

  17. Changes in glucose metabolism and gene expression after transfer of anti-angiogenic genes in rat hepatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human troponin I (TROP), the soluble receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (sFLT) and angiostatin (ASTAT) are potent inhibitors of endothelial cell proliferation, angiogenesis and tumour growth in vivo. Transfer of these genes into tumours may induce changes not only in perfusion, but also more general ones such as changes in metabolism. The aim of this study was to assess these reactions using FDG-PET and high-throughput methods such as gene profiling. We established Morris hepatoma (MH3924A) cell lines expressing TROP, sFLT or ASTAT and quantified 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG) uptake by dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) after tumour inoculation in ACI rats. Furthermore, expression of glucose transporter-1 and -3 (GLUT-1 and GLUT-3) as well as hexokinase-1 and -2 were investigated by RT-PCR and immunohistomorphometry. In addition, gene array analyses were performed. 18FDG uptake, vascular fraction and distribution volume were significantly higher in all genetically modified tumours. Immunohistomorphometry showed an increased percentage of hexokinase-1 and -2 as well as GLUT-1 and -3 immunoreactive (ir) cells. Using gene arrays and comparing all three groups of genetically modified tumours, we found upregulated expression of 36 genes related to apoptosis, signal transduction, stress or metabolism. TROP-, sFLT- or ASTAT-expressing MH3924A tumours show enhanced influx of 18FDG, which seems to be caused by several factors: enhanced exchange of nutrients between blood and tumour, increased amounts of glucose transporters and hexokinases, and increased expression of genes related to apoptosis, matrix and stress, which induce an increased demand for glucose. (orig.)

  18. The mRNA expression profile of metabolic genes relative to MHC isoform pattern in human skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plomgaard, Peter; Penkowa, Milena; Leick, Lotte;

    2006-01-01

    The metabolic profile of rodent muscle is generally reflected in the myosin heavy chain (MHC) fiber-type composition. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that metabolic gene expression is not tightly coupled with MHC fiber-type composition for all genes in human skeletal muscle...... metabolism genes, which suggests that basal mRNA regulation of genes encoding mitochondrial proteins does not match the wide differences in mitochondrial content of these muscles....... of a broad range of metabolic genes. The triceps muscle had two- to fivefold higher MHC IIa, phosphofructokinase, and LDH A mRNA content and two- to fourfold lower MHC I, lipoprotein lipase, CD36, hormone-sensitive lipase, and LDH B and hexokinase II mRNA than vastus lateralis or soleus...

  19. PI3K: An attractive candidate for the central integration of metabolism and reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricedes eAcosta-Martinez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In neurons, as in a variety of other cell types, the enzyme phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K is a key intermediate that is common to the signaling pathways of a number of peripheral metabolic cues, including insulin and leptin, which are well known to regulate both metabolic and reproductive functions. In this article, I explore the possibility that PI3K is a key integrator of metabolic and neural signals regulating gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH/luteinizing hormone (LH release and explore the hypothesis that this enzyme is pivotal in many disorders where gonadotropin release is at risk. Although the mechanisms mediating the influence of metabolism and nutrition on fertility are currently unclear, the strong association between metabolic disorders and infertility is undeniable. For example, women suffering from anorectic disorders experience amenorrhea as a consequence of malnutrition-induced impairment of LH release, and at the other extreme, obesity is also commonly co-morbid with menstrual dysfunction and infertility. Impaired hypothalamic insulin and leptin receptor signaling is thought to be at the core of reproductive disorders associated with metabolic dysfunction. While low levels of leptin and insulin characterize states of negative energy balance, prolonged nutrient excess is associated with insulin and leptin resistance. Metabolic models known to alter GnRH/LH release such as diabetes, diet-induced obesity, and caloric restriction are also accompanied by impairment of PI3K signaling in insulin and leptin sensitive tissues including the hypothalamus. However, a clear link between this signaling pathway and the control of GnRH release by peripheral metabolic cues has not been established. Investigating the role of the signaling pathways shared by metabolic cues that are critical for a normal reproductive state can help identify possible targets in the treatment of metabolic and reproductive disorders such as Polycystic Ovarian

  20. Spatial and temporal distribution of genes involved in polyamine metabolism during tomato fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaniklidis, Georgios; Kotsiras, Anastasios; Tsafouros, Athanasios; Roussos, Peter A; Aivalakis, Georgios; Katinakis, Panagiotis; Delis, Costas

    2016-03-01

    Polyamines are organic compounds involved in various biological roles in plants, including cell growth and organ development. In the present study, the expression profile, the accumulation of free polyamines and the transcript localisation of the genes involved in Put metabolism, such as Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), Arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and copper containing Amine oxidase (CuAO), were examined during Solanum lycopersicum cv. Chiou fruit development and maturation. Moreover, the expression of genes coding for enzymes involved in higher polyamine metabolism, including Spermidine synthase (SPDS), Spermine synthase (SPMS), S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC) and Polyamine oxidase (PAO), were studied. Most genes participating in PAs biosynthesis and metabolism exhibited an increased accumulation of transcripts at the early stages of fruit development. In contrast, CuAO and SPMS were mostly expressed later, during the development stages of the fruits where a massive increase in fruit volume occurs, while the SPDS1 gene exhibited a rather constant expression with a peak at the red ripe stage. Although Put, Spd and Spm were all exhibited decreasing levels in developing immature fruits, Put levels maxed late during fruit ripening. In contrast to Put both Spd and Spm levels continue to decrease gradually until full ripening. It is worth noticing that in situ RNA-RNA hybridisation is reported for the first time in tomato fruits. The localisation of ADC2, ODC1 and CuAO gene transcripts at tissues such as the locular parenchyma and the vascular bundles fruits, supports the theory that all genes involved in Put biosynthesis and catabolism are mostly expressed in fast growing tissues. The relatively high expression levels of CuAO at the ImG4 stage of fruit development (fruits with a diameter of 3 cm), mature green and breaker stages could possibly be attributed to the implication of polyamines in physiological processes taking place during fruit ripening. PMID

  1. New insight into genes in association with asthma: literature-based mining and network centrality analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Rui; WANG Lei; WANG Gang

    2013-01-01

    Background Asthma is a heterogeneous disease for which a strong genetic basis has been firmly established.Until now no studies have been undertaken to systemically explore the network of asthma-related genes using an internally developed literature-based discovery approach.This study was to explore asthma-related genes by using literaturebased mining and network centrality analysis.Methods Literature involving asthma-related genes were searched in PubMed from 2001 to 2011.Integration of natural language processing with network centrality analysis was used to identify asthma susceptibility genes and their interaction network.Asthma susceptibility genes were classified into three functional groups by gene ontology (GO) analysis and the key genes were confirmed by establishing asthma-related networks and pathways.Results Three hundred and twenty-six genes related with asthma such as IGHE (IgE),interleukin (IL)-4,5,6,10,13,17A,and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha were identified.GO analysis indicated some biological processes (developmental processes,signal transduction,death,etc.),cellular components (non-structural extracellular,plasma membrane and extracellular matrix),and molecular functions (signal transduction activity) that were involved in asthma.Furthermore,22 asthma-related pathways such as the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway,hematopoietic cell lineage,JAK-STAT signaling pathway,chemokine signaling pathway,and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction,and 17 hub genes,such as JAK3,CCR1-3,CCR5-7,CCR8,were found.Conclusions Our study provides a remarkably detailed and comprehensive picture of asthma susceptibility genes and their interacting network.Further identification of these genes and molecular pathways may play a prominent role in establishing rational therapeutic approaches for asthma.

  2. Rhamnolipids in perspective: gene regulatory pathways, metabolic engineering, production and technological forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobler, Leticia; Vilela, Leonardo F; Almeida, Rodrigo V; Neves, Bianca C

    2016-01-25

    Rhamnolipids have emerged as a very promising class of biosurfactants in the last decades, exhibiting properties of great interest in several industrial applications, and have represented a suitable alternative to chemically-synthesized surfactants. This class of biosurfactants has been extensively studied in recent years, aiming at their large-scale production based on renewable resources, which still require high financial costs. Development of non-pathogenic, high-producing strains has been the focus of a number of studies involving heterologous microbial hosts as platforms. However, the intricate gene regulation network controlling rhamnolipid biosynthesis represents a challenge to metabolic engineering and remains to be further understood and explored. This article provides an overview of the biosynthetic pathways and the main gene regulatory factors involved in rhamnolipid production within Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the prototypal producing species. In addition, we provide a perspective view into the main strategies applied to metabolic engineering and biotechnological production. PMID:26409933

  3. Information theory in systems biology. Part I: Gene regulatory and metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Kavousi, Kaveh; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    "A Mathematical Theory of Communication", was published in 1948 by Claude Shannon to establish a framework that is now known as information theory. In recent decades, information theory has gained much attention in the area of systems biology. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of those contributions that have applied information theory in inferring or understanding of biological systems. Based on the type of system components and the interactions between them, we classify the biological systems into 4 main classes: gene regulatory, metabolic, protein-protein interaction and signaling networks. In the first part of this review, we attempt to introduce most of the existing studies on two types of biological networks, including gene regulatory and metabolic networks, which are founded on the concepts of information theory. PMID:26701126

  4. Uncovering transcriptional regulation of glycerol metabolism in Aspergilli through genome-wide gene expression data anlysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salazar, Margarita Pena; Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Panagiotou, Gianni;

    2009-01-01

    Glycerol is catabolized by a wide range of microorganisms including Aspergillus species. To identify the transcriptional regulation of glycerol metabolism in Aspergillus, we analyzed data from triplicate batch fermentations of three different Aspergilli (Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus oryzae and...... Aspergillus niger) with glucose and glycerol as carbon sources. Protein comparisons and cross-analysis with gene expression data of all three species resulted in the identification of 88 genes having a conserved response across the three Aspergilli. A promoter analysis of the up-regulated genes led to the...... identification of a conserved binding site for a putative regulator to be 5′-TGCGGGGA-3′, a binding site that is similar to the binding site for Adr1 in yeast and humans. We show that this Adr1 consensus binding sequence was over-represented on promoter regions of several genes in A. nidulans, A. oryzae and A...

  5. GABA metabolism pathway genes, UGA1 and GAD1, regulate replicative lifespan in Saccharomycescerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Yuka; Tamura, Takayuki [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266 Tamura, Nagahama, Shiga 526-0829 (Japan); Yoshida, Ryo [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ohta, Shinji [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266 Tamura, Nagahama, Shiga 526-0829 (Japan); Fukusaki, Eiichiro [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Mukai, Yukio, E-mail: y_mukai@nagahama-i-bio.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266 Tamura, Nagahama, Shiga 526-0829 (Japan)

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields}We demonstrate that two genes in the yeast GABA metabolism pathway affect aging. {yields} Deletion of the UGA1 or GAD1 genes extends replicative lifespan. {yields} Addition of GABA to wild-type cultures has no effect on lifespan. {yields} Intracellular GABA levels do not differ in longevity mutants and wild-type cells. {yields} Levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlate with lifespan. -- Abstract: Many of the genes involved in aging have been identified in organisms ranging from yeast to human. Our previous study showed that deletion of the UGA3 gene-which encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor necessary for {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-dependent induction of the UGA1 (GABA aminotransferase), UGA2 (succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase), and UGA4 (GABA permease) genes-extends replicative lifespan in the budding yeast Saccharomycescerevisiae. Here, we found that deletion of UGA1 lengthened the lifespan, as did deletion of UGA3; in contrast, strains with UGA2 or UGA4 deletions exhibited no lifespan extension. The {Delta}uga1 strain cannot deaminate GABA to succinate semialdehyde. Deletion of GAD1, which encodes the glutamate decarboxylase that converts glutamate into GABA, also increased lifespan. Therefore, two genes in the GABA metabolism pathway, UGA1 and GAD1, were identified as aging genes. Unexpectedly, intracellular GABA levels in mutant cells (except for {Delta}uga2 cells) did not differ from those in wild-type cells. Addition of GABA to culture media, which induces transcription of the UGA structural genes, had no effect on replicative lifespan of wild-type cells. Multivariate analysis of {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for the whole-cell metabolite levels demonstrated a separation between long-lived and normal-lived strains. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of identified metabolites showed that levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlated with lifespan

  6. GABA metabolism pathway genes, UGA1 and GAD1, regulate replicative lifespan in Saccharomycescerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: →We demonstrate that two genes in the yeast GABA metabolism pathway affect aging. → Deletion of the UGA1 or GAD1 genes extends replicative lifespan. → Addition of GABA to wild-type cultures has no effect on lifespan. → Intracellular GABA levels do not differ in longevity mutants and wild-type cells. → Levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlate with lifespan. -- Abstract: Many of the genes involved in aging have been identified in organisms ranging from yeast to human. Our previous study showed that deletion of the UGA3 gene-which encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor necessary for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-dependent induction of the UGA1 (GABA aminotransferase), UGA2 (succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase), and UGA4 (GABA permease) genes-extends replicative lifespan in the budding yeast Saccharomycescerevisiae. Here, we found that deletion of UGA1 lengthened the lifespan, as did deletion of UGA3; in contrast, strains with UGA2 or UGA4 deletions exhibited no lifespan extension. The Δuga1 strain cannot deaminate GABA to succinate semialdehyde. Deletion of GAD1, which encodes the glutamate decarboxylase that converts glutamate into GABA, also increased lifespan. Therefore, two genes in the GABA metabolism pathway, UGA1 and GAD1, were identified as aging genes. Unexpectedly, intracellular GABA levels in mutant cells (except for Δuga2 cells) did not differ from those in wild-type cells. Addition of GABA to culture media, which induces transcription of the UGA structural genes, had no effect on replicative lifespan of wild-type cells. Multivariate analysis of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for the whole-cell metabolite levels demonstrated a separation between long-lived and normal-lived strains. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of identified metabolites showed that levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlated with lifespan extension. These results strongly suggest

  7. Regulation of a Novel Acidithiobacillus caldus Gene Cluster Involved in Metabolism of Reduced Inorganic Sulfur Compounds▿

    OpenAIRE

    Rzhepishevska, Olena I.; Valdés, Jorge; Marcinkeviciene, Liucija; Gallardo, Camelia Algora; Meskys, Rolandas; Bonnefoy, Violaine; Holmes, David S.; Dopson, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Acidithiobacillus caldus has been proposed to play a role in the oxidation of reduced inorganic sulfur compounds (RISCs) produced in industrial biomining of sulfidic minerals. Here, we describe the regulation of a new cluster containing the gene encoding tetrathionate hydrolase (tetH), a key enzyme in the RISC metabolism of this bacterium. The cluster contains five cotranscribed genes, ISac1, rsrR, rsrS, tetH, and doxD, coding for a transposase, a two-component response regulator (RsrR and Rs...

  8. In situ gene expression in mixed-culture biofilms: Evidence of metabolic interactions between community members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Sternberg, Claus; Andersen, Jens Bo; Christensen, Bjarke Bak; Ramos, Juan L.; Givskov, Michael Christian; Molin, Søren

    1998-01-01

    Microbial communities growing in laboratory-based pow chambers were investigated in order to study compartmentalization of specific gene expression. Among the community members studied, the focus,vas in particular on Pseudomonas putida and a strain of an Acinetobacter sp., and the genes studied are...... both community and pure-culture biofilms, while the Pm promoter was induced in the mixed community but not in a pure-culture biofilm. By sequentially adding community members, induction of Pm was shown to be a consequence of direct metabolic interactions between an Acinetobacter species and P. putida...

  9. [Genetic Association of ADRA2A and ADRB3 Genes with Metabolic Syndrome among the Tatars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetova, O V; Viktorova, T V; Mustafina, O E; Karpov, A A; Khusnutdinova, E K

    2015-07-01

    An association study was performed for genetic polymorphisms in ADRB3 (rs4994) and ADRA2A (rs1800544, rs553668) genes to estimate their effect on quantitative parameters, including glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR index in women from the Tatar population of Russia. It has been shown that CT and CC are associated with metabolic syndrome and increased insulin. It was shown that ADRA2A (rs1800544) gene polymorphism was associated with high levels of insulin and an increased HOMA-IR index in GG- and GC-genotype carriers. PMID:26410938

  10. Binary gene expression patterning of the molt cycle: the case of chitin metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abehsera, Shai; Glazer, Lilah; Tynyakov, Jenny; Plaschkes, Inbar; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Khalaila, Isam; Aflalo, Eliahu D; Sagi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    In crustaceans, like all arthropods, growth is accompanied by a molting cycle. This cycle comprises major physiological events in which mineralized chitinous structures are built and degraded. These events are in turn governed by genes whose patterns of expression are presumably linked to the molting cycle. To study these genes we performed next generation sequencing and constructed a molt-related transcriptomic library from two exoskeletal-forming tissues of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, namely the gastrolith and the mandible cuticle-forming epithelium. To simplify the study of such a complex process as molting, a novel approach, binary patterning of gene expression, was employed. This approach revealed that key genes involved in the synthesis and breakdown of chitin exhibit a molt-related pattern in the gastrolith-forming epithelium. On the other hand, the same genes in the mandible cuticle-forming epithelium showed a molt-independent pattern of expression. Genes related to the metabolism of glucosamine-6-phosphate, a chitin precursor synthesized from simple sugars, showed a molt-related pattern of expression in both tissues. The binary patterning approach unfolds typical patterns of gene expression during the molt cycle of a crustacean. The use of such a simplifying integrative tool for assessing gene patterning seems appropriate for the study of complex biological processes. PMID:25919476

  11. Binary Gene Expression Patterning of the Molt Cycle: The Case of Chitin Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abehsera, Shai; Glazer, Lilah; Tynyakov, Jenny; Plaschkes, Inbar; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Khalaila, Isam; Aflalo, Eliahu D.; Sagi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    In crustaceans, like all arthropods, growth is accompanied by a molting cycle. This cycle comprises major physiological events in which mineralized chitinous structures are built and degraded. These events are in turn governed by genes whose patterns of expression are presumably linked to the molting cycle. To study these genes we performed next generation sequencing and constructed a molt-related transcriptomic library from two exoskeletal-forming tissues of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, namely the gastrolith and the mandible cuticle-forming epithelium. To simplify the study of such a complex process as molting, a novel approach, binary patterning of gene expression, was employed. This approach revealed that key genes involved in the synthesis and breakdown of chitin exhibit a molt-related pattern in the gastrolith-forming epithelium. On the other hand, the same genes in the mandible cuticle-forming epithelium showed a molt-independent pattern of expression. Genes related to the metabolism of glucosamine-6-phosphate, a chitin precursor synthesized from simple sugars, showed a molt-related pattern of expression in both tissues. The binary patterning approach unfolds typical patterns of gene expression during the molt cycle of a crustacean. The use of such a simplifying integrative tool for assessing gene patterning seems appropriate for the study of complex biological processes. PMID:25919476

  12. A virus-induced gene silencing approach to understanding alkaloid metabolism in Catharanthus roseus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liscombe, David K.; O’Connor, Sarah E.

    2011-01-01

    The anticancer agents vinblastine and vincristine are bisindole alkaloids derived from coupling vindoline and catharanthine, monoterpenoid indole alkaloids produced exclusively by Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) plants. Industrial production of vinblastine and vincristine currently relies on isolation from C. roseus leaves, a process that affords these compounds in 0.0003–0.01% yields. Metabolic engineering efforts to improve alkaloid content or provide alternative sources of the bisindole alkaloids ultimately rely on the isolation and characterization of the genes involved. Several vindoline biosynthetic genes have been isolated, and the cellular and subcellular organization of the corresponding enzymes has been well studied. However, due to the leaf-specific localization of vindoline biosynthesis, and the lack of production of this precursor in cell suspension and hairy root cultures of C. roseus, further elucidation of this pathway demands the development of reverse genetics approaches to assay gene function in planta. The bipartite pTRV vector system is a Tobacco Rattle Virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) platform that has provided efficient and effective means to assay gene function in diverse plant systems. We have developed a VIGS method to investigate gene function in C. roseus plants using the pTRV vector system. The utility of this approach in understanding gene function in C. roseus leaves is demonstrated by silencing known vindoline biosynthetic genes previously characterized in vitro. PMID:21802100

  13. Binary gene expression patterning of the molt cycle: the case of chitin metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shai Abehsera

    Full Text Available In crustaceans, like all arthropods, growth is accompanied by a molting cycle. This cycle comprises major physiological events in which mineralized chitinous structures are built and degraded. These events are in turn governed by genes whose patterns of expression are presumably linked to the molting cycle. To study these genes we performed next generation sequencing and constructed a molt-related transcriptomic library from two exoskeletal-forming tissues of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, namely the gastrolith and the mandible cuticle-forming epithelium. To simplify the study of such a complex process as molting, a novel approach, binary patterning of gene expression, was employed. This approach revealed that key genes involved in the synthesis and breakdown of chitin exhibit a molt-related pattern in the gastrolith-forming epithelium. On the other hand, the same genes in the mandible cuticle-forming epithelium showed a molt-independent pattern of expression. Genes related to the metabolism of glucosamine-6-phosphate, a chitin precursor synthesized from simple sugars, showed a molt-related pattern of expression in both tissues. The binary patterning approach unfolds typical patterns of gene expression during the molt cycle of a crustacean. The use of such a simplifying integrative tool for assessing gene patterning seems appropriate for the study of complex biological processes.

  14. Association of the ADRA1A gene and the severity of metabolic abnormalities in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chin; Chiu, Hsien-Jane; Loh, El-Wui; Chan, Chin-Hong; Hwu, Tzong-Ming; Liu, Yun-Ru; Lan, Tsuo-Hung

    2012-01-10

    Patients with schizophrenia have a higher risk of developing metabolic abnormalities and their associated diseases. Some studies found that the accumulative number of metabolic syndrome components was associated with the severity of metabolic abnormalities. The purpose of this study was to examine the roles of the ADRA1A, ADRA2A, ADRB3, and 5HT2A genes in the risk of having more severe metabolic abnormalities among patients with schizophrenia. We studied a sample of 232 chronic inpatients with schizophrenia (120 males and 112 females) to explore the associations between the four candidate genes and the severity of metabolic syndrome by accumulative number of the components. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms in the candidate genes were genotyped, including the Arg347Cys in ADRA1A, the C1291G in ADRA2A, the Try64Arg in ADRB3, and the T102C in 5HT2A. An association between the accumulative number of metabolic syndrome components and the ADRA1A gene was found after adjusting age, sex, and other related variables (p-value=0.036). Presence of the Arg347 allele in the ADRA1A gene is a risk factor for having more severe metabolic abnormalities. These findings suggest a medical attention of closely monitoring metabolic risks for schizophrenia patients with high-risk genotypes. PMID:22037178

  15. ALK7 Gene Polymorphism is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome Risk and Cardiovascular Remodeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenchao; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Wei [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Lv, Ruijuan [Department of Emergency, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Wang, Zhihao [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Department of Geriatrics, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Shang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yun; Zhong, Ming [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Chen, Yuguo; Tang, Mengxiong, E-mail: tangmengxiongsdu8@163.com [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Department of Emergency, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China)

    2013-08-15

    Activin receptor-like kinase 7 (ALK7) is a type I receptor for the TGF-β superfamily and has recently been demonstrated to play an important role in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis. To investigate the association of the ALK7 gene polymorphism with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular remodeling in MetS patients. The single nucleotide polymorphism rs13010956 in the ALK7 gene was genotyped in 351 Chinese subjects undergoing carotid and cardiac ultrasonography. The associations of the ALK7 gene polymorphism with the MetS phenotype, MetS parameters, and cardiovascular ultrasonic features were analyzed. The rs13010956 polymorphism in the ALK7 gene was found to be significantly associated with the MetS phenotype in females (p < 0.05) and was also significantly associated with blood pressure in the total (p < 0.05) and female populations (p < 0.01). Further analysis revealed that rs13010956 was associated with mean intima-media thickness of the carotid arteries in females (p < 0.05). After control for body mass index, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, and triglycerides, rs13010956 was also found to be significantly associated with left ventricular mass index in the total (p < 0.05) and female populations (p < 0.05). Our findings suggested that the ALK7 gene polymorphism rs13010956 was significantly associated with MetS risk in females and may be involved in cardiovascular remodeling in MetS patients.

  16. Population analysis of xenobiotic metabolizing genes in South Brazilian Euro and Afro-descendants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Euzébio Maciel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Individual variability in xenobiotic metabolism has been associated with susceptibility to developing complex diseases. Genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism have been evaluated in association studies; the difficulty of obtaining accurate gene frequencies in mixed populations makes interpretation of the results difficult. We sought to estimate population parameters for the cytochrome P450 and glutathione S-transferase gene families, thus contributing to studies using these genes as markers. We describe the frequencies of six genes (CYP1A1, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 and estimate population parameters in 115 Euro-descendants and 196 Afro-descendants from Curitiba, South of Brazil. PCR-based methods were used for genotyping, and statistical analysis were performed by AMOVA with ARLEQUIN software. The mutant allele frequencies in the Afro-descendants and Euro-descendants, respectively, were: CYP1A1*2A = 30.1% and 15.2%; CYP2D6*4 = 14.5% and 21.5%; CYP2E1*5B = 7.9% and 5%; GSTP1*B = 37.8% and 28.3%. The null genotype frequencies were: GSTM1*0 = 36.8% and 46.1%; GSTT1*0 = 24.2% and 17.4%.

  17. ALK7 Gene Polymorphism is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome Risk and Cardiovascular Remodeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activin receptor-like kinase 7 (ALK7) is a type I receptor for the TGF-β superfamily and has recently been demonstrated to play an important role in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis. To investigate the association of the ALK7 gene polymorphism with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular remodeling in MetS patients. The single nucleotide polymorphism rs13010956 in the ALK7 gene was genotyped in 351 Chinese subjects undergoing carotid and cardiac ultrasonography. The associations of the ALK7 gene polymorphism with the MetS phenotype, MetS parameters, and cardiovascular ultrasonic features were analyzed. The rs13010956 polymorphism in the ALK7 gene was found to be significantly associated with the MetS phenotype in females (p < 0.05) and was also significantly associated with blood pressure in the total (p < 0.05) and female populations (p < 0.01). Further analysis revealed that rs13010956 was associated with mean intima-media thickness of the carotid arteries in females (p < 0.05). After control for body mass index, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, and triglycerides, rs13010956 was also found to be significantly associated with left ventricular mass index in the total (p < 0.05) and female populations (p < 0.05). Our findings suggested that the ALK7 gene polymorphism rs13010956 was significantly associated with MetS risk in females and may be involved in cardiovascular remodeling in MetS patients

  18. Functional Operons in Secondary Metabolic Gene Clusters in Glarea lozoyensis (Fungi, Ascomycota, Leotiomycetes)

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Qun; Chen, Li; Li, Yan; Bills, Gerald F.; Zhang, Xinyu; Xiang, Meichun; LI, SHAOJIE; Che, Yongsheng; Wang, Chengshu; Niu, Xuemei; An, Zhiqiang; Liu, Xingzhong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Operons are multigene transcriptional units which occur mostly in prokaryotes but rarely in eukaryotes. Protein-coding operons have not been reported in the Fungi even though they represent a very diverse kingdom of organisms. Here, we report a functional operon involved in the secondary metabolism of the fungus Glarea lozoyensis belonging to Leotiomycetes (Ascomycota). Two contiguous genes, glpks3 and glnrps7, encoding polyketide synthase and nonribosomal peptide synthetase, respect...

  19. Adaptive evolution of energy metabolism genes and the origin of flight in bats

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Yong-Yi; Liang, Lu; Zhu, Zhou-Hai; Zhou, Wei-Ping; David M. Irwin; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Bat flight poses intriguing questions about how flight independently developed in mammals. Flight is among the most energy-consuming activities. Thus, we deduced that changes in energy metabolism must be a primary factor in the origin of flight in bats. The respiratory chain of the mitochondrial produces 95% of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) needed for locomotion. Because the respiratory chain has a dual genetic foundation, with genes encoded by both the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, w...

  20. Heritable Transmission of Diabetic Metabolic Memory in Zebrafish Correlates With DNA Hypomethylation and Aberrant Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, Ansgar S.; Sarras, Michael P.; LEONTOVICH, ALEXEY; Intine, Robert V.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic memory (MM) is the phenomenon whereby diabetes complications persist and progress after glycemic recovery is achieved. Here, we present data showing that MM is heritable and that the transmission correlates with hyperglycemia-induced DNA hypomethylation and aberrant gene expression. Streptozocin was used to induce hyperglycemia in adult zebrafish, and then, following streptozocin withdrawal, a recovery phase was allowed to reestablish a euglycemic state. Blood glucose and serum insu...

  1. Protective effect of myostatin gene deletion on aging-related muscle metabolic decline

    OpenAIRE

    Chabi, Beatrice; Pauly, Marion; Carillon, Julie; Carnac, Gilles; Favier, François; Fouret, Gilles; Bonafos, Béatrice; Vanterpool, Frankie; Vernus, Barbara,; Coudray, Charles; Feillet Coudray, Christine; Bonnieu, Anne; Lacan, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    While myostatin gene deletion is a promising therapy to fight muscle loss during aging, this approach induces also skeletal muscle metabolic changes such as mitochondrial deficits, redox alteration and increased fatigability. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of aging on these features in aged wild-type (WT) and mstn knockout (KO) mice. Moreover, to determine whether an enriched-antioxidant diet may be useful to prevent agerelated disorders, we orally administered to the...

  2. FSH and bFGF regulate the expression of genes involved in Sertoli cell energetic metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueira, Mariana; Riera, María Fernanda; Galardo, María Noel; Camberos, María Del Carmen; Pellizzari, Eliana Herminia; Cigorraga, Selva Beatriz; Meroni, Silvina Beatriz

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if FSH and bFGF regulate fatty acid (FA) metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis in Sertoli cells (SC). SC cultures obtained from 20-day-old rats were incubated with 100ng/ml FSH or 30ng/ml bFGF for 6, 12, 24 and 48h. The expression of genes involved in transport and metabolism of FA such as: fatty acid transporter CD36 (FAT/CD36), carnitine-palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), long- and medium-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenases (LCAD, MCAD), and of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis such as: nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 (NRF1, NRF2) and transcription factor A (Tfam), was analyzed. FSH stimulated FAT/CD36, CPT1, MCAD, NRF1, NRF2 and Tfam mRNA levels while bFGF only stimulated CPT1 expression. A possible participation of PPARβ/δ activation in the regulation of gene expression and lactate production was then evaluated. SC cultures were incubated with FSH or bFGF in the presence of the PPARβ/δ antagonist GSK3787 (GSK; 20μM). bFGF stimulation of CPT1 expression and lactate production were inhibited by GSK. On the other hand, FSH effects were not inhibited by GSK indicating that FSH regulates the expression of genes involved in FA transport and metabolism and in mitochondrial biogenesis, independently of PPARβ/δ activation. FA oxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis as well as lactate production are essential for the energetic metabolism of the seminiferous tubule. The fact that these processes are regulated by hormones in a different way reflects the multifarious regulation of molecular mechanisms involved in Sertoli cell function. PMID:26315388

  3. Genetic Analysis of Candidate Genes for the Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Grallert, Harald

    2008-01-01

    This work investigated genetic susceptibility for type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in several study designs. 31 DNA variants from 7 candidate genes involved in development of these diseases were analyzed for associations with the diseases or related parameters. Single nucleotide polymorphisms were genotyped using MALDI-TOF MS and statistically analyzed. The obtained associations are the basis for further functional studies, which will provide deeper insight in the etiology of...

  4. Conservation of lipid metabolic gene transcriptional regulatory networks in fish and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Antoñanzas, Greta; Tocher, Douglas R; Martinez-Rubio, Laura; Leaver, Michael J

    2014-01-15

    Lipid content and composition in aquafeeds have changed rapidly as a result of the recent drive to replace ecologically limited marine ingredients, fishmeal and fish oil (FO). Terrestrial plant products are the most economic and sustainable alternative; however, plant meals and oils are devoid of physiologically important cholesterol and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), docosahexaenoic (DHA) and arachidonic (ARA) acids. Although replacement of dietary FO with vegetable oil (VO) has little effect on growth in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), several studies have shown major effects on the activity and expression of genes involved in lipid homeostasis. In vertebrates, sterols and LC-PUFA play crucial roles in lipid metabolism by direct interaction with lipid-sensing transcription factors (TFs) and consequent regulation of target genes. The primary aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of key TFs in the transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism in fish by transfection and overexpression of TFs. The results show that the expression of genes of LC-PUFA biosynthesis (elovl and fads2) and cholesterol metabolism (abca1) are regulated by Lxr and Srebp TFs in salmon, indicating highly conserved regulatory mechanism across vertebrates. In addition, srebp1 and srebp2 mRNA respond to replacement of dietary FO with VO. Thus, Atlantic salmon adjust lipid metabolism in response to dietary lipid composition through the transcriptional regulation of gene expression. It may be possible to further increase efficient and effective use of sustainable alternatives to marine products in aquaculture by considering these important molecular interactions when formulating diets. PMID:24177230

  5. Functional analyses of a flavonol synthase - like gene from Camellia nitidissima reveal its roles in flavonoid metabolism during floral pigmentation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xing-Wen Zhou; Zheng-Qi Fan; Yue Chen; Yu-Lin Zhu; Ji-Yuan Li; Heng-Fu Yin

    2013-09-01

    The flavonoids metabolic pathway plays central roles in floral coloration, in which anthocyanins and flavonols are derived from common precursors, dihydroflavonols. Flavonol synthase (FLS) catalyses dihydroflavonols into flavonols, which presents a key branch of anthocyanins biosynthesis. The yellow flower of Camellia nitidissima Chi. is a unique feature within the genus Camellia, which makes it a precious resource for breeding yellow camellia varieties. In this work, we characterized the secondary metabolites of pigments during floral development of C. nitidissima and revealed that accumulation of flavonols correlates with floral coloration. We first isolated CnFLS1 and showed that it is a FLS of C. nitidissima by gene family analysis. Second, expression analysis during floral development and different floral organs indicated that the expression level of CnFLS1 was regulated by developmental cues, which was in agreement with the accumulating pattern of flavonols. Furthermore, over-expression of CnFLS1 in Nicotiana tabacum altered floral colour into white or light yellow, and metabolic analysis showed significant increasing of flavonols and reducing of anthocyanins in transgenic plants. Our work suggested CnFLS1 plays critical roles in yellow colour pigmentation and is potentially a key point of genetic engineering toward colour modification in Camellia.

  6. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a particular food provides to the body. A chocolate bar has more calories than an apple, so ... More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Endocrine System Blood ...

  7. Flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in the Fe(III)-reducing organism Geobacter metallireducens via 13C isotopiclabeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Chakraborty, Romy; Martin, Hector Garcia; Chu,Jeannie; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-08-13

    We analyzed the carbon fluxes in the central metabolism ofGeobacter metallireducens strain GS-15 using 13C isotopomer modeling.Acetate labeled in the 1st or 2nd position was the sole carbon source,and Fe-NTA was the sole terminal electron acceptor. The measured labeledacetate uptake rate was 21 mmol/gdw/h in the exponential growth phase.The resulting isotope labeling pattern of amino acids allowed an accuratedetermination of the in vivo global metabolic reaction rates (fluxes)through the central metabolic pathways using a computational isotopomermodel. The model indicated that over 90 percent of the acetate wascompletely oxidized to CO2 via a complete tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cyclewhile reducing iron. Pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxykinase were present under these conditions, but enzymes in theglyoxylate shunt and malic enzyme were absent. Gluconeogenesis and thepentose phosphate pathway were mainly employed for biosynthesis andaccounted for less than 3 percent of total carbon consumption. The modelalso indicated surprisingly high reversibility in the reaction betweenoxoglutarate and succinate. This step operates close to the thermodynamicequilibrium possibly because succinate is synthesized via a transferasereaction, and its product, acetyl-CoA, inhibits the conversion ofoxoglutarate to succinate. These findings enable a better understandingof the relationship between genome annotation and extant metabolicpathways in G. metallireducens.

  8. Central and Metabolic Effects of High Fructose Consumption: Evidence from Animal and Human Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra Stoianov; Khosrow Adeli

    2014-01-01

    Fructose consumption has increased dramatically in the last 40 years, and its role in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome has been implicated by many studies. It is most often encountered in the diet as sucrose (glucose and fructose) or high-fructose corn syrup (55% fructose). At high levels, dietary exposure to fructose triggers a series of metabolic changes originating in the liver, leading to hepatic steatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance, and decreased leptin sensitivi...

  9. Central nervous system: a conductor orchestrating metabolic regulations harmed by both hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Scheen, André

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the brain has a key role in the control of energy metabolism, body fat content and glucose metabolism. Neuronal systems, which regulate energy intake, energy expenditure, and endogenous glucose production, sense and respond to input from hormonal and nutrient-related signals that convey information regarding both body energy stores and current energy availability. In response to this input, adaptive changes occur that promote energy homeostasis and the maintenanc...

  10. PPARγ regulates the expression of cholesterol metabolism genes in alveolar macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear transcription factor involved in lipid metabolism that is constitutively expressed in the alveolar macrophages of healthy individuals. PPARγ has recently been implicated in the catabolism of surfactant by alveolar macrophages, specifically the cholesterol component of surfactant while the mechanism remains unclear. Studies from other tissue macrophages have shown that PPARγ regulates cholesterol influx, efflux, and metabolism. PPARγ promotes cholesterol efflux through the liver X receptor-alpha (LXRα) and ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1). We have recently shown that macrophage-specific PPARγ knockout (PPARγ KO) mice accumulate cholesterol-laden alveolar macrophages that exhibit decreased expression of LXRα and ABCG1 and reduced cholesterol efflux. We hypothesized that in addition to the dysregulation of these cholesterol efflux genes, the expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis and influx was also dysregulated and that replacement of PPARγ would restore regulation of these genes. To investigate this hypothesis, we have utilized a Lentivirus expression system (Lenti-PPARγ) to restore PPARγ expression in the alveolar macrophages of PPARγ KO mice. Our results show that the alveolar macrophages of PPARγ KO mice have decreased expression of key cholesterol synthesis genes and increased expression of cholesterol receptors CD36 and scavenger receptor A-I (SRA-I). The replacement of PPARγ (1) induced transcription of LXRα and ABCG1; (2) corrected suppressed expression of cholesterol synthesis genes; and (3) enhanced the expression of scavenger receptors CD36. These results suggest that PPARγ regulates cholesterol metabolism in alveolar macrophages.

  11. ColoLipidGene: signature of lipid metabolism-related genes to predict prognosis in stage-II colon cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Teodoro; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Herranz, Jesús; Cejas, Paloma; Molina, Susana; González-Vallinas, Margarita; Mendiola, Marta; Burgos, Emilio; Aguayo, Cristina; Custodio, Ana B.; Machado, Isidro; Ramos, David; Gironella, Meritxell; Espinosa-Salinas, Isabel; Ramos, Ricardo; Martín-Hernández, Roberto; Risueño, Alberto; De Las Rivas, Javier; Reglero, Guillermo; Yaya, Ricardo; Fernández-Martos, Carlos; Aparicio, Jorge; Maurel, Joan; Feliu, Jaime; de Molina, Ana Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism plays an essential role in carcinogenesis due to the requirements of tumoral cells to sustain increased structural, energetic and biosynthetic precursor demands for cell proliferation. We investigated the association between expression of lipid metabolism-related genes and clinical outcome in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients with the aim of identifying a metabolic profile associated with greater malignancy and increased risk of relapse. Expression profile of 70 lipid metabolism-related genes was determined in 77 patients with stage II colon cancer. Cox regression analyses using c-index methodology was applied to identify a metabolic-related signature associated to prognosis. The metabolic signature was further confirmed in two independent validation sets of 120 patients and additionally, in a group of 264 patients from a public database. The combined analysis of these 4 genes, ABCA1, ACSL1, AGPAT1 and SCD, constitutes a metabolic-signature (ColoLipidGene) able to accurately stratify stage II colon cancer patients with 5-fold higher risk of relapse with strong statistical power in the four independent groups of patients. The identification of a group of 4 genes that predict survival in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients allows delineation of a high-risk group that may benefit from adjuvant therapy, and avoids the toxic and unnecessary chemotherapy in patients classified as low-risk group. PMID:25749516

  12. Subchronic effects of valproic acid on gene expression profiles for lipid metabolism in mouse liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valproic acid (VPA) is used clinically to treat epilepsy, however it induces hepatotoxicity such as microvesicular steatosis. Acute hepatotoxicity of VPA has been well documented by biochemical studies and microarray analysis, but little is known about the chronic effects of VPA in the liver. In the present investigation, we profiled gene expression patterns in the mouse liver after subchronic treatment with VPA. VPA was administered orally at a dose of 100 mg/kg/day or 500 mg/kg/day to ICR mice, and the livers were obtained after 1, 2, or 4 weeks. The activities of serum liver enzymes did not change, whereas triglyceride concentration increased significantly. Microarray analysis revealed that 1325 genes of a set of 32,996 individual genes were VPA responsive when examined by two-way ANOVA (P 1.5). Consistent with our previous results obtained using an acute VPA exposure model (Lee et al., Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 220:45-59, 2007), the most significantly over-represented biological terms for these genes included lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism. Biological pathway analysis suggests that the genes responsible for increased biosynthesis of cholesterol and triglyceride, and for decreased fatty acid β-oxidation contribute to the abnormalities in lipid metabolism induced by subchronic VPA treatment. A comparison of the VPA-responsive genes in the acute and subchronic models extracted 15 commonly altered genes, such as Cyp4a14 and Adpn, which may have predictive power to distinguish the mode of action of hepatotoxicants. Our data provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of VPA-induced hepatotoxicity and useful information to predict steatogenic hepatotoxicity

  13. Genes related to antioxidant metabolism are involved in Methylobacterium mesophilicum-soybean interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Welington Luiz; Santos, Daiene Souza; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Salgueiro-Londoño, Jennifer Katherine; Camargo-Neves, Aline Aparecida; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega

    2015-10-01

    The genus Methylobacterium is composed of pink-pigmented methylotrophic bacterial species that are widespread in natural environments, such as soils, stream water and plants. When in association with plants, this genus colonizes the host plant epiphytically and/or endophytically. This association is known to promote plant growth, induce plant systemic resistance and inhibit plant infection by phytopathogens. In the present study, we focused on evaluating the colonization of soybean seedling-roots by Methylobacterium mesophilicum strain SR1.6/6. We focused on the identification of the key genes involved in the initial step of soybean colonization by methylotrophic bacteria, which includes the plant exudate recognition and adaptation by planktonic bacteria. Visualization by scanning electron microscopy revealed that M. mesophilicum SR1.6/6 colonizes soybean roots surface effectively at 48 h after inoculation, suggesting a mechanism for root recognition and adaptation before this period. The colonization proceeds by the development of a mature biofilm on roots at 96 h after inoculation. Transcriptomic analysis of the planktonic bacteria (with plant) revealed the expression of several genes involved in membrane transport, thus confirming an initial metabolic activation of bacterial responses when in the presence of plant root exudates. Moreover, antioxidant genes were mostly expressed during the interaction with the plant exudates. Further evaluation of stress- and methylotrophic-related genes expression by qPCR showed that glutathione peroxidase and glutathione synthetase genes were up-regulated during the Methylobacterium-soybean interaction. These findings support that glutathione (GSH) is potentially a key molecule involved in cellular detoxification during plant root colonization. In addition to methylotrophic metabolism, antioxidant genes, mainly glutathione-related genes, play a key role during soybean exudate recognition and adaptation, the first step in

  14. Genes associated to lactose metabolism illustrate the high diversity of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandar, Christelle F; Cailliez-Grimal, Catherine; Rahman, Abdur; Rondags, Emmanuel; Remenant, Benoît; Zagorec, Monique; Leisner, Jorgen J; Borges, Frédéric; Revol-Junelles, Anne-Marie

    2016-09-01

    The dairy population of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum is characterized by a high diversity suggesting a high diversity of the genetic traits linked to the dairy process. As lactose is the main carbon source in milk, the genetics of lactose metabolism was investigated in this LAB. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that the species C. maltaromaticum exhibits genes related to the Leloir and the tagatose-6-phosphate (Tagatose-6P) pathways. More precisely, strains can bear genes related to one or both pathways and several strains apparently do not contain homologs related to these pathways. Analysis at the population scale revealed that the Tagatose-6P and the Leloir encoding genes are disseminated in multiple phylogenetic lineages of C. maltaromaticum: genes of the Tagatose-6P pathway are present in the lineages I, II and III, and genes of the Leloir pathway are present in the lineages I, III and IV. These data suggest that these genes evolved thanks to horizontal transfer, genetic duplication and translocation. We hypothesize that the lac and gal genes evolved in C. maltaromaticum according to a complex scenario that mirrors the high population diversity. PMID:27217362

  15. The association of polymorphisms in 5-fluorouracil metabolism genes with outcome in adjuvant treatment of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shoaib, Afzal; Gusella, Milena; Jensen, Søren Astrup;

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether specific combinations of polymorphisms in 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) metabolism-related genes were associated with outcome in 5-FU-based adjuvant treatment of colorectal cancer....

  16. Glutamate metabolism of astrocytes during hyperbaric oxygen exposure and its effects on central nervous system oxygen toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Liang; Li, Dan; Wang, Zhong-Zhuang; Xu, Wei-Gang; Li, Run-Ping; Zhang, Jun-Dong

    2016-01-20

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) has been used widely in many underwater missions and clinical work. However, exposure to extremely high oxygen pressure may cause central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT). The regulation of astrocyte glutamate metabolism is closely related to epilepsy. This study aimed to observe the effects of HBO exposure on glutamate metabolism in astrocytes and confirm the role of glutamate metabolism in CNS-OT. Anesthetized rats were exposed to 5 atmosphere absolute HBO for 80 min and microdialysis samples of brain interstitial fluid were continuously collected. Extracellular glutamate and glutamine concentrations were also detected. Freely moving rats were exposed to HBO of the same pressure for 20 min and glutamine synthetase (GS) activity in brain tissues was measured. Finally, we observed the effects of different doses of drugs related to glutamate metabolism on the latency of CNS-OT. Results showed that HBO exposure significantly increased glutamate content, whereas glutamine content was significantly reduced. Moreover, HBO exposure significantly reduced GS activity. Glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) selective antagonist ceftriaxone prolonged CNS-OT latency, whereas GLT-1 selective inhibitor dihydrokainate shortened CNS-OT latency. In summary, HBO exposure improved glutamate concentration and reduced glutamine concentration by inhibition of GS activity. GLT-1 activation also participated in the prevention of HBO-induced CNS-OT. Our research will provide a potential new target to terminate or attenuate CNS-OT. PMID:26619231

  17. Central nervous system gene expression changes in a transgenic mouse model for bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tortosa Raül

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gene expression analysis has proven to be a very useful tool to gain knowledge of the factors involved in the pathogenesis of diseases, particularly in the initial or preclinical stages. With the aim of finding new data on the events occurring in the Central Nervous System in animals affected with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, a comprehensive genome wide gene expression study was conducted at different time points of the disease on mice genetically modified to model the bovine species brain in terms of cellular prion protein. An accurate analysis of the information generated by microarray technique was the key point to assess the biological relevance of the data obtained in terms of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy pathogenesis. Validation of the microarray technique was achieved by RT-PCR confirming the RNA change and immunohistochemistry techniques that verified that expression changes were translated into variable levels of protein for selected genes. Our study reveals changes in the expression of genes, some of them not previously associated with prion diseases, at early stages of the disease previous to the detection of the pathological prion protein, that might have a role in neuronal degeneration and several transcriptional changes showing an important imbalance in the Central Nervous System homeostasis in advanced stages of the disease. Genes whose expression is altered at early stages of the disease should be considered as possible therapeutic targets and potential disease markers in preclinical diagnostic tool development. Genes non-previously related to prion diseases should be taken into consideration for further investigations.

  18. Metabolomic and Gene Expression Profiles Exhibit Modular Genetic and Dietary Structure Linking Metabolic Syndrome Phenotypes in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephanie; Dew-Budd, Kelly; Davis, Kristen; Anderson, Julie; Bishop, Ruth; Freeman, Kenda; Davis, Dana; Bray, Katherine; Perkins, Lauren; Hubickey, Joana; Reed, Laura K

    2015-12-01

    Genetic and environmental factors influence complex disease in humans, such as metabolic syndrome, and Drosophila melanogaster serves as an excellent model in which to test these factors experimentally. Here we explore the modularity of endophenotypes with an in-depth reanalysis of a previous study by Reed et al. (2014), where we raised 20 wild-type genetic lines of Drosophila larvae on four diets and measured gross phenotypes of body weight, total sugar, and total triglycerides, as well as the endophenotypes of metabolomic and whole-genome expression profiles. We then perform new gene expression experiments to test for conservation of phenotype-expression correlations across different diets and populations. We find that transcript levels correlated with gross phenotypes were enriched for puparial adhesion, metamorphosis, and central energy metabolism functions. The specific metabolites L-DOPA and N-arachidonoyl dopamine make physiological links between the gross phenotypes across diets, whereas leucine and isoleucine thus exhibit genotype-by-diet interactions. Between diets, we find low conservation of the endophenotypes that correlate with the gross phenotypes. Through the follow-up expression study, we found that transcript-trait correlations are well conserved across populations raised on a familiar diet, but on a novel diet, the transcript-trait correlations are no longer conserved. Thus, physiological canalization of metabolic phenotypes breaks down in a novel environment exposing cryptic variation. We cannot predict the physiological basis of disease in a perturbing environment from profiles observed in the ancestral environment. This study demonstrates that variation for disease traits within a population is acquired through a multitude of physiological mechanisms, some of which transcend genetic and environmental influences, and others that are specific to an individual's genetic and environmental context. PMID:26530416

  19. Leptin receptor and ghrelin genes polymorphisms in relation to the metabolism of lipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Trakovická

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to analyse genetic polymorphisms in genes encoding leptin receptor (LEPR and ghrelin (GHR as genetic markers of metabolic disorders in human nutrition. Genomic DNA was obtained from in total 84 human blood samples. Effect of analysed genetic markers was evaluated for three biochemical parameters: total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol. The PCR-RFLP method was used for identification of SNPs in LEPR (Gln223Arg and GHR (171T/C genes. In analysed population prevalence of heterozygous LEPRAG (47.62% and GHRCT (40.48% genotypes was observed. Frequency of LEPRA and LEPRB alleles were 0.55 and 0.45, respectively. Similar the GHRC allele had only slight predominance than GHRT allele (0.54/0.46. In population was found higher level of observed heterozygosity across loci (0.44. For both SNPs was found high effective allele number (1.98 which was also transferred to the median level of polymorphic information content (0.37. Association analysis of LEPR and GHR genotypes effect on selected biochemical parameters was performed using GLM procedure. Significant association was found only for levels of LDL cholesterol (P<0.01. Our study shows that both genes are involved in nutritional status and therefore can be considered as candidate genes of lipids metabolism disorders and obesity.

  20. Expression profiling of Crambe abyssinica under arsenate stress identifies genes and gene networks involved in arsenic metabolism and detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandasamy Suganthi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic contamination is widespread throughout the world and this toxic metalloid is known to cause cancers of organs such as liver, kidney, skin, and lung in human. In spite of a recent surge in arsenic related studies, we are still far from a comprehensive understanding of arsenic uptake, detoxification, and sequestration in plants. Crambe abyssinica, commonly known as 'abyssinian mustard', is a non-food, high biomass oil seed crop that is naturally tolerant to heavy metals. Moreover, it accumulates significantly higher levels of arsenic as compared to other species of the Brassicaceae family. Thus, C. abyssinica has great potential to be utilized as an ideal inedible crop for phytoremediation of heavy metals and metalloids. However, the mechanism of arsenic metabolism in higher plants, including C. abyssinica, remains elusive. Results To identify the differentially expressed transcripts and the pathways involved in arsenic metabolism and detoxification, C. abyssinica plants were subjected to arsenate stress and a PCR-Select Suppression Subtraction Hybridization (SSH approach was employed. A total of 105 differentially expressed subtracted cDNAs were sequenced which were found to represent 38 genes. Those genes encode proteins functioning as antioxidants, metal transporters, reductases, enzymes involved in the protein degradation pathway, and several novel uncharacterized proteins. The transcripts corresponding to the subtracted cDNAs showed strong upregulation by arsenate stress as confirmed by the semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusions Our study revealed novel insights into the plant defense mechanisms and the regulation of genes and gene networks in response to arsenate toxicity. The differential expression of transcripts encoding glutathione-S-transferases, antioxidants, sulfur metabolism, heat-shock proteins, metal transporters, and enzymes in the ubiquitination pathway of protein degradation as well as several unknown

  1. Self-mobilization and organization of the genes encoding the toluene metabolic pathway of Pseudomonas mendocina KR1.

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, A; Olsen, R. H.

    1994-01-01

    The toluene metabolic pathway of Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 is chromosomally encoded, but the pathway could be transferred by conjugation from strain KR1 to the chromosome of P. aeruginosa or P. putida. Such transconjugants utilized toluene, p-cresol, and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde. However, transconjugants were unable to further transfer toluene genes to other recipients unless Pseudomonas sex factor R68.45 was present in trans. Although the genes encoding the upper pathway for toluene metabolism ...

  2. Resistin gene polymorphisms are associated with acne and serum lipid levels, providing a potential nexus between lipid metabolism and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Sidra; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Javed, Qamar

    2016-05-01

    Acne vu lgaris is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease causing social stigma and psychological effect on patients. We hypothesized that the genes that can affect both lipid metabolism and inflammation may be central for acne formation and present targets for treatment. Pro-inflammatory adipokine resistin, one such likely target, activates NFkB and JNK pathways inducing TLR-2, IL-1, IL-6, and TNFα genes. The polymorphisms in promoter and intron region of the resistin gene affect its expression levels. Therefore, we explored the association of resistin polymorphisms (RETN +299G > A and -420C > G) with pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. We used PCR-RFLP method to genotype at the two single nucleotide polymorphisms at RETN promoter in 530 acne patients vs. 550 age- and sex-matched control subjects. We also measured serum lipid levels in acne patients and associated these with RETN genotypes. We found that the RETN gene polymorphisms are strongly associated with acne vulgaris and the severity of acne symptoms. In females the variant allele frequencies of both SNPs are statistically higher in patients than in controls; in males frequency distribution does not reach significance. The haplotype containing both variant alleles is significantly more common in patients than in controls. We find no association of RETN SNPs with the acne types. Importantly, we found that the levels of HDL-C were significantly decreased in variant genotype of RETN. Our results show that the RETN polymorphisms expected to boost resistin expression increase the risk of developing acne. We suggest that resistin may provide an attractive target for treatment. PMID:26858108

  3. Regulation of the cell cycle via mitochondrial gene expression and energy metabolism in HeLa cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Xiong; Yang Jiao; Weiwei Huang; Mingxing Ma; Min Yu; Qinghua Cui; Deyong Tan

    2012-01-01

    Human cervical cancer HeLa cells have functional mitochondria.Recent studies have suggested that mitochondrial metabolism plays an essential role in tumor cell proliferation.Nevertheless,how cells coordinate mitochondrial dynamics and cell cycle progression remains to be clarified.To investigate the relationship between mitochondrial function and cell cycle regulation,the mitochondrial gene expression profile and cellular ATP levels were determined by cell cycle progress analysis in the present study.HeLa cells were synchronized in the G0/G1 phase by serum starvation,and re-entered cell cycle by restoring serum culture,time course experiment was performed to analyze the expression of mitochondrial transcription regulators and mitochondrial genes,mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP),cellular ATP levels,and cell cycle progression.The results showed that when arrested G0/G1 cells were stimulated in serum-containing medium,the amount of DNA and the expression levels of both mRNA and proteins in mitochondria started to increase at 2 h time point,whereas the MMP and ATP level elevated at 4 h.Furthermore,the cyclin D1 expression began to increase at 4 h after serum triggered cell cycle.ATP synthesis inhibitor-oligomycintreatment suppressed the cyclin D1 and cyclin B1 expression levels and blocked cell cycle progression.Taken together,our results suggested that increased mitochondrial gene expression levels,oxidative phosphorylation activation,and cellular ATP content increase are important events for triggering cell cycle.Finally,we demonstrated that mitochondrial gene expression levels and cellular ATP content are tightly regulated and might play a central role in regulating cell proliferation.

  4. Toxicogenomic Analysis Suggests Chemical-Induced Sexual Dimorphism in the Expression of Metabolic Genes in Zebrafish Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Xun Zhang; Choong Yong Ung; Siew Hong Lam; Jing Ma; Yu Zong Chen; Louxin Zhang; Zhiyuan Gong; Baowen Li

    2012-01-01

    Differential gene expression in two sexes is widespread throughout the animal kingdom, giving rise to sex-dimorphic gene activities and sex-dependent adaptability to environmental cues, diets, growth and development as well as susceptibility to diseases. Here, we present a study using a toxicogenomic approach to investigate metabolic genes that show sex-dimorphic expression in the zebrafish liver triggered by several chemicals. Our analysis revealed that, besides the known genes for xenobioti...

  5. The association between HTR2C gene polymorphisms and the metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Hans; Franke, Barbara; van der-Beek van der, Annemarie Aart; Arends, Johan; Wilmink, Frederik W; Scheffer, Hans; Egberts, Antoine C G

    2007-08-01

    The use of antipsychotics is associated with metabolic side effects, which put patients with schizophrenia or related disorders at risk for cardiovascular morbidity. The high interindividual variability in antipsychotic-induced metabolic abnormalities suggests that genetic makeup is a possible determinant. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated whether genotypes of the HTR2C receptor are associated with the metabolic syndrome in patients using antipsychotics. Patients were identified from a schizophrenia disease management program. In this program, patients' blood pressure, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and waist circumference are measured regularly during follow-up. The primary end point of our study was the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome as classified by a modified version of the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III. Primary determinants were polymorphisms in the HTR2C receptor gene (HTR2C:c.1-142948[GT]n, rs3813928 [-997 G/A], rs3813929 [-759 C/T], rs518147 [-697 G/C], and rs1414334 [C > G]). The included patients (n = 112) mainly (>80%) used atypical antipsychotics (clozapine, olanzapine, and risperidone). Carriership of the variant alleles of the HTR2C polymorphisms rs518147, rs1414334, and HTR2C:c.1-142948(GT)n was associated with an increased risk of the metabolic syndrome (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 2.62 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.00-6.85]; OR, 4.09 [95% CI, 1.41-11.89]; and OR, 3.12 [95% CI, 1.13-8.16]), respectively. Our findings suggest that HTR2C genotypes are associated with antincreased risk of metabolic syndrome in patients taking antipsychotics. PMID:17632216

  6. Interleukin-17A Differentially Induces Inflammatory and Metabolic Gene Expression in the Adipose Tissues of Lean and Obese Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yine Qu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The functions of interleukin-17A (IL-17A in adipose tissues and adipocytes have not been well understood. In the present study, male mice were fed with a regular diet (n = 6, lean mice or a high-fat diet (n = 6, obese mice for 30 weeks. Subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT and visceral adipose tissue (VAT were analyzed for IL-17A levels. SAT and VAT were treated with IL-17A and analyzed for inflammatory and metabolic gene expression. Mouse 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes were differentiated into adipocytes, followed with IL-17A treatment and analysis for inflammatory and metabolic gene expression. We found that IL-17A levels were higher in obese SAT than lean SAT; the basal expression of inflammatory and metabolic genes was different between SAT and VAT and between lean and obese adipose tissues. IL-17A differentially induced expression of inflammatory and metabolic genes, such as tumor necrosis factor α, Il-6, Il-1β, leptin, and glucose transporter 4, in adipose tissues of lean and obese mice. IL-17A also differentially induced expression of inflammatory and metabolic genes in pre-adipocytes and adipocytes, and IL-17A selectively activated signaling pathways in adipose tissues and adipocytes. These findings suggest that IL-17A differentially induces inflammatory and metabolic gene expression in the adipose tissues of lean and obese mice.

  7. Interleukin-17A Differentially Induces Inflammatory and Metabolic Gene Expression in the Adipose Tissues of Lean and Obese Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yine; Zhang, Qiuyang; Ma, Siqi; Liu, Sen; Chen, Zhiquan; Mo, Zhongfu; You, Zongbing

    2016-01-01

    The functions of interleukin-17A (IL-17A) in adipose tissues and adipocytes have not been well understood. In the present study, male mice were fed with a regular diet (n = 6, lean mice) or a high-fat diet (n = 6, obese mice) for 30 weeks. Subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) were analyzed for IL-17A levels. SAT and VAT were treated with IL-17A and analyzed for inflammatory and metabolic gene expression. Mouse 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes were differentiated into adipocytes, followed with IL-17A treatment and analysis for inflammatory and metabolic gene expression. We found that IL-17A levels were higher in obese SAT than lean SAT; the basal expression of inflammatory and metabolic genes was different between SAT and VAT and between lean and obese adipose tissues. IL-17A differentially induced expression of inflammatory and metabolic genes, such as tumor necrosis factor α, Il-6, Il-1β, leptin, and glucose transporter 4, in adipose tissues of lean and obese mice. IL-17A also differentially induced expression of inflammatory and metabolic genes in pre-adipocytes and adipocytes, and IL-17A selectively activated signaling pathways in adipose tissues and adipocytes. These findings suggest that IL-17A differentially induces inflammatory and metabolic gene expression in the adipose tissues of lean and obese mice. PMID:27070576

  8. Expression Profile of Genes Related to Drug Metabolism in Human Brain Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelis Stavrinou

    Full Text Available Endogenous and exogenous compounds as well as carcinogens are metabolized and detoxified by phase I and II enzymes, the activity of which could be crucial to the inactivation and hence susceptibility to carcinogenic factors. The expression of these enzymes in human brain tumor tissue has not been investigated sufficiently. We studied the association between tumor pathology and the expression profile of seven phase I and II drug metabolizing genes (CYP1A1, CYP1B1, ALDH3A1, AOX1, GSTP1, GSTT1 and GSTM3 and some of their proteins.Using qRT-PCR and western blotting analysis the gene and protein expression in a cohort of 77 tumors were investigated. The major tumor subtypes were meningioma, astrocytoma and brain metastases, -the later all adenocarcinomas from a lung primary.Meningeal tumors showed higher expression levels for AOX1, CYP1B1, GSTM3 and GSTP1. For AOX1, GSTM and GSTP1 this could be verified on a protein level as well. A negative correlation between the WHO degree of malignancy and the strength of expression was identified on both transcriptional and translational level for AOX1, GSTM3 and GSTP1, although the results could have been biased by the prevalence of meningiomas and glioblastomas in the inevitably bipolar distribution of the WHO grades. A correlation between the gene expression and the protein product was observed for AOX1, GSTP1 and GSTM3 in astrocytomas.The various CNS tumors show different patterns of drug metabolizing gene expression. Our results suggest that the most important factor governing the expression of these enzymes is the histological subtype and to a far lesser extent the degree of malignancy itself.

  9. Gene expression changes in the tyrosine metabolic pathway regulate caste-specific cuticular pigmentation of termites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuoka, Yudai; Maekawa, Kiyoto

    2016-07-01

    In social insects, all castes have characteristic phenotypes suitable for their own tasks and to engage in social behavior. The acquisition of caste-specific phenotypes was a key event in the course of social insect evolution. However, understanding of the genetic basis and the developmental mechanisms that produce these phenotypes is still very limited. In particular, termites normally possess more than two castes with specific phenotypes (i.e. workers, soldiers, and reproductives), but proximate developmental mechanisms are far from being fully understood. In this study, we focused on the pigmentation of the cuticle as a model trait for caste-specific phenotypes, during the molts of each caste; workers, soldiers, presoldiers (intermediate stage of soldiers), and alates (primary reproductives) in Zootermopsis nevadensis. Expression patterns of cuticular tanning genes (members of the tyrosine metabolic pathway) were different among each molt, and high expression levels of several "key genes" were observed during each caste differentiation. For the differentiation of castes with well-tanned cuticles (i.e. soldiers and alates), all focal genes except DDC in the former were highly expressed. On the other hand, high expression levels of yellow and aaNAT were observed during worker and presoldier molts, respectively, but most other genes in the pathway were expressed at low levels. RNA interference (RNAi) of these key genes affected caste-specific cuticular pigmentation, leading to soldiers with yellowish-white heads and pigmented mandibular tips, presoldiers with partly pigmented head cuticles, and alates with the yellow head capsules. These results suggest that the pigmentation of caste-specific cuticles is achieved by the regulation of gene expression in the tyrosine metabolic pathway. PMID:27125584

  10. Congenital Central Hypothyroidism due to a Homozygous Mutation in the TSHβ Subunit Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Catharina Grünert; Miriam Schmidts; Joachim Pohlenz; Matthias Volkmar Kopp; Markus Uhl; Karl Otfried Schwab

    2011-01-01

    Congenital central hypothyroidism (CCH) is a rare condition occurring in 1 : 20000 to 1 : 50000 newborns. As TSH plasma levels are low, CCH is usually not detected by TSH-based neonatal screening for hypothyroidism, and, as a result, diagnosis is often delayed putting affected children at risk for developmental delay and growth failure. We report on a girl with isolated central hypothyroidism due to a homozygous one-base pair deletion (T313del) in exon 3 of the TSHβ subunit gene. The molecula...

  11. Identification of genes influencing dendrite morphogenesis in developing peripheral sensory and central motor neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chwalla Barbara

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developing neurons form dendritic trees with cell type-specific patterns of growth, branching and targeting. Dendrites of Drosophila peripheral sensory neurons have emerged as a premier genetic model, though the molecular mechanisms that underlie and regulate their morphogenesis remain incompletely understood. Still less is known about this process in central neurons and the extent to which central and peripheral dendrites share common organisational principles and molecular features. To address these issues, we have carried out two comparable gain-of-function screens for genes that influence dendrite morphologies in peripheral dendritic arborisation (da neurons and central RP2 motor neurons. Results We found 35 unique loci that influenced da neuron dendrites, including five previously shown as required for da dendrite patterning. Several phenotypes were class-specific and many resembled those of known mutants, suggesting that genes identified in this study may converge with and extend known molecular pathways for dendrite development in da neurons. The second screen used a novel technique for cell-autonomous gene misexpression in RP2 motor neurons. We found 51 unique loci affecting RP2 dendrite morphology, 84% expressed in the central nervous system. The phenotypic classes from both screens demonstrate that gene misexpression can affect specific aspects of dendritic development, such as growth, branching and targeting. We demonstrate that these processes are genetically separable. Targeting phenotypes were specific to the RP2 screen, and we propose that dendrites in the central nervous system are targeted to territories defined by Cartesian co-ordinates along the antero-posterior and the medio-lateral axes of the central neuropile. Comparisons between the screens suggest that the dendrites of peripheral da and central RP2 neurons are shaped by regulatory programs that only partially overlap. We focused on one common

  12. Metagenomic analysis of nitrogen metabolism genes in the surface of marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Carolina; Schneider, Dominik; Thürmer, Andrea; Dellwig, Olaf; Lipka, Marko; Daniel, Rolf; Böttcher, Michael E.; Friedrich, Michael W.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we analysed metagenomes along with biogeochemical profiles from Skagerrak (North Sea) and Bothnian Bay (Baltic Sea) sediments, to trace the prevailing nitrogen pathways. NO3- was present in the top 5 cm below the sediment-water interface at both sites. NH4+ increased with depth below 5 cm where it overlapped with the NO3- zone. Steady state modelling of NO3- and NH4+ porewater profiles indicates zones of net nitrogen species transformations. Protease, peptidase, urease and deaminase ammonification genes were detected in metagenomes. Genes involved in ammonia oxidation (amo, hao), nitrite oxidation (nxr), denitrification (nar, nir, nor) and dissimilatory NO3- reduction to NH4+ (nap, nfr and otr) were also present. 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that the nitrifying group Nitrosopumilales and other groups involved in nitrification and denitrification (Nitrobacter, Nitrosomonas, Nitrospira, Nitrosococcus, and Nitrosonomas) appeared less abundant in Skagerrak sediments compared to Bothnian Bay sediments. Beggiatoa and Thiothrix 16S rRNA genes were also present suggesting chemolithoautotrophic NO3- reduction to NO2- or NH4+ as a possible pathway. Although anammox planctomycetes 16S rRNA genes were present in metagenomes, anammox protein-coding genes were not detected. Our results show the metabolic potential for ammonification, nitrification, NO3- reduction, and denitrification activities in Skagerrak and Bothnian Bay sediments.

  13. Genetic polymorphisms and possible gene-gene interactions in metabolic and DNA repair genes: Effects on DNA damage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Naccarati, Alessio; Souček, P.; Štětina, R.; Haufroid, V.; Kumar, R.; Vodičková, Ludmila; Trtková, K.; Dušinská, M.; Hemminki, K.; Vodička, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 593, 1-2 (2006), s. 22-31. ISSN 0027-5107 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/03/0437 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : Single-strand breaks * Genetic polymorphisms * Metabolism Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.111, year: 2006

  14. Differential metabolic rates among the school going boys of a Central Indian Town (Sagar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Thakur

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The prime objective of the present study was to estimate the basal metabolic rate (BMR and resting metabolic rate (RMR among school going boys of 5-18 year of age. The subjects were recruited from government schools of Sagar town of Madhya Pradesh state of Indian Union. Height and weight of the boys were measured using standard anthropometric techniques. Body mass index (BMI and metabolic rates (BMR/RMR were computed for each individual. It was found that mean of BMI varies from 13.8±1.6 Kg m- 2 among boys of 8 year of age to 19.0±1.9 Kg m- 2 among boys of 17 year of age. Similarly, mean of Basal metabolic rate (BMR varies from 1219.0±106.9 K cal/day among boys aged 5 year of age to 2296.3±255.9 K cal/day among 17 year of age. Pre pubertal and pubertal boys have significant difference in their basal metabolic rates as well as stunted, underweight and undernourished boys have significant low BMR. The linear bivariate regression analysis shows that the BMR is dependent on BMI, weight and height. The RMR have highest regression coefficient (r2=0.935 on BMR, followed by Height (r2=0.664, weight (r2=0.631 and body mass index (r2=0.368. The similar trends can be seen for RMR also. The BMR is highly dependent on RMR followed by height, weight and BMI.

  15. Quercetin Impacts Expression of Metabolism- and Obesity-Associated Genes in SGBS Adipocytes

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    Andreas Leiherer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is characterized by the rapid expansion of visceral adipose tissue, resulting in a hypoxic environment in adipose tissue which leads to a profound change of gene expression in adipocytes. As a consequence, there is a dysregulation of metabolism and adipokine secretion in adipose tissue leading to the development of systemic inflammation and finally resulting in the onset of metabolic diseases. The flavonoid quercetin as well as other secondary plant metabolites also referred to as phytochemicals have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-diabetic effects known to be protective in view of obesity-related-diseases. Nevertheless, its underlying molecular mechanism is still obscure and thus the focus of this study was to explore the influence of quercetin on human SGBS (Simpson Golabi Behmel Syndrome adipocytes’ gene expression. We revealed for the first time that quercetin significantly changed expression of adipokine (Angptl4, adipsin, irisin and PAI-1 and glycolysis-involved (ENO2, PFKP and PFKFB4 genes, and that this effect not only antagonized but in part even overcompensated the effect mediated by hypoxia in adipocytes. Thus, these results are explained by the recently proposed hypothesis that the protective effect of quercetin is not solely due to its free radical-scavenging activity but also to a direct effect on mitochondrial processes, and they demonstrate that quercetin might have the potential to counteract the development of obesity-associated complications.

  16. Metabolic regulation in meagre, Argyrosomus regius (Asso, 1801: Study of gene-diet interactions on lipid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Silva-Brito

    2014-06-01

    stimulates the expression of the fads2. In contrast, Elovl5 is very efficient to convert the desaturated products of ∆6/∆8 and so Elovl5 expression is not enhanced, since the activity of this enzyme is already higher. These findings may explain the differences in the expression of two genes, between hepatic fads2 and elovl5. Furthermore, increased hepatic fads2 expression between FO-S and VO-S treatments was 114 fold. Such induction was much greater than observed in Salmo salad (Zheng et al., 2005. However, Salmo salad has separate and distinct genes for ∆6 and ∆5 desaturases (Zheng et al., 2005 and, due to genome duplication, it has two genes with ∆6 activity (Monroig et al., 2010. Moreover, lipid peroxidation in liver increases with the number of fatty acid (FA double bonds (Haggag, Elsanhoty & Ramadan, 2014. D'Aquino et al. (1991 observed that rats fed diets with fish oil had increased lipid peroxidation. Our results indicate that, in FO-S, selenium may have protected FA from peroxidation, thus dietary HUFA seemed to have been sufficient to maintain the phospholipid turnover and induction of FA metabolism genes did not occur. In FO-NS diet membranes were not protected efficiently from lipid peroxidation, and therefore a higher expression of FA metabolism genes was necessary to offset the damage, consequently, biosynthesis of HUFA was more stimulated. ROS-induced oxidative stress has been associated with expression and protein levels of transcription factors (Okuno et al., 2012. A reduction of ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species has been observed in fish fed VO with selenium, when compared to VO without selenium (data not presented. It is plausible to infer that a stimulation of expression and level of protein SREBP-1 by a reduction of ROS. SREBP-1 play a role on the regulation of genes involved in biosynthesis of HUFA, as fads2 and elovl5 (Jump, Tripathy & Depner, 2013. In conclusion, our results showed that vegetable oils have an effect on expression level of genes

  17. JAZF1 can regulate the expression of lipid metabolic genes and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Guang-feng [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan (China); Department of Critical Care Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008, Hunan (China); Xiao, Di; Gong, Wei-jing [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan (China); Liu, Hui-xia; Liu, Jun [Department of Geriatrics, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008, Hunan (China); Zhou, Hong-hao [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan (China); Liu, Zhao-qian, E-mail: liuzhaoqian63@126.com [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan (China)

    2014-03-14

    Highlights: • JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited the expression of SREBP1, ACC, and FAS. • JAZF1 overexpression upregulated the expression of HSL and ATGL. • SREBP1 and JAZF1 could regulate each other in adipocytes. - Abstract: JAZF1 is a newly identified gene with unknown functions. A recent genome-wide association study showed that JAZF1 is associated with type 2 diabetes and is highly expressed in liver and adipose tissue. Studies have demonstrated that JAZF1 is the co-repressor for nuclear orphan receptor TAK1, whereas most nuclear orphan receptor family members are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism. Therefore, JAZF1 could be closely related to glycolipid metabolism. In this study, JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the induced differentiation process of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The overexpression of JAZF1 inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes and significantly inhibited the expression of SREBPl, ACC, and FAS, which were important in lipid synthesis, while upregulating the expression of key enzyme hormone-sensitive lipase in lipoclasis. Moreover, SREBPl exhibited an inhibitory function on the expression of JAZF1. SREBP1 reversed the inhibitory action on lipid accumulation of JAZF1. SREBP1 and JAZF1 were observed to regulate each other in adipocytes. Therefore, JAZF1 could regulate the expression of particular genes related to lipid metabolism and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes. This result suggests that JAZF1 may be a potential target for the treatment of diseases, such as obesity and lipid metabolism disorders.

  18. A Clade-Specific Arabidopsis Gene Connects Primary Metabolism and Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dallas C.; Zheng, Wenguang; Huang, Sheng; Du, Chuanlong; Zhao, Xuefeng; Yennamalli, Ragothaman M.; Sen, Taner Z.; Nettleton, Dan; Wurtele, Eve S.; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Nearly immobile, plants have evolved new components to be able to respond to changing environments. One example is Qua Quine Starch (QQS, AT3G30720), an Arabidopsis thaliana-specific orphan gene that integrates primary metabolism with adaptation to environment changes. SAQR (Senescence-Associated and QQS-Related, AT1G64360), is unique to a clade within the family Brassicaceae; as such, the gene may have arisen about 20 million years ago. SAQR is up-regulated in QQS RNAi mutant and in the apx1 mutant under light-induced oxidative stress. SAQR plays a role in carbon allocation: overexpression lines of SAQR have significantly decreased starch content; conversely, in a saqr T-DNA knockout (KO) line, starch accumulation is increased. Meta-analysis of public microarray data indicates that SAQR expression is correlated with expression of a subset of genes involved in senescence, defense, and stress responses. SAQR promoter::GUS expression analysis reveals that SAQR expression increases after leaf expansion and photosynthetic capacity have peaked, just prior to visible natural senescence. SAQR is expressed predominantly within leaf and cotyledon vasculature, increasing in intensity as natural senescence continues, and then decreasing prior to death. In contrast, under experimentally induced senescence, SAQR expression increases in vasculature of cotyledons but not in true leaves. In SAQR KO line, the transcript level of the dirigent-like disease resistance gene (AT1G22900) is increased, while that of the Early Light Induced Protein 1 gene (ELIP1, AT3G22840) is decreased. Taken together, these data indicate that SAQR may function in the QQS network, playing a role in integration of primary metabolism with adaptation to internal and environmental changes, specifically those that affect the process of senescence. PMID:27462324

  19. Transcriptome Analysis of Syringa oblata Lindl. Inflorescence Identifies Genes Associated with Pigment Biosynthesis and Scent Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zheng

    Full Text Available Syringa oblata Lindl. is a woody ornamental plant with high economic value and characteristics that include early flowering, multiple flower colors, and strong fragrance. Despite a long history of cultivation, the genetics and molecular biology of S. oblata are poorly understood. Transcriptome and expression profiling data are needed to identify genes and to better understand the biological mechanisms of floral pigments and scents in this species. Nine cDNA libraries were obtained from three replicates of three developmental stages: inflorescence with enlarged flower buds not protruded, inflorescence with corolla lobes not displayed, and inflorescence with flowers fully opened and emitting strong fragrance. Using the Illumina RNA-Seq technique, 319,425,972 clean reads were obtained and were assembled into 104,691 final unigenes (average length of 853 bp, 41.75% of which were annotated in the NCBI non-redundant protein database. Among the annotated unigenes, 36,967 were assigned to gene ontology categories and 19,956 were assigned to eukaryoticorthologous groups. Using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway database, 12,388 unigenes were sorted into 286 pathways. Based on these transcriptomic data, we obtained a large number of candidate genes that were differentially expressed at different flower stages and that were related to floral pigment biosynthesis and fragrance metabolism. This comprehensive transcriptomic analysis provides fundamental information on the genes and pathways involved in flower secondary metabolism and development in S. oblata, providing a useful database for further research on S. oblata and other plants of genus Syringa.

  20. mRNA expression of genes regulating lipid metabolism in ringed seals (Pusa hispida) from differently polluted areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Genes regulating lipid metabolism were studied in ringed seals. •We compared highly contaminated Baltic seals and less contaminated Svalbard seals. •mRNA expression of hepatic PPARγ was higher in the Baltic seals. •mRNA expression of adipose PPARγ target genes was higher in the Baltic seals. •Contaminant exposure may affect lipid metabolism in the Baltic ringed seals. -- Abstract: There is a growing concern about the ability of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to influence lipid metabolism. Although POPs are found at high concentrations in some populations of marine mammals, for example in the ringed seal (Pusa hispida) from the Baltic Sea, little is known about the effects of POPs on their lipid metabolism. An optimal regulation of lipid metabolism is crucial for ringed seals during the fasting/molting season. This is a physiologically stressful period, during which they rely on the energy stored in their fat reserves. The mRNA expression levels for seven genes involved in lipid metabolism were analyzed in liver and/or blubber tissue from molting ringed seals from the polluted Baltic Sea and a less polluted reference location, Svalbard (Norway). mRNA expression of genes encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) α and γ and their target genes acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 (ACOX1) and cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) were analyzed in liver. mRNA expression level of genes encoding PPARβ, PPARγ and their target genes encoding fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) and adiponectin (ADIPOQ) were measured in inner and middle blubber layers. In addition, we evaluated the influence of molting status on hepatic mRNA expression of genes encoding PPARs and their target genes in ringed seals from Svalbard. Our results show higher mRNA expression of genes encoding hepatic PPARγ and adipose PPARβ, FABP4, and ADIPOQ in the Baltic seals compared to the Svalbard seals. A positive relationship between mRNA expressions of genes

  1. mRNA expression of genes regulating lipid metabolism in ringed seals (Pusa hispida) from differently polluted areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelli, Martina Galatea [Norwegian Polar Institute, Fram Centre, 9296 Tromsø (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Biology, 5020 Bergen (Norway); Rusten, Marte; Goksøyr, Anders [University of Bergen, Department of Biology, 5020 Bergen (Norway); Routti, Heli, E-mail: heli.routti@npolar.no [Norwegian Polar Institute, Fram Centre, 9296 Tromsø (Norway)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: •Genes regulating lipid metabolism were studied in ringed seals. •We compared highly contaminated Baltic seals and less contaminated Svalbard seals. •mRNA expression of hepatic PPARγ was higher in the Baltic seals. •mRNA expression of adipose PPARγ target genes was higher in the Baltic seals. •Contaminant exposure may affect lipid metabolism in the Baltic ringed seals. -- Abstract: There is a growing concern about the ability of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to influence lipid metabolism. Although POPs are found at high concentrations in some populations of marine mammals, for example in the ringed seal (Pusa hispida) from the Baltic Sea, little is known about the effects of POPs on their lipid metabolism. An optimal regulation of lipid metabolism is crucial for ringed seals during the fasting/molting season. This is a physiologically stressful period, during which they rely on the energy stored in their fat reserves. The mRNA expression levels for seven genes involved in lipid metabolism were analyzed in liver and/or blubber tissue from molting ringed seals from the polluted Baltic Sea and a less polluted reference location, Svalbard (Norway). mRNA expression of genes encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) α and γ and their target genes acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 (ACOX1) and cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) were analyzed in liver. mRNA expression level of genes encoding PPARβ, PPARγ and their target genes encoding fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) and adiponectin (ADIPOQ) were measured in inner and middle blubber layers. In addition, we evaluated the influence of molting status on hepatic mRNA expression of genes encoding PPARs and their target genes in ringed seals from Svalbard. Our results show higher mRNA expression of genes encoding hepatic PPARγ and adipose PPARβ, FABP4, and ADIPOQ in the Baltic seals compared to the Svalbard seals. A positive relationship between mRNA expressions of genes

  2. Congenital Central Hypothyroidism due to a Homozygous Mutation in the TSHβ Subunit Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Catharina Grünert

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital central hypothyroidism (CCH is a rare condition occurring in 1 : 20000 to 1 : 50000 newborns. As TSH plasma levels are low, CCH is usually not detected by TSH-based neonatal screening for hypothyroidism, and, as a result, diagnosis is often delayed putting affected children at risk for developmental delay and growth failure. We report on a girl with isolated central hypothyroidism due to a homozygous one-base pair deletion (T313del in exon 3 of the TSHβ subunit gene. The molecular genetic and typical radiologic findings are discussed, and a systematic diagnostic workup for congenital central hypothyroidism is proposed. Physicians need to be aware of this rare condition to avoid diagnostic delay and to install prompt replacement therapy.

  3. Effects of long-term football training on the expression profile of genes involved in muscle oxidative metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfieri, A; Martone, D; Randers Thomsen, Morten Bredsgaard; Labruna, G; Mancini, A; Nielsen, Jens Jung; Bangsbo, Jens; Krustrup, Peter; Buono, P

    2015-01-01

    and a muscle biopsy from the vastus lateralis were collected at T0 (pre intervention) and at T1 (post intervention). Gene expression was measured by RTqPCR on RNA extracted from muscle biopsies. The expression levels of the genes principally involved in energy metabolism (PPARγ, adiponectin, AMPKα1/α2...

  4. Transcriptome analysis of Gerbera hybrida ray florets: putative genes associated with gibberellin metabolism and signal transduction.

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    Qi Kuang

    Full Text Available In this study, the transcriptome of the Gerbera hybrida ray floret was constructed using a high-throughput Illumina sequencing platform. All 47,104 UniGenes with an average length of 845 nt and an N50 equaling 1321 nt were generated from 72,688,546 total primary reads after filtering and assembly. A total of 36,693 transcripts were annotated by comparison with non-redundant National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI protein (Nr, non-redundant NCBI nucleotide (Nt, Gene Ontology (GO, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG databases after removing exogenous contaminated sequences. The majority of the genes that are associated with gibberellin metabolism and signal transduction were identified. The targets for signal transduction of other plant hormones were also enumerated. Our study provides a systematic overview of the hormone signal transduction genes that are involved in ray floral development in Asteraceae and should facilitate further understanding of the crucial roles of phytohormones in plant growth.

  5. Folate metabolism gene 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR is associated with ADHD in myelomeningocele patients.

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    Catherine J Spellicy

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to examine the relation between the 5, 10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene and behaviors related to attention- deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD in individuals with myelomeningocele. The rationale for the study was twofold: folate metabolizing genes, (e.g. MTHFR, are important not only in the etiology of neural tube defects but are also critical to cognitive function; and individuals with myelomeningocele have an elevated incidence of ADHD. Here, we tested 478 individuals with myelomeningocele for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder behavior using the Swanson Nolan Achenbach Pelham-IV ADHD rating scale. Myelomeningocele participants in this group for whom DNAs were available were genotyped for seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the MTHFR gene. The SNPs were evaluated for an association with manifestation of the ADHD phenotype in children with myelomeningocele. The data show that 28.7% of myelomeningocele participants exhibit rating scale elevations consistent with ADHD; of these 70.1% had scores consistent with the predominantly inattentive subtype. In addition, we also show a positive association between the SNP rs4846049 in the 3'-untranslated region of the MTHFR gene and the attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder phenotype in myelomeningocele participants. These results lend further support to the finding that behavior related to ADHD is more prevalent in patients with myelomeningocele than in the general population. These data also indicate the potential importance of the MTHFR gene in the etiology of the ADHD phenotype.

  6. Variation in genes related to hepatic lipid metabolism and changes in waist circumference and body weight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meidtner, Karina; Fisher, Eva; Angquist, Lars;

    2014-01-01

    We analysed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging the genetic variability of six candidate genes (ATF6, FABP1, LPIN2, LPIN3, MLXIPL and MTTP) involved in the regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism, an important regulatory site of energy balance for associations with body mass index (BMI......) and changes in weight and waist circumference. We also investigated effect modification by sex and dietary intake. Data of 6,287 individuals participating in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition were included in the analyses. Data on weight and waist circumference were...

  7. Apo Lipoprotein A1 Gene Polymorphisms Predict Cardio-Metabolic Risk in South Asian Immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Sunita Dodani; Rebecca Henkhaus; Lei Dong; Butler, Merlin G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of death globally with increasing burden in South Asians in the US. Specific genetic variants that influence CAD have not been fully assessed in South Asian Immigrants. The goal is to identify Apo lipoprotein A1 (APOA1) gene polymorphisms and their association with CAD risk factors, metabolic syndrome and dysfunctional HDL (Dys-HDL). Methods: A community-based study on South Asians aged 35-65 years without CAD was conducted. APOA1 g...

  8. Learning-Induced Gene Expression in the Hippocampus Reveals a Role of Neuron -Astrocyte Metabolic Coupling in Long Term Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Tadi, Monika

    2015-10-29

    We examined the expression of genes related to brain energy metabolism and particularly those encoding glia (astrocyte)-specific functions in the dorsal hippocampus subsequent to learning. Context-dependent avoidance behavior was tested in mice using the step-through Inhibitory Avoidance (IA) paradigm. Animals were sacrificed 3, 9, 24, or 72 hours after training or 3 hours after retention testing. The quantitative determination of mRNA levels revealed learning-induced changes in the expression of genes thought to be involved in astrocyte-neuron metabolic coupling in a time dependent manner. Twenty four hours following IA training, an enhanced gene expression was seen, particularly for genes encoding monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1, MCT4), alpha2 subunit of the Na/K-ATPase and glucose transporter type 1. To assess the functional role for one of these genes in learning, we studied MCT1 deficient mice and found that they exhibit impaired memory in the inhibitory avoidance task. Together, these observations indicate that neuron-glia metabolic coupling undergoes metabolic adaptations following learning as indicated by the change in expression of key metabolic genes.

  9. Learning-Induced Gene Expression in the Hippocampus Reveals a Role of Neuron -Astrocyte Metabolic Coupling in Long Term Memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Tadi

    Full Text Available We examined the expression of genes related to brain energy metabolism and particularly those encoding glia (astrocyte-specific functions in the dorsal hippocampus subsequent to learning. Context-dependent avoidance behavior was tested in mice using the step-through Inhibitory Avoidance (IA paradigm. Animals were sacrificed 3, 9, 24, or 72 hours after training or 3 hours after retention testing. The quantitative determination of mRNA levels revealed learning-induced changes in the expression of genes thought to be involved in astrocyte-neuron metabolic coupling in a time dependent manner. Twenty four hours following IA training, an enhanced gene expression was seen, particularly for genes encoding monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1, MCT4, alpha2 subunit of the Na/K-ATPase and glucose transporter type 1. To assess the functional role for one of these genes in learning, we studied MCT1 deficient mice and found that they exhibit impaired memory in the inhibitory avoidance task. Together, these observations indicate that neuron-glia metabolic coupling undergoes metabolic adaptations following learning as indicated by the change in expression of key metabolic genes.

  10. Litter size variation in hypothalamic gene expression determines adult metabolic phenotype in Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii.

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    Xue-Ying Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early postnatal environments may have long-term and potentially irreversible consequences on hypothalamic neurons involved in energy homeostasis. Litter size is an important life history trait and negatively correlated with milk intake in small mammals, and thus has been regarded as a naturally varying feature of the early developmental environment. Here we investigated the long-term effects of litter size on metabolic phenotype and hypothalamic neuropeptide mRNA expression involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, using the offspring reared from large (10-12 and small (3-4 litter sizes, of Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii, a rodent species from Inner Mongolia grassland in China. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hypothalamic leptin signaling and neuropeptides were measured by Real-Time PCR. We showed that offspring reared from small litters were heavier at weaning and also in adulthood than offspring from large litters, accompanied by increased food intake during development. There were no significant differences in serum leptin levels or leptin receptor (OB-Rb mRNA in the hypothalamus at weaning or in adulthood, however, hypothalamic suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3 mRNA in adulthood increased in small litters compared to that in large litters. As a result, the agouti-related peptide (AgRP mRNA increased in the offspring from small litters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings support our hypothesis that natural litter size has a permanent effect on offspring metabolic phenotype and hypothalamic neuropeptide expression, and suggest central leptin resistance and the resultant increase in AgRP expression may be a fundamental mechanism underlying hyperphagia and the increased risk of overweight in pups of small litters. Thus, we conclude that litter size may be an important and central determinant of metabolic fitness in adulthood.

  11. Expression of genes associated with carbohydrate metabolism in cotton stems and roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheffler Jodi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L is an important crop worldwide that provides fiber for the textile industry. Cotton is a perennial plant that stores starch in stems and roots to provide carbohydrates for growth in subsequent seasons. Domesticated cotton makes these reserves available to developing seeds which impacts seed yield. The goals of these analyses were to identify genes and physiological pathways that establish cotton stems and roots as physiological sinks and investigate the role these pathways play in cotton development during seed set. Results Analysis of field-grown cotton plants indicated that starch levels peaked about the time of first anthesis and then declined similar to reports in greenhouse-grown cotton plants. Starch accumulated along the length of the stem and the shape and size of the starch grains from stems were easily distinguished from transient starch. Microarray analyses compared gene expression in tissues containing low levels of starch with tissues rapidly accumulating starch. Statistical analysis of differentially expressed genes indicated increased expression among genes associated with starch synthesis, starch degradation, hexose metabolism, raffinose synthesis and trehalose synthesis. The anticipated changes in these sugars were largely confirmed by measuring soluble sugars in selected tissues. Conclusion In domesticated cotton starch stored prior to flowering was available to support seed production. Starch accumulation observed in young field-grown plants was not observed in greenhouse grown plants. A suite of genes associated with starch biosynthesis was identified. The pathway for starch utilization after flowering was associated with an increase in expression of a glucan water dikinase gene as has been implicated in utilization of transient starch. Changes in raffinose levels and levels of expression of genes controlling trehalose and raffinose biosynthesis were also observed in vegetative

  12. Polymorphisms of two histamine-metabolizing enzymes genes and childhood allergic asthma: a case control study

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    Sobkowiak Paulina

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histamine-metabolizing enzymes (N-methyltransferase and amiloride binding protein 1 are responsible for histamine degradation, a biogenic amine involved in allergic inflammation. Genetic variants of HNMT and ABP1 genes were found to be associated with altered enzyme activity. We hypothesized that alleles leading to decreased enzyme activity and, therefore, decreased inactivation of histamine may be responsible for altered susceptibility to asthma. Methods The aim of this study was to analyze polymorphisms within the HNMT and ABP1 genes in the group of 149 asthmatic children and in the group of 156 healthy children. The genetic analysis involved four polymorphisms of the HNMT gene: rs2071048 (-1637T/C, rs11569723 (-411C/T, rs1801105 (Thr105Ile = 314C/T and rs1050891 (1097A/T and rs1049793 (His645Asp polymorphism for ABP1 gene. Genotyping was performed with use of PCR-RFLP. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistica software; linkage disequilibrium analysis was done with use of Haploview software. Results We found an association of TT genotype and T allele of Thr105Ile polymorphism of HNMT gene with asthma. For other polymorphisms for HNMT and ABP1 genes, we have not observed relationship with asthma although the statistical power for some SNPs might not have been sufficient to detect an association. In linkage disequilibrium analysis, moderate linkage was found between -1637C/T and -411C/T polymorphisms of HNMT gene. However, no significant differences in haplotype frequencies were found between the group of the patients and the control group. Conclusions Our results indicate modifying influence of histamine N-methyltransferase functional polymorphism on the risk of asthma. The other HNMT polymorphisms and ABP1 functional polymorphism seem unlikely to affect the risk of asthma.

  13. Metabolic syndrome in the rural population of Wardha, Central India: An exploratory factor analysis

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    Pradeep R Deshmukh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Metabolic syndrome - a plausible precondition for type II diabetes and cardiovascular diseases is also on rise. To understand the mechanistic complexity of metabolic syndrome it is imperative to study the specific contribution of the determinants of metabolic syndrome. Such study can help to identify the most significant factor which may be of use in early detection as well as prevention efforts. Such information is scarcely available from India and especially from rural India. Hence, the present study was undertaken to explore for such factor which might be considered crucial for development of such pathogenesis particularly in rural population of Wardha. Methods: A cross-sectional study comprising of 300 subjects was carried out in rural area of Primary Health Center, attached to medical college with approximate 31,000 populations. The anthropometric parameters such as height, weight, waist circumference were measured. Overnight fasting samples were collected for lipid profile (total cholesterol, triglyceride, high density lipoproteins, low density lipoproteins, very low density lipoproteins and fasting blood glucose levels. The National Cholesterol Education Programme Adult Treatment Panel, ATP-III guidelines were used to categorize the study subjects. As many of the variables are highly intercorrelated, exploratory factor analysis was carried out to reduce the data to a smaller number of independent factors that accounts for the most of the variances in the data. Principal component analysis was used as a method of extraction. Results: For both sexes, three factors were extracted accounting for about 71% variance in the measured variables. An adiposity factor which accounted for highest explained variance (28%, was the initial factor extracted. It was loaded positively by waist circumference, triglyceride, and very low density lipoprotein and negatively loaded by high density lipoprotein. Second factor extracted

  14. Influence of neonatal hypothyroidism on hepatic gene expression and lipid metabolism in adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santana-Farré, Ruymán; Mirecki-Garrido, Mercedes; Bocos, Carlos;

    2012-01-01

    , and triglycerides showed no significant differences. In contrast, CH rats showed significant changes in the expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism, including an increased transcription of PPARa and a reduced expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol uptake, cellular...... sterol efflux, triglyceride assembly, bile acid synthesis, and lipogenesis. These changes were associated with a decrease of intrahepatic lipids. Finally, CH rats responded to the onset of hypothyroidism in adulthood with a reduction of serum fatty acids and hepatic cholesteryl esters and to T3...... replacement with an enhanced activation of malic enzyme. In summary, we provide in vivo evidence that neonatal hypothyroidism influences the hepatic transcriptional program and tissue sensitivity to hormone treatment in adulthood. This highlights the critical role that a euthyroid state during development...

  15. Assessing the Potential for Expression of Metabolically Diverse Genes in Subseafloor Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, J. M.; Shock, E.

    2009-12-01

    A combination of geochemical and biochemical processes defines the transition between sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in subseafloor sediments. One line of investigation that promises to help elucidate this transition is metagenomic characterization of the subseafloor sediment column. Analysis of metagenomic data from sediment at the Peru Margin reveals that sequences homologous to known genes in the methanogenic and sulfate reductive pathways can be identified at different depths below the seafloor [1]. However, without metatranscriptomic or metaprotoeomic data it is unclear whether the presence of these genes implies that these metabolic pathways are being utilized. In this study, we describe a theoretical method for assessing the potential for gene expression. Constructing a thermodynamic model for the relative stabilities of proteins depends on knowing the amino acid sequences of the proteins and defining model environments, which can then be compared and refined using geochemical observations. We report the results of a series of stability calculations that are consistent with a greater overall energetic potential for the expression of enzymes for sulfate reduction and methanogenesis at shallow and deep horizons, respectively. The results are also consistent with a decrease in the oxidation state of the pore fluid with depth, which is mirrored in the chemical compositions of the proteins involved in methanogenesis. At sediment near the seafloor, where genes for both sulfate reduction and methanogenesis were identified [1], fluctuations in oxidation state could be responsible for differing levels of expression of these proteins and therefore contribute to a shift to a different metabolic strategy. [1] J. F. Biddle, S. Fitz-Gibbon, S. C. Schuster, J. E. Brenchley and C. H. House. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 105:10583, 2008. Relative stabilities of sulfite reductases ("sulf") and methylene-5,6,7,8-tetrahydromethanopterin dehydrogenases ("meth") that are

  16. Salmonella Modulates Metabolism During Growth under Conditions that Induce Expression of Virulence Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-Mo; Schmidt, Brian; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Jones, Marcus B.; Deatherage, Brooke L.; Brewer, Heather M.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; McDermott, Jason E.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott N.; Ansong, Charles; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-04-05

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a facultative pathogen that uses complex mechanisms to invade and proliferate within mammalian host cells. To investigate possible contributions of metabolic processes in S. Typhimurium grown under conditions known to induce expression of virulence genes, we used a metabolomics-driven systems biology approach coupled with genome scale modeling. First, we identified distinct metabolite profiles associated with bacteria grown in either rich or virulence-inducing media and report the most comprehensive coverage of the S. Typhimurium metabolome to date. Second, we applied an omics-informed genome scale modeling analysis of the functional consequences of adaptive alterations in S. Typhimurium metabolism during growth under our conditions. Excitingly, we observed possible sequestration of metabolites recently suggested to have immune modulating roles. Modeling efforts highlighted a decreased cellular capability to both produce and utilize intracellular amino acids during stationary phase culture in virulence conditions, despite significant abundance increases for these molecules as observed by our metabolomics measurements. Model-guided analysis suggested that alterations in metabolism prioritized other activities necessary for pathogenesis instead, such as lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

  17. Inferring bi-directional interactions between circadian clock genes and metabolism with model ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzegorczyk, Marco; Aderhold, Andrej; Husmeier, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    There has been much interest in reconstructing bi-directional regulatory networks linking the circadian clock to metabolism in plants. A variety of reverse engineering methods from machine learning and computational statistics have been proposed and evaluated. The emphasis of the present paper is on combining models in a model ensemble to boost the network reconstruction accuracy, and to explore various model combination strategies to maximize the improvement. Our results demonstrate that a rich ensemble of predictors outperforms the best individual model, even if the ensemble includes poor predictors with inferior individual reconstruction accuracy. For our application to metabolomic and transcriptomic time series from various mutagenesis plants grown in different light-dark cycles we also show how to determine the optimal time lag between interactions, and we identify significant interactions with a randomization test. Our study predicts new statistically significant interactions between circadian clock genes and metabolites in Arabidopsis thaliana, and thus provides independent statistical evidence that the regulation of metabolism by the circadian clock is not uni-directional, but that there is a statistically significant feedback mechanism aiming from metabolism back to the circadian clock. PMID:25719342

  18. The malQ gene is essential for starch metabolism in Streptococcus mutans

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    Yutaka Sato

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The malQ and glgP genes, respectively, annotated as putative 4-α-glucanotransferase and putative glycogen phosphorylase are located with a 29 nucleotide overlap on the Streptococcus mutans genome. We found that the glgP gene of this organism was induced with maltose, and the gene likely constituted an operon with the upstream gene malQ. This putative operon was negatively regulated with the malR gene located upstream from the malQ gene and a MalR-binding consensus sequence was found upstream of the malQ gene. S. mutans is not able to catabolize starch. However, this organism utilizes maltose degraded from starch in the presence of saliva amylase. Therefore, we hypothesized that the MalQ/GlgP system may participate in the metabolism of starch-degradation products. Methods: A DNA fragment amplified from the malQ or glgP gene overexpressed His-tagged proteins with the plasmid pBAD/HisA. S. mutans malQ and/or glgP mutants were also constructed. Purified proteins were assayed for glucose-releasing and phosphorylase activities with appropriate buffers containing maltose, maltotriose, maltodextrin, or amylodextrin as a substrate, and were photometrically assayed with a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase–NADP system. Results: Purified MalQ protein released glucose from maltose and maltotriose but did not from either maltodextrin or amylodextrin. The purified GlgP protein did not exhibit a phosphorylase reaction with maltose or maltotriose but generated glucose-1-phosphate from maltodextrin and amylodextrin. However, the GlgP protein released glucose-1-phosphate from maltose and maltotriose in the presence of the MalQ protein. In addition, the MalQ enzyme activity with maltose released not only glucose but also produced maltooligosaccharides as substrates for the GlgP protein. Conclusion: These results suggest that the malQ gene encodes 4-α-glucanotransferase but not α-1,4-glucosidase activity. The malQ mutant could not grow in the

  19. Role of central nervous system in acute radiation syndrome functional metabolic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In adult rabbit, the effect on the brain of a whole-body or encephalic gamma irradiation is a function of the absorbed dose and begins after 25 rads. Three phases are described in the mechanism of radiation effect. In the initial phase, irradiation acts as a direct stimulus of cerebral structures. The second phase is a response towards aggression which includes: the effect of stimulation of various cerebral structures; their response and the induced feed-back mechanism; the release of metabolites inducing a functional metabolic encephalopathy in which occur: modification of blood pressure; modification of pulmonary ventilation; modification of acido-basic blood equilibrium. The third phase consists of functional recovery

  20. Nonsense mutations in the human β-globin gene affect mRNA metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of premature translation termination mutations (nonsense mutations) have been described in the human α- and β-globin genes. Studies on mRNA isolated from patients with β0-thalassemia have shown that for both the β-17 and the β-39 mutations less than normal levels of β-globin mRNA accumulate in peripheral blood cells. (The codon at which the mutation occurs designates the name of the mutation; there are 146 codons in human β-globin mRNA). In vitro studies using the cloned β-39 gene have reproduced this effect in a heterologous transfection system and have suggested that the defect resides in intranuclear metabolism. The authors have asked if this phenomenon of decreased mRNA accumulation is a general property of nonsense mutations and if the effect depends on the location or the type of mutation. Toward this end, they have studied the effect of five nonsense mutations and two missense mutations on the expression of human β-globin mRNA in a heterologous transfection system. In all cases studied, the presence of a translation termination codon correlates with a decrease in the steady-state level of mRNA. The data suggest that the metabolism of a mammalian mRNA is affected by the presence of a mutation that affects translation

  1. Diet-gene interactions and PUFA metabolism: a potential contributor to health disparities and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Floyd H; Murphy, Robert C; Wilson, Bryan A; Sergeant, Susan; Ainsworth, Hannah; Seeds, Michael C; Mathias, Rasika A

    2014-05-01

    The "modern western" diet (MWD) has increased the onset and progression of chronic human diseases as qualitatively and quantitatively maladaptive dietary components give rise to obesity and destructive gene-diet interactions. There has been a three-fold increase in dietary levels of the omega-6 (n-6) 18 carbon (C18), polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6), with the addition of cooking oils and processed foods to the MWD. Intense debate has emerged regarding the impact of this increase on human health. Recent studies have uncovered population-related genetic variation in the LCPUFA biosynthetic pathway (especially within the fatty acid desaturase gene (FADS) cluster) that is associated with levels of circulating and tissue PUFAs and several biomarkers and clinical endpoints of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Importantly, populations of African descent have higher frequencies of variants associated with elevated levels of arachidonic acid (ARA), CVD biomarkers and disease endpoints. Additionally, nutrigenomic interactions between dietary n-6 PUFAs and variants in genes that encode for enzymes that mobilize and metabolize ARA to eicosanoids have been identified. These observations raise important questions of whether gene-PUFA interactions are differentially driving the risk of cardiovascular and other diseases in diverse populations, and contributing to health disparities, especially in African American populations. PMID:24853887

  2. Diet-Gene Interactions and PUFA Metabolism: A Potential Contributor to Health Disparities and Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floyd H. Chilton

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The “modern western” diet (MWD has increased the onset and progression of chronic human diseases as qualitatively and quantitatively maladaptive dietary components give rise to obesity and destructive gene-diet interactions. There has been a three-fold increase in dietary levels of the omega-6 (n-6 18 carbon (C18, polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6, with the addition of cooking oils and processed foods to the MWD. Intense debate has emerged regarding the impact of this increase on human health. Recent studies have uncovered population-related genetic variation in the LCPUFA biosynthetic pathway (especially within the fatty acid desaturase gene (FADS cluster that is associated with levels of circulating and tissue PUFAs and several biomarkers and clinical endpoints of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Importantly, populations of African descent have higher frequencies of variants associated with elevated levels of arachidonic acid (ARA, CVD biomarkers and disease endpoints. Additionally, nutrigenomic interactions between dietary n-6 PUFAs and variants in genes that encode for enzymes that mobilize and metabolize ARA to eicosanoids have been identified. These observations raise important questions of whether gene-PUFA interactions are differentially driving the risk of cardiovascular and other diseases in diverse populations, and contributing to health disparities, especially in African American populations.

  3. Relationship of polymorphisms within metabolic genes and carcass traits in crossbred beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, L A; Casas, E; Shackelford, S D; Wheeler, T L

    2012-04-01

    Feed intake has been shown to alter neurological signaling related to feeding behavior and subsequent activation of adipogenic mechanisms. Fat characteristics are pivotal for carcass and meat quality, including marbling score, flavor, and tenderness. The objective of this study was to establish the association of SNP, from genes functionally related to fat metabolism and obesity, with growth, fat, and carcass traits in steers. A total of 33 informative SNP from candidate genes [cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), DNA-protein kinase (DNA-PK), fatty acid synthase (FASN), and fat mass and obesity associated (FTO)] were used to genotype crossbred steers (n = 620), and associations with growth and carcass traits were assessed. Five markers within the DNA-PK gene were associated (P grade, and retail product yield. Additionally, 2 unique DNA-PK SNP were associated (P < 0.05) with marbling score. Three haplotypes were observed using these SNP and were significantly (P = 0.0014) associated with marbling score. Slaughter weight, ADG, and HCW were associated (P < 0.05) with SNP from CART, FTO, and FASN. Data from this study indicate that polymorphisms within candidate genes have an indirect relationship with lipogenesis. Replication of these results within other populations will be necessary to establish if these markers will be successful as predictors of fatness components and carcass traits in cattle. PMID:22100592

  4. GeneChip expression profiling reveals the alterations of energy metabolism related genes in osteocytes under large gradient high magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Zhi-Hao; Yin, Chun; Ma, Jian-Hua; Li, Di-Jie; Zhao, Fan; Sun, Yu-Long; Hu, Li-Fang; Shang, Peng; Qian, Ai-Rong

    2015-01-01

    The diamagnetic levitation as a novel ground-based model for simulating a reduced gravity environment has recently been applied in life science research. In this study a specially designed superconducting magnet with a large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels (μ-g, 1-g, and 2-g), was used to simulate a space-like gravity environment. Osteocyte, as the most important mechanosensor in bone, takes a pivotal position in mediating the mechano-induced bone remodeling. In this study, the effects of LG-HMF on gene expression profiling of osteocyte-like cell line MLO-Y4 were investigated by Affymetrix DNA microarray. LG-HMF affected osteocyte gene expression profiling. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and data mining were further analyzed by using bioinfomatic tools, such as DAVID, iReport. 12 energy metabolism related genes (PFKL, AK4, ALDOC, COX7A1, STC1, ADM, CA9, CA12, P4HA1, APLN, GPR35 and GPR84) were further confirmed by real-time PCR. An integrated gene interaction network of 12 DEGs was constructed. Bio-data mining showed that genes involved in glucose metabolic process and apoptosis changed notablly. Our results demostrated that LG-HMF affected the expression of energy metabolism related genes in osteocyte. The identification of sensitive genes to special environments may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone loss or osteoporosis. PMID:25635858

  5. GeneChip expression profiling reveals the alterations of energy metabolism related genes in osteocytes under large gradient high magnetic fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    Full Text Available The diamagnetic levitation as a novel ground-based model for simulating a reduced gravity environment has recently been applied in life science research. In this study a specially designed superconducting magnet with a large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF, which can provide three apparent gravity levels (μ-g, 1-g, and 2-g, was used to simulate a space-like gravity environment. Osteocyte, as the most important mechanosensor in bone, takes a pivotal position in mediating the mechano-induced bone remodeling. In this study, the effects of LG-HMF on gene expression profiling of osteocyte-like cell line MLO-Y4 were investigated by Affymetrix DNA microarray. LG-HMF affected osteocyte gene expression profiling. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs and data mining were further analyzed by using bioinfomatic tools, such as DAVID, iReport. 12 energy metabolism related genes (PFKL, AK4, ALDOC, COX7A1, STC1, ADM, CA9, CA12, P4HA1, APLN, GPR35 and GPR84 were further confirmed by real-time PCR. An integrated gene interaction network of 12 DEGs was constructed. Bio-data mining showed that genes involved in glucose metabolic process and apoptosis changed notablly. Our results demostrated that LG-HMF affected the expression of energy metabolism related genes in osteocyte. The identification of sensitive genes to special environments may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone loss or osteoporosis.

  6. Metabolic syndrome, diabetes and atherosclerosis: Influence of gene-environment interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite remarkable progress in diagnosis and understanding of risk factors, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world's developed countries. The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors (visceral obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, and hypertension), is increasingly being recognized as a new risk factor for type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Nevertheless, there is wide variation in both the occurrence of disease and age of onset, even in individuals who display very similar risk profiles. There is now compelling evidence that a complex interplay between genetic determinants and environmental factors (still largely unknown) is the reason for this large inter-individual variation in disease susceptibility. The purpose of the present review is to describe the current status of our knowledge concerning the gene-environment interactions potentially implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It focuses predominantly on studies of genes (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, alcohol dehydrogenase type 1C, apolipoprotein E, glutathione S-transferases T1 and M1) that are known to be modified by dietary and lifestyle habits (fat diet, intake of alcohol and smoking habit). It also describes the limited current understanding of the role of genetic variants of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and their interactions with environmental toxicants. Additional studies are needed in order to clarify whether inter-individual differences in detoxification of environmental toxicants may have an essential role in the development of CVD and contribute to the emerging field of 'environmental cardiology'. Such knowledge may be particularly relevant for improving cardiovascular risk stratification and conceiving the development of 'personalized intervention program'.

  7. Metabolic syndrome, diabetes and atherosclerosis: Influence of gene-environment interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassi, Maria Grazia, E-mail: andreas@ifc.cnr.it [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, G. Pasquinucci Hospital, Via Aurelia Sud, Massa (Italy)

    2009-07-10

    Despite remarkable progress in diagnosis and understanding of risk factors, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world's developed countries. The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors (visceral obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, and hypertension), is increasingly being recognized as a new risk factor for type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Nevertheless, there is wide variation in both the occurrence of disease and age of onset, even in individuals who display very similar risk profiles. There is now compelling evidence that a complex interplay between genetic determinants and environmental factors (still largely unknown) is the reason for this large inter-individual variation in disease susceptibility. The purpose of the present review is to describe the current status of our knowledge concerning the gene-environment interactions potentially implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It focuses predominantly on studies of genes (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, alcohol dehydrogenase type 1C, apolipoprotein E, glutathione S-transferases T1 and M1) that are known to be modified by dietary and lifestyle habits (fat diet, intake of alcohol and smoking habit). It also describes the limited current understanding of the role of genetic variants of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and their interactions with environmental toxicants. Additional studies are needed in order to clarify whether inter-individual differences in detoxification of environmental toxicants may have an essential role in the development of CVD and contribute to the emerging field of 'environmental cardiology'. Such knowledge may be particularly relevant for improving cardiovascular risk stratification and conceiving the development of 'personalized intervention program'.

  8. Coregulated genes link sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase and arsenic metabolism in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Csaba I; Vass, Imre; Rákhely, Gábor; Vass, István Zoltán; Tóth, András; Duzs, Agnes; Peca, Loredana; Kruk, Jerzy; Kós, Péter B

    2014-10-01

    Although the biogeochemistry of the two environmentally hazardous compounds arsenic and sulfide has been extensively investigated, the biological interference of these two toxic but potentially energy-rich compounds has only been hypothesized and indirectly proven. Here we provide direct evidence for the first time that in the photosynthetic model organism Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 the two metabolic pathways are linked by coregulated genes that are involved in arsenic transport, sulfide oxidation, and probably in sulfide-based alternative photosynthesis. Although Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 is an obligate photoautotrophic cyanobacterium that grows via oxygenic photosynthesis, we discovered that specific genes are activated in the presence of sulfide or arsenite to exploit the energy potentials of these chemicals. These genes form an operon that we termed suoRSCT, located on a transposable element of type IS4 on the plasmid pSYSM of the cyanobacterium. suoS (sll5036) encodes a light-dependent, type I sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase. The suoR (sll5035) gene downstream of suoS encodes a regulatory protein that belongs to the ArsR-type repressors that are normally involved in arsenic resistance. We found that this repressor has dual specificity, resulting in 200-fold induction of the operon upon either arsenite or sulfide exposure. The suoT gene encodes a transmembrane protein similar to chromate transporters but in fact functioning as an arsenite importer at permissive concentrations. We propose that the proteins encoded by the suoRSCT operon might have played an important role under anaerobic, reducing conditions on primordial Earth and that the operon was acquired by the cyanobacterium via horizontal gene transfer. PMID:25022856

  9. Adaptive evolution of the chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase gene involved in irregular monoterpene metabolism

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    Liu Ping-Li

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase (CDS is a key enzyme in biosynthetic pathways producing pyrethrins and irregular monoterpenes. These compounds are confined to plants of the tribe Anthemideae of the Asteraceae, and play an important role in defending the plants against herbivorous insects. It has been proposed that the CDS genes arose from duplication of the farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FDS gene and have different function from FDSs. However, the duplication time toward the origin of CDS and the evolutionary force behind the functional divergence of the CDS gene are still unknown. Results Two duplication events were detected in the evolutionary history of the FDS gene family in the Asteraceae, and the second duplication led to the origin of CDS. CDS occurred after the divergence of the tribe Mutisieae from other tribes of Asteraceae but before the birth of the Anthemideae tribe. After its origin, CDS accumulated four mutations in sites homologous to the substrate-binding and catalysis sites of FDS. Of these, two sites were involved in the binding of the nucleophilic substrate isopentenyl diphosphate in FDS. Maximum likelihood analyses showed that some sites in CDS were under positive selection and were scattered throughout primary sequences, whereas in the three-dimensional structure model they clustered in the large central cavity. Conclusion Positive selection associated with gene duplication played a major role in the evolution of CDS.

  10. Lysine Malonylome May Affect the Central Metabolism and Erythromycin Biosynthesis Pathway in Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun-Yu; Xu, Zhen; Zhou, Ying; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2016-05-01

    Lysine acylation is a dynamic, reversible post-translational modification that can regulate cellular and organismal metabolism in bacteria. Acetylome has been studied well in bacteria. However, to our knowledge, there are no proteomic data on the lysine malonylation in prokaryotes, especially in actinomycetes, which are the major producers of therapeutic antibiotics. In our study, the first malonylome of the erythromycin-producing Saccharopolyspora erythraea was described by using a high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach and high-affinity antimalonyllysine antibodies. We identified 192 malonylated sites on 132 substrates. Malonylated proteins are enriched in many biological processes such as protein synthesis, glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, the TCA cycle, and the feeder metabolic pathways of erythromycin synthesis according to GO analysis and KEGG pathway analysis. A total of 238 S/T/Y/H-phosphorylated sites on 158 proteins were also identified in our study, which aimed to explore the potential cross-talk between acylation and phosphorylation. After that, site-specific mutations showed that malonylation is a negative regulatory modification on the enzymatic activity of the acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs) and glutamine synthetase (Gs). Furthermore, we compared the malonylation levels of the two-growth state to explore the potential effect of malonylation on the erythromycin biosynthesis. These findings expand our current knowledge of the actinomycetes malonylome and supplement the acylproteome databases of the whole bacteria. PMID:27090497

  11. Clp-dependent proteolysis down-regulates central metabolic pathways in glucose-starved Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerth, Ulf; Kock, Holger; Kusters, Ilja; Michalik, Stephan; Switzer, Robert L.; Hecker, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Entry into stationary phase in Bacillus subtilis is linked not only to a redirection of the gene expression program but also to posttranslational events such as protein degradation. Using S-35-labeled methionine pulse-chase labeling and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis we monitored

  12. Dietary Njavara rice bran oil reduces experimentally induced hypercholesterolaemia by regulating genes involved in lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chithra, Pushpan K; Sindhu, G; Shalini, V; Parvathy, Rathnam; Jayalekshmy, Ananthasankaran; Helen, Antony

    2015-04-28

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the anti-atherogenic effect of Njavara rice bran oil (NjRBO) on atherosclerosis by modulating enzymes and genes involved in lipid metabolism in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet (HCD). Adult male rats (Sprague-Dawley strain, weighing 100-120 g) were divided into three groups of nine animals each. Group I served as the control, group II were fed a HCD and group III were fed a HCD and NjRBO (100 mg/kg body weight). The study duration was 60 d. Serum and tissue lipid profile, atherogenic index, enzymes of lipid metabolism, plasma C-reactive protein levels, serum paraoxonase and arylesterase activities, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, gene and protein expression of paraoxonase 1 (PON1), PPARα, ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), apoB and apoA1 in the liver were quantified. Total cholesterol, TAG, phospholipid, NEFA, LDL-cholesterol concentrations in the serum and liver, lipogenic enzyme activities, hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity and atherogenic index were significantly increased in HCD-fed rats, but they decreased after treatment with NjRBO. HDL-cholesterol level and lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase activity were increased in the NjRBO-treated group, but decreased in the HCD-fed group. The expression levels of ABCA1, apoA1, PON1 and PPARα were found to be significantly increased in NjRBO-treated group compared with the HCD-fed group; however, the expression level of apoB was found to be higher in HCD-fed group and lower in the NjRBO-treated group. These data suggest that NjRBO possesses an anti-atherogenic property by modulating lipid metabolism and up-regulating genes involved in reverse cholesterol transport and antioxidative defence mechanism through the induction of the gene expression PON1. PMID:25823019

  13. Promiscuous Gene Expression in the Thymus: The Root of Central Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle A. R. Magalhães

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The thymus is a complex organ with an epithelium formed by two main cell types, the cortical thymic epithelial (cTECs and medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs, referred to as stroma. Immature thymocytes arising from the bone marrow, macrophages and dendritic cells also populate the thymus. Thymocytes evolve to mature T cells featuring cell differentiation antigens (CDs, which characterize the phenotypically distinct stages, defined as double-negative (DN, double positive (DP and single positive (SP, based on expression of the coreceptors CD4 and CD8. The thymus is therefore implicated in T cell differentiation and during development into T cells thymocytes are in close association with the stroma. Recent evidence showed that mTECs express a diverse set of genes coding for parenchymal organ specific proteins. This phenomenon has been termed promiscuous gene expression (PGE and has led to the reconsideration of the role of the thymus in central T cell tolerance to self-antigens, which prevents autoimmunity. The evidence of PGE is causing a reanalysis in the scope of central tolerance understanding. We summarize the evidence of PGE in the thymus, focusing particularly the use of cDNA microarray technology for the broad characterization of gene expression and demarcation of PGE emergence during thymus ontogeny.

  14. Genetic Association and Gene-gene interaction of HAS2, HABP1 and HYAL3 Implicate Hyaluronan Metabolic Genes in Glaucomatous Neurodegeneration

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    Kaustuv Basu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronan (HA plays a significant role in maintaining aqueous humor outflow in trabecular meshwork, the primary ocular tissue involved in glaucoma. We examined potential association of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the HA synthesizing gene – hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2, hyaluronan binding protein 1 (HABP1 and HA catabolic gene hyaluronidase 3 (HYAL3 in the primary open angle glaucoma (POAG patients in the Indian population. Thirteen tagged SNPs (6 for HAS2, 3 for HABP1 and 4 for HYAL3 were genotyped in 116 high tension (HTG, 321 non-high tension glaucoma (NHTG samples and 96 unrelated, age-matched, glaucoma-negative, control samples. Allelic and genotypic association were analyzed by PLINK v1.04; haplotypes were identified using PHASE v2.1 and gene-gene interaction was analyzed using multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR v2.0. An allelic association (rs6651224; p = 0.03; OR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.25–0.94 was observed at the second intron (C>G of HAS2 both for NHTG and HTG. rs1057308 revealed a genotypic association (p = 0.03 at the 5’ UTR of HAS2 with only HTG. TCT haplotype (rs1805429 – rs2472614 – rs8072363 in HABP1 and TTAG and TTGA (rs2285044 – rs3774753 – rs1310073 – rs1076872 in HYAL3 were found to be significantly high (p < 0.05 both for HTG and NHTG compared to controls. Gene-gene interaction revealed HABP1 predominantly interacts with HAS2 in HTG while it associates with both HYAL3 and HAS2 in NHTG. This is the first genetic evidence, albeit from a smaller study, that the natural polymorphisms in the genes involved in hyaluronan metabolism are potentially involved in glaucomatous neurodegeneration.

  15. Genome-wide association study of metabolic traits reveals novel gene-metabolite-disease links.

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    Rico Rueedi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic traits are molecular phenotypes that can drive clinical phenotypes and may predict disease progression. Here, we report results from a metabolome- and genome-wide association study on (1H-NMR urine metabolic profiles. The study was conducted within an untargeted approach, employing a novel method for compound identification. From our discovery cohort of 835 Caucasian individuals who participated in the CoLaus study, we identified 139 suggestively significant (P<5×10(-8 and independent associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP and metabolome features. Fifty-six of these associations replicated in the TasteSensomics cohort, comprising 601 individuals from São Paulo of vastly diverse ethnic background. They correspond to eleven gene-metabolite associations, six of which had been previously identified in the urine metabolome and three in the serum metabolome. Our key novel findings are the associations of two SNPs with NMR spectral signatures pointing to fucose (rs492602, P = 6.9×10(-44 and lysine (rs8101881, P = 1.2×10(-33, respectively. Fine-mapping of the first locus pinpointed the FUT2 gene, which encodes a fucosyltransferase enzyme and has previously been associated with Crohn's disease. This implicates fucose as a potential prognostic disease marker, for which there is already published evidence from a mouse model. The second SNP lies within the SLC7A9 gene, rare mutations of which have been linked to severe kidney damage. The replication of previous associations and our new discoveries demonstrate the potential of untargeted metabolomics GWAS to robustly identify molecular disease markers.

  16. Associations of iron metabolism genes with blood manganese levels: a population-based study with validation data from animal models

    OpenAIRE

    Claus Henn Birgit; Kim Jonghan; Wessling-Resnick Marianne; Téllez-Rojo Martha; Jayawardene Innocent; Ettinger Adrienne S; Hernández-Avila Mauricio; Schwartz Joel; Christiani David C; Hu Howard; Wright Robert O

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Given mounting evidence for adverse effects from excess manganese exposure, it is critical to understand host factors, such as genetics, that affect manganese metabolism. Methods Archived blood samples, collected from 332 Mexican women at delivery, were analyzed for manganese. We evaluated associations of manganese with functional variants in three candidate iron metabolism genes: HFE [hemochromatosis], TF [transferrin], and ALAD [δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase]. We use...

  17. Skeletal muscle carnitine loading increases energy expenditure, modulates fuel metabolism gene networks and prevents body fat accumulation in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Stephens, Francis B; Wall, Benjamin T.; Marimuthu, Kanagaraj; Shannon, Chris E; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Macdonald, Ian A.; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2013-01-01

    Twelve weeks of daily L-carnitine and carbohydrate feeding in humans increases skeletal muscle total carnitine content, and prevents body mass accrual associated with carbohydrate feeding alone. Here we determined the influence of L-carnitine and carbohydrate feeding on energy metabolism, body fat mass andmuscle expression of fuel metabolism genes. Twelve males exercised at 50% maximal oxygen consumption for 30 min once before and once after 12 weeks of twice daily feeding of 80 g carbohyd...

  18. Association of folate metabolism genes MTHFR and MTRR with multiple complex congenital malformation risk in Chinese population of Shanxi

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qin; Bai, Baoling; Liu, Xiaozhen; Miao, Chunyue; Li, Huili

    2014-01-01

    Birth defects are common, serious malformations with a complex etiology that suggests involvement of both genetic and environmental factors. Low dietary folate and polymorphisms in genes of folate metabolism can influence risk for birth defects. In the present study 250 Chinese birth defects cases who suffered 1-8 types of birth defect disease phenotypes were subjected and two genetic variants in two folate metabolism key enzymes, rs1801394 of methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) and rs180113...

  19. Carbon conversion efficiency and central metabolic fluxes in developing sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Ana P; Goffman, Fernando D; Ohlrogge, John B; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2007-10-01

    The efficiency with which developing sunflower embryos convert substrates into seed storage reserves was determined by labeling embryos with [U-(14)C6]glucose or [U-(14)C5]glutamine and measuring their conversion to CO2, oil, protein and other biomass compounds. The average carbon conversion efficiency was 50%, which contrasts with a value of over 80% previously observed in Brassica napus embryos (Goffman et al., 2005), in which light and the RuBisCO bypass pathway allow more efficient conversion of hexose to oil. Labeling levels after incubating sunflower embryos with [U-(14)C4]malate indicated that some carbon from malate enters the plastidic compartment and contributes to oil synthesis. To test this and to map the underlying pattern of metabolic fluxes, separate experiments were carried out in which embryos were labeled to isotopic steady state using [1-(13)C1]glucose, [2-(13)C1]glucose, or [U-(13)C5]glutamine. The resultant labeling in sugars, starch, fatty acids and amino acids was analyzed by NMR and GC-MS. The fluxes through intermediary metabolism were then quantified by computer-aided modeling. The resulting flux map accounted well for the labeling data, was in good agreement with the observed carbon efficiency, and was further validated by testing for agreement with gas exchange measurements. The map shows that the influx of malate into oil is low and that flux through futile cycles (wasting ATP) is low, which contrasts with the high rates previously determined for growing root tips and heterotrophic cell cultures. PMID:17683473

  20. Primary metabolism plays a central role in moulding silicon-inducible brown spot resistance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bockhaven, Jonas; Steppe, Kathy; Bauweraerts, Ingvar; Kikuchi, Shoshi; Asano, Takayuki; Höfte, Monica; De Vleesschauwer, David

    2015-10-01

    Over recent decades, a multitude of studies have shown the ability of silicon (Si) to protect various plants against a range of microbial pathogens exhibiting different lifestyles and infection strategies. Despite this relative wealth of knowledge, an understanding of the action mechanism of Si is still in its infancy, which hinders its widespread application for agricultural purposes. In an attempt to further elucidate the molecular underpinnings of Si-induced disease resistance, we studied the transcriptome of control and Si-treated rice plants infected with the necrotrophic brown spot fungus Cochliobolus miyabeanus. Analysis of brown spot-infected control plants suggested that C. miyabeanus represses plant photosynthetic processes and nitrate reduction in order to trigger premature senescence and cause disease. In Si-treated plants, however, these pathogen-induced metabolic alterations are strongly impaired, suggesting that Si alleviates stress imposed by the pathogen. Interestingly, Si also significantly increased photorespiration rates in brown spot-infected plants. Although photorespiration is often considered as a wasteful process, recent studies have indicated that this metabolic bypass also enhances resistance during abiotic stress and pathogen attack by protecting the plant's photosynthetic machinery. In view of these findings, our results favour a scenario in which Si enhances brown spot resistance by counteracting C. miyabeanus-induced senescence and cell death via increased photorespiration. Moreover, our results shed light onto the mechanistic basis of Si-induced disease control and support the view that, in addition to activating plant immune responses, Si can also reduce disease severity by interfering with pathogen virulence strategies. PMID:25583155

  1. Effect of angiotensin converting enzyme gene I/D polymorphism in patients with metabolic syndrome in North Indian population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gaurav Mittal; Vibhanshu Gupta; Shahzad F Haque; Anwer S Khan

    2011-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have investigated the effect of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene I/D polymorphism and various cardiovascular risk factors in different populations with varied results. Currently, the association of ACE gene polymorphism with metabolic syndrome has not been studied in North Indians. While studies assessing the effect with polymorphism on each of the components of metabolic syndrome separately are present, data regarding the metabolic syndrome per se are sparse. The present study evaluated the effect of ACE gene I/D polymorphism in patients with metabolic syndrome in North Indian population at a tertiary care centre.Methods Fifty subjects, with thirty cases of metabolic syndrome (NCEP/ATP Ⅲ guidelines, 2004) and twenty age and gender matched healthy controls were chosen. Detailed history was reviewed and clinical examination of the subjects was carried out. Relevant investigations including blood glucose (fasting and post prandial), blood urea, serum creatinine and serum lipids were done. DNA of cases and controls was analysed for I/D polymorphism using polymerase chain reaction.Results D/D genotype was more frequent in patients with metabolic syndrome as compared with healthy controls (P<0.05). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was significantly higher in the D/D genotype than I/D and I/I genotypes (P <0.05). Our study also showed positive association between obesity, fasting blood glucose and ACE gene polymorphism while no association was found with triglycerides and high density lipoprotein cholesterol.The I/I group was significantly associated with waist circumference and fasting blood glucose (P <0.05).Conclusion Our study clearly showed that metabolic syndrome was associated with ACE gene polymorphism.However due to less number of subjects in the study further studies are needed to corroborate our results.

  2. Consortium analysis of gene and gene–folate interactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathways with ovarian carcinoma risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelemen, Linda E; Terry, Kathryn L; Goodman, Marc T;

    2014-01-01

    SCOPE: We reevaluated previously reported associations between variants in pathways of one-carbon (1-C) (folate) transfer genes and ovarian carcinoma (OC) risk, and in related pathways of purine and pyrimidine metabolism, and assessed interactions with folate intake. METHODS AND RESULTS: Odds......11587873 (OR = 0.92; p = 6 × 10(-5)) and rs828054 (OR = 1.06; p = 1 × 10(-4)). Thirteen variants in the pyrimidine metabolism genes, DPYD, DPYS, PPAT, and TYMS, also interacted significantly with folate in a multivariant analysis (corrected p = 9.9 × 10(-6)) but collectively explained only 0.2% of OC risk....... Although no other associations were significant after multiple testing correction, variants in SHMT1 in 1-C transfer, previously reported with OC, suggested lower risk at higher folate (p(interaction) = 0.03-0.006). CONCLUSION: Variation in pyrimidine metabolism genes, particularly DPYD, which...

  3. Pyruvate Oxidoreductases Involved in Glycolytic Anaerobic Metabolism of Polychaetes from the Continental Shelf off Central-South Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, R. R.; Quiñones, R. A.

    2000-10-01

    The presence of low oxygen conditions in extensive areas of the continental shelf off central-south Chile has important effects on the biochemical adaptations of the organisms living in this ecosystem. Polychaetes assemblages cohabit on the shelf with an extensively distributed prokaryotic community made up of giant filamentous sulfur bacteria (mainly Thioploca sp.). The aim of this research was to characterize the pyruvate oxidoreductases enzymes involved in the biochemical adaptation of these benthic polychaetes. Nine polychaete species ( Paraprionospio pinnata, Nephtys ferruginea, Glycera americana, Haploscoloplos sp., Lumbrineris composita, Sigambra bassi, Aricidea pigmentata , Cossura chilensis, and Pectinaria chilensis) were assayed for lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), octopine dehydrogenase (OPDH), strombine dehydrogenase (STRDH) and alanopine dehydrogenase (ALPDH). Each species had a characteristic number of the pyruvate oxidoreductases assayed ranging from 4 in Paraprionospio pinnata to 1 in Pectinaria chilensis . The pyruvate saturation curves obtained for the enzymes from all species analysed, except L. composita, suggest that NADH can be oxidized at different rates depending on the amino acid used in the reaction with pyruvate. Our results indicate that organisms having more that one pyruvate oxidoreductase present a greater metabolic capacity to cope with functional and environmental hypoxia because these enzymes would better regulate the pyruvate consumption rate during the transition period. Thus, the dominance of Paraprionospio pinnata in the study area and its worldwide distribution is consistent with its higher number of pyruvate oxidoreductases with different pyruvate consumption rates involved in anaerobic metabolism. Finally, a positive allometric relationship was found between body size and the specific activity of ALPDH, STRDH, and maximum pyruvate oxidoreductase specific activity. This latter result suggests a positive scaling of the specific

  4. Adiponectin gene polymorphism is selectively associated with the concomitant presence of metabolic syndrome and essential hypertension.

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    Hsin-Bang Leu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Cardiovascular risk increases with the presence of both metabolic syndrome (MetS and hypertension (HTN. Although the adiponectin (ADIPOQ gene has been reported to be involved in MetS, its association with HTN remained undetermined. This study aimed to investigate the association of ADIPOQ gene with the phenotypes of HTN and MetS. METHODS: A total of 962 participants from 302 families from the Taiwan young-onset hypertension genetic study were enrolled. Plasma adiponectin were measured, and association analysis was conducted by using GEE regression-based method. Another study, of 1448 unrelated participants, was conducted to replicate the association between ADIPOQ gene and variable phenotypes of MetS with or without HTN. RESULTS: Among 962 subjects from family samples, the lowest plasma adiponectin value was observed in MetS with HTN component (9.3±0.47 µg/ml compared with hypertensives (13.4±0.74 µg /ml or MetS without HTN (11.9±0.60 µg/ml, P<0.05. The SNP rs1501299 (G276T in ADIPOQ gene was found associated with the presence of HTN in MetS (odds ratio for GG+GT vs. TT = 2.46; 95% CI: 1.14-5.3, p = 0.02, but not rs2241766 (T45G. No association of ADIPOQ gene with HTN alone or MetS without HTN was observed. The significant association of the SNP rs1501299 (G276T with the phenotype of presence of HTN in MetS was confirmed (odds ratio for GG+GT vs. TT = 2.15; 95% CI: 1.1-4.3 in the replication study. CONCLUSIONS: ADIPOQ genetic variants were selectively and specifically associated with the concomitant presence of MetS and HTN, suggesting potential genetic linkage between MetS and HTN.

  5. SNP selection for genes of iron metabolism in a study of genetic modifiers of hemochromatosis

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    Vulpe Chris D

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report our experience of selecting tag SNPs in 35 genes involved in iron metabolism in a cohort study seeking to discover genetic modifiers of hereditary hemochromatosis. Methods We combined our own and publicly available resequencing data with HapMap to maximise our coverage to select 384 SNPs in candidate genes suitable for typing on the Illumina platform. Results Validation/design scores above 0.6 were not strongly correlated with SNP performance as estimated by Gentrain score. We contrasted results from two tag SNP selection algorithms, LDselect and Tagger. Varying r2 from 0.5 to 1.0 produced a near linear correlation with the number of tag SNPs required. We examined the pattern of linkage disequilibrium of three levels of resequencing coverage for the transferrin gene and found HapMap phase 1 tag SNPs capture 45% of the ≥ 3% MAF SNPs found in SeattleSNPs where there is nearly complete resequencing. Resequencing can reveal adjacent SNPs (within 60 bp which may affect assay performance. We report the number of SNPs present within the region of six of our larger candidate genes, for different versions of stock genotyping assays. Conclusion A candidate gene approach should seek to maximise coverage, and this can be improved by adding to HapMap data any available sequencing data. Tag SNP software must be fast and flexible to data changes, since tag SNP selection involves iteration as investigators seek to satisfy the competing demands of coverage within and between populations, and typability on the technology platform chosen.

  6. Gene-gene-environment interactions between drugs, transporters, receptors, and metabolizing enzymes: Statins, SLCO1B1, and CYP3A4 as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadee, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    Pharmacogenetic biomarker tests include mostly specific single gene-drug pairs, capable of accounting for a portion of interindividual variability in drug response and toxicity. However, multiple genes are likely to contribute, either acting independently or epistatically, with the CYP2C9-VKORC1-warfarin test panel, an example of a clinically used gene-gene-dug interaction. I discuss here further instances of gene-gene-drug interactions, including a proposed dynamic effect on statin therapy by genetic variants in both a transporter (SLCO1B1) and a metabolizing enzyme (CYP3A4) in liver cells, the main target site where statins block cholesterol synthesis. These examples set a conceptual framework for developing diagnostic panels involving multiple gene-drug combinations. PMID:23436703

  7. The Association of Polymorphisms in Leptin/Leptin Receptor Genes and Ghrelin/Ghrelin Receptor Genes With Overweight/Obesity and the Related Metabolic Disturbances: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghalandari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Leptin and ghrelin are two important appetite and energy balance-regulating peptides. Common polymorphisms in the genes coding these peptides and their related receptors are shown to be associated with body weight, different markers of obesity and metabolic abnormalities. This review article aims to investigate the association of common polymorphisms of these genes with overweight/obesity and the metabolic disturbances related to it. Evidence Acquisition The keywords leptin, ghrelin, polymorphism, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, obesity, overweight, Body Mass Index, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM (MeSH headings were used to search in the following databases: Pubmed, Sciencedirect (Elsevier, and Google scholar. Overall, 24 case-control studies, relevant to our topic, met the criteria and were included in the review. Results The most prevalent leptin/leptin receptor genes (LEP/LEPR and ghrelin/ghrelin receptor genes (GHRL/GHSR single nucleotide polymorphisms studied were LEP G-2548A, LEPR Q223R, and Leu72Met, respectively. Nine studies of the 17 studies on LEP/LEPR, and three studies of the seven studies on GHRL/GHSR showed significant relationships. Conclusions In general, our study suggests that the association between LEP/LEPR and GHRL/GHSR with overweight/obesity and the related metabolic disturbances is inconclusive. These results may be due to unidentified gene-environment interactions. More investigations are needed to further clarify this association.

  8. Interleukin-1 gene polymorphism disease activity and bone mineral metabolism in rheumatoid arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine whether interleukin-1α and 1β gene polymorphism is associated with rheumatoid arthritis disease activity and bone mineral metabolism, and whether there is any relationship between IL-1β and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) motif gene. Methods IL-1 gene polymorphisms were analyzed in 65 RA patients who met American College of Radiology (ACR) criteria and 60 controls. From genomic DNA, 2 polymorphisms in each gene for IL1α-889 and IL-1β+3953 were typed by PCR-RFLP and HLA-DRB1 allele typing was also undertaken by PCR-SSOP. Some clinical and laboratory parameters were collected. The allelic frequencies and carriage rates were compared between RA patients and controls and between patients with active and quiescent disease. Comparison was also made between IL-1 polymorphism and parameters of bone mineral metabolism and between patients with the HLA-DRB1 RA motif plus IL-1β2 and patients without the two alleles. Fisher test and the analysis of variance was used to analyze the data.Results There was no significant difference in the frequency and carriage rate of IL-1α polymorphisms between RA patients and the controls. The β2/2 genotype of IL-1β was more common in female RA patients compared with controls (P=0.001). A lower carriage rate of IL-1β2 occurred in male RA patients (P=0.001). A higher carriage rate of IL-1α2 is associated with a higher ESR (P=0.008), HAQ score (P=0.03), and vit-D3 (P<0.001), but conversely a lower SJC (p=0.002), a lower RF (P=0.002) and a lower BMD at the lumbar spine (P=0.001). A higher frequency of IL-1α1 is associated with a lower CRP value (P=0.009). An increased IL-1β2 carriage is associated with active rheumatoid disease as indicated by a higher CRP (P<0.001), ESR (P<0.001) and pain score (P=0.001) and a higher BMD at the lumbar spine (P=0.007), lower vit-D3 and. Udpd/Crea level The presence of the HLA DRB1 RA motif and IL-1β allele 2 at same time did not contribute to disease activity

  9. Mining Metatranscriptomic Data of a Cyanobacterial Bloom for Patterns of Secondary Metabolism Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, K.; Wang, J.; Thompson, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    The secondary metabolism of bacterial cells produces small molecules that can have both medicinal properties and toxigenic effects. This study focuses on mining metatranscriptomes from a tropical eutrophic water reservoir in Singapore experiencing a cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Bloom dominated by Microcystis, to identify the types of secondary metabolites genes being expressed and by what taxa. A phylogenomic approach as implemented in the online tool Natural Product Domain Seeker (NaPDoS) was used. NaPDoS was recently developed to classify ketosynthase and condensation domains from polyketide synthases and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases, respectively, to provide insight into potential types of pathway products. Water samples from the reservoir were collected six times over a day/night cycle. Total RNA was extracted and subjected to ribosomal depletion followed by cDNA synthesis and next-generation Illumina DNA sequencing, generating 493,468 to 678,064 95-101 base pairs post-quality control reads per sample. Evidence for expression of PKS and NRPS type genes based on identification of a ketosynthase and condensation domains are present in all time points. KS domains fall into to two main phylogenetic groups, type I and type II, within the type II group of domains are domains for fatty acid biosynthesis (fab), which is considered a part of primary metabolism. Type I KS domains are part of the classic PKS natural product biosynthetic genes that make things such as antibiotics and other toxins such as microcystin. 2849 KS domains were detected in the combined reservoir samples, of these 1141 were likely from fatty acid biosynthesis and 1708 were related to secondary metabolism type KS domains. The most abundant KS domains (485) besides the fab genes are closely related to a KS domain that is not currently experimentally linked to a known secondary metabolite but the domain is found in four Microcystis genomes along with two other species of cyanobacteria. The three

  10. Differential effect of fructose on fat metabolism and clock gene expression in hepatocytes vs. myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapnik, Nava; Rozenblit-Susan, Sigal; Genzer, Yoni; Froy, Oren

    2016-08-01

    In the liver, fructose bypasses the main rate-limiting step of glycolysis at the level of phosphofructokinase, allowing it to act as an unregulated substrate for de novo lipogenesis. It has been reported that consumption of large amounts of fructose increases de novo lipogenesis in the liver. However, the effect of fructose on ectopic deposition of muscle fat has been under dispute. Our aim was to study the effect of fructose on levels of genes and proteins involved in fatty acid oxidation and synthesis in hepatocytes vs. muscle cells. In addition, as fat accumulation leads to disruption of daily rhythms, we tested the effect of fructose treatment on clock gene expression. AML-12 hepatocytes and C2C12 myotubes were treated with fructose or glucose for 2 consecutive 24-h cycles and harvested every 6h. In contrast to glucose, fructose disrupted clock gene rhythms in hepatocytes, but in myotubes, it led to more robust rhythms. Fructose led to low levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) and high levels of LIPIN1 in hepatocytes compared with glucose. In contrast, fructose led to high pAMPK and low LIPIN1 and microsomal triacylglycerol transfer protein (MTTP) levels in myotubes compared with glucose. Analysis of fat content revealed that fructose led to less fat accumulation in myotubes compared to hepatocytes. In summary, fructose shifts metabolism towards fatty acid synthesis and clock disruption in hepatocytes, but not in myotubes. PMID:27240446

  11. Hypolipidemic effect of dietary pea proteins: Impact on genes regulating hepatic lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigamonti, Elena; Parolini, Cinzia; Marchesi, Marta; Diani, Erika; Brambilla, Stefano; Sirtori, Cesare R; Chiesa, Giulia

    2010-05-01

    Controversial data on the lipid-lowering effect of dietary pea proteins have been provided and the mechanisms behind this effect are not completely understood. The aim of the study was to evaluate a possible hypolipidemic activity of a pea protein isolate and to determine whether pea proteins could affect the hepatic lipid metabolism through regulation of genes involved in cholesterol and fatty acid homeostasis. Rats were fed Nath's hypercholesterolemic diets for 28 days, the protein sources being casein or a pea protein isolate from Pisum sativum. After 14 and 28 days of dietary treatment, rats fed pea proteins had markedly lower plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels than rats fed casein (pPea protein-fed rats displayed higher hepatic mRNA levels of LDL receptor versus those fed casein (ppea protein-fed rats than in rats fed casein (ppea proteins in rats. Moreover, pea proteins appear to affect cellular lipid homeostasis by upregulating genes involved in hepatic cholesterol uptake and by downregulating fatty acid synthesis genes. PMID:20077421

  12. Identification of genes encoding granule-bound starch synthase involved in amylose metabolism in banana fruit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Miao

    Full Text Available Granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS is responsible for amylose synthesis, but the role of GBSS genes and their encoded proteins remains poorly understood in banana. In this study, amylose content and GBSS activity gradually increased during development of the banana fruit, and decreased during storage of the mature fruit. GBSS protein in banana starch granules was approximately 55.0 kDa. The protein was up-regulated expression during development while it was down-regulated expression during storage. Six genes, designated as MaGBSSI-1, MaGBSSI-2, MaGBSSI-3, MaGBSSI-4, MaGBSSII-1, and MaGBSSII-2, were cloned and characterized from banana fruit. Among the six genes, the expression pattern of MaGBSSI-3 was the most consistent with the changes in amylose content, GBSS enzyme activity, GBSS protein levels, and the quantity or size of starch granules in banana fruit. These results suggest that MaGBSSI-3 might regulate amylose metabolism by affecting the variation of GBSS levels and the quantity or size of starch granules in banana fruit during development or storage.

  13. Gene expression profiling in Entamoeba histolytica identifies key components in iron uptake and metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Adriana Hernández-Cuevas

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica is an ameboid parasite that causes colonic dysentery and liver abscesses in humans. The parasite encounters dramatic changes in iron concentration during its invasion of the host, with relatively low levels in the intestinal lumen and then relatively high levels in the blood and liver. The liver notably contains sources of iron; therefore, the parasite's ability to use these sources might be relevant to its survival in the liver and thus the pathogenesis of liver abscesses. The objective of the present study was to identify factors involved in iron uptake, use and storage in E. histolytica. We compared the respective transcriptomes of E. histolytica trophozoites grown in normal medium (containing around 169 µM iron, low-iron medium (around 123 µM iron, iron-deficient medium (around 91 µM iron, and iron-deficient medium replenished with hemoglobin. The differentially expressed genes included those coding for the ATP-binding cassette transporters and major facilitator transporters (which share homology with bacterial siderophores and heme transporters and genes involved in heme biosynthesis and degradation. Iron deficiency was associated with increased transcription of genes encoding a subset of cell signaling molecules, some of which have previously been linked to adaptation to the intestinal environment and virulence. The present study is the first to have assessed the transcriptome of E. histolytica grown under various iron concentrations. Our results provide insights into the pathways involved in iron uptake and metabolism in this parasite.

  14. Dietary fat influences the expression of contractile and metabolic genes in rat skeletal muscle.

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    Wataru Mizunoya

    Full Text Available Dietary fat plays a major role in obesity, lipid metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases. To determine whether the intake of different types of dietary fats affect the muscle fiber types that govern the metabolic and contractile properties of the skeletal muscle, we fed male Wistar rats with a 15% fat diet derived from different fat sources. Diets composed of soybean oil (n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA-rich, fish oil (n-3 PUFA-rich, or lard (low in PUFAs were administered to the rats for 4 weeks. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC isoforms were used as biomarkers to delineate the skeletal muscle fiber types. Compared with soybean oil intake, fish oil intake showed significantly lower levels of the fast-type MyHC2B and higher levels of the intermediate-type MyHC2X composition in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscle, which is a fast-type dominant muscle. Concomitantly, MyHC2X mRNA levels in fish oil-fed rats were significantly higher than those observed in the soybean oil-fed rats. The MyHC isoform composition in the lard-fed rats was an intermediate between that of the fish oil and soybean oil-fed rats. Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4, and porin mRNA showed significantly upregulated levels in the EDL of fish oil-fed rats compared to those observed in soybean oil-fed and lard-fed rats, implying an activation of oxidative metabolism. In contrast, no changes in the composition of MyHC isoforms was observed in the soleus muscle, which is a slow-type dominant muscle. Fatty acid composition in the serum and the muscle was significantly influenced by the type of dietary fat consumed. In conclusion, dietary fat affects the expression of genes related to the contractile and metabolic properties in the fast-type dominant skeletal muscle, where the activation of oxidative metabolism is more pronounced after fish oil intake than that after soybean oil intake.

  15. The role of polymorphisms in genes of folate metabolism and hyperhomocysteinemia in realization of missed abortion in the Ist trimester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alija Aimbetova

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article explores mechanisms of non-developing the Ist trimester pregnancy on the basis of studying frequency of polymorphic alleles in folate metabolism genes MTHFR C677T, MTHFR A1298C, MTRR A66G, MTR A2756G, homocysteine level, platelet and plasma haemostasis sections.Polymorphism in MTHFR, MTRR, and MTR genes of folate metabolism causes hyperhomocysteinemia and thrombophilic changes. In conditions of genetically accustomed thrombophilic changes the desynchronization of fibrinolysis and fibrin formation processes during implantation occurs that leads to poor trophoblast invasion and its inadequacy, which in turn causes miscarriage due to non-developing pregnancy in the Ist trimester.

  16. Lipoic acid metabolism in Escherichia coli: sequencing and functional characterization of the lipA and lipB genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, K E; Cronan, J E

    1993-01-01

    Two genes, lipA and lipB, involved in lipoic acid biosynthesis or metabolism were characterized by DNA sequence analysis. The translational initiation site of the lipA gene was established, and the lipB gene product was identified as a 25-kDa protein. Overproduction of LipA resulted in the formation of inclusion bodies, from which the protein was readily purified. Cells grown under strictly anaerobic conditions required the lipA and lipB gene products for the synthesis of a functional glycine...

  17. Linking Central Metabolism with Increased Pathway Flux: l-Valine Accumulation by Corynebacterium glutamicum

    OpenAIRE

    Radmacher, Eva; Vaitsikova, Adela; Burger, Udo; Krumbach, Karin; Sahm, Hermann; Eggeling, Lothar

    2002-01-01

    Mutants of Corynebacterium glutamicum were made and enzymatically characterized to clone ilvD and ilvE, which encode dihydroxy acid dehydratase and transaminase B, respectively. These genes of the branched-chain amino acid synthesis were overexpressed together with ilvBN (which encodes acetohydroxy acid synthase) and ilvC (which encodes isomeroreductase) in the wild type, which does not excrete l-valine, to result in an accumulation of this amino acid to a concentration of 42 mM. Since l-vali...

  18. Biosynthesis of storage compounds by Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and global identification of genes involved in their metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rost Enrique

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the genus Rhodococcus are frequently found in soil and other natural environments and are highly resistant to stresses common in those environments. The accumulation of storage compounds permits cells to survive and metabolically adapt during fluctuating environmental conditions. The purpose of this study was to perform a genome-wide bioinformatic analysis of key genes encoding metabolism of diverse storage compounds by Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and to examine its ability to synthesize and accumulate triacylglycerols (TAG, wax esters, polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA, glycogen and polyphosphate (PolyP. Results We identified in the RHA1 genome: 14 genes encoding putative wax ester synthase/acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase enzymes (WS/DGATs likely involved in TAG and wax esters biosynthesis; a total of 54 genes coding for putative lipase/esterase enzymes possibly involved in TAG and wax ester degradation; 3 sets of genes encoding PHA synthases and PHA depolymerases; 6 genes encoding key enzymes for glycogen metabolism, one gene coding for a putative polyphosphate kinase and 3 putative exopolyphosphatase genes. Where possible, key amino acid residues in the above proteins (generally in active sites, effectors binding sites or substrate binding sites were identified in order to support gene identification. RHA1 cells grown under N-limiting conditions, accumulated TAG as the main storage compounds plus wax esters, PHA (with 3-hydroxybutyrate and 3-hydroxyvalerate monomers, glycogen and PolyP. Rhodococcus members were previously known to accumulate TAG, wax esters, PHAs and polyP, but this is the first report of glycogen accumulation in this genus. Conclusion RHA1 possess key genes to accumulate diverse storage compounds. Under nitrogen-limiting conditions lipids are the principal storage compounds. An extensive capacity to synthesize and metabolize storage compounds appears to contribute versatility to RHA1 in its

  19. Abundance of ruminal bacteria, epithelial gene expression, and systemic biomarkers of metabolism and inflammation are altered during the peripartal period in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minuti, A; Palladino, A; Khan, M J; Alqarni, S; Agrawal, A; Piccioli-Capelli, F; Hidalgo, F; Cardoso, F C; Trevisi, E; Loor, J J

    2015-12-01

    Seven multiparous Holstein cows with a ruminal fistula were used to investigate the changes in rumen microbiota, gene expression of the ruminal epithelium, and blood biomarkers of metabolism and inflammation during the transition period. Samples of ruminal digesta, biopsies of ruminal epithelium, and blood were obtained during -14 through 28d in milk (DIM). A total of 35 genes associated with metabolism, transport, inflammation, and signaling were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Among metabolic-related genes, expression of HMGCS2 increased gradually from -14 to a peak at 28 DIM, underscoring its central role in epithelial ketogenesis. The decrease of glucose and the increase of nonesterified fatty acids and β-hydroxybutyrate in the blood after calving confirmed the state of negative energy balance. Similarly, increases in bilirubin and decreases in albumin concentrations after calving were indicative of alterations in liver function and inflammation. Despite those systemic signs, lower postpartal expression of TLR2, TLR4, CD45, and NFKB1 indicated the absence of inflammation within the epithelium. Alternatively, these could reflect an adaptation to react against inducers of the immune system arising in the rumen (e.g., bacterial endotoxins). The downregulation of RXRA, INSR, and RPS6KB1 between -14 and 10 DIM indicated a possible increase in insulin resistance. However, the upregulation of IRS1 during the same time frame could serve to restore sensitivity to insulin of the epithelium as a way to preserve its proliferative capacity. The upregulation of TGFB1 from -14 and 10 DIM coupled with upregulation of both EGFR and EREG from 10 to 28 DIM indicated the existence of 2 waves of epithelial proliferation. However, the downregulation of TGFBR1 from -14 through 28 DIM indicated some degree of cell proliferation arrest. The downregulation of OCLN and TJP1 from -14 to 10 DIM indicated a loss of tight-junction integrity. The gradual upregulation of

  20. Vertebrate patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 4 (PNPLA4) genes and proteins: a gene with a role in retinol metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Roger S

    2012-01-01

    At least eight families of mammalian patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing proteins (PNPLA) (E.C. 3.1.1.3) catalyse the hydrolysis of triglycerides, including PNPLA4 (alternatively PLPL4 or GS2), which also acts as a retinol transacylase and participates in retinol-ester metabolism in the body. Bioinformatic methods were used to predict the amino acid sequences, secondary and tertiary structures and gene locations for PNPLA4 genes and encoded proteins using data from several vertebrate...

  1. Transcription analysis of genes involved in lipid metabolism reveals the role of chromium in reducing body fat in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mostafa; Najaf Panah, Mohammad Javad; Bakhtiarizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Emami, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Chromium was proposed to be an essential trace element over 50 years ago and has been accepted as an essential element for over 30 years. The recent studies indicated that the addition of supra nutritional amounts of chromium to the diet can only be considered as having pharmacological effects. However, the precise mechanism through which chromium acts on lipid, carbohydrate, protein and nucleic acid metabolism are relatively poor studied. To uncover, at least partially, the role of chromium in lipid metabolism, in this study, we evaluated the expression status of eight important genes, involved in fat biosynthesis and lipid metabolism, in four different tissue types (liver, subcutaneous fat, visceral fat, and longissimus muscle) in domestic goat kids feeding on three different chromium levels. The quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) was established for expression analyses with HSP90 gene was used as reference gene. The results showed that supplementation of goats with 1.5mg/day chromium significantly decreases the expression of the ACC1, DGAT1, FABP4, FAS, HSL, LEP genes, but does not affect the expression of the LPL and SCD1 genes in all studied tissues. This study highlights, for the first time, the role of supra nutritional levels of chromium in lipid biosynthesis and metabolism. These findings are of especial importance for improving meat quality in domestic animals. PMID:26302911

  2. Comparative analysis of RNA regulatory elements of amino acid metabolism genes in Actinobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelfand Mikhail S

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Formation of alternative structures in mRNA in response to external stimuli, either direct or mediated by proteins or other RNAs, is a major mechanism of regulation of gene expression in bacteria. This mechanism has been studied in detail using experimental and computational approaches in proteobacteria and Firmicutes, but not in other groups of bacteria. Results Comparative analysis of amino acid biosynthesis operons in Actinobacteria resulted in identification of conserved regions upstream of several operons. Classical attenuators were predicted upstream of trp operons in Corynebacterium spp. and Streptomyces spp., and trpS and leuS genes in some Streptomyces spp. Candidate leader peptides with terminators were observed upstream of ilvB genes in Corynebacterium spp., Mycobacterium spp. and Streptomyces spp. Candidate leader peptides without obvious terminators were found upstream of cys operons in Mycobacterium spp. and several other species. A conserved pseudoknot (named LEU element was identified upstream of leuA operons in most Actinobacteria. Finally, T-boxes likely involved in the regulation of translation initiation were observed upstream of ileS genes from several Actinobacteria. Conclusion The metabolism of tryptophan, cysteine and leucine in Actinobacteria seems to be regulated on the RNA level. In some cases the mechanism is classical attenuation, but in many cases some components of attenuators are missing. The most interesting case seems to be the leuA operon preceded by the LEU element that may fold into a conserved pseudoknot or an alternative structure. A LEU element has been observed in a transposase gene from Bifidobacterium longum, but it is not conserved in genes encoding closely related transposases despite a very high level of protein similarity. One possibility is that the regulatory region of the leuA has been co-opted from some element involved in transposition. Analysis of phylogenetic patterns

  3. Emiliania Huxleyi (Prymnesiophyceae): Nitrogen-metabolism genes and their expression in response to external nitrogen souces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Annette; LaRoche, Julie; Richardson, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    The availability and composition of dissolved nitrogen in ocean waters are factors that influence species composition in natural phytoplankton communities. The same factors affect the ratio of organic to inorganic carbon incorporation in calcifying species, such as the coccolithophore Emiliania...... this study, the complete amino acid sequences for three functional genes involved in nitrogen metabolism in E. huxleyi were identified: a putative formamidase, a glutamine synthetase (GSII family), and assimilatory nitrate reductase. Expression patterns of the three enzymes in cells grown on inorganic...... as well as organic nitrogen sources indicated reduced expression levels of nitrate reductase when cells were grown on NH4+ and a reduced expression level of the putative formamidase when growth was on NO3-. The data reported here suggest the presence of a nitrogen preference hierarchy in E. huxleyi...

  4. Polyamine metabolism-based dual functional gene delivery system to synergistically inhibit the proliferation of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Peng-Fei; Xing, Lei; Qiao, Jian-Bin; Zhang, Jia-Liang; He, Yu-Jing; Zhang, Mei; Lyu, Jin-Yuan; Luo, Cheng-Qiong; Jin, Liang; Jiang, Hu-Lin

    2016-06-15

    Polyamine content, which is associated with tumor growth, can be regulated by ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase (SAMDC), two key enzymes in polyamine biosynthesis. Here we aim to develop a pH-responsive cationic poly(agmatine) based on a polyamine analogue-agmatine that can dually function as a gene delivery vector as well as an anticancer agent by inhibiting ODC after intracellular degradation. The core-shell nanoparticles, formed by poly(agmatine)/SAMDC siRNA complex as a core, were coated with bovine serum albumin for better in vivo circulation stability and tumor targeting. When the nanoparticles were taken up by tumor cells via endocytosis and degraded in endosome, the released agmatine and SAMDC siRNA can synergistically inhibit polyamines biosynthesis, inducing inhibition of tumor proliferation. Our study offered a potential way in tumor therapy based on polyamine metabolism. PMID:27102990

  5. Protective effect of myostatin gene deletion on aging-related muscle metabolic decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabi, B; Pauly, M; Carillon, J; Carnac, G; Favier, F B; Fouret, G; Bonafos, B; Vanterpool, F; Vernus, B; Coudray, C; Feillet-Coudray, C; Bonnieu, A; Lacan, D; Koechlin-Ramonatxo, C

    2016-06-01

    While myostatin gene deletion is a promising therapy to fight muscle loss during aging, this approach induces also skeletal muscle metabolic changes such as mitochondrial deficits, redox alteration and increased fatigability. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of aging on these features in aged wild-type (WT) and mstn knockout (KO) mice. Moreover, to determine whether an enriched-antioxidant diet may be useful to prevent age-related disorders, we orally administered to the two genotypes a melon concentrate rich in superoxide dismutase for 12 weeks. We reported that mitochondrial functional abnormalities persisted (decreased state 3 and 4 of respiration; p<0.05) in skeletal muscle from aged KO mice; however, differences with WT mice were attenuated at old age in line with reduced difference on running endurance between the two genotypes. Interestingly, we showed an increase in glutathione levels, associated with lower lipid peroxidation levels in KO muscle. Enriched antioxidant diet reduced the aging-related negative effects on maximal aerobic velocity and running limit time (p<0.05) in both groups, with systemic adaptations on body weight. The redox status and the hypertrophic phenotype appeared to be beneficial to KO mice, mitigating the effect of aging on the skeletal muscle metabolic remodeling. PMID:26944368

  6. Hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression through the life stages of the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice S Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs. No comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs has been carried out through life stages in any species. RESULTS: Using full-genome arrays, the mRNA expression of all XMETs and their regulatory proteins was examined during fetal (gestation day (GD 19, neonatal (postnatal day (PND 7, prepubescent (PND32, middle age (12 months, and old age (18 and 24 months in the C57BL/6J (C57 mouse liver and compared to adults. Fetal and neonatal life stages exhibited dramatic differences in XMET mRNA expression compared to the relatively minor effects of old age. The total number of XMET probe sets that differed from adults was 636, 500, 84, 5, 43, and 102 for GD19, PND7, PND32, 12 months, 18 months and 24 months, respectively. At all life stages except PND32, under-expressed genes outnumbered over-expressed genes. The altered XMETs included those in all of the major metabolic and transport phases including introduction of reactive or polar groups (Phase I, conjugation (Phase II and excretion (Phase III. In the fetus and neonate, parallel increases in expression were noted in the dioxin receptor, Nrf2 components and their regulated genes while nuclear receptors and regulated genes were generally down-regulated. Suppression of male-specific XMETs was observed at early (GD19, PND7 and to a lesser extent, later life stages (18 and 24 months. A number of female-specific XMETs exhibited a spike in expression centered at PND7. CONCLUSIONS: The analysis revealed dramatic differences in the expression of the XMETs, especially in the fetus and neonate that are partially dependent on gender-dependent factors. XMET expression can be used to predict life stage-specific responses to environmental chemicals and drugs.

  7. Gene therapy for misfolding protein diseases of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Sebastian, Waldy; Samaranch, Lluis; Kells, Adrian P; Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof S

    2013-07-01

    Protein aggregation as a result of misfolding is a common theme underlying neurodegenerative diseases. Accordingly, most recent studies aim to prevent protein misfolding and/or aggregation as a strategy to treat these pathologies. For instance, state-of-the-art approaches, such as silencing protein overexpression by means of RNA interference, are being tested with positive outcomes in preclinical models of animals overexpressing the corresponding protein. Therapies designed to treat central nervous system diseases should provide accurate delivery of the therapeutic agent and long-term or chronic expression by means of a nontoxic delivery vehicle. After several years of technical advances and optimization, gene therapy emerges as a promising approach able to fulfill those requirements. In this review we will summarize the latest improvements achieved in gene therapy for central nervous system diseases associated with protein misfolding (e.g., amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, and prion diseases), as well as the most recent approaches in this field to treat these pathologies. PMID:23700209

  8. Effect of Mitochondrial Dysfunction on Carbon Metabolism and Gene Expression in Flower Tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria V.Busi; Maria E.Gomez-Lobato; Sebastian P.Rius; Valeria R.Turowski; Paula Casati; Eduardo J.Zabaleta; Diego F.Gomez-Casati; Alejandro Araya

    2011-01-01

    We characterized the transcriptomic response of transgenic plants carrying a mitochondrial dysfunction induced by the expression of the unedited form of the ATP synthase subunit 9.The u-ATP9 transgene driven by A9 and APETALA3 promoters induce mitochondrial dysfunction revealed by a decrease jn both oxygen uptake and adenine nucleotides(ATP,ADP)levels without changes in the ATP/ADP ratio.Furthermore,we measured an increase in ROS accumulation and a decrease in glutathione and ascorbate levels with a concomitant oxidative stress response.The transcriptome analysis of young Arabidopsis flowers,validated by Qrt-PCR and enzymatic or functional tests,showed dramatic changes in u-ATP9 plants.Both lines display a modification in the expression of various genes involved in carbon,lipid,and cell wall metabolism,suggesting that an important metabolic readjustment occurs in plants with a mitochondrial dysfunction.Interestingly,transcript levels involved in mitochondrial respiration,protein synthesis,and degradation are affected.Moreover,the Ievels of several mRNAs encoding for transcription factors and DNA binding proteins were also changed.Some of them are involved in stress and hormone responses,suggesting that several signaling pathways overlap.Indeed,the transcriptome data revealed that the mitochondrial dysfunction dramatically alters the expression of genes involved in signaling pathways,including those related to ethylene,absicic acid,and auxin signal transduction.Our data suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction model used in this report may be usefuI to uncover the retrograde signaling mechanism between the nucleus and mitochondria in plant cells.

  9. The association between common genetic variation in the FTO gene and metabolic syndrome in Han Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Tong; ZHANG Li-li; ZHANG Yun; SUN Xiao-fang; ZHANG Qian; HUANG Yi; XIAO Xin-hua; WANG Duen-mei; DIAO Cheng-ming; ZHANG Feng; XU Ling-ling; ZHANG Yong-biao; LI Wen-hui

    2010-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) identified FTO gene as a locus conferring increased risk for common obesity in many populations with European ancestry. However, the involvement of FTO gene in obesity or T2DM related metabolic traits has not been consistently established in Chinese populations. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of FTO genetic polymorphisms with metabolic syndrome (MetS) in Han Chinese.Methods We tested 41 FTO single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for association between FTO and MetS-related traits. There were a total of 236 unrelated subjects (108 cases and 128 controls), grouped according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria.Results Of the 41 SNPs examined, only SNP rs8047395 exhibited statistical significance (P=0.026) under a recessive model, after Bonferroni adjustment for multiple testing (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.11-2.42; P=0.014). The common distributions of this polymorphism among Chinese-with a minor allele frequency (MAF) of 36% in the control group versus 48% in the MetS group-greatly improved our test power in a relatively small sample size for an association study. Previously identified obesity-(or T2DM-) associated FTO SNPs were less common in Han Chinese and were not associated with MetS in this study. No significant associations were found between our FTO SNPs and any endophenotypes of MetS.Conclusions A more common risk-conferring variant of FTO for MetS was identified in Han Chinese. Our study substantiated that genetic variations in FTO locus are involved in the pathogenesis of MetS.

  10. Horizontal gene transfer confers fermentative metabolism in the respiratory-deficient plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ienne, Susan; Pappas, Georgios; Benabdellah, Karim; González, Antonio; Zingales, Bianca

    2012-04-01

    Among trypanosomatids, the genus Phytomonas is the only one specifically adapted to infect plants. These hosts provide a particular habitat with a plentiful supply of carbohydrates. Phytomonas sp. lacks a cytochrome-mediated respiratory chain and Krebs cycle, and ATP production relies predominantly on glycolysis. We have characterised the complete gene encoding a putative pyruvate/indolepyruvate decarboxylase (PDC/IPDC) (548 amino acids) of P. serpens, that displays high amino acid sequence similarity with phytobacteria and Leishmania enzymes. No orthologous PDC/IPDC genes were found in Trypanosoma cruzi or T. brucei. Conservation of the PDC/IPDC gene sequence was verified in 14 Phytomonas isolates. A phylogenetic analysis shows that Phytomonas protein is robustly monophyletic with Leishmania spp. and C. fasciculata enzymes. In the trees this clade appears as a sister group of indolepyruvate decarboxylases of γ-proteobacteria. This supports the proposition that a horizontal gene transfer event from a donor phytobacteria to a recipient ancestral trypanosome has occurred prior to the separation between Phytomonas, Leishmania and Crithidia. We have measured the PDC activity in P. serpens cell extracts. The enzyme has a Km value for pyruvate of 1.4mM. The acquisition of a PDC, a key enzyme in alcoholic fermentation, explains earlier observations that ethanol is one of the major end-products of glucose catabolism under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This represents an alternative and necessary route to reoxidise part of the NADH produced in the highly demanding glycolytic pathway and highlights the importance of this type of event in metabolic adaptation. PMID:22293462

  11. Coe genes are expressed in differentiating neurons in the central nervous system of protostomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Demilly

    Full Text Available Genes of the coe (collier/olfactory/early B-cell factor family encode Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factors that are widely conserved in metazoans and involved in many developmental processes, neurogenesis in particular. Whereas their functions during vertebrate neural tube formation have been well documented, very little is known about their expression and role during central nervous system (CNS development in protostomes. Here we characterized the CNS expression of coe genes in the insect Drosophila melanogaster and the polychaete annelid Platynereis dumerilii, which belong to different subgroups of protostomes and show strikingly different modes of development. In the Drosophila ventral nerve cord, we found that the Collier-expressing cells form a subpopulation of interneurons with diverse molecular identities and neurotransmitter phenotypes. We also demonstrate that collier is required for the proper differentiation of some interneurons belonging to the Eve-Lateral cluster. In Platynereis dumerilii, we cloned a single coe gene, Pdu-coe, and found that it is exclusively expressed in post mitotic neural cells. Using an original technique of in silico 3D registration, we show that Pdu-coe is co-expressed with many different neuronal markers and therefore that, like in Drosophila, its expression defines a heterogeneous population of neurons with diverse molecular identities. Our detailed characterization and comparison of coe gene expression in the CNS of two distantly-related protostomes suggest conserved roles of coe genes in neuronal differentiation in this clade. As similar roles have also been observed in vertebrates, this function was probably already established in the last common ancestor of all bilaterians.

  12. Impact of dietary protein on lipid metabolism-related gene expression in porcine adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Changrong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High dietary protein can reduce fat deposition in animal subcutaneous adipose tissue, but little is known about the mechanism. Methods Sixty Wujin pigs of about 15 kg weight were fed either high protein (HP: 18% or low protein (LP: 14% diets, and slaughtered at body weights of 30, 60 or 100 kg. Bloods were collected to measure serum parameters. Subcutaneous adipose tissues were sampled for determination of adipocyte size, protein content, lipid metabolism-related gene expression, and enzyme activities. Results HP significantly reduced adipocyte size, fat meat percentage and backfat thickness, but significantly increased daily gain, lean meat percentage and loin eye area at 60 and 100 kg. Serum free fatty acid and triglyceride concentrations in the HP group were significantly higher than in the LP group. Serum glucose and insulin concentrations were not significantly affected by dietary protein at any body weight. HP significantly reduced gene expression of acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC, fatty acid synthase (FAS and sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c at 60 kg and 100 kg; however, the mRNA level and enzyme activity of FAS were increased at 30 kg. HP promoted gene and protein expression and enzyme activities of lipoprotein lipase (LPL, carmitine palmtoyltransferase-1B (CPT-1B, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ and adipocyte-fatty acid binding proteins (A-FABP at 60 kg, but reduced their expression at 100 kg. Gene expression and enzyme activity of hormone sensitive lipase (HSL was reduced markedly at 60 kg but increased at 100 kg by the high dietary protein. Levels of mRNA, enzyme activities and protein expression of ACC, FAS, SREBP-1c and PPARγ in both LP and HP groups increased with increasing body weight. However, gene and protein expression levels/enzyme activities of LPL, CPT-1B, A-FABP and HSL in both groups were higher at 60 kg than at 30 and 100 kg. Conclusion Fat deposition in Wujin

  13. Implications of central obesity-related variants in LYPLAL1, NRXN3, MSRA, and TFAP2B on quantitative metabolic traits in adult Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Dorthe Sadowa; Banasik, Karina; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Sandholt, Camilla H; Sandbæk, Annelli; Lauritzen, Torsten; Jørgensen, Torben; Witte, Daniel Rinse; Holm, Jens-Christian; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf

    2011-01-01

    -binding protein 2 beta (TFAP2B) associate with measures of central obesity. To elucidate potential underlying phenotypes we aimed to investigate whether these variants associated with: 1) quantitative metabolic traits, 2) anthropometric measures (waist circumference (WC), waist-hip ratio, and BMI), or 3) type 2...

  14. Issues in the in vivo measurement of glucose metabolism of human central nervous system tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Chiro, G; Brooks, R A; Patronas, N J; Bairamian, D; Kornblith, P L; Smith, B H; Mansi, L; Barker, J

    1984-01-01

    Over 150 cases of central nervous system tumors have been studied with positron emission tomography using fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG) as a tracer. From this material 100 consecutive cases of cerebral glioma have been reviewed and analyzed. The results show a strong correlation of tumor grade with glycolytic rate, with visual "hot spots" present in all high-grade neoplasms and in only four low-grade tumors. The quantitative accuracy is limited by three basic factors. First, the measurement of tissue uptake, as compared with the parent technique, autoradiography, is more difficult because detection must be done outside the body. Effects such as scattered radiation and self-attenuation introduce errors unless properly corrected. A more serious problem when measuring small structures, such as a rim-shaped high-grade glioma, is the limited spatial resolution. The most advanced scanner, the Neuro-PET, has a resolution of 6 to 7 mm. Second, corrections are needed for backflow, including free tracer at the time of the scan that will return to the blood and "trapped" tracer that will backflow because of the presence of phosphatase. These corrections are calculated from the blood activity using nominal rate constants for 18FDG. Our study found no significant alteration in rate constants between normal and tumoral tissue. Finally, a lumped constant is needed to correct for kinetic differences between 18FDG and glucose. If there is a change in the mechanism of either membrane transport or the hexokinase reaction, the lumped constant may change. However, measurements of actual glucose utilization in tissue culture lines from six patients support the 18FDG results. PMID:6331282

  15. Identification and Characterization of a Rat Novel Gene RSEP4 Expressed Specifically in Central Nervous System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Dao WANG; Ling-Wei KONG; Zhi-Qin XIE; Yu-Qiu ZHANG; Zhi-Xin LIN; Zhi-Qi ZHAO; Lei YU; Nai-He JING

    2004-01-01

    The low-abundantly expressed genes composed the majorities of the mRNAs expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), and were thought to be important for the normal brain functions. Through differential screening a low-abundance cDNA sublibrary with mRNA from neuropathic pain of chronic constriction injury (CCI) model, we have identified a novel rat gene, rat spinal-cord expression protein 4 gene (RSEP4). The total length ofRSEP4 cDNA is 2006 bp, with a 501 nucleotide open reading frame (ORF) that encodes a 167 amino acid polypeptide. Northern blot revealed that RSEP4 was expressed specifically in the CNS. In situ hybridization showed that the mRNA of RSEP4 was strongly expressed in the CA1, CA2, CA3 and DG regions of hippocampus, the Purkinje cells of cerebellum, and the small sensory neurons of dorsal horn and large motor neurons of ventral horn of spinal cord. Over-expression of RSEP4-EGFP fusion protein in the human embryonic kidney 293T cells showed that RSEP4 protein was mainly localized in the cell cytoplasm. These results suggest that RSEP4 may play some roles in the CNS.

  16. mRNA stability and the unfolding of gene expression in the long-period yeast metabolic cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farina Lorenzo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In yeast, genome-wide periodic patterns associated with energy-metabolic oscillations have been shown recently for both short (approx. 40 min and long (approx. 300 min periods. Results The dynamical regulation due to mRNA stability is found to be an important aspect of the genome-wide coordination of the long-period yeast metabolic cycle. It is shown that for periodic genes, arranged in classes according either to expression profile or to function, the pulses of mRNA abundance have phase and width which are directly proportional to the corresponding turnover rates. Conclusion The cascade of events occurring during the yeast metabolic cycle (and their correlation with mRNA turnover reflects to a large extent the gene expression program observable in other dynamical contexts such as the response to stresses/stimuli.

  17. Regulation of a novel Acidithiobacillus caldus gene cluster involved in metabolism of reduced inorganic sulfur compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzhepishevska, Olena I; Valdés, Jorge; Marcinkeviciene, Liucija; Gallardo, Camelia Algora; Meskys, Rolandas; Bonnefoy, Violaine; Holmes, David S; Dopson, Mark

    2007-11-01

    Acidithiobacillus caldus has been proposed to play a role in the oxidation of reduced inorganic sulfur compounds (RISCs) produced in industrial biomining of sulfidic minerals. Here, we describe the regulation of a new cluster containing the gene encoding tetrathionate hydrolase (tetH), a key enzyme in the RISC metabolism of this bacterium. The cluster contains five cotranscribed genes, ISac1, rsrR, rsrS, tetH, and doxD, coding for a transposase, a two-component response regulator (RsrR and RsrS), tetrathionate hydrolase, and DoxD, respectively. As shown by quantitative PCR, rsrR, tetH, and doxD are upregulated to different degrees in the presence of tetrathionate. Western blot analysis also indicates upregulation of TetH in the presence of tetrathionate, thiosulfate, and pyrite. The tetH cluster is predicted to have two promoters, both of which are functional in Escherichia coli and one of which was mapped by primer extension. A pyrrolo-quinoline quinone binding domain in TetH was predicted by bioinformatic analysis, and the presence of an o-quinone moiety was experimentally verified, suggesting a mechanism for tetrathionate oxidation. PMID:17873067

  18. Xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme gene polymorphisms predict response to lung volume reduction surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeMeo Dawn L

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT, marked variability in response to lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS was observed. We sought to identify genetic differences which may explain some of this variability. Methods In 203 subjects from the NETT Genetics Ancillary Study, four outcome measures were used to define response to LVRS at six months: modified BODE index, post-bronchodilator FEV1, maximum work achieved on a cardiopulmonary exercise test, and University of California, San Diego shortness of breath questionnaire. Sixty-four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped in five genes previously shown to be associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease susceptibility, exercise capacity, or emphysema distribution. Results A SNP upstream from glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTP1; p = 0.003 and a coding SNP in microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1; p = 0.02 were each associated with change in BODE score. These effects appeared to be strongest in patients in the non-upper lobe predominant, low exercise subgroup. A promoter SNP in EPHX1 was associated with change in BODE score (p = 0.008, with the strongest effects in patients with upper lobe predominant emphysema and low exercise capacity. One additional SNP in GSTP1 and three additional SNPs in EPHX1 were associated (p Conclusion Genetic variants in GSTP1 and EPHX1, two genes encoding xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, were predictive of response to LVRS. These polymorphisms may identify patients most likely to benefit from LVRS.

  19. Upregulation of genes involved in cardiac metabolism enhances myocardial resistance to ischemia/reperfusion in the rat heart

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ravingerová, T.; Čarnická, S.; Ledvényiová, V.; Barlaka, E.; Galatou, E.; Chytilová, Anna; Mandíková, Petra; Nemčeková, M.; Adameová, A.; Kolář, František; Lazou, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 62, Suppl.1 (2013), S151-S163. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB12SK164 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : myocardial ischemia * PPAR activation * metabolic genes * delayed preconditioning * WY-14643 Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.487, year: 2013

  20. Wounding of potato tubers induces increases in ABA biosynthesis and catabolism and alters expression of ABA metabolic genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of physical wounding on ABA biosynthesis and catabolism and expression of genes encoding key ABA metabolic enzymes were determined in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers. An increase in ABA and ABA metabolite content was observed 48 h after wounding and remained elevated through 96 h. ...

  1. Relative expression of genes of terpene metabolism in different tissues of Artemisia annua L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundgren Anneli

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, Artemisia annua L. (annual or sweet wormwood has received increasing attention due to the fact that the plant produces the sesquiterpenoid endoperoxide artemisinin, which today is widely used for treatment of malaria. The plant produces relatively small amounts of artemisinin and a worldwide shortage of the drug has led to intense research in order to increase the yield of artemisinin. In order to improve our understanding of terpene metabolism in the plant and to evaluate the competition for precursors, which may influence the yield of artemisinin, we have used qPCR to estimate the expression of 14 genes of terpene metabolism in different tissues. Results The four genes of the artemisinin biosynthetic pathway (amorpha-4,11-diene synthase, amorphadiene-12-hydroxylase, artemisinic aldehyde ∆11(13 reductase and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 showed remarkably higher expression (between ~40- to ~500-fold in flower buds and young leaves compared to other tissues (old leaves, stems, roots, hairy root cultures. Further, dihydroartemisinic aldehyde reductase showed a very high expression only in hairy root cultures. Germacrene A and caryophyllene synthase were mostly expressed in young leaves and flower buds while epi-cedrol synthase was highly expressed in old leaves. 3-Hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase exhibited lower expression in old leaves compared to other tissues. Farnesyldiphosphate synthase, squalene synthase, and 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase showed only modest variation in expression in the different tissues, while expression of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase was 7-8-fold higher in flower buds and young leaves compared to old leaves. Conclusions Four genes of artemisinin biosynthesis were highly expressed in flower buds and young leaves (tissues showing a high density of glandular trichomes. The expression of dihydroartemisinic aldehyde reductase has been suggested to have a

  2. Quantitative candidate gene association studies of metabolic traits in Han Chinese type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, F J; Cai, C Y; Yu, P; Lv, J; Ling, C; Shi, W T; Jiao, H X; Chang, B C; Yang, F H; Tian, Y; Li, M S; Wang, Y H; Zou, L; Shi, J M; Chen, L M; Li, W D

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified many loci associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hyperuricemia, and obesity in various ethnic populations. However, quantitative traits have been less well investigated in Han Chinese T2DM populations. We investigated the association between candidate gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and metabolic syndrome-related quantitative traits in Han Chinese T2DM subjects. Unrelated Han Chinese T2DM patients (1975) were recruited. Eighty-six SNPs were genotyped and tested for association with quantitative traits including lipid profiles, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), serum uric acid (SUA), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), plasma glucose [fasting plasma glucose (FPG)], plasma glucose 120 min post-OGTT (P2PG; OGTT = oral glucose tolerance test), and insulin resistance-related traits. We found that CAMTA1, ABI2, VHL, KAT2B, PKHD1, ESR1, TOX, SLC30A8, SFI1, and MYH9 polymorphisms were associated with HbA1c, FPG, and/or P2PG; GCK, HHEX, TCF7L2, KCNQ1, and TBX5 polymorphisms were associated with insulin resistance-related traits; ABCG2, SLC2A9, and PKHD1 polymorphisms were associated with SUA; CAMTA1, VHL, KAT2B, PON1, NUB1, SLITRK5, SMAD3, FTO, FANCA, and PCSK2 polymorphisms were associated with blood lipid traits; CAMTA1, SPAG16, TOX, KCNQ1, ACACB, and MYH9 polymorphisms were associated with blood pressure; and UBE2E3, SPAG16, SLC2A9, CDKAL1, CDKN2A/B, TCF7L2, SMAD3, and PNPLA3 polymorphisms were associated with BMI (all P values <0.05). Some of the candidate genes were associated with metabolic and anthropometric traits in T2DM in Han Chinese. Although none of these associations reached genome-wide significance (P < 5 x 10(-8)), genes and loci identified in this study are worthy of further replication and investigation. PMID:26634513

  3. New concepts of the central control of reproduction, integrating influence of stress, metabolic state, and season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, I J; Arbabi, L

    2016-07-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone is the primary driver of reproductive function and pulsatile GnRH secretion from the brain causes the synthesis and secretion of LH and FSH from the pituitary gland. Recent work has revealed that the secretion of GnRH is controlled at the level of the GnRH secretory terminals in the median eminence. At this level, projections of kisspeptin cells from the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus are seen to be closely associated with fibers and terminals of GnRH cells. Direct application of kisspeptin into the median eminence causes release of GnRH. The kisspeptin cells are activated at the time of a natural "pulse" secretion of GnRH, as reflected in the secretion of LH. This appears to be due to input to the kisspeptin cells from glutamatergic cells in the basal hypothalamus, indicating that more than 1 neural element is involved in the secretion of GnRH. Because the GnRH secretory terminals are outside the blood-brain barrier, factors such as kisspeptin may be administered systemically to cause GnRH secretion; this offers opportunities for manipulation of the reproductive axis using factors that do not cross the blood-brain barrier. In particular, kisspeptin or analogs of the same may be used to activate reproduction in the nonbreeding season of domestic animals. Another brain peptide that influences reproductive function is gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH). Work in sheep shows that this peptide acts on GnRH neuronal perikarya, but projections to the median eminence also allow secretion into the hypophysial portal blood and action of GnIH on pituitary gonadotropes. GnIH cells are upregulated in anestrus, and infusion of GnIH can block the ovulatory surge in GnRH and/or LH secretion. Metabolic status may also affect the secretion of reproduction, and this could involve action of gut peptides and leptin. Neuropeptide Y and Y-receptor ligands have a negative impact on reproduction, and Neuropeptide Y production is markedly increased in

  4. Linked gene networks involved in nitrogen and carbon metabolism and levels of water-soluble carbohydrate accumulation in wheat stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, C Lynne; Casu, Rosanne E; Rattey, Allan; Dreccer, M Fernanda; Kam, Jason W; van Herwaarden, Anthony F; Shorter, Ray; Xue, Gang Ping

    2011-12-01

    High levels of water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) provide an important source of stored assimilate for grain filling in wheat. To better understand the interaction between carbohydrate metabolism and other metabolic processes associated with the WSC trait, a genome-wide expression analysis was performed using eight field-grown lines from the high and low phenotypic tails of a wheat population segregating for WSC and the Affymetrix wheat genome array. The 259 differentially expressed probe sets could be assigned to 26 functional category bins, as defined using MapMan software. There were major differences in the categories to which the differentially expressed probe sets were assigned; for example, probe sets upregulated in high relative to low WSC lines were assigned to category bins such as amino acid metabolism, protein degradation and transport and to be involved in starch synthesis-related processes (carbohydrate metabolism bin), whereas downregulated probe sets were assigned to cell wall-related bins, amino acid synthesis and stress and were involved in sucrose breakdown. Using the set of differentially expressed genes as input, chemical-protein network analyses demonstrated a linkage between starch and N metabolism via pyridoxal phosphate. Twelve C and N metabolism-related genes were selected for analysis of their expression response to varying N and water treatments in the field in the four high and four low WSC progeny lines; the two nitrogen/amino acid metabolism genes demonstrated a consistent negative association between their level of expression and level of WSC. Our results suggest that the assimilation of nitrogen into amino acids is an important factor that influences the levels of WSC in the stems of field-grown wheat. PMID:21789636

  5. Glucose Metabolism Gene Expression Patterns and Tumor Uptake of {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose After Radiation Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, George D., E-mail: george.wilson@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Beaumont BioBank, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Thibodeau, Bryan J.; Fortier, Laura E.; Pruetz, Barbara L. [Beaumont BioBank, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Galoforo, Sandra; Baschnagel, Andrew M.; Chunta, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Oliver Wong, Ching Yee [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Molecular Imaging Medicine, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Yan, Di; Marples, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Huang, Jiayi [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether radiation treatment influences the expression of glucose metabolism genes and compromises the potential use of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) as a tool to monitor the early response of head and neck cancer xenografts to radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Low passage head and neck squamous cancer cells (UT14) were injected to the flanks of female nu/nu mice to generate xenografts. After tumors reached a size of 500 mm{sup 3} they were treated with either sham RT or 15 Gy in 1 fraction. At different time points, days 3, 9, and 16 for controls and days 4, 7, 12, 21, 30, and 40 after irradiation, 2 to 3 mice were assessed with dynamic FDG-PET acquisition over 2 hours. Immediately after the FDG-PET the tumors were harvested for global gene expression analysis and immunohistochemical evaluation of GLUT1 and HK2. Different analytic parameters were used to process the dynamic PET data. Results: Radiation had no effect on key genes involved in FDG uptake and metabolism but did alter other genes in the HIF1α and glucose transport–related pathways. In contrast to the lack of effect on gene expression, changes in the protein expression patterns of the key genes GLUT1/SLC2A1 and HK2 were observed after radiation treatment. The changes in GLUT1 protein expression showed some correlation with dynamic FDG-PET parameters, such as the kinetic index. Conclusion: {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography changes after RT would seem to represent an altered metabolic state and not a direct effect on the key genes regulating FDG uptake and metabolism.

  6. Central Role of Glutamate Metabolism in the Maintenance of Nitrogen Homeostasis in Normal and Hyperammonemic Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur J. L. Cooper

    2016-03-01

    enzyme pyruvate carboxylase. Here, we suggest that glutamate may constitute a buffer or bulwark against changes in cerebral amine and ammonia nitrogen. Although the glutamate transporters are briefly discussed, the major emphasis of the present review is on the enzymology contributing to the maintenance of glutamate levels under normal and hyperammonemic conditions. Emphasis will also be placed on the central role of glutamate in the glutamine-glutamate and glutamine-GABA neurotransmitter cycles between neurons and astrocytes. Finally, we provide a brief and selective discussion of neuropathology associated with altered cerebral glutamate levels.

  7. Central Role of Glutamate Metabolism in the Maintenance of Nitrogen Homeostasis in Normal and Hyperammonemic Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Arthur J L; Jeitner, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    . Here, we suggest that glutamate may constitute a buffer or bulwark against changes in cerebral amine and ammonia nitrogen. Although the glutamate transporters are briefly discussed, the major emphasis of the present review is on the enzymology contributing to the maintenance of glutamate levels under normal and hyperammonemic conditions. Emphasis will also be placed on the central role of glutamate in the glutamine-glutamate and glutamine-GABA neurotransmitter cycles between neurons and astrocytes. Finally, we provide a brief and selective discussion of neuropathology associated with altered cerebral glutamate levels. PMID:27023624

  8. Genes responsible for vaginal extracellular matrix metabolism are modulated by women's reproductive cycle and menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Shynlova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To analyze the expression of genes involved in extracellular matrix (ECM biogenesis and remodeling in vaginal tissue of women with clinically normal pelvic floor support (defined as controls according to the phase of menstrual cycle and postmenopausal women with and without pelvic organ prolapse (POP. Materials and Methods This study examined the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs, and the Lysyl oxidase (LOX family genes in the anterior vaginal wall of Caucasian women by real-time RT-PCR. Initially, mRNA expression was assessed in premenopausal controls in the secretory (group 1, n = 10 vs. proliferative (group 2, n = 8 phase of menstrual cycle. In addition, we compared premenopausal controls in the proliferative phase (group 2 vs. postmenopausal controls (group 3, n = 5. Finally, we analyzed postmenopausal controls (group 3 vs. postmenopausal women with advanced POP (group 4, n = 13. Results According to the phase of menstrual cycle, MMP1 was significantly reduced (p = 0.003, whereas the expression of TIMP1 and LOXL4 was significantly up-regulated during proliferative phase (both p < 0.01 when compared to the secretory phase in premenopausal control women. Regarding menopausal status/ageing, all MMPs were down-regulated, while TIMP3, TIMP4 and LOXL2 were significantly up-regulated in postmenopausal control women when compared to premenopausal controls (p = 0.005, p = 0.01 and p < 0.001, correspondingly. TIMP4 and LOXL2 mRNA levels were significantly decreased in postmenopausal POP patients compared to asymptomatic postmenopausal controls (p < 0.01 for both. Conclusions Our results indicate that ovarian cycle and age-related changes influence the expression of genes encoding proteins responsible for ECM metabolism in human vagina. Moreover, POP is associated with alteration in vaginal ECM components after menopause.

  9. Gene Mutation Profiles in Primary Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma of Central Nervous System: Next Generation Sequencing Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorovic Balint, Milena; Jelicic, Jelena; Mihaljevic, Biljana; Kostic, Jelena; Stanic, Bojana; Balint, Bela; Pejanovic, Nadja; Lucic, Bojana; Tosic, Natasa; Marjanovic, Irena; Stojiljkovic, Maja; Karan-Djurasevic, Teodora; Perisic, Ognjen; Rakocevic, Goran; Popovic, Milos; Raicevic, Sava; Bila, Jelena; Antic, Darko; Andjelic, Bosko; Pavlovic, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    The existence of a potential primary central nervous system lymphoma-specific genomic signature that differs from the systemic form of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has been suggested, but is still controversial. We investigated 19 patients with primary DLBCL of central nervous system (DLBCL CNS) using the TruSeq Amplicon Cancer Panel (TSACP) for 48 cancer-related genes. Next generation sequencing (NGS) analyses have revealed that over 80% of potentially protein-changing mutations were located in eight genes (CTNNB1, PIK3CA, PTEN, ATM, KRAS, PTPN11, TP53 and JAK3), pointing to the potential role of these genes in lymphomagenesis. TP53 was the only gene harboring mutations in all 19 patients. In addition, the presence of mutated TP53 and ATM genes correlated with a higher total number of mutations in other analyzed genes. Furthermore, the presence of mutated ATM correlated with poorer event-free survival (EFS) (p = 0.036). The presence of the mutated SMO gene correlated with earlier disease relapse (p = 0.023), inferior event-free survival (p = 0.011) and overall survival (OS) (p = 0.017), while mutations in the PTEN gene were associated with inferior OS (p = 0.048). Our findings suggest that the TP53 and ATM genes could be involved in the molecular pathophysiology of primary DLBCL CNS, whereas mutations in the PTEN and SMO genes could affect survival regardless of the initial treatment approach. PMID:27164089

  10. Gene Mutation Profiles in Primary Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma of Central Nervous System: Next Generation Sequencing Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorovic Balint, Milena; Jelicic, Jelena; Mihaljevic, Biljana; Kostic, Jelena; Stanic, Bojana; Balint, Bela; Pejanovic, Nadja; Lucic, Bojana; Tosic, Natasa; Marjanovic, Irena; Stojiljkovic, Maja; Karan-Djurasevic, Teodora; Perisic, Ognjen; Rakocevic, Goran; Popovic, Milos; Raicevic, Sava; Bila, Jelena; Antic, Darko; Andjelic, Bosko; Pavlovic, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    The existence of a potential primary central nervous system lymphoma-specific genomic signature that differs from the systemic form of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has been suggested, but is still controversial. We investigated 19 patients with primary DLBCL of central nervous system (DLBCL CNS) using the TruSeq Amplicon Cancer Panel (TSACP) for 48 cancer-related genes. Next generation sequencing (NGS) analyses have revealed that over 80% of potentially protein-changing mutations were located in eight genes (CTNNB1, PIK3CA, PTEN, ATM, KRAS, PTPN11, TP53 and JAK3), pointing to the potential role of these genes in lymphomagenesis. TP53 was the only gene harboring mutations in all 19 patients. In addition, the presence of mutated TP53 and ATM genes correlated with a higher total number of mutations in other analyzed genes. Furthermore, the presence of mutated ATM correlated with poorer event-free survival (EFS) (p = 0.036). The presence of the mutated SMO gene correlated with earlier disease relapse (p = 0.023), inferior event-free survival (p = 0.011) and overall survival (OS) (p = 0.017), while mutations in the PTEN gene were associated with inferior OS (p = 0.048). Our findings suggest that the TP53 and ATM genes could be involved in the molecular pathophysiology of primary DLBCL CNS, whereas mutations in the PTEN and SMO genes could affect survival regardless of the initial treatment approach. PMID:27164089

  11. Bisphenol A Exposure May Induce Hepatic Lipid Accumulation via Reprogramming the DNA Methylation Patterns of Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Zhang-Hong; Pan, Jie-Xue; Jin, Lu-Yang; Xu, Hai-Yan; Yu, Tian-Tian; Ullah, Kamran; Rahman, Tanzil Ur; Ren, Jun; Cheng, Yi; Dong, Xin-Yan; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role of bisphenol A (BPA) in metabolic disorders. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Using a mouse BPA exposure model, we investigated the effects of long-term BPA exposure on lipid metabolism and the underlying mechanisms. The male mice exposed to BPA (0.5 μg BPA /kg/day, a human relevant dose) for 10 months exhibited significant hepatic accumulation of triglycerides and cholesterol. The liver cells from the BPA-exposed mice showed significantly increased expression levels of the genes related to lipid synthesis. These liver cells showed decreased DNA methylation levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2, and increased expression levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2 that may upregulate the genes related to lipid synthesis. The expression levels of DNA methyltransferases were decreased in BPA-exposed mouse liver. Hepa1-6 cell line treated with BPA showed decreased expression levels of DNA methyltransferases and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. DNA methyltransferase knockdown in Hepa1-6 led to hypo-methylation and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. Our results suggest that long-term BPA exposure could induce hepatic lipid accumulation, which may be due to the epigenetic reprogramming of the genes involved in lipid metabolism, such as the alterations of DNA methylation patterns.

  12. Fluvastatin increases insulin-like growth factor-1 gene expression in rat model of metabolic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was found to have a role in both glucose homeostasis and cardiovascular diseases. The present study was designed to compare the effects of fluvastatin and metformin on IGF-1 mRNA expression within the liver and other individual components of the metabolic syndrome induced in rats by high fructose feeding. Rats fed 60% fructose in diet for 6 weeks were treated daily with fluvastatin (3.75 mg/kg/day) during the last two weeks and were compared with untreated fructose fed group. Fasting levels of plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, insulin, nitric oxide products, IGF-1 mRNA within the liver as well as systolic blood pressure and body weight were determined. Compared to control rats, the fructose fed group developed hypertension, hyperlipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and endothelial dysfunction as well as decreased levels of plasma IGF-1 and its mRNA within the liver. Fructose fed rats treated with fluvastatin or metformin for 2 weeks showed significant decrease in plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, insulin and glucose levels compared to untreated fructose fed group. Also, both drugs increased significantly plasma levels of nitric oxide products and IGF-1 together with significant increase in IGF-1 mRNA within the liver. However, only metformin treated rats showed significant decrease in systolic blood pressure compared to fructose fed group. This study showed that in a rat model of insulin resistance, fluvastatin improves the metabolic profile and increases plasma level of IGF-1 and its gene expression as effective as metformin. (author)

  13. Impact of the PPAR gamma-2 gene polymorphisms on the metabolic state of postmenopausal women

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BOGNA GRYGIEL-GÓRNIAK; MARIA MOSOR; JUSTYNA MARCINKOWSKA; JULIUSZ PRZYSŁAWSKI; JERZY NOWAK

    2016-09-01

    The relationship Pro12Ala (rs1801282) and C1431T (rs3856806) polymorphisms of PPAR gamma-2 with glucose and lipid metabolism is not clear after menopause. We investigated the impact of the Pro12Ala and C1431T silentsubstitution in the 6th exon in PPAR gamma-2 gene on nutritional and metabolic status in 271 postmenopausal women(122 lean and 149 obese). The general linear model (GLM) approach to the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to infer the interactions between the analysed genotypes. The frequency of the Pro-T haplotype was higher in obese than in lean women ($p\\lt 0.0349$). In the analysed GLM models according to obesity status, the C1431C genotypewas related to a lower glucose concentration ($\\beta=-0.2103$) in lean women, and to higher folliculotropic hormone FSH levels ($\\beta=0.1985$) and lower waist circumferences ($\\beta=-0.1511$) in obese women. The influence of C1431C waspresent regardless of the occurrence of the Pro12Ala polymorphism. The co-existence of the C1431C and Pro12Progenotypes was related to lower values for triceps skinfold thickness compared those for the T1241/X and Ala12/X polymorphisms ($\\beta=-0.1425$). The presence of C1431C decreased the differences between triceps values that weredetermined by Pro or Ala allele. In conclusion, C1431T polymorphism seems to have a more essential influence onanthropometric and biochemical parameters than is the case with Pro12Ala polymorphism.

  14. Effects of endocrine disruptors on genes associated with 17beta-estradiol metabolism and excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanet, Nathalie; Lancon, Allan; Delmas, Dominique; Jannin, Brigitte; Chagnon, Marie-Christine; Cherkaoui-Malki, Moustapha; Latruffe, Norbert; Artur, Yves; Heydel, Jean-Marie

    2008-11-01

    In order to provide a global analysis of the effects of endocrine disruptors on the hormone cellular bioavailability, we combined 17beta-estradiol (E2) cellular flow studies with real-time PCR and Western blot expression measurements of genes involved in the hormone metabolism and excretion. Three endocrine disruptors commonly found in food were chosen for this study, which was conducted in the estrogen receptor (ER) negative hepatoblastoma HepG2 cell line: bisphenol A (BPA), genistein (GEN) and resveratrol (RES). We showed that 24 h after a single dose treatment with genistein, resveratrol or bisphenol A, the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters (the multidrug resistance or MDR, and the multidrug resistance associated proteins or MRP) uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) and/or sulfotransferases (ST) involved in 17beta-estradiol elimination process were significantly modulated and that 17beta-estradiol cellular flow was modified. Resveratrol induced MDR1 and MRP3 expressions, bisphenol A induced MRP2 and MRP3 expressions, and both enhanced 17beta-estradiol efflux. Genistein, on the other hand, inhibited ST1E1 and UGT1A1 expressions, and led to 17beta-estradiol cellular retention. Thus, we demonstrate that bisphenol A, genistein and resveratrol modulate 17beta-estradiol cellular bioavailability in HepG2 and that these modulations most probably involve regulations of 17beta-estradiol phase II and III metabolism proteins. Up to now, the estrogenicity of environmental estrogenic pollutants has been based on the property of these compounds to bind to ERs. Our results obtained with ER negative cells provide strong evidence for the existence of ER-independent pathways leading to endocrine disruption. PMID:18634814

  15. Central obesity and atherogenic dyslipidemia in metabolic syndrome are associated with increased risk for colorectal adenoma in a Chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Tsann

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS is composed of cardiovascular risk factors including insulin resistance, obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Most of the components of MetS have been linked to the development of neoplasm. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between individual components of MetS and colorectal adenoma. Methods The study subjects were recruited from a pool of 4872 individuals who underwent a health check-up examination during the period January 2006 to May 2008. Each participant fulfilled a structured questionnaire. MetS was defined based on the America Heart Association and National Heart Lung Blood Institute criteria. Subjects with history of colon cancer, colon polyps, colitis, or prior colonic surgery were excluded. Results A total of 4122 subjects were included for final analysis (2367 men and 1755 women; mean age, 49.6 ± 11.7 years. Of them, MetS was diagnosed in 708 men (29.9% and in 367 women (20.9%. Among the patients with MetS, 34.6% had adenoma, 31.7% had hyperplastic polyps and 23.3% were polyp-free (p Conclusions Of the components of MetS analyzed in this study, central obesity and dyslipidemia are independent risk factors for colorectal adenoma. With regard to the prevention of colorectal neoplasm, life-style modification such as weight reduction is worthwhile.

  16. Characterization of homeobox genes reveals sophisticated regionalization of the central nervous system in the European cuttlefish Sepia officinalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Focareta

    Full Text Available Cephalopod mollusks possess a number of anatomical traits that often parallel vertebrates in morphological complexity, including a centralized nervous system with sophisticated cognitive functionality. Very little is known about the genetic mechanisms underlying patterning of the cephalopod embryo to arrive at this anatomical structure. Homeodomain (HD genes are transcription factors that regulate transcription of downstream genes through DNA binding, and as such are integral parts of gene regulatory networks controlling the specification and patterning of body parts across lineages. We have used a degenerate primer strategy to isolate homeobox genes active during late-organogenesis from the European cuttlefish Sepia officinalis. With this approach we have isolated fourteen HD gene fragments and examine the expression profiles of five of these genes during late stage (E24-28 embryonic development (Sof-Gbx, Sof-Hox3, Sof-Arx, Sof-Lhx3/4, Sof-Vsx. All five genes are expressed within the developing central nervous system in spatially restricted and largely non-overlapping domains. Our data provide a first glimpse into the diversity of HD genes in one of the largest, yet least studied, metazoan clades and illustrate how HD gene expression patterns reflect the functional partitioning of the cephalopod brain.

  17. Polymorphisms of estrogen-metabolizing genes and breast cancer risk: a multigenic study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Ding-fen; ZHOU Xin; HU Ming-bai; XIE Wei; MAO Zong-fu; CHEN Dong-e; LIU Fang; ZHENG Fang

    2005-01-01

    Background Endogenous estrogen plays a very important role in the carcinogenesis and progression of breast cancer. The enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and metabolism of estrogen have been proposed to contribute to this effect. To examine this hypothesis, we conducted a case-control study to investigate the relationship between polymorphisms of genes responsible for estrogen biosynthesis (CYP17, cytochrome P450c17a and CYP19, aromatase cytochrome P450) and estrogen sulfation of inactivation (SULT1A1, sulfotransferase1A1) and the risk of breast cancer in Chinese women. Methods This study involved 213 breast cancer patients and 430 matched controls. PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and short tandem repeat polymorphism (STRP) assays were used to detect the mononucleotide transition of CYP17 and SULT1A1 and tandem repeat polymorphism of CYP19. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine OR and 95% CI of each and all three high-risk genotypes, of all three genotypes combined, and of estrogen exposure factors. The relationship between each high-risk genotype and clinicalpathological characteristics were also assessed. Results The frequency of A2 allele of CYP17 was 49.8% in cases and 49.1% in controls (P=0.82). The frequency of His allele of SULT1A1 was significantly higher in cases (13.6%) than in controls (9.5%) (P<0.05). There was also significant difference of the (TTTA)10 allele of CYP19 which was 12.4% in cases and 8.2% in controls (P<0.05). When the CYP17 A2 allele, CYP19 (TTTA)10 and SULT1A1 His allele were considered as the "putative high-risk" genotype, there was an increased risk of breast cancer with the number of high-risk genotypes in a dose-response effect (trend, P=0.05). In multivariate analysis, the SULT1A1 genotype remained the most significant determinant for breast cancer, with OR=2.37 (95% CI 1.23-4.74), followed by CYP19, with OR=1.75 (95% CI 1.27-3.56). The (TTTA)10 allele of CYP19 was associated with tumor

  18. Increased isobutanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of genes in valine metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karhumaa Kaisa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isobutanol can be a better biofuel than ethanol due to its higher energy density and lower hygroscopicity. Furthermore, the branched-chain structure of isobutanol gives a higher octane number than the isomeric n-butanol. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was chosen as the production host because of its relative tolerance to alcohols, robustness in industrial fermentations, and the possibility for future combination of isobutanol production with fermentation of lignocellulosic materials. Results The yield of isobutanol was improved from 0.16 to 0.97 mg per g glucose by simultaneous overexpression of biosynthetic genes ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 in valine metabolism in anaerobic fermentation of glucose in mineral medium in S. cerevisiae. Isobutanol yield was further improved by twofold by the additional overexpression of BAT2, encoding the cytoplasmic branched-chain amino-acid aminotransferase. Overexpression of ILV6, encoding the regulatory subunit of Ilv2, in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain decreased isobutanol production yield by threefold. In aerobic cultivations in shake flasks in mineral medium, the isobutanol yield of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain were 3.86 and 0.28 mg per g glucose, respectively. They increased to 4.12 and 2.4 mg per g glucose in yeast extract/peptone/dextrose (YPD complex medium under aerobic conditions, respectively. Conclusions Overexpression of genes ILV2, ILV3, ILV5, and BAT2 in valine metabolism led to an increase in isobutanol production in S. cerevisiae. Additional overexpression of ILV6 in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain had a negative effect, presumably by increasing the sensitivity of Ilv2 to valine inhibition, thus weakening the positive impact of overexpression of ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 on isobutanol production. Aerobic cultivations of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain showed that supplying amino acids in cultivation media

  19. Effects of steroid treatment on growth, nutrient partitioning, and expression of genes related to growth and nutrient metabolism in adult triploid rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, B M; Weber, G M

    2016-07-01

    The contribution of sex steroids to nutrient partitioning and energy balance during gonad development was studied in rainbow trout. Specifically, 19-mo old triploid (3N) female rainbow trout were fed treatment diets supplemented with estradiol-17β (E2), testosterone (T), or dihydrotestosterone at 30-mg steroid/kg diet for a 1-mo period. Growth performance, nutrient partitioning, and expression of genes central to growth and nutrient metabolism were compared with 3N and age-matched diploid (2N) female fish consuming a control diet not supplemented with steroids. Only 2 N fish exhibited active gonad development, with gonad weights increasing from 3.7% to 5.5% of body weight throughout the study, whereas gonad weights in 3N fish remained at 0.03%. Triploid fish consuming dihydrotestosterone exhibited faster specific growth rates than 3N-controls (P 0.05). Gene transcripts associated with physiological pathways were identified in maturing 2N and E2-treated 3N fish that differed in abundance from 3N-control fish (P igfbp1b1, igfbp2b1, igfbp5b1, igfbp6b1), and genes associated with lipid binding and transport (fabp3, fabp4, lpl, cd36), fatty acid oxidation (cpt1a), and the pparg transcription factor. In muscle, these mechanisms included reductions in myogenic gene expression (fst, myog) and the proteolysis-related gene, cathepsin-L, suggesting an E2-induced reduction in the capacity for muscle growth. These findings suggest that increased E2 signaling in the sexually maturing female rainbow trout alters physiological pathways in liver, particularly those related to IGF signaling and lipid metabolism, to partition nutrients away from muscle growth toward support of maturation-related processes. In contrast, the mobilization of viscera lipid stores appear to be mediated less by E2 and more by energy demands associated with gonad development. These findings improve the understanding of how steroids regulate nutrient metabolism to meet the high energy demands associated

  20. Effect of leptin gene methylation on glucose metabolism in pregnant rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen LI

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To examine the dynamic level of progesterone,insulin,and leptin,as well as the change in the features of leptin gene methylation in the promoter region of pregnant rats during different gestation stages and to analyze the correlation and effect of these conditions on glucose metabolism during gestation.Methods C57BL/6J pregnant rats are divided to four different groups,namely,early,mid-,and late gestation,as well as seven days postpartum(five rats for each group.Five C57BL/6J non-pregnant rats are taken as the control group.The change in glucose metabolism during gestation was determined by measuring the glucose tolerance of rats in different groups and by testing the level of progesterone,insulin,and leptin in the sera and the level of the methylation of leptin gene promoters during different stages of gestation.Results The levels of insulin [(13.70±0.70,14.78±0.91,and 16.07±0.55mU/L],progesterone [(10.10±0.37,11.41±0.50,and 15.34±0.65μg/L],and leptin [(1356.73±100.41,1628.02±53.03,and 1954.12±39.71ng/L] in pregnant rats in the three groups(early,mid-,and late gestation are apparently higher than that of the non-pregnant rats [(12.25±1.62mU/L,(7.14±0.38μg/L,and(934.38±62.29ng/L] and the postpartum group [(12.46±0.93mU/L,(9.74±0.82μg/L,and(1259.19±105.74ng/L].The difference among the different stages of gestation has statistical significance(P < 0.01,but the difference between the non-pregnant and postpartum groups is statistically insignificant.Fasting blood glucose during gestation is low.The level of blood glucose in mid-gestation and late-gestation rats after being injected with glucose is apparently higher than that of the non-pregnant group(P < 0.01.The level of methylation in the leptin gene promoter zone of the placenta drops along with gestation.Conclusions High levels of progesterone,insulin,and leptin contribute to physiological insulin resistance during gestation,resulting in reduced fasting blood glucose

  1. Role of adipocyte-derived apoE in modulating adipocyte size, lipid metabolism, and gene expression in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Zhi Hua; Gu, DeSheng; Mazzone, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    Adipocytes isolated from apolipoprotein E (apoE)-knockout (EKO) mice display alterations in triglyceride (TG) metabolism and gene expression. The present studies were undertaken to evaluate the impact of endogenously produced adipocyte apoE on these adipocyte parameters in vivo, independent of the profoundly disturbed metabolic milieu of EKO mice. Adipose tissue from wild-type (WT) or EKO mice was transplanted into WT recipients, which were then fed chow or high-fat diet for 8–10 wk. After a ...

  2. Hypoxic culture conditions induce increased metabolic rate and collagen gene expression in ACL-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Tomasz J; Leong, Natalie L; Dar, Ayelet; Wu, Ling; Kabir, Nima; Khan, Adam Z; Eliasberg, Claire D; Pedron, Andrew; Karayan, Ashant; Lee, Siyoung; Di Pauli von Treuheim, Theodor; Jiacheng, Jin; Wu, Ben M; Evseenko, Denis; McAllister, David R; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2016-06-01

    There has been substantial effort directed toward the application of bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissue. Recently, resident tissue-specific stem cells have been described in a variety of mesenchymal structures including ligament, tendon, muscle, cartilage, and bone. In the current study, we systematically characterize three novel anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-derived cell populations with the potential for ligament regeneration: ligament-forming fibroblasts (LFF: CD146(neg) , CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ), ligament perivascular cells (LPC: CD146(pos) CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ) and ligament interstitial cells (LIC: CD34(pos) CD146(neg) , CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) )-and describe their proliferative and differentiation potential, collagen gene expression and metabolism in both normoxic and hypoxic environments, and their trophic potential in vitro. All three groups of cells (LIC, LPC, and LFF) isolated from adult human ACL exhibited progenitor cell characteristics with regard to proliferation and differentiation potential in vitro. Culture in low oxygen tension enhanced the collagen I and III gene expression in LICs (by 2.8- and 3.3-fold, respectively) and LFFs (by 3- and 3.5-fold, respectively) and increased oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate in LICs (by 4- and 3.5-fold, respectively), LFFs (by 5.5- and 3-fold, respectively), LPCs (by 10- and 4.5-fold, respectively) as compared to normal oxygen concentration. In summary, this study demonstrates for the first time the presence of three novel progenitor cell populations in the adult ACL that demonstrate robust proliferative and matrix synthetic capacity; these cells may play a role in local ligament regeneration, and consequently represent a potential cell source for ligament engineering applications. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  3. 6-Gingerol Protects against Nutritional Steatohepatitis by Regulating Key Genes Related to Inflammation and Lipid Metabolism

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    Thing-Fong Tzeng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, including non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, appears to be increasingly common worldwide. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of 6-gingerol ((S-5-hydroxy-1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-3-decanone, a bioactive ingredient of plants belonging to the Zingiberaceae family, on experimental models of NASH. In HepG2 cells, 6-gingerol (100 μmol/L treatment inhibited free fatty acids mixture (0.33 mmol/L palmitate and 0.66 mmol/L oleate-induced triglyceride and inflammatory marker accumulations. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with a methionine and choline-deficient (MCD diet to induce steatohepatitis. After four weeks of MCD diet feeding, the mice were dosed orally with 6-gingerol (25, 50 or 100 mg/kg/day once daily for another four weeks. 6-Gingerol (100 mg/kg/day attenuated liver steatosis and necro-inflammation in MCD diet-fed mice. The expressions of inflammatory cytokine genes, including those for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6, and nuclear transcription factor (NF-κB, which were increased in the livers of MCD diet-fed mice, were attenuated by 6-gingerol. 6-Gingerol possesses a repressive property on hepatic steatosis, which is associated with induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α. Our study demonstrated the protective role of 6-gingerol in ameliorating nutritional steatohepatitis. The effect was mediated through regulating key genes related to lipid metabolism and inflammation.

  4. Metabolic activity of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and gene expression during exposure to xylitol and sucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Eva-Maria; Klein, Christian; Schwindt, Dimitri; von Ohle, Christiane

    2014-12-01

    The objective of the study was to analyse Streptococcus mutans biofilms grown under different dietary conditions by using multifaceted methodological approaches to gain deeper insight into the cariogenic impact of carbohydrates. S. mutans biofilms were generated during a period of 24 h in the following media: Schaedler broth as a control medium containing endogenous glucose, Schaedler broth with an additional 5% sucrose, and Schaedler broth supplemented with 1% xylitol. The confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)-based analyses of the microbial vitality, respiratory activity (5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride, CTC) and production of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) were performed separately in the inner, middle and outer biofilm layers. In addition to the microbiological sample testing, the glucose/sucrose consumption of the biofilm bacteria was quantified, and the expression of glucosyltransferases and other biofilm-associated genes was investigated. Xylitol exposure did not inhibit the viability of S. mutans biofilms, as monitored by the following experimental parameters: culture growth, vitality, CTC activity and EPS production. However, xylitol exposure caused a difference in gene expression compared to the control. GtfC was upregulated only in the presence of xylitol. Under xylitol exposure, gtfB was upregulated by a factor of 6, while under sucrose exposure, it was upregulated by a factor of three. Compared with glucose and xylitol, sucrose increased cell vitality in all biofilm layers. In all nutrient media, the intrinsic glucose was almost completely consumed by the cells of the S. mutans biofilm within 24 h. After 24 h of biofilm formation, the multiparametric measurements showed that xylitol in the presence of glucose caused predominantly genotypic differences but did not induce metabolic differences compared to the control. Thus, the availability of dietary carbohydrates in either a pure or combined form seems to affect the

  5. Metabolic activity of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and gene expression during exposure to xylitol and sucrose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eva-Maria Decker; Christian Klein; Dimitri Schwindt; Christiane von Ohle

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyse Streptococcus mutans biofilms grown under different dietary conditions by using multifaceted methodological approaches to gain deeper insight into the cariogenic impact of carbohydrates. S. mutans biofilms were generated during a period of 24 h in the following media:Schaedler broth as a control medium containing endogenous glucose, Schaedler broth with an additional 5%sucrose, and Schaedler broth supplemented with 1%xylitol. The confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)-based analyses of the microbial vitality, respiratory activity (5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride, CTC) and production of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) were performed separately in the inner, middle and outer biofilm layers. In addition to the microbiological sample testing, the glucose/sucrose consumption of the biofilm bacteria was quantified, and the expression of glucosyltransferases and other biofilm-associated genes was investigated. Xylitol exposure did not inhibit the viability of S. mutans biofilms, as monitored by the following experimental parameters:culture growth, vitality, CTC activity and EPS production. However, xylitol exposure caused a difference in gene expression compared to the control. GtfC was upregulated only in the presence of xylitol. Under xylitol exposure, gtfB was upregulated by a factor of 6, while under sucrose exposure, it was upregulated by a factor of three. Compared with glucose and xylitol, sucrose increased cell vitality in all biofilm layers. In all nutrient media, the intrinsic glucose was almost completely consumed by the cells of the S. mutans biofilm within 24 h. After 24 h of biofilm formation, the multiparametric measurements showed that xylitol in the presence of glucose caused predominantly genotypic differences but did not induce metabolic differences compared to the control. Thus, the availability of dietary carbohydrates in either a pure or combined form seems to affect the cariogenic potential

  6. Central metabolism in Mycobacterium smegmatis during the transition from O2-rich to O2-poor conditions as studied by isotopomer-assisted metabolite analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yinjie J; Shui, Wenqing; Myers, Samuel; Feng, Xueyang; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Keasling, Jay D

    2009-08-01

    Isotopomer-assisted metabolite analysis was used to investigate the central metabolism of Mycobacterium smegmatis and its transition from normal growth to a non-replicating state under a hypoxic environment. Tween 80 significantly promoted aerobic growth by improving O(2) transfer, while only small amount was degraded and metabolized via the TCA cycle for biomass synthesis. As the bacillus encountered hypoxic stress, isotopomer analysis suggested: (1) isocitrate lyase activity increased, which further induced glyoxylate pathway and glycine dehydrogenase for replenishing NAD(+); (2) the relative amount of acetyl-CoA entering the TCA cycle was doubled, whereas little entered the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways. PMID:19357814

  7. The 380 kb pCMU01 plasmid encodes chloromethane utilization genes and redundant genes for vitamin B12- and tetrahydrofolate-dependent chloromethane metabolism in Methylobacterium extorquens CM4: a proteomic and bioinformatics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Roselli

    tetrahydrofolate-bound one-carbon units, and central metabolism. The mosaic organization of plasmid pCMU01 and the clustering of genes coding for dehalogenase enzymes and for biosynthesis of associated cofactors suggests a history of gene acquisition related to chloromethane utilization.

  8. Effect of Diet Supplementation on the Expression of Bovine Genes Associated with Fatty Acid Synthesis and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep J. Joseph

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA are of important nutritional and health benefit to human. Food products of animal origin are their major dietary source and their concentration increases with high concentrate diets fed to animals. To examine the effects of diet supplementation on the expression of genes related to lipid metabolism, 28 Angus steers were fed either pasture only, pasture with soybean hulls and corn oil, pasture with corn grain, or high concentrate diet. At slaughter, samples of subcutaneous adipose tissue were collected, from which RNA was extracted. Relative abundance of gene expression was measured using Affymetrix GeneChip Bovine Genome array. An ANOVA model nested within gene was used to analyze the background adjusted, normalized average difference of probe-level intensities. To control experiment wise error, a false discovery rate of 0.01 was imposed on all contrasts. Expression of several genes involved in the synthesis of enzymes related to fatty acid metabolism and lipogenesis such as stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD, fatty acid synthetase (FASN, lipoprotein lipase (LPL, fatty-acyl elongase (LCE along with several trancription factors and co-activators involved in lipogenesis were found to be differentially expressed. Confirmatory RT-qPCR was done to validate the microarray results, which showed satisfactory correspondence between the two platforms. Results show that changes in diet by increasing dietary energy intake by supplementing high concentrate diet have effects on the transcription of genes encoding enzymes involved in fat metabolism which in turn has effects on fatty acid content in the carcass tissue as well as carcass quality. Corn supplementation either as oil or grain appeared to significantly alter the expression of genes directly associated with fatty acid synthesis.

  9. A spectrum of CodY activities drives metabolic reorganization and virulence gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Nicholas R; Samuels, David J; Behera, Ranjan K; Livny, Jonathan; Rhee, Kyu Y; Sadykov, Marat R; Brinsmade, Shaun R

    2016-08-01

    The global regulator CodY controls the expression of dozens of metabolism and virulence genes in the opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus in response to the availability of isoleucine, leucine and valine (ILV), and GTP. Using RNA-Seq transcriptional profiling and partial activity variants, we reveal that S. aureus CodY activity grades metabolic and virulence gene expression as a function of ILV availability, mediating metabolic reorganization and controlling virulence factor production in vitro. Strains lacking CodY regulatory activity produce a PIA-dependent biofilm, but development is restricted under conditions that confer partial CodY activity. CodY regulates the expression of thermonuclease (nuc) via the Sae two-component system, revealing cascading virulence regulation and factor production as CodY activity is reduced. Proteins that mediate the host-pathogen interaction and subvert the immune response are shut off at intermediate levels of CodY activity, while genes coding for enzymes and proteins that extract nutrients from tissue, that kill host cells, and that synthesize amino acids are among the last genes to be derepressed. We conclude that S. aureus uses CodY to limit host damage to only the most severe starvation conditions, providing insight into one potential mechanism by which S. aureus transitions from a commensal bacterium to an invasive pathogen. PMID:27116338

  10. Adipokinetic hormone receptor gene identification and its role in triacylglycerol metabolism in the blood-sucking insect Rhodnius prolixus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Bezerra, Michele; De Paula, Iron F; Medina, Jorge M; Silva-Oliveira, Gleidson; Medeiros, Jonas S; Gäde, Gerd; Gondim, Katia C

    2016-02-01

    Adipokinetic hormone (AKH) has been associated with the control of energy metabolism in a large number of arthropod species due to its role on the stimulation of lipid, carbohydrate and amino acid mobilization/release. In the insect Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of Chagas' disease, triacylglycerol (TAG) stores must be mobilized to sustain the metabolic requirements during moments of exercise or starvation. Besides the recent identification of the R. prolixus AKH peptide, other components required for the AKH signaling cascade and its mode of action remain uncharacterized in this insect. In the present study, we identified and investigated the expression profile of the gene encoding the AKH receptor of R. prolixus (RhoprAkhr). This gene is highly conserved in comparison to other sequences already described and its transcript is abundant in the fat body and the flight muscle of the kissing bug. Moreover, RhoprAkhr expression is induced in the fat body at moments of increased TAG mobilization; the knockdown of this gene resulted in TAG accumulation both in fat body and flight muscle after starvation. The inhibition of Rhopr-AKHR transcription as well as the treatment of insects with the peptide Rhopr-AKH in its synthetic form altered the transcript levels of two genes involved in lipid metabolism, the acyl-CoA-binding protein-1 (RhoprAcbp1) and the mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase-1 (RhoprGpat1). These results indicate that the AKH receptor is regulated at transcriptional level and is required for TAG mobilization under starvation. In addition to the classical view of AKH as a direct regulator of enzymatic activity, we propose here that AKH signaling may account for the regulation of nutrient metabolism by affecting the expression profile of target genes. PMID:26163435

  11. Increased isobutanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of genes in valine metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xiao; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Borodina, Irina;

    2011-01-01

    production. Aerobic cultivations of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain showed that supplying amino acids in cultivation media gave a substantial improvement in isobutanol production for the reference strain, but not for the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain. This result....... Overexpression of ILV6, encoding the regulatory subunit of Ilv2, in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain decreased isobutanol production yield by threefold. In aerobic cultivations in shake flasks in mineral medium, the isobutanol yield of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain...... were 3.86 and 0.28 mg per g glucose, respectively. They increased to 4.12 and 2.4 mg per g glucose in yeast extract/peptone/dextrose (YPD) complex medium under aerobic conditions, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Overexpression of genes ILV2, ILV3, ILV5, and BAT2 in valine metabolism led to an increase in...

  12. Metabolic and gene expression analysis of apple (Malus x domestica) carotenogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampomah-Dwamena, Charles; Dejnoprat, Supinya; Lewis, David; Sutherland, Paul; Volz, Richard K; Allan, Andrew C

    2012-07-01

    Carotenoid accumulation confers distinct colouration to plant tissues, with effects on plant response to light and as well as health benefits for consumers of plant products. The carotenoid pathway is controlled by flux of metabolites, rate-limiting enzyme steps, feed-back inhibition, and the strength of sink organelles, the plastids, in the cell. In apple (Malus × domestica Borkh), fruit carotenoid concentrations are low in comparison with those in other fruit species. The apple fruit flesh, in particular, begins development with high amounts of chlorophylls and carotenoids, but in all commercial cultivars a large proportion of this is lost by fruit maturity. To understand the control of carotenoid concentrations in apple fruit, metabolic and gene expression analysis of the carotenoid pathway were measured in genotypes with varying flesh and skin colour. Considerable variation in both carotenoid concentrations and compound profile was observed between tissues and genotypes, with carotenes and xanthophylls being found only in fruit accumulating high carotenoid concentrations. The study identified potential rate-limiting steps in carotenogenesis, which suggested that the expression of ZISO, CRTISO, and LCY-ε, in particular, were significant in predicting final carotenoid accumulation in mature apple fruit. PMID:22717407

  13. Alterations of pancreatic islet structure, metabolism and gene expression in diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regan Roat

    Full Text Available The reduction of functional β cell mass is a key feature of type 2 diabetes. Here, we studied metabolic functions and islet gene expression profiles of C57BL/6J mice with naturally occurring nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT deletion mutation, a widely used model of diet-induced obesity and diabetes. On high fat diet (HF, the mice developed obesity and hyperinsulinemia, while blood glucose levels were only mildly elevated indicating a substantial capacity to compensate for insulin resistance. The basal serum insulin levels were elevated in HF mice, but insulin secretion in response to glucose load was significantly blunted. Hyperinsulinemia in HF fed mice was associated with an increase in islet mass and size along with higher BrdU incorporation to β cells. The temporal profiles of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS of isolated islets were comparable in HF and normal chow fed mice. Islets isolated from HF fed mice had elevated basal oxygen consumption per islet but failed to increase oxygen consumption further in response to glucose or carbonyl cyanide-4-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP. To obtain an unbiased assessment of metabolic pathways in islets, we performed microarray analysis comparing gene expression in islets from HF to normal chow-fed mice. A few genes, for example, those genes involved in the protection against oxidative stress (hypoxia upregulated protein 1 and Pgc1α were up-regulated in HF islets. In contrast, several genes in extracellular matrix and other pathways were suppressed in HF islets. These results indicate that islets from C57BL/6J mice with NNT deletion mutation develop structural, metabolic and gene expression features consistent with compensation and decompensation in response to HF diet.

  14. Effects of anthropogenic sound on digging behavior, metabolism, Ca2+/Mg2+ ATPase activity, and metabolism-related gene expression of the bivalve Sinonovacula constricta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chao; Zhao, Xinguo; Liu, Saixi; Shi, Wei; Han, Yu; Guo, Cheng; Jiang, Jingang; Wan, Haibo; Shen, Tiedong; Liu, Guangxu

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic sound has increased significantly in the past decade. However, only a few studies to date have investigated its effects on marine bivalves, with little known about the underlying physiological and molecular mechanisms. In the present study, the effects of different types, frequencies, and intensities of anthropogenic sounds on the digging behavior of razor clams (Sinonovacula constricta) were investigated. The results showed that variations in sound intensity induced deeper digging. Furthermore, anthropogenic sound exposure led to an alteration in the O:N ratios and the expression of ten metabolism-related genes from the glycolysis, fatty acid biosynthesis, tryptophan metabolism, and Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle (TCA cycle) pathways. Expression of all genes under investigation was induced upon exposure to anthropogenic sound at ~80 dB re 1 μPa and repressed at ~100 dB re 1 μPa sound. In addition, the activity of Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase in the feet tissues, which is directly related to muscular contraction and subsequently to digging behavior, was also found to be affected by anthropogenic sound intensity. The findings suggest that sound may be perceived by bivalves as changes in the water particle motion and lead to the subsequent reactions detected in razor clams.

  15. Effect of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid on gene expression of the critical enzymes involved in homocysteine metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Tao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies showed that plasma n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA was negatively associated with plasma homocysteine (Hcy. Objective We investigated the regulatory effect of n-3 PUFA on mRNA expression of the critical genes encoding the enzymes involved in Hcy metabolism. Methods HepG2 cells were treated with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, alpha-linolenic acid (ALA respectively for 48 h. The cells were collected and total RNA was isolated. The mRNA expression levels of the genes were determined by using Real Time-PCR. Results Compared with controls, the mRNA expression levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR were significantly increased in the DHA group (p Conclusions Our results suggest that DHA up-regulates CSE and MTHFR mRNA expression and down-regulates MAT mRNA expression involved in Hcy metabolism.

  16. Validation of using gene expression in mononuclear cells as a marker for hepatic cholesterol metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutta Amrita

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HMG-CoA reductase and the LDL receptor are ubiquitously expressed in major tissues. Since the liver plays a major role in regulating circulating LDL, it is usually of interest to measure the effects of drug or dietary interventions on these proteins in liver. In humans, peripheral blood mononuclear cells have been used as a surrogate for liver to assess regulation of these genes, although there is concern regarding the validity of this approach. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between liver and mononuclear cell expression of HMG-CoA reductase and the LDL receptor in guinea pigs, a well established model for human cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism. We extracted RNA from liver and mononuclear cells of guinea pigs from a previous study where the effects of rapamycin, an immunosuppresant drug used for transplant patients, on lipid metabolism were evaluated. Guinea pigs were assigned to three different diets containing the same amount of fat (15 g/100 g and cholesterol (0.08 g/100 g for a period of 3 weeks. The only difference among diets was the concentration of rapamycin: 0, 0.0028 or 0.028 g/100 g. There were no differences in plasma LDL cholesterol (LDL-C among groups. Values were 78.4 ± 14.3, 65.8 ± 17.2 and 68.4 ± 45.4 mg/dL (P > 0.05 for guinea pigs treated with 0, low or high doses of rapamycin, respectively. The mRNA abundance for the LDL receptor and HMG-CoA reductase was measured both in liver (n = 30 and mononuclear cells (n = 22 using reverse transcriptase PCR. In agreement with the finding of no changes in plasma LDL-C, there were also no differences for the expression of HMG-CoA reductase or the LDL receptor among groups. However, a positive correlation was found between liver and mononuclear cells for both HMG-CoA reductase (r = 0.613, P

  17. Identification of Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion (ADME) Genes Relevant to Steatosis Using a Differential Gene Expression Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) parameters represent important connections between exposure to chemicals and the activation of molecular initiating events of Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) in cellular, tissue, and organ level targets. ADME parameters u...

  18. Gene Coexpression Analysis Reveals Complex Metabolism of the Monoterpene Alcohol Linalool in Arabidopsis Flowers[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginglinger, Jean-François; Boachon, Benoit; Höfer, René; Paetz, Christian; Köllner, Tobias G.; Miesch, Laurence; Lugan, Raphael; Baltenweck, Raymonde; Mutterer, Jérôme; Ullmann, Pascaline; Beran, Franziska; Claudel, Patricia; Verstappen, Francel; Fischer, Marc J.C.; Karst, Francis; Bouwmeester, Harro; Miesch, Michel; Schneider, Bernd; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Ehlting, Jürgen; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

    2013-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 family encompasses the largest family of enzymes in plant metabolism, and the functions of many of its members in Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Gene coexpression analysis pointed to two P450s that were coexpressed with two monoterpene synthases in flowers and were thus predicted to be involved in monoterpenoid metabolism. We show that all four selected genes, the two terpene synthases (TPS10 and TPS14) and the two cytochrome P450s (CYP71B31 and CYP76C3), are simultaneously expressed at anthesis, mainly in upper anther filaments and in petals. Upon transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana, the TPS enzymes colocalize in vesicular structures associated with the plastid surface, whereas the P450 proteins were detected in the endoplasmic reticulum. Whether they were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or in N. benthamiana, the TPS enzymes formed two different enantiomers of linalool: (−)-(R)-linalool for TPS10 and (+)-(S)-linalool for TPS14. Both P450 enzymes metabolize the two linalool enantiomers to form different but overlapping sets of hydroxylated or epoxidized products. These oxygenated products are not emitted into the floral headspace, but accumulate in floral tissues as further converted or conjugated metabolites. This work reveals complex linalool metabolism in Arabidopsis flowers, the ecological role of which remains to be determined. PMID:24285789

  19. Identification of Circular RNAs From the Parental Genes Involved in Multiple Aspects of Cellular Metabolism in Barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz eDarbani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available RNA circularization made by head-to-tail back-splicing events is involved in the regulation of gene expression from transcriptional to post-translational levels. By exploiting RNA-Seq data and down-stream analysis, we shed light on the importance of circular RNAs in plants. The results introduce circular RNAs as novel interactors in the regulation of gene expression in plants and imply the comprehensiveness of this regulatory pathway by identifying circular RNAs for a diverse set of genes. These genes are involved in several aspects of cellular metabolism as hormonal signaling, intracellular protein sorting, carbohydrate metabolism and cell-wall biogenesis, respiration, amino acid biosynthesis, transcription and translation, and protein ubiquitination. Additionally, these parental loci of circular RNAs, from both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, encode for different transcript classes including protein coding transcripts, microRNA, rRNA, and long non-coding/microprotein coding RNAs. The results shed light on the mitochondrial exonic circular RNAs and imply the importance of circular RNAs for regulation of mitochondrial genes. Importantly, we introduce circular RNAs in barley and elucidate their cellular-level alterations across tissues and in response to micronutrients iron and zinc. In further support of circular RNAs' functional roles in plants, we report several cases where fluctuations of circRNAs do not correlate with the levels of their parental-loci encoded linear transcripts.Keywords: circular RNAs, coding and non-coding transcripts, leaves, seeds, transfer cells, micronutrients, mitochondria

  20. Identification of Circular RNAs from the Parental Genes Involved in Multiple Aspects of Cellular Metabolism in Barley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbani, Behrooz; Noeparvar, Shahin; Borg, Søren

    2016-01-01

    RNA circularization made by head-to-tail back-splicing events is involved in the regulation of gene expression from transcriptional to post-translational levels. By exploiting RNA-Seq data and down-stream analysis, we shed light on the importance of circular RNAs in plants. The results introduce circular RNAs as novel interactors in the regulation of gene expression in plants and imply the comprehensiveness of this regulatory pathway by identifying circular RNAs for a diverse set of genes. These genes are involved in several aspects of cellular metabolism as hormonal signaling, intracellular protein sorting, carbohydrate metabolism and cell-wall biogenesis, respiration, amino acid biosynthesis, transcription and translation, and protein ubiquitination. Additionally, these parental loci of circular RNAs, from both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, encode for different transcript classes including protein coding transcripts, microRNA, rRNA, and long non-coding/microprotein coding RNAs. The results shed light on the mitochondrial exonic circular RNAs and imply the importance of circular RNAs for regulation of mitochondrial genes. Importantly, we introduce circular RNAs in barley and elucidate their cellular-level alterations across tissues and in response to micronutrients iron and zinc. In further support of circular RNAs' functional roles in plants, we report several cases where fluctuations of circRNAs do not correlate with the levels of their parental-loci encoded linear transcripts. PMID:27375638

  1. Genetic Variations in Xenobiotic Metabolic Pathway Genes, Personal Hair Dye Use, and Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yawei; Hughes, Kathryn J.; Zahm, Shelia Hoar; Zhang, Yaqun; Holford, Theodore R.; Dai, Li; Bai, Yana; Han, Xuesong; Qin, Qin; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zhu, Yong; Leaderer, Brian; Zheng, Tongzhang

    2009-01-01

    From 1996 to 2000, the authors conducted a population-based case-control study among Connecticut women to test the hypothesis that genetic variation in xenobiotic metabolic pathway genes modifies the relation between hair dye use and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. No effect modifications were found for women who started using hair dyes in 1980 or afterward. For women who started using hair dye before 1980 as compared with never users, a statistically significantly increased risk of non-Hodgkin...

  2. Expression of ROS-responsive genes and transcription factors after metabolic formation of H2O2 in chloroplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Balazadeh, Salma; Jaspert, Nils; Arif, Muhammad; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Maurino, Veronica G.

    2012-01-01

    Glycolate oxidase (GO) catalyses the oxidation of glycolate to glyoxylate, thereby consuming O(2) and producing H(2)O(2). In this work, Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing GO in the chloroplasts (GO plants) were used to assess the expressional behavior of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-responsive genes and transcription factors (TFs) after metabolic induction of H(2)O(2) formation in chloroplasts. In this organelle, GO uses the glycolate derived from the oxygenase activity of RubisCO. Here,...

  3. Expression profiles of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and disposition in human renal tissues and renal cell models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Hauwaert, Cynthia; Savary, Grégoire [EA4483, Université de Lille 2, Faculté de Médecine de Lille, Pôle Recherche, 59045 Lille (France); Buob, David [Institut de Pathologie, Centre de Biologie Pathologie Génétique, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Leroy, Xavier; Aubert, Sébastien [Institut de Pathologie, Centre de Biologie Pathologie Génétique, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, UMR837, Centre de Recherche Jean-Pierre Aubert, Equipe 5, 59045 Lille (France); Flamand, Vincent [Service d' Urologie, Hôpital Huriez, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Hennino, Marie-Flore [EA4483, Université de Lille 2, Faculté de Médecine de Lille, Pôle Recherche, 59045 Lille (France); Service de Néphrologie, Hôpital Huriez, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Perrais, Michaël [Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, UMR837, Centre de Recherche Jean-Pierre Aubert, Equipe 5, 59045 Lille (France); and others

    2014-09-15

    Numerous xenobiotics have been shown to be harmful for the kidney. Thus, to improve our knowledge of the cellular processing of these nephrotoxic compounds, we evaluated, by real-time PCR, the mRNA expression level of 377 genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), transporters, as well as nuclear receptors and transcription factors that coordinate their expression in eight normal human renal cortical tissues. Additionally, since several renal in vitro models are commonly used in pharmacological and toxicological studies, we investigated their metabolic capacities and compared them with those of renal tissues. The same set of genes was thus investigated in HEK293 and HK2 immortalized cell lines in commercial primary cultures of epithelial renal cells and in proximal tubular cell primary cultures. Altogether, our data offers a comprehensive description of kidney ability to process xenobiotics. Moreover, by hierarchical clustering, we observed large variations in gene expression profiles between renal cell lines and renal tissues. Primary cultures of proximal tubular epithelial cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue in terms of transcript profiling. Moreover, compared to other renal cell models, Tacrolimus dose dependent toxic effects were lower in proximal tubular cell primary cultures that display the highest metabolism and disposition capacity. Therefore, primary cultures appear to be the most relevant in vitro model for investigating the metabolism and bioactivation of nephrotoxic compounds and for toxicological and pharmacological studies. - Highlights: • Renal proximal tubular (PT) cells are highly sensitive to xenobiotics. • Expression of genes involved in xenobiotic disposition was measured. • PT cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue.

  4. Regulation of carotenoid accumulation and the expression of carotenoid metabolic genes in citrus juice sacs in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lancui; Ma, Gang; Kato, Masaya; Yamawaki, Kazuki; Takagi, Toshihiko; Kiriiwa, Yoshikazu; Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Yoshioka, Terutaka; Nesumi, Hirohisa

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, to investigate the mechanisms regulating carotenoid accumulation in citrus, a culture system was set up in vitro with juice sacs of three citrus varieties, Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.), Valencia orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck), and Lisbon lemon (Citrus limon Burm.f.). The juice sacs of all the three varieties enlarged gradually with carotenoid accumulation. The changing patterns of carotenoid content and the expression of carotenoid metabolic genes in juice sac...

  5. Behavior of a metabolic cycling population at the single cell level as visualized by fluorescent gene expression reporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Laxman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During continuous growth in specific chemostat cultures, budding yeast undergo robust oscillations in oxygen consumption that are accompanied by highly periodic changes in transcript abundance of a majority of genes, in a phenomenon called the Yeast Metabolic Cycle (YMC. This study uses fluorescent reporters of genes specific to different YMC phases in order to visualize this phenomenon and understand the temporal regulation of gene expression at the level of individual cells within the cycling population. METHODOLOGY: Fluorescent gene expression reporters for different phases of the YMC were constructed and stably integrated into the yeast genome. Subsequently, these reporter-expressing yeast were used to visualize YMC dynamics at the individual cell level in cultures grown in a chemostat or in a microfluidics platform under varying glucose concentrations, using fluorescence microscopy and quantitative Western blots. CONCLUSIONS: The behavior of single cells within a metabolic cycling population was visualized using phase-specific fluorescent reporters. The reporters largely recapitulated genome-specified mRNA expression profiles. A significant fraction of the cell population appeared to exhibit basal expression of the reporters, supporting the hypothesis that there are at least two distinct subpopulations of cells within the cycling population. Although approximately half of the cycling population initiated cell division in each permissive window of the YMC, metabolic synchrony of the population was maintained. Using a microfluidics platform we observed that low glucose concentrations appear to be necessary for metabolic cycling. Lastly, we propose that there is a temporal window in the oxidative growth phase of the YMC where the cycling population segregates into at least two subpopulations, one which will enter the cell cycle and one which does not.

  6. Silica nanoparticles induced metabolic stress through EGR1, CCND, and E2F1 genes in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Vaiyapuri S; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Akbarsha, Mohammad A; Alshatwi, Ali A

    2015-01-01

    The SiO2 synthesized in bulk form, adopting the conventional methods for application in food industry applications, may also contain nano-sized particles. On account of the unique physico-chemical properties, the SiO2 particulates, such as size and shape, cause metabolic toxicity in cells. Poor understanding of the molecular level nanotoxicity resulting from high-volume synthetic SiO2 exposures in humans is a serious issue, since these particles may also contribute to metabolic stress-mediated chronic diseases. In the present study, we examined the structural characteristics of these nano-sized silica particles adopting SEM and dynamic light scattering (DLS) and assessed the alterations in the cell cycle induced by these silica particles in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) adopting 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell viability assay, morphological changes in the cells adopting fluorescent microscopy, cell cycle analysis adopting flow cytometry, and the expression of genes linked to cell cycle (i.e., proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), early growth response protein (EGR1), E2F transcription factor (E2F1), cyclin D1, cyclin C, and cyclin D3) adopting qPCR. The SEM and DLS studies indicated that the commercial grade SiO2-NPs were in the nano-scale range. Alterations in the cytoplasmic organization, nuclear morphology, cell cycle progression, and expression of genes linked to cell cycle-dependent metabolic stress through EGR1, CCND, and E2F1 genes were the primary indicators of metabolic stress. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that synthetic SiO2 acutely affects hMSC through cell cycle-dependent oxidative stress gene network. The toxicity mechanisms (both acute and chronic) of food grade silica should be investigated in greater depth with special reference to food safety. PMID:25374141

  7. Expression profiles of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and disposition in human renal tissues and renal cell models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous xenobiotics have been shown to be harmful for the kidney. Thus, to improve our knowledge of the cellular processing of these nephrotoxic compounds, we evaluated, by real-time PCR, the mRNA expression level of 377 genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), transporters, as well as nuclear receptors and transcription factors that coordinate their expression in eight normal human renal cortical tissues. Additionally, since several renal in vitro models are commonly used in pharmacological and toxicological studies, we investigated their metabolic capacities and compared them with those of renal tissues. The same set of genes was thus investigated in HEK293 and HK2 immortalized cell lines in commercial primary cultures of epithelial renal cells and in proximal tubular cell primary cultures. Altogether, our data offers a comprehensive description of kidney ability to process xenobiotics. Moreover, by hierarchical clustering, we observed large variations in gene expression profiles between renal cell lines and renal tissues. Primary cultures of proximal tubular epithelial cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue in terms of transcript profiling. Moreover, compared to other renal cell models, Tacrolimus dose dependent toxic effects were lower in proximal tubular cell primary cultures that display the highest metabolism and disposition capacity. Therefore, primary cultures appear to be the most relevant in vitro model for investigating the metabolism and bioactivation of nephrotoxic compounds and for toxicological and pharmacological studies. - Highlights: • Renal proximal tubular (PT) cells are highly sensitive to xenobiotics. • Expression of genes involved in xenobiotic disposition was measured. • PT cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue

  8. The carbon storage regulator (Csr system exerts a nutrient-specific control over central metabolism in Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Revelles

    Full Text Available The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the csrA51 mutant affects the growth efficiency on a broad range of physiologically relevant carbon sources, including compounds utilized by the Entner-Doudoroff (ED pathway. Detailed investigations of the metabolomes and fluxomes of mutants and wild-type cells grown on carbon sources representative of glycolysis and of the ED pathway (glucose and gluconate, respectively, revealed significant re-adjusting of central carbon metabolism for both compounds in the csrA51 mutant. However, the metabolic re-adjusting observed on gluconate was strikingly different from that observed on glucose, indicating a nutrient-specific control of metabolism by the Csr system.

  9. The carbon storage regulator (Csr) system exerts a nutrient-specific control over central metabolism in Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelles, Olga; Millard, Pierre; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Oswald, Eric; Létisse, Fabien; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr) system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations) showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the csrA51 mutant affects the growth efficiency on a broad range of physiologically relevant carbon sources, including compounds utilized by the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway. Detailed investigations of the metabolomes and fluxomes of mutants and wild-type cells grown on carbon sources representative of glycolysis and of the ED pathway (glucose and gluconate, respectively), revealed significant re-adjusting of central carbon metabolism for both compounds in the csrA51 mutant. However, the metabolic re-adjusting observed on gluconate was strikingly different from that observed on glucose, indicating a nutrient-specific control of metabolism by the Csr system. PMID:23840455

  10. Adipose tissue transcriptional response of lipid metabolism genes in growing Iberian pigs fed oleic acid v. carbohydrate enriched diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, R; Núñez, Y; Fernández, A; Isabel, B; Rodríguez, C; Daza, A; López-Bote, C; Silió, L; Óvilo, C

    2016-06-01

    Diet influences animal body and tissue composition due to direct deposition and to the nutrients effects on metabolism. The influence of specific nutrients on the molecular regulation of lipogenesis is not well characterized and is known to be influenced by many factors including timing and physiological status. A trial was performed to study the effects of different dietary energy sources on lipogenic genes transcription in ham adipose tissue of Iberian pigs, at different growth periods and on feeding/fasting situations. A total of 27 Iberian male pigs of 28 kg BW were allocated to two separate groups and fed with different isocaloric feeding regimens: standard diet with carbohydrates as energy source (CH) or diet enriched with high oleic sunflower oil (HO). Ham subcutaneous adipose tissue was sampled by biopsy at growing (44 kg mean BW) and finishing (100 kg mean BW) periods. The first sampling was performed on fasted animals, while the last sampling was performed twice, with animals fasted overnight and 3 h after refeeding. Effects of diet, growth period and feeding/fasting status on gene expression were explored quantifying the expression of a panel of key genes implicated in lipogenesis and lipid metabolism processes. Quantitative PCR revealed several differentially expressed genes according to diet, with similar results at both timings: RXRG, LEP and FABP5 genes were upregulated in HO group while ME1, FASN, ACACA and ELOVL6 were upregulated in CH. The diet effect on ME1 gene expression was conditional on feeding/fasting status, with the higher ME1 gene expression in CH than HO groups, observed only in fasting samples. Results are compatible with a higher de novo endogenous synthesis of fatty acids (FA) in the carbohydrate-supplemented group and a higher FA transport in the oleic acid-supplemented group. Growth period significantly affected the expression of most of the studied genes, with all but PPARG showing higher expression in finishing pigs according to

  11. OsSRT1 is involved in rice seed development through regulation of starch metabolism gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Lu, Yue; Zhao, Yu; Zhou, Dao-Xiu

    2016-07-01

    OsSRT1 is a NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase, closely related to the human SIRT6 that plays key roles in genome stability and metabolic homeostasis. In this work, we investigated the role of OsSRT1 in rice seed development. Down-regulation of OsSRT1 induced higher expression of Rice Starch Regulator1 (RSR1) and amylases genes in developing seeds, which resulted in a decrease of starch synthesis and an increase of starch degradation, leading to abnormal seed development. ChIP assay showed that OsSRT1 was required to reduce histone H3K9 acetylation on starch metabolism genes and transposons in developing seeds. In addition, OsSRT1 was detected to directly bind to starch metabolism genes such as OsAmy3B, OsAmy3E, OsBmy4, and OsBmy9. Our results suggested that OsSRT1-mediated histone deacetylation is involved in starch accumulation and transposon repression to regulate normal seed development. PMID:27181944

  12. Fatty Acid Desaturase Gene Polymorphisms and Metabolic Measures in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Patients Taking Antipsychotics

    OpenAIRE

    Burghardt, Kyle J.; Kristen N. Gardner; Johnson, Joshua W.; Ellingrod, Vicki L.

    2013-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics have become a common therapeutic option in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, these medications come with a high risk of metabolic side effects, particularly dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. Therefore, identification of patients who are at increased risk for metabolic side effects is of great importance. The genetics of fatty acid metabolism is one area of research that may help identify such patients. Therefore, in this present study, we aimed to de...

  13. Analysis of Aspergillus nidulans metabolism at the genome-scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Helga; Ozcelik, İlknur Ş; Hofmann, Gerald;

    2008-01-01

    function. Results: In this work, we have manually assigned functions to 472 orphan genes in the metabolism of A. nidulans, by using a pathway-driven approach and by employing comparative genomics tools based on sequence similarity. The central metabolism of A. nidulans, as well as biosynthetic pathways of...

  14. Maternal transmission of Alzheimer's disease: Prodromal metabolic phenotype and the search for genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosconi Lisa

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract After advanced age, having a parent affected with Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most significant risk factor for developing AD among cognitively normal (NL individuals. Although rare genetic mutations have been identified among the early-onset forms of familial AD (EOFAD, the genetics of the more common forms of late-onset AD (LOAD remain elusive. While some LOAD cases appear to be sporadic in nature, genetically mediated risk is evident from the familial aggregation of many LOAD cases. The patterns of transmission and biological mechanisms through which a family history of LOAD confers risk to the offspring are not known. Brain imaging studies using 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET have shown that NL individuals with a maternal history of LOAD, but not with a paternal family history, express a phenotype characterised by a pattern of progressive reductions of brain glucose metabolism, similar to that in AD patients. As maternally inherited AD may be associated with as many as 20 per cent of the total LOAD population, understanding the causes and mechanisms of expression of this form of AD is of great relevance. This paper reviews known genetic mutations implicated in EOFAD and their effects on brain chemistry, structure and function; epidemiology and clinical research findings in LOAD, including in vivo imaging findings showing selective patterns of hypometabolism in maternally inherited AD; possible genetic mechanisms involved in maternal transmission of AD, including chromosome X mutations, mitochondrial DNA and imprinting; and genetic mechanisms involved in other neurological disorders with known or suspected maternal inheritance. The review concludes with a discussion of the potential role of brain imaging for identifying endophenotypes in NL individuals at risk for AD, and for directing investigation of potential susceptibility genes for AD.

  15. A fuzzy logic controller based approach to model the switching mechanism of the mammalian central carbon metabolic pathway in normal and cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Abhijit; Paul, Debjyoti; De, Rajat K

    2016-07-19

    Dynamics of large nonlinear complex systems, like metabolic networks, depend on several parameters. A metabolic pathway may switch to another pathway in accordance with the current state of parameters in both normal and cancer cells. Here, most of the parameter values are unknown to us. A fuzzy logic controller (FLC) has been developed here for the purpose of modeling metabolic networks by approximating the reasons for the behaviour of a system and applying expert knowledge to track switching between metabolic pathways. The simulation results can track the switching between glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, as well as glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways (PPP) in normal cells. Unlike normal cells, pyruvate kinase (M2 isoform) (PKM2) switches alternatively between its two oligomeric forms, i.e. an active tetramer and a relatively low activity dimer, in cancer cells. Besides, there is a coordination among PKM2 switching and enzymes catalyzing PPP. These phenomena help cancer cells to maintain their high energy demand and macromolecular synthesis. However, the reduction of initial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to a very low concentration, decreasing initial glucose uptake, destroying coordination between glycolysis and PPP, and replacement of PKM2 by its relatively inactive oligomeric form (dimer) or inhibition of the translation of PKM2 may destabilize the mutated control mechanism of the mammalian central carbon metabolic (CCM) pathway in cancer cells. The performance of the model is compared appropriately with some existing ones. PMID:27225801

  16. Ochratoxin a lowers mRNA levels of genes encoding for key proteins of liver cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundhausen, Christoph; Boesch-Saadatmandi, Christine; Matzner, Nicole; Lang, Florian; Blank, Ralf; Wolffram, Siegfried; Blaschek, Wolfgang; Rimbach, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a nephro- and hepatotoxic mycotoxin that frequently contaminates food and feedstuffs. Although recent studies have indicated that OTA modulates renal gene expression, little is known regarding its impact on differential gene expression in the liver. Therefore a microarray study of the HepG2 liver cell transcriptome in response to OTA exposure (0, 0.25, 2.5 micromol/l for 24 h) was performed using Affymetrix GeneChip technology. Selected microarray results were verified by real-time PCR and Western blotting as independent methods. Out of 14,500 genes present on the microarray, 13 and 250 genes were down-regulated by 0.25 and 2.5 micromol/l OTA, respectively. Reduced mRNA levels of calcineurin A beta (PPP3CB), which regulates inflammatory signalling pathways in immune cells, and of the uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), which has been suggested to control the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), were observed in response to 0.25 micromol/l OTA. A particularly strong down-regulation due to 2.5 micromol/l OTA was evident for the mRNA levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) and tubulin beta 1 (TUBB1) which have been demonstrated to function as a pro-survival factor in hepatocytes and as an important cytoskeletal component, respectively. In addition, many genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism, including phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1), stearoyl-Coenzyme A desaturase 1 (SCD), and glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1), were down-regulated by OTA. Furthermore, OTA significantly inhibited the capacitative calcium entry into the HepG2 cells, indicating an alteration of calcium homeostasis. Overall, OTA dose-dependently affects multiple genes encoding for key proteins of liver cell metabolism. PMID:19287073

  17. Exposure to atrazine affects the expression of key genes in metabolic pathways integral to energy homeostasis in Xenopus laevis tadpoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaya, Renee M., E-mail: renee.zaya@wmich.edu [Great Lakes Environmental and Molecular Sciences Center, Department of Biological Sciences, 3425 Wood Hall, Western Michigan University, 1903 West Michigan Avenue, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Amini, Zakariya, E-mail: zakariya.amini@wmich.edu [Great Lakes Environmental and Molecular Sciences Center, Department of Biological Sciences, 3425 Wood Hall, Western Michigan University, 1903 West Michigan Avenue, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Whitaker, Ashley S., E-mail: ashley.s.whitaker@wmich.edu [Great Lakes Environmental and Molecular Sciences Center, Department of Biological Sciences, 3425 Wood Hall, Western Michigan University, 1903 West Michigan Avenue, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Ide, Charles F., E-mail: charles.ide@wmich.edu [Great Lakes Environmental and Molecular Sciences Center, Department of Biological Sciences, 3425 Wood Hall, Western Michigan University, 1903 West Michigan Avenue, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    In our laboratory, Xenopus laevis tadpoles exposed throughout development to 200 or 400 {mu}g/L atrazine, concentrations reported to periodically occur in puddles, vernal ponds and runoff soon after application, were smaller and had smaller fat bodies (the tadpole's lipid storage organ) than controls. It was hypothesized that these changes were due to atrazine-related perturbations of energy homeostasis. To investigate this hypothesis, selected metabolic responses to exposure at the transcriptional and biochemical levels in atrazine-exposed tadpoles were measured. DNA microarray technology was used to determine which metabolic pathways were affected after developmental exposure to 400 {mu}g/L atrazine. From these data, genes representative of the affected pathways were selected for assay using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to measure changes in expression during a 2-week exposure to 400 {mu}g/L. Finally, ATP levels were measured from tadpoles both early in and at termination of exposure to 200 and 400 {mu}g/L. Microarray analysis revealed significant differential gene expression in metabolic pathways involved with energy homeostasis. Pathways with increased transcription were associated with the conversion of lipids and proteins into energy. Pathways with decreased transcription were associated with carbohydrate metabolism, fat storage, and protein synthesis. Using qRT-PCR, changes in gene expression indicative of an early stress response to atrazine were noted. Exposed tadpoles had significant decreases in acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (AD) and glucocorticoid receptor protein (GR) mRNA after 24 h of exposure, and near-significant (p = 0.07) increases in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {beta} (PPAR-{beta}) mRNA by 72 h. Decreases in AD suggested decreases in fatty acid {beta}-oxidation while decreases in GR may have been a receptor desensitization response to a glucocorticoid surge. Involvement of PPAR-{beta}, an energy

  18. Cinnamon extract regulates intestinal lipid metabolism related gene expression in primary enterocytes of rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerging evidence suggests that the small intestine is not a passive organ, but is actively involved in the regulation of lipid absorption, intracellular transport, and metabolism, and is closely linked to systemic lipoprotein metabolism. We have reported previously that the water-soluble components...

  19. An association between TRP64ARG polymorphism of the B3 adrenoreceptor gene and some metabolic disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abilova Samai S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgrounds B3 adrenoreceptors (ADRB3 are abundant in adipose tissue and play the role in its metabolism and lipolysis. Some variants of the ADRB3 gene may predispose subjects for the development obesity and metabolic abnormalities in the setting of modern sedentary lifestyle. ADRB3 gene polymorphism association with metabolic disturbances has never been studied before in the ethnic Kyrgyz population. Aim To study an association between Trp64Arg polymorphism of the ADRB3 and metabolic syndrome (MS components in an ethnic Kyrgyz group. Materials and methods 213 Ethnic Kyrgyz volunteers over the age of 30 were enrolled in the study. The assessment plan for each individual comprised of general physical and anthropometric exams as well as laboratory tests (glucose, lipid panel, insulin and genotyping by Trp64Arg polymorphism of the ADRB3. MS diagnosis was consistent with modified ATP III criteria (2005. Logistic regression analysis was performed to test the potential independent association between Arg64 allele with obesity, abdominal obesity (AO and arterial hypertension (AH. Results Trp64Arg polymorphism of the ADRB3 was assessed in 213 individuals (145 men, 68 women aged 30-73 (mean age 50.7 ± 7.6. Arg64 allele frequency was 0.239; ADRB3 genotype distribution among participants was: Trp64 homozygotes 54.5%, Trp64Arg 43.2% and Arg64 homozygotes 2.3%. There was an association between Trp64Arg и Arg64Arg genotypes and higher BMI, WC and obesity frequency (p Conclusion Arg64 allele of the ADRB3 gene in the studied group has an association with MS components such as obesity, AO and decreased HDL-C level.

  20. The nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor contribute to the impact of fipronil on hepatic gene expression linked to thyroid hormone metabolism.

    OpenAIRE

    ROQUES, Beatrice; Leghait, Julien; Lacroix, Marlène; Lasserre, Frederic; Pineau, Thierry; Viguie, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Fipronil is described as a thyroid disruptor in rat. Based on the hypothesis that this results from a perturbation of hepatic thyroid hormone metabolism, our goal was to investigate the pathways involved in fipronil-induced liver gene expression regulations. First, we performed a microarray screening in the liver of rats treated with fipronil or vehicle. Fipronil treatment led to the upregulation of several genes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics, including the cytochrome P450 Cyp2b1,...

  1. Haplotype-Based Study of the Association of Alcohol Metabolizing Genes with Alcohol Dependence in Four Independent Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jixia; Zhou, Zhifeng; Hodgkinson, Colin A.; Yuan, Qiaoping; Shen, Pei-Hong; Mulligan, Connie J.; Wang, Alex; Gray, Rebecca R.; Roy, Alec; Virkkunen, Matti; Goldman, David; Enoch, Mary-Anne

    2010-01-01

    Background Ethanol is metabolized by two rate limiting reactions: alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) convert ethanol to acetaldehyde, subsequently metabolized to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH). Approximately 50% of East Asians have genetic variants that significantly impair this pathway and influence alcohol dependence (AD) vulnerability. We investigated whether variation in alcohol metabolism genes might alter the AD risk in four non-East Asian populations by performing systematic haplotype association analyses in order to maximize the chances of capturing functional variation. Methods Haplotype-tagging SNPs were genotyped using the Illumina GoldenGate platform. Genotypes were available for 40 SNPs across the ADH genes cluster and 24 SNPs across the two ALDH genes in four diverse samples that included cases (lifetime AD) and controls (no Axis 1 disorders). The case, control sample sizes were: Finnish Caucasians: 232, 194; African Americans: 267, 422; Plains American Indians: 226, 110; Southwestern American (SW) Indians: 317, 72. Results In all four populations, as well as HapMap populations, five haplotype blocks were identified across the ADH gene cluster: (1) ADH5-ADH4; (2) ADH6-ADH1A-ADH1B; (3) ADH1C; (4) intergenic; (5) ADH7. The ALDH1A1 gene was defined by four blocks and ALDH2 by one block. No haplotype or SNP association results were significant after correction for multiple comparisons; however several results, particularly for ALDH1A1 and ADH4, replicated earlier findings. There was an ALDH1A1 block 1 and 2 (extending from intron 5 to the 3′ UTR) yin yang haplotype (haplotypes that have opposite allelic configuration) association with AD in the Finns driven by SNPs rs3764435 and rs2303317 respectively, and an ALDH1A1 block 3 (including the promoter region) yin yang haplotype association in SW Indians driven by 5 SNPs, all in allelic identity. The ADH4 SNP rs3762894 was associated with AD in Plains Indians. Conclusions The systematic evaluation of

  2. Ginseng Extracts Restore High-Glucose Induced Vascular Dysfunctions by Altering Triglyceride Metabolism and Downregulation of Atherosclerosis-Related Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Hoi-huen Chan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The king of herbs, Panax ginseng, has been used widely as a therapeutic agent vis-à-vis its active pharmacological and physiological effects. Based on Chinese pharmacopeia Ben Cao Gang Mu and various pieces of literature, Panax ginseng was believed to exert active vascular protective effects through its antiobesity and anti-inflammation properties. We investigated the vascular protective effects of ginseng by administrating ginseng extracts to rats after the induction of diabetes. We found that Panax ginseng can restore diabetes-induced impaired vasorelaxation and can reduce serum triglyceride but not cholesterol level in the diabetic rats. The ginseng extracts also suppressed the expression of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered the expression of lipid-related genes. The results provide evidence that Panax ginseng improves vascular dysfunction induced by diabetes and the protective effects may possibly be due to the downregulation of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered lipid metabolism, which help to restore normal endothelium functions.

  3. Centralized Consensus Hemagglutinin Genes Induce Protective Immunity against H1, H3 and H5 Influenza Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webby, Richard J; Weaver, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    With the exception of the live attenuated influenza vaccine there have been no substantial changes in influenza vaccine strategies since the 1940's. Here we report an alternative vaccine approach that uses Adenovirus-vectored centralized hemagglutinin (HA) genes as vaccine antigens. Consensus H1-Con, H3-Con and H5-Con HA genes were computationally derived. Mice were immunized with Ad vaccines expressing the centralized genes individually. Groups of mice were vaccinated with 1 X 1010, 5 X 107 and 1 X 107 virus particles per mouse to represent high, intermediate and low doses, respectively. 100% of the mice that were vaccinated with the high dose vaccine were protected from heterologous lethal challenges within each subtype. In addition to 100% survival, there were no signs of weight loss and disease in 7 out of 8 groups of high dose vaccinated mice. Lower doses of vaccine showed a reduction of protection in a dose-dependent manner. However, even the lowest dose of vaccine provided significant levels of protection against the divergent influenza strains, especially considering the stringency of the challenge virus. In addition, we found that all doses of H5-Con vaccine were capable of providing complete protection against mortality when challenged with lethal doses of all 3 H5N1 influenza strains. This data demonstrates that centralized H1-Con, H3-Con and H5-Con genes can be effectively used to completely protect mice against many diverse strains of influenza. Therefore, we believe that these Ad-vectored centralized genes could be easily translated into new human vaccines. PMID:26469190

  4. Genetic polymorphisms in CYP1A1, GSTM1, GSTP1 and GSTT1 metabolic genes and risk of lung cancer in Asturias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabolic genes have been associated with the function of metabolizing and detoxifying environmental carcinogens. Polymorphisms present in these genes could lead to changes in their metabolizing and detoxifying ability and thus may contribute to individual susceptibility to different types of cancer. We investigated if the individual and/or combined modifying effects of the CYP1A1 MspI T6235C, GSTM1 present/null, GSTT1 present/null and GSTP1 Ile105Val polymorphisms are related to the risk of developing lung cancer in relation to tobacco consumption and occupation in Asturias, Northern Spain. A hospital-based case–control study (CAPUA Study) was designed including 789 lung cancer patients and 789 control subjects matched in ethnicity, age, sex, and hospital. Genotypes were determined by PCR or PCR-RFLP. Individual and combination effects were analysed using an unconditional logistic regression adjusting for age, pack-years, family history of any cancer and occupation. No statistically significant main effects were observed for the carcinogen metabolism genes in relation to lung cancer risk. In addition, the analysis did not reveal any significant gene-gene, gene-tobacco smoking or gene-occupational exposure interactions relative to lung cancer susceptibility. Lastly, no significant gene-gene combination effects were observed. These results suggest that genetic polymorphisms in the CYP1A1, GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 metabolic genes were not significantly associated with lung cancer risk in the current study. The results of the analysis of gene-gene interactions of CYP1A1 MspI T6235C, GSTM1 present/null, GSTT1 present/null and GSTP1 Ile105Val polymorphisms in lung cancer risk indicate that these genes do not interact in lung cancer development

  5. The housekeeping gene hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT regulates multiple developmental and metabolic pathways of murine embryonic stem cell neuronal differentiation.

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    Tae Hyuk Kang

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which mutations of the purinergic housekeeping gene hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT cause the severe neurodevelopmental Lesch Nyhan Disease (LND are poorly understood. The best recognized neural consequences of HPRT deficiency are defective basal ganglia expression of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA and aberrant DA neuronal function. We have reported that HPRT deficiency leads to dysregulated expression of multiple DA-related developmental functions and cellular signaling defects in a variety of HPRT-deficient cells, including human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells. We now describe results of gene expression studies during neuronal differentiation of HPRT-deficient murine ESD3 embryonic stem cells and report that HPRT knockdown causes a marked switch from neuronal to glial gene expression and dysregulates expression of Sox2 and its regulator, genes vital for stem cell pluripotency and for the neuronal/glial cell fate decision. In addition, HPRT deficiency dysregulates many cellular functions controlling cell cycle and proliferation mechanisms, RNA metabolism, DNA replication and repair, replication stress, lysosome function, membrane trafficking, signaling pathway for platelet activation (SPPA multiple neurotransmission systems and sphingolipid, sulfur and glycan metabolism. We propose that the neural aberrations of HPRT deficiency result from combinatorial effects of these multi-system metabolic errors. Since some of these aberrations are also found in forms of Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease, we predict that some of these systems defects play similar neuropathogenic roles in diverse neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases in common and may therefore provide new experimental opportunities for clarifying pathogenesis and for devising new potential therapeutic targets in developmental and genetic disease.

  6. Pathophysiological, genetic and gene expression features of a novel rodent model of the cardio-metabolic syndrome.

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    Robert H Wallis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Complex etiology and pathogenesis of pathophysiological components of the cardio-metabolic syndrome have been demonstrated in humans and animal models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have generated extensive physiological, genetic and genome-wide gene expression profiles in a congenic strain of the spontaneously diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK rat containing a large region (110 cM, 170 Mb of rat chromosome 1 (RNO1, which covers diabetes and obesity quantitative trait loci (QTL, introgressed onto the genetic background of the normoglycaemic Brown Norway (BN strain. This novel disease model, which by the length of the congenic region closely mirrors the situation of a chromosome substitution strain, exhibits a wide range of abnormalities directly relevant to components of the cardio-metabolic syndrome and diabetes complications, including hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia, enhanced insulin secretion both in vivo and in vitro, insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia and altered pancreatic and renal histological structures. Gene transcription data in kidney, liver, skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue indicate that a disproportionately high number (43-83% of genes differentially expressed between congenic and BN rats map to the GK genomic interval targeted in the congenic strain, which represents less than 5% of the total length of the rat genome. Genotype analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in strains genetically related to the GK highlights clusters of conserved and strain-specific variants in RNO1 that can assist the identification of naturally occurring variants isolated in diabetic and hypertensive strains when different phenotype selection procedures were applied. CONCLUSIONS: Our results emphasize the importance of rat congenic models for defining the impact of genetic variants in well-characterised QTL regions on in vivo pathophysiological features and cis-/trans- regulation of gene expression. The congenic

  7. HRGRN: A Graph Search-Empowered Integrative Database of Arabidopsis Signaling Transduction, Metabolism and Gene Regulation Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xinbin; Li, Jun; Liu, Tingsong; Zhao, Patrick Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The biological networks controlling plant signal transduction, metabolism and gene regulation are composed of not only tens of thousands of genes, compounds, proteins and RNAs but also the complicated interactions and co-ordination among them. These networks play critical roles in many fundamental mechanisms, such as plant growth, development and environmental response. Although much is known about these complex interactions, the knowledge and data are currently scattered throughout the published literature, publicly available high-throughput data sets and third-party databases. Many 'unknown' yet important interactions among genes need to be mined and established through extensive computational analysis. However, exploring these complex biological interactions at the network level from existing heterogeneous resources remains challenging and time-consuming for biologists. Here, we introduce HRGRN, a graph search-empowered integrative database of Arabidopsis signal transduction, metabolism and gene regulatory networks. HRGRN utilizes Neo4j, which is a highly scalable graph database management system, to host large-scale biological interactions among genes, proteins, compounds and small RNAs that were either validated experimentally or predicted computationally. The associated biological pathway information was also specially marked for the interactions that are involved in the pathway to facilitate the investigation of cross-talk between pathways. Furthermore, HRGRN integrates a series of graph path search algorithms to discover novel relationships among genes, compounds, RNAs and even pathways from heterogeneous biological interaction data that could be missed by traditional SQL database search methods. Users can also build subnetworks based on known interactions. The outcomes are visualized with rich text, figures and interactive network graphs on web pages. The HRGRN database is freely available at http://plantgrn.noble.org/hrgrn/. PMID:26657893

  8. A mouse model for the metabolic effects of the human fat mass and obesity associated FTO gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Church

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Human FTO gene variants are associated with body mass index and type 2 diabetes. Because the obesity-associated SNPs are intronic, it is unclear whether changes in FTO expression or splicing are the cause of obesity or if regulatory elements within intron 1 influence upstream or downstream genes. We tested the idea that FTO itself is involved in obesity. We show that a dominant point mutation in the mouse Fto gene results in reduced fat mass, increased energy expenditure, and unchanged physical activity. Exposure to a high-fat diet enhances lean mass and lowers fat mass relative to control mice. Biochemical studies suggest the mutation occurs in a structurally novel domain and modifies FTO function, possibly by altering its dimerisation state. Gene expression profiling revealed increased expression of some fat and carbohydrate metabolism genes and an improved inflammatory profile in white adipose tissue of mutant mice. These data provide direct functional evidence that FTO is a causal gene underlying obesity. Compared to the reported mouse FTO knockout, our model more accurately reflects the effect of human FTO variants; we observe a heterozygous as well as homozygous phenotype, a smaller difference in weight and adiposity, and our mice do not show perinatal lethality or an age-related reduction in size and length. Our model suggests that a search for human coding mutations in FTO may be informative and that inhibition of FTO activity is a possible target for the treatment of morbid obesity.

  9. New Genes Tied to Endocrine, Metabolic, and Dietary Regulation of Lifespan from a Caenorhabditis elegans Genomic RNAi Screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Most of our knowledge about the regulation of aging comes from mutants originally isolated for other phenotypes. To ask whether our current view of aging has been affected by selection bias, and to deepen our understanding of known longevity pathways, we screened a genomic Caenorhabditis elegans RNAi library for clones that extend lifespan. We identified 23 new longevity genes affecting signal transduction, the stress response, gene expression, and metabolism and assigned these genes to specific longevity pathways. Our most important findings are (i that dietary restriction extends C. elegans' lifespan by down-regulating expression of key genes, including a gene required for methylation of many macromolecules, (ii that integrin signaling is likely to play a general, evolutionarily conserved role in lifespan regulation, and (iii that specific lipophilic hormones may influence lifespan in a DAF-16/FOXO-dependent fashion. Surprisingly, of the new genes that have conserved sequence domains, only one could not be associated with a known longevity pathway. Thus, our current view of the genetics of aging has probably not been distorted substantially by selection bias.

  10. The powdery mildew resistance gene REN1 co-segregates with an NBS-LRR gene cluster in two Central Asian grapevines

    OpenAIRE

    Morgante Michele; Kovács László; Kozma Pál; Hoffmann Sarolta; Cipriani Guido; Copetti Dario; Coleman Courtney; Testolin Raffaele; Di Gaspero Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Grape powdery mildew is caused by the North American native pathogen Erysiphe necator. Eurasian Vitis vinifera varieties were all believed to be susceptible. REN1 is the first resistance gene naturally found in cultivated plants of Vitis vinifera. Results REN1 is present in 'Kishmish vatkana' and 'Dzhandzhal kara', two grapevines documented in Central Asia since the 1920's. These cultivars have a second-degree relationship (half sibs, grandparent-grandchild, or avuncular),...

  11. Gene polymorphisms and gene scores linked to low serum carotenoid status and their associations with metabolic disturbance and depressive symptoms in African-American adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beydoun, May A.; Nalls, Michael A.; Canas, J. Atilio; Evans, Michele K.; Zonderman, Alan B.

    2016-01-01

    Gene polymorphisms provide means to obtain unconfounded associations between carotenoids and various health outcomes. We tested whether gene polymophorisms and gene scores linked to serum carotenoid status are related to metabolic disturbance and depressive symptoms in African-American adults residing in Baltimore city, MD, using cross-sectional data from the Healthy Aging in Neighborhood of Diversity Across the Lifespan (HANDLS) study (Age range:30–64y, N=873–994). We examined 24 single nucleotide polymorphisms of various gene loci that were previously shown to be associated with low serum carotenoid status (SNPlcar). Genetic risk scores (5 low specific-carotenoid risk scores (LSCRS: α-carotene, β-carotene, lutein+zeaxanthin, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene) and 1 low total-carotenoid risk score (LTCRS: total carotenoids)) were created. SNPlcar, LSCRS and LTCRS were entered as predictors for a number of health outcomes. Those included obesity, National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components, elevated homeostatic model assessment, Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR), C-reactive protein (CRP), hyperuricemia and elevated depressive symptoms (EDS, Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) score≥16). Among key findings, SNPlcar were not associated with the main outcomes after correction for multiple testing. However, an inverse association was found between LTCRS and HDL-C dyslipidemia. Specifically, the α-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin LSCRS were associated with lower odds of HDL-C dyslipidemia. However, the β-cryptoxanthin LSCRS was linked to a higher odds of EDS, with a linear dose-response relationship. In sum, gene risk scores linked to low serum carotenoids had mixed effects on HDL-C dyslipidemia and EDS. Further studies using larger African-American samples are needed. PMID:25201307

  12. Shigella reroutes host cell central metabolism to obtain high-flux nutrient supply for vigorous intracellular growth

    OpenAIRE

    Kentner, David; Martano, Giuseppe; Callon, Morgane; Chiquet, Petra; Brodmann, Maj; Burton, Olga; Wahlander, Asa; Nanni, Paolo; Delmotte, Nathanaël; Grossmann, Jonas; Limenitakis, Julien; Schlapbach, Ralph; Kiefer, Patrick; Vorholt, Julia A.; Hiller, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Shigella flexneri proliferate in infected human epithelial cells at exceptionally high rates. This vigorous growth has important consequences for rapid progression to life-threatening bloody diarrhea, but the underlying metabolic mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we used metabolomics, proteomics, and genetic experiments to determine host and Shigella metabolism during infection in a cell culture model. The data suggest that infected host cells maintain largely normal fluxes through g...

  13. Maternal Factors Are Associated with the Expression of Placental Genes Involved in Amino Acid Metabolism and Transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pricilla E Day

    Full Text Available Maternal environment and lifestyle factors may modify placental function to match the mother's capacity to support the demands of fetal growth. Much remains to be understood about maternal influences on placental metabolic and amino acid transporter gene expression. We investigated the influences of maternal lifestyle and body composition (e.g. fat and muscle content on a selection of metabolic and amino acid transporter genes and their associations with fetal growth.RNA was extracted from 102 term Southampton Women's Survey placental samples. Expression of nine metabolic, seven exchange, eight accumulative and three facilitated transporter genes was analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR.Increased placental LAT2 (p = 0.01, y+LAT2 (p = 0.03, aspartate aminotransferase 2 (p = 0.02 and decreased aspartate aminotransferase 1 (p = 0.04 mRNA expression associated with pre-pregnancy maternal smoking. Placental mRNA expression of TAT1 (p = 0.01, ASCT1 (p = 0.03, mitochondrial branched chain aminotransferase (p = 0.02 and glutamine synthetase (p = 0.05 was positively associated with maternal strenuous exercise. Increased glutamine synthetase mRNA expression (r = 0.20, p = 0.05 associated with higher maternal diet quality (prudent dietary pattern pre-pregnancy. Lower LAT4 (r = -0.25, p = 0.05 and aspartate aminotransferase 2 mRNA expression (r = -0.28, p = 0.01 associated with higher early pregnancy diet quality. Lower placental ASCT1 mRNA expression associated with measures of increased maternal fat mass, including pre-pregnancy BMI (r = -0.26, p = 0.01. Lower placental mRNA expression of alanine aminotransferase 2 associated with greater neonatal adiposity, for example neonatal subscapular skinfold thickness (r = -0.33, p = 0.001.A number of maternal influences have been linked with outcomes in childhood, independently of neonatal size; our finding of associations between placental expression of transporter and metabolic genes and maternal smoking

  14. A case of familial central precocious puberty caused by a novel mutation in the makorin RING finger protein 3 gene

    OpenAIRE

    Grandone, Anna; Cantelmi, Grazia; Cirillo, Grazia; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Luongo, Caterina; Miraglia del Giudice, Emanuele; Perrone, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background Central precocious puberty (CPP) is often familial but its genetic cause is largely unknown. Very recently, the makorin RING finger protein 3 (MKRN3) gene, located on chromosome 15 in the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS)-associated region (15q11-q13), has been found mutated in 5 families with familial precocious puberty. The MKRN3 is a maternal imprinted gene and the phenotype is expressed only when the MKRN3 mutations are localized on the allele inherited from the father. The function ...

  15. LmSmdB: an integrated database for metabolic and gene regulatory network in Leishmania major and Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Patel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A database that integrates all the information required for biological processing is essential to be stored in one platform. We have attempted to create one such integrated database that can be a one stop shop for the essential features required to fetch valuable result. LmSmdB (L. major and S. mansoni database is an integrated database that accounts for the biological networks and regulatory pathways computationally determined by integrating the knowledge of the genome sequences of the mentioned organisms. It is the first database of its kind that has together with the network designing showed the simulation pattern of the product. This database intends to create a comprehensive canopy for the regulation of lipid metabolism reaction in the parasite by integrating the transcription factors, regulatory genes and the protein products controlled by the transcription factors and hence operating the metabolism at genetic level.

  16. Horizontal Transfer and Death of a Fungal Secondary Metabolic Gene Cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Matthew A; Rokas, Antonis; Slot, Jason C.

    2012-01-01

    A cluster composed of four structural and two regulatory genes found in several species of the fungal genus Fusarium (class Sordariomycetes) is responsible for the production of the red pigment bikaverin. We discovered that the unrelated fungus Botrytis cinerea (class Leotiomycetes) contains a cluster of five genes that is highly similar in sequence and gene order to the Fusarium bikaverin cluster. Synteny conservation, nucleotide composition, and phylogenetic analyses of the cluster genes in...

  17. The effects of paternal high-fat diet exposure on offspring metabolism with epigenetic changes in the mouse adiponectin and leptin gene promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuyama, Hisashi; Mitsui, Takashi; Eguchi, Takeshi; Tamada, Shoko; Hiramatsu, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that epigenetic changes resulting from malnutrition might play important roles in transgenerational links with metabolic diseases. Previously, we observed that exposure to a high-fat diet (HFD) in utero caused a metabolic syndrome-like phenomenon through epigenetic modifications of the adiponectin and leptin genes that persisted for multiple generations. Recent etiological studies indicated that paternal BMI had effects on offspring BMI that were independent of but additive to maternal BMI effects. Thus, we examined whether paternal HFD-induced obesity affected the metabolic status of offspring through epigenetic changes in the adiponectin and leptin genes. Additionally, we investigated whether a normal diet during subsequent generations abolished the epigenetic changes associated with paternal HFD exposure before conception. We observed the effects of paternal HFD exposure before conception over multiple generations on offspring metabolic traits, including weight and fat gain, glucose intolerance, hypertriglyceridemia, abnormal adipocytokine levels, hypertension, and adiponectin and leptin gene expression and epigenetic changes. Normal diet consumption by male offspring during the subsequent generation following paternal HFD exposure diminished whereas consumption for two generations completely abolished the effect of paternal HFD exposure on metabolic traits and adipocytokine promoter epigenetic changes in the offspring. The effects of paternal HFD exposure on offspring were relatively weaker than those following HFD exposure in utero. However, paternal HFD exposure had an additive metabolic effect for two generations, suggesting that both paternal and maternal nutrition might affect offspring metabolism through epigenetic modifications of adipocytokine genes for multiple generations. PMID:27245335

  18. Metabolic Syndrome in Italian Obese Children and Adolescents: Stronger Association with Central Fat Depot than with Insulin Sensitivity and Birth Weight

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    Claudia Brufani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate whether body fat distribution, birth weight, and family history for diabetes (FHD were associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS in children and adolescents. Methods. A total of 439 Italian obese children and adolescents (5–18 years were enrolled. Subjects were divided into 2 groups: prepubertal and pubertal. MetS was diagnosed according to the adapted National Cholesterol Education Program criteria. Birth weight percentile, central obesity index (measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, insulin sensitivity (ISI, and disposition index were evaluated. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine variables associated with MetS. Results. The prevalence of MetS was 17%, with higher percentage in adolescents than in children (21 versus 12%. In the overall population, central obesity index was a stronger predictor of MetS than insulin sensitivity and low birth weight. When the two groups were considered, central fat depot remained the strongest predictor of MetS, with ISI similarly influencing the probability of MetS in the two groups and birth weight being negatively associated to MetS only in pubertal individuals. Neither FHD nor degree of fatness was a significant predictor of MetS. Conclusion. Simple clinical parameters like increased abdominal adiposity and low birth weight could be useful tools to identify European obese adolescents at risk for metabolic complications.

  19. Association of IL-6 and CRP gene polymorphisms with obesity and metabolic disorders in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pâmela F. Todendi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Activation of adipose tissue inflammation is associated with obesity caused by lipid accumulation in adipocytes. Through this activation, proinflammatory cytokines, such as Interleukin-6 (IL-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP seem to influence metabolic disorders. The present study evaluated whether polymorphisms in the CRP (rs1205 and IL-6 (rs1800795, rs2069845 genes are associated with the development of metabolic disorders in children and adolescents. A cross-sectional study was performed, consisting of 470 students from the municipality of Santa Cruz do Sul, Brazil, aged 7-17 years. Body mass index (BMI was classified according to overweight and obesity. Genotyping was performed by real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction(PCR. Anthropometric characteristics, biochemical markers, immunological markers and blood pressure were assessed. Descriptive statistics, chi-square and logistic regression were used for the analyses. No association was detected between the rs1800795 polymorphism and the assessed variables. Individuals with the risk genotype in the rs1205 gene were associated with the risk of developing hypercholesterolemia (OR 2.79; CI 1.40, 5.57; p = 0.003. Carriers of the risk genotype in the rs2069845 gene are associated with the risk of developing obesity (OR 3.07; CI 1.08, 8.72; p = 0.03. The polymorphism rs2069845 was associated with obesity and rs1205 was associated with the risk of developing hypercholesterolemia in Brazilian schoolchildren.

  20. Distribution of genetic polymorphisms of genes encoding drug metabolizing enzymes & drug transporters - a review with Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurusamy Umamaheswaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase I and II drug metabolizing enzymes (DME and drug transporters are involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism as well as elimination of many therapeutic agents, toxins and various pollutants. Presence of genetic polymorphisms in genes encoding these proteins has been associated with marked inter-individual variability in their activity that could result in variation in drug response, toxicity as well as in disease predisposition. The emergent field pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics (PGx is a promising discipline, as it predicts disease risk, selection of proper medication with regard to response and toxicity, and appropriate drug dosage guidance based on an individual′s genetic make-up. Consequently, genetic variations are essential to understand the ethnic differences in disease occurrence, development, prognosis, therapeutic response and toxicity. For that reason, it is necessary to establish the normative frequency of these genes in a particular population before unraveling the genotype-phenotype associations. Although a fair amount of allele frequency data are available in Indian populations, the existing pharmacogenetic data have not been compiled into a database. This review was intended to compile the normative frequency distribution of the variants of genes encoding DMEs (CYP450s, TPMT, GSTs, COMT, SULT1A1, NAT2 and UGTs and transporter proteins (MDR1, OCT1 and SLCO1B1 with Indian perspective.

  1. Virus-induced gene silencing of pea CHLI and CHLD affects tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, chloroplast development and the primary metabolic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tao; Luo, Sha; Araújo, Wagner L; Schlicke, Hagen; Rothbart, Maxi; Yu, Jing; Fan, Tingting; Fernie, Alisdair R; Grimm, Bernhard; Luo, Meizhong

    2013-04-01

    The first committed and highly regulated step of chlorophyll biosynthesis is the insertion of Mg(2+) into protoporphyrin IX, which is catalyzed by Mg chelatase that consists of CHLH, CHLD and CHLI subunits. In this study, CHLI and CHLD genes were suppressed by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS-CHLI and VIGS-CHLD) in pea (Pisum sativum), respectively. VIGS-CHLI and VIGS-CHLD plants both showed yellow leaf phenotypes with the reduced Mg chelatase activity and the inactivated synthesis of 5-aminolevulinic acid. The lower chlorophyll accumulation correlated with undeveloped thylakoid membranes, altered chloroplast nucleoid structure, malformed antenna complexes and compromised photosynthesis capacity in the yellow leaf tissues of the VIGS-CHLI and VIGS-CHLD plants. Non-enzymatic antioxidant contents and the activities of antioxidant enzymes were altered in response to enhanced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the chlorophyll deficient leaves of VIGS-CHLI and VIGS-CHLD plants. Furthermore, the results of metabolite profiling indicate a tight correlation between primary metabolic pathways and Mg chelatase activity. We also found that CHLD induces a feedback-regulated change of the transcription of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes. CHLD and CHLI silencing resulted in a rapid reduction of photosynthetic proteins. Taken together, Mg chelatase is not only a key regulator of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis but its activity also correlates with ROS homeostasis, primary interorganellar metabolism and retrograde signaling in plant cells. PMID:23416492

  2. Polymorphisms of Estrogen Metabolism-Related Genes and Prostate Cancer Risk in Two Populations of African Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emeville, Elise; Ferdinand, Séverine; Punga, Augustin; Lufuma, Simon; Blanchet, Pascal; Romana, Marc; Multigner, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Background Estrogens are thought to play a critical role in prostate carcinogenesis. It has been suggested that polymorphisms of genes encoding enzymes involved in estrogen metabolism are risk factors for prostate cancer. However, few studies have been performed on populations of African ancestry, which are known to have a high risk of prostate cancer. Objective We investigated whether functional polymorphisms of CYP17, CYP19, CYP1B1, COMT and UGT1A1 affected the risk of prostate cancer in two different populations of African ancestry. Methods In Guadeloupe (French West Indies), we compared 498 prostate cancer patients and 565 control subjects. In Kinshasa (Democratic Republic of Congo), 162 prostate cancer patients were compared with 144 controls. Gene polymorphisms were determined by the SNaPshot technique or short tandem repeat PCR analysis. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results The AA genotype and the A allele of rs4680 (COMT) appeared to be inversely associated with the risk of prostate cancer in adjusted models for both Afro-Caribbean and native African men. For the A allele, a significant inverse association was observed among cases with low-grade Gleason scores and localized clinical stage, in both populations. Conclusions These preliminary results support the hypothesis that polymorphisms of genes encoding enzymes involved in estrogen metabolism may modulate the risk of prostate cancer in populations of African ancestry. PMID:27074016

  3. Cloning, sequence analysis, and characterization of the genes involved in isoprimeverose metabolism in Lactobacillus pentosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaillou, S.; Lokman, B.C.; Leer, R.J.; Posthuma, C.; Postma, P.W.; Pouwels, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    Two genes, xylP and xylQ, from the xylose regulon of Lactobacillus pentosus were cloned and sequenced. Together with the repressor gene of the regulon, xylR, the xylPQ genes form an operon which is inducible by xylose and which is transcribed from a promoter located 145 bp upstream of xylP. A putati

  4. Temporal Expression of the Bacillus subtilis secA Gene, Encoding a Central Component of the Preprotein Translocase

    OpenAIRE

    Herbort, Markus; Klein, Michael; Manting, Erik H.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Freudl, Roland

    1999-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, the secretion of extracellular proteins strongly increases upon transition from exponential growth to the stationary growth phase. It is not known whether the amounts of some or all components of the protein translocation apparatus are concomitantly increased in relation to the increased export activity. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptional organization and temporal expression of the secA gene, encoding a central component of the B. subtilis preprotein transloc...

  5. Daily rhythms of lipid metabolic gene expression in zebra fish liver: Response to light/dark and feeding cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, J F; López-Olmeda, J F; Martínez, F J; Sánchez-Vázquez, F J

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous studies about fish nutrition and lipid metabolism, very little is known about the daily rhythm expression of lipogenesis and lipolysis genes. This research aimed to investigate the existence of daily rhythm expressions of the genes involved in lipid metabolism and their synchronization to different light/dark (LD) and feeding cycles in zebra fish liver. For this purpose, three groups of zebra fish were submitted to a 12:12 h LD cycle. A single daily meal was provided to each group at various times: in the middle of the light phase (ML); in the middle of the dark phase (MD); at random times. After 20 days of acclimation to these experimental conditions, liver samples were collected every 4 h in one 24-h cycle. The results revealed that most genes displayed a significant daily rhythm with an acrophase of expression in the dark phase. The acrophase of lipolytic genes (lipoprotein lipase - lpl, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor - pparα and hydroxyacil CoA dehydrogenase - hadh) was displayed between ZT 02:17 h and ZT 18:31 h. That of lipogenic genes (leptin-a - lepa, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor - pparγ, liver X receptor - lxr, insulin-like growth factor - igf1, sterol regulatory element-binding protein - srebp and fatty acid synthase - fas) was displayed between ZT 15:25 h and 20:06 h (dark phase). Feeding time barely influenced daily expression rhythms, except for lxr in the MD group, whose acrophase shifted by about 14 h compared with the ML group (ZT 04:31 h versus ZT 18:29 h, respectively). These results evidence a strong synchronization to the LD cycle, but not to feeding time, and most genes showed a nocturnal acrophase. These findings highlight the importance of considering light and feeding time to optimize lipid metabolism and feeding protocols in fish farming. PMID:26595085

  6. Deep sequencing of the Camellia sinensis transcriptome revealed candidate genes for major metabolic pathways of tea-specific compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, CY; Yang, H; Wei, CL; Yu, O; Zhang, ZZ; Sun, J; Wan, XC

    2011-01-01

    Tea is one of the most popular non-alcoholic beverages worldwide. However, the tea plant, Camellia sinensis, is difficult to culture in vitro, to transform, and has a large genome, rendering little genomic information available. Recent advances in large-scale RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) provide a fast, cost-effective, and reliable approach to generate large expression datasets for functional genomic analysis, which is especially suitable for non-model species with un-sequenced genomes. Using high-throughput Illumina RNA-seq, the transcriptome from poly (A){sup +} RNA of C. sinensis was analyzed at an unprecedented depth (2.59 gigabase pairs). Approximate 34.5 million reads were obtained, trimmed, and assembled into 127,094 unigenes, with an average length of 355 bp and an N50 of 506 bp, which consisted of 788 contig clusters and 126,306 singletons. This number of unigenes was 10-fold higher than existing C. sinensis sequences deposited in GenBank (as of August 2010). Sequence similarity analyses against six public databases (Uniprot, NR and COGs at NCBI, Pfam, InterPro and KEGG) found 55,088 unigenes that could be annotated with gene descriptions, conserved protein domains, or gene ontology terms. Some of the unigenes were assigned to putative metabolic pathways. Targeted searches using these annotations identified the majority of genes associated with several primary metabolic pathways and natural product pathways that are important to tea quality, such as flavonoid, theanine and caffeine biosynthesis pathways. Novel candidate genes of these secondary pathways were discovered. Comparisons with four previously prepared cDNA libraries revealed that this transcriptome dataset has both a high degree of consistency with previous EST data and an approximate 20 times increase in coverage. Thirteen unigenes related to theanine and flavonoid synthesis were validated. Their expression patterns in different organs of the tea plant were analyzed by RT-PCR and quantitative real

  7. Deep sequencing of the Camellia sinensis transcriptome revealed candidate genes for major metabolic pathways of tea-specific compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Qi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tea is one of the most popular non-alcoholic beverages worldwide. However, the tea plant, Camellia sinensis, is difficult to culture in vitro, to transform, and has a large genome, rendering little genomic information available. Recent advances in large-scale RNA sequencing (RNA-seq provide a fast, cost-effective, and reliable approach to generate large expression datasets for functional genomic analysis, which is especially suitable for non-model species with un-sequenced genomes. Results Using high-throughput Illumina RNA-seq, the transcriptome from poly (A+ RNA of C. sinensis was analyzed at an unprecedented depth (2.59 gigabase pairs. Approximate 34.5 million reads were obtained, trimmed, and assembled into 127,094 unigenes, with an average length of 355 bp and an N50 of 506 bp, which consisted of 788 contig clusters and 126,306 singletons. This number of unigenes was 10-fold higher than existing C. sinensis sequences deposited in GenBank (as of August 2010. Sequence similarity analyses against six public databases (Uniprot, NR and COGs at NCBI, Pfam, InterPro and KEGG found 55,088 unigenes that could be annotated with gene descriptions, conserved protein domains, or gene ontology terms. Some of the unigenes were assigned to putative metabolic pathways. Targeted searches using these annotations identified the majority of genes associated with several primary metabolic pathways and natural product pathways that are important to tea quality, such as flavonoid, theanine and caffeine biosynthesis pathways. Novel candidate genes of these secondary pathways were discovered. Comparisons with four previously prepared cDNA libraries revealed that this transcriptome dataset has both a high degree of consistency with previous EST data and an approximate 20 times increase in coverage. Thirteen unigenes related to theanine and flavonoid synthesis were validated. Their expression patterns in different organs of the tea plant were

  8. Transcriptome and Gene Ontology (GO) Enrichment Analysis Reveals Genes Involved in Biotin Metabolism That Affect l-Lysine Production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong-Il; Kim, Jong-Hyeon; Park, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is widely used for amino acid production. In the present study, 543 genes showed a significant change in their mRNA expression levels in l-lysine-producing C. glutamicum ATCC21300 than that in the wild-type C. glutamicum ATCC13032. Among these 543 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 28 genes were up- or downregulated. In addition, 454 DEGs were functionally enriched and categorized based on BLAST sequence homologies and gene ontology (GO) annotations using the Blast2GO software. Interestingly, NCgl0071 (bioB, encoding biotin synthase) was expressed at levels ~20-fold higher in the l-lysine-producing ATCC21300 strain than that in the wild-type ATCC13032 strain. Five other genes involved in biotin metabolism or transport-NCgl2515 (bioA, encoding adenosylmethionine-8-amino-7-oxononanoate aminotransferase), NCgl2516 (bioD, encoding dithiobiotin synthetase), NCgl1883, NCgl1884, and NCgl1885-were also expressed at significantly higher levels in the l-lysine-producing ATCC21300 strain than that in the wild-type ATCC13032 strain, which we determined using both next-generation RNA sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR analysis. When we disrupted the bioB gene in C. glutamicum ATCC21300, l-lysine production decreased by approximately 76%, and the three genes involved in biotin transport (NCgl1883, NCgl1884, and NCgl1885) were significantly downregulated. These results will be helpful to improve our understanding of C. glutamicum for industrial amino acid production. PMID:27005618

  9. Transcriptome and Gene Ontology (GO Enrichment Analysis Reveals Genes Involved in Biotin Metabolism That Affect l-Lysine Production in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Il Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium glutamicum is widely used for amino acid production. In the present study, 543 genes showed a significant change in their mRNA expression levels in l-lysine-producing C. glutamicum ATCC21300 than that in the wild-type C. glutamicum ATCC13032. Among these 543 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, 28 genes were up- or downregulated. In addition, 454 DEGs were functionally enriched and categorized based on BLAST sequence homologies and gene ontology (GO annotations using the Blast2GO software. Interestingly, NCgl0071 (bioB, encoding biotin synthase was expressed at levels ~20-fold higher in the l-lysine-producing ATCC21300 strain than that in the wild-type ATCC13032 strain. Five other genes involved in biotin metabolism or transport—NCgl2515 (bioA, encoding adenosylmethionine-8-amino-7-oxononanoate aminotransferase, NCgl2516 (bioD, encoding dithiobiotin synthetase, NCgl1883, NCgl1884, and NCgl1885—were also expressed at significantly higher levels in the l-lysine-producing ATCC21300 strain than that in the wild-type ATCC13032 strain, which we determined using both next-generation RNA sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR analysis. When we disrupted the bioB gene in C. glutamicum ATCC21300, l-lysine production decreased by approximately 76%, and the three genes involved in biotin transport (NCgl1883, NCgl1884, and NCgl1885 were significantly downregulated. These results will be helpful to improve our understanding of C. glutamicum for industrial amino acid production.

  10. Maternal folate, alcohol and energy metabolism-related gene polymorphisms and the risk of recurrent pregnancy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sata, F; Yamada, H; Kishi, R; Minakami, H

    2012-10-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that the condition of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) may be multifactorial, with both genetic predisposition and environmental factors potentially involved in its pathogenesis. The aim of this study is to elucidate the associations between maternal folate, alcohol and energy metabolism-related gene polymorphisms and the risk of RPL. This case-control study, which involved 116 cases with two or more instances of RPL and 306 fertile controls, was performed in the city of Sapporo, Japan. The associations between eight single nucleotide polymorphisms of folate, alcohol and energy metabolism-related genes [methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), 5-methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase (MTR), 5-methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase reductase (MTRR), alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B), aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), beta-3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG)], and RPL were assessed. Without consideration of cigarette smoking or alcohol use, the risk of RPL significantly decreased in women with the MTHFR rs1801133 TT, MTR rs1805087 AG or ALDH2 rs671 AA genotype (P < 0.05). The risk of RPL associated with cigarette smoking and alcohol use decreased significantly in women carrying the MTHFR rs1801133 T allele [odds ratio (OR), 0.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.27-0.95]. Similarly, the risk of RPL significantly decreased in women carrying the MTR rs1805087 G allele (OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.23-0.85). Our findings suggest that maternal gene polymorphisms related to folate metabolism may decrease the risk of RPL. Molecular epidemiological studies are needed to unequivocally elucidate the multifactorial effects of both genetic and environmental factors on human fecundity. PMID:25102261

  11. Association between the -455T>C promoter polymorphism of the APOC3 gene and the metabolic syndrome in a multi-ethnic sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pollex, Rebecca L; Ban, Matthew R; Young, T Kue;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common polymorphisms in the promoter of the APOC3 gene have been associated with hypertriglyceridemia and may impact on phenotypic expression of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). The rs7566605 marker, located near the INSIG2 gene, has been found to be associated with obesity, making it...

  12. Metabolic gene clusters encoding the enzymes of two branches of the 3-oxoadipate pathway in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérecová, Gabriela; Neboháčová, Martina; Zeman, Igor; Pryszcz, Leszek P; Tomáška, Ľubomír; Gabaldón, Toni; Nosek, Jozef

    2015-05-01

    The pathogenic yeast Candida albicans utilizes hydroxyderivatives of benzene via the catechol and hydroxyhydroquinone branches of the 3-oxoadipate pathway. The genetic basis and evolutionary origin of this catabolic pathway in yeasts are unknown. In this study, we identified C. albicans genes encoding the enzymes involved in the degradation of hydroxybenzenes. We found that the genes coding for core components of the 3-oxoadipate pathway are arranged into two metabolic gene clusters. Our results demonstrate that C. albicans cells cultivated in media containing hydroxybenzene substrates highly induce the transcription of these genes as well as the corresponding enzymatic activities. We also found that C. albicans cells assimilating hydroxybenzenes cope with the oxidative stress by upregulation of cellular antioxidant systems such as alternative oxidase and catalase. Moreover, we investigated the evolution of the enzymes encoded by these clusters and found that most of them share a particularly sparse phylogenetic distribution among Saccharomycotina, which is likely to have been caused by extensive gene loss. We exploited this fact to find co-evolving proteins that are suitable candidates for the missing enzymes of the pathway. PMID:25743787

  13. Changes in the Phosphoproteome and Metabolome Link Early Signaling Events to Rearrangement of Photosynthesis and Central Metabolism in Salinity and Oxidative Stress Response in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanmei; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    Salinity and oxidative stress are major factors affecting and limiting the productivity of agricultural crops. The molecular and biochemical processes governing the plant response to abiotic stress have often been researched in a reductionist manner. Here, we report a systemic approach combining metabolic labeling and phosphoproteomics to capture early signaling events with quantitative metabolome analysis and enzyme activity assays to determine the effects of salt and oxidative stress on plant physiology. K(+) and Na(+) transporters showed coordinated changes in their phosphorylation pattern, indicating the importance of dynamic ion homeostasis for adaptation to salt stress. Unique phosphorylation sites were found for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SNF1 kinase homolog10 and 11, indicating their central roles in the stress-regulated responses. Seven Sucrose Non-fermenting1-Related Protein Kinase2 kinases showed varying levels of phosphorylation at multiple serine/threonine residues in their kinase domain upon stress, showing temporally distinct modulation of the various isoforms. Salinity and oxidative stress also lead to changes in protein phosphorylation of proteins central to photosynthesis, in particular the kinase State Transition Protein7 required for state transition and light-harvesting II complex proteins. Furthermore, stress-induced changes of the phosphorylation of enzymes of central metabolism were observed. The phosphorylation patterns of these proteins were concurrent with changes in enzyme activity. This was reflected by altered levels of metabolites, such as the sugars sucrose and fructose, glycolysis intermediates, and amino acids. Together, our study provides evidence for a link between early signaling in the salt and oxidative stress response that regulates the state transition of photosynthesis and the rearrangement of primary metabolism. PMID:26471895

  14. PAH-DNA adducts in environmentally exposed population in relation to metabolic and DNA repair genes polymorphisms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Binková, Blanka; Chvátalová, Irena; Lněničková, Zdena; Milcová, Alena; Tulupová, Elena; Farmer, P. B.; Šrám, Radim

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 620, - (2007), s. 49-61. ISSN 0027-5107 R&D Projects: GA MŽP SI/340/2/00; GA MŽP SL/740/5/03 Grant ostatní: EU(GB) 2000-00091 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : DNA adducts * genetic polymorphisms * metabolic genes Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 4.159, year: 2007

  15. Interleukin-17A Differentially Induces Inflammatory and Metabolic Gene Expression in the Adipose Tissues of Lean and Obese Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yine Qu; Qiuyang Zhang; Siqi Ma; Sen Liu; Zhiquan Chen; Zhongfu Mo; Zongbing You

    2016-01-01

    The functions of interleukin-17A (IL-17A) in adipose tissues and adipocytes have not been well understood. In the present study, male mice were fed with a regular diet (n = 6, lean mice) or a high-fat diet (n = 6, obese mice) for 30 weeks. Subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) were analyzed for IL-17A levels. SAT and VAT were treated with IL-17A and analyzed for inflammatory and metabolic gene expression. Mouse 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes were differentiated into adipo...

  16. The carbon storage regulator (Csr) system exerts a nutrient-specific control over central metabolism in Escherichia coli strain nissle 1917

    OpenAIRE

    Revelles, Olga; Millard, Pierre; Nougayrede, Jean-Philippe; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Oswald, Eric; Létisse, Fabien; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr) system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations) showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the c...

  17. Shigella reroutes host cell central metabolism to obtain high-flux nutrient supply for vigorous intracellular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentner, David; Martano, Giuseppe; Callon, Morgane; Chiquet, Petra; Brodmann, Maj; Burton, Olga; Wahlander, Asa; Nanni, Paolo; Delmotte, Nathanaël; Grossmann, Jonas; Limenitakis, Julien; Schlapbach, Ralph; Kiefer, Patrick; Vorholt, Julia A; Hiller, Sebastian; Bumann, Dirk

    2014-07-01

    Shigella flexneri proliferate in infected human epithelial cells at exceptionally high rates. This vigorous growth has important consequences for rapid progression to life-threatening bloody diarrhea, but the underlying metabolic mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we used metabolomics, proteomics, and genetic experiments to determine host and Shigella metabolism during infection in a cell culture model. The data suggest that infected host cells maintain largely normal fluxes through glycolytic pathways, but the entire output of these pathways is captured by Shigella, most likely in the form of pyruvate. This striking strategy provides Shigella with an abundant favorable energy source, while preserving host cell ATP generation, energy charge maintenance, and survival, despite ongoing vigorous exploitation. Shigella uses a simple three-step pathway to metabolize pyruvate at high rates with acetate as an excreted waste product. The crucial role of this pathway for Shigella intracellular growth suggests targets for antimicrobial chemotherapy of this devastating disease. PMID:24958876

  18. Cloning of Thermostable DNA Polymerase Gene from a Thermophilic Brevibacillus sp. Isolated from Sikidang Crater, Dieng Plateu, Central Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Dhiantika Witasari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermostable DNA polymerase has an important role for amplifying small amount of DNA through polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Thermophillic bacteria Brevibacillus sp. was isolated from Sikidang Crater, Dieng Plateu, Central Java. Previous study showed that crude protein of the isolate could be used in PCR. Unfortunately, like most native thermostable enzymes, the thermostable DNA polymerase of the isolate is synthesized in a very low level and therefore is cumbersome to purify. The purpose of this research is to clone thermostable DNA polymerase gene of the isolate. The DNA polymerase gene was amplified by means of PCR using spesific primers. The amplified fragment was then isolated, purified, and ligated into the pGEM-T cloning vector. The recombinant plasmid was then transformed to competent E. coli JM109 cells using heat shock method. The cloned thermostable DNA polymerase gene from the thermophilic isolate was then characterized for its nucleotide base sequence. The result showed that the DNA Pol I gene was successfully be amplified from the isolate DNA genom, resulting in ± 2,7 kb DNA fragment in length. Sequence analysis of segment of targeted gene showed high similarity to that of thermostable DNA polymerase genes from other Bacillus.Key words : Thermostable DNA Pol I, Brevibacillus sp., PCR, cloning

  19. Disruption of the acyl-coa binding protein gene delays hepatic adaptation to metabolic changes at weaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neess, Ditte; Bloksgaard, Maria; Sørensen, Signe Bek; Marcher, Ann-Britt; Elle, Ida C; Helledie, Torben; Due, Marianne; Pagmantidis, Vasileios; Finsen, Bente; Wilbertz, Johannes; Kruhoeffer, Mogens; Faergeman, Nils; Mandrup, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    , little is known about the in vivo function in mammalian cells. We have generated mice with targeted disruption of ACBP (ACBP-/-). These mice are viable and fertile and develop normally. However, around weaning the ACBP-/- mice go through a crisis with overall weakness, and a slightly decreased growth...... rate. Using microarray analysis we show that the liver of ACBP-/- mice display a significantly delayed adaptation to weaning with late induction of target genes of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) family. As a result, hepatic de novo cholesterogenesis is decreased at weaning. The...... delayed induction of SREBP target genes around weaning is caused by a compromised processing and decreased expression of SREBP precursors leading to reduced binding of SREBP to target sites in chromatin. In conclusion, lack of ACBP interferes with the normal metabolic adaptation to weaning and leads to...

  20. Effect of high-intensity training on exercise-induced gene expression specific to ion homeostasis and metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsborg, Nikolai; Bangsbo, Jens; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2003-01-01

    Changes in gene expression during recovery from high-intensity, intermittent, one-legged exercise were studied before and after 5.5 wk of training. Genes related to metabolism, as well as Na+, K+, and pH homeostasis, were selected for analyses. After the same work was performed before and after the...... training period, several muscle biopsies were obtained from vastus lateralis muscle. In the untrained state, the Na+-K+-ATPase alpha1-subunit mRNA level was approximately threefold higher (P < 0.01) at 0, 1, and 3 h after exercise, relative to the preexercise resting level. After 3-5 h of recovery in the...... resting mRNA levels were observed as a result of training. In conclusion, cellular adaptations to high-intensity exercise training may, in part, be induced by transcriptional regulation. After training, the transcriptional response to an exercise bout at a given workload is diminished....

  1. The CanOE strategy: integrating genomic and metabolic contexts across multiple prokaryote genomes to find candidate genes for orphan enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Alexander Thil Smith

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Of all biochemically characterized metabolic reactions formalized by the IUBMB, over one out of four have yet to be associated with a nucleic or protein sequence, i.e. are sequence-orphan enzymatic activities. Few bioinformatics annotation tools are able to propose candidate genes for such activities by exploiting context-dependent rather than sequence-dependent data, and none are readily accessible and propose result integration across multiple genomes. Here, we present CanOE (Candidate genes for Orphan Enzymes, a four-step bioinformatics strategy that proposes ranked candidate genes for sequence-orphan enzymatic activities (or orphan enzymes for short. The first step locates "genomic metabolons", i.e. groups of co-localized genes coding proteins catalyzing reactions linked by shared metabolites, in one genome at a time. These metabolons can be particularly helpful for aiding bioanalysts to visualize relevant metabolic data. In the second step, they are used to generate candidate associations between un-annotated genes and gene-less reactions. The third step integrates these gene-reaction associations over several genomes using gene families, and summarizes the strength of family-reaction associations by several scores. In the final step, these scores are used to rank members of gene families which are proposed for metabolic reactions. These associations are of particular interest when the metabolic reaction is a sequence-orphan enzymatic activity. Our strategy found over 60,000 genomic metabolons in more than 1,000 prokaryote organisms from the MicroScope platform, generating candidate genes for many metabolic reactions, of which more than 70 distinct orphan reactions. A computational validation of the approach is discussed. Finally, we present a case study on the anaerobic allantoin degradation pathway in Escherichia coli K-12.

  2. Evidence for cross-pathway regulation of metabolic gene expression in plants.

    OpenAIRE

    Guyer, D; Patton, D; Ward, E

    1995-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, blocking histidine biosynthesis with a specific inhibitor of imidazoleglycerol-phosphate dehydratase caused increased expression of eight genes involved in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids, histidine, lysine, and purines. A decrease in expression of glutamine synthetase was also observed. Addition of histidine eliminated the gene-regulating effects of the inhibitor, demonstrating that the changes in gene expression resulted from histidine-pathway blockage. The...

  3. Influence of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator on expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quadri Luis EN

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis (CF is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene. Infections of the respiratory tract are a hallmark in CF. The host immune responses in CF are not adequate to eradicate pathogens, such as P. aeruginosa. Dendritic cells (DC are crucial in initiation and regulation of immune responses. Changes in DC function could contribute to abnormal immune responses on multiple levels. The role of DC in CF lung disease remains unknown. Methods This study investigated the expression of CFTR gene in bone marrow-derived DC. We compared the differentiation and maturation profile of DC from CF and wild type (WT mice. We analyzed the gene expression levels in DC from naive CF and WT mice or following P. aeruginosa infection. Results CFTR is expressed in DC with lower level compared to lung tissue. DC from CF mice showed a delayed in the early phase of differentiation. Gene expression analysis in DC generated from naive CF and WT mice revealed decreased expression of Caveolin-1 (Cav1, a membrane lipid raft protein, in the CF DC compared to WT DC. Consistently, protein and activity levels of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP, a negative regulator of Cav1 expression, were increased in CF DC. Following exposure to P. aeruginosa, expression of 3β-hydroxysterol-Δ7 reductase (Dhcr7 and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 2 (Scd2, two enzymes involved in the lipid metabolism that are also regulated by SREBP, was less decreased in the CF DC compared to WT DC. Conclusion These results suggest that CFTR dysfunction in DC affects factors involved in membrane structure and lipid-metabolism, which may contribute to the abnormal inflammatory and immune response characteristic of CF.

  4. Xylose-metabolizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains overexpressing the TKL1 and TAL1 genes encoding the pentose phosphate pathway enzymes transketolase and transaldolase.

    OpenAIRE

    Walfridsson, M; Hallborn, J; Penttilä, M.; Keränen, S; Hahn-Hägerdal, B

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was metabolically engineered for xylose utilization. The Pichia stipitis CBS 6054 genes XYL1 and XYL2 encoding xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase were cloned into S. cerevisiae. The gene products catalyze the two initial steps in xylose utilization which S. cerevisiae lacks. In order to increase the flux through the pentose phosphate pathway, the S. cerevisiae TKL1 and TAL1 genes encoding transketolase and transaldolase were overexpressed. A XYL1- and XYL2-con...

  5. Studies on the effect of cell cycle arrest on central metabolism in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, using physiological and systems biology approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joomi

    Diatoms (Bacillarophyceae) are photosynthetic unicellular microalgae that have risen to ecological prominence in the modern oceans over the past 30 million years. They are excellent candidates for biodiesel feedstocks. Global climate change has led to an interest in algal triacylglycerols (TAGs) as feedstocks for sustainable biodiesel, and diatoms are attractive candidates for TAG production as one of the most productive and environmentally flexible algae in the contemporary oceans. For Chapter 2, a genome-scale metabolic model was constructed to calculate intracellular fluxes of a diatom under different growth conditions. The model identified enzymes that may be relevant to increasing lipid synthesis, explored how transporters affect flux outputs, and explored unusual features of diatoms, including the Entner-Douderoff and phosphoketolase pathways, and glycolytic enzymes in their mitochondria. Chapter 3 discusses how cell cycle arrest via cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibition, can increase accumulation of TAGs, and shift metabolism away from protein synthesis. For Chapter 4, transcriptome analysis of cells under cell cycle arrest was performed to show that the pattern of gene expression was fundamentally different from nitrogen stress. Most of the genes related to fatty acid and TAG synthesis were up-regulated. The gene expression pattern for light harvesting complexes was similar to cells stressed by high light, suggesting that arrested cells have smaller sinks for photosynthetically generated electrons.

  6. Metabolic enzyme activities, metabolism-related genes expression and bioaccumulation in juvenile white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei exposed to benzo[a]pyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xianyun; Pan, Luqing; Wang, Lin

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) on metabolic detoxification system and bioaccumulation of white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. In this study, juvenile white shrimp L. vannamei were exposed for 21 days at four different concentrations of 0, 0.03, 0.3 and 3μg/L. Detoxification enzyme activities of phase I (aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH), 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), epoxide hydrolase (EH)) and phase II (glutathione-S-transferase (GST), sulfotransferase (SULT), uridine diphosphate glucuronyl transferase (UGT)) were determined, and results showed that all the detoxification enzyme activities increased in a dose-dependent manner except for the low BaP exposure. Transcription of genes was detected and measured by real-time RT-PCR. It showed that at day six BaP increased cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, GST, SULT visa aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner, which suggests that they could be potential targets of BaP that disrupt the detoxification system. The consistency of their responses to BaP exposure implies that AhR action may be involved in invertebrate CYP regulation. Additionally, BaP bioaccumulation increased rapidly first and showed an incoming plateau. Besides, the enzyme activities and bioaccumulation in the hepatopancreas were higher than those in the gills. These results will not only provide information on BaP metabolic mechanism for this species, but also scientific data for pollution monitoring. PMID:24636950

  7. Salacia oblonga root improves cardiac lipid metabolism in Zucker diabetic fatty rats: Modulation of cardiac PPAR-α-mediated transcription of fatty acid metabolic genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excess cardiac triglyceride accumulation in diabetes and obesity induces lipotoxicity, which predisposes the myocytes to death. On the other hand, increased cardiac fatty acid (FA) oxidation plays a role in the development of myocardial dysfunction in diabetes. PPAR-α plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis of lipid metabolism. We have previously demonstrated that the extract from Salacia oblonga root (SOE), an Ayurvedic anti-diabetic and anti-obesity medicine, improves hyperlipidemia in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats (a genetic model of type 2 diabetes and obesity) and possesses PPAR-α activating properties. Here we demonstrate that chronic oral administration of SOE reduces cardiac triglyceride and FA contents and decreases the Oil red O-stained area in the myocardium of ZDF rats, which parallels the effects on plasma triglyceride and FA levels. Furthermore, the treatment suppressed cardiac overexpression of both FA transporter protein-1 mRNA and protein in ZDF rats, suggesting inhibition of increased cardiac FA uptake as the basis for decreased cardiac FA levels. Additionally, the treatment also inhibited overexpression in ZDF rat heart of PPAR-α mRNA and protein and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, acyl-CoA oxidase and 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase mRNAs and restored the downregulated acetyl-CoA carboxylase mRNA. These results suggest that SOE inhibits cardiac FA oxidation in ZDF rats. Thus, our findings suggest that improvement by SOE of excess cardiac lipid accumulation and increased cardiac FA oxidation in diabetes and obesity occurs by reduction of cardiac FA uptake, thereby modulating cardiac PPAR-α-mediated FA metabolic gene transcription

  8. Restricted expression of a median Hox gene in the central nervous system of chaetognaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papillon, Daniel; Perez, Yvan; Fasano, Laurent; Le Parco, Yannick; Caubit, Xavier

    2005-07-01

    Hox genes encode a set of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors that regulate anterior-posterior patterning. Here we report the first developmental expression of a Hox gene from Chaetognatha. These metazoans have been shown recently to be part of the protostome group of bilaterians. We describe the analysis of the SceMed4 gene (a Spadella cephaloptera Median Hox gene) including its expression from late stages of egg development to 7 days after hatching. In all of these stages, SceMed4 is expressed in two lateral stripes in a restricted region of the developing ventral ganglion. PMID:15789247

  9. Alterations in Hepatic FGF21, Co-Regulated Genes, and Upstream Metabolic Genes in Response to Nutrition, Ketosis and Inflammation in Peripartal Holstein Cows.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haji Akbar

    Full Text Available In rodents, fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 has emerged as a key metabolic regulator produced by liver. To gather preliminary data on the potential importance of FGF1, co-regulated genes, and upstream metabolic genes, we examined the hepatic mRNA expression in response to nutrition and inflammation in dairy cows. In experiment 1, induction of ketosis through feed restriction on d 5 postpartum upregulated FGF21, its co-receptor KLB, and PPARA but only elicited a numerical increase in serum FGF21 concentration. In experiment 2, cows in control (CON or receiving 50 g/d of L-carnitine (C50 from -14 through 21 d had increased FGF21, PPARA, and NFIL3 on d 10 compared with d 2 postpartum. In contrast, compared with CON and C50, 100 g/d L-carnitine (C100 resulted in lower FGF21, KLB, ANGPTL4, and ARNTL expression on d 10. In experiment 3, cows were fed during the dry period either a higher-energy (OVE; 1.62 Mcal/kg DM or lower-energy (CON; 1.34 Mcal/kg DM diet and received 0 (OVE:N, CON:N or 200 μg of LPS (OVE:Y, CON:Y into the mammary gland at d 7 postpartum. For FGF21 mRNA expression in CON, the LPS challenge (CON:Y prevented a decrease in expression between d 7 and 14 postpartum such that cows in CON:N had a 4-fold lower expression on d 14 compared with d 7. The inflammatory stimulus induced by LPS in CON:Y resulted in upregulation of PPARA on d 14 to a similar level as cows in OVE:N. In OVE:Y, expression of PPARA was lower than CON:N on d 7 and remained unchanged on d 14. On d 7, LPS led to a 4-fold greater serum FGF21 only in OVE but not in CON cows. In fact, OVE:Y reached the same serum FGF21 concentration as CON:N, suggesting a carryover effect of dietary energy level on signaling mechanisms within liver. Overall, results indicate that nutrition, ketosis, and inflammation during the peripartal period can alter hepatic FGF21, co-regulated genes, and upstream metabolic genes to various extents. The functional outcome of these changes merits

  10. Lack of Association of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Gene Polymorphisms with Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Variables in Young Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Hirata

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the association of estrogen receptor alpha gene (ESR1 polymorphisms with cardiorespiratory and metabolic parameters in young women. In total, 354 healthy women were selected for cardiopulmonary exercise testing and short-term heart rate (HR variability (HRV evaluation. The HRV analysis was determined by the temporal indices rMSSD (square root of the mean squared differences of successive R–R intervals (RRi divided by the number of RRi minus one, SDNN (root mean square of differences from mean RRi, divided by the number of RRi and power spectrum components by low frequency (LF, high frequency (HF and LF/HF ratio. Blood samples were obtained for serum lipids, estradiol and DNA extraction. ESR1 rs2234693 and rs9340799 polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR and fragment restriction analysis. HR and oxygen uptake (VO2 values did not differ between the ESR1 polymorphisms with respect to autonomic modulation. We not find a relationship between ESR1 T–A, T–G, C–A and C–G haplotypes and cardiorespiratory and metabolic variables. Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that VO2, total cholesterol and triglycerides influence HRV (p < 0.05. The results suggest that ESR1 variants have no effect on cardiorespiratory and metabolic variables, while HRV indices are influenced by aerobic capacity and lipids in healthy women.

  11. The acute impact of polyphenols from Hibiscus sabdariffa in metabolic homeostasis: an approach combining metabolomics and gene-expression analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Debón, Raúl; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Senan-Campos, Oriol; Massucci, Francesco A; Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Guimerà, Roger; Camps, Jordi; Menendez, Javier A; Joven, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    We explored the acute multifunctional effects of polyphenols from Hibiscus sabdariffa in humans to assess possible consequences on the host's health. The expected dynamic response was studied using a combination of transcriptomics and metabolomics to integrate specific functional pathways through network-based methods and to generate hypotheses established by acute metabolic effects and/or modifications in the expression of relevant genes. Data were obtained from healthy male volunteers after 3 hours of ingestion of an aqueous Hibiscus sabdariffa extract. The data were compared with data obtained prior to the ingestion, and the overall findings suggest that these particular polyphenols had a simultaneous role in mitochondrial function, energy homeostasis and protection of the cardiovascular system. These findings suggest beneficial actions in inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and oxidation, which are interrelated mechanisms. Among other effects, the activation of the heme oxygenase-biliverdin reductase axis, the systemic inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system, the inhibition of the angiotensin-converting enzyme, and several actions mirroring those of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists further support this notion. We also found concordant findings in the serum of the participants, which include a decrease in cortisol levels and a significant increase in the active vasodilator metabolite of bradykinin (des-Arg(9)-bradykinin). Therefore, our data support the view that polyphenols from Hibiscus sabdariffa play a regulatory role in metabolic health and in the maintenance of blood pressure, thus implying a multi-faceted impact in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26234931

  12. Metabolic suppression during mesodermal differentiation of embryonic stem cells identified by single-cell comprehensive gene expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuanshu; Fujisawa, Ikuma; Ino, Kosuke; Matsue, Tomokazu; Shiku, Hitoshi

    2015-09-01

    Flk-1 (VEGF receptor 2) is a well-defined mesodermal progenitor marker and the Flk-1-positive (Flk-1(+)) cells derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been known to generate hemangioblasts and cardiovascular progenitor cells, which are formed in the early and late stages of differentiation, respectively. In this study, we separated Flk-1(+) and Flk-1(-) cells from spontaneously differentiating embryoid bodies (EBs) of mouse ESCs. We found that cell aggregates derived from late stage Flk-1(+) cells had a relatively small size and a low oxygen consumption rate (OCR) compared with those derived from Flk-1(-) cells. Furthermore, using single-cell comprehensive gene expression analysis, we found that both Flk-1(+) and Flk-1(-) cells could be categorized into subgroups with either low or high glucose metabolic activity. We observed that metabolic suppression occurs in cells expressing an intermediate level of both Nanog and Pou5f1. Taken together, our data suggested that the temporary metabolic suppression is an intrinsic feature of mesodermal differentiation. PMID:26211925

  13. Thermophilic and thermoacidophilic metabolism genes and enzymes from alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and related organisms, methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Apel, William A.; Reed, David William; Lee, Brady D.; Thompson, David N.; Roberto, Francisco F.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.

    2015-12-29

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods for modulating or altering metabolism in a cell using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  14. Thermophilic and thermoacidophilic metabolism genes and enzymes from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and related organisms, methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Vicki S; Apel, William A; Reed, David W; Lee, Brady D; Thompson, David N; Roberto, Francisco F; Lacey, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-20

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods for modulating or altering metabolism in a cell using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  15. Combined effect of water loss and wounding stress on gene activation of metabolic pathways associated with phenolic biosynthesis in carrot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Moreno, Alejandro; Redondo-Gil, Mónica; Benavides, Jorge; Nair, Vimal; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis; Jacobo-Velázquez, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The application of postharvest abiotic stresses is an effective strategy to activate the primary and secondary metabolism of plants inducing the accumulation of antioxidant phenolic compounds. In the present study, the effect of water stress applied alone and in combination with wounding stress on the activation of primary (shikimic acid) and secondary (phenylpropanoid) metabolic pathways related with the accumulation of phenolic compound in plants was evaluated. Carrot (Daucus carota) was used as model system for this study, and the effect of abiotic stresses was evaluated at the gene expression level and on the accumulation of metabolites. As control of the study, whole carrots were stored under the same conditions. Results demonstrated that water stress activated the primary and secondary metabolism of carrots, favoring the lignification process. Likewise, wounding stress induced higher activation of the primary and secondary metabolism of carrots as compared to water stress alone, leading to higher accumulation of shikimic acid, phenolic compounds, and lignin. Additional water stress applied on wounded carrots exerted a synergistic effect on the wound-response at the gene expression level. For instance, when wounded carrots were treated with water stress, the tissue showed 20- and 14-fold increases in the relative expression of 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosanate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase genes, respectively. However, since lignification was increased, lower accumulation of phenolic compounds was detected. Indicatively, at 48 h of storage, wounded carrots treated with water stress showed ~31% lower levels of phenolic compounds and ~23% higher lignin content as compared with wounded controls. In the present study, it was demonstrated that water stress is one of the pivotal mechanism of the wound-response in carrot. Results allowed the elucidation of strategies to induce the accumulation of specific primary or secondary metabolites when plants are

  16. Combined effect of water loss and wounding stress on gene activation of metabolic pathways associated with phenolic biosynthesis in carrot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Moreno, Alejandro; Redondo-Gil, Mónica; Benavides, Jorge; Nair, Vimal; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis; Jacobo-Velázquez, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    The application of postharvest abiotic stresses is an effective strategy to activate the primary and secondary metabolism of plants inducing the accumulation of antioxidant phenolic compounds. In the present study, the effect of water stress applied alone and in combination with wounding stress on the activation of primary (shikimic acid) and secondary (phenylpropanoid) metabolic pathways related with the accumulation of phenolic compound in plants was evaluated. Carrot (Daucus carota) was used as model system for this study, and the effect of abiotic stresses was evaluated at the gene expression level and on the accumulation of metabolites. As control of the study, whole carrots were stored under the same conditions. Results demonstrated that water stress activated the primary and secondary metabolism of carrots, favoring the lignification process. Likewise, wounding stress induced higher activation of the primary and secondary metabolism of carrots as compared to water stress alone, leading to higher accumulation of shikimic acid, phenolic compounds, and lignin. Additional water stress applied on wounded carrots exerted a synergistic effect on the wound-response at the gene expression level. For instance, when wounded carrots were treated with water stress, the tissue showed 20- and 14-fold increases in the relative expression of 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosanate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase genes, respectively. However, since lignification was increased, lower accumulation of phenolic compounds was detected. Indicatively, at 48 h of storage, wounded carrots treated with water stress showed ~31% lower levels of phenolic compounds and ~23% higher lignin content as compared with wounded controls. In the present study, it was demonstrated that water stress is one of the pivotal mechanism of the wound-response in carrot. Results allowed the elucidation of strategies to induce the accumulation of specific primary or secondary metabolites when plants are

  17. Combined effect of water loss and wounding stress on gene activation of metabolic pathways associated with phenolic biosynthesis in carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro eBecerra-Moreno

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The application of postharvest abiotic stresses is an effective strategy to activate the primary and secondary metabolism of plants inducing the accumulation of antioxidant phenolic compounds. In the present study, the effect of water stress applied alone and in combination with wounding stress on the activation of primary (shikimic acid and secondary (phenylpropanoid metabolic pathways related with the accumulation of phenolic compound in plants was evaluated. Carrot (Daucus carota was used as model system for this study, and the effect of abiotic stresses was evaluated at the gene expression level and on the accumulation of metabolites. As control of the study, whole carrots were stored under the same conditions. Results demonstrated that water stress activated the primary and secondary metabolism of carrots, favoring the lignification process. Likewise, wounding stress induced higher activation of the primary and secondary metabolism of carrots as compared to water stress alone, leading to higher accumulation of shikimic acid, phenolic compounds and lignin. Additional water stress applied on wounded carrots exerted a synergistic effect on the wound-response at the gene expression level. For instance, when wounded carrots were treated with water stress, the tissue showed 20- and 14-fold increases in the relative expression of 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosanate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase genes, respectively. However, since lignification was increased, lower accumulation of phenolic compounds was detected. Indicatively, at 48 h of storage, wounded carrots treated with water stress showed ~31% lower levels of phenolic compounds and ~23% higher lignin content as compared with wounded controls. In the present study, it was demonstrated that water stress is one of the pivotal mechanism of the wound-response in carrot. Results allowed the elucidation of strategies to induce the accumulation of specific primary or secondary

  18. The powdery mildew resistance gene REN1 co-segregates with an NBS-LRR gene cluster in two Central Asian grapevines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgante Michele

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grape powdery mildew is caused by the North American native pathogen Erysiphe necator. Eurasian Vitis vinifera varieties were all believed to be susceptible. REN1 is the first resistance gene naturally found in cultivated plants of Vitis vinifera. Results REN1 is present in 'Kishmish vatkana' and 'Dzhandzhal kara', two grapevines documented in Central Asia since the 1920's. These cultivars have a second-degree relationship (half sibs, grandparent-grandchild, or avuncular, and share by descent the chromosome on which the resistance allele REN1 is located. The REN1 interval was restricted to 1.4 cM using 38 SSR markers distributed across the locus and the segregation of the resistance phenotype in two progenies of collectively 461 offspring, derived from either resistant parent. The boundary markers delimit a 1.4-Mbp sequence in the PN40024 reference genome, which contains 27 genes with known functions, 2 full-length coiled-coil NBS-LRR genes, and 9 NBS-LRR pseudogenes. In the REN1 locus of PN40024, NBS genes have proliferated through a mixture of segmental duplications, tandem gene duplications, and intragenic recombination between paralogues, indicating that the REN1 locus has been inherently prone to producing genetic variation. Three SSR markers co-segregate with REN1, the outer ones confining the 908-kb array of NBS-LRR genes. Kinship and clustering analyses based on genetic distances with susceptible cultivars representative of Central Asian Vitis vinifera indicated that 'Kishmish vatkana' and 'Dzhandzhal kara' fit well into local germplasm. 'Kishmish vatkana' also has a parent-offspring relationship with the seedless table grape 'Sultanina'. In addition, the distant genetic relatedness to rootstocks, some of which are derived from North American species resistant to powdery mildew and have been used worldwide to guard against phylloxera since the late 1800's, argues against REN1 being infused into Vitis vinifera from a

  19. Isoflavone Regulates Lipid Metabolism via Expression of Related Genes in OVX Rats Fed on a High-fat Diet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO-LIN NA; JUNKO EZAKI; FUMIE SUGIYAMA; HONG-BIN CUI; YOSHIKO ISHIMI

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of isoflavone on body weight, fat mass, and gene expression in relation to lipid metabolism. Methods Thirty-six female SD rats were variectomized or sham-operated and fed on a high-fat diet. Two months later, abdominal incision was made, blood was collected to separate serum, and the liver and adipose tissue were immediately collected and weighed. Some portions of these tissues were frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored at -80℃. Results Ovariectomy (OVX) with a high-fat diet could induce obesity in rats, while treatment with isoflavone significantly inhibited the increase in body weight and fat mass in abdomen. Serum total cholesterol and leptin were significantly decreased in isoflavone group, compared with the OVX group. The mRNA expression of liver fatty acid synthase (FAS) in the OVX group was significantly higher than that in sham-operated group, while this difference was not observed in the isoflavone group. The mRNA expression of liver hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) in the OVX rats tended to be lower than that in the sham-operated rats. Furthermore, a large amount of isoflavone maintained the mRNA expression at a sham level. Conclusion lsoflavone may prevent obesity induced by ovariectomy with a high-fat diet, in part by modulating gene expression related to lipid metabolism.

  20. Effects of Choline on DNA Methylation and Macronutrient Metabolic Gene Expression in In Vitro Models of Hyperglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xinyin; Greenwald, Esther; Jack-Roberts, Chauntelle

    2016-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient that plays an important role in lipid metabolism and DNA methylation. Studies in rodents suggest that choline may adversely affect glycemic control, yet studies in humans are lacking. Using the human hepatic and placental cells, HepG2 and BeWo, respectively, we examined the interaction between choline and glucose treatments. In HepG2 cells, choline supplementation (1 mM) increased global DNA methylation and DNA methyltransferase expression in both low-glucose (5 mM) and high-glucose (35 mM) conditions. Choline supplementation increased the expression of peroxisomal acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 (ACOX1), which mediates fatty acid β-oxidation, especially in the high-glucose condition. High-glucose exposure increased the transcription of the gluconeogenic gene phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), while choline supplementation mitigated such increase. Compared to HepG2 cells, the placenta-derived BeWo cells were relatively unresponsive to either high-glucose or -choline treatment. In conclusion, choline and glucose interacted to affect macronutrient metabolic genes, yet there was no indication that choline may worsen glycemic control in these in vitro human cell culture models. PMID:27081315

  1. Hepatic and subcutaneous adipose lipid metabolism genes modulation by dietary fish oil and stearate in transition goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Farina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the experiment was to understand the interaction between saturated or unsaturated fatty acids and genes involved in lipid metabolism in liver and subcutaneous adipose tissue. With this purpose, further gene expression assays were performed on obtained adipose and liver samples from a previous in vivo study where expression levels of ADIPOQ, LPIN1, LPL, PPARG, SREBF1 and THRSP were already determined. The study consisted on the administration of either a no fat-supplemented, or a stearic acid or fish oil supplemented diets to dairy goats from the last week of gestation until 21 days after kidding. Fat-supplied goats received 30g/head/d extra fatty acids during the dry period and 50g/head/d during lactation. Liver and subcutaneous adipose tissue samples were harvested at day ­7, 7 and 21 relative to kidding and immediately snap frozen in liquid nitrogen. At the present moment, quantitative real-time RT-PCR of ACAT1, MSMO1, CPT1, IL6 on liver and ACACA, LEP, LPL, FASN, IL6 and PLIN2 on adipose tissue are running. Data obtained will be analysed using the MIXED procedure of SAS and results may increase the knowledge on the mechanism of action of saturated or unsaturated dietary fatty acid sources in the fatty acid metabolism changes during transition in dairy goats.  

  2. Aspergillus flavus Blast2GO gene ontology database: elevated growth temperature alters amino acid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    The availability of a representative gene ontology (GO) database is a prerequisite for a successful functional genomics study. Using online Blast2GO resources we constructed a GO database of Aspergillus flavus. Of the predicted total 13,485 A. flavus genes 8,987 were annotated with GO terms. The mea...

  3. Gene Regulation by Metabolic Enzyme GMP Synthetase and Chromatin Remodeler NuRD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A. Reddy (Ashok)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractSpatial and temporal control of the gene expression is crucial for normal growth and development of an organism. Environmental stress factors pose a constant threat to normal development of an organism by causing altered gene expression. Cells have evolved counteractive mechanisms to ove

  4. Normally Occurring Environmental and Behavioral Influences on Gene Activity: From Central Dogma to Probabilistic Epigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Gilbert

    1998-01-01

    Attempts to show how genes and environments cooperate in the construction of organisms, focusing on how genes require environmental and behavioral inputs to function appropriately during the normal course of human development. The discussion is related to a model of probabilistic epigenesis. (SLD)

  5. Gene expression analysis of rice seedling under potassium deprivation reveals major changes in metabolism and signaling components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Shankar

    Full Text Available Plant nutrition is one of the important areas for improving the yield and quality in crops as well as non-crop plants. Potassium is an essential plant nutrient and is required in abundance for their proper growth and development. Potassium deficiency directly affects the plant growth and hence crop yield and production. Recently, potassium-dependent transcriptomic analysis has been performed in the model plant Arabidopsis, however in cereals and crop plants; such a transcriptome analysis has not been undertaken till date. In rice, the molecular mechanism for the regulation of potassium starvation responses has not been investigated in detail. Here, we present a combined physiological and whole genome transcriptomic study of rice seedlings exposed to a brief period of potassium deficiency then replenished with potassium. Our results reveal that the expressions of a diverse set of genes annotated with many distinct functions were altered under potassium deprivation. Our findings highlight altered expression patterns of potassium-responsive genes majorly involved in metabolic processes, stress responses, signaling pathways, transcriptional regulation, and transport of multiple molecules including K(+. Interestingly, several genes responsive to low-potassium conditions show a reversal in expression upon resupply of potassium. The results of this study indicate that potassium deprivation leads to activation of multiple genes and gene networks, which may be acting in concert to sense the external potassium and mediate uptake, distribution and ultimately adaptation to low potassium conditions. The interplay of both upregulated and downregulated genes globally in response to potassium deprivation determines how plants cope with the stress of nutrient deficiency at different physiological as well as developmental stages of plants.

  6. D-Serine exposure resulted in gene expression changes indicative of activation of fibrogenic pathways and down-regulation of energy metabolism and oxidative stress response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    , metabolism and transport, inflammatory response, proteasome-mediated degradation of oxidatively damaged cytosolic proteins, Ras protein signal transduction, TGF-beta signaling pathway and mRNA transcription, processing, splicing and transport. On the other hand, major metabolic pathways, which include carbohydrate metabolism, TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, ATP synthesis coupled electron transport, amino acid metabolism and transport, lipid metabolism, nucleotide metabolism, and vitamin metabolism, and oxidative stress response including induction of antioxidant genes and glutathione metabolism are down-regulated. As tubular epithelia have strong energy demand for normal functions, down-regulation of energy metabolism after D-serine treatment may be related to the mechanism of its nephrotoxicity. In addition, hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species, is produced as a byproduct of the metabolism of D-serine by D-amino acid oxidase in the peroxisomes of the tubular epithelia. Down-regulation of pathways for antioxidant genes induction and glutathione metabolism will likely exacerbate the cytotoxicity of this reactive oxygen species. The observation that the genes involved in apoptosis, DNA repair, proteasome pathway for the degradation of oxidatively damaged cytosolic proteins were up-regulated lends some supports to this premise. Up-regulation of pathways of cell proliferation cycle, DNA replication and gene expression process, including mRNA transcription, processing, splicing, transport, translation initiation, and protein transport along with protein complex assembly, suggests ongoing tissue repair and regeneration. Consistent with the fibrogenic function of the TGF-beta signaling pathway in various experimental renal diseases, genes encoding major extracellular matrix components such as collagens, laminins, fibronectin 1 and tenascins are also strongly up-regulated. Taken together, the results of this study provide important insights into the molecular mechanism

  7. Lentivirus-mediated gene transfer to the central nervous system: therapeutic and research applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Liang-Fong; Goodhead, Lucy; Prat, Christine; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Kingsman, Susan M; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2006-01-01

    The management of disorders of the nervous system remains a medical challenge. The key goals are to understand disease mechanisms, to validate therapeutic targets, and to develop new therapeutic strategies. Viral vector-mediated gene transfer can meet these goals and vectors based on lentiviruses have particularly useful features. Lentiviral vectors can deliver 8 kb of sequence, they mediate gene transfer into any neuronal cell type, expression and therapy are sustained, and normal cellular functions in vitro and in vivo are not compromised. After delivery into the nervous system they induce no significant immune responses, there are no unwanted side effects of the vectors per se to date, and manufacturing and safety testing for clinical applications are well advanced. There are now numerous examples of effective long-term treatment of animal models of neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, motor neuron diseases, lysosomal storage diseases, and spinal injury, using a range of therapeutic genes expressed in lentiviral vectors. Significant issues remain in some areas of neural gene therapy including defining the optimum therapeutic gene(s), increasing the specificity of delivery, regulating expression of potentially toxic genes, and designing clinically relevant strategies. We discuss the applications of lentiviral vectors in therapy and research and highlight the essential features that will ensure their translation to the clinic in the near future. PMID:16409120

  8. Added value of next generation gene panel analysis for patients with elevated methylmalonic acid and no clinical diagnosis following functional studies of vitamin B12 metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupavac, Mihaela; Tian, Xia; Chu, Jordan; Wang, Guoli; Feng, Yanming; Chen, Stella; Fenter, Remington; Zhang, Victor W; Wang, Jing; Watkins, David; Wong, Lee-Jun; Rosenblatt, David S

    2016-03-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) based gene panel testing is increasingly available as a molecular diagnostic approach for inborn errors of metabolism. Over the past 40years patients have been referred to the Vitamin B12 Clinical Research Laboratory at McGill University for diagnosis of inborn errors of cobalamin metabolism by functional studies in cultured fibroblasts. DNA samples from patients in which no diagnosis was made by these studies were tested by a NGS gene panel to determine whether any molecular diagnoses could be made. 131 DNA samples from patients with elevated methylmalonic acid and no diagnosis following functional studies of cobalamin metabolism were analyzed using the 24 gene extended cobalamin metabolism NGS based panel developed by Baylor Miraca Genetics Laboratories. Gene panel testing identified two or more variants in a single gene in 16/131 patients. Eight patients had pathogenic findings, one had a finding of uncertain significance, and seven had benign findings. Of the patients with pathogenic findings, five had mutations in ACSF3, two in SUCLG1 and one in TCN2. Thus, the NGS gene panel allowed for the presumptive diagnosis of 8 additional patients for which a diagnosis was not made by the functional assays. PMID:26827111

  9. Genome-wide bioinformatics analysis of steroid metabolism-associated genes in Nocardioides simplex VKM Ac-2033D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtratnikova, Victoria Y; Schelkunov, Mikhail I; Fokina, Victoria V; Pekov, Yury A; Ivashina, Tanya; Donova, Marina V

    2016-08-01

    Actinobacteria comprise diverse groups of bacteria capable of full degradation, or modification of different steroid compounds. Steroid catabolism has been characterized best for the representatives of suborder Corynebacterineae, such as Mycobacteria, Rhodococcus and Gordonia, with high content of mycolic acids in the cell envelope, while it is poorly understood for other steroid-transforming actinobacteria, such as representatives of Nocardioides genus belonging to suborder Propionibacterineae. Nocardioides simplex VKM Ac-2033D is an important biotechnological strain which is known for its ability to introduce ∆(1)-double bond in various 1(2)-saturated 3-ketosteroids, and perform convertion of 3β-hydroxy-5-ene steroids to 3-oxo-4-ene steroids, hydrolysis of acetylated steroids, reduction of carbonyl groups at C-17 and C-20 of androstanes and pregnanes, respectively. The strain is also capable of utilizing cholesterol and phytosterol as carbon and energy sources. In this study, a comprehensive bioinformatics genome-wide screening was carried out to predict genes related to steroid metabolism in this organism, their clustering and possible regulation. The predicted operon structure and number of candidate gene copies paralogs have been estimated. Binding sites of steroid catabolism regulators KstR and KstR2 specified for N. simplex VKM Ac-2033D have been calculated de novo. Most of the candidate genes grouped within three main clusters, one of the predicted clusters having no analogs in other actinobacteria studied so far. The results offer a base for further functional studies, expand the understanding of steroid catabolism by actinobacteria, and will contribute to modifying of metabolic pathways in order to generate effective biocatalysts capable of producing valuable bioactive steroids. PMID:26832142

  10. Sulphur metabolism and cellulase gene expression are connected processes in the filamentous fungus Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph Trichoderma reesei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmoll Monika

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulphur compounds like cysteine, methionine and S-adenosylmethionine are essential for the viability of most cells. Thus many organisms have developed a complex regulatory circuit that governs the expression of enzymes involved in sulphur assimilation and metabolism. In the filamentous fungus Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph Trichoderma reesei little is known about the participants in this circuit. Results Analyses of proteins binding to the cellulase activating element (CAE within the promotor of the cellobiohydrolase cbh2 gene led to the identification of a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase protein named LIMPET (LIM1, which is an orthologue of the sulphur regulators SCON-2 of Neurospora crassa and Met30p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Transcription of lim1 is specifically up-regulated upon sulphur limitation and responds to cellulase inducing conditions. In addition, light dependent stimulation/shut down of cellulase gene transcription by methionine in the presence of sulphate was observed. Further, lim1 transcriptionally reacts to a switch from constant darkness to constant light and is subject to regulation by the light regulatory protein ENVOY. Thus lim1, despite its function in sulphur metabolite repression, responds both to light as well as sulphur- and carbon source. Upon growth on cellulose, the uptake of sulphate is dependent on the light status and essential for growth in light. Unlike other fungi, growth of H. jecorina is not inhibited by selenate under low sulphur conditions, suggesting altered regulation of sulphur metabolism. Phylogenetic analysis of the five sulphate permeases found in the genome of H. jecorina revealed that the predominantly mycelial sulphate permease is lacking, thus supporting this hypothesis. Conclusion Our data indicate that the significance of the sulphate/methionine-related signal with respect to cellulase gene expression is dependent on the light status and reaches beyond detection of sulphur

  11. The hydrocephalus inducing gene product, Hydin, positions axonemal central pair microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farr Helen

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impairment of cilia and flagella function underlies a growing number of human genetic diseases. Mutations in hydin in hy3 mice cause lethal communicating hydrocephalus with early onset. Hydin was recently identified as an axonemal protein; however, its function is as yet unknown. Results Here we use RNAi in Trypanosoma brucei to address this issue and demonstrate that loss of Hydin causes slow growth and a loss of cell motility. We show that two separate defects in newly-formed flagellar central pair microtubules underlie the loss of cell motility. At early time-points after RNAi induction, the central pair becomes mispositioned, while at later time points the central pair is lost. While the basal body is unaffected, both defects originate at the basal plate, reflecting a role for TbHydin throughout the length of the central pair. Conclusion Our data provide the first evidence of Hydin's role within the trypanosome axoneme, and reveal central pair anomalies and thus impairment of ependymal ciliary motility as the likely cause of the hydrocephalus observed in the hy3 mouse.

  12. Detection of DNA sequence polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism genes by polymerase chain reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, D.A. (National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The glutathione transferase mu gene (GST1) and the debrisoquine hydroxylase gene (CYP2D6) are known to be polymorphic in the human population and have been associated with increased susceptibility to cancer. Smokers with low lymphocyte GST mu activity are at higher risk for lung cancer, while low debrisoquine hydroxylase activity has been correlated with lower risk for lung and bladder cancer. Phenotypic characterization of these polymorphisms by lymphocyte enzyme activity (GST) and urine metabolite ratios (debrisoquine) is cumbersome for population studies. Recent cloning and sequencing of the mutant alleles of these genes has allowed genotyping via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Advantages of PCR approaches are speed, technical simplicity, and minimal sample requirements. This article reviews the PCR-based methods for detection of genetic polymorphisms in human cancer susceptibility genes.

  13. Flexible metabolic pathway construction using modular and divisible selection gene regulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, Peter; Myling-Petersen, Nils; Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Genetic selections are important to biological engineering. Although selectable traits are limited,currently each trait only permits simultaneous introduction of a single DNA fragment. Complex pathwayand strain construction however depends on rapid, combinatorial introduction of many genes thaten...

  14. Detection of DNA sequence polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism genes by polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, D A

    1991-01-01

    The glutathione transferase mu gene (GST1) and the debrisoquine hydroxylase gene (CYP2D6) are known to be polymorphic in the human population and have been associated with increased susceptibility to cancer. Smokers with low lymphocyte GST mu activity are at higher risk for lung cancer, while low debrisoquine hydroxylase activity has been correlated with lower risk for lung and bladder cancer. Phenotypic characterization of these polymorphisms by lymphocyte enzyme activity (GST) and urine metabolite ratios (debrisoquine) is cumbersome for population studies. Recent cloning and sequencing of the mutant alleles of these genes has allowed genotyping via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Advantages of PCR approaches are speed, technical simplicity, and minimal sample requirements. This article reviews the PCR-based methods for detection of genetic polymorphisms in human cancer susceptibility genes. PMID:1684153

  15. [The role of angiotensin-converting enzyme gene I/D polymorphism in development of metabolic disorders in patients with cardiovascular pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vynohradova, S V

    2005-01-01

    The role of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene I/D polymorphism in development of cardiovascular pathology (CVP), metabolic syndrom and insulin-independent diabet associated with such metabolic disorders as glucose intolerance and hyperglicemia, intolerance to insulin and hyperinsulinemia, dyslipiproteinemia (DLP) and obesity is discussed. Most of authors consider D-allel and DD genotype to be assosiated with development of DLP and such CVP as ishemic heart disease and myocardial infarction. PMID:16018179

  16. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for the production of l-valine based on transcriptome analysis and in silico gene knockout simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jin Hwan; Lee, Kwang Ho; Kim, Tae Yong; Lee, Sang Yup

    2007-01-01

    The l-valine production strain of Escherichia coli was constructed by rational metabolic engineering and stepwise improvement based on transcriptome analysis and gene knockout simulation of the in silico genome-scale metabolic network. Feedback inhibition of acetohydroxy acid synthase isoenzyme III by l-valine was removed by site-directed mutagenesis, and the native promoter containing the transcriptional attenuator leader regions of the ilvGMEDA and ilvBN operon was replaced with the tac pro...

  17. Genetic disorders of vitamin B12 metabolism: eight complementation groups – eight genes

    OpenAIRE

    Froese, D. Sean; Gravel, Roy A

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl) is an essential nutrient in human metabolism. Genetic diseases of vitamin B12 utilisation constitute an important fraction of inherited newborn disease. Functionally, B12 is the cofactor for methionine synthase and methylmalonyl CoA mutase. To function as a cofactor, B12 must be metabolised through a complex pathway that modifies its structure and takes it through subcellular compartments of the cell. Through the study of inherited disorders of vitamin B12 utilisa...

  18. Activation of a metabolic gene regulatory network downstream of mTOR complex 1

    OpenAIRE

    Düvel, Katrin; Yecies, Jessica L.; Menon, Suchithra; Raman, Pichai; Lipovsky, Alex I.; Souza, Amanda L.; Triantafellow, Ellen; Ma, Qicheng; Gorski, Regina; Cleaver, Stephen; Heiden, Matthew G. Vander; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P.; Finan, Peter M.; Clish, Clary B; Murphy, Leon O.

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a common molecular event in a variety of pathological settings, including genetic tumor syndromes, cancer, and obesity. However, the cell intrinsic consequences of mTORC1 activation remain poorly defined. Through a combination of unbiased genomic, metabolomic, and bioinformatic approaches, we demonstrate that mTORC1 activation is sufficient to stimulate specific metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, the oxidati...

  19. Inferring bi-directional interactions between circadian clock genes and metabolism with model ensembles

    OpenAIRE

    Grzegorczyk, Marco; Aderhold, Andrej; Husmeier, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    There has been much interest in reconstructing bi-directional regulatory networks linking the circadian clock to metabolism in plants. A variety of reverse engineering methods from machine learning and computational statistics have been proposed and evaluated. The emphasis of the present paper is on combining models in a model ensemble to boost the network reconstruction accuracy, and to explore various model combination strategies to maximize the improvement. Our results demonstrate that a r...

  20. Genes, Enzymes, and Regulation of para-Cresol Metabolism in Geobacter metallireducens▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Franziska; Heintz, Dimitri; Johannes, Jörg; Dorsselaer, Alain Van; Boll, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    In aerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria, the degradation of para-cresol (p-cresol) involves the initial hydroxylation to p-hydroxybenzyl alcohol by water catalyzed by the soluble, periplasmatic flavocytochrome p-cresol methylhydroxylase (PCMH; α2β2 composition). In denitrifying bacteria the further metabolism proceeds via oxidation to p-hydroxybenzoate, the formation of p-hydroxybenzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA), and the subsequent dehydroxylation of the latter to benzoyl-CoA by reduction. In ...

  1. A virus-induced gene silencing approach to understanding alkaloid metabolism in Catharanthus roseus

    OpenAIRE

    Liscombe, David K.; O’Connor, Sarah E.

    2011-01-01

    The anticancer agents vinblastine and vincristine are bisindole alkaloids derived from coupling vindoline and catharanthine, monoterpenoid indole alkaloids produced exclusively by Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) plants. Industrial production of vinblastine and vincristine currently relies on isolation from C. roseus leaves, a process that affords these compounds in 0.0003–0.01% yields. Metabolic engineering efforts to improve alkaloid content or provide alternative sources of the ...

  2. Role of Nitrogen and Carbon Transport, Regulation, and Metabolism Genes for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Survival In Vivo†

    OpenAIRE

    Joanne M Kingsbury; Goldstein, Alan L.; McCusker, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is both an emerging opportunistic pathogen and a close relative of pathogenic Candida species. To better understand the ecology of fungal infection, we investigated the importance of pathways involved in uptake, metabolism, and biosynthesis of nitrogen and carbon compounds for survival of a clinical S. cerevisiae strain in a murine host. Potential nitrogen sources in vivo include ammonium, urea, and amino acids, while potential carbon sources include glucose, lactate,...

  3. Differential gene expression and lipid metabolism in fatty liver induced by acute ethanol treatment in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethanol induces cumulative liver damage including steatosis, steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. The aim of this study is to investigate the global intrahepatic gene expression profile in the mouse liver treated with ethanol. A single oral dose of 0.5 or 5 g/kg ethanol was administered to male ICR mice, and liver samples were obtained after 6, 24 and 72 h. Histopathological evaluation showed typical fatty livers in the high-dose group at 24 h. Microarray analysis identified 28 genes as being ethanol responsive (two-way ANOVA; p < 0.05), after adjustment by the Benjamini-Hochberg multiple testing correction; these genes displayed ≥ 2-fold induction or repression. The expression of genes that are known to be involved in fatty acid synthesis was examined. The transcript for lipogenic transcription factor, sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding factor 1 (Srebf1), was upregulated by acute ethanol exposure. Of the genes known to contain SRE or SRE-like sequences and to be regulated by SRE-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), those encoding malic enzyme (Mod1), ATP-citrate lyase (Acly), fatty acid synthase (Fasn) and stearyl-CoA desaturase (Scd1) were induced by ethanol. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed the changes in the expression levels of the selected genes. The change in the Srebf1 mRNA level correlates well with that of the SREBP1 protein expression as well as its binding to the promoters of the target genes. The present study identifies differentially expressed genes that can be applied to the biomarkers for alcohol-binge-induced fatty liver. These results support the hypothesis by which ethanol-induced steatosis in mice is mediated by the fatty acid synthetic pathway regulated by SREBP1

  4. Growth factor enhanced retroviral gene transfer to the adult central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L A; Mitrophanous, K A; Clark, L A; Kim, V N; Rohll, J B; Kingsman, A J; Colello, R J

    2000-07-01

    The use of viral vectors for gene delivery into mammalian cells provides a new approach in the treatment of many human diseases. The first viral vector approved for human clinical trials was murine leukemia virus (MLV), which remains the most commonly used vector in clinical trials to date. However, the application of MLV vectors is limited since MLV requires cells to be actively dividing in order for transduction and therefore gene delivery to occur. This limitation precludes the use of MLV for delivering genes to the adult CNS, where very little cell division is occurring. However, we speculated that this inherent limitation of ML V may be overcome by utilizing the known mitogenic effect of growth factors on cells of the CNS. Specifically, an in vivo application of growth factor to the adult brain, if able to induce cell division, could enhance MLV-based gene transfer to the adult brain. We now show that an exogenous application of basic fibroblast growth factor induces cell division in vivo. Under these conditions, where cells of the adult brain are stimulated to divide, MLV-based gene transfer is significantly enhanced. This novel approach precludes any vector modifications and provides a simple and effective way of delivering genes to cells of the adult brain utilizing MLV-based retroviral vectors. PMID:10918476

  5. Moderate voluntary exercise attenuates the metabolic syndrome in melanocortin-4 receptor-deficient rats showing central dopaminergic dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Obici

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Central dopamine dysregulation during VWR reinforces the link between MC4R function and molecular and behavioral responding to rewards. The data also suggest that exercise can be a successful lifestyle intervention in MC4R-haploinsufficient individuals despite reduced positive reinforcement during exercise training.

  6. Oxidant-NO dependent gene regulation in dogs with type I diabetes: impact on cardiac function and metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojaimi Caroline

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms responsible for the cardiovascular mortality in type I diabetes (DM have not been defined completely. We have shown in conscious dogs with DM that: 1 baseline coronary blood flow (CBF was significantly decreased, 2 endothelium-dependent (ACh coronary vasodilation was impaired, and 3 reflex cholinergic NO-dependent coronary vasodilation was selectively depressed. The most likely mechanism responsible for the depressed reflex cholinergic NO-dependent coronary vasodilation was the decreased bioactivity of NO from the vascular endothelium. The goal of this study was to investigate changes in cardiac gene expression in a canine model of alloxan-induced type 1 diabetes. Methods Mongrel dogs were chronically instrumented and the dogs were divided into two groups: one normal and the other diabetic. In the diabetic group, the dogs were injected with alloxan monohydrate (40-60 mg/kg iv over 1 min. The global changes in cardiac gene expression in dogs with alloxan-induced diabetes were studied using Affymetrix Canine Array. Cardiac RNA was extracted from the control and DM (n = 4. Results The array data revealed that 797 genes were differentially expressed (P 2+ cycling genes (ryanodine receptor; SERCA2 Calcium ATPase, structural proteins (actin alpha. Of particular interests are genes involved in glutathione metabolism (glutathione peroxidase 1, glutathione reductase and glutathione S-transferase, which were markedly down regulated. Conclusion our findings suggest that type I diabetes might have a direct effect on the heart by impairing NO bioavailability through oxidative stress and perhaps lipid peroxidases.

  7. Genetic diversity, inter-gene pool introgression and nutritional quality of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Matthew W; González, Laura F; Kimani, Paul M; Butare, Louis

    2010-07-01

    The Great Lakes region of Central Africa is a major producer of common beans in Africa. The region is known for high population density and small average farm size. The common bean represents the most important legume crop of the region, grown on over a third of the cultivated land area, and the per capita consumption is among the highest in the world for the food crop. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity in a collection of 365 genotypes from the Great Lakes region of Central Africa, including a large group of landraces from Rwanda as well as varieties from primary centers of diversity and from neighboring countries of Central Africa, such as the Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda, using 30 fluorescently labeled microsatellite markers and automated allele detection. In addition, the landraces were evaluated for their seed iron and zinc concentration to determine if genetic diversity influenced nutritional quality. Principal coordinate and neighbor-joining analyses allowed the separation of the landraces into 132 Andean and 195 Mesoamerican (or Middle American) genotypes with 32 landraces and 6 varieties intermediate between the gene pools and representing inter-gene pool introgression in terms of seed characteristics and alleles. Genetic diversity and the number of alleles were high for the collection, reflecting the preference for a wide range of seed types in the region and no strong commercial class preference, although red, red mottled and brown seeded beans were common. Observed heterozygosity was also high and may be explained by the common practice of maintaining seed and plant mixtures, a coping strategy practiced by Central African farmers to reduce the effects of abiotic and biotic stresses. Finally, nutritional quality differed between the gene pools with respect to seed iron and zinc concentration, while genotypes from the intermediate group were notably high in both minerals. In conclusion, this study has shown that

  8. Transcriptome analysis of the oil-rich tea plant, Camellia oleifera, reveals candidate genes related to lipid metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En-Hua Xia

    Full Text Available Rapidly driven by the need for developing sustainable sources of nutritionally important fatty acids and the rising concerns about environmental impacts after using fossil oil, oil-plants have received increasing awareness nowadays. As an important oil-rich plant in China, Camellia oleifera has played a vital role in providing nutritional applications, biofuel productions and chemical feedstocks. However, the lack of C. oleifera genome sequences and little genetic information have largely hampered the urgent needs for efficient utilization of the abundant germplasms towards modern breeding efforts of this woody oil-plant.Here, using the 454 GS-FLX sequencing platform, we generated approximately 600,000 RNA-Seq reads from four tissues of C. oleifera. These reads were trimmed and assembled into 104,842 non-redundant putative transcripts with a total length of ∼38.9 Mb, representing more than 218-fold of all the C. oleifera sequences currently deposited in the GenBank (as of March 2014. Based on the BLAST similarity searches, nearly 42.6% transcripts could be annotated with known genes, conserved domains, or Gene Ontology (GO terms. Comparisons with the cultivated tea tree, C. sinensis, identified 3,022 pairs of orthologs, of which 211 exhibited the evidence under positive selection. Pathway analysis detected the majority of genes potentially related to lipid metabolism. Evolutionary analysis of omega-6 fatty acid desaturase (FAD2 genes among 20 oil-plants unexpectedly suggests that a parallel evolution may occur between C. oleifera and Olea oleifera. Additionally, more than 2,300 simple sequence repeats (SSRs and 20,200 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were detected in the C. oleifera transcriptome.The generated transcriptome represents a considerable increase in the number of sequences deposited in the public databases, providing an unprecedented opportunity to discover all related-genes associated with lipid metabolic pathway in C

  9. Inherited amplification of an active gene in the cytochrome P450 CYP2D locus as a cause of ultrarapid metabolism of debrisoquine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, I.; Lundqvist, E.; Ingelman-Sundberg, M. (Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)); Bertilsson, L.; Dahl, M.L.; Sjoeqvist, F. (Huddinge Univ. Hospital, Huddinge (Sweden))

    1993-11-15

    Deficient hydroxylation of debrisoquine is an autosomal recessive trait that affects [approx]7% of the Caucasian population. These individuals (poor metabolizers) carry deficient:CYP2D6 gene variants and have an impaired metabolism of several commonly used drugs. The opposite phenomenon also exists, and certain individuals metabolize the drugs very rapidly, resulting in subtherapeutic plasma concentrations at normal doses. In the present study, the authors have investigated the molecular genetic basis for ultrarapid metabolism of debrisoquine. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the CYP2D locus in two families with very rapid metabolism of debrisoquine [metabolic ratio (MR) for debrisoquine = 0.01-0.1] revealed the variant CYP2D6 gene CYP2D6L. EcoRI RFLP and Xba I pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analyses showed that this gene had been amplified 12-fold in three members (father and his two children) of one of the families, and two copies were present among members of the other family. The CYP2D6L gene had an open reading frame and carried two mutations causing amino acid substitutions: one in exon 6, yielding an Arg-296[yields]Cys exchange and one in exon 9 causing Ser-486[yields]Thr. The MR of subjects carrying one copy of the CYP2D6L gene did not significantly differ from that of those with the wild-type gene, indicating that the structural alterations were not of importance for the catalytic properties of the gene product. Examination of the MR among subjects carrying wild-type CYP2D6, CYP2D6L, or deficient alleles revealed a relationship between the number of active genes and MR. The data show the principle of inherited amplification of an active gene. Furthermore, the finding of a specific haplotype with two or more active CYP2D6 genes allows genotyping for ultrarapid drug metabolizers. This genotyping could be of predictive value for individualized and more efficient drug therapy.

  10. Expression of the Autoimmune Regulator Gene and Its Relevance to the Mechanisms of Central and Peripheral Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Perniola

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1 is a monogenic disease due to pathogenic variants occurring in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE gene. Its related protein, AIRE, activates the transcription of genes encoding for tissue-specific antigens (TsAgs in a subset of medullary thymic epithelial cells: the presentation of TsAgs to the maturating thymocytes induces the apoptosis of the autoreactive clones and constitutes the main form of central tolerance. Dysregulation of thymic AIRE expression in genetically transmitted and acquired diseases other than APS-1 may contribute to further forms of autoimmunity. As AIRE and its murine homolog are also expressed in the secondary lymphoid organs, the extent and relevance of AIRE participation in the mechanisms of peripheral tolerance need to be thoroughly defined.

  11. Antidepressant-induced akathisia-related homicides associated with diminishing mutations in metabolizing genes of the CYP450 family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucire Y

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Yolande Lucire, Christopher CrottyEdgecliff Centre, Edgecliff, NSW, AustraliaPurpose: To examine the relation between variant alleles in 3 CYP450 genes (CYP2D6, CYP2C9 and CYP2C19, interacting drugs and akathisia in subjects referred to a forensic psychiatry practice in Sydney, Australia.Patients and methods: This paper concerns 10/129 subjects who had been referred to the first author’s practice for expert opinion or treatment. More than 120 subjects were diagnosed with akathisia/serotonin toxicity after taking psychiatric medication that had been prescribed for psychosocial distress. They were tested for variant alleles in CYP450 genes, which play a major role in Phase I metabolism of all antidepressant and many other medications. Eight had committed homicide and many more became extremely violent while on antidepressants. Ten representative case histories involving serious violence are presented in detail.Results: Variant CYP450 allele frequencies were higher in akathisia subjects compared with random primary care patients tested at the same facility. Ten subjects described in detail had variant alleles for one or more of their tested CYP450 genes. All but two were also on interacting drugs, herbals or illicit substances, impairing metabolism further. All those described were able to stop taking antidepressants and return to their previously normal personalities.Conclusion: The personal, medical, and legal problems arising from overuse of antidepressant medications and resulting toxicity raise the question: how can such toxicity events be understood and prevented? The authors suggest that the key lies in understanding the interplay between the subject’s CYP450 genotype, substrate drugs and doses, co-prescribed inhibitors and inducers and the age of the subject. The results presented here concerning a sample of persons given antidepressants for psychosocial distress demonstrate the extent to which the psychopharmacology industry has

  12. Partial Amelioration of Peripheral and Central Symptoms of Huntington’s Disease via Modulation of Lipid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jane Y.; Tran, Conny; Hwang, Lin; Deng, Gang; Jung, Michael E.; Faull, Kym F.; Levine, Michael S.; Cepeda, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background Huntington’s disease (HD) is a fatal, inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterized by uncontrollable dance-like movements, as well as cognitive deficits and mood changes. A feature of HD is a metabolic disturbance that precedes neurological symptoms. In addition, brain