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Sample records for central hypoventilation syndrome

  1. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: diagnostic and management challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Kasi, Ajay; Perez,Iris; Kun,Sheila; Keens, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Ajay S Kasi,1 Iris A Perez,1,2 Sheila S Kun,1 Thomas G Keens1,2 1Division of Pediatric Pulmonology and Sleep Medicine, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, 2Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is a rare genetic disorder with failure of central control of breathing and of the autonomic nervous system function due to a mutation in the paired-like homeobox 2B (PHOX2B) gene. Affec...

  2. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: diagnostic and management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasi AS

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ajay S Kasi,1 Iris A Perez,1,2 Sheila S Kun,1 Thomas G Keens1,2 1Division of Pediatric Pulmonology and Sleep Medicine, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, 2Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS is a rare genetic disorder with failure of central control of breathing and of the autonomic nervous system function due to a mutation in the paired-like homeobox 2B (PHOX2B gene. Affected patients have absent or negligible ventilatory sensitivity to hypercapnia and hypoxemia, and they do not exhibit signs of respiratory distress when challenged with hypercarbia or hypoxia. The diagnosis of CCHS must be confirmed with PHOX2B gene mutation. Generally, the PHOX2B mutation genotype can aid in anticipating the severity of the phenotype. They require ventilatory support for life. Home assisted ventilation options include positive pressure ventilation via tracheostomy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and diaphragm pacing via phrenic nerve stimulation, but each strategy has its associated limitations and challenges. Since all the clinical manifestations of CCHS may not manifest at birth, periodic monitoring and early intervention are necessary to prevent complications and improve outcome. Life-threatening arrhythmias can manifest at different ages and a normal cardiac monitoring study does not exclude future occurrences leading to the dilemma of timing and frequency of cardiac rhythm monitoring and treatment. Given the rare incidence of CCHS, most health care professionals are not experienced with managing CCHS patients, particularly those with diaphragm pacers. With early diagnosis and advances in home mechanical ventilation and monitoring strategies, many CCHS children are surviving into adulthood presenting new challenges in their care. Keywords: congenital central hypoventilation syndrome, PHOX2B, home mechanical ventilation, diaphragm

  3. Hippocampal volume reduction in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    Full Text Available Children with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS, a genetic disorder characterized by diminished drive to breathe during sleep and impaired CO(2 sensitivity, show brain structural and functional changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans, with impaired responses in specific hippocampal regions, suggesting localized injury.We assessed total volume and regional variation in hippocampal surface morphology to identify areas affected in the syndrome. We studied 18 CCHS (mean age+/-std: 15.1+/-2.2 years; 8 female and 32 healthy control (age 15.2+/-2.4 years; 14 female children, and traced hippocampi on 1 mm(3 resolution T1-weighted scans, collected with a 3.0 Tesla MRI scanner. Regional hippocampal volume variations, adjusted for cranial volume, were compared between groups based on t-tests of surface distances to the structure midline, with correction for multiple comparisons. Significant tissue losses emerged in CCHS patients on the left side, with a trend for loss on the right; however, most areas affected on the left also showed equivalent right-sided volume reductions. Reduced regional volumes appeared in the left rostral hippocampus, bilateral areas in mid and mid-to-caudal regions, and a dorsal-caudal region, adjacent to the fimbria.The volume losses may result from hypoxic exposure following hypoventilation during sleep-disordered breathing, or from developmental or vascular consequences of genetic mutations in the syndrome. The sites of change overlap regions of abnormal functional responses to respiratory and autonomic challenges. Affected hippocampal areas have roles associated with memory, mood, and indirectly, autonomic regulation; impairments in these behavioral and physiological functions appear in CCHS.

  4. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000085.htm Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is a condition in some ...

  5. Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome? Obesity hypoventilation (HI-po-ven-tih- ... NHLBI Research Featured in HBO Documentary Series on Obesity Hear people talk about their challenges and successes ...

  6. PHOX2B mutations in three Chinese patients with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siu-Fong June Or; Ming-for Tony Tong; Fai-Man Ivan Lo; Chi-Wai Law; Ting-Yat Miu; Delphine Trochet; Tak-Sum Stephen Lam

    2006-01-01

    @@ Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome(CCHS, OMIM #209880) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of the autonomic nervous system(ANS) characterized by an abnormal autonomic ventilatory response to progressive hypercarbia and sustained hypoxemia. Patients typically present in the newborn period with hypoventilation or apnea asleep, awake, or both, without any associated cardiac, pulmonary, neuromuscular or brainstem lesions. Rarely, some patients may present at a later age and are diagnosed to have late onset central hypoventilation syndrome (LOCHS).1 Other features of ANS dysfunction such as feeding difficulty due to oesophageal dysmotility, severe constipation in the absence of Hirschsprung disease, poor regulation of basal body temperature, episodes of profuse sweating, pupillary and ocular abnormalities,decreased beat-to-beat variability of heart rate,attenuated response of heart rate to exercise,abnormal fluctuation of blood pressure, decreased perception to pain, and decreased perception to anxiety may be variably present but not essential for diagnosis.

  7. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is a condition in some obese people in which poor breathing leads to ... Maintain a healthy weight and avoid obesity. Use your CPAP or BiPAP treatment as your provider prescribed.

  8. Average Volume-Assured Pressure Support in a 16-Year-Old Girl with Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Vagiakis, Emmanouil; Koutsourelakis, Ioannis; Perraki, Eleni; Roussos, Charis; Mastora, Zafeiria; Zakynthinos, Spyros; Kotanidou, Anastasia

    2010-01-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is an uncommon disorder characterized by the absence of adequate autonomic control of respiration, which results in alveolar hypoventilation and decreased sensitivity to hypercarbia and hypoxemia, especially during sleep.1 Patients with CCHS need lifelong ventilatory support. The treatment options for CCHS include intermittent positive pressure ventilation administered via tracheostomy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, negative-pres...

  9. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Dabal Laila

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is becoming a major medical concern in several parts of the world, with huge economic impacts on health- care systems, resulting mainly from increased cardiovascular risks. At the same time, obesity leads to a number of sleep-disordered breathing patterns like obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS, leading to increased morbidity and mortality with reduced quality of life. OHS is distinct from other sleep- related breathing disorders although overlap may exist. OHS patients may have obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea with hypercapnia and sleep hypoventilation, or an isolated sleep hypoventilation. Despite its major impact on health, this disorder is under-recognized and under-diagnosed. Available management options include aggressive weight reduction, oxygen therapy and using positive airway pressure techniques. In this review, we will go over the epidemiology, pathophysiology, presentation and diagnosis and management of OHS.

  10. Genotype-phenotype relationship in Japanese patients with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokaze, Tomoyuki; Sasaki, Ayako; Meguro, Toru; Hasegawa, Hisaya; Hiraku, Yuka; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Kishikawa, Yumiko; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    Examine the genotype-phenotype relationship in Japanese congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) patients and estimate the incidence of CCHS in Japan. Subjects were 92 Japanese patients with PHOX2B mutations; 19 cases carried 25 polyalanine repeat expansion mutations (PARMs); 67 cases carried 26 or more PARMs; and 6 had non-PARMs (NPARMs). We collected clinical data in all patients and estimated the development or intelligent quotients only in the patients carrying 25 PARM. The estimated incidence of CCHS was greater than one case per 148 000 births. Polyhydramnios was observed in three cases. Twelve infants exhibited depressed respiration at birth. In 19 cases carrying 25 PARM, the male-to-female ratio was ~3, no cases had Hirschsprung disease; 7 cases (37%) developed hypoventilation after the neonatal period, and 8 cases (42%) had mental retardation. In other 73 cases carrying 26 or more PARMs or NPARMs, male-to-female ratio was equal; patients frequently complicated with Hirschsprung disease and constipation, and all patients presented with hypoventilation in the neonatal period. Clinical symptoms were severe in most patients carrying long PARMs and NPARMs. In 25 PARM, additional genetic and/or epigenetic factors were required for CCHS development and male sex is likely a predisposing factor. The patients carrying 25 PARM frequently had mental retardation likely because they were not able to receive appropriate ventilation support following a definitive diagnosis owing to subtle and or irregular hypoventilation. Molecular diagnosis provides a definitive diagnosis and enables to receive appropriate ventilator support. PMID:26063465

  11. An assistive device for congenital central hypoventilation syndrome outpatients during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Emilia; Piazza, Caterina; Cavalleri, Matteo; Taddeo, Peter; Carcano, Alessandro; Morandi, Francesco; Reni, Gianluigi

    2014-10-01

    Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome is a genetic disease characterized by alveolar hypoventilation and autonomic dysregulation. Patients have hypoventilations, especially during sleep, conditioning hypercapnia which can lead to neurological damage and death. They therefore need mechanical ventilators, that provide sufficient gas exchange, and pulse-oximeters that monitor oxy-hemoglobin blood concentration. Due to the restrictions regarding domiciliary assistive devices, the presence of a caregiver is required all night long. Currently, the only alarm systems available are the ones integrated in the ventilators and monitoring systems. During the night, multiple false alarms may occur, interrupting the sleep and causing anxiety. In this work we describe an assistive device that acquires real-time data from a pulse-oximeter, provides a multisensory stimulation if oxygen saturation falls under a certain threshold, and wakes up the patient if the hypoxia is severe. Tests on healthy subjects have shown that the device guarantees rapid awakenings, with a stimulator-dependent efficacy, and that it does not affect sleep efficiency. The purpose of the device is to determine a gentle awakening if mild hypoxia conditions persist, and to assure rapid awakening when a severe hypoxia occurs, reducing false alarms, improving the quality of sleep and increasing the self-sufficiency of the patients. PMID:25069973

  12. Impaired Neural Structure and Function Contributing to Autonomic Symptoms in Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome

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    Ronald M Harper

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS patients show major autonomic alterations in addition to their better-known breathing deficiencies. The processes underlying CCHS, mutations in the PHOX2B gene, target autonomic neuronal development, with frame shift extent contributing to symptom severity. Many autonomic characteristics, such as impaired pupillary constriction and poor temperature regulation, reflect parasympathetic alterations, and can include disturbed alimentary processes, with malabsorption and intestinal motility dyscontrol. The sympathetic nervous system changes can exert life-threatening outcomes, with dysregulation of sympathetic outflow leading to high blood pressure, time-altered and dampened heart rate and breathing responses to challenges, cardiac arrhythmia, profuse sweating, and poor fluid regulation. The central mechanisms contributing to failed autonomic processes are readily apparent from structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, which reveal substantial cortical thinning, tissue injury, and disrupted functional responses in hypothalamic, hippocampal, posterior thalamic, and basal ganglia sites and their descending projections, as well as insular, cingulate, and medial frontal cortices, which influence subcortical autonomic structures. Midbrain structures are also compromised, including the raphe system and its projections to cerebellar and medullary sites, the locus coeruleus, and medullary reflex integrating sites, including the dorsal and ventrolateral medullary nuclei. The damage to rostral autonomic sites overlaps metabolic, affective and cognitive regulatory regions, leading to hormonal disruption, anxiety, depression, behavioral control, and sudden death concerns. The injuries suggest that interventions for mitigating hypoxic exposure and nutrient loss may provide cellular protection, in the same fashion as interventions in other conditions with similar malabsorption, fluid turnover

  13. The cerebral cost of breathing: an FMRI case-study in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

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    Mike Sharman

    Full Text Available Certain motor activities--like walking or breathing--present the interesting property of proceeding either automatically or under voluntary control. In the case of breathing, brainstem structures located in the medulla are in charge of the automatic mode, whereas cortico-subcortical brain networks--including various frontal lobe areas--subtend the voluntary mode. We speculated that the involvement of cortical activity during voluntary breathing could impact both on the "resting state" pattern of cortical-subcortical connectivity, and on the recruitment of executive functions mediated by the frontal lobe. In order to test this prediction we explored a patient suffering from central congenital hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS, a very rare developmental condition secondary to brainstem dysfunction. Typically, CCHS patients demonstrate efficient cortically-controlled breathing while awake, but require mechanically-assisted ventilation during sleep to overcome the inability of brainstem structures to mediate automatic breathing. We used simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings to compare patterns of brain activity between these two types of ventilation during wakefulness. As compared with spontaneous breathing (SB, mechanical ventilation (MV restored the default mode network (DMN associated with self-consciousness, mind-wandering, creativity and introspection in healthy subjects. SB on the other hand resulted in a specific increase of functional connectivity between brainstem and frontal lobe. Behaviorally, the patient was more efficient in cognitive tasks requiring executive control during MV than during SB, in agreement with her subjective reports in everyday life. Taken together our results provide insight into the cognitive and neural costs of spontaneous breathing in one CCHS patient, and suggest that MV during waking periods may free up frontal lobe resources, and make them available for cognitive recruitment. More generally, this study reveals how the

  14. The cerebral cost of breathing: an FMRI case-study in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Mike; Gallea, Cécile; Lehongre, Katia; Galanaud, Damien; Nicolas, Nathalie; Similowski, Thomas; Cohen, Laurent; Straus, Christian; Naccache, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Certain motor activities--like walking or breathing--present the interesting property of proceeding either automatically or under voluntary control. In the case of breathing, brainstem structures located in the medulla are in charge of the automatic mode, whereas cortico-subcortical brain networks--including various frontal lobe areas--subtend the voluntary mode. We speculated that the involvement of cortical activity during voluntary breathing could impact both on the "resting state" pattern of cortical-subcortical connectivity, and on the recruitment of executive functions mediated by the frontal lobe. In order to test this prediction we explored a patient suffering from central congenital hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS), a very rare developmental condition secondary to brainstem dysfunction. Typically, CCHS patients demonstrate efficient cortically-controlled breathing while awake, but require mechanically-assisted ventilation during sleep to overcome the inability of brainstem structures to mediate automatic breathing. We used simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings to compare patterns of brain activity between these two types of ventilation during wakefulness. As compared with spontaneous breathing (SB), mechanical ventilation (MV) restored the default mode network (DMN) associated with self-consciousness, mind-wandering, creativity and introspection in healthy subjects. SB on the other hand resulted in a specific increase of functional connectivity between brainstem and frontal lobe. Behaviorally, the patient was more efficient in cognitive tasks requiring executive control during MV than during SB, in agreement with her subjective reports in everyday life. Taken together our results provide insight into the cognitive and neural costs of spontaneous breathing in one CCHS patient, and suggest that MV during waking periods may free up frontal lobe resources, and make them available for cognitive recruitment. More generally, this study reveals how the active

  15. Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 12/2016 Symptoms Symptoms Listen The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) provides the following list of features that ... The in-depth resources contain medical and scientific language that may be hard to understand. You may ...

  16. Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... difficulty regulating heart rate and blood pressure; decreased perception of pain; low body temperature; sporadic profuse sweating; Hirschsprung disease ; constipation; learning difficulties; eye abnormalities; and a characteristic facial appearance ( ...

  17. Gender differences in patients with obesity hypoventilation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BaHammam, Ahmed S; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Piper, Amanda; Bahammam, Salman A; Almeneessier, Aljohara S; Olaish, Awad H; Javaheri, Shahrokh

    2016-08-01

    The role of gender and menopause in obstructive sleep apnoea is well known; however, no study has reported the impact of gender on the clinical presentation and the nocturnal respiratory events in patients with obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Therefore, this study prospectively evaluated differences in the clinical characteristics of women and men with obesity hypoventilation syndrome in a large cohort of patients with obstructive sleep apnoea. During the study period, a total of 1973 patients were referred to the sleep clinic with clinical suspicion of obstructive sleep apnoea. All patients underwent overnight polysomnography, during which time spirometry, arterial blood samples and thyroid tests were routinely obtained. Among 1973 consecutive patients, 1693 (617 women) were diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnoea, among whom 144 suffered from obesity hypoventilation syndrome (96 women). The prevalence of obesity hypoventilation syndrome among women and men was 15.6% and 4.5%, respectively (P duration of SpO2 sleep disorders clinic for evaluation of obstructive sleep apnoea, obesity hypoventilation syndrome is more prevalent in women than men, and that women with obesity hypoventilation syndrome suffer from significantly more co-morbidities. Post-menopausal women with obstructive sleep apnoea have the highest prevalence of obesity hypoventilation syndrome. PMID:26990045

  18. Association of misoprostol, moebius syndrome and congenital central alveolar hypoventilation: case report Associação de misoprostol, síndrome de Moebius e hipoventilação central congênita: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAGDA LAHORGUE NUNES

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case showing the association of Moebius syndrome, the use of misoprostol during pregnancy and the development of central congenital alveolar hypoventilation. Pathophysiological aspects of these three diseases are discussed and also the unfavorable prognosis of this association.Descrevemos o caso de um paciente com Síndrome de Moebius associada ao uso de misoprostol durante a gestação. A criança necessitou de suporte ventilatório desde o primeiro dia de vida e evoluiu com quadro de hipoventilação alveolar central congênita, persistindo dependente de ventilação mecânica. São discutidos aspectos fisiopatológicos que poderiam justificar a comorbidade destes três eventos, assim como o prognóstico reservado desta associação.

  19. Ventilatory support and pharmacological treatment of patients with central apnoea or hypoventilation during sleep

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    D. Pevernagie

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of central sleep apnoea or hypoventilation encompasses hypercapnic central hypoventilation, such as obesity hypoventilation syndrome and eucapnic or hypocapnic central sleep apnoea. Among subjects with eucapnic or hypocapnic central sleep apnoea, several therapeutic options are available for those with Cheyne–Stokes respiration (CSR. CSR is frequent in patients with New York Heart Association stage III and IV chronic heart failure, and in various neurological disorders. In these patients, treatment modalities include optimising cardiac condition and drugs, such as theophylline, acetazolamide and/or oxygen. Ventilatory support, such as nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP, bi-level pressure support, or adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV, has been shown to improve CSR in patients with cardiac failure; however, convincing evidence that nasal CPAP improves life expectancy in these patients is lacking. Nevertheless, the treatment of associated obstructive sleep-disordered breathing is indicated per se, as it may improve cardiac function. There is currently no proof that bi-level ventilation is superior to nasal CPAP. The few available studies that have focused on ASV have shown satisfactory control of CSR in cardiac failure patients. While ASV is not a first-line treatment choice, it appears to be superior to oxygen, CPAP and bi-level pressure ventilation in controlling the apnoea/hypopnea index and probably sleep fragmentation. As yet there are no data on mortality and, as such, firm conclusions cannot be drawn as to the role of ASV in the management of cardiac failure patients suffering from CSR. Obesity-related hypoventilation has increased dramatically over recent decades due to the epidemic increase in obesity in the developed countries. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome predisposes to the development of pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale. Noninvasive home ventilation is increasingly applied in obese patients with

  20. Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome: Weighing in on Therapy Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Amanda

    2016-03-01

    Obesity hypoventilation syndrome is becoming an increasingly encountered condition both in respiratory outpatient clinics and in hospitalized patients. The health consequences and social disadvantages of obesity hypoventilation syndrome are significant. Unfortunately, the diagnosis and institution of appropriate therapy is commonly delayed when the syndrome is not recognized or misdiagnosed. Positive airway pressure therapy remains the mainstay of treatment and is effective in controlling sleep-disordered breathing and improving awake blood gases in the majority of individuals. Evidence supporting one mode of therapy over another is limited. Both continuous and bilevel therapy modes can successfully improve daytime gas exchange, with adherence to therapy an important modifiable factor in the response to treatment. Despite adherence to therapy, these individuals continue to experience excess mortality primarily due to cardiovascular events compared with those with eucapnic sleep apnea using CPAP. This difference likely arises from ongoing systemic inflammation secondary to the morbidly obese state. The need for a comprehensive approach to managing nutrition, weight, and physical activity in addition to reversal of sleep-disordered breathing is now widely recognized. Future studies need to evaluate the impact of a more aggressive and comprehensive treatment plan beyond managing sleep-disordered breathing. The impact of early identification and treatment of sleep-disordered breathing on the development and reversal of cardiometabolic dysfunction also requires further attention. PMID:26292036

  1. Eclampsia as a cause of secondary non-obstructive central sleep hypoventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štourač, P; Hradilová, T; Straževská, E; Turčáni, P; Štouračová, A; Janků, P; Skřičková, J; Gál, R

    2015-01-01

    The central alveolar hypoventilation of Ondine's curse is a disorder characterized by absent or diminished ventilatory response to hypercapnia, hypoxia or both, with parallel decrease in saturation to 50%. The secondary form may begin mainly after insult that affects the brain stem. We present a case of a 24-years old primipara in the 41st gestational week with an uncomplicated course of pregnancy and with secondary non-obstructive sleeping hypoventilation which occurred after eclamptic seizure. This obstetric case provides evidence for the benefit of home BiPAP use for patients with secondary Ondine's curse. PMID:25723073

  2. Genetics Home Reference: congenital central hypoventilation syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... face and skull, and other tissue and cell types. Mutations are believed to interfere with the PHOX2B protein's role in promoting neuron formation and differentiation, especially in the autonomic nervous ...

  3. Respiratory mechanics and ventilatory control in overlap syndrome and obesity hypoventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Verbraecken, Johan; Walter T. McNicholas

    2013-01-01

    The overlap syndrome of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), in addition to obesity hypoventilation syndrome, represents growing health concerns, owing to the worldwide COPD and obesity epidemics and related co-morbidities. These disorders constitute the end points of a spectrum with distinct yet interrelated mechanisms that lead to a considerable health burden. The coexistence OSA and COPD seems to occur by chance, but the combination can contribut...

  4. [Noninvasive ventilation: efficacy of a new ventilatory mode in patients with obesity-hypoventilation syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couillard, A; Pepin, J-L; Rabec, C; Cuvelier, A; Portmann, A; Muir, J-F

    2015-03-01

    Noninvasive ventilation is recommended to correct the nocturnal hypoventilation and relieve the symptoms of patients with the obesity-hypoventilation syndrome (OHS). The benefits of fixed pressure ventilation (S/T technology) are recognized but limited on account of the variability of nocturnal ventilatory requirements. The new technique AVAPS-AE (automatic EPAP) allows adjustment of the pressure according to the volume currently targeted. Its efficacy has not yet been evaluated. Our objectives are to evaluate firstly, whether AVAPS-AE optimizes the benefits of S/T technology on sleep architecture and quality, secondly, whether these benefits are associated with an improvement in gas exchange, symptoms, exercise tolerance, level of physical activity and quality of life of patients with OHS. In this multicenter trial, 60 newly diagnosed patients with OHS will be randomized to the control (S/T) and trial (AVAPS-AE) groups. A standardized titration procedure will be followed for the calibration of the ventilators. Functional evaluations (polysomnography, blood gases, impedance measurements and walking tests), questionnaires (physical activity, quality of life, quality of sleep and daytime somnolence) visual scales (fatigue, headaches) and a recording of activity will be undertaken after two months of ventilation. PMID:25847207

  5. Prevalence, clinical characteristics, and predictors of obesity hypoventilation syndrome in a large sample of Saudi patients with obstructive sleep apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed S BaHammam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the prevalence, clinical characteristics, and predictors of obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) in a large sample of Saudi patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods: This prospective observational study consisted of 1693 patients who were diagnosed to have sleep-disordered breathing using type I attended polysomnography (PSG) between January 2002 and December 2012 in the University Sleep Disorders Center (USDC) at King Saud University Hospital, Riyadh, King...

  6. Central Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Central Pain Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Central Pain Syndrome? Central pain syndrome is a neurological condition ...

  7. Rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD): a case with additional features and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Chew, H B; Ngu, L H; Keng, W.T.

    2011-01-01

    A rare syndrome of rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) has been recently described. We report the first patient with this syndrome in Southeast Asia and review reported cases to date. Our patient was good health with normal development until the age of 2. He then developed hyperphagic obesity, hypersomnolence, seizures, alveolar hypoventilation, central hypothyroidism, sodium and water dysregulation, gastrointestinal dysmotil...

  8. Alveolar hypoventilation treated with medroxyprogesterone.

    OpenAIRE

    Milerad, J; Lagercrantz, H.; Löfgren, O

    1985-01-01

    Two children aged 1 and 20 months developed alveolar hypoventilation syndrome. They suffered severe apnoeic episodes and periodically required assisted ventilation. Their ventilatory response to carbon dioxide was lower than that of normal children and the transcutaneous oxygen tension during sleep was well below the normal range. Treatment with medroxyprogesterone acetate resulted in an improved response to carbon dioxide, and assisted ventilation was no longer needed. Oxygen and carbon diox...

  9. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed. PMID:26944242

  10. Respiratory failure associated with hypoventilation in a patient with severe hypothyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Fukusumi, Munehisa; Iidaka, Toshiko; Mouri, Atsuto; Hamamoto, Yoichiro; Kamimura, Mitsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old Japanese man was admitted to hospital because of decreased consciousness due to type II respiratory failure. Severe hypothyroidism was diagnosed and considered to be associated with hypoventilation due to respiratory muscle dysfunction and sleep apnea syndrome. His status was improved partially by replacement of thyroid hormone. Despite maintaining a euthyroid state, improvement of respiratory muscle dysfunction was incomplete.

  11. Vasculitis Syndromes of the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About NINDS Vasculitis Syndromes of the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS ... 496-5717 "Vasculitis Syndromes of the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems Fact Sheet", NINDS, Publication date July 2011. NIH ...

  12. Metabolic syndrome and central retinal artery occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosanović-Jaković Natalija

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The accumulation of risk factors for central retinal artery occlusion can be seen in a single person and might be explained by the metabolic syndrome. Case report. We presented the case of a 52-year-old man with no light perception in his right eye. The visual loss was monocular and painless, fundoscopy showed central retinal artery occlusion and the laboratory investigation showed the raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 105 mm/h and the raised C-reactive protein of 22 mg/l. Specific laboratory investigations and fluorescein angiography excluded the presence of vasculitis, collagen vascular diseases, hypercoagulable state and antiphospholipid syndrome. Conclusion. The patient met all the five of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP criteria for the metabolic syndrome: hypertension, abnormal lipid profile, abnormal glucose metabolism, obesity and hyperuricemia. Measurement of C-reactive protein is useful for the assessment of therapeutic systemic effect on any abnormality in the metabolic syndrome. Individual therapy for all risk factors in the metabolic syndrome is necessary to prevent complications such as cardiovascular, retinal vascular diseases and stroke.

  13. Metabolic syndrome and central retinal artery occlusion

    OpenAIRE

    Kosanović-Jaković Natalija; Petrović Lidija; Risimić Dijana; Milenković Svetislav; Matić Danica

    2005-01-01

    Background. The accumulation of risk factors for central retinal artery occlusion can be seen in a single person and might be explained by the metabolic syndrome. Case report. We presented the case of a 52-year-old man with no light perception in his right eye. The visual loss was monocular and painless, fundoscopy showed central retinal artery occlusion and the laboratory investigation showed the raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 105 mm/h and the raised C-reactive protein of 22 mg/l. ...

  14. Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Hall Roger K

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome (SMMCI) is a complex disorder consisting of multiple, mainly midline defects of development resulting from unknown factor(s) operating in utero about the 35th–38th day(s) from conception. It is estimated to occur in 1:50,000 live births. Aetiology is uncertain. Missense mutation in the SHH gene (I111F) at 7q36 may be associated with SMMCI. The SMMCI tooth differs from the normal central incisor, in that the crown form is symmetric; i...

  15. Central Nervous System Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bahr, Nathan; Boulware, David R; Marais, Suzaan; Scriven, James; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Meintjes, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (CNS-IRIS) develops in 9 %–47 % of persons with HIV infection and a CNS opportunistic infection who start antiretroviral therapy and is associated with a mortality rate of 13 %–75 %. These rates vary according to the causative pathogen. Common CNS-IRIS events occur in relation to Cryptococcus, tuberculosis (TB), and JC virus, but several other mycobacteria, fungi, and viruses have been associated with IRIS. IRIS symptoms often...

  16. Fibromyalgia: the prototypical central sensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomershine, Chad S

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM), the most common central sensitivity syndrome (CSS) affecting over 5% of the population, is a disorder of chronic widespread pain accompanied by numerous other symptoms that causes significant functional impairment. The core FM symptom domains can be recalled using the FIBRO mnemonic and include Fatigue and Fog (cognitive dysfunction), Insomnia (difficulties with all aspects of sleep including initiation, maintenance and restorative), Blues (depression and anxiety), Rigidity (stiffness in muscles and joints) and Ow! (widespread pain and tenderness). While typically presenting in middle-aged women, FM can affect both sexes at any age. FM is a syndrome of abnormal central pain processing and increased central sensitivity caused by neurobiological changes that cause dysregulation of mechanisms that normally regulate pain sensation. There are currently three different methods for diagnosing FM; the 1990, 2010 and modified 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria. While disabling, FM symptoms can be managed with a regimen of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments. Medication types with benefit in treating FM include anticonvulsants, antidepressants, anti-inflammatories, muscle relaxers, tramadol, and stimulants. Beneficial nonpharmacologic therapies include aerobic and resistance exercise, stretching, cognitive behavioral therapy, and education. Effective management requires formulation of an individualized regimen since patients differ widely in symptoms and treatments they find beneficial. Such an individualized regimen should be based on a systematic assessment of problematic symptoms conducted at baseline and each follow-up with treatments modified over time. While challenging, FM symptoms can be effectively managed and patients can lead full, productive lives. PMID:26088213

  17. Contemporary Insights and Novel Treatment Approaches to Central Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Grayburn, Ryan L.; Kaka, Yaquta; Wilson Tang, W. H.

    2014-01-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) is a common and under-diagnosed condition commonly associated with Cheyne-Stokes respiration. It is particularly prevalent in the heart failure population affecting up to 40% of all patients with heart failure. The pathophysiology associated with CSA is based on the underlying effects of hypoventilation and hyperventilation, with neurologic dysregulation of respiratory control as the primary defect. However, therapeutic options are limited due to the prevailing perce...

  18. HOXA1 mutations are not a common cause of Möbius syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Jessica K; Andrews, Caroline; Chan, Wai-Man; Engle, Elizabeth C

    2010-02-01

    The HOXA1-related syndromes result from autosomal-recessive truncating mutations in the homeobox transcription factor, HOXA1. Limited horizontal gaze and sensorineural deafness are the most common features; affected individuals can also have facial weakness, mental retardation, autism, motor disabilities, central hypoventilation, carotid artery, and/or conotruncal heart defects. Möbius syndrome is also phenotypically heterogeneous, with minimal diagnostic criteria of nonprogressive facial weakness and impaired ocular abduction; mental retardation, autism, motor disabilities, additional eye movements restrictions, hearing loss, hypoventilation, and craniofacial, lingual, and limb abnormalities also occur. We asked, given the phenotypic overlap between these syndromes and the variable expressivity of both disorders, whether individuals with Möbius syndrome might harbor mutations in HOXA1. Our results suggest that HOXA1 mutations are not a common cause of sporadic Möbius syndrome in the general population. PMID:20227628

  19. HOXA1 mutations are not a common cause of Möbius syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rankin, Jessica K.; Andrews, Caroline; Chan, Wai-man; Engle, Elizabeth C

    2010-01-01

    The HOXA1-related syndromes result from autosomal recessive truncating mutations in the homeobox transcription factor, HOXA1. Limited horizontal gaze and sensorineural deafness are the most common features; affected individuals can also have facial weakness, mental retardation, autism, motor disabilities, central hypoventilation, carotid artery and/or conotruncal heart defects. Möbius syndrome is also phenotypically heterogeneous, with minimal diagnostic criteria of nonprogressive facial weak...

  20. Cognitive - Behavioral Therapy in Central Sensitivity Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David A

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a formal therapeutic approach that encourages selfmanagement of illnesses in accordance with the BioPsychoSocial model. CBT is composed of numerous skills grounded in known principles of behavioral and cognitive change. Each skill is designed to influence one of the facets associated with the perception of pain (i.e., sensory factors, emotional factors, or cognitive factors). Across the various Central Sensitivity Syndromes (CSS), CBT is thought to be beneficial to at least a portion of individuals afflicted. This paper provides a description of CBT, some recommendations for integrating CBT into clinical practice, and a brief review of the evidence supporting the use of CBT with various forms of CSS. PMID:26717953

  1. Central pontine myelinolysis in a case of alcohol dependence syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Kaushik; Fernandes, Austin B; Goyal, Sunil; Shanker, Sunitha

    2015-01-01

    Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome includes Central Pontine Myelinolysis and Extrapontine Myelinolysis. This condition has been described in cases of chronic Alcohol Dependence Syndrome and in rapid correction of hyponatremia. Though we frequently see patients with Alcohol Dependence Syndrome presenting with complicated withdrawal, Central Pontine Myelinolysis remains largely undetected and under-reported in literature. We present here a case of protracted Delirium Tremens where MRI brain revealed Central Pontine Myelinolysis. Subsequently cognitive assessment revealed significant dysfunction and brain SPECT showed hypo-perfusion of the frontal lobes. Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome should be suspected in protracted Delirium Tremens. PMID:27212829

  2. Central pontine myelinolysis in a case of alcohol dependence syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Chatterjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome includes Central Pontine Myelinolysis and Extrapontine Myelinolysis. This condition has been described in cases of chronic Alcohol Dependence Syndrome and in rapid correction of hyponatremia. Though we frequently see patients with Alcohol Dependence Syndrome presenting with complicated withdrawal, Central Pontine Myelinolysis remains largely undetected and under-reported in literature. We present here a case of protracted Delirium Tremens where MRI brain revealed Central Pontine Myelinolysis. Subsequently cognitive assessment revealed significant dysfunction and brain SPECT showed hypo-perfusion of the frontal lobes. Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome should be suspected in protracted Delirium Tremens.

  3. Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Roger K

    2006-01-01

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome (SMMCI) is a complex disorder consisting of multiple, mainly midline defects of development resulting from unknown factor(s) operating in utero about the 35th-38th day(s) from conception. It is estimated to occur in 1:50,000 live births. Aetiology is uncertain. Missense mutation in the SHH gene (I111F) at 7q36 may be associated with SMMCI. The SMMCI tooth differs from the normal central incisor, in that the crown form is symmetric; it develops and erupts precisely in the midline of the maxillary dental arch in both primary and permanent dentitions. Congenital nasal malformation (choanal atresia, midnasal stenosis or congenital pyriform aperture stenosis) is positively associated with SMMCI. The presence of an SMMCI tooth can predict associated anomalies and in particular the serious anomaly holoprosencephaly. Common congenital anomalies associated with SMMCI are: severe to mild intellectual disability, congenital heart disease, cleft lip and/or palate and less frequently, microcephaly, hypopituitarism, hypotelorism, convergent strabismus, oesophageal and duodenal atresia, cervical hemivertebrae, cervical dermoid, hypothyroidism, scoliosis, absent kidney, micropenis and ambiguous genitalia. Short stature is present in half the children. Diagnosis should be made by eight months of age, but can be made at birth and even prenatally at 18-22 weeks from the routine mid-trimester ultrasound scan. Management depends upon the individual anomalies present. Choanal stenosis requires emergency surgical treatment. Short stature may require growth hormone therapy. SMMCI tooth itself is mainly an aesthetic problem, which is ideally managed by combined orthodontic, prosthodontic and oral surgical treatment; alternatively, it can be left untreated. PMID:16722608

  4. Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Roger K

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome (SMMCI is a complex disorder consisting of multiple, mainly midline defects of development resulting from unknown factor(s operating in utero about the 35th–38th day(s from conception. It is estimated to occur in 1:50,000 live births. Aetiology is uncertain. Missense mutation in the SHH gene (I111F at 7q36 may be associated with SMMCI. The SMMCI tooth differs from the normal central incisor, in that the crown form is symmetric; it develops and erupts precisely in the midline of the maxillary dental arch in both primary and permanent dentitions. Congenital nasal malformation (choanal atresia, midnasal stenosis or congenital pyriform aperture stenosis is positively associated with SMMCI. The presence of an SMMCI tooth can predict associated anomalies and in particular the serious anomaly holoprosencephaly. Common congenital anomalies associated with SMMCI are: severe to mild intellectual disability, congenital heart disease, cleft lip and/or palate and less frequently, microcephaly, hypopituitarism, hypotelorism, convergent strabismus, oesophageal and duodenal atresia, cervical hemivertebrae, cervical dermoid, hypothyroidism, scoliosis, absent kidney, micropenis and ambiguous genitalia. Short stature is present in half the children. Diagnosis should be made by eight months of age, but can be made at birth and even prenatally at 18–22 weeks from the routine mid-trimester ultrasound scan. Management depends upon the individual anomalies present. Choanal stenosis requires emergency surgical treatment. Short stature may require growth hormone therapy. SMMCI tooth itself is mainly an aesthetic problem, which is ideally managed by combined orthodontic, prosthodontic and oral surgical treatment; alternatively, it can be left untreated.

  5. Narcolepsy and ROHHAD Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at Ghent University Hospital, Belgium; Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, and Sleep Medicine Centre, Heeze, Netherlands, report a 7-year-old girl with rapid-onset obesity, hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD syndrome.

  6. Rare association of central pontine myelinolysis with infantile tremor syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kalpana Datta; Supratim Datta; Indranil Dutta

    2012-01-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) is an acute demyelination within the central basis pontis. Though exact mechanism is not known it is seen commonly with rapid correction of hyponatremia and also with pontine ischemia or infarction, demyelinating diseases, pontine neoplasm and different metabolic diseases. We report a rare association of CPM in a patient of Infantile Tremor Syndrom (ITS). ITS is a syndrome of tremor, mental and physical retardation, pigmentary changes of hair and skin and an...

  7. Central nervous system malformations in Mohr's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    REARDON, W.; Harbord, M G; Hall-Craggs, M A; Kendall, B; Brett, E. M.; Baraitser, M

    1989-01-01

    A boy with severe developmental delay, bilateral, symmetrical hallucal duplication, and accessory alveolar frenula was found to have radiological evidence of a large arachnoid cyst compressing the cerebellum and brain stem. We review neurological abnormalities in Mohr's syndrome.

  8. 阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停低通气综合征患者膈肌肌电图的变化及意义%Change of diaphragm electromyograms in patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypoventilation syndrome and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯宇虹; 陈荣昌; 罗远明; 钟南山

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore change of diaphragm electromyograms in patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypoventilation syndrome (OSAHS) before and after nocturnal sleep, as well as effective nasal continuous positive airway pressure (n-CPAP) ventilation treatment for more than two months. Methods Diaphragm electromyogram was recorded with chest surface electrodes in 22 patients with moderate and severe OSAHS and 24 normal people, and phrenic nerve conduction time (PNCT) and diaphragm compound muscle action potential (CMAP) provoked by unilateral magnetic stimulation (UMS) were measured for them before and after sleep. Measurements were repeated for five patients with severe OSAHS after effective OSAHS patients before and after nocturnal sleep than that in normal people bilaterally, (8.4±0. 6)ms and (8.4±0. 9)ms vs (7. 3±0. 8)ms and (7. 3±0. 8) ms for the left side; and (8.4±1.3) ms and (8. 9 ± 0. 8) ms vs (7.2 ± 0. 8) ms and (7.2 ± 0. 8 ) ms for the right side ( P 0.05).5例重度OSAHS患者经有效经鼻持续气道正压通气治疗超过2个月后,双侧PNCT较治疗前显著缩短[左侧为(8.6±0.7)ms与(7.4±0.5)ms,右侧为(7.8±0.6)ms与(6.4±0.6)ms,均P<0.05].结论 OSAHA患者膈神经传导和膈肌功能减弱,可能与长期夜间缺氧和(或)睡眠结构紊乱有关.

  9. Central sensitization as a component of post-deployment syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jeffrey D.; Wassermann, Eric M.; Chao, Wendy; Ramage, Amy E.; Robin, Donald A.; Clauw, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Many service members and veterans report chronic unexplained symptoms such as pain, fatigue and memory complaints, which have most recently been characterized as post-deployment syndrome (PDS). Chronic widespread pain is a component of this syndrome, producing significant disability and considerable health care costs. The similarity between the nature of these complaints and other medically unexplained illnesses such as fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, and chronic fatigue syndrome suggest that they may share a common mechanism. Here, we provide support for PDS as a consequence of pain and sensory amplification secondary to neuroplastic changes within the central nervous system, a phenomenon often termed central sensitization. We also discuss how factors such as stress and genetics may promote chronic widespread pain in veterans and service members who develop PDS. PMID:23232159

  10. [Analgesic effects of cannabinoids on central pain syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igon'kina, S I; Churiukanov, M V; Churiukanov, V V; Kukushkin, M L

    2011-01-01

    It was shown that cannabinoids anandamide, HU210 and WIN 55,212-2 inhibit both spontaneous episodes of pain and mechanical allodynia in rats with central pain syndrome caused by disturbance of inhibitory processes in the dorsal horns of lumbar spinal cord. The analgesic effect is most pronounced in the intrathecal route of administration. The intensity of analgesic actions of cannabinoids on the central pain syndrome in rats, depending on the drug is as follows: HU210 > WIN 55,212-2 > anandamide. PMID:22359935

  11. Masquerade Syndrome of Multicentre Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Guerriero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In Italy we say that the most unlucky things can happen to physicians when they get sick, despite the attention of colleagues. To confirm this rumor, we report the sad story of a surgeon with bilateral vitreitis and glaucoma unresponsive to traditional therapies. Methods/Design. Case report. Results. After one year of steroidal and immunosuppressive therapy, a vitrectomy, and a trabeculectomy for unresponsive bilateral vitreitis and glaucoma, MRI showed a multicentre primary central nervous system lymphoma, which was the underlying cause of the masquerade syndrome. Conclusions. All ophthalmologists and clinicians must be aware of masquerade syndromes, in order to avoid delays in diagnosis.

  12. Rare association of central pontine myelinolysis with infantile tremor syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Kalpana; Datta, Supratim; Dutta, Indranil

    2012-01-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) is an acute demyelination within the central basis pontis. Though exact mechanism is not known it is seen commonly with rapid correction of hyponatremia and also with pontine ischemia or infarction, demyelinating diseases, pontine neoplasm and different metabolic diseases. We report a rare association of CPM in a patient of Infantile Tremor Syndrom (ITS). ITS is a syndrome of tremor, mental and physical retardation, pigmentary changes of hair and skin and anemia in malnourished children. Though first reported in Indian subcontinent many identical cases were reported from around the world. Our case is a 15 month old child with generalized tremor, mild hepatosplenomegaly with features of grade II malnutrition including skin and hair changes. All the signs and symtoms of tremor improved after treatment with the World Health Organization (WHO) protocol for protein energy malnutrition (PEM) and administration of propranolol without any side effects. PMID:22412274

  13. Rare association of central pontine myelinolysis with infantile tremor syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Datta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM is an acute demyelination within the central basis pontis. Though exact mechanism is not known it is seen commonly with rapid correction of hyponatremia and also with pontine ischemia or infarction, demyelinating diseases, pontine neoplasm and different metabolic diseases. We report a rare association of CPM in a patient of Infantile Tremor Syndrom (ITS. ITS is a syndrome of tremor, mental and physical retardation, pigmentary changes of hair and skin and anemia in malnourished children. Though first reported in Indian subcontinent many identical cases were reported from around the world. Our case is a 15 month old child with generalized tremor, mild hepatosplenomegaly with features of grade II malnutrition including skin and hair changes. All the signs and symtoms of tremor improved after treatment with the World Health Organization (WHO protocol for protein energy malnutrition (PEM and administration of propranolol without any side effects.

  14. [Two cases of solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catania, P; Conti, C; Poggi, G M; Bardelli, T; Lasagni, D; De Martino, M

    2010-02-01

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome (SMMCI) syndrome is a unique developmental abnormality arising from an unknown event occurring between the 35th and 38th days in utero, and involving mieline structure of the head including the cranial bones, the maxilla and its container dentition (specifically the central incisor tooth germ), together with other midline structures of the body. The SMMCI tooth may be possibly occur as an isolated trait or in association with many other midline developmental anomalies. It is estimated to occur in 1:50000 live births. There is a wide variability in the phenotypic spectrum. SMMCI is considered one of the most minimal expressions of the holoprosencephaly spectrum. Mutation in the Sonic Hedgehog homolog (SHH) gene may be associated with SSMMCI, but recent studies suggests the existence of several other candidate genes. We described two patients with SMMCI. They presented a solitary median maxillary incisor, short stature, hipotelorism and corpus callosus anomalies found on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). They also present severe hiponatremia. At the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of cases of SMMCI with hiponatremia. We suggest that the sodium disorder may be secondary to syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). PMID:20212404

  15. Clinical observations of metabolic disturbance in patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypoventilation syndrome%阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停低通气综合征患者代谢紊乱的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常桂娟; 祖菲亚; 张德莲; 李南方

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea hypoventilation syndrome (OSAHS), insulin resistance (IR) and metabolic syndrome (MS), as well as to explore the possible mechanism of MS caused by OSAHS. Methods We recruited 186 hospitalized patients with hypertensions, who were divided into four groups based on their nocturnal polygraphs recordings, 35 as controls (group Ⅰ), 61 with mild (group Ⅱ), 52 with moderate (group Ⅲ) and 38 with severe OSAHS (group Ⅳ). They all underwent measurements including body height, body weight, waist circumference (WC), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), serum uric acid, creatinine, fasting plasma glucose, fasting plasma insulin, serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterul, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and triglyceride. Results One hundred and two patients with OSAHS (67.6 percent) also suffered of MS, 33 (86.8 percent) of them with severe OSAHS. There was no significant difference in age, gender, fasting plasma glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprutein-cholesterul, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and triglyceride among the four groups (P>0.05). Body mass index (BMI), WC, ratio of serum uric acid to creatinine and DBP were all significantly higher in patients with severe OSAHS than those in patients with mild and moderate OSAHS and controls (P<0.01). SBP was significantly higher in patients with severe OSAHS than that in those with mild and moderate OSAHS (P<0.01). Insulin resistance was significantly severer in patients with severe OSAHS than that in those with mild OSAHS and controls (P<0.01). Results of multivariate linear regression analysis showed that insulin resistance was correlated with BMI and reversely correlated with minimal blood oxygen saturation, and minimal blood oxygen saturation reversely correlated with WC and ratio of uric acid to creatinine. Condusions Hypoxemia and obesity may promote development of insulin resistance

  16. Pseudo-piano playing motions and nocturnal hypoventilation in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis: response to prompt tumor removal and immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Akiko; Iizuka, Takahiro; Urano, Yoshiaki; Arai, Masahide; Hara, Atsuko; Hamada, Junichi; Hirose, Ryuichi; Dalmau, Josep; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Tumor resection is recommended in anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis, however it is often difficult during an early stage of the disease. We report here the efficacy of early tumor removal in a patient with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. This 21-year-old woman was admitted to another hospital with rapidly progressive psychiatric symptoms, a decreased level of consciousness, and seizures. Abdominal CT showed a pelvic mass. On day 1 of admission to our center, she developed hypoventilation requiring mechanical support. She had orofacial dyskinesias with well-coordinated, pseudo-piano playing involuntary finger movements. Based on these clinical features, she was immediately scheduled for tumor resection on day 3. While awaiting surgery, she began to receive high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone. After tumor removal, she received plasma exchange, followed by intravenous immunoglobulin and additional high-dose methylprednisolone. Two weeks after tumor removal, she started following simple commands and progressive improvement, although she remained on mechanical ventilation for 10 weeks due to nocturnal central hypoventilation. Anti-NMDAR antibodies in serum/CSF were detected. Pathological examination showed immature teratoma with foci of infiltrates of B- and T-cells. Early tumor resection with immunotherapy facilitates recovery from this disease, but central hypoventilation may require long mechanical support. Non-jerky elaborate finger movements suggest antibody-mediated disinhibition of the cortico-striatal systems. PMID:21422691

  17. A not very essential obesity: the Rohhad Syndrome. Description of two cases and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ramistella

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Rapid-onset Obesity with Hypothalamic Dysfunction, Hypoventilation, and Autonomic Dysregulation (ROHHAD is a rare and complex pediatric disorder . Children typically show ROHHAD after the first years of life with rapid weight gain and subsequently autonomic nervous system dysregulation (altered pain perception, pupillary dysfunction, hypothermia and bradycardia; alveolar hypoventilation with risk of cardiorespiratory arrest and hypothalamic dysfunction (central diabetes insipidus, hypothyroidism, growth hormone and corticotrophin deficiency. Tumours of neural crest origin, such as ganglioneuroblastoma and ganglioneuronoma, are reported in 33% of the patients and may be found in the chest or abdomen. Here we describe two girls who presented with rapid weight gain, at the age of 5 and 9 years respectively. The first was admitted due to obesity and central hypothyroidism. After two months she rapidly developed a clinical picture characterized by thermal dysregulation, hypodipsia and severe hypernatriemia, hypertrigliceridemia, alveolar hypoventilation supported by mechanical ventilation. The second presented with rapid-onset obesity and a mild hyperprolactinemia. After three months of follow- up she was admitted due to a clinical picture of hypothermia, seizures and hyponatremia. Subsequentely she developed altered water balance (severe hypernatremia and severe hypoventilation . Chest CT and MR imaging showed a posterior mediastinal mass. Endocrinological investigation showed corticotrophin deficiency and central hypothyroidism treated with specific replacement therapies. Conclusions: On the basis of our experiences we can infer that it is necessary perform specific further investigations of hypothalamic function in all the children with rapid onset obesity in order to early prevent the catastrophic consequences that may occur in this syndrome.

  18. Acute traumatic central cord syndrome: MRI-pathological correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acute traumatic central cord syndrome (ATCCS) is commonly stated to result from an injury which affects primarily the center of the spinal cord and is frequently hemorrhagic. To test the validity of this widely disseminated hypothesis, the magnetic resonance images [MRI] of 11 consecutive cases of ATCCS caused by closed injury to the spine were analyzed and correlated with the gross pathological and histological features of 3 cervical spinal cords obtained at post mortem from patients with ATCCS, including 2 of patients studied by MRI. In this study, the MRI and pathological observations indicate that ATCCS is predominantly a white matter injury and that intramedullary hemorrhage is not a necessary feature of the syndrome; indeed, it is probably an uncommon event in ATCCS. We suggest that the most common mechanism of injury in ATCCS may be direct compression of the cervical spinal cord by buckling of the ligamenta flava into an already narrowed cervical spinal canal; this would explain the predominance of axonal injury in the white matter of the lateral columns. (orig./GDG)

  19. Acute traumatic central cord syndrome: MRI-pathological correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quencer, R.M. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Miami MRI Center, FL (United States) Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, FL (United States)); Bunge, R.P.; Egnor, M.; Green, B.A. (Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, FL (United States) Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, FL (United States)); Puckett, W. (Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, FL (United States)); Naidich, T.P. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Miami MRI Center, FL (United States) Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, FL (United States) Baptist Hospital of Greater Miami, FL (United States)); Post, M.J.D. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Miami MRI Center, FL (United States)); Norenberg, M. (Dept. of Neuropathology, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, FL (United States))

    1992-04-01

    The acute traumatic central cord syndrome (ATCCS) is commonly stated to result from an injury which affects primarily the center of the spinal cord and is frequently hemorrhagic. To test the validity of this widely disseminated hypothesis, the magnetic resonance images [MRI] of 11 consecutive cases of ATCCS caused by closed injury to the spine were analyzed and correlated with the gross pathological and histological features of 3 cervical spinal cords obtained at post mortem from patients with ATCCS, including 2 of patients studied by MRI. In this study, the MRI and pathological observations indicate that ATCCS is predominantly a white matter injury and that intramedullary hemorrhage is not a necessary feature of the syndrome; indeed, it is probably an uncommon event in ATCCS. We suggest that the most common mechanism of injury in ATCCS may be direct compression of the cervical spinal cord by buckling of the ligamenta flava into an already narrowed cervical spinal canal; this would explain the predominance of axonal injury in the white matter of the lateral columns. (orig./GDG).

  20. Central poststroke pain: somatosensory abnormalities and the presence of associated myofascial pain syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira Rogério Adas; de Andrade Daniel; Machado André Guelman; Teixeira Manoel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Central post-stroke pain (CPSP) is a neuropathic pain syndrome associated with somatosensory abnormalities due to central nervous system lesion following a cerebrovascular insult. Post-stroke pain (PSP) refers to a broader range of clinical conditions leading to pain after stroke, but not restricted to CPSP, including other types of pain such as myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), painful shoulder, lumbar and dorsal pain, complex regional pain syndrome, and spasticity-related ...

  1. Risk factors for sexual dysfunction in male patients with obstructive sleep apnea and hypoventilation syndrome%阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停低通气综合征引起男性性功能障碍危险因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘松; 陈颖; 郝钢跃; 贺正一

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨男性阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停低通气综合征(OSAHS)患者性功能障碍的危险因素.方法 采用国际勃起功能指数量表(IIEF-5)评估121例男性22~50岁OSAHS患者性功能,分为性功能正常组(65例)和性功能障碍组(56例).比较两组患者临床资料和多导睡眠图监测结果.部分性功能障碍患者进行持续气道正压(CPAP)治疗后再次以IIEF-5评价性功能.结果 性功能障碍组患者体质量指数(BMI)显著高于性功能正常组[(31.5±3.9) kg/m2与(30.1±3.5) kg/m2,t=6.897,P<0.01],有糖尿病病史者显著多于性功能正常组(18例与10例,x2=4.750,P<0.05),晨间血压升高者显著多于性功能正常组(38例与27例,x2 =8.381,P<0.01);性功能障碍组患者多导睡眠图监测显示,呼吸紊乱指数(RDI)、最长呼吸暂停时间(Tmax)、最低脉搏血氧饱和度(LSp02)、脉搏血氧饱和度低于90%时间占总睡眠(TST)时间比(T90%)、浅睡眠(S1+S2)占ST比、深睡眠(S3+S4)占TST比、快动眼睡眠(REM)占TST比等指标与性功能正常组之间差异有统计学意义(t值分别为5.290、2.253、3.770、7.536、6.599、3.935和5.536,P均<0.05).多因素Logistic回归分析显示,糖尿病病史、多导睡眠图监测中S1 +S2占TST比、RDI和LSp02对男性OSAHS患者出现性功能障碍有统计学意义,其OR值(95%可信区间)分别为2.10(1.17 ~5.01)、3.52(1.33 ~ 5.97)、1.45(1.08 ~2.95)和0.86(0.67~0.93),P均<0.05.20例性功能障碍患者持续气道正压治疗2个月后14例经IIEF-5评分(>21分)正常.结论 具有糖尿病病史,睡眠结构紊乱S1 +S2占TST比增多、RDI较高和LSpO2较低是男性OSAHS患者发生性功能障碍的独立危险因素.持续气道正压治疗可以显著改善男性OSAHS患者性功能.%Objective To investigate the risk factors of sexual dysfunction in male patients with obstructive sleep apnea and hypoventilation syndrome (OSAHS).Methods One hundred and twenty-one OSAHS male

  2. Capnography for Assessing Nocturnal Hypoventilation and Predicting Compliance with Subsequent Noninvasive Ventilation in Patients with ALS

    OpenAIRE

    Sung-Min Kim; Kyung Seok Park; Hyunwoo Nam; Suk-Won Ahn; Suhyun Kim; Jung-Joon Sung; Kwang-Woo Lee

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) suffer from hypoventilation, which can easily worsen during sleep. This study evaluated the efficacy of capnography monitoring in patients with ALS for assessing nocturnal hypoventilation and predicting good compliance with subsequent noninvasive ventilation (NIV) treatment. METHODS: Nocturnal monitoring and brief wake screening by capnography/pulse oximetry, functional scores, and other respiratory signs were assessed in 26 patien...

  3. Acute traumatic central cord syndrome: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molliqaj, G; Payer, M; Schaller, K; Tessitore, E

    2014-01-01

    Acute traumatic central cord syndrome (ATCCS) is the most common type of incomplete spinal cord injury, characterized by predominant upper extremity weakness, and less severe sensory and bladder dysfunction. ATCCS is thought to result from post-traumatic centro-medullary hemorrhage and edema, or, as more recently proposed, from a Wallerian degeneration, as a consequence of spinal cord pinching in a narrowed canal. Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the method of choice for diagnosis, showing a typical intramedullary hypersignal on T2 sequences. Non-surgical treatment relies on external cervical immobilization, maintenance of a sufficient systolic blood pressure, and early rehabilitation, and should be reserved for patients suffering from mild ATCCS. Surgical management of ATCCS consists of posterior, anterior or combined approaches, in order to achieve spinal cord decompression, with or without stabilization. The benefits of early surgical decompression in the setting of ATCCS remain controversial due to the lack of clinical randomized trials; recent studies suggest that early surgery (less than 72hours after trauma) appears to be safe and effective, especially for patients with evidence of focal anatomical cord compression. PMID:24613283

  4. Central versus peripheral cardiovascular risk in metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.KevinShoemaker

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS; i.e. 3 of 5 of the following risk factors (RFs: elevated blood pressure, waist circumference, triglycerides, blood glucose or reduced HDL are thought to be prone to serious cardiovascular disease and there is debate as to whether the disease begins in the peripheral vasculature or centrally. This study investigates hemodynamics, cardiac function/morphology, as well as mechanical properties of the central (heart, carotid artery and peripheral (total peripheral resistance, forearm vascular bed vasculature in individuals without (1-2 RFs; n=28, or with (≥3 RFs; n=46 MetS. After adjustments for statin and blood pressure medication use, those with MetS had lower mitral valve E/A ratios (<3 RFs: 1.24±0.07; ≥3 RFs: 1.01±0.04; P=0.025, and higher total peripheral resistance index (<3 RFs: 48±2 mmHg/L/min/m2; ≥3 RFs: 53±2 mmHg/L/min/m2; P=0.04. There were no differences in heart size, carotid artery measurements, cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity, pulse wave velocity, stroke volume index, or cardiac output index due to MetS after adjustments for statin and blood pressure medication use. In a separate analysis, the use of statins was associated with increased inertia in the brachial vascular bed, increased HbA1c and decreased LDL cholesterol. The independent use of anti-hypertensive medication was associated with decreased predicted VO2max, triglycerides, diastolic blood pressure, interventricular septum thickness, calculated left ventricle mass, left ventricle posterior wall thickness, and left ventricle pre-ejection period, but increased carotid stiffness, HDL cholesterol, and heart rate. These data imply that both a central cardiac effect and a peripheral effect of vascular resistance are expressed in MetS. These data also indicate that variance in between-group responses due to pharmacological treatments are important factors to consider in studying cardiovascular changes in these individuals.

  5. Suspected Central Anticholinergic Syndrome Related to Cycloplegic Eye Drop in a Premature Baby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berrin Işık

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic approach for the central anticholinergic syndrome after application of cycloplegic eye drops in a premature infant patient who was scheduled for laser photocoagulation under general anesthesia is reviewed in the light of the relevant literature.

  6. Suspected Central Anticholinergic Syndrome Related to Cycloplegic Eye Drop in a Premature Baby

    OpenAIRE

    Berrin Işık; Ahmet Hondur; Fatma Akgün; Nurdan Bedirli

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic approach for the central anticholinergic syndrome after application of cycloplegic eye drops in a premature infant patient who was scheduled for laser photocoagulation under general anesthesia is reviewed in the light of the relevant literature.

  7. Solitary median maxillary central incisor in association with Goldenhar's syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia de Paula e Silva, Francisco Wanderley; de Carvalho, Fabricio Kitazono; Diaz-Serrano, Kranya Victória; de Freitas, Aldevina Campos; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino

    2007-01-01

    Goldenhar's syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by several anomalies that include dermal epibulbar cysts, auricular appendices and malformations and vertebral anomalies. In this article, the authors report a case of Goldenhar's syndrome in a 10-year-old child who presented with the classical signs of this condition and a solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI). PMID:17658185

  8. The dystrophic hamster: an animal model of alveolar hypoventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, E H; Burbach, J A

    1991-11-01

    The BIO 14.6 dystrophic hamster (DH) is a genetically determined animal model of alveolar hypoventilation (AH) that exhibits a ventilatory control pattern of compensation and then decompensation similar to that in progressive forms of muscular dystrophy and nonprogressive congenital myopathies in humans. Possible causes of AH in the DH include respiratory muscle weakness, ventilation-to-perfusion inequalities, and an inadequate drive to breathe. Histochemical and contractile abnormalities of the diaphragm, reduced lung surface area available for gas exchange, abnormal pulmonary microvascular reactivity to hypoxia, altered levels of neurochemicals, and abnormal cellular regulation of calcium are among the specific factors that may contribute to the development of AH. The potential role of hypothyroidism in the development of AH is reviewed because many hypothyroid patients exhibit AH and other ventilatory dysfunctions, hypothyroidism is present in human patients and animals with muscular dystrophy, and thyroid status is known to influence lung architecture, myocyte function, and neural activity. Additional studies linking neurohormonal signals, transcellular signal processing, and control of ventilation in the DH may help us understand the etiology of AH in human disease. PMID:1684789

  9. The Great Deceiver: A Case of Central Sensitization Presenting as Carcinoid Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Juan A

    2016-06-01

    Central sensitization defines a state of amplified sensory input within the nervous system across many organ systems; it overlaps syndromes as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, irritable bowel, and interstitial cystitis. Commonly, individuals will experience multiple syndromes during the course of their lifetime. A 62-year-old patient presented for evaluation of multiple medically unexplained symptoms postsurgically including chronic left chest wall and flank pain with concomitant diarrhea, abdominal pain, and facial flushing. After extensive multidisciplinary evaluations, he was diagnosed as having central sensitization in which the initial presentation mimicked carcinoid syndrome. He was subsequently treated with extensive multidisciplinary pain rehabilitation, and it did well. PMID:27144900

  10. Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome associated with unique cleft palate: a rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holla, Goda; Ramakrishna, Yeluri; Holla, Anup; Munshi, Autar Krishen

    2014-01-01

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) syndrome is a rare dental anomaly that affects 1:50,000 live births. SMMCI syndrome is characterized by the presence of a single central incisor located on the maxillary midline in both primary and permanent dentitions. It may occur as an isolated finding or in association with developmental defects and systemic involvement. Congenital anomalies associated with SMMCI syndrome can include short stature, mild forms of deviation in craniofacial morphology, mild to severe intellectual disability, congenital heart disease, and cleft lip and/or palate. This report describes a clinical case of a 7-year-old girl with SMMCI syndrome--in addition to bilateral residual cleft and associated nasal regurgitation--that was treated with a removable maxillary obturator. PMID:24598504

  11. The Frequency of Exfoliation Syndrome in the Central Anatolia Region of Turkey

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    Raşit Kılıç

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of exfoliation syndrome in the Central Anatolia region of Turkey and to evaluate its relationship with cardiovascular and ocular diseases. Methods. Patients over the age of 45 years who presented to the clinic were included in the study. All cases underwent a comprehensive ophthalmology examination. Exfoliation syndrome was diagnosed with the presence of exfoliative material on the lens anterior capsule or iris on slit lamp examination. The patients were divided into two groups as the exfoliation syndrome group and nonexfoliation syndrome group according to the presence of exfoliative material. Results. Exfoliative material was found in one or both eyes of 212 of the 2103 patients (10.1% evaluated within the scope of the study. A significant relationship was found between exfoliation syndrome and increasing age and male gender. A significant relationship was found between exfoliation syndrome and glaucoma, cataracts, age-related macular degeneration, and phacodonesis. While no relationship was found between exfoliation syndrome and hypertension or diabetes mellitus, a significant relationship was found with coronary artery disease. Conclusion. The unilateral or bilateral exfoliation syndrome frequency was 10.1% in this hospital-based study. A statistically significant relationship was found between exfoliation syndrome and advancing age, gender, and coronary artery disease.

  12. Outcome after incomplete spinal cord injury: central cord versus Brown-Sequard syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wirz, M.; Zörner, B; Rupp, R; Dietz, V.

    2010-01-01

    Study design : A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data.Objective:A hemisection of the spinal cord is a frequently used animal model for spinal cord injury (SCI), the corresponding human condition, that is, the Brown-Sequard syndrome (BS), is relatively rare as compared with the central cord syndrome (CC). The time course of neurological deficit, functional recovery, impulse conductivity and rehabilitation length of stay in BS and CC subjects were compared.Setting:Nine Europea...

  13. Non-stroke Central Neurologic Manifestations in Antiphospholipid Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelnik, Cécile M; Kozora, Elizabeth; Appenzeller, Simone

    2016-02-01

    Thrombotic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are well known, and various non-stroke neuro-psychiatric manifestations (NPMs) have also been consistently described, but their place in APS remains unclear. Some syndromes, such as migraine or cognitive dysfunction, are frequently described in APS, whereas others, like seizure, multiple sclerosis-like symptoms, transverse myelitis, movement disorders, or psychiatric symptoms, are rarely found. Overlap with other autoimmune diseases, in particular with systemic lupus erythematosus, the lack of large sample size prospective studies, and discrepancies in antiphospholipid antibody (aPL) determinations complicate the study of the relationship between those disorders and aPL/APS. This review article aimed to summarize updated data on pathophysiologic, epidemiologic, and radiologic findings about non-stroke NPM described in primary APS and aPL-positive patients without overlap of other autoimmune diseases. PMID:26923254

  14. Miller-Fisher Syndrome: Is the ataxia central or peripheral?

    OpenAIRE

    Sandler, R.D.; Hoggard, N; Hadjivassiliou, M

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with a brief history of slurred speech, unsteadiness, double vision and paraesthesia. He had been unwell for 12 days with campylobacter gastroenteritis. On examination, there was ophthalmoplegia, nystagmus, areflexia and lower limb and gait ataxia. Serological testing was positive for GQ1b antibody in keeping with the diagnosis of Miller Fisher Syndrome (MFS). He was treated with two courses of intravenous immunoglobulins and made a good recovery, only displaying m...

  15. The primary Maxillary Central Incisor in the Solitary Median Maxillary Central Incisor syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, I; Balslev-Olesen, M

    2012-01-01

    Solitary Median Maxillary Central Incisor (SMMCI) is a developmental anomaly in the permanent dentition with one single central incisor in the maxilla, positioned exactly in the midline. This condition has been associated with extra- and intraoral malformations in the frontonasal segment of the...... cranium and face. It is not known whether the centrally located permanent incisor is always preceded by a centrally located primary incisor. The aim was to analyse whether a permanent single central incisor in SMMCI is always preceded by a primary single central incisor and to study extra- and intraoral...

  16. Capnography for assessing nocturnal hypoventilation and predicting compliance with subsequent noninvasive ventilation in patients with ALS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Min Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS suffer from hypoventilation, which can easily worsen during sleep. This study evaluated the efficacy of capnography monitoring in patients with ALS for assessing nocturnal hypoventilation and predicting good compliance with subsequent noninvasive ventilation (NIV treatment. METHODS: Nocturnal monitoring and brief wake screening by capnography/pulse oximetry, functional scores, and other respiratory signs were assessed in 26 patients with ALS. Twenty-one of these patients were treated with NIV and had their treatment compliance evaluated. RESULTS: Nocturnal capnography values were reliable and strongly correlated with the patients' respiratory symptoms (R(2 = 0.211-0.305, p = 0.004-0.021. The duration of nocturnal hypercapnea obtained by capnography exhibited a significant predictive power for good compliance with subsequent NIV treatment, with an area-under-the-curve value of 0.846 (p = 0.018. In contrast, no significant predictive values for nocturnal pulse oximetry or functional scores for nocturnal hypoventilation were found. Brief waking supine capnography was also useful as a screening tool before routine nocturnal capnography monitoring. CONCLUSION: Capnography is an efficient tool for assessing nocturnal hypoventilation and predicting good compliance with subsequent NIV treatment of ALS patients, and may prove useful as an adjunctive tool for assessing the need for NIV treatment in these patients.

  17. Central obesity measurements predict metabolic syndrome in a retrospective cohort study of postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Rosety-Rodríguez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The various diagnostic classifications in the literature concur as regards the important role of abdominal obesity in the onset and progression of metabolic syndrome. Accordingly, this study was aimed at clarifying whether central obesity measurements assessed by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA may predict metabolic syndrome in Spanish postmenopausal women. Material and methods: This historical cohort study included a total of 1326 postmenopausal women aged > 45 years old who had routinely undergone DXA to measure their bone mineral density between january 2006 and january 2011. The regions of interest (ROI envisaged in our study by using DXA were the lumbar regions L1-L4 and L4-L5. At the same time, they underwent a complete medical examination including personal medical history assessment, biochemical blood analysis, blood pressure measurement and anthropometrical evaluation. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed attending to the criteria established by National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NECP-ATP-III. Results: During the observation period, 537 women, representing 40.5% of the total studied, met the diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome. L1-L4 and L4-L5 abdominal fat mass determinations were associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in all regression models tested, showing an increasing gradient from the lowest to highest quintile. Conclusion: Central adiposity measurements assessed by DXA, especially L1-L4 region of interest, could be considered a powerful predictor of metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women.

  18. Solitary median maxillary central incisor, short stature, choanal atresia/midnasal stenosis (SMMCI) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R K; Bankier, A; Aldred, M J; Kan, K; Lucas, J O; Perks, A G

    1997-12-01

    This article describes a series of 21 consecutive cases, each involving a solitary median maxillary central incisor; the patients were seen in the Department of Dentistry or the Victorian Clinical Genetics Unit, Murdoch Institute, at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, from 1966 to 1997. The spectrum of anomalies and associated features present in these cases--solitary median maxillary central incisor, choanal atresia, and holoprosencephaly--is described, and the literature related to the features, including genetic studies in these conditions, is reviewed. We relate our findings in these cases to current knowledge of developmental embryology. It is hoped that the findings, together with our interpretation of them, will help to clarify understanding of solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome. This syndrome was previously considered a simple midline defect of the dental lamina, but it is now recognized as a possible predictor of holoprosencephalies of varying degrees in the proband, in members of the proband's family, and in the family's descendants. PMID:9431535

  19. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, central plateau, southeastern, and southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Luiz T M; Moreli, Marcos L; de-Sousa, Ricardo L M; Borges, Alessandra A; de-Figueiredo, Glauciane G; Machado, Alex M; Bisordi, Ivani; Nagasse-Sugahara, Teresa K; Suzuki, Akemi; Pereira, Luiz E; de-Souza, Renato P; de-Souza, Luiza T M; Braconi, Carla T; Harsi, Charlotte M; de-Andrade-Zanotto, Paolo M

    2009-04-01

    Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is an increasing health problem in Brazil because of encroachment of sprawling urban, agricultural, and cattle-raising areas into habitats of subfamily Sigmodontinae rodents, which serve as hantavirus reservoirs. From 1993 through June 2007, a total of 884 cases of HPS were reported in Brazil (case-fatality rate 39%). To better understand this emerging disease, we collected 89 human serum samples and 68 rodent lung samples containing antibodies to hantavirus from a 2,500-km-wide area in Brazil. RNA was isolated from human samples and rodent tissues and subjected to reverse transcription-PCR. Partial sequences of nucleocapsid protein and glycoprotein genes from 22 human and 16 rodent sources indicated only Araraquara virus and Juquitiba virus lineages. The case-fatality rate of HPS was higher in the area with Araraquara virus. This virus, which may be the most virulent hantavirus in Brazil, was associated with areas that have had greater anthropogenic changes. PMID:19331732

  20. Central retinal artery occlusion in a patient with ANCA-negative Churg-Strauss syndrome

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    Miyazaki M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Yuji Kumano,1 Noriko Yoshida,2 Satoru Fukuyama,3 Masanori Miyazaki,2 Hiroshi Enaida,2 Takaaki Matsui11Ohshima Hospital of Ophthalmology, Fukuoka, 2Department of Ophthalmology, 3Research Institute for Diseases of the Chest, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, JapanAbstract: Ocular involvement in Churg-Strauss syndrome is infrequent. We describe the case of a 54-year-old woman with eosinophilia and involvement of the respiratory tract, skin, and peripheral nervous system, fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology criteria for Churg-Strauss syndrome. The patient presented with acute, painless vision loss in her right eye. Central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO without accompanying retinal vasculitis was diagnosed by angiographic findings and funduscopic findings of retinal whitening with a cherry-red spot. Although her antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA status was negative, CRAO was thought to be an ocular manifestation of Churg-Strauss syndrome, and appropriate treatment was planned. She was treated with high-dose corticosteroids and anticoagulant therapy. Her macular edema improved, but visual recovery was poor. Specific therapy to alter inflammation, blood coagulation, and rheology reportedly plays an important role in ANCA-positive patients with Churg-Strauss syndrome who develop CRAO. Regardless of ANCA status, high-dose corticosteroids should be considered for CRAO in patients with Churg-Strauss syndrome, as discussed in this case.Keywords: CRAO, ANCA, Churg-Strauss syndrome

  1. Periodic fever syndromes in Eastern and Central European countries: results of a pediatric multinational survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Mariana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To analyze the prevalence of diagnosed and suspected autoinflammatory diseases in Eastern and Central European (ECE countries, with a particular interest on the diagnostic facilities in these countries. Methods Two different strategies were used to collect data on patients with periodic fever syndromes from ECE countries- the Eurofever survey and collection of data with the structured questionnaire. Results Data from 35 centers in 14 ECE countries were collected. All together there were 11 patients reported with genetically confirmed familial Mediterranean fever (FMF, 14 with mevalonate-kinase deficiency (MKD, 11 with tumor necrosis factor receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS and 4 with chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular syndrome (CINCA. Significantly higher numbers were reported for suspected cases which were not genetically tested. All together there were 49 suspected FMF patients reported, 24 MKD, 16 TRAPS, 7 CINCA and 2 suspected Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS patients. Conclusions The number of genetically confirmed patients with periodic fever syndromes in ECE countries is very low. In order to identify more patients in the future, it is important to organize educational programs for increasing the knowledge on these diseases and to establish a network for genetic testing of periodic fever syndromes in ECE countries.

  2. Variation of serum interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein levels in obstructive sleep apnea hypoventilation syndrome with or without accompanying CAD%血清白细胞介素-6 C反应蛋白在阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停通气综合征及其合并冠心病患者体内的水平变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敏艳; 刘卓拉; 张秀兰

    2011-01-01

    目的 通过检测阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停低通气综合征(OSAHS)及OSAHS合并冠心病(CAD)患者血清白细胞介素-6(IL-6)及C反应蛋白(CRP)水平的变化,研究两者与OSAHS及OSAHS合并CAD的相关性,旨在探讨OSAHS合并冠心病的发病机制.方法 随机选择经多导睡眠图(PSG)监测确诊的OSAHS患者60例,其中单纯OSAHS患者40例,OSAHS合并CAD患者20例.另选择我院同期健康体检者30名.于睡眠呼吸监测次日晨起采取空腹肘静脉血3 ml,采用放射免疫法测定IL-6,酶联免疫吸附试验测定CRP,并记录睡眠呼吸监测相关指标,对其结果进行分析.结果 单纯OSAHS组、OSAHS合并CAD组与健康对照组相比血清IL-6、CRP浓度均升高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).OSAHS合并CAD组血清IL-6、CRP浓度均高于单纯OSAHS组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).OSAHS合并CAD组与单纯OSAHS组相比,睡眠呼吸暂停低通气指数(AHI)升高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);最低血氧饱和度(SaO2)及平均SaO2均降低,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);但最长呼吸暂停时间及最长低通气时间差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).单纯OSAHS组与OSAHS合并CAD组2组患者血清IL-6和CRP均呈正相关(r分别为0.941与0.922,P<0.01).不论单纯OSAHS组还是OSAHS合并CAD组,血清IL-6、CRP水平均与AHI呈正相关,与最低SaO2呈负相关,而与最长呼吸暂停时间及最长低通气时间无相关性.结论 OSAHS可能存在着一个慢性炎症过程,它在OSAHS合并CAD的发生发展中起着重要作用.%Objective To detect the variation of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypoventilation syndrome (OSAHS) and in those with accompanying coronary artery disease (CAD) (OSAHS+CAD), and to study the correlation between the two biomarkers, OSAHS and OSAHS+CAD, in order to explore the pathogenesis of OSAHS+CAD. Methods Sixty patients confirmed with OSAHS by polysomnography

  3. Chromosomal and related Mendelian syndromes associated with Hirschsprung's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S W

    2012-11-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) is a fairly frequent cause of intestinal obstruction in children. It is characterized as a sex-linked heterogonous disorder with variable severity and incomplete penetrance giving rise to a variable pattern of inheritance. Although Hirschsprung's disease occurs as an isolated phenotype in at least 70% of cases, it is not infrequently associated with a number of congenital abnormalities and associated syndromes, demonstrating a spectrum of congenital anomalies. Certain of these syndromic phenotypes have been linked to distinct genetic sites, indicating underlying genetic associations of the disease and probable gene-gene interaction, in its pathogenesis. These associations with HSCR include Down's syndrome and other chromosomal anomalies, Waardenburg syndrome and other Dominant sensorineural deafness, the Congenital Central Hypoventilation and Mowat-Wilson and other brain-related syndromes, as well as the MEN2 and other tumour associations. A number of other autosomal recessive syndromes include the Shah-Waardenburg, the Bardet-Biedl and Cartilage-hair hypoplasia, Goldberg-Shprintzen syndromes and other syndromes related to cholesterol and fat metabolism among others. The genetics of Hirschsprung's disease are highly complex with the majority of known genetic sites relating to the main susceptibility pathways (RET an EDNRB). Non-syndromic non-familial, short-segment HSCR appears to represent a non-Mendelian condition with variable expression and sex-dependent penetrance. Syndromic and familial forms, on the other hand, have complex patterns of inheritance and being reported as autosomal dominant, recessive and polygenic patterns of inheritance. The phenotypic variability and incomplete penetrance observed in Hirschsprung's disease could also be explained by the involvement of modifier genes, especially in its syndromic forms. In this review, we look at the chromosomal and Mendelian associations and their underlying signalling pathways

  4. DiGeorge syndrome associated with solitary median maxillary central incisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huai-Chih; Shyur, Shyh-Dar; Huang, Li-Hsin; Chang, Yi-Chi; Wen, Da-Chin; Liang, Pei-Hsuan; Lin, Mao-Tsair

    2005-01-01

    DiGeorge syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency disease characterized by dysgenesis of the thymus and parathyroid glands, conotruncal cardiac anomalies, and other dysmorphic features. Although most patients have a common microscopic deletion in chromosome 22q11.2, marked clinical variability exists. A solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) is a rare dental anomaly which may be an isolated occurrence or associated with congenital nasal airway abnormalities or holoprosencephaly. We report a patient with DiGeorge syndrome who was diagnosed at nearly 1 month of age and was later found to have a solitary median central incisor. Initially, the patient presented with recurrent episodes of respiratory distress attributed to partial airway obstruction, one of the phenotypic features of SMMCI. A fluorescence in situ hybridization study showed a chromosome 22q11.2 deletion. PMID:16252847

  5. Ramsay Hunt Syndrome Associated with Central Nervous System Involvement in an Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tommy L H; Cartagena, Ana M; Bombassaro, Anne Marie; Hosseini-Moghaddam, Seyed M

    2016-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome associated with varicella zoster virus reactivation affecting the central nervous system is rare. We describe a 55-year-old diabetic female who presented with gait ataxia, right peripheral facial palsy, and painful vesicular lesions involving her right ear. Later, she developed dysmetria, fluctuating diplopia, and dysarthria. Varicella zoster virus was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid by polymerase chain reaction. She was diagnosed with Ramsay Hunt syndrome associated with spread to the central nervous system. Her facial palsy completely resolved within 48 hours of treatment with intravenous acyclovir 10 mg/kg every 8 hours. However, cerebellar symptoms did not improve until a tapering course of steroid therapy was initiated. PMID:27366189

  6. Suspected Central Anticholinergic Syndrome Related to Cycloplegic Eye Drop in a Premature Baby

    OpenAIRE

    Bedirli, Nurdan; Akgün, Fatma; Hondur, Ahmet; Işık, Berrin

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic approach for the central anticholinergic syndrome after application of cycloplegic eye drops in a premature infant patient who was scheduled for laser photocoagulation under general anesthesia is reviewed in the light of the relevant literature Turkish Başlık: Prematüre Retinopatisi Olan Bebekte Sikloplejik Göz Damlasına Bağlı Santral Antikolinerjik Sendrom Şüphesi Anahtar Kelimeler: Santral antikolinerjik sendrom, siklopent...

  7. Two uncommon manifestations of leptospirosis:Sweet’s syndrome and central nervous system vasculitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter George

    2011-01-01

    To leptospirosis is the commonest spirocheatal infection in the tropical and temperate countries of Indian sub-continent and Africa and the most common zoonosis worldwide. The protean manifestation of this infectious disease is a challenge for practising clinicians across the world. In poor developing countries, at most clinical suspicion it is essential in the diagnosis of this disease. In this report, we are able to document two uncommon manifestations of leptospirosis, namely Sweet’s syndrome and central nervous system vasculitis.

  8. Diagnostic reliability of magnetic resonance imaging for central nervous system syndromes in systemic lupus erythematosus: a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimura Katsuji; Kanno Tokiko; Soejima Makoto; Fukasawa Chikako; Kawaguchi Yasushi; Harigai Masayoshi; Katsumata Yasuhiro; Yamada Takayuki; Yamanaka Hisashi; Hara Masako

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous studies of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a diagnostic tool for central nervous system (CNS) syndromes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) contained several limitations such as study design, number of enrolled patients, and definition of CNS syndromes. We overcame these problems and statistically evaluated the diagnostic values of abnormal MRI signals and their chronological changes in CNS syndromes of SLE. Methods We prospectively studied 191 patients with...

  9. A case of solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) syndrome with bilateral pyriform aperture stenosis and choanal atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Kate; Wynne, David M

    2010-08-01

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome is a rare disorder involving midline abnormalities. It may present with life threatening respiratory distress in the neonate secondary to nasal malformations. These include pyriform aperture stenosis and choanal atresia. We present the first reported case of simultaneous choanal atresia and pyriform aperture stenosis in a neonate with solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome. The clinical presentation and the management of congenital pyriform aperture stenosis are discussed. PMID:20627328

  10. Clinical course, management and in-hospital outcomes of acute coronary syndrome in Central Asian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravshanbek Kurbanov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes features history, risk factors and hospital management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS in women of the Central Asia (829 ACS patients are included, and also comparison of hospital outcomes of ACS in groups of men and women.ACS in women in the Central Asia comprises features as more non Q-wave myocardial infarction frequency, smaller adherence to treatment of dyslipidemia, more obesity degrees. Women arrive to hospital average in 4 hours after men; have more percent of the atypical form. In-hospital outcomes in men and women significantly did not differ because of general tendency to late arriving to the hospital and small quantity of revascularization procedures. The reasons of differences between men and women in the region are mostly connected to social sphere (late arriving, non-treated dyslipidemia than to physiological peculiarities.

  11. Central poststroke pain: somatosensory abnormalities and the presence of associated myofascial pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Oliveira Rogério Adas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central post-stroke pain (CPSP is a neuropathic pain syndrome associated with somatosensory abnormalities due to central nervous system lesion following a cerebrovascular insult. Post-stroke pain (PSP refers to a broader range of clinical conditions leading to pain after stroke, but not restricted to CPSP, including other types of pain such as myofascial pain syndrome (MPS, painful shoulder, lumbar and dorsal pain, complex regional pain syndrome, and spasticity-related pain. Despite its recognition as part of the general PSP diagnostic possibilities, the prevalence of MPS has never been characterized in patients with CPSP patients. We performed a cross-sectional standardized clinical and radiological evaluation of patients with definite CPSP in order to assess the presence of other non-neuropathic pain syndromes, and in particular, the role of myofascial pain syndrome in these patients. Methods CPSP patients underwent a standardized sensory and motor neurological evaluation, and were classified according to stroke mechanism, neurological deficits, presence and profile of MPS. The Visual Analogic Scale (VAS, McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ, and Beck Depression Scale (BDS were filled out by all participants. Results Forty CPSP patients were included. Thirty-six (90.0% had one single ischemic stroke. Pain presented during the first three months after stroke in 75.0%. Median pain intensity was 10 (5 to 10. There was no difference in pain intensity among the different lesion site groups. Neuropathic pain was continuous-ongoing in 34 (85.0% patients and intermittent in the remainder. Burning was the most common descriptor (70%. Main aggravating factors were contact to cold (62.5%. Thermo-sensory abnormalities were universal. MPS was diagnosed in 27 (67.5% patients and was more common in the supratentorial extra-thalamic group (P Conclusions The presence of MPS is not an exception after stroke and may present in association with CPSP

  12. Analysis of genetic variation of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) isolates in Central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Can; Ning, Yibao; Xu, Binrui; Gong, Wenzhi; Zhang, Dongdong

    2016-05-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an epidemic etiology in pigs of all ages causing reproductive failure and respiratory manifestation. PRRSV has been circulating in Chinese pig farms for almost 20 years. The aim of the present study was to fully understand the extent of the genetic diversity and molecular characteristics of PRRSVs in Central China. A strain of PRRSV isolated from a recent outbreak farm in Hunan province in Central China, designated HUN-2014, was sequenced and analyzed with 39 other PRRSVs from 1998 to 2014 in Central China. Comparative results of genomic sequences revealed that all 40 PRRSVs belonged to the North American genotype (NA genotype) and shared 88.8-99.0% homology. Phylogenetic analysis showed three subgenotypes, namely conventional PRRSV (C-PRRSV), specially mutant PRRSV (S-PRRSV) and highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV), in all 40 PRRSVs. Moreover, comparative analysis of amino acid (AA) sequences of NSP2, GP3, GP5 and ORF5a revealed the main evolution trend of PRRSVs in Central China from 1998 to 2014, which was from C-PRRSV to HP-PRRSV, accompanied by different evolving directions to S-PRRSV. In conclusion, both the major evolutionary trend and special features of genetic variation should be emphasized as theoretical basis for development of new vaccines and control strategies for PRRS. PMID:26781704

  13. A REPORT OF CENTRAL RETINAL ARTERY OCCLUSION (CRAO , IN YOUNG MALES IN ITS INITIAL MANIFESTATION, AS PRIMAR Y ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: AIM: To report a case of Central Retinal Artery Occlusi on (CRAO in young males in its initial manifestation as Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome. METHODS: 32 year healthy male, with abrupt sudden painless loss of vision in r ight eye since 48 hours, with Grade 2 Relative afferent pupillary defect, visual acuity of hand movements in OD and 6/18 in OS. Fundoscopy disclosed signs compatible of central reti nal artery occlusion confirmed with FFA. Carotid Doppler imaging and echocardiography was done to determine the source. RESULTS: Antiphospholipid antibody cofactor, beta2-glycoprotein 1 antibodies, IgM, was positive with titre of more than 94 un its/ml on two occasions, 1 2 weeks apart, with normal range being less than 20 units/ml for each isotope (IgG, IgM, or IgA .According to the 2006 revised Sapporo criteria Antiphospholipid syndrome was diagnosed. Thor ough examination excluded other system involvement. Immunological studies excluded other systemic disorders. CONCLUSIONS: In literature, prevalence of CRAO is 0.85% for every 100000 and prevalence of Antiphospholipid Syndrome in patients showing a major retinal vascula r obstruction is 5% - 33%. Antiphospholipid syndrome should be ruled out in every young patient who presents with Central retinal artery occlusion. Association must be considered, as Central retinal artery occlusion could be the initial manifestation of ant iphospholipid syndrome with high risk of recurrence.

  14. The trisomy 18 syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cereda Anna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The trisomy 18 syndrome, also known as Edwards syndrome, is a common chromosomal disorder due to the presence of an extra chromosome 18, either full, mosaic trisomy, or partial trisomy 18q. The condition is the second most common autosomal trisomy syndrome after trisomy 21. The live born prevalence is estimated as 1/6,000-1/8,000, but the overall prevalence is higher (1/2500-1/2600 due to the high frequency of fetal loss and pregnancy termination after prenatal diagnosis. The prevalence of trisomy 18 rises with the increasing maternal age. The recurrence risk for a family with a child with full trisomy 18 is about 1%. Currently most cases of trisomy 18 are prenatally diagnosed, based on screening by maternal age, maternal serum marker screening, or detection of sonographic abnormalities (e.g., increased nuchal translucency thickness, growth retardation, choroid plexus cyst, overlapping of fingers, and congenital heart defects . The recognizable syndrome pattern consists of major and minor anomalies, prenatal and postnatal growth deficiency, an increased risk of neonatal and infant mortality, and marked psychomotor and cognitive disability. Typical minor anomalies include characteristic craniofacial features, clenched fist with overriding fingers, small fingernails, underdeveloped thumbs, and short sternum. The presence of major malformations is common, and the most frequent are heart and kidney anomalies. Feeding problems occur consistently and may require enteral nutrition. Despite the well known infant mortality, approximately 50% of babies with trisomy 18 live longer than 1 week and about 5-10% of children beyond the first year. The major causes of death include central apnea, cardiac failure due to cardiac malformations, respiratory insufficiency due to hypoventilation, aspiration, or upper airway obstruction and, likely, the combination of these and other factors (including decisions regarding aggressive care. Upper airway

  15. Central leptin resistance and hypothalamic inflammation are involved in letrozole-induced polycystic ovary syndrome rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Yuling; Zhao, Fangui; Wang, Wenjun

    2016-08-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that leptin acts as an important mediator in energy homeostasis and reproduction. Since dysfunction of reproduction and metabolism are major characteristics of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), the role of leptin in pathogenesis of PCOS needs further research. Many studies have shown that central leptin resistance existed in obesity rats through leptin intracerebroventricular (icv) injection; however, central leptin resistance in PCOS rats has not been reported. This study aimed to investigate whether there was a state of central leptin resistance in PCOS rats, as well as explore the possible association of hypothalamic inflammation with central leptin resistance. First, letrozole was used to induce the PCOS model, 24 h food intake, 24 h body weight changes and the expression of p-STAT3 were determined following leptin or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) icv injection in rats. Second, we further evaluated the expressions of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, p-IKKβ, NF-κB, p-NF-κB, IκBα, p-IκBα and SOCS3 in hypothalamus. The results showed that 24 h food intake and body weight were decreased, while the expression of p-STAT3 was increased in control group rats following leptin icv injection compared with aCSF icv injection; however, both of them showed no significant difference in PCOS rats. Furthermore, inflammatory markers were upregulated in the hypothalami of PCOS rats. Taken together, our data indicated that there was a state of chronic low-grade inflammation in hypothalamus which might be the possible mechanism for central leptin resistance in PCOS rats. PMID:27233601

  16. Lack of differential pattern in central adiposity and metabolic syndrome in Barrett's esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Healy, L A

    2012-02-01

    Obesity is an established risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma, although the mechanism is unclear. A pathway from reflux to inflammation through metaplasia is the dominant hypothesis, and an added role relating to visceral adiposity and the metabolic syndrome has been mooted in Barrett\\'s esophagus (BE) patients. Whether BE differs from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in obesity and metabolic syndrome profiles is unclear, and this was the focus of this study. Patients with proven BE or GERD were randomly selected from the unit data registry and invited to attend for metabolic syndrome screening, anthropometry studies including segmental body composition analysis, and laboratory tests including fasting lipids, insulin, and C-reactive protein. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. One hundred and eighteen BE patients and 113 age- and sex-matched GERD controls were studied. The incidence of obesity (body mass index >30 kg\\/m(2)) was 36% and 38%, respectively, with the pattern of fat deposition predominantly central and an estimated trunk fat mass of 13 and 14 kg, respectively. Using the NCEP criteria, metabolic syndrome was significantly more common in the BE cohort (30% vs 20%, P < 0.05), but there was no significant difference using IDF criteria (42% vs 37%, P= 0.340). Central obesity and the metabolic syndrome are common in both Barrett\\'s and GERD cohorts, but not significantly different, suggesting that central obesity and the metabolic syndrome does not per se impact on the development of BE in a reflux population. In BE, the importance of obesity and the metabolic syndrome in disease progression merits further study.

  17. Diagnostic reliability of magnetic resonance imaging for central nervous system syndromes in systemic lupus erythematosus: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishimura Katsuji

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as a diagnostic tool for central nervous system (CNS syndromes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE contained several limitations such as study design, number of enrolled patients, and definition of CNS syndromes. We overcame these problems and statistically evaluated the diagnostic values of abnormal MRI signals and their chronological changes in CNS syndromes of SLE. Methods We prospectively studied 191 patients with SLE, comparing those with (n = 57 and without (n = 134 CNS syndrome. CNS syndromes were characterized using the American College of Rheumatology case definitions. Results Any abnormal MRI signals were more frequently observed in subjects in the CNS group (n = 25 than in the non-CNS group (n = 32 [relative risk (RR, 1.7; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.1-2.7; p = 0.016] and the positive and negative predictive values for the diagnosis of CNS syndrome were 42% and 76%, respectively. Large abnormal MRI signals (ø ≥ 10 mm were seen only in the CNS group (n = 7; RR, 3.7; CI, 2.9-4.7; p = 0.0002, whereas small abnormal MRI signals (ø p = 0.029, whereas small signals did not (p = 1.000. Conclusions Abnormal MRI signals, which showed statistical associations with CNS syndrome, had insufficient diagnostic values. A large MRI signal was, however, useful as a diagnostic and surrogate marker for CNS syndrome of SLE, although it was less common.

  18. A Case of Turner Syndrome with Concomitant Transient Hypogammaglobulinaemia of Infancy and Central Diabetes Insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Hüseyin Anıl; Özkan, Behzat; Hazan, Filiz; Büyükinan, Muammer; Çelik, Tanju

    2013-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disorder that affects development in females and is characterized by the complete or partial absence of the second sex chromosome, or monosomy X. TS is associated with abnormalities in lymphatic and skeletal development, in growth, and in gonadal function. Cardiac and renal malformations and a number of specific cognitive findings may also be encountered in these patients. An increased risk for hypothyroidism, sensorineural hearing loss, hypertension, and other problems has also been reported. We present the case of a patient with TS accompanied by transient hypogammaglobulinaemia of infancy (THI) and central diabetes insipidus, which we believe is the first reported TS patient with these concomitant disorders. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23419422

  19. Central anticholinergic syndrome vs. idiosyncratic reaction triggered by a small IV dose of atropine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, X; Cui, Y; White, P F; Tang, J; Ma, H

    2016-02-01

    A 58-year-old male was scheduled to undergo radical gastrectomy for cancer under general anesthesia. The patient developed agitation and irregular breathing after receiving a single dose of atropine (0.5 mg) to treat bradycardia immediately prior to induction of anesthesia. Within 5 min after the atropine injection, the patient became unresponsive with facial flushing and diaphoresis. When a drop in oxygen saturation was observed, a laryngeal mask airway was inserted after administering a small bolus dose of propofol (80 mg) and the patient was ventilated with 100% oxygen. Physostigmine was not administered because of the relatively low dose of atropine and the fact that his symptoms were not totally consistent with central anticholinergic syndrome (CAS). The differential diagnosis at the time also included an acute cardiovascular event and an idiosyncratic reaction to atropine. The patient fully recovered within 80 min from this highly unusual reaction to a single 0.5 mg IV dose of atropine. PMID:26471203

  20. Bi-level CPAP does not change central blood flow in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Aquilano, Giulia; Galletti, Silvia; Aceti, Arianna; Vitali, Francesca; Faldella, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Background Current literature provides limited data on the hemodynamic changes that may occur during bi-level continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) support in preterm infants. However, the application of a positive end-expiratory pressure may be transmitted to the heart and the great vessels resulting in changes of central blood flow. Objective To assess changes in central blood flow in infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) during bi-level CPAP support. Design A prospective st...

  1. Endocrine and anatomical findings in a case of Solitary Median Maxillary Central Incisor Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szakszon, Katalin; Felszeghy, Enikő; Csízy, István; Józsa, Tamás; Káposzta, Rita; Balogh, Erzsébet; Oláh, Eva; Balogh, István; Berényi, Ervin; Knegt, Alida C; Ilyés, István

    2012-02-01

    Solitary Median Maxillary Central Incisor Syndrome (SMMCI) is a rare malformation syndrome consisting of multiple, mainly midline defects. Some authors suggest that it is a mild manifestation of the wide spectrum of holoprosencephaly, others classify it rather as a distinct entity. Authors report a case of SMMCI presenting with growth retardation, mild intellectual disability and absence of puberty. Cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic investigations could identify no abnormalities. The presence of a single maxillary incisor called for further investigations to clarify hidden anomalies, these were empty sella, panhypopituitarism, hypothyroidism, and hypoplasia of the inner genitals. Based on the above findings, growth hormone, estrogen, and L-thyroxine substitution was introduced, which resulted in satisfactory longitudinal growth and onset of sexual maturation. We suggest genetic counselling and if needed, invasive investigations in female patients with short stature and absent/delayed puberty, with or without sex chromosomal anomalies, as the adequate therapy and even the quality of life of patient depends largely on the knowledge of their anatomical and endocrine status. PMID:22138217

  2. Operative Treatment of Haglund Syndrome With Central Achilles Tendon-Splitting Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae Hoon; Ahn, Chi-Young; Byun, Chu-Hwan; Kim, Yoon-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Haglund syndrome is characterized by chronic posterior heel pain associated with a posterosuperior calcaneal prominence. We assessed the clinical and radiologic outcomes after operative treatment of Haglund syndrome using the central tendon-splitting approach. Fifteen feet in 15 patients were investigated retrospectively after surgery. Of the 15 patients, 14 were males (93.3%) and 1 was female (6.7%). Their mean age was 33.1 ± 8.2 (range 20 to 50) years. The mean follow-up duration was 3.5 ± 1.5 years (range 24 to 90 months). The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot Scale and Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles scores were investigated to assess the clinical outcomes. Patient satisfaction was assessed at the latest follow-up visit. The lateral talo-first metatarsal angle, calcaneal pitch angle, Fowler-Philip angle, and parallel pitch line were measured to assess the foot shape and radiographic outcomes. Clinically, the mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scale score increased from 62.1 ± 7.5 preoperatively to 92.5 ± 3.5 at the latest follow-up visit. The mean Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles score increased from 53.2 ± 7.4 to 89.6 ± 3.4. All patients were satisfied with the operative results. Radiographically, all patients had cavus feet with an increased lateral talo-first metatarsal angle (mean +5.9° ± 5.0°) and calcaneal pitch angle (mean 26.0° ± 3.8°). The mean Fowler-Philip angle decreased from 58.9° ± 15.0° to 32.5° ± 7.2° postoperatively, and the positive parallel pitch line had changed to a negative value in all cases. Operative treatment with the central tendon-splitting approach appears to be safe and satisfactory for intractable Haglund syndrome. PMID:26232175

  3. Imaging Findings of Central Nervous System Vasculitis Associated with Goodpasture's Syndrome: a Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jee Young; Ahn, Kook Jin; Jung, Jung Im; Jung, So Lyung; Kim, Bum Soo; Hahn, Seong Tae [College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    We report a rare case of CNS vasculitis associated with Goodpasture's syndrome in a 34-year-old man, who presented with a seizure and sudden onset of right sided weakness. He also had recurrent hemoptysis of one month's duration. Goodpasture's syndrome is histologically diagnosed by intense linear deposits of IgG along the glomerular basement membrane in both renal and lung tissues. oodpasture's syndrome is a rare disease, characterized by rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage and circulating antiglomerular basement membrane antibody (anti-GBM antibody). Central nervous system (CNS) manifestations in Goodpasture's syndrome are extremely rare, with only a few cases having been reported in the literature (8 10). Therefore, we present our imaging findings of CNS vasculitis associated with Goodpasture's syndrome, together with a review of the relevant literature. In summary, CNS vasculitis associated with Goodpasture's syndrome is extremely rare. Awareness of the imaging findings, as well as the clinical significance of CNS vasculitis associated with Goodpasture's syndrome, can be helpful in making the correct diagnosis and subsequent management of this rare condition.

  4. Bilateral Central Retinal Vein Occlusions Combined with Artery Occlusions in A Patient with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Wen; Xuemei Chen; Haitai Li; Ruiduan Liao; Dezheng Wu

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This is the first report of a bilateral nonischemic central retinal vein occlusionscombined with artery occlusions in a patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome(AIDS). Methods: Case report. Results: A 22-year-old Chinese(male) with a positive human immunodeficiency virus(HIV) infection developed bilateral nonischemic central retinal vein occlusions combinedwith artery occlusions and severe vision loss. The manifestations of the fundus andfluorescein angiography were similar in both eyes.Conclusion: This case report provides the evidences that central retinal vein and arteryocclusions are probably part of the spectrum of AIDS vascular diseases.

  5. Systemic 5-fluorouracil treatment causes a syndrome of delayed myelin destruction in the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Ruolan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer treatment with a variety of chemotherapeutic agents often is associated with delayed adverse neurological consequences. Despite their clinical importance, almost nothing is known about the basis for such effects. It is not even known whether the occurrence of delayed adverse effects requires exposure to multiple chemotherapeutic agents, the presence of both chemotherapeutic agents and the body's own response to cancer, prolonged damage to the blood-brain barrier, inflammation or other such changes. Nor are there any animal models that could enable the study of this important problem. Results We found that clinically relevant concentrations of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; a widely used chemotherapeutic agent were toxic for both central nervous system (CNS progenitor cells and non-dividing oligodendrocytes in vitro and in vivo. Short-term systemic administration of 5-FU caused both acute CNS damage and a syndrome of progressively worsening delayed damage to myelinated tracts of the CNS associated with altered transcriptional regulation in oligodendrocytes and extensive myelin pathology. Functional analysis also provided the first demonstration of delayed effects of chemotherapy on the latency of impulse conduction in the auditory system, offering the possibility of non-invasive analysis of myelin damage associated with cancer treatment. Conclusions Our studies demonstrate that systemic treatment with a single chemotherapeutic agent, 5-FU, is sufficient to cause a syndrome of delayed CNS damage and provide the first animal model of delayed damage to white-matter tracts of individuals treated with systemic chemotherapy. Unlike that caused by local irradiation, the degeneration caused by 5-FU treatment did not correlate with either chronic inflammation or extensive vascular damage and appears to represent a new class of delayed degenerative damage in the CNS.

  6. Long-standing meningomyelocele can be a predictor of difficult airway and postoperative hypoventilation: challenge to the anaesthesiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Arijit; Khanna, Puneet; Singh, Abhishek; Sharma, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    A 15-year-old female patient presented with severe pain in the abdomen and obstructive uropathy. She underwent Yang-Monti ileovesicostomy under general anaesthesia. She is a known case of long-standing meningomyelocele (MMC) and presented with its potential complications such as difficult airway and restrictive lung disease. We describe the successful anaesthetic management of a case of anticipated difficult airway and postoperative hypoventilation as a sequel of kyphosis due to MMC. Her airway was secured with fibre optic-guided intubation in a semirecumbent position. Postoperative hypoventilation, hypercarbia and respiratory acidosis were managed conservatively, followed by staged weaning in the intensive care unit. Obstruction of the catheterisable continent channel of the neurogenic bladder itself may present with uropathy and urosepsis, which were also taken care of preoperatively. PMID:26884079

  7. Anterior cervical surgery methods for central cord syndrome without radiographic spinal fracture-dislocation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengwei JING; Qin FU; Xiaojun XU

    2009-01-01

    This study was aimed to explore the anterior cervical surgery methods to treat central cord syndrome without radiographic spinal fracture-dislocation (CCSWORFD), retrospectively analyze the cases of CCSWORFD, and evaluate the curative effect of anterior cervical surgery methods for CCSWORFD. Twenty four cases of CCSWORFD (19 males and 5 females), all suffering from cervical hyperextension injury, between 45-68 (average 59) years old, were operated on by anterior cervical surgery methods. Among these, 18 cases had been followed up for 6-24 (average 15) months; 18 cases, who had anterior decompression and plate fixation with titanium mesh bone grafting or iliac bone grafting achieved reliable effects based on the Japanese Orthopedics Association (JOA) evaluation (improved scores of cases with titanium mesh bone grafting, t = 2.800, P0.05). Most of these cases had degeneration of cervical vertebra. The decompression which relieves the oppression to the spinal cord can help lessen edema of the spinal cord, and early fixation for stability of cervical vertebra is better for the recovery of spinal cord injury. Anterior operation with titanium mesh bone grafting or iliac bone grafting are both reliable curative methods for CCSWORFD, and titanium mesh bone grafting can avoid the trauma of the supplying graft. Mesh bone grafting can also shorten hospital stay.

  8. Central nervous system involvement in primary Sjögren's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yu DONG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and imaging data of 4 cases of primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS combined with central nervous system (CNS lesions were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical symptoms of 4 patients were as follows: 2 cases had fever; 2 cases had blurred vision; 2 cases had lower extremity weakness; one case had single lower limb weakness; one case had unilateral limb weakness; one case had hemisensory reduction; one case had bilateral abducens paralysis; 3 cases had peripheral neuropathy. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF revealed increased CSF pressure (210-270 mm H2O in 3 cases, increased number of leukocyte [(50-380 × 10 6/L] in 3 cases, and increased protein (1.30-2.56 g/L in 3 cases. Brain MRI showed multiple lesions in white matters. After high-dose steroid therapy, 3 cases had good prognosis, and one had recurrent lower extremity weakness after 6 months. pSS combined with CNS lesions is rare. Lumbar puncture and brain MRI is important for diagnosis, and high-dose steroid therapy may have good therapeutic effect. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.04.014

  9. Endocrine management of children with Prader–Willi syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medeiros CB

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Clarice Borschiver Medeiros,1 Ana Paula Bordallo,1 Flavio Moutinho Souza,2 Paulo Ferrez Collett-Solberg1,31Endocrinology Unit, Departamento de Medicina Interna, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 2Pediatric Endocrinology Unit, Departamento de Pediatria, Hospital Federal Cardoso Fontes – Ministério da Saúde do Brasil, Brasília, Brazil; 3Laboratório de Pesquisas Clínicas e Experimentais em Biologia Vascular (BioVasc, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilAbstract: Prader–Willi syndrome is a rare genetic condition afflicting nearly 1/15,000 live births. Clinical features include neonatal hypotonia, poor weight gain in early infancy followed by binge eating from childhood to adulthood, severe obesity, developmental delay, short stature, and hypogonadism of both central and peripheral etiology. Central hypothyroidism and adrenal insufficiency may occur. Sleep disordered breathing, by obstruction of upper airways associated with central hypoventilation, is a common feature. Most of these characteristics are assumed to be the result of a hypothalamic dysfunction. The most important complication and the most difficult to manage is the obesity. This review aims at discussing the most recent strategies to manage the endocrine complications of Prader–Willi syndrome patients, with a special approach on the treatment of obesity, hypogonadism, and short stature. We summarize the indication and effects of recombinant human growth hormone therapy on growth, cognitive development, and body composition, and discuss the effects of recombinant human growth hormone therapy on the resulting sleep disorders.Keywords: Prader–Willi syndrome, obesity, hypogonadism, growth hormone, sleep disorder

  10. Unilateral central retinal artery occlusion as the sole presenting sign of Susac syndrome in a young man: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Luiza dos Apóstolos-Pereira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 24-year-old man presenting with sudden visual loss in the left eye from a central retinal artery occlusion. An extensive clinical investigation revealed no etiology. Three weeks later, however, the patient developed hearing loss followed by encephalopathy and multiple branch retinal artery occlusions in the right eye. Fluorescein angiography confirmed retinal vascular occlusions with no sign of vasculitis. The neurological examination revealed a diffuse encephalopathy while the MRI scan disclosed several small areas of infarcts in the brain. Bilateral sensorineural hearing loss was confirmed on audiometry. The patient was diagnosed with Susac syndrome and treated with methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide, resulting in slight improvement and stabilization. This case shows that Susac syndrome may be diagnosed late due to the absence at onset of one or more of the symptoms of the classic triad (encephalopathy, multiple branch retinal artery occlusions and hearing loss. This case also serves to emphasize that Susac syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of central retinal artery occlusion, even in apparently healthy young men.

  11. Central nervous system PET-CT imaging reveals regional impairments in pediatric patients with Wolfram syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Zmyslowska

    Full Text Available Wolfram syndrome (WFS is inherited as an autosomal recessive disease with main clinical features of diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, diabetes insipidus and deafness. However, various neurological defects may also be detected. The aim of this study was to evaluate aspects of brain structure and function using PET-CT (positron emission tomography and computed tomography and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric patients with WFS. Regional changes in brain glucose metabolism were measured using standardized uptake values (SUVs based on images of (18F fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG uptake in 7 WFS patients aged 10.1-16.0 years (mean 12.9±2.4 and in 20 healthy children aged 3-17.9 years (mean 12.8±4.1. In all patients the diagnosis of WFS was confirmed by DNA sequencing of the WFS1 gene. Hierarchical clustering showed remarkable similarities of glucose uptake patterns among WFS patients and their differences from the control group. SUV data were subsequently standardized for age groups 13 years old to account for developmental differences. Reduced SUVs in WFS patients as compared to the control group for the bilateral brain regions such as occipital lobe (-1.24±1.20 vs. -0.13±1.05; p = 0.028 and cerebellum (-1.11±0.69 vs. -0.204±1.00; p = 0.036 were observed and the same tendency for cingulate (-1.13±1.05 vs. -0.15±1.12; p = 0.056, temporal lobe (-1.10±0.98 vs. -0.15±1.10; p = 0.057, parietal lobe (-1.06±1.20 vs. -0.08±1.08; p = 0.058, central region (-1.01±1.04 vs. -0.09±1.06; p = 0.060, basal ganglia (-1.05±0.74 vs. -0.20±1.07; p = 0.066 and mesial temporal lobe (-1.06±0.82 vs. -0.26±1.08; p = 0.087 was also noticed. After adjusting for multiple hypothesis testing, the differences in glucose uptake were non-significant. For the first time, regional differences in brain glucose metabolism among patients with WFS were shown using PET-CT imaging.

  12. Animal models of Central Diabetes Insipidus: Human relevance of acquired beyond hereditary syndromes and the role of oxytocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Antonio; Mahía, Javier; Puerto, Amadeo

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to review different animal models of Central Diabetes Insipidus, a neurobiological syndrome characterized by the excretion of copious amounts of diluted urine (polyuria), a consequent water intake (polydipsia), and a rise in the serum sodium concentration (hypernatremia). In rodents, Central Diabetes Insipidus can be caused by genetic disorders (Brattleboro rats) but also by various traumatic/surgical interventions, including neurohypophysectomy, pituitary stalk compression, hypophysectomy, and median eminence lesions. Regardless of its etiology, Central Diabetes Insipidus affects the neuroendocrine system that secretes arginine vasopressin, a neurohormone responsible for antidiuretic functions that acts trough the renal system. However, most Central Diabetes Insipidus models also show disorders in other neurobiological systems, specifically in the secretion of oxytocin, a neurohormone involved in body sodium excretion. Although the hydromineral behaviors shown by the different Central Diabetes Insipidus models have usually been considered as very similar, the present review highlights relevant differences with respect to these behaviors as a function of the individual neurobiological systems affected. Increased understanding of the relationship between the neuroendocrine systems involved and the associated hydromineral behaviors may allow appropriate action to be taken to correct these behavioral neuroendocrine deficits. PMID:27118135

  13. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes and primary angiitis of the central nervous system: clinical, imaging, and angiographic comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Aneesh B; Topcuoglu, Mehmet A; Fok, Joshua W; Kursun, Oguzhan; Nogueira, Raul G; Frosch, Matthew P; Caviness, Verne S

    2016-06-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes (RCVS) and primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) are invariably considered in the differential diagnosis of new cerebral arteriopathies. However, prompt and accurate diagnosis remains challenging. Here we compared the features of 159 RCVS to 47 PACNS patients and developed criteria for prompt bedside diagnosis. Recurrent thunderclap headache (TCH), and single TCH combined with either normal neuroimaging, border zone infarcts, or vasogenic edema, have 100% positive predictive value for diagnosing RCVS or RCVS-spectrum disorders. In patients without TCH and positive angiography, neuroimaging can discriminate RCVS (no lesion) from PACNS (deep/brainstem infarcts). Ann Neurol 2016;79:882-894. PMID:27043703

  14. Loss of myelinated axons is specific to the central nervous system in a mouse model of the fetal alcohol syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Parson, S H; Sojitra, N M

    1995-01-01

    We have previously developed a mouse model of the fetal alcohol syndrome, the outcome of which is a late loss of myelinated axons in the optic nerve of offspring of alcohol-treated mice between 9 and 15 wk of age. We have extended this study to investigate whether this axon loss is stable and specific to the central nervous system. Pregnant female (C57BL/6/Wlds x CBA) F1 mice were injected intraperitoneally with a single dose of a 25% solution of ethanol (v:w), on d 12 of gestation. Control a...

  15. Effects of steroids therapy and ACTH therapy on the central nervous system evaluated by CT. Nephrotic syndrome and infantile spasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xano, E.; Yamashita, F.; Aoki, N.i; Matsuishi, T. (Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine); Yamamoto, M.

    1981-05-01

    CT scanning revealed cerebral atrophy of various degrees in 12 of 15 cases of nephrotic syndrome in which ACTH therapy was given and also in all the 8 cases of infantile spasms in which ACTH therapy was given. CT findings of cerebral atrophy were analysed by computor and expressed in terms of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-space/intracranial space ratio (%). The ratio was 6.6 +- 3.9% in nephrotic syndrome, 16.4 +- 7.8% in infantile spasms, and 1.6 +- 0.8% in control, showing statistically significant differences among them. Abnormal CT findings of 12 cases of nephrotic syndrome returned to normal after withdrawal of steroids in 9 cases (75%). CT findings in 8 cases of infantile spasms also improved in all the cases after withdrawal of ACTH therapy. The results suggested that cerebral atrophy on CT scan is a reversible change. However, the effect of steroids and ACTH on the central nervous system is not sufficiently known yet. We should be very careful about long-term administration of great amount of steroids or ACTH to infants and children.

  16. Assessment of central chemosensitivity and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity using I-123 MIBG imaging in central sleep apnea syndrome in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodine-123 m-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging has been used to study cardiac sympathetic function in various cardiac diseases. Central sleep apnea syndrome (CSAS) occurs frequently in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and is reported to be associated with a poor prognosis. One of the mechanisms of its poor prognosis may be related to impaired cardiac sympathetic activity. However, the relationship between chemosensitivity to carbon dioxide, which is reported to correlate with the severity of CSAS, and cardiac sympathetic activity has not been investigated. Therefore, this study was undertaken to assess cardiac sympathetic function and chemosensitivity to carbon dioxide in CHF patients. The oxygen desaturation index (ODI) was evaluated in 21 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (male/female: 19/2, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)5 times/h underwent polysomnography. Patients with an apnea hypopnea index >15/h but without evidence of obstructive apnea were defined as having CSAS. Early (15 min) and delayed (4 hr) planar MIBG images were obtained from these patients. The mean counts in the whole heart and the mediastinum were obtained. The heart-to-mediastinum count ratio of the delayed image (H/M) and the corrected myocardial washout rate (WR) were also calculated. The central chemoreflex was assessed with the rebreathing method using a hypercapnic gas mixture (7% CO2 and 93% O2). Ten of the 21 patients had CSAS. The H/M ratio was similar in patients both with and without CSAS (1.57±0.18 vs. 1.59±0.14, p=0.82). However, the WR was higher in patients with CSAS than in patients without CSAS (40±8% vs. 30±12%, p<0.05). ODI significantly correlated with central chemosensitivity to carbon dioxide. Moreover, there was a highly significant correlation between WR and central chemosensitivity (r=0.65, p<0.05). However, there was no correlation between ODI and the WR (r=0.36, p=0.11). Cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with CHF and CSAS is

  17. Síndrome do incisivo central superior solitário: relato de caso Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Machado

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: a presença de um incisivo central superior solitário é um evento bastante incomum na população. A prevalência da chamada Síndrome do Incisivo Central Superior Solitário (SICSS é verificada em 1:50.000 nascimentos, sendo registrado um maior acometimento no sexo feminino. Essa alteração no desenvolvimento da oclusão dentária é caracterizada por más formações estruturais, sobretudo na região de linha média do paciente. O diagnóstico precoce e o tratamento adequado dessa síndrome são de grande importância, pois essa condição talvez seja um indicativo de que o paciente pode apresentar outras más formações congênitas severas, não devendo ser a SICSS considerada uma simples anomalia dentária. Os procedimentos ortodônticos, nesses casos, variam dependendo do grau de comprometimento das estruturas ósseas da maxila, da oclusão em si, e principalmente da sutura palatina mediana. OBJETIVO: discutir, baseado em evidências científicas, aspectos importantes relacionados à SICSS, bem como apresentar um caso clínico de paciente do sexo feminino com SICSS, que foi submetida a tratamento ortodôntico na Clínica Odontológica Integrada Infantil da Universidade Federal de Santa Maria / RS. CONCLUSÃO: pela análise crítica da literatura, verifica-se ser muito importante o diagnóstico correto e precoce acerca dessa síndrome, visto que há possibilidade da mesma estar associada a outros problemas de desenvolvimento. Além disso, o paciente acometido pela SICSS deve ser assistido por uma equipe multidisciplinar de saúde, de forma a otimizar os resultados clínicos e devolver-lhe qualidade de vida.INTRODUCTION: The presence of a single median maxillary central incisor is an uncommon event in the population. The prevalence of the Solitary Median Maxillary Central Incisor (SMMCI syndrome is about 1:50,000 live births, occurring more in women. This alteration in the development of the dental occlusion is

  18. Neutrophil-Associated Central Nervous System Inflammation in Tuberculous Meningitis Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Marais, Suzaan; Wilkinson, Katalin A.; Lesosky, Maia; Coussens, Anna K.; Deffur, Armin; Pepper, Dominique J.; Schutz, Charlotte; Ismail, Zahiera; Meintjes, Graeme; Wilkinson, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The immunopathogenesis of tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) remains incompletely understood, and we know of only 1 disease site-specific study of the underlying immunology; we recently showed that Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture positivity and increased neutrophils in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) are associated with TBM-IRIS. In this study we investigated inflammatory mediators at the diseas...

  19. [Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome:a case of report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Li-ying; Liu, Xin-qiang

    2014-04-01

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) is a rare dental anomaly characterized by a symmetric central incisor of normal size, developed and erupted precisely in the midline of the maxilla in both primary and permanent dentitions. SMMCI may occur alone or be associated with other midline structures defects of the body or other systemic disorders. The best known association is holoprosencephaly (HPE). This paper reported a case of SMMCI that companied with other midline structures defects of the body. PMID:24935855

  20. Metabolic syndrome in the rural population of Wardha, Central India: An exploratory factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep R Deshmukh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Metabolic syndrome - a plausible precondition for type II diabetes and cardiovascular diseases is also on rise. To understand the mechanistic complexity of metabolic syndrome it is imperative to study the specific contribution of the determinants of metabolic syndrome. Such study can help to identify the most significant factor which may be of use in early detection as well as prevention efforts. Such information is scarcely available from India and especially from rural India. Hence, the present study was undertaken to explore for such factor which might be considered crucial for development of such pathogenesis particularly in rural population of Wardha. Methods: A cross-sectional study comprising of 300 subjects was carried out in rural area of Primary Health Center, attached to medical college with approximate 31,000 populations. The anthropometric parameters such as height, weight, waist circumference were measured. Overnight fasting samples were collected for lipid profile (total cholesterol, triglyceride, high density lipoproteins, low density lipoproteins, very low density lipoproteins and fasting blood glucose levels. The National Cholesterol Education Programme Adult Treatment Panel, ATP-III guidelines were used to categorize the study subjects. As many of the variables are highly intercorrelated, exploratory factor analysis was carried out to reduce the data to a smaller number of independent factors that accounts for the most of the variances in the data. Principal component analysis was used as a method of extraction. Results: For both sexes, three factors were extracted accounting for about 71% variance in the measured variables. An adiposity factor which accounted for highest explained variance (28%, was the initial factor extracted. It was loaded positively by waist circumference, triglyceride, and very low density lipoprotein and negatively loaded by high density lipoprotein. Second factor extracted

  1. Preschool weight and body mass index in relation to central obesity and metabolic syndrome in adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Lise; Sørensen, Thorkild; Petersen, Liselotte;

    2014-01-01

    Artiklen ser på vægt og BMI i alderen 0-5 år, og de to faktorers betydning for overvægt og metabolisk syndrom i voksenalderen. Studiet viser, at der er en lineær sammenhæng mellem vægt (0-1 år) og BMI (2-5 år) og senere BMI og taljeomfang. Studiet viser også, at børn, der ligger blandt de øverste...

  2. The prevalence and etiology of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS as a cause of female infertility in central Travancore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Roy George

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent alarming rise in the incidence of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, the most common cause of female infertility is becoming a major concern among adolescent women worldwide. Altered hormonal and metabolic profiles are one of the common clinical manifestations in PCOS. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and the etiology of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS as a cause of female infertility in Central Travancore women, in view of their change in life style. In this cross sectional study, a consecutive series of 500 women (20-35 who were subjected to infertility treatment at specialist infertility clinics in Kottayam, Pathanamthitta and Alappuzha districts were selected. About 20 healthy volunteer females with regular menstrual cycles aged between 20 to 35 years were considered as the control. The data were collected from hospital records as well as using an investigator administered questionnaire. All data were tabulated and were subjected to statistical analysis using student’s‘t’ test, ANOVA and correlation. According to the findings of this study, PCOS is one of the most common causes of female infertility in Central Travancore women due to change in life style factors and unhealthy dietary patterns. The PCOS patients in our study also showed a wide range of hormonal and metabolic abnormalities. Insulin, FSH, LH, LH: FSH ratio, testosterone, prolactin, thyroxin (T4 , progesterone, glucose and cholesterol levels were increased in PCOS. The adoption of their unhealthy dietary habits and lack of exercise are key to improving chances of these hormonal and metabolic imbalances and increasing risks of PCOS among them.

  3. Distribution of Wfs1 protein in the central nervous system of the mouse and its relation to clinical symptoms of the Wolfram syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luuk, H.; Koks, S.; Plaas, M.; Hannibal, J.; Vasar, E.; Rehfeld, Jens Frederik

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the coding region of the WFS1 gene cause Wolfram syndrome, a rare multisystem neurodegenerative disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance. Patients with Wolfram syndrome display considerable clinical pleiomorphism, and symptoms such as neurological complications and psychiatric...... enrichment of Wf1 protein in the central extended amygdala and ventral striatum. Prominent Wfs1 expression was seen in the hippocampal CA1 region, parasubiculum, superficial part of the second and third layers of the prefrontal cortex and proisocortical areas, hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory system...... neurological and psychiatric symptoms found in Wolfram syndrome. Enrichment of Wfs1 protein in the central extended amygdala suggests a role in the modulation of anxiety and fear Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8/20...

  4. The Effects of Lamotrigine on Pain, Sleep, and Mood in Refractory Form of Central Post-Stroke Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Petramfar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Central post-stroke pain (CPSP is a distressingpain syndrome, sometimes become refractory to the conventionalpain managements. Anticonvulsants have been used toalleviate different central pains. Lamotrigine is a novel anticonvulsantand its proper dosage and its efficacy have notbeen well studied yet. The aim of this study was to evaluatethe effect of 100 mg lamotrigine on refractory form of CPSP.Methods: The medical files of 17 patients with CPSP who hadnot responded to the other drugs and were treated with lamotriginewere studied. Using Brief Pain Inventory, pain, sleepand mood were assessed before, and after 8 and 24 weeks oftreatment.Results: After 24 weeks, 70.5 % of the patients responded tolamotrigine, and there was an improvement of 2.41 in themean score of average pain (P=0.001.Conclusion: Lamotrigine 100 mg daily was effective in thetreatment of refractory CPSP, and might be prescribed beforeplanning for more aggressive surgical managements.Iran J Med Sci 2010; 35(4: 299-303.

  5. Pathology of tissue loss (white syndrome) in Acropora sp. corals from the Central Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Aeby, Greta S.

    2011-01-01

    We performed histological examination of 69 samples of Acropora sp. manifesting different types of tissue loss (Acropora White Syndrome-AWS) from Hawaii, Johnston Atoll and American Samoa between 2002 and 2006. Gross lesions of tissue loss were observed and classified as diffuse acute, diffuse subacute, and focal to multifocal acute to subacute. Corals with acute tissue loss manifested microscopic evidence of necrosis sometimes associated with ciliates, helminths, fungi, algae, sponges, or cyanobacteria whereas those with subacute tissue loss manifested mainly wound repair. Gross lesions of AWS have multiple different changes at the microscopic level some of which involve various microorganisms and metazoa. Elucidating this disease will require, among other things, monitoring lesions over time to determine the pathogenesis of AWS and the potential role of tissue-associated microorganisms in the genesis of tissue loss. Attempts to experimentally induce AWS should include microscopic examination of tissues to ensure that potentially causative microorganisms associated with gross lesion are not overlooked.

  6. Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome: clinical case with a novel mutation of sonic hedgehog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavelli, Livia; Zanacca, C; Caselli, G; Banchini, G; Dubourg, C; David, V; Odent, S; Gurrieri, F; Neri, G

    2004-05-15

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) is a rare dental anomaly. It is usually considered as a minor manifestation of holoprosencephaly (HPE). Some reported families had severe cases of HPE in some members and SMMCI in others. Mutations of Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) have been documented in these families. SMMCI has also been found as an isolated finding or together with other anomalies such as microcephaly, short stature, endocrine pathology, and choanal atresia. We describe a patient with SMMCI and a novel SHH mutation: Val332Ala. PMID:15103725

  7. Ictal central apnea and bradycardia in temporal lobe epilepsy complicated by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Nishimura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 12-year-old boy who developed temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE with daily complex partial seizures (CPS and monthly generalized seizures. Moreover, he frequently snored while asleep since early childhood. Polysomnography (PSG revealed severe obstructive sleep apnea with apnea–hypopnea index (AHI of 37.8/h. Video-PSG with simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG recording captured two ictal apneic episodes during sleep, without any motor manifestations. The onset of rhythmic theta activity in the midtemporal area on EEG was preceded by the onset of apnea by several seconds and disappeared soon after cessation of central apnea. One episode was accompanied by ictal bradycardia of <48 beats/min which persisted for 50 s beyond the end of epileptic activity. After treatment with carbamazepine and tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy, the seizures were well controlled and AHI decreased to 2.5/h. Paroxysmal discharges also disappeared during this time. Uncontrolled TLE complicated by sleep apnea should be evaluated for the presence of ictal central apnea/bradycardia.

  8. Disease: H00916 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hing. It is frequently associated with a broad spectrum of dysautonomic symptoms, suggesting the involve...e (CCHS) is a disorder characterized by an idiopathic failure of the automatic control of breat...ion of pontine noradrenergic neurons and patterning of central respiratory output. Neuroscience 130:95-105 (2005) ... ...H00916 Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) Congenital central hypoventilation syndrom...ment of genes widely expressed in the autonomic nervous system. In particular, th

  9. Extensive Central Nervous System Cryptococcal Disease Presenting as Immune Reconstitution Syndrome in a Patient with Advanced HIV: Report of a Case and Review of Management Dilemmas and Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuagu, Onyema; Villanueva, Merceditas

    2014-11-19

    One of the complications of the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART), immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), is particularly problematic in the management of cryptococcal meningitis. We present the case of a 35-year-old male with acquired immune deficiency syndrome diagnosed with extensive central nervous system (CNS) cryptococcal disease, including meningitis and multiple intracranial cysts, diagnosed eight weeks after the initiation of ART. The patient experienced a relapsing and remitting clinical course despite repeated courses of potent antifungal therapy and aggressive management of raised intracranial pressure. This review highlights therapeutic dilemmas and strategies in the management of CNS cryptococcosis complicated with IRIS and highlights gaps in available treatment guidelines. PMID:25568756

  10. Acute Cerebrovascular Radiation Syndrome: Radiation Neurotoxicity , mechanisms of CNS radiation injury, advanced countermeasures for Radiation Protection of Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    Key words: Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome (Cv ARS), Radiation Neurotoxins (RNT), Neurotransmitters, Radiation Countermeasures, Antiradiation Vaccine (ArV), Antiradiation Blocking Antibodies, Antiradiation Antidote. Psychoneuroimmunology, Neurotoxicity. ABSTRACT: To review the role of Radiation Neurotoxins in triggering, developing of radiation induced central nervous system injury. Radiation Neurotoxins - rapidly acting blood toxic lethal agent, which activated after irradiation and concentrated, circulated in interstitial fluid, lymph, blood with interactions with cell membranes, receptors and cell compartments. Radiation Neurotoxins - biological molecules with high enzymatic activity and/or specific lipids and activated or modified after irradiation. The Radiation Neurotoxins induce increased permeability of blood vessels, disruption of the blood-brain barrier, blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and developing severe disorder of blood macro- and micro-circulation. Principles of Radiation Psychoneuro-immunology and Psychoneuro-allergology were applied for determination of pathological processes developed after irradiation or selective administration of Radiation Neurotoxins to radiation naïve mammals. Effects of radiation and exposure to radiation can develop severe irreversible abnormalities of Central Nervous System, brain structures and functions. Antiradiation Vaccine - most effective, advanced methods of protection, prevention, mitigation and treatment and was used for of Acute Radiation Syndromes and elaboration of new technology for immune-prophylaxis and immune-protection against ϒ, Heavy Ion, Neutron irradiation. Results of experiments suggested that blocking, antitoxic, antiradiation antibodies can significantly reduce toxicity of Radiation Toxins. New advanced technology include active immune-prophylaxis with Antiradiation Vaccine and Antiradiation therapy that included specific blocking antibodies to Radiation Neurotoxins

  11. Loss of myelinated axons is specific to the central nervous system in a mouse model of the fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parson, S H; Sojitra, N M

    1995-12-01

    We have previously developed a mouse model of the fetal alcohol syndrome, the outcome of which is a late loss of myelinated axons in the optic nerve of offspring of alcohol-treated mice between 9 and 15 wk of age. We have extended this study to investigate whether this axon loss is stable and specific to the central nervous system. Pregnant female (C57BL/6/Wlds x CBA) F1 mice were injected intraperitoneally with a single dose of a 25% solution of ethanol (v:w), on d 12 of gestation. Control animals were given a similar volume of saline at the same time. Litters were taken at 12 (n = 18) and 23 (n = 26) wk of age. Optic nerves only from 12-wk-old, and optic, tibial and saphenous nerves from 23-wk-old mice were removed. A systematic, random sampling method was used to estimate the cross-sectional area of whole nerves from semi thin sections, and the numbers and diameters of myelinated axons from ultrathin sections. There were no differences for the optic nerves of 12-wk-old alcohol-treated and control animals. Optic nerves from the alcohol-treated group at 23 wk had smaller cross-sectional areas and approximately 17% fewer myelinated axons than control nerves. These results confirm that axon loss occurs between 12 and 15 wk, and demonstrate that there is no additional loss of myelinated axons between 15 and 23 wk. In contrast, there were no significant differences in cross-sectional area, number of myelinated axons or axon calibre spectra for the tibial and saphenous nerves between the alcohol-treated and control groups. There was thus no evidence of a peripheral neuropathy as has been observed in chronic alcoholic subjects. In this 'binge' model of the fetal alcohol syndrome, a carefully timed dose of alcohol is administered during pregnancy to coincide with a critical period of development of the visual system. The result is a teratogenic effect which is specific to the central nervous system, stable and reproducible, with no obvious effect on the peripheral

  12. BURNOUT SYNDROME, JOB SATISFACTION LEVELS AND RELATED FACTORS IN CENTRAL TRABZON PROVINCE PRIMARY HEALTH CENTER WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asuman YAVUZYILMAZ

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Burnout manifests itself in individuals working in professions involving face-to-face contact with the public in depersonalization towards others, feelings of emotional exhaustion, and reduced feelings of personal achievement and adequacy. The objective in this study was to determine burnout and job satisfaction levels and related factors in primary health center personnel in the central part of the Turkish province of Trabzon. A total of 227 people working in central Trabzon province primary health centers participated in this cross-sectional study, a level of 90.4%. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used to determine burnout level and the Job Satisfaction Inventory for job satisfaction. Burnout levels in health personnel were high among women (15.06±5.57, married individuals (14.80±5.65 and those dissatisfied with their working conditions (16.80±5.81; physicians (5.00±2.79, those without children (5.19±2.54, those whose spouses were not working (4.69±2.70 and smokers (4.71±3.29 had a high level of depersonalization; and married individuals were determined to have a low personal achievement level (10.24±4.14 (p=0.020, p=0.028, p=0.011, p=0.038, p=0.028, p=0.012 and p=0.010, respectively. In conclusion, gender, marital status, age, satisfaction with working conditions and income level were determined to be related to burnout and job satisfaction. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(1.000: 41-50

  13. BURNOUT SYNDROME, JOB SATISFACTION LEVELS AND RELATED FACTORS IN CENTRAL TRABZON PROVINCE PRIMARY HEALTH CENTER WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat TOPBAS

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Burnout manifests itself in individuals working in professions involving face-to-face contact with the public in depersonalization towards others, feelings of emotional exhaustion, and reduced feelings of personal achievement and adequacy. The objective in this study was to determine burnout and job satisfaction levels and related factors in primary health center personnel in the central part of the Turkish province of Trabzon. A total of 227 people working in central Trabzon province primary health centers participated in this cross-sectional study, a level of 90.4%. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used to determine burnout level and the Job Satisfaction Inventory for job satisfaction. Burnout levels in health personnel were high among women (15.06±5.57, married individuals (14.80±5.65 and those dissatisfied with their working conditions (16.80±5.81; physicians (5.00±2.79, those without children (5.19±2.54, those whose spouses were not working (4.69±2.70 and smokers (4.71±3.29 had a high level of depersonalization; and married individuals were determined to have a low personal achievement level (10.24±4.14 (p=0.020, p=0.028, p=0.011, p=0.038, p=0.028, p=0.012 and p=0.010, respectively. In conclusion, gender, marital status, age, satisfaction with working conditions and income level were determined to be related to burnout and job satisfaction. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(1: 41-50

  14. Role of microglia and astrocyte in central pain syndrome following electrolytic lesion at the spinothalamic tract in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Kobra; Saghaei, Elham; Abbaszadeh, Fatemeh; Afhami, Mina; Haeri, Ali; Rahimi, Farzaneh; Jorjani, Masoumeh

    2013-03-01

    Central pain syndrome (CPS) is a debilitating state and one of the consequences of spinal cord injury in patients. Many pathophysiological aspects of CPS are not well documented. Spinal glia activation has been identified as a key factor in the sensory component of chronic pain. In this study, the role of glial subtypes in the process of CPS induced by unilateral electrolytic lesion of spinothalamic tract (STT) is investigated. Male rats received a laminectomy at T8-T9 and then unilateral electrolytic lesion centered on the STT. Thermal and mechanical thresholds as well as locomotor function were measured on days 0, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 post-injuries by tail flick, von Frey filament, and open field tests, respectively. To investigate the spinal glial activation following denervation in STT-lesioned groups, Iba1 and GFAP were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting at the same time points. Data showed that STT lesion significantly decreased thermal pain at day 3 in comparison with sham groups. Significant bilateral allodynia appeared in hind paws at day 14 after spinal cord injury and continued to day 28 (P < 0.05). Additionally, electrolytic spinal lesion attenuated locomotor function of injured animals after 7 days (P < 0.05). In both histological assessments and Western blotting, Iba1 increased at days 3 and 7 while increased GFAP occurred from day 14 to 28 after lesion. It appears that microglial activation is important in the early stages of pain development and astrocytic activation occurs later. These events may lead to behavioral outcomes especially central neuropathic pain. PMID:22722907

  15. MR findings of central nervous system involvement in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patient : a report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central nervous system (CNS) manifestations in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients are an early and common feature. The spectrum of AIDS-related CNS diseases are encephalitis caused by the human immunodeficiency virus(HIV) itself, opportunistic infection, infarct and malignancy. We experienced two cases of CNS involvement in AIDS and they were serologically diagnosed as HIV encephalitis and CNS toxoplasmosis, respectively. In the case of the HIV encephalitis patient, brain MRI showed a non-enhancing lesion with high signal intensity on T2WI and low signal on T1WI and there was no mass effect on the right frontal lobe, periventricular white matter, splenium of the corpus callosum or bilateral basal ganglia. In the other case of CNS toxoplasmosis, MR showed multiple nodular and rim enhanced mass lesions in the right basal ganglia, thalamus and periventricular white matter, which were of low signal intensity on T1WI and of high intensity on T2WI. We thus report the related MRI findings

  16. Central obesity and atherogenic dyslipidemia in metabolic syndrome are associated with increased risk for colorectal adenoma in a Chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Tsann

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS is composed of cardiovascular risk factors including insulin resistance, obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Most of the components of MetS have been linked to the development of neoplasm. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between individual components of MetS and colorectal adenoma. Methods The study subjects were recruited from a pool of 4872 individuals who underwent a health check-up examination during the period January 2006 to May 2008. Each participant fulfilled a structured questionnaire. MetS was defined based on the America Heart Association and National Heart Lung Blood Institute criteria. Subjects with history of colon cancer, colon polyps, colitis, or prior colonic surgery were excluded. Results A total of 4122 subjects were included for final analysis (2367 men and 1755 women; mean age, 49.6 ± 11.7 years. Of them, MetS was diagnosed in 708 men (29.9% and in 367 women (20.9%. Among the patients with MetS, 34.6% had adenoma, 31.7% had hyperplastic polyps and 23.3% were polyp-free (p Conclusions Of the components of MetS analyzed in this study, central obesity and dyslipidemia are independent risk factors for colorectal adenoma. With regard to the prevention of colorectal neoplasm, life-style modification such as weight reduction is worthwhile.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging: early detection of central nervous system involvement in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central Nervous System (CNS) involvement, whether primary by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus - HIV - itself, or secondary (toxoplasmosis or lymphoma) is remarkably frequent in AIDS, in 40 to 70% of cases, depending upon the author. In order to study the natural history of this illness, a cohort of 25 asymptomatic seropositive patients have been established. Every 6 months these patients undergo biological and clinical examinations, as well as Magnetic Resonance brain scans. After two examinations at a 6 month's interval, the first results are reported. Out of these 25 cases, 9 present anomalies: One patient with diffuse cerebral atrophy and 8 others with high signal intensity areas on T2 weighted sequences, like those of the Multiple Sclerosis. No relationship could be demonstrated between the existence of these lesions and various criteria such as age, sex, risk factors and T4 cells count. The nature of these lesions is not lear. They certainly indicate early involvement of the CNS after primary infection by the HIV virus. They may either represent scars of the primary infection or early alterations announcing developing encephalopathy

  18. Central Cord Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI) is used to indicate the degree of spinal cord compression and vertebral instability. Vertebral instability due to acute traumatic injury or cervical disc herniation is often treated by surgery to ...

  19. Repositioning and Leaving In Situ the Central Venous Catheter During Percutaneous Treatment of Associated Superior Vena Cava Syndrome: A Report of Eight Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe a combined procedure of repositioning and leaving in situ a central venous catheter followed by immediate percutaneous treatment of associated superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS). Methods: Eight patients are presented who have central venous catheter-associated SVCS (n = 6 Hickman catheters, n = 2 Port-a-cath) caused by central vein stenosis (n = 4) or concomitant thrombosis (n = 4). With the use of a vascular snare introduced via the transcubital or transjugular approach, the tip of the central venous catheter could be engaged, and repositioned after deployment of a stent in the innominate or superior vena cava. Results: In all patients it was technically feasible to reposition the central venous catheter and treat the SVCS at the same time. In one patient flipping of the Hickman catheter in its original position provoked dislocation of the released Palmaz stent, which could be positioned in the right common iliac vein. Conclusion: Repositioning of a central venous catheter just before and after stent deployment in SVCS is technically feasible and a better alternative than preprocedural removal of the vascular access

  20. Sternoplasty and rib distraction in neonatal Jeune syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conroy, Eimear

    2010-09-01

    A 12-week-old boy with Jeune syndrome (asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy) was referred to the orthopaedic unit with progressive respiratory failure, recurrent respiratory tract infections, and recurrent admissions to the intensive care unit for ventilatory support. His chest x-ray revealed a small and narrow thoracic cage with short broad ribs and abnormal costal cartilages. His chest expansion was impaired by the short, horizontally positioned ribs resulting in alveolar hypoventilation. Without surgical intervention to expand his thoracic cage, he would die of respiratory failure.

  1. Extensive central nervous system cryptococcal disease presenting as immune reconstitution syndrome in a patient with advanced HIV: report of a case and review of management dilemmas and strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onyema Ogbuagu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the complications of the use of anti-retroviral therapy (ART, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS, is particularly problematic in the management of cryptococcal meningitis. We present the case of a 35- year-old male with acquired immune deficiency syndrome diagnosed with extensive central nervous system (CNS cryptococcal disease, including meningitis and multiple intracranial cysts, diagnosed eight weeks after the initiation of ART. The patient experienced a relapsing and remitting clinical course despite repeated courses of potent antifungal therapy and aggressive management of raised intracranial pressure. This review highlights therapeutic dilemmas and strategies in the management of CNS cryptococcosis complicated with IRIS and highlights gaps in available treatment guidelines.

  2. Dental trauma clinically mimicking single central incisor syndrome = Traumatismo dentário mimetizando clinicamente a síndrome do incisivo central único

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Rafaela Nogueira

    2012-01-01

    Objetivo: Apresentar um caso clínico de ausência de um incisivo central perdido por traumatismo e encaminhado ao ortodontista com suspeita de apresentar síndrome do incisivo central único (SMMCI). Descrição do caso: Paciente gênero feminino, 12 anos com queixa da aparência de seus dentes. Ao exame intrabucal observou-se a presença de um incisivo central único localizado na linha média sem espaçamentos em relação aos incisivos laterais superiores. A paciente relatou dois episódios de avulsã...

  3. Imbalance between thyroid hormones and the dopaminergic system might be central to the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jose Carlos; Pradella-Hallinan, Marcia; Lins Pessoa, Hugo de

    2010-05-01

    Data collected from medical literature indicate that dopaminergic agonists alleviate Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms while dopaminergic agonists antagonists aggravate them. Dopaminergic agonists is a physiological regulator of thyroid-stimulating hormone. Dopaminergic agonists infusion diminishes the levels of thyroid hormones, which have the ability to provoke restlessness, hyperkinetic states, tremors, and insomnia. Conditions associated with higher levels of thyroid hormones, such as pregnancy or hyperthyroidism, have a higher prevalence of Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms. Low iron levels can cause secondary Restless Legs Syndrome or aggravate symptoms of primary disease as well as diminish enzymatic activities that are involved in dopaminergic agonists production and the degradation of thyroid hormones. Moreover, as a result of low iron levels, dopaminergic agonists diminishes and thyroid hormones increase. Iron therapy improves Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms in iron deprived patients. Medical hypothesis. To discuss the theory that thyroid hormones, when not counterbalanced by dopaminergic agonists, may precipitate the signs and symptoms underpinning Restless Legs Syndrome. The main cause of Restless Legs Syndrome might be an imbalance between the dopaminergic agonists system and thyroid hormones. PMID:20535374

  4. Imbalance between thyroid hormones and the dopaminergic system might be central to the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome: a hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Carlos Pereira Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Data collected from medical literature indicate that dopaminergic agonists alleviate Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms while dopaminergic agonists antagonists aggravate them. Dopaminergic agonists is a physiological regulator of thyroid-stimulating hormone. Dopaminergic agonists infusion diminishes the levels of thyroid hormones, which have the ability to provoke restlessness, hyperkinetic states, tremors, and insomnia. Conditions associated with higher levels of thyroid hormones, such as pregnancy or hyperthyroidism, have a higher prevalence of Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms. Low iron levels can cause secondary Restless Legs Syndrome or aggravate symptoms of primary disease as well as diminish enzymatic activities that are involved in dopaminergic agonists production and the degradation of thyroid hormones. Moreover, as a result of low iron levels, dopaminergic agonists diminishes and thyroid hormones increase. Iron therapy improves Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms in iron deprived patients. Medical hypothesis. To discuss the theory that thyroid hormones, when not counterbalanced by dopaminergic agonists, may precipitate the signs and symptoms underpinning Restless Legs Syndrome. The main cause of Restless Legs Syndrome might be an imbalance between the dopaminergic agonists system and thyroid hormones.

  5. Effect of electroacupuncture on P2X3 receptor regulation in the peripheral and central nervous systems of rats with visceral pain caused by irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Z. J.; L. Y. Wu; Zhou, C. L.; Dou, C. Z.; Shi, Y; H. R. Liu; Wu, H. G.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of the purinergic receptor P2X3 in the peripheral and central nervous systems during acupuncture treatment for the visceral pain of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A total of 24 8-day-old Sprague–Dawley (SD) neonatal male rats (SPF grade) were stimulated using colorectal distention (CRD) when the rats were awake. The modeling lasted for 2 weeks with one stimulation per day. After 6 weeks, the rats were randomly divided into three groups of eigh...

  6. Imbalance between thyroid hormones and the dopaminergic system might be central to the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome: a hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Jose Carlos Pereira Jr.; Marcia Pradella-Hallinan; Hugo de Lins Pessoa

    2010-01-01

    Data collected from medical literature indicate that dopaminergic agonists alleviate Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms while dopaminergic agonists antagonists aggravate them. Dopaminergic agonists is a physiological regulator of thyroid-stimulating hormone. Dopaminergic agonists infusion diminishes the levels of thyroid hormones, which have the ability to provoke restlessness, hyperkinetic states, tremors, and insomnia. Conditions associated with higher levels of thyroid hormones, such as pregn...

  7. Síndrome do incisivo central superior solitário: relato de caso Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Machado; Patricia Machado; Betina Grehs; Renésio Armindo Grehs

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUÇÃO: a presença de um incisivo central superior solitário é um evento bastante incomum na população. A prevalência da chamada Síndrome do Incisivo Central Superior Solitário (SICSS) é verificada em 1:50.000 nascimentos, sendo registrado um maior acometimento no sexo feminino. Essa alteração no desenvolvimento da oclusão dentária é caracterizada por más formações estruturais, sobretudo na região de linha média do paciente. O diagnóstico precoce e o tratamento adequado dessa síndrome são...

  8. Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) and anti-GAD-related CNS degenerations: protean additions to the autoimmune central neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Fatima; Rowley, Merrill; Jayakrishnan, Bindu; Teuber, Suzanne; Gershwin, M Eric; Mackay, Ian R

    2011-09-01

    Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS) is a rare autoimmune neurological disease attributable to autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD) more usually associated with the islet beta cell destruction of autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D). SPS is characterized by interference in neurons with the synthesis/activity of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) resulting in the prototypic progressive spasmodic muscular rigidity of SPS, or diverse neurological syndromes, cerebellar ataxia, intractable epilepsy, myoclonus and several others. Remarkably, a single autoantibody, anti-GAD, can be common to widely different disease expressions, i.e. T1D and SPS. One explanation for these data is the differences in epitope engagement between the anti-GAD reactivity in SPS and T1D: in both diseases, anti-GAD antibody reactivity is predominantly to a conformational epitope region in the PLP- and C-terminal domains of the 65 kDa isoform but, additionally in SPS, there is reactivity to conformational epitope(s) on GAD67, and short linear epitopes in the C-terminal region and at the N-terminus of GAD65. Another explanation for disease expressions in SPS includes ready access of anti-GAD to antigen sites due to immune responsiveness within the CNS itself according to intrathecal anti-GAD-specific B cells and autoantibody. Closer study of the mysterious stiff-person syndrome should enhance the understanding of this disease itself, and autoimmunity in general. PMID:21680149

  9. Metabolic Syndrome in Italian Obese Children and Adolescents: Stronger Association with Central Fat Depot than with Insulin Sensitivity and Birth Weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Brufani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate whether body fat distribution, birth weight, and family history for diabetes (FHD were associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS in children and adolescents. Methods. A total of 439 Italian obese children and adolescents (5–18 years were enrolled. Subjects were divided into 2 groups: prepubertal and pubertal. MetS was diagnosed according to the adapted National Cholesterol Education Program criteria. Birth weight percentile, central obesity index (measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, insulin sensitivity (ISI, and disposition index were evaluated. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine variables associated with MetS. Results. The prevalence of MetS was 17%, with higher percentage in adolescents than in children (21 versus 12%. In the overall population, central obesity index was a stronger predictor of MetS than insulin sensitivity and low birth weight. When the two groups were considered, central fat depot remained the strongest predictor of MetS, with ISI similarly influencing the probability of MetS in the two groups and birth weight being negatively associated to MetS only in pubertal individuals. Neither FHD nor degree of fatness was a significant predictor of MetS. Conclusion. Simple clinical parameters like increased abdominal adiposity and low birth weight could be useful tools to identify European obese adolescents at risk for metabolic complications.

  10. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome involving the central nervous system in a patient with HIV infection: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffiri, Lorenzo; Verma, Rajanshu; Struzzieri, Kevin; Monterroso, Joanne; Batts, Donald H; Loehrke, Mark E

    2013-01-01

    IRIS is described as a paradoxical deterioration of clinical status upon initiation of combined anti-retroviral therapy (cART) in patients with HIV infection. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (CNS-IRIS) involving the central nervous system is rarely reported. We describe the case of 57-year-old man who developed a fatal case of CNS- IRIS. A rapid deterioration of neurological status was associated with progression of patchy T2-weighted hyperintensities involving different vascular territories on brain MRI. Diagnosis of CNS-IRIS is based of laboratory and radiologic findings, however brain biopsy is supportive. Despite immune restoration being involved in clinical deterioration, discontinuation of cART is not recommended. The use of corticosteroids is highly controversial. Prompt recognition of CNS-IRIS is crucial for preventing neurological complications and ensuing sequelae. PMID:23435821

  11. [Case of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder associated with central pontine and extrapontine myelinolysis preceded by syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Waka; Matsui, Naoko; Fujita, Koji; Izumi, Yuishin; Nishida, Yoshihiko; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Kaji, Ryuji

    2014-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman complained of general malaise. She presented with hyponatremia and plasma osmotic pressure was lower than urinary osmotic pressure. In addition, serum antidiuretic hormone level was higher than the measurement sensitivity. She was diagnosed with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). She fell into a coma despite correction of serum sodium level. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed high signal intensities in the cerebral cortex, striatum, thalamus, hypothalamus, midbrain, and pons in fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. Spinal MRI revealed a longitudinally extending lesion in the cervical cord. Serum sample was positive for anti-aquaporin-4 antibody, supporting the diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) combined with central pontine and extrapontine myelinolysis. In patients with NMOSD, the immune reaction can gradually cause destructive changes of the hypothalamus and lead to unstable ADH secretion in the absence of immunomodulatory treatment. PMID:25087556

  12. Moderate voluntary exercise attenuates the metabolic syndrome in melanocortin-4 receptor-deficient rats showing central dopaminergic dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Obici

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Central dopamine dysregulation during VWR reinforces the link between MC4R function and molecular and behavioral responding to rewards. The data also suggest that exercise can be a successful lifestyle intervention in MC4R-haploinsufficient individuals despite reduced positive reinforcement during exercise training.

  13. The acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symptoms and signs from medical aspects resulting from whole body exposure, or in the main part, to ionizing radiation are described. The dose-response relationship is studied and the exposure is divided in three parts: central nervous system syndrome, gastrointestinal syndrome and hematopoietic syndrome. Brief comments about the treatment are reported. (M.A.C.)

  14. Central leptin insufficiency syndrome: an interactive etiology for obesity, metabolic and neural diseases and for designing new therapeutic interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Kalra, Satya P.

    2007-01-01

    This review critically reappraises recent scientific evidence concerning central leptin insufficiency versus leptin resistance formulations to explain metabolic and neural disorders resulting from subnormal or defective leptin signaling in various sites in the brain. Research at various fronts to unravel the complexities of the neurobiology of leptin is surveyed to provide a comprehensive account of the neural and metabolic effects of environmentally-imposed fluctuations in leptin availabilit...

  15. [Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis due to Parsonage-Turner syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissier-Ducamp, D; Martinez, S; Alagha, K; Charpin, D; Chanez, P; Palot, A

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of a 49-years-old patient who presented to the accident and emergency department with sudden onset dyspnea associated with acute shoulder pain. He was breathless at rest with supine hypoxemia. He had an amyotrophic left shoulder with localized paresis of the shoulder. Both hemi-diaphragms were elevated on chest X-rays. Pulmonary function tests showed a restrictive pattern and both phrenic nerve conduction velocities were decreased. At night, alveolar hypoventilation was evidenced by elevated mean capnography (PtcCO2: 57mmHg). Neuralgic amyotrophy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome was the final diagnosis. This syndrome is a brachial plexus neuritis with a predilection for the suprascapular and axillary nerves. Phrenic nerve involvement is rare but where present can be the most prominent clinical feature as in our case report. PMID:25534571

  16. Cut off values for abdominal obesity as a criterion of metabolic syndrome in an ethnic Kyrgyz population (Central Asian region)

    OpenAIRE

    Mirrakhimov Aibek E; Lunegova Olga S; Kerimkulova Alina S; Moldokeeva Cholpon B; Nabiev Malik P; Mirrakhimov Erkin M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background People of different racial and ethnic backgrounds have a distinct pattern of central fat deposition, thus making it necessary to devise a race based approach for the diagnosis and evaluation of abdominal obesity (AO). This is the first study to determine the optimal waist circumference (WC) cutoff values for definition of AO in an ethnic Kyrgyz population. Methods 323 persons of Kyrgyz ethnicity (183 women and 140 men), with a mean age of 51.8 ± 9.5 years old were included...

  17. Development of central nervous system autoimmunity is impaired in the absence of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marita Bosticardo

    Full Text Available Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASP is a key regulator of the actin cytoskeleton in hematopoietic cells. Defective expression of WASP leads to multiple abnormalities in different hematopoietic cells. Despite severe impairment of T cell function, WAS patients exhibit a high prevalence of autoimmune disorders. We attempted to induce EAE, an animal model of organ-specific autoimmunity affecting the CNS that mimics human MS, in Was(-/- mice. We describe here that Was(-/- mice are markedly resistant against EAE, showing lower incidence and milder score, reduced CNS inflammation and demyelination as compared to WT mice. Microglia was only poorly activated in Was(-/- mice. Antigen-induced T-cell proliferation, Th-1 and -17 cytokine production and integrin-dependent adhesion were increased in Was(-/- mice. However, adoptive transfer of MOG-activated T cells from Was(-/- mice in WT mice failed to induce EAE. Was(-/- mice were resistant against EAE also when induced by adoptive transfer of MOG-activated T cells from WT mice. Was(+/- heterozygous mice developed an intermediate clinical phenotype between WT and Was(-/- mice, and they displayed a mixed population of WASP-positive and -negative T cells in the periphery but not in their CNS parenchyma, where the large majority of inflammatory cells expressed WASP. In conclusion, in absence of WASP, T-cell responses against a CNS autoantigen are increased, but the ability of autoreactive T cells to induce CNS autoimmunity is impaired, most probably because of an inefficient T-cell transmigration into the CNS and defective CNS resident microglial function.

  18. Long-lasting beneficial effects of central serotonin receptor 7 stimulation in female mice modeling Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Bianca; Chiodi, Valentina; Adriani, Walter; Lacivita, Enza; Mallozzi, Cinzia; Leopoldo, Marcello; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Fuso, Andrea; Laviola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by severe behavioral and physiological symptoms. Mutations in the methyl CpG binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) cause more than 95% of classic cases, and currently there is no cure for this devastating disorder. Recently we have demonstrated that specific behavioral and brain molecular alterations can be rescued in MeCP2-308 male mice, a RTT mouse model, by pharmacological stimulation of the brain serotonin receptor 7 (5-HT7R). This member of the serotonin receptor family-crucially involved in the regulation of brain structural plasticity and cognitive processes-can be stimulated by systemic repeated treatment with LP-211, a brain-penetrant selective 5-HT7R agonist. The present study extends previous findings by demonstrating that the LP-211 treatment (0.25 mg/kg, once per day for 7 days) rescues RTT-related phenotypic alterations, motor coordination (Dowel test), spatial reference memory (Barnes maze test) and synaptic plasticity (hippocampal long-term-potentiation) in MeCP2-308 heterozygous female mice, the genetic and hormonal milieu that resembles that of RTT patients. LP-211 also restores the activation of the ribosomal protein (rp) S6, the downstream target of mTOR and S6 kinase, in the hippocampus of RTT female mice. Notably, the beneficial effects on neurobehavioral and molecular parameters of a seven-day long treatment with LP-211 were evident up to 2 months after the last injection, thus suggesting long-lasting effects on RTT-related impairments. Taken together with our previous study, these results provide compelling preclinical evidence of the potential therapeutic value for RTT of a pharmacological approach targeting the brain 5-HT7R. PMID:25926782

  19. Long-lasting beneficial effects of central serotonin receptor 7 stimulation in female mice modeling Rett syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca eDe Filippis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RTT is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by severe behavioral and physiological symptoms. Mutations in the methyl CpG binding protein 2 gene (MECP2 cause more than 95% of classic cases, and currently there is no cure for this devastating disorder. Recently we have demonstrated that specific behavioral and brain molecular alterations can be rescued in MeCP2-308 male mice, a RTT mouse model, by pharmacological stimulation of the brain serotonin receptor 7 (5-HT7R. This member of the serotonin receptor family – crucially involved in the regulation of brain structural plasticity and cognitive processes – can be stimulated by systemic repeated treatment with LP-211, a brain-penetrant selective 5-HT7R agonist. The present study extends previous findings by demonstrating that the LP-211 treatment (0.25 mg/kg, once per day for 7 days rescues RTT-related phenotypic alterations, motor coordination (Dowel test, spatial reference memory (Barnes maze test and synaptic plasticity (hippocampal long-term-potentiation in MeCP2-308 heterozygous female mice, the genetic and hormonal milieu that resembles that of RTT patients. LP-211 also restores the activation of the ribosomal protein S6, the downstream target of mTOR and S6 kinase, in the hippocampus of RTT female mice. Notably, the beneficial effects on neurobehavioral and molecular parameters of a seven-day long treatment with LP-211 were evident up to two months after the last injection, thus suggesting long-lasting effects on RTT-related impairments. Taken together with our previous study, these results provide compelling preclinical evidence of the potential therapeutic value for RTT of a pharmacological approach targeting the brain 5-HT7R.

  20. Effets de l'inhibition du système sympathique central sur les paramètres métaboliques et microcirculatoires chez les rats obèses avec syndrome métabolique

    OpenAIRE

    Nascimento, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors that characterize the metabolic syndrome (MS), including high blood pressure, obesity and glucose intolerance, are accompanied by sympathetic hyperactivity. In this study, we investigated the effects of a chronic oral antihypertensive treatment using centrally-acting sympatho-inhibitory drugs on the metabolic and microvascular parameters in rats under long-term high-fat diet with salt supplementation. For that, fifty male adult Wistar rats were mainta...

  1. Cut off values for abdominal obesity as a criterion of metabolic syndrome in an ethnic Kyrgyz population (Central Asian region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirrakhimov Aibek E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People of different racial and ethnic backgrounds have a distinct pattern of central fat deposition, thus making it necessary to devise a race based approach for the diagnosis and evaluation of abdominal obesity (AO. This is the first study to determine the optimal waist circumference (WC cutoff values for definition of AO in an ethnic Kyrgyz population. Methods 323 persons of Kyrgyz ethnicity (183 women and 140 men, with a mean age of 51.8 ± 9.5 years old were included in the study. Measurement of blood pressure (BP, anthropometric data (including body mass index calculation and WC measurement, fasting blood sugar, serum lipid parameters and insulin were performed in all examined individuals. Insulin resistance (IR was considered as HOMA index (insulin × fasting glucose/22.5 ≥ 2.77. Sensitivity and specificity for the presence of IR or two other criteria of MS (according to the international classification, 2009 were calculated by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves for men and women separately. Results The optimal sensitivity and specificity obtained from the ROC curves for IR were 88 cm in women (sensitivity of 0.85, 95%CI (0.72-0.93, specificity of 0.58, 95%CI (0.49-0.66 and 94 cm for men (sensitivity of 0.8, 95% CI (0.65-0.91, specificity of 0.61, 95% CI (0.51-0.71. The data from the ROC curve for any two other MS criteria confirmed the results and the WC 88 cm in women (sensitivity of 0.82, 95% CI (0.72-0.9, specificity of 0.72, 95% CI (0.62-0.8 and 94 cm in men (sensitivity of 0.74, 95% CI (0.62-0.84, specificity of 0.73, 95% CI (0.61-0.83 were corresponded to the optimal sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion WC ≥ 88 cm and ≥ 94 cm should be used as a criterion for the diagnosis of AO for Kyrgyz women and men respectively based on these results.

  2. Central neurobiological mechanism of liver depression and spleen deficiency syndrome based on chronic stress: a review%从慢性应激探讨肝郁脾虚证的中枢神经生物学机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓红; 李晶晶; 刘玥芸; 陈家旭

    2012-01-01

    Some researchers focus on research of the nature of syndromes. The methods of combining traditional Chinese medicine syndrome and diseases and the correspondence between formulas and syndromes may be used in research of the nature of syndromes. According to combined theories of zang-organ state and seven emotions in traditional Chinese medicine with stress theory in modern medicine, the authors applied the methods of chronic immobilization stress to induce liver depression and spleen deficiency syndrome in rats based on the thinking of relativity on formula and syndrome. The research showed that the central neurobiology mechanism of liver depression and spleen deficiency syndrome closely correlates to the hypo-thalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, brain-gut axis, myriad central neurotrophic factors, neurotransmitters, neuropep-tides and hormones and their receptors, involving in many encephalic regions such as the hypothalamus, hippocampus, cortex, amygdale, etc. The authors will combine their previous work with multi-disciplinary research, such as genomics, proteomics, metabolomics and bioinformatics in future studies, to reveal the scientific connotations of liver depression and spleen deficiency syndrome.%证实质的研究一直是很多学者研究的重点方向,可利用中医病证结合、方证相关的研究思路来探寻证候的生物学基础.从现代应激理论入手,结合中医脏象理论和七情学说,运用中医方证相关的研究思路,通过慢性束缚应激的方法复制肝郁脾虚证大鼠模型,前期实验结果提示肝郁脾虚证的中枢神经生物学机制与下丘脑-垂体-肾上腺轴、脑肠轴以及中枢多种神经营养因子、神经递质、神经肽、激素及其受体密切相关,涉及下丘脑、海马、皮层、杏仁核等多个脑区.今后将结合基因组学、蛋白质组学、代谢组学,并与生物信息学等多学科结合,以期揭示肝郁脾虚证的科学内涵.

  3. Effect of electroacupuncture on P2X3 receptor regulation in the peripheral and central nervous systems of rats with visceral pain caused by irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Z J; Wu, L Y; Zhou, C L; Dou, C Z; Shi, Y; Liu, H R; Wu, H G

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of the purinergic receptor P2X3 in the peripheral and central nervous systems during acupuncture treatment for the visceral pain of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A total of 24 8-day-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) neonatal male rats (SPF grade) were stimulated using colorectal distention (CRD) when the rats were awake. The modeling lasted for 2 weeks with one stimulation per day. After 6 weeks, the rats were randomly divided into three groups of eight each: (1) the normal group (NG, n = 8); (2) the model group (MG, n = 8); and (3) the model + electroacupuncture group (EA, n = 8) that received electroacupuncture at a needling depth of 5 mm at the Shangjuxu (ST37, bilateral) and Tianshu (ST25, bilateral) acupoints. The parameters of the Han's acupoint nerve stimulator (HANS) were as follows: sparse-dense wave with a frequency of 2/100 Hz, current of 2 mA, 20 min/stimulation, and one stimulation per day; the treatment was provided for seven consecutive days. At the sixth week after the treatment, the abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) score was determined; immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry were used to measure the expression of the P2X3 receptor in myenteric plexus neurons, prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex; and, a real-time PCR assay was performed to measure the expression of P2X3 messenger RNA (mRNA) in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord. After stimulation with CRD, the expression levels of the P2X3 receptor in the inter-colonic myenteric plexus, DRG, spinal cord, prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex were upregulated, and the sensitivity of the rats to IBS visceral pain was increased. Electroacupuncture (EA) could downregulate the expression of the P2X3 receptor and ease the sensitivity to visceral pain. The P2X3 receptor plays an important role in IBS visceral pain. The different levels of P2X3 in the peripheral enteric nervous system and central nervous system mediate the

  4. Serotonin Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Muñoz Cortés

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The serotonin syndrome is a clinical condition associated with serotonin agonists, prescribed to treat some psychiatric and non psychiatric diseases like affective, anxiety and pain disorders. Is due to an excessive stimulation of central and peripheral serotonin receptors that leads to mental, autonomic and neuromuscular changes. Usually the disorder resolves within the first 24 hours after the medications are discontinued, however some patients progress to a multiple organ failure and die. This paper is a theoretical review of the fundamental aspects of the serotonin syndrome, beginning with a brief review of the anatomic and physiologic features of serotonin system, to continue to examine the most relevant historic, diagnosis, clinical and treatment aspects of the syndrome.

  5. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia

    OpenAIRE

    Collin Blattner; Dennis C Polley; Frank Ferritto; Elston, Dirk M

    2013-01-01

    Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia is a common cause of progressive permanent apical alopecia. This unique form of alopecia includes entities previously know as “hot comb alopecia,” “follicular degeneration syndrome,” “pseudopelade” in African Americans and “central elliptical pseudopelade” in Caucasians. The etiology appears to be multifactorial and the condition occurs in all races.

  6. Mermaid syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Çelik, Yalçın; Turhan, Ali Haydar; Gülaşı, Selvi; Kara, Tuğba; Şenli, Hicran; Atıcı, Aytuğ

    2013-01-01

    Sirenomelia also known as the mermaid syndrome is a very rare congenital anomaly characterized by lower limb fusion and severe urogenital gastrointestinal cardiovasculer central nervous system malformations We report a case of sirenomelia who had a single umblical artery renal agenesis pulmoner hypoplasia esophageal atresia ventricular septal defect anal atresia intestinal atresia and who was lost at fifth hour of life Turk Arch Ped 2013; 48: 65 7

  7. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Crowther, Mark; Branch, Ware; Khamashta, Munther A

    2010-10-30

    The antiphospholipid syndrome causes venous, arterial, and small-vessel thrombosis; pregnancy loss; and preterm delivery for patients with severe pre-eclampsia or placental insufficiency. Other clinical manifestations are cardiac valvular disease, renal thrombotic microangiopathy, thrombocytopenia, haemolytic anaemia, and cognitive impairment. Antiphospholipid antibodies promote activation of endothelial cells, monocytes, and platelets; and overproduction of tissue factor and thromboxane A2. Complement activation might have a central pathogenetic role. Of the different antiphospholipid antibodies, lupus anticoagulant is the strongest predictor of features related to antiphospholipid syndrome. Therapy of thrombosis is based on long-term oral anticoagulation and patients with arterial events should be treated aggressively. Primary thromboprophylaxis is recommended in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and probably in purely obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome. Obstetric care is based on combined medical-obstetric high-risk management and treatment with aspirin and heparin. Hydroxychloroquine is a potential additional treatment for this syndrome. Possible future therapies for non-pregnant patients with antiphospholipid syndrome are statins, rituximab, and new anticoagulant drugs. PMID:20822807

  8. Beals Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Boards & Staff Annual Report & Financials Contact Us Donate Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are ... the syndrome. How does Beals syndrome compare with Marfan syndrome? People with Beals syndrome have many of ...

  9. Intestinal endotoxemia plays a central role in development of hepatopulmonary syndrome in a cirrhotic rat model induced by multiple pathogenic factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the correlation between severity of hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) and degree of hepatic dysfunction, and to explore how intestinal endotoxemia (IETM) affects the development of HPS in cirrhotic rats.METHODS: Male Wister rats were fed with a diet containing maize flour, lard, cholesterol, and alcohol and injected subcutaneously with CCl4 oil solution every two days for 8 wk to induce typical cirrhosis and development of HPS. The animals were also given a nitric oxide (NO) production inhibitor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) intraperitoneally, and an iNOS inhibitor, aminoguanidine hydrochloride (AG) via gavage daily from the end of the 4th wk to the end of the 6th or 8th wk, or a HO-1 inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) intraperitoneally 12 h prior to killing. Blood, liver and lung tissues were sampled.RESULTS: Histological deterioration of the lung paralleled to that of the liver in the cirrhotic rats. The number of pulmonary capillaries was progressively increased from 6.1±1.1 (count/filed) at the 4th wk to 14.5±2.4 (count/filed) at the 8th wk in the cirrhotic rats. Increased pulmonary capillaries were associated with increased blood levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (0.31±0.08 EU/mL vs control 0.09±0.03 EU/mL),alanine transferase (ALT, 219.1±17.4 U/L vs control 5.9±2.2 U/L) and portal vein pressure. Compared with normal control animals, the number of total cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of the cirrhotic rats at the 8th wk was not changed, but the number of macrophages and the ratio of macrophages to total cells were increased by nearly 2-fold, protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) started to increase significantly at the 4th wk, and reached its peak at the 8th wk in the lung of cirrhotic rats. The increase of iNOS expression appeared to be quicker than that of eNOS.NO2-/NO3-was also increased, which was correlated to the increase of iNOS (r

  10. Widespread non-central nervous system organ pathology in fragile X premutation carriers with fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome and CGG knock-in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunsaker, M.R.; Greco, C.M.; Spath, M.A.; Smits, A.P.T.; Navarro, C.S.; Tassone, F.; Kros, J.M.; Severijnen, L.A.; Berry-Kravis, E.M.; Berman, R.F.; Hagerman, P.J.; Willemsen, R.; Hagerman, R.J.; Hukema, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder generally presenting with intention tremor and gait ataxia, but with a growing list of co-morbid medical conditions including hypothyroidism, hypertension, peripheral neuropathy, and cognitive decline. T

  11. Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Antiphospholipid Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Hughes Syndrome Table of Contents ( ... research is being done? Clinical Trials What is Antiphospholipid Syndrome? Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder caused ...

  12. KBG syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brancati Francesco

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract KBG syndrome is a rare condition characterised by a typical facial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, skeletal (mainly costovertebral anomalies and developmental delay. To date, KBG syndrome has been reported in 45 patients. Clinical features observed in more than half of patients that may support the diagnosis are short stature, electroencephalogram (EEG anomalies (with or without seizures and abnormal hair implantation. Cutaneous syndactyly, webbed short neck, cryptorchidism, hearing loss, palatal defects, strabismus and congenital heart defects are less common findings. Autosomal dominant transmission has been observed in some families, and it is predominantly the mother, often showing a milder clinical picture, that transmits the disease. The diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical findings as the aetiology is unknown. The final diagnosis is generally achieved after the eruption of upper permanent central incisors at 7–8 years of age when the management of possible congenital anomalies should have been already planned. A full developmental assessment should be done at diagnosis and, if delays are noted, an infant stimulation program should be initiated. Subsequent management and follow-up should include an EEG, complete orthodontic evaluation, skeletal investigation with particular regard to spine curvatures and limb asymmetry, hearing testing and ophthalmologic assessment.

  13. The stress ulcer syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Essen, H.A.

    1986-01-01

    textabstractThe stress ulcer syndrome is described in this thesis. This syndrome is seen in patients admitted to intensive care departments or being treated in field hospitals, in disaster areas, or battle fields. Acute mucosal lesions associated with burns (Curling's ulcers) and central nervous system disorders (Cushing's ulcers) appear to have a different pathophysiology and a different pathology to the real stress ulcers. Peptic ulcers and gastric lesions following use of non-steroidal ant...

  14. Gorlin syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil K

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited condition that exhibits high penetrance and variable expressivity. It is characterized mainly by Basal cell carcinomas, Odontogenic keratocysts and skeletal anomalies. However, medical literature documents both common and lesser known manifestations of the disorder involving the skin, central nervous system, skeletal system etc. Diagnosis of the syndrome in childhood is basically through oral abnormalities. A case of Gorlin syndrome has been reported here, with review of literature.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Noonan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... article on PubMed Central Rohrer T. Noonan syndrome: introduction and basic clinical features. Horm Res. 2009 Dec; ... Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA ...

  16. Joubert Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Joubert Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... Organizations Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Joubert Syndrome? Joubert syndrome is a rare brain malformation ...

  17. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, ... fibrillin. A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, ...

  18. Primary sleep apnoea syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Chokroverty, S.; Sharp, J T

    1981-01-01

    Polygraphic study in 18 men with the sleep apnoea syndrome showed central, upper airway obstructive, and mixed apnoeas. Fifty per cent of the total apnoea time was central, 33% was obstructive, and 17% was mixed. Apnoeic episodes were accompanied by oxygen desaturation, relative bradycardia and hypotonia of orofacial muscles innervated by ponto-medullary neurons. During regular breathing these muscles revealed tonic and phasic inspiratory EMG activities. The data suggest that the primary slee...

  19. Dental approach to craniofacial syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Inger

    2012-01-01

    The paper consists of three parts. Part 1: Definition of Syndromes. Focus is given to craniofacial syndromes in which abnormal traits in the dentition are associated symptoms. In the last decade, research has concentrated on phenotype, genotype, growth, development, function, and treatment. Part 2...... distinction is essential for insight into craniofacial syndromes. The dentition, thus, becomes central in diagnostics and evaluation of the pathogenesis. Developmental fields can explore and advance the concept of dental approaches to craniofacial syndromes. Discussion. As deviations in teeth persist and do...

  20. Nevus comedonicus syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pravesh Yadav; Vibhu Mendiratta; Shiwangi Rana; Ram Chander

    2015-01-01

    A case of nevus comedonicus syndrome with atypical cutaneous presentation (widespread involvement without any particular pattern, midline lesions involving lower abdomen and involvement of bilateral pinna), and some unusual skeletal (adduction deformity involving bilateral metatarsal along with medial deviation at the level of tarsometatarsal joint), central nervous system (agenesis of corpus callosum with a interhemispheric cyst), visceral (pancreatic cyst) and neurological manifestations ha...

  1. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini Monica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes (RCVS are a group of disorders that have in common an acute presentation with headache, reversible vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries, with or without neurological signs and symptoms. In contrast to primary central nervous system vasculitis, they have a relatively benign course. We describe here a patient who was diagnosed with RCVS.

  2. The central role of vascular extracellular matrix and basement membrane remodeling in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes: the matrix preloaded

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagi Suresh C

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The vascular endothelial basement membrane and extra cellular matrix is a compilation of different macromolecules organized by physical entanglements, opposing ionic charges, chemical covalent bonding, and cross-linking into a biomechanically active polymer. These matrices provide a gel-like form and scaffolding structure with regional tensile strength provided by collagens, elasticity by elastins, adhesiveness by structural glycoproteins, compressibility by proteoglycans – hyaluronans, and communicability by a family of integrins, which exchanges information between cells and between cells and the extracellular matrix of vascular tissues. Each component of the extracellular matrix and specifically the capillary basement membrane possesses unique structural properties and interactions with one another, which determine the separate and combined roles in the multiple diabetic complications or diabetic opathies. Metabolic syndrome, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and their parallel companion (atheroscleropathy are associated with multiple metabolic toxicities and chronic injurious stimuli. The adaptable quality of a matrix or form genetically preloaded with the necessary information to communicate and respond to an ever-changing environment, which supports the interstitium, capillary and arterial vessel wall is individually examined.

  3. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gvozdenović Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is now recognized as a toxin-mediated, multisystem illness. It is characterized by an early onset of shock with multiorgan failure and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes. The symptoms for staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are similar. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was not well described until 1993, when children who had suffered from varicella presented roughly 2-4 weeks later with a clinical syndrome highly suggestive of toxic shock syndrome. Characteristics, complications and therapy. It is characterized by a sudden onset of fever, chills, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle aches and rash. It can rapidly progress to severe and intractable hypotension and multisystem dysfunction. Almost every organ system can be involved. Complications of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome may include kidney failure, liver failure and even death. Crystalloids and inotropic agents are used to treat the hypovolemic shock aggressively, with close monitoring of the patient’s mean arterial pressure and central venous pressure. An immediate and aggressive management of hypovolemic shock is essential in streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Targeted antibiotics are indicated; penicillin or a betalactam antibiotic is used for treating group A streptococci, and clindamycin has emerged as a key portion of the standard treatment.

  4. Central nervous system abnormalities in patients with oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (Goldenhar syndrome Anormalidades do sistema nervoso central em pacientes com espectro óculo-aurículo-vertebral (síndrome de Goldenhar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fabiano Machado Rosa

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the central nervous system (CNS alterations present in a sample of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS patients, trying to correlate them with other clinical features. METHOD: Seventeen patients with diagnosis of OAVS were evaluated. All presented radiological evaluation of the CNS, normal GTG-Banding karyotype and clinical features involving at least two from the four following areas: oro-cranio-facial, ocular, auricular and vertebral. RESULTS: CNS alterations were verified in eight from seventeen patients (47%. Diffuse cerebral hypoplasia, dilated lateral cerebral ventricles (asymptomatic hydrocephalus, corpus callosum dysgenesis and frontal hypodensities were the most frequent abnormalities. Presence of ophthalmologic abnormalities was the only clinical association observed, being significantly more frequent among patients with cerebral alterations (63% versus 11%. CONCLUSION: CNS abnormalities are frequent in patients with OAVS, especially in carriers of ophthalmologic alterations. However, the absence of detectable cerebral abnormalities did not exclude the possibility that these subjects will subsequently present neurological symptoms.OBJETIVO: Descrever as alterações do sistema nervoso central (SNC presentes em uma amostra de pacientes com espectro óculo-aurículo-vertebral (EOAV, tentando correlacioná-las com os demais achados clínicos. MÉTODO: Foram avaliados dezessete pacientes com diagnóstico de EOAV. Todos apresentavam avaliação radiológica do SNC, cariótipo por bandas GTG normal e achados clínicos em pelo menos duas das quatro das seguintes áreas: oro-crânio-facial, ocular, auricular e vertebral. RESULTADOS: Alterações do SNC foram verificadas em oito dos dezessete pacientes (47%. Hipoplasia cerebral difusa, dilatação dos ventrículos cerebrais laterais (hidrocefalia assintomática, disgenesia do corpo caloso e hipondesidades frontais foram as anormalidades mais frequentes. A presença de

  5. Location of immunization and interferon-γ are central to induction of salivary gland dysfunction in Ro60 peptide immunized model of Sjogren's syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongen Yin

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Anti-Ro antibodies can be found in the serum of the majority of patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS. Immunization with a 60-kDa Ro peptide has been shown to induce SS-like symptoms in mice. The aim of this study was to investigate factors involved in salivary gland (SG dysfunction after immunization and to test whether the induction of SS could be improved. METHODS: Ro60 peptide immunization was tested in Balb/c mice, multiple antigenic peptide (MAP-Ro60 and Pertussis toxin (PTX were tested in SJL/J mice. In addition, two injection sites were compared in these two strains: the abdominal area and the tailbase. Each group of mice was tested for a loss of SG function, SG lymphocytic infiltration, anti-Ro and anti-La antibody formation, and cytokine production in cultured cells or homogenized SG extracts. RESULTS: Ro60 peptide immunization in the abdominal area of female Balb/c mice led to impaired SG function, which corresponded with increased Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-12 systemically and locally in the SG. Moreover, changing the immunization conditions to MAP-Ro60 in the abdominal area, and to lesser extend in the tailbase, also led to impaired SG function in SJL/J mice. As was seen in the Balb/c mice, increased IFN-γ in the SG draining lymph nodes accompanied the SG dysfunction. However, no correlation was observed with anti-MAP-Ro60 antibody titers, and there was no additional effect on disease onset or severity. CONCLUSIONS: Effective induction of salivary gland dysfunction after Ro60 peptide immunization depended on the site of injection. Disease induction was not affected by changing the immunization conditions. However, of interest is that the mechanism of action of Ro60 peptide immunization appears to involve an increase in Th1 cytokines, resulting in the induction of SG dysfunction.

  6. The high cost of motherhood: End-lactation syndrome in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) on the central California, USA, coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Sarah S; Miller, Melissa A.; Tinker, M. Tim; Staedler, Michelle M.; Batac, Francesca I.; Dodd, Erin M.; Henkel, Laird A.

    2016-01-01

    Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) have exceptionally high energetic requirements, which nearly double during lactation and pup care. Thus, females are extremely vulnerable to caloric insufficiency. Despite a number of compensatory strategies, the metabolic challenge of reproduction culminates in numerous maternal deaths annually. Massive depletion of energy reserves results in a case presentation that we define as end-lactation syndrome (ELS), characterized by moderate to severe emaciation not attributable to a concurrent, independent disease process in females dying during late pup care or postweaning. We compiled detailed data for 108 adult female southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) examined postmortem that stranded in California, USA, 2005–12, and assessed pathology, reproductive status, and the location and timing of stranding. We introduce simple, grossly apparent, standardized physical criteria to assess reproductive stage for female sea otters. We also describe ELS, examine associated risk factors, and highlight female life history strategies that likely optimize reproduction and survival. Our data suggest that females can reset both the timing and energetic demands of reproduction through fetal loss, pup abandonment, or early weaning as part of specific physiologic checkpoints during each reproductive cycle. Females appear to preload nutritionally during delayed implantation and gestation to increase fitness and reproductive success. We found that ELS was a major cause of death, affecting 56% of enrolled adult females. Peak ELS prevalence occurred in late spring, possibly reflecting the population trend toward fall/winter pupping. Increasing age and number of pregnancies were associated with a higher risk of ELS. Although the proportion of ELS females was highest in areas with dense sea otter populations, cases were recovered throughout the range, suggesting that death from ELS is associated with, but not solely caused by, population resource limitation.

  7. THE HIGH COST OF MOTHERHOOD: END-LACTATION SYNDROME IN SOUTHERN SEA OTTERS (ENHYDRA LUTRIS NEREIS) ON THE CENTRAL CALIFORNIA COAST, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Sarah M; Miller, Melissa A; Tinker, M Tim; Staedler, Michelle M; Batac, Francesca I; Dodd, Erin M; Henkel, Laird A

    2016-04-28

    Sea otters ( Enhydra lutris ) have exceptionally high energetic requirements, which nearly double during lactation and pup care. Thus, females are extremely vulnerable to caloric insufficiency. Despite a number of compensatory strategies, the metabolic challenge of reproduction culminates in numerous maternal deaths annually. Massive depletion of energy reserves results in a case presentation that we define as end-lactation syndrome (ELS), characterized by moderate to severe emaciation not attributable to a concurrent, independent disease process in females dying during late pup care or postweaning. We compiled detailed data for 108 adult female southern sea otters ( Enhydra lutris nereis) examined postmortem that stranded in California, US, 2005-12, and assessed pathology, reproductive status, and the location and timing of stranding. We introduce simple, grossly apparent, standardized physical criteria to assess reproductive stage for female sea otters. We also describe ELS, examine associated risk factors, and highlight female life history strategies that likely optimize reproduction and survival. Our data suggest that females can reset both the timing and energetic demands of reproduction through fetal loss, pup abandonment, or early weaning as part of specific physiologic checkpoints during each reproductive cycle. Females appear to preload nutritionally during delayed implantation and gestation to increase fitness and reproductive success. We found that ELS was a major cause of death, affecting 56% of enrolled adult females. Peak ELS prevalence occurred in late spring, possibly reflecting the population trend toward fall/winter pupping. Increasing age and number of pregnancies were associated with a higher risk of ELS. Although the proportion of ELS females was highest in areas with dense sea otter populations, cases were recovered throughout the range, suggesting that death from ELS is associated with, but not solely caused by, population resource limitation

  8. Kindler syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviarasan P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kindler syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder associated with skin fragility. It is characterized by blistering in infancy, photosensitivity and progressive poikiloderma. The syndrome involves the skin and mucous membrane with radiological changes. The genetic defect has been identified on the short arm of chromosome 20. This report describes an 18-year-old patient with classical features like blistering and photosensitivity in childhood and the subsequent development of poikiloderma. The differential diagnosis of Kindler syndrome includes diseases like Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, epidermolysis bullosa, Rothmund-Thomson syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum. Our patient had classical cutaneous features of Kindler syndrome with phimosis as a complication.

  9. Complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruehl, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome is a chronic pain condition characterized by autonomic and inflammatory features. It occurs acutely in about 7% of patients who have limb fractures, limb surgery, or other injuries. Many cases resolve within the first year, with a smaller subset progressing to the chronic form. This transition is often paralleled by a change from "warm complex regional pain syndrome," with inflammatory characteristics dominant, to "cold complex regional pain syndrome" in which autonomic features dominate. Multiple peripheral and central mechanisms seem to be involved, the relative contributions of which may differ between individuals and over time. Possible contributors include peripheral and central sensitization, autonomic changes and sympatho-afferent coupling, inflammatory and immune alterations, brain changes, and genetic and psychological factors. The syndrome is diagnosed purely on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms. Effective management of the chronic form of the syndrome is often challenging. Few high quality randomized controlled trials are available to support the efficacy of the most commonly used interventions. Reviews of available randomized trials suggest that physical and occupational therapy (including graded motor imagery and mirror therapy), bisphosphonates, calcitonin, subanesthetic intravenous ketamine, free radical scavengers, oral corticosteroids, and spinal cord stimulation may be effective treatments. Multidisciplinary clinical care, which centers around functionally focused therapies is recommended. Other interventions are used to facilitate engagement in functional therapies and to improve quality of life. PMID:26224572

  10. 上颌正中孤立中切牙综合征1例报告%Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome: a case of report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康丽颖; 刘新强

    2014-01-01

    上颌正中孤立中切牙(solitary median maxillary central incisor,SMMCI)是一种比较罕见的牙畸形,是指在上颌牙弓中仅发育并萌出1颗中切牙且该中切牙位于牙弓的正中,形态左右对称,大小与正常中切牙相似,在乳、恒牙列均可见.SMMCI可单独发生,也可伴发其他先天性中线结构畸形,或与一些系统性疾病同时发生.其中,与前脑无裂畸形(holoprosencephaly,HPE)关系最为密切.本文报告1例伴有其他中线结构缺陷的上颌正中孤立中切牙病例.并对相关问题进行讨论.

  11. Prenatal and postnatal prevalence of Turner's syndrome: a registry study.

    OpenAIRE

    Gravholt, C. H.; Juul, S; Naeraa, R. W.; Hansen, J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study prevalence of Turner's syndrome in Denmark and to assess validity of prenatal diagnosis. DESIGN--Study of data on prenatal and postnatal Turner's syndrome in Danish Cytogenetic Central Register. SUBJECTS--All registered Turner's syndrome karyotypes (100 prenatal cases and 215 postnatal cases) during 1970-93. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Prevalence of Turner's syndrome karyotypes among prenatally tested fetuses and Turner's syndrome among liveborn infants. RESULTS--Among infant g...

  12. [Alport's syndrome (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huismans, H

    1978-05-01

    A case report is given of a 22-years old student (whose brother had Alport's syndrome) with recurrent central corneal swelling and paracentral erosions of the cornea of both eyes. Further signs of beginning Alport's syndrome in this case are disturbance of re-adaptation after dazzling (Mesoptometer) and paracentral scotomata in the visual fields. Remarkable was the small diameter of the disc in both eyes (1.37 mm). Local therapy was Scopolamin-eye-drops, Actihaemyl- and especially Cystein-Gel (2.4%). PMID:672101

  13. Neuropathological changes of central nervous system in Guillain-Barré syndrome.%吉兰-巴雷综合征中枢神经系统病理改变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林世和; 赵节绪; 江新梅; 宋晓南

    2001-01-01

    Objective  To investigate the neuropathological changes of central nervous system in Guillain-Barré syndrom. Methods Brain, spinal cord and sciatic nerve were obtained from 22 cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Eight cases were examined by general autopsy, 14 cases were examined by limited autopsy. HE, KB, Bielschowsky, Weil and Sudan Ⅲ staining were carried out, the sections were observed by light microscopy. Results 1.Cerebral superficial veins congested, widening of the cortical sulci, narrowed gyri and mild cerebellar tonsillar hernia were present. 2. Majority of cerbral neurons presented an ischemic changes. Slightly loss of hippocampal pyramidal neurons were found. There was chromatolysis of motor neurons of brain stem. Lymphocytic infiltration around the small vessels occurred in the pons and medullary oblongata in 8 cases. Focal demyelination was noted in pons and frontal white matter in 2 cases. Loss of Purkinje cells and appearance of glial nodules were observed in molecular layer of cerebellum. 3. Swellin, central chromatolysis and eccentric nuclei of anterior horn cells appeared in 16 cases, which were pronounced in cervical and lumbal segment of spinal cord. Vaculated neuroplasma and lymphacytic infiltrition could be seen. 4. Segmental demyelination and lymphocytic infiltration were the main neuropathological changes observed in 20 cases. There were two other cases in which the axon were severely involved, which showed swelling and breakdown of axons and as well as axonal bulbs. Conclusions 1. Lymphocytic infiltration in brain stem and spinal cord were in continuousness of pathological changes of peripheral nerves. 2. Finding of glial nodules suggested that there was possibility of infection of neurotropic virus. 3. Occurence of focal demyelination in cerebrum and brain stem indicated that Guillain-Barré syndrome may have combined involvement of central and peripheral nervous system.%目的观察

  14. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cushing's syndrome, also called hypercortisolism , is a rare endocrine disorder caused by chronic exposure of the body's tissues ... removing the tumor while minimizing the chance of endocrine deficiency or long-term ... for Cushing's Syndrome Clinical Trials ...

  15. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  16. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These ... doctors agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  17. Asperger syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form of autism. It can lead to difficulty interacting socially, repeat behaviors, and clumsiness. Asperger syndrome is a part of the larger developmental disorder ...

  18. Pseudoaminopterin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraoua, Lilia; Capri, Yline; Perrin, Laurence; Benmansour, Abdelmajjid; Verloes, Alain

    2012-09-01

    Pseudoaminopterin syndrome or aminopterin syndrome-like sine aminopterin (ASSA syndrome--OMIM 600325] is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome defined by characteristic dysmorphic features, skeletal defects, limb anomalies, cryptorchidism, and growth retardation. The syndrome owes its name to the fact that patients resemble the children exposed to aminopterin or to methotrexate, two dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors used for chemotherapy, or as an abortificient in early pregnancy. Ten patients have been described with pseudoaminopterin syndrome. Their phenotype is variable, and differs from the phenotype resulting from folic acid deprivation, leading to the notion that the pathogenesis may be more complex than simple vitamin deficiency. We report on an Algerian patient with pseudoaminopterin syndrome, review the previously reported cases and confirm that pseudoaminopterin syndrome does not result from a detectable contiguous gene imbalance as high resolution CGH array was normal in this child. PMID:22811276

  19. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder ... hearing and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from ...

  20. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of ...

  1. Proteus Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome Definition Common Signs Diagnostic Criteria (I have ... NIH to go with this criteria) Glossary Videos Proteus Syndrome is a condition which involves atypical growth ...

  2. Learning about Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Marfan Syndrome What is Marfan syndrome? What are the ... Syndrome Additional Resources for Marfan Syndrome What is Marfan syndrome? Marfan syndrome is one of the most ...

  3. CT and MRI of congenital nasal lesions in syndromic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginat, Daniel T. [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Robson, Caroline D. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Congenital malformations of the nose can be associated with a variety of syndromes, including solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome, CHARGE syndrome, Bosma syndrome, median cleft face syndrome, PHACES association, Bartsocas-Papas syndrome, Binder syndrome, duplication of the pituitary gland-plus syndrome and syndromic craniosynsotosis (e.g., Apert and Crouzon syndromes) among other craniofacial syndromes. Imaging with CT and MRI plays an important role in characterizing the nasal anomalies as well as the associated brain and cerebrovascular lesions, which can be explained by the intimate developmental relationship between the face and intracranial structures, as well as certain gene mutations. These conditions have characteristic imaging findings, which are reviewed in this article. (orig.)

  4. Alagille syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Krantz, I D; Piccoli, D A; Spinner, N B

    1997-01-01

    Alagille syndrome (OMIM 118450) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with abnormalities of the liver, heart, eye, skeleton, and a characteristic facial appearance. Also referred to as the Alagille-Watson syndrome, syndromic bile duct paucity, and arteriohepatic dysplasia, it is a significant cause of neonatal jaundice and cholestasis in older children. In the fully expressed syndrome, affected subjects have intrahepatic bile duct paucity and cholestasis, in conjunction with cardiac ma...

  5. Cushing Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links Share this: Page Content What is Cushing’s syndrome? Cushing’s syndrome is a condition that occurs when the body’s ... medication or as a result of a tumor, Cushing’s syndrome can develop. Many factors influence whether this happens, ...

  6. Dumping Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Dumping Syndrome Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome occurs when food, especially sugar, ...

  7. Central blood pressure and pulse wave velocity: relationship to target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in diabetic patients or metabolic syndrome. An observational prospective study. LOD-DIABETES study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castaño-Sánchez Carmen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic patients show an increased prevalence of non-dipping arterial pressure pattern, target organ damage and elevated arterial stiffness. These alterations are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The objectives of this study are the following: to evaluate the prognostic value of central arterial pressure and pulse wave velocity in relation to the incidence and outcome of target organ damage and the appearance of cardiovascular episodes (cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, chest pain and stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome. Methods/Design Design: This is an observational prospective study with 5 years duration, of which the first year corresponds to patient inclusion and initial evaluation, and the remaining four years to follow-up. Setting: The study will be carried out in the urban primary care setting. Study population: Consecutive sampling will be used to include patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between 20-80 years of age. A total of 110 patients meeting all the inclusion criteria and none of the exclusion criteria will be included. Measurements: Patient age and sex, family and personal history of cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular risk factors. Height, weight, heart rate and abdominal circumference. Laboratory tests: hemoglobin, lipid profile, creatinine, microalbuminuria, glomerular filtration rate, blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, blood insulin, fibrinogen and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. Clinical and 24-hour ambulatory (home blood pressure monitoring and self-measured blood pressure. Common carotid artery ultrasound for the determination of mean carotid intima-media thickness. Electrocardiogram for assessing left ventricular hypertrophy. Ankle-brachial index. Retinal vascular study based on funduscopy with non-mydriatic retinography and evaluation of pulse wave morphology and pulse wave velocity using the SphygmoCor system. The

  8. Waardenburg′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amladi Sangeeta

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A 2 ½ year old female child presented with heterochromia irides and a depigmented macule on the hand with central hyperpigmentation. There was presence of medial eyebrow hyperplasia, broad nasal root and dystopia canthorum. The fundus on the affected side was albinotic. There was no white forelock or deafness. Biopsy from the depigmented area showed an absence of melancocytes. A diagnosis of Waardenburg′s syndrome type 1 was made.

  9. Waardenburg′s syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yesudian Devakar; Jayaraman M; Janaki V; Yesudian Patrick

    1993-01-01

    A 2 ½ year old female child presented with heterochromia irides and a depigmented macule on the hand with central hyperpigmentation. There was presence of medial eyebrow hyperplasia, broad nasal root and dystopia canthorum. The fundus on the affected side was albinotic. There was no white forelock or deafness. Biopsy from the depigmented area showed an absence of melancocytes. A diagnosis of Waardenburg′s syndrome type 1 was made.

  10. Nevus comedonicus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravesh Yadav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of nevus comedonicus syndrome with atypical cutaneous presentation (widespread involvement without any particular pattern, midline lesions involving lower abdomen and involvement of bilateral pinna, and some unusual skeletal (adduction deformity involving bilateral metatarsal along with medial deviation at the level of tarsometatarsal joint, central nervous system (agenesis of corpus callosum with a interhemispheric cyst, visceral (pancreatic cyst and neurological manifestations have been illustrated.

  11. Fetal varicella syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandra S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal varicella syndrome is a rare condition of the newborn, presenting with cutaneous scars, limb defects and ocular and central nervous system abnormalities. It is due to varicella or zoster developing in the fetus following maternal varicella infection during early pregnancy. We are reporting one such patient who presented with a linear, depressed, erythematous scar over the left forearm and axillary fold, with a history of maternal chicken pox during the first trimester of pregnancy.

  12. Fetal varicella syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandra S; Metta Arun; Haneef Nayeem; Kodali Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Fetal varicella syndrome is a rare condition of the newborn, presenting with cutaneous scars, limb defects and ocular and central nervous system abnormalities. It is due to varicella or zoster developing in the fetus following maternal varicella infection during early pregnancy. We are reporting one such patient who presented with a linear, depressed, erythematous scar over the left forearm and axillary fold, with a history of maternal chicken pox during the first trimester of pregnancy.

  13. Alagille Syndrome: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Callea, Michele; Bahsi, Emrullah; Montanari, Marco; Ince, Bayram; Mancini, Giovanni E.; YAVUZ, Yasemin; Radovich, Franco; Gunay, Ayse; Piana, Gabriela; Unal, Mehmet; D’Alessandro, Giovanni; Caselli, Mauro; Clarich, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Alagille Syndrome (AGS) is a genetically determined multisystem disorder affecting liver, hearth, eyes, skeleton and facies, less commonly kidney and CNS. The prognosis depends on the severity of the associated anomalies. The liver pathology plays a central role in that most clinical complications are due to long standing cholestasis as a consequence of lack of bile excretion secondary to paucity/absence of interlobular bile ducts. That results in hyperbilirubinemia, hypercholesterolemia, hyp...

  14. Imaging of Horner's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horner's syndrome, or oculosympathetic paresis, results from interruption of the sympathetic trunk innervation to the eye and presents typically with meiosis, ptosis and facial anhydrosis on the affected side.1 The pathological process ranges from benign, such as cluster headache, or life threatening, such as lung malignancy. Appropriate imaging requires an anatomical appreciation of the complex and circuitous route the neuronal pathway takes as it passes from the central nervous system to the eye

  15. CENTRAL PONTINE MYELINOLYSIS: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chethan Belgur

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Central Pontine Myelinolysis is a clinically heterogeneous condition with difficult clinical and radiological diagnosis. When the condition is found outside pons it is called extrapontine myelinolysis which is together termed as osmotic demyelination syndrome. We present a case of central pontine myelinolysis with characteristic MR imaging features

  16. The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biesecker Leslie G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS is a pleiotropic, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. It is rare, but precise estimates of incidence are difficult to determine, as ascertainment is erratic (estimated range 1–9/1,000,000. The primary findings include hypertelorism, macrocephaly with frontal bossing, and polysyndactyly. The polydactyly is most commonly preaxial of the feet and postaxial in the hands, with variable cutaneous syndactyly, but the limb findings vary significantly. Other low frequency findings include central nervous system (CNS anomalies, hernias, and cognitive impairment. GCPS is caused by loss of function mutations in the GLI3 transcription factor gene and is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The disorder is allelic to the Pallister-Hall syndrome and one form of the acrocallosal syndrome. Clinical diagnosis is challenging because the findings of GCPS are relatively non-specific, and no specific and sensitive clinical have been delineated. For this reason, we have proposed a combined clinical-molecular definition for the syndrome. A presumptive diagnosis of GCPS can be made if the patient has the classic triad of preaxial polydactyly with cutaneous syndactyly of at least one limb, hypertelorism, and macrocephaly. Patients with a phenotype consistent with GCPS (but which may not manifest all three attributes listed above and a GLI3 mutation may be diagnosed definitively with GCPS. In addition, persons with a GCPS-consistent phenotype who are related to a definitively diagnosed family member in a pattern consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance may be diagnosed definitively as well. Antenatal molecular diagnosis is technically straightforward to perform. Differential diagnoses include preaxial polydactyly type 4, the GCPS contiguous gene syndrome, acrocallosal syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, Carpenter syndrome, and Teebi syndrome. Treatment of the disorder is symptomatic, with plastic or

  17. Metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M Alshehri

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The constellation of dyslipidemia (hypertriglyceridemia and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, impaired glucose tolerance, and central obesity is now classified as metabolic syndrome, also called syndrome X. In the past few years, several expert groups have attempted to set forth simple diagnostic criteria for use in clinical practice to identify patients who manifest the multiple components of the metabolic syndrome. These criteria have varied somewhat in specific elements, but in general, they include a combination of multiple and metabolic risk factors. The most widely recognized of the metabolic risk factors are atherogenic dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, and elevated plasma glucose. Individuals with these characteristics, commonly manifest a prothrombotic state as well as and a proinflammatory state. Atherogenic dyslipidemia consists of an aggregation of lipoprotein abnormalities including elevated serum triglyceride and apolipoprotein B (apoB, increased small LDL particles, and a reduced level of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C. The metabolic syndrome is often referred to as if it were a discrete entity with a single cause. Available data suggest that it truly is a syndrome, ie, a grouping of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD risk factors, that probably has more than one cause. Regardless of cause, the syndrome identifies individuals at an elevated risk for ASCVD. The magnitude of the increased risk can vary according to the components of the syndrome present as well as the other, non-metabolic syndrome risk factors in a particular person.

  18. Urofacial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal F Akl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is characterized by functional obstructive uropathy asso-ciated with an inverted smile. The importance of the subject is that it sheds light, not only on the muscles of facial expression, but also on the inheritance of voiding disorders and lower urinary tract malformations. We report a 10-year-old-male patient who had the urofacial syndrome. Early diagnosis of the urofacial syndrome is important to avoid upper urinary tract damage and renal failure.

  19. Waardenburg syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Read, A P; Newton, V E

    1997-01-01

    Auditory-pigmentary syndromes are caused by physical absence of melanocytes from the skin, hair, eyes, or the stria vascularis of the cochlea. Dominantly inherited examples with patchy depigmentation are usually labelled Waardenburg syndrome (WS). Type I WS, characterised by dystopia canthorum, is caused by loss of function mutations in the PAX3 gene. Type III WS (Klein-Waardenburg syndrome, with abnormalities of the arms) is an extreme presentation of type I; some but not all patients are ho...

  20. Sweet Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kasapçopur, Özgür; Sever, Lale; Çalışkan, Salim; Kodakoğlu, Ramazan; Mat, Cem; Kaner, Gültekin; Arısoy, Nil

    1996-01-01

    Sweet syndrome is a vasculitis characterized with fever leucocytosis neutrophilia and dermal neutrophilic infiltration In children Sweet syndrome usually occurs with secondary to infection and in adults to malignancy We report a Sweet syndrome in a five years old girl with respiratory infections otitis dactylitis long lasting fever and cutaneous rash A neutrophilic dermal infiltration is noted in cutaneous biopsy These signs have disappeared with corticosteroid treatment In conclusion Sweet s...

  1. Revesz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revesz syndrome is a rare variant of dyskeratosis congenita and is characterized by bilateral exudative retinopathy, alterations in the anterior ocular segment, intrauterine growth retardation, fine sparse hair, reticulate skin pigmentation, bone marrow failure, cerebral calcification, cerebellar hypoplasia and psychomotor retardation. Few patients with this syndrome have been reported, and significant clinical variations exist among patients. This report describes the first Brazilian case of Revesz syndrome and its ocular and clinical features.

  2. Metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogia Atul

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The Metabolic syndrome is a widely prevalent and multi-factorial disorder. The syndrome has been given several names, including- the metabolic syndrome, the insulin resistance syndrome, the plurimetabolic syndrome, and the deadly quartet. With the formulation of NCEP/ATP III guidelines, some uniformity and standardization has occurred in the definition of metabolic syndrome and has been very useful for epidemiological purposes. The mechanisms underlying the metabolic syndrome are not fully known; however resistance to insulin stimulated glucose uptake seems to modify biochemical responses in a way that predisposes to metabolic risk factors. The clinical relevance of the metabolic syndrome is related to its role in the development of cardiovascular disease. Management of the metabolic syndrome involves patient-education and intervention at various levels. Weight reduction is one of the main stays of treatment. In this article we comprehensively discuss this syndrome- the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical relevance and management. The need to do a comprehensive review of this particular syndrome has arisen in view of the ever increasing incidence of this entitiy. Soon, metabolic syndrome will overtake cigarette smoking as the number one risk factor for heart disease among the US population. Hardly any issue of any primary care medical journal can be opened without encountering an article on type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia or hypertension. It is rare to see type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity or hypertension in isolation. Insulin resistance and resulting hyperinsulinemia have been implicated in the development of glucose intolerance (and progression to type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension, polycystic ovary yndrome, hypercoagulability and vascular inflammation, as well as the eventual development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease manifested as myocardial infarction, stroke and myriad end organ diseases. Conversely

  3. Brugada syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bockeria O.L.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome is characterized by sudden death associated with one of several ECG patterns including incomplete right bundle-branch block and ST-segment elevation in the anterior precordial leads. According to the ECG patterns there are three types of Brugada syndrome. Brugada syndrome is genetically determined and has an autosomal dominant pattern of transmission in about 50% of familial cases. Nowadays implantation of cardioverter-defibrillator is the only proven method of sudden cardiac death prevention.

  4. Velocardiofacial syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Pike, A. C.; Super, M.

    1997-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome is a syndrome of multiple anomalies that include cleft palate, cardiac defects, learning difficulties, speech disorder and characteristic facial features. It has an estimated incidence of 1 in 5000. The majority of cases have a microdeletion of chromosome 22q11.2. The phenotype of this condition shows considerable variation, not all the principal features are present in each case. Identification of the syndrome can be difficult as many of the anomalies are minor and ...

  5. Sheehan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postpartum hypopituitarism; Postpartum pituitary insufficiency; Hypopituitarism Syndrome ... Malee MP. Pituitary and adrenal disorders in pregnancy. In: Gabbe ... Problem Pregnancies . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  6. What Is Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NDSS Home » Down Syndrome » What Is Down Syndrome? What Is Down Syndrome? In every cell in the ... chromosome 21 causes the characteristics of Down syndrome. What Causes Down Syndrome? Regardless of the type of ...

  7. Marfan Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Marfan Syndrome KidsHealth > For Teens > Marfan Syndrome Print A ... a genetic disorder called Marfan syndrome. What Is Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome is named after Antoine Marfan, ...

  8. Down Syndrome: Eye Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En Español Read in Chinese What causes Down syndrome? Down syndrome is caused by a duplication of all ... in persons with Down syndrome. How common is Down syndrome? The frequency of Down syndrome is approximately 1 ...

  9. Proteus Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome Foundation The Proteus Syndrome Foundation , a 501c3 ... 1 Trial with ARQ 092 in Proteus Syndrome Proteus Syndrome Patient Registry The Proteus Syndrome Foundation Contact ...

  10. 中心性肥胖高血压尿微量白蛋白/尿肌酐特征及与中医证型相关性分析%Analysis on the Characteristics of Urinary Microalbumin/Creatinine Ratio in Central Obesity Hypertension and Its Correlation with Traditional Chinese Medicine Syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    芦波; 韩亚楠; 周训杰; 桂明泰; 姚磊; 李建华; 符德玉

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the TCM syndrome distribution characteristics of central obesity hypertension patients; To analyze its correlation with urinary microalbumin/creatinine (MA/Cr) ratio; To provide some proof for an efficient way to control central obesity hypertension and prevent and cure its early renal injury with integrated TCM and Western medicine.Methods It was performed in a cross-sectional epidemiological study. The age, gender, height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, medical history and symptoms of 359 central obesity hypertension patients were collected in Shanghai. Then according to the four diagnostic methods, TCM syndromes were recorded. The urinary MA/Cr ratio, fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin and hs-CRP levels were detected.Results The urinary MA/Cr detectable rate in Shanghai among central obesity hypertension was 33.4% (120/359), men accounting for 56% and women 44%. Among central obesity hypertension patients, the HOMA-IR and hs-CRP level of urinary albumin group were significantly higher than those of normal group, with statistical significance (P<0.05). Among 359 central obesity hypertension patients, 140 people had phlegm-dampness syndrome, accounting for 39%, the largest part; 108 had liver-yang hyperactivity syndrome, accounting for 30%; 61 had yin-yang deficiency syndrome, accounting for 17%; 50 had yin-deficiency and yang-hyperactivity syndrome, accounting for 14%; the number of four TCM syndromes had statistical difference (P<0.05). Urinary MA/Cr ratio of the patients with phlegm-dampness syndrome was significantly higher than that of other three syndromes (P<0.05).Conclusion The incidence rate of early renal damage with central obesity hypertension patients is high in Shanghai area, and the early stage of renal damage is associated with insulin resistance and inflammatory reaction. Among central obesity hypertension, phlegm-dampness syndrome and liver-yang hyperactivity account for the majority, and patients with

  11. Three Cases With Inappropriate TSH Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Sebila Dökmetaş

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH syndrome or central hyperthyroidism is a rare disorder characterized by inappropriately normal or elevated levels of TSH and elevated levels of T3 and T4. The syndrome is associated with TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma (TSHoma or thyroid hormone resistance (THR. Thyroid-releasing hormone stimulation test and T3 suppression test can be useful for the differential diagnosis of central hyperthyroidism. In the present study, we report three cases of inappropriate TSH syndrome diagnosed after TRH stimulation and T3 suppression tests. Turk Jem 2012; 16: 105-8

  12. Acute lymphoid leukemia presenting with superior vena cava syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Emami Ardestani; Firouzeh Moeinzadeh

    2013-01-01

    When superior vena cava (SVC) compress or obstructed by internal or external pressure, we encounter to SVC syndrome. The cause of this compression is malignant or benign. Although the widespread use of permanent central venous access catheters coupled with the improved success of chemotherapy has increased the incidence of SVC syndrome not caused by direct tumor infiltration (non-malignant SVC syndrome) but SVC syndrome may be a sign of advanced malignancy. In this report, we present a 30-yea...

  13. Pediatric Neurocutaneous Syndromes with Cerebellar Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Neurocutaneous syndromes encompasses a broad group of genetic disorders with different clinical, genetic, and pathologic features that share developmental lesions of the skin as well as central and peripheral nervous system. Cerebellar involvement has been shown in numerous types of neurocutaneous syndrome. It may help or be needed for the diagnosis and to explain the cognitive and behavioral phenotype of affected children. This article describes various types of neurocutaneous syndrome with cerebellar involvement. For each neurocutaneous disease or syndrome, clinical features, genetic, neuroimaging findings, and the potential role of the cerebellar involvement is discussed. PMID:27423801

  14. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder K. Gupta, Ritu Gupta, Sunil Dutt Sharma

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Turner Syndrome is one of the important chromosomal disorders characterised by loss (total or part ofsex chromosome. The manifestations being peripheral edema, short stature, extra skin fold, webbing ofneck, renal and cardiovascular anomalies, sexual infantilism, learning disability etc. We present here aone month female baby who had classical features of Turner Syndrome. The karyotape analysis wasconsistent with the diagnosis.

  15. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akcan AB.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is an important cause of short stature in girls and primer amenorrhea in young women that is usually caused by loss of part or all of an X chromosome. This topic will review the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management of Turner syndrome.

  16. Tourette Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Look, Kathy

    Tourette Syndrome has a history of being misdiagnosed or undiagnosed due to its unusual and complex symptoms. This paper describes: the symptoms of Tourette Syndrome; its etiology; age of onset; therapeutic methods, such as drug therapy, psychotherapy, diet control, and hypnosis; educational implications; and employment prospects. Several…

  17. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera, Ricard; Piette, Jean-Charles; Font, Josep;

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression.......To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression....

  18. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Renu

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of proteus syndrome in a 20 year old male is repoted. Hemihypertrophy, asymmetric megalodactyly, linear epidermal naevus, naevus flammeus, angiokeratoma, lymphangioma circumscriptum, thickening of the palms and soles, scoliosis and varicose veins were present. There are only few reports of these cases in adults. The syndrome has not been reported from India.

  19. Burnout Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Panova, Gordana; Panov, Nenad; Stojanov, H; Sumanov, Gorgi; Panova, Blagica; Stojanovski, Angel; Nikolovska, Lence; Jovevska, Svetlana; Trajanovski, D; Asanova, D

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Increasing work responsibilities, allocation of duties, loss of energy and motivation in everyday activities, emotional exhaustion, lack of time for themselves, insuffi cient time for rest and recreation, dissatisfaction in private life. All these symptoms can be cause of Burnout Syndrome. Aim: To see the importance of this syndrome, the consequences of job dissatisfaction, the environment, family and expression in drastic chan...

  20. Poland syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Madhur Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poland′s syndrome is a rare congenital condition, characterized by the absence of the sternal or breastbone portion of the pectoralis major muscle, which may be associated with the absence of nearby musculoskeletal structures. We hereby report an 8-year-old boy with typical features of Poland syndrome, the first documented case from Uttar Pradesh, India.

  1. Noonan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev K. Digra, Deep Aman Singh, Vikram Gupta, Ghanshyam Saini

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a 11 year old boy and his father both Noonan’s. Noonan syndrome occurs in 1 out of 2000live births. Short stature, webbing of neck, pectus carinatum or pectus excavatum, hypertelorismcubitus valgus, epicanthus, downward slanted palpebral fissures, ptosis, microganthia and earabnormalities are the common features of Noonan syndrome.

  2. Bloom's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Niemann-Pick Disease, Type A Spinal Muscular Atrophy Tay-Sachs Disease Usher Syndrome, Type 1F and Type III ... Niemann-Pick Disease, Type A Spinal Muscular Atrophy Tay-Sachs Disease Usher Syndrome, Type 1F and Type III ...

  3. [Dejerine-Roussy syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambier, J

    1982-01-01

    The description of the thalamic syndrome by J. Dejerine and G. Roussy in 1906 was a consecration of the clinicopathologic method, announcing the end of discussions relative to the role of the thalamus as a sensorial relay center, discussions opposing B. Luys to Türk and to Charcot and which animated the end of the 19th century. Since then, the thalamic syndrome has not ceased to arouse the attention of neurologists, who have developed four major themes: the specificity of the thalamic hemianesthesia; the mechanism of the central pain; the semiologic value and physiopathology of the abnormal movements; and finally the pupillary and vasomotor disorders. Exploration of each of these topics led to a definition of neurologic semiology and to the development of neurophysiology during the second half of the XXth century. By reviewing this the confrontation between different men and schools appears behind the opposition of ideas. The revision of the thalamic syndrome ceased when the discovery of the non-specific functions of the thalamus opened the way to new concepts. Dejerine-Roussy's syndrome expresses the semiology of the relay nuclei. For the last thirty years, experience has accumulated on the semiology of lesions affecting the nuclei of convergence. Neuropsychology of thalamic lesions has demonstrated the regulatory role performed by the thalamus within each hemisphere and in the relative activation of each hemisphere. But this is another story. PMID:6763299

  4. [Fisher Syndrome and Bickerstaff Brainstem Encephalitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-11-01

    Fisher syndrome has been regarded as a peculiar inflammatory neuropathy with ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia, whereas Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis has been considered a pure central nervous system disease characterized by ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and consciousness disturbance. Both disorders share common features including preceding infection, albumin-cytological dissociation, and association with Guillain-Barré syndrome. The discovery of anti-GQ1b IgG antibodies further supports the view that the two disorders represent a single disease spectrum. The lesions in Fisher syndrome and Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis are presumably determined by the expression of ganglioside GQ1b in the human peripheral and central nervous systems. Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis is likely to represent a variant of Fisher syndrome with central nervous system involvement. PMID:26560952

  5. Elejalde syndrome (ES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh Shanehsaz, Siavash; Rezazadeh, Azadeh; Dandashli, Anwar

    2015-03-01

    Silvery hair and severe dysfunction of the central nervous system (Neuroectodermal melanolysosomal disease or Elejalde Syndrome) characterize this rare autosomal recessive syndrome. The main clinical features include silver-leaden hair, bronze skin after sun exposure, and neurologic involvement. Large granules of melanin unevenly distributed in the hair shaft are observed. Abnormal melanocytes and melanosomes and abnormal inclusion bodies in fibroblasts may be present. We report a 10-year-old girl with silver-leaden (silvery) hair, bronze skin color on sun-exposed areas, generalized hypopigmentation of covered body parts, and congenital seizures. The child was the elder of two children born of a consanguineous marriage. The younger sibling, a female neonate, had the same clinical presentation. PMID:25780981

  6. Kounis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntuli, P M; Makambwa, E

    2015-10-01

    Kounis syndrome is characterised by a group of symptoms that manifest as unstable vasospastic or non-vasospastic angina secondary to a hypersensitivity reaction. It was first described by Kounis and Zavras in 1991 as the concurrence of an allergic response with an anaphylactoid or anaphylactic reaction and coronary artery spasm or even myocardial infarction. Since then, this condition has evolved to include a number of mast cell activation disorders associated with acute coronary syndrome. There are many triggering factors, including reactions to multiple medications, exposure to radiological contrast media, poison ivy, bee stings, shellfish and coronary stents. In addition to coronary arterial involvement, Kounis syndrome comprises other arterial systems with similar physiologies, such as mesenteric and cerebral circulation resulting in ischaemia/infarction of the vital organs. The incidence of this condition is difficult to establish owing to the number of potential instigating factors and its relatively infrequent documentation in the literature.We report the case of an HIV-negative 39-year-old man with no coronary risk factors or family history of premature coronary artery disease, who developed Kounis syndrome after the administration of fluoroquinolone for dysuria. However, to the best of our knowledge,no data on the incidence and prevalence of Kounis syndrome in South Africa have ever been reported in the literature. The recent understanding of Kounis syndrome has led to the condition being classified into three syndrome variants. PMID:26636160

  7. HYDROLETHALUS SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aradhana

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Hydrolethalus Syndrome (HLS is a rare lethal genetic syndrome, recognized as a consequence of a study on Meckle syndrome in Finland .1 HLS is characterized by multiple developmental defects of fetus which include fetal hydrocephalus, agenesis of corpus callosum, absent midline structures of brain, Cleft lip and cleft palate, defective lobulation of lungs, micrognathia and very characteristic abnormality of polydactyly. About 80% of patients have polydactyly, in hands it is postaxial and preaxial in feet with duplicated big toe. A highly characteristic hallux duplex is seen in almost no other situation .2 Club feet is also common.

  8. Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Ruth H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuroacanthocytosis (NA syndromes are a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by the association of red blood cell acanthocytosis and progressive degeneration of the basal ganglia. NA syndromes are exceptionally rare with an estimated prevalence of less than 1 to 5 per 1'000'000 inhabitants for each disorder. The core NA syndromes include autosomal recessive chorea-acanthocytosis and X-linked McLeod syndrome which have a Huntington´s disease-like phenotype consisting of a choreatic movement disorder, psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline, and additional multi-system features including myopathy and axonal neuropathy. In addition, cardiomyopathy may occur in McLeod syndrome. Acanthocytes are also found in a proportion of patients with autosomal dominant Huntington's disease-like 2, autosomal recessive pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and several inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, namely abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome and hypobetalipoproteinemia leading to vitamin E malabsorption. The latter disorders are characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and sensory ataxia due to dorsal column degeneration, but movement disorders and cognitive impairment are not present. NA syndromes are caused by disease-specific genetic mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration is not known. The association of the acanthocytic membrane abnormality with selective degeneration of the basal ganglia, however, suggests a common pathogenetic pathway. Laboratory tests include blood smears to detect acanthocytosis and determination of serum creatine kinase. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate striatal atrophy. Kell and Kx blood group antigens are reduced or absent in McLeod syndrome. Western blot for chorein demonstrates absence of this protein in red blood cells of chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Specific genetic testing is possible in all NA syndromes

  9. Hypereosinophilic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldman Michel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypereosinophilic syndromes (HES constitute a rare and heterogeneous group of disorders, defined as persistent and marked blood eosinophilia (> 1.5 × 109/L for more than six consecutive months associated with evidence of eosinophil-induced organ damage, where other causes of hypereosinophilia such as allergic, parasitic, and malignant disorders have been excluded. Prevalence is unknown. HES occur most frequently in young to middle-aged patients, but may concern any age group. Male predominance (4–9:1 ratio has been reported in historic series but this is likely to reflect the quasi-exclusive male distribution of a sporadic hematopoietic stem cell mutation found in a recently characterized disease variant. Target-organ damage mediated by eosinophils is highly variable among patients, with involvement of skin, heart, lungs, and central and peripheral nervous systems in more than 50% of cases. Other frequently observed complications include hepato- and/or splenomegaly, eosinophilic gastroenteritis, and coagulation disorders. Recent advances in underlying pathogenesis have established that hypereosinophilia may be due either to primitive involvement of myeloid cells, essentially due to occurrence of an interstitial chromosomal deletion on 4q12 leading to creation of the FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion gene (F/P+ variant, or to increased interleukin (IL-5 production by a clonally expanded T cell population (lymphocytic variant, most frequently characterized by a CD3-CD4+ phenotype. Diagnosis of HES relies on observation of persistent and marked hypereosinophilia responsible for target-organ damage, and exclusion of underlying causes of hypereosinophilia, including allergic and parasitic disorders, solid and hematological malignancies, Churg-Strauss disease, and HTLV infection. Once these criteria are fulfilled, further testing for eventual pathogenic classification is warranted using appropriate cytogenetic and functional approaches. Therapeutic

  10. Piriformis syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wallet sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis ... medical help immediately if: You have sudden severe pain in your lower back or legs, along with muscle weakness or numbness ...

  11. Rett syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    An infant with Rett syndrome usually has normal development for the first 6 to 18 months. Symptoms range from ... of social engagement Ongoing, severe constipation and gastroesophageal reflux (GERD ) Poor circulation that can lead to cold ...

  12. Gardner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndromes. For more information, talk with an assisted reproduction specialist at a fertility clinic. How common is ... detected X-ray or computed tomography (CT or CAT) scan of the small bowel if adenomas are ...

  13. Piriformis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome occurs when this muscle presses on your sciatic nerve (the nerve that goes from your spinal cord ... cause the piriformis muscle to press against the sciatic nerve, such as sitting, walking up stairs or running. ...

  14. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caved-in look. He also wore glasses for myopia (say: my-OH-pee-uh), or nearsightedness, which ... syndrome, this "glue" is weaker than normal. This causes changes in many systems of the body, but ...

  15. Aase syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a provider who has experience treating anemias. A bone marrow transplant may be necessary if other treatment fails. ... counseling is recommended if you have a family history of this syndrome and wish to become pregnant.

  16. Hunter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to your health care provider for more information. Bone marrow transplant has been tried for the early-onset form, ... to have children and who have a family history of Hunter syndrome. Prenatal testing is available. Carrier ...

  17. Hurler syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to your health care provider for more information. Bone marrow transplant has been used in several people with this ... Call your provider if: You have a family history of Hurler syndrome and are considering having children ...

  18. [Heptopulmonary syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, Antonio; Díaz, Ainhoa; Iruzubieta, Paula; Salcines, José Ramón; Crespo, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome is characterized by the presence of liver disease, pulmonary vascular dilatations, and arterial hypoxemia. It is usually associated with cirrhosis of any origin, but has been described in other liver diseases, both acute and chronic, and not always associated with portal hypertension. The gold standard method to detect pulmonary vascular dilations is contrast enhancement echocardiography with saline and is essential for the diagnosis of hepatopulmonary syndrome. These dilatations reflect changes in the pulmonary microvasculature (vasodilatation, intravascular monocyte accumulation, and angiogenesis) and induce a ventilation/perfusion mismatch, or even true intrapulmonary shunts, which eventually trigger hypoxemia. This syndrome worsens patients' prognosis and impairs their quality of life and may lead to the need for liver transplantation, which is the only effective and definitive treatment. In this article, we review the etiological, pathophysiological, clinical and therapeutic features of this syndrome. PMID:25840463

  19. Turcot Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... procedure done in conjunction with in-vitro fertilization (IVF). It allows people who carry a specific known ... screening? If you are concerned about your family history and think your family may have Turcot syndrome, ...

  20. Levator Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo Are 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety? ALL NEWS > Resources First ... are variations of levator syndrome. The muscle spasm causes pain that typically is not related to defecation. ...

  1. Pendred Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health Search Search form Search A–Z Index Español Menu Home ... children, the thyroid is important for normal growth and development. Children with Pendred syndrome, however, rarely have problems ...

  2. Goodpasture syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... glomerulonephritis with pulmonary hemorrhage; Pulmonary renal syndrome; Glomerulonephritis - pulmonary hemorrhage ... when urinating Nausea and vomiting Pale skin Swelling (edema) in any area of the body, especially in the legs

  3. Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... methylphenidate and clonidine in children with ADHD and tics. Developing New Treatments for Tourette Syndrome: Clinical and Basic Science Dialogue Publicaciones en Español Síndrome de Tourette Prepared ...

  4. Alport Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome diagnosed? Your healthcare provider will have to watch your signs, symptoms, and look at your family ... 05/2016 - 10:00am Philadelphia, PA Kidney Camp Sun, 07/17/2016 - 6:00pm Ingleside, IL Register ...

  5. Barth Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie;

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (CM) (often dilated), skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart...

  6. [DIDMOAD syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicanoğlu, R; Canbakan, B; Yildiz, N; Arikan, E; Kundur, H; Bahtiyar, K; Sayali, E

    1994-01-01

    The DIDMOAD or so called Wolfram syndrome is a hereditary disease with autosomal-recessive transmission showing 4 main features: diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, nervus opticus atrophia and deafness. Beside this it shows multiple organ involvement. Our 38-year old male patient, showing all above mentioned features except deafness had urinary tract involvement and neurological symptoms. EEG, cerebral MRI, tests with evoked potentials and HLA-typing were performed to discuss the aetiopathogenetic background in our patient. Almost all symptoms of the Wolfram syndrome can be mixed up with complications of diabetes mellitus, which is usually the first symptom of the Wolfram syndrome. Because of this, wrong diagnosis is not rare. Hence in differential diagnosis in any diabetes mellitus type I patient, the possibility of the Wolfram syndrome should be discussed. PMID:8023526

  7. Heyde's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perišić Nenad

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heyde's syndrome implies an association of calcified aortic stenosis with the high gradient of pressure and angiodysplasic bleeding from the digestive tract. It has been proven that in patients with this syndrome, acquired form of von Willebrand type II A develops. Replacing of aortic valves by artificial ones brings about the spontaneous retreat of coagulation disorder, and the stoppage of the digestive tract bleeding. Case report. We reported two patients with the Heyde's syndrome. In one of the patients the aortic valves were replaced by biologic valves, after which the digestive tract bleeding stopped, while the second patient was treated conservatively due to a high operation risk. Conclusion. Patients with Heyde's syndrome are a complex multidisciplinary problem, thus their adequate treatment requires a team work in order to provide the most rational type of therapy for each patient separately.

  8. Reifenstein syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... male sex hormones (androgens). Testosterone is a male sex hormone. This disorder is a type of androgen insufficiency syndrome. ... Donohoue PA. Disorders of sex development. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton ... J, Schor N, Behrman RE, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . ...

  9. HELLP syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out of 1,000 pregnancies. In women with preeclampsia or eclampsia , the condition develops in 10 to ... have high blood pressure and are diagnosed with preeclampsia before they develop HELLP syndrome. In some cases, ...

  10. Kindler syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kaviarasan P; Prasad P; Shradda; Viswanathan P

    2005-01-01

    Kindler syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder associated with skin fragility. It is characterized by blistering in infancy, photosensitivity and progressive poikiloderma. The syndrome involves the skin and mucous membrane with radiological changes. The genetic defect has been identified on the short arm of chromosome 20. This report describes an 18-year-old patient with classical features like blistering and photosensitivity in childhood and the subsequent development of poikiloderm...

  11. Turner Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandran Sudarshan; G Sree Vijayabala; KS Prem Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects mostly females. Affected females have characteristic features such as short stature, premature ovarian failure, and several other features. Oral manifestations of this condition are not much discussed in the literature. But reported literature includes teeth, palate, periodontal and salivary changes. So the aim of this review is to illustrate the general manifestations, and especially the oral manifestations of Turner syndrome and evaluate th...

  12. Pendred's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes Pendred's syndrome in three siblings of a consanguineous marriage, belonging to Rahimyar Khan. The children presented with deafmutism and goiters. The investigations included scintigram, perchlorate discharge test and audiometery. The perchlorate discharge was positive in index case. Bilateral sensorineural hearing defect was detected on Pure Tone Average (PTA) audiometry. Meticulous clinical and laboratory evaluation is mandatory for the detection of rare disorders like Pendred's syndrome. (author)

  13. Trigeminal trophic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parimalam Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal trophic syndrome (TTS is a rare cause of facial ulceration, consequent to damage to the trigeminal nerve or its central sensory connections. We reporta case of TTS in a 48-year-old woman with Bell′s palsy following herpes zoster infection. The patient was treated and counseled. There hasnot been any recurrence for 1 year and the patient is being followed-up. The diagnosis of TTS should be suspected when there is unilateral facial ulceration, especially involving the ala nasi associated with sensory impairment.

  14. Etiopathogenetic mechanisms of fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.H. Gracely

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS is a common chronic condition of widespread pain with causal mechanisms that are largely unknown. It is characterized by moderate to severe musculoskel - etal pain and allodynia, but its pathogenesis appears confined to the nociceptive structures of the central nervous system. From a pathogenetic point of view, indeed, no clear muscle pathology has been demonstrated in FMS (1, 2, while increasing evidence suggests a disturbance in pain perception that is genetically conditioned. In our review we will consider five “keypoints” that we think determine the origin and maintenance of the pain syndrome that we define as fibromyalgia...

  15. Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs Skip sharing on social media links ... been diagnosed with Turner syndrome. Now what? Is Turner syndrome inherited? Turner syndrome is usually not inherited, but ...

  16. Learning about Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the genetic terms used on this page Learning About Down Syndrome What is Down syndrome? What ... Down syndrome? People who have Down syndrome have learning difficulties, mental retardation, a characteristic facial appearance, and ...

  17. Burning Mouth Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OralHealth > Topics > Burning Mouth Syndrome > Burning Mouth Syndrome Burning Mouth Syndrome Main Content Key Points Symptoms Diagnosis Primary and Secondary BMS Treatment Helpful Tips Key Points Burning mouth syndrome is burning pain in the mouth that may ...

  18. Hypercoagulability in response to elevated body temperature and central hypovolemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Martin; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Overgaard, Flemming Anders;

    2013-01-01

    Coagulation abnormalities contribute to poor outcomes in critically ill patients. In trauma patients exposed to a hot environment, a systemic inflammatory response syndrome, elevated body temperature, and reduced central blood volume occur in parallel with changes in hemostasis and endothelial...

  19. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  20. Índices de obesidade central e fatores de risco cardiovascular na síndrome dos ovários policísticos Índices de obesidad central y factores de riesgo cardiovascular en el síndrome de ovarios poliquísticos Central obesity index and cardiovascular risk factors in polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Caldas Costa

    2010-05-01

    la cintura (CC, de la relación cintura-cadera (RCC, de la relación cintura-estatura (RCEst y del índice de conicidad (índice C, en los que se refiere a la detección de factores de riesgo cardiovascular (FRCV en mujeres con SOP. MÉTODOS: Por medio de estudio transversal, fueron seleccionadas 102 mujeres (26,5 ± 5 años con diagnóstico de SOP, de acuerdo con el consenso de Rotterdam. El colesterol total (CT, los triglicéridos (TG, el LDL-colesterol (LDL-c, el HDL-colesterol (HDL-C, la glucemia en ayunas, la glicemia después del test oral de tolerancia a la glucosa (TOTG y la presión arterial (PA fueron evaluadas en todas las pacientes, además de las variables antropométricas. RESULTADOS: La relación cintura-estatura fue el marcador que presentó correlaciones positivas significativas con el mayor número de FRCV (PA, TG y glucemia después del TOTG, destacándose además la correlación negativa con HDL-C. Todos los marcadores antropométricos evaluados se correlacionaron positivamente con la PA, mientras que CC y RCC presentaron correlación positiva también con TG. En lo tocante a la precisión para detección de FRCV, los indicadores antropométricos considerados presentaron índices de sensibilidad superiores al 60%, destacándose la RCEst, que presentó sensibilidad superior al 70%. CONCLUSIÓN: La RCEst demostró ser el indicador antropométrico con la mayor precisión para la predicción de FRCV. En este sentido, se propone la inclusión de ese parámetro de fácil medición en la evaluación clínica para el rastreo de mujeres con SOP y FRCV.BACKGROUND: Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS present a high prevalence of abdominal obesity, which is associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. OBJECTIVE: To verify the accuracy of the waist circumference (WC, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, waist-to-height ratio (WHtR and the conicity index (CI in the detection of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF in women with PCOS. METHODS: The present

  1. Postconcussional Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla Keskin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Postconcussional syndrome is characterized by somatic, cognitive and psychiatric (emotional, behavioral symptoms that occurs after mild traumatic brain injury. It has been known that these symptoms recover fully within 3-6 months almost in 90% of patients. Although its etiology is still controversial, biological, psychological and social factors may account for the development and continuation of the symptoms. Diagnosis is based on the subjective complaints. To find out an objective method for definite diagnosis, trials searching for both neuroimaging and specific serum biomarkers stil continue. The treatment of the syndrome is mainly of palliative nature. Information, education, reassurance and multifaceted rehabilitation programmes can be beneficial. There are promising trials reporting the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment of postconcussional syndrome. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 96-109

  2. Nutcracker syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this case study is to highlight the symptoms of the Nutcracker Syndrome (NCS), the methods of clinical investigations and the importance of differential diagnosis. Introduction: The NCS refers to left renal vein entrapment caused by abnormal branching patterns of the superior mesenteric artery from the aorta.1,2 Clinical case presentation: A 27 years old female presented to the emergency department with complaints of abdominal discomfort, bloating, loose bowel motions and irregular micro-haematuria. The radiologist's report indicated the findings from computed tomography examination to be consistent with anterior NCS. Discussion: In most of the NCS cases the clinical symptoms are non-specific.3 The syndrome is caused by a vascular disorder, but its clinical manifestation can relate to a wide range of abdominal, urological, endovascular or gynaecological pathologies.4 Conclusion: Nutcracker Syndrome is a relatively rare disease and underdiagnosed may lead to left renal vein thrombosis

  3. Refeeding syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathy Swagata

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a fifty-year-old male who was admitted with a three month history of increasing weakness, prostration, decreasing appetite and inability to swallow. The patient was a chronic alcoholic, unemployed, and of very poor socioeconomic background. The patient was initially investigated for upper GI malignancy, Addisons disease, bulbar palsy and other endocrinopathies. Concurrent management was started for severe electrolyte abnormalities and enteral nutritional supplementation was begun. By the fourth day of feeding patient developed severe hypophosphatemia and other life-threatening features suggesting refeeding syndrome. The patient was managed for the manifestations of refeeding syndrome. A final diagnosis of chronic alcoholic malnutrition with refeeding syndrome was made. Refeeding of previously starving patients may lead to a variety of complications including sudden death.

  4. Cohen Syndrome. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elayne Esther Santana Hernández

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cohen syndrome is a rare genetic disease that is transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. It is characterized by obesity, hypotonia, mental retardation, microcephaly, typical craniofacial dysmorphism, large and prominent central incisors as well as thin, spindle-shaped fingers. The locus for Cohen syndrome has been located on chromosome 8q 22 (COH 1. Few cases have been reported since its description, it is clinically diagnosed through a proper delineation of the phenotype. The case of 14-year-old patient with this syndrome in whom a clinical diagnosis had not been established thus far is presented. An accurate delineation of the phenotype was achieved at this age and consequently, the correct diagnosis was reached, which is critical in order to provide better genetic counseling to the family.

  5. Eagle's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical.

  6. Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  7. [Eisenmenger syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Iversen, Kasper; Vejlstrup, Niels G; Hansen, Peter Bo; Søndergaard, Lars

    2009-04-01

    Congenital heart disease with left-to-right shunt can induce proliferation, vasoconstriction and thrombosis in the pulmonary vascular bed. Eventually, the patient may develop Eisenmenger syndrome defined as pulmonary arterial hypertension caused by high pulmonary vascular resistance with right-to-left shunt and cyanosis. Patients with Eisenmenger syndrome suffer a high risk of complications in connection with acute medical conditions, extra-cardiac surgery and pregnancy. This article describes the precautions that should be taken to reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients. PMID:19416617

  8. Rapunzel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An 18-year-old single female patient, presented with non specific gastrointestinal symptoms of anorexia, abdominal pain, and change in bowel habit. Clinically she was anemic, cachectic, and depressed. Abdominal examination revealed mobile epigastric mass. The scalp alopecia and endoscopy coupled by computed tomography scan, confirmed the diagnoses of trichobezoar, but it was not diagnosed as Rapunzel syndrome except after laparotomy, gastrotomy, and enterotomy. There are less than 16 cases of Rapunzel syndrome described worldwide, and this is the first case to be described in the middle east. (author)

  9. Joubert syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joubert syndrome is a rare malformation of the posterior fossa, mainly affecting the cerebellar vermis, which generally appears as a dysplastic lesion. Other structures of the cervico medullary junction may be involved, with accompanying brainstem hypoplasia according to neuroimaging studies. The diagnosis is usually reached during, childhood, based on a constellation of changes in the child's neurological development that are supported by the results of imaging studied. Respiratory problems are the most common signs in newborns,leading to the suspicion of the presence of this syndrome. (Author) 11 refs

  10. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects mostly females. Affected females have characteristic features such as short stature, premature ovarian failure, and several other features. Oral manifestations of this condition are not much discussed in the literature. But reported literature includes teeth, palate, periodontal and salivary changes. So the aim of this review is to illustrate the general manifestations, and especially the oral manifestations of Turner syndrome and evaluate their possible management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(4.000: 246-252

  11. Eisenmengers syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Iversen, Kasper; Vejlstrup, Niels G;

    2009-01-01

    Congenital heart disease with left-to-right shunt can induce proliferation, vasoconstriction and thrombosis in the pulmonary vascular bed. Eventually, the patient may develop Eisenmenger syndrome defined as pulmonary arterial hypertension caused by high pulmonary vascular resistance with right......-to-left shunt and cyanosis. Patients with Eisenmenger syndrome suffer a high risk of complications in connection with acute medical conditions, extra-cardiac surgery and pregnancy. This article describes the precautions that should be taken to reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients. Udgivelsesdato...

  12. Olmsted syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Olmsted syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of periorificial, keratotic plaques and bilateral palmoplantar keratoderma. New associated features are being reported. Olmsted syndrome is particularly rare in a female patient, and we report such a case in a six year-old Indian girl, who presented with keratoderma of her soles since birth and on her palms since the age of two years along with perioral and perinasal hyperkeratosis. She had sparse, light brown, thin hair. Although the psychomotor development of the child was normal until 18 months of age, the keratoderma plaques had restricted the child′s mobility after that stage.

  13. Eagle syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eagle syndrome occurs due to elongation of the styloid process or calcification of the stylohyoid ligament, which then may produce a pain sensation due the pressure exerted on various structures in the head and neck. When suspected, imaging helps in identifying the abnormally elongated styloid process or the calcified ligament. In recent years, three-dimensional CT (3DCT) has proved to be valuable in these cases. We report the case of a 62-year-old man with this syndrome in whom imaging with 3DCT conclusively established the diagnosis

  14. Lemierre's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, D N

    2012-02-01

    Lemierre\\'s syndrome is a rare disease that results in an oropharyngeal infection, which precipitates an internal jugular vein thrombosis and metastatic infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus and has been identified as the causative agent. We describe the case of a young girl whose presentation and diagnosis were confounded by a history of valvular heart disease. Infection of heart valves can produce many of the signs and symptoms associated with Lemierre\\'s syndrome. We describe the diagnosis, investigation and optimal management of this rare disorder.

  15. Morbihan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Veraldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of severe Morbihan syndrome (chronic erythematous edema of the upper portion of the face in a 60-year-old man. The syndrome was characterized clinically by erythematous edema involving the forehead, glabella, and both eyelids, because of which the patient was not able to open completely his eyes. Furthermore, erythema and telangiectasiae were visible on the nose and cheeks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations were within normal ranges or negative. Histopathological examination showed dermal edema, perivascular and periadnexal lympho-histiocytic infiltrate, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Oral isotretinoin was ineffective despite the relatively long duration of the therapy (26 weeks.

  16. Burnout syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bábská, Simona

    2014-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with the so-called burnout syndrome, which, as I believe, is getting to be a serious problem in today´s busy world. This issue deserves a full attention especially from those concerned – workers in assisting professions. What usually precedes the burnout syndrome is a big enthusiasm and motivation for work in which a potential patient can help other people and get them out of their troubles, sometimes he /she feels even like having a mission. However, without kno...

  17. Neu-Laxova syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S; Begum, J; Sharifunnaher, B; Saha, A K; Afroza, S; Islam, M Z

    2014-01-01

    Neu-Laxova syndrome (NLS) is a rare lethal syndrome found in both consanguinous and non-consanguinous couple. This is characterized by terrible face with unusual craniofacial appearance with exophthalmos, spectrum of central nervous system malformation, like microcaphaly, hypoplastic cerebellum, cleft lip/palate, ichthyosis and oedema. The diagnosis is made on the basis of clinical parameter. We report a 4 hour old male term newborn with IUGR of Neu-Laxova syndrome presented with anencephaly, rudimentary cerebellum, exophthalmos of right eye, bilateral cleft lip and palate and cryptorchidism. Anencephaly and cryptorchidism are two recently reported findings of NLS. We are presenting this case in addition from Bangladesh to lend further support to those two new findings as component of Neu-Laxova syndrome. Outcome of this syndrome is not good. Most of the patients are died of infection within hours to days. PMID:24584393

  18. Trigeminal trophic syndrome: A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil N Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal trophic syndrome is a rare condition resulting from self-manipulation of the skin after a peripheral or central injury to the trigeminal system. The syndrome consists of a classic triad of anaesthesia, paraesthesia, and a secondary persistent or recurrent facial ulceration. We describe a 60 year-old woman who developed this syndrome as a sequel to the gasserian ganglion block for trigeminal neuralgia. She had also developed melasma within 1 year. A remarkable benefit was achieved by proper patient education and topical antibiotics which led to the healing of all ulcerations within 4 weeks. In the case reported here, the diagnosis of the trigeminal trophic syndrome was made primarily as a result of the physician′s experience with the syndrome previously.

  19. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Vis; K. van Engelen; J. Timmermans; B.C. Hamel; B.J.M. Mulder

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome. Althou

  20. Europa central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel BARTOSEK

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available La investigación francesa continúa interesándose por Europa Central. Desde luego, hay límites a este interés en el ambiente general de mi nueva patria: en la ignorancia, producto del largo desinterés de Francia por este espacio después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, y en el comportamiento y la reflexión de la clase política y de los medios de comunicación (una anécdota para ilustrar este ambiente: durante la preparación de nuestro coloquio «Refugiados e inmigrantes de Europa Central en el movimiento antifascista y la Resistencia en Francia, 1933-1945», celebrado en París en octubre de 1986, el problema de la definición fue planteado concreta y «prácticamente». ¡Y hubo entonces un historiador eminente, para quién Alemania no formaría parte de Europa Central!.

  1. Ectopic corticotroph syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penezić Zorana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is a clinical state resulting from prolonged, inappropriate exposure to excessive endogenous secretion of Cortisol and hence excess circulating free cortisol, characterized by loss of the normal feedback mechanisms of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and the normal circadian rhythm of cortisol secretion [2]. The etiology of Cushing's syndrome may be excessive ACTH secretion from the pituitary gland, ectopic ACTH secretion by nonpituitary tumor, or excessive autonomous secretion of cortisol from a hyperfunctioning adrenal adenoma or carcinoma. Other than this broad ACTH-dependent and ACTH-independent categories, the syndrome may be caused by ectopic CRH secretion, PPNAD, MAH, ectopic action of GIP or catecholamines, and other adrenel-dependent processes associated with adrenocortical hyperfunction. CASE REPORT A 31 year-old men with b-month history of hyperpigmentation, weight gain and proximal myopathy was refereed to Institute of Endocrinology for evaluation of hypercortisolism. At admission, patient had classic cushingoid habit with plethoric face, dermal and muscle atrophy, abdominal strie rubrae and centripetal obesity. The standard laboratory data showed hyperglycaemia and hypokaliemia with high potassium excretion level. The circadian rhythm of cortisol secretion was blunted, with moderately elevated ACTH level, and without cortisol suppression after low-dose and high-dose dexamethason suppression test. Urinary 5HIAA was elevated. Abdominal and sellar region magnetic resonance imaging was negative. CRH stimulation resulted in ACTH increase of 87% of basal, but without significant increase of cortisol level, only 7%. Thoracal CT scan revealed 14 mm mass in right apical pulmonary segment. A wedge resection of anterior segment of right upper lobe was performed. Microscopic evaluation showed tumor tissue consisting of solid areas of uniform, oval cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm and centrally

  2. Mesenteric lymph node cavitation syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh; James; Freeman

    2010-01-01

    The mesenteric lymph node cavitation syndrome consists of central necrosis of mesenteric lymph nodes and may occur with either celiac disease or a sprue-like intestinal disease that fails to respond to a gluten-free diet. Splenic hypofunction may also be present. The cause is not known but its development during the clinical course of celiac disease is usually indicative of a poor prognosis for the intestinal disorder, a potential for signif icant compli-cations including sepsis and malignancy, particularly...

  3. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If you already have metabolic syndrome, making these healthy lifestyle choices can help reduce your risk of heart disease and other health problems. If lifestyle changes alone can’t control your ... to help. Maintain a healthy weight Your doctor can measure your body mass ...

  4. Nephrotic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use of certain legal and illegal drugs, or morbid obesity can lead to nephrotic syndrome. Symptoms Some kids ... KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All ...

  5. Robinow Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Gökalp

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Robinow syndrome is characterized by dwarfism demonstrating short-limbed extremities, vertebral malsegmentation/malformation (hemivertebra, costal dysplasia, genital hypoplasia, and fetal facial appearance (wide and prominent forehead, hypertelorism, small and wide nose, molar hypoplasia, and retrognathia. It is a rare genetic disease which may present with either mild autosomal dominant form or severe recessive form. Vertebral and costal abnormalities are common diagnostic signs that may be severe. The disease presents with kyphoscoliosis and chest abnormalities along with thoracic vertebral fusion and hemivertebral appearance. Ribs may demonstrate fusion. Based on those involvements, the disease can be categorized as spondylothoracic, spondylocostal, ischiovertebral dysplasia, and cervicofaciothoracic syndrome.Diagnosis is established by the help of clinical characteristics. Radiography might contribute to the diagnosis by revealing changes in the skeletal system. Case Report: A three-year-old male patient presented with operated left undescendent testis and buried penis. On physical examination, he also had a dysmorphic face characterized by macrocephaly, hypertelorism, prominent eyes, a flattened nasal bridge, triangular-fish mouth, gingival hypertrophy and left hand clinodactyly. Radiographic examination documented mesomelic shortening of the radius-ulna, malsegmentation of the thoracal spine and the ribs fusion.Conclusion: Robinow syndrome is a rare syndrome which can be diagnosed by typical facial appearance and radiologic findings. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2010; 8: 44-7

  6. Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  7. Nodding Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-19

    Dr. Scott Dowell, a CDC director, discusses the rare illness, nodding syndrome, in children in Africa.  Created: 12/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/27/2014.

  8. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of their hearing within the first year of life. Progressive vision loss caused by retinitis pigmentosa becomes occurs in childhood. ... type III have progressive hearing loss and vision loss beginning in the first few decades of life. Unlike the other forms of Usher syndrome, infants ...

  9. [Refeeding syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ševela, Stanislav; Novák, František; Kazda, Antonín; Brodská, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Despite being known more than 60 years, refeeding syndrome (RS) still bears many uncertainties. For example, its definition is not clear and definite, and the attitude to it varies from the complete neglect to over-prevention.The term "refeeding syndrome" refers to electrolyte and metabolic changes occurring in malnourished patients after the readministration of nutrition. These changes concern especially to phosphates and ions. Potassium, magnesium, naturism and fluids balance are involved. The changes lead to cell energetic metabolism and electric potential disturbances, with related clinical symptoms.Fully developed refeeding syndrome is quite rare; nevertheless it can be fatal for the patient. However, even its development can lead to many complications increasing the patient's morbidity and the length of stay in the hospital. Yet the refeeding syndrome is more or less predictable and if kept in mind also preventable.The aim of this article is to get the reader to know more about this metabolic phenomenon and possible attitudes towards it. PMID:27088791

  10. Noonan syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgt, I. van der

    2007-01-01

    Noonan Syndrome (NS) is characterised by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The main facial features of NS are hypertelorism with down-slanting palpebral fissures, ptosis and low-set

  11. Metabolic syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles Shaeffer

    2004-01-01

    @@ The emergence of cardiac disease as the number one world-wide cause of death justifies efforts to identify individuals at higher risk for preventive therapy. The metabolic syndrome, originally described by Reaven, 1 has been associated with higher cardiovascular disease risk. 2 Type Ⅱ diabetes is also a frequent sequela. 3

  12. Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... writing, painting, or making music help focus the mind on other things. There's speculation that the composer Mozart had TS. Find support. The Tourette Syndrome Association sponsors support groups with others who understand the challenges of TS. Take control. People with TS can feel more in control ...

  13. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Bødtger, Uffe; Heltberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    a variety of infectious complications. Rapid diagnosis and treatment is necessary to avoid severe complications or death. Close collaboration with local microbiologist is pivotal. Treatment consists of longterm treatment with penicillin and metronidazole. This is a case report of Lemierre's syndrome....

  14. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Mulder, B. J.; van Engelen, K.; Vis, J.C.; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B C J

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome. Although variable expression is known to be present in Marfan syndrome, phenotypic expression of Marfan syndrome in our patient might be masked by the co-occurrence of Down syndrome. (Neth Heart J 2009;1...

  15. Cerebral Salt Wasting Syndrome After Calvarial Remodeling in Craniosynostosis

    OpenAIRE

    Byeon, Jun-Hee; Yoo, Gyeol

    2005-01-01

    Hyponatremia and increased urine output after calvarial remodeling have been noted in pediatric patients with craniosynostosis. If not treated properly, patients develop hypoosmotic conditions that can lead to cerebral edema, increased intracranial pressure, and collapsed circulation. Postoperative hyponatremia after central nervous system surgery is considered as the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) secretion. Recently, however, cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS) ins...

  16. Wolf's syndrome in a neonatal period: new find neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a new born patient with Wolf's syndrome. We contribute with the most frequently clinical, genetics and radiological findings including a radiological discovery linked a malformation of the central nervous system, consistent in agenesia of the corpus callosum, not described so far in the reviewed literature about the Wolf syndrome. (author)

  17. Normal Reactions to Orthostatic Stress in Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Gunilla; Julu, Peter O. O.; Engerstrom, Ingegerd Witt; Sandlund, Marlene; Lindstrom, Britta

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate orthostatic reactions in females with Rett syndrome (RTT), and also whether the severity of the syndrome had an impact on autonomic reactions. Based on signs of impaired function of the central autonomic system found in RTT, it could be suspected that orthostatic reactions were affected. The orthostatic…

  18. Atrial Ectopic Tachycardia in a Patient With Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Awerbach, Jordan D.; Khatib, Sammy; Moodie, Douglas S.; Snyder, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    The fibrillin defect central to Marfan syndrome is believed to affect myocardial conduction and predispose affected patients to various arrhythmias, including ventricular tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, and atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia. Here we describe an adult Marfan patient with atrial ectopic tachycardia. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of atrial ectopic tachycardia in the setting of Marfan syndrome.

  19. Rivaroxaban in patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mega, Jessica L; Braunwald, Eugene; Wiviott, Stephen D; Bassand, Jean-Pierre; Bhatt, Deepak L; Bode, Christoph; Burton, Paul; Cohen, Marc; Cook-Bruns, Nancy; Fox, Keith A A; Goto, Shinya; Murphy, Sabina A; Plotnikov, Alexei N; Schneider, David; Sun, Xiang; Verheugt, Freek W A; Gibson, C Michael; Grande, Peer

    2012-01-01

    Acute coronary syndromes arise from coronary atherosclerosis with superimposed thrombosis. Since factor Xa plays a central role in thrombosis, the inhibition of factor Xa with low-dose rivaroxaban might improve cardiovascular outcomes in patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome....

  20. Metabolic Syndrome as a Risk Factor for Elevated Intraocular Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Sahinoglu-Keskek, Nedime; Keskek, Sakir Ozgur; Cevher, Selim; Kirim, Sinan; Kayiklik, Asim; Ortoglu, Gulay; Saler, Tayyibe

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between intraocular pressure and metabolic syndrome by comparing central corneal thicknesses. Methods: One hundred sixty-two subjects were enrolled in this cross-sectional study, with 89 subjects in a metabolic syndrome group and 73 subjects in a control group. Ophthalmological examinations, including intraocular pressure and central corneal thickness measurements, were performed on each subject. Serum fasting glucose, trigly...

  1. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  2. Waardenburg syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Manish; Kavadu, Paresh; Chougule, Sachin

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of Waardenburg syndrome in a female child aged 2yrs. Petrus Johannes Waardenburg(1) , a Dutch Ophthalmologist in 1951 described individuals with retinal pigmentary differences who had varying degrees of hearing loss and dystopia canthorum (i.e., latral displacement of inner canthi of eyes). The disease runs in families with a dominant inheritance pattern with varying degree of clinical presentation. Patient usually present with heterochromic iris, pigmentary abnormalities of ...

  3. Waardenburg syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Tagra Sunita; Talwar Amrita; Walia Rattan Lal; Sidhu Puneet

    2006-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features ...

  4. HABERLAND SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratnakumari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Encephalo cranio cutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL is a rare neuro-cutaneous syndrome. It is characterized by unilateral lipomas of the cranium, face, and neck, ipsilateral lipodermoids of the eye, ipsilateral brain anomalies. There are 53 cases mentioned so far in the literature. To our knowledge, only 3 cases were reported from India. We report a case of a baby girl who presented in our institution for neuro-radiological evaluation based on which diagnosis of ECCL was made.

  5. Turner Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Akcan AB.

    2007-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a neurogenetic disorder characterized by partial or complete monosomy-X. TS is associated with certain physical and medical features including estrogen deficiency, short stature and increased risk for several diseases with cardiac conditions being among the most serious. Girls with TS are typically treated with growth hormone and estrogen replacement therapies to address short stature and estrogen deficiency. The cognitive-behavioral phenotype associated with TS includ...

  6. Robinow Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gökhan Gökalp; Erdal Eren; Zeynep Yazıcı; Halil Sağlam

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Robinow syndrome is characterized by dwarfism demonstrating short-limbed extremities, vertebral malsegmentation/malformation (hemivertebra), costal dysplasia, genital hypoplasia, and fetal facial appearance (wide and prominent forehead, hypertelorism, small and wide nose, molar hypoplasia, and retrognathia). It is a rare genetic disease which may present with either mild autosomal dominant form or severe recessive form. Vertebral and costal abnormalities are common diagnostic si...

  7. Marfan syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Eesha; Pandey, Ramesh Kumar

    1997-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of the connective tissue, with skeletal, ligamentous, orooculofacial, pulmonary, abdominal, neurological and the most fatal, cardiovascular manifestations. It has no cure but early diagnosis, regular monitoring and preventive lifestyle regimen ensure a good prognosis. However, the diagnosis can be difficult as it is essentially a clinical one, relying on family history, meticulous physical examination and investigation of involved organ sy...

  8. Noonan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bhambhani, Vikas; Muenke, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a common genetic disorder that causes multiple congenital abnormalities and a large number of potential health conditions. Most affected individuals have characteristic facial features that evolve with age; a broad, webbed neck; increased bleeding tendency; and a high incidence of congenital heart disease, failure to thrive, short stature, feeding difficulties, sternal deformity, renal malformation, pubertal delay, cryptorchidism, developmental or behavioral problems, visio...

  9. Apert's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Gudipaneni Ravi; Jyothsna, Mandapati; Ahmed, Syed Basheer; Sree Lakshmi, Ketham Reddy

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apert's syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by craniosynostosis, midfacial malforma­tion and symmetrical syndactyly of hands and feet. Craniofacial deformities include cone-shaped calvarium, fat forehead, prop-tosis, hypertelorism and short nose with a bulbous tip. Intraoral findings include high arched palate with pseudocleft, maxillary transverse and sagittal hypoplasia with concomitant dental crowding, skeletal and dental anterior open bite...

  10. Hepatorenal syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sharon Turban; Paul J Thuluvath; Mohamed G Atta

    2007-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a "functional" and reversible form of renal failure that occurs in patients with advanced chronic liver disease. The distinctive hallmark feature of HRS is the intense renal vasoconstriction caused by interactions between systemic and portal hemodynamics. This results in activation of vasoconstrictors and suppression of vasodilators in the renal circulation. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, as well as current and emerging therapies of HRS are discussed in this review.

  11. Brachycephalic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, Gilles; Heidenreich, Dorothee

    2016-07-01

    Animals presenting with brachycephalic syndrome suffer from multilevel obstruction of the airways as well as secondary structural collapse. Stenotic nares, aberrant turbinates, nasopharyngeal collapse, soft palate elongation and hyperplasia, laryngeal collapse, and left bronchus collapse are being described as the most common associated anomalies. Rhinoplasty and palatoplasty as well as newer surgical techniques and postoperative care strategies have resulted in significant improvement of the prognosis even in middle-aged dogs. PMID:27012936

  12. Caroli's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1958 Caroli described the syndrome of congenital, either segmental or involving the entire bile duct system, saccular extensions of the intrahepatic bile ducts. He differentiated between two types of this disease pattern. The first form concerns pure cystic dilatations of the intrahepatic bile ducts, whereas the second one is combined with hepatic fibrosis and portal hypertension. Both types are characterised by cystic dilatations in the kidneys and in the extrahepatic bile ducts, pancreas and spleen. (orig.)

  13. Griscelli syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial albinism with immunodeficiency is a rare and fatal immunologic disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and variable cellular immunodeficiency. It was initially described in 1978. Primary abnormalities included silvery grayish sheen to the hair, large pigment agglomerations in hair shafts and an abundance of mature melanosomes in melanocytes, with reduced pigmentation of adjacent keratinocytes. We describe a child with Griscelli syndrome who presented with hepatitis, pancytopenia and silvery hair. The diagnosis was confirmed by microscopic skin and hair examination.

  14. Asperger syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Woodbury-Smith, Marc R.; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Asperger syndrome (AS) is a chronic neurodevelopmental disorder of social interaction, communication, and a restricted range of behaviors or interests. Although not generally associated with intellectual disability, the severe social disability and, in many cases, associated mental health and other medical problems, result in disability throughout life. The diagnosis is often delayed, sometimes into adulthood, which is unfortunate because there are now a range...

  15. Brugada syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Bastiaenen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Brugada syndrome demonstrates characteristic electrocardiogram features and is a significant cause of sudden death in young adults with overtly normal cardiac structure and function. The genetic basis has not yet been fully elucidated but our understanding of the causative mutations and modifiers of arrhythmic events is advancing rapidly alongside sequencing technologies. We expect that the future will include risk stratification according to genotype and management tailored to the genetic diagnosis.

  16. Burnout syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kebza, V.; Šolcová, Iva

    Praha: EFPA/UPA, 2007 - (Polišenská, V.; Šolc, M.; Kotrlová, J.). s. 31 ISBN 978-80-7064-017-3. [European Conress of Psychology /10./. 03.07.2007-06.07.2007, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA406/06/0747 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : burnout syndrome * type D personality * physiological indicators Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  17. CREST Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğçe Köksüz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of CREST syndrome (calsinosis cutis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, oesophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia with all of the five major symptoms. A 46-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic with the complaint of erythema, rigidity and pain on the plantar surface of the feet. She had had Raynaud’s phenomenon for 20 years and oesophageal reflux for five years. Her face had become masklike and there was prominent telangiectasies on her face and hands. Sclerosis were confined to the fingers (sclerodactyly. Direct X-ray graphy demonstrated calcinosis cutis on the left hand and suprapatellar region. She was treated with nifedipine 30 mg/day, acetylsalicylic acid 100 mg/day for Raynaud’s phenomenon and famotidine 40 mg/day, metoclopramide HCL 30 mg/day for oesophageal dysmotility. Her complaints were partially relieved after the treatment. This case had all of the five major symptoms of CREST syndrome, and we aimed to emphasize the major symptoms and complications of CREST syndrome. (Turk J Dermatol 2012; 6: 48-50

  18. Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhambhani, Vikas; Muenke, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a common genetic disorder that causes multiple congenital abnormalities and a large number of potential health conditions. Most affected individuals have characteristic facial features that evolve with age; a broad, webbed neck; increased bleeding tendency; and a high incidence of congenital heart disease, failure to thrive, short stature, feeding difficulties, sternal deformity, renal malformation, pubertal delay, cryptorchidism, developmental or behavioral problems, vision problems, hearing loss, and lymphedema. Familial recurrence is consistent with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance, but most cases are due to de novo mutations. Diagnosis can be made on the basis of clinical features, but may be missed in mildly affected patients. Molecular genetic testing can confirm diagnosis in 70% of cases and has important implications for genetic counseling and management. Most patients with Noonan syndrome are intellectually normal as adults, but some may require multidisciplinary evaluation and regular follow-up care. Age-based Noonan syndrome-specific growth charts and treatment guidelines are available. PMID:24444506

  19. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Dragan M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disease with recurrent thromboses and pregnancy complications (90% are female patients that can be primary and secondary (with concomitant autoimmune disease. Antiphospholipid antibodies are prothrombotic but also act directly with brain tissue. One clinical and one laboratory criterion is necessary for the diagnosis of APS. Positive serological tests have to be confirmed after at least 12 weeks. Clinical picture consists of thromboses in many organs and spontaneous miscarriages, sometimes thrombocytopaenia and haemolytic anaemia, but neurological cases are the most frequent: headaches, stroke, encephalopathy, seizures, visual disturbances, Sneddon syndrome, dementia, vertigo, chorea, balism, transitory global amnesia, psychosis, transversal myelopathy and Guillain-Barre syndrome. About 50% of strokes below 50 years of age are caused by APS. The first line of therapy in stroke is anticoagulation: intravenous heparin or low-weight heparins. In chronic treatment, oral anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy are used, warfarin and aspirin, mostly for life. In resistant cases, corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis are necessary. Prognosis is good in most patients but some are treatment-resistant with recurrent thrombotic events and eventually death.

  20. National Down Syndrome Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Down Syndrome Since 1979 National Down Syndrome Society 8 E 41st Street, 8th Floor New York ... Program! The mission of the National Down Syndrome Society is to be the national advocate for the ...

  1. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Condiciones Chinese Conditions Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Read in Chinese What is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)? Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) describes changes in a baby born to a mother whose pregnancy was complicated by alcohol consumption. A broader term ...

  2. Tourette Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their child cope with the condition. About Tourette Syndrome Tourette syndrome (TS) is named for French doctor Georges ... people with TS. previous continue Diagnosing and Treating Tourette Syndrome Pediatricians and family doctors may refer a child ...

  3. Barth Syndrome (BTHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Barth Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Barth Syndrome? Barth syndrome (BTHS) is a rare, genetic disorder ...

  4. Sexuality and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NDSS Home » Resources » Wellness » Sexuality » Sexuality & Down Syndrome Sexuality & Down Syndrome Human sexuality encompasses an individual's self- ... community standards for adult behavior. How Can Healthy Sexuality be Encouraged for Individuals with Down Syndrome? Creating ...

  5. Narcotic Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intolerance Malabsorption Narcotic Bowel Syndrome Radiation Therapy Injury Short Bowel Syndrome Symptoms & Causes Treatments Nutrition and Diet Managing Secondary Effects Medications Surgery Daily Living with SBS Resources SMA Syndrome Volvulus ...

  6. Pollination syndromes ignored

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maruyama, P. K.; Oliveira, G. M.; Ferreira, Célia Maria Dias;

    2013-01-01

    Generalization prevails in flower-animal interactions, and although animal visitors are not equally effective pollinators, most interactions likely represent an important energy intake for the animal visitor. Hummingbirds are nectar-feeding specialists, and many tropical plants are specialized...... toward hummingbird-pollination. In spite of this, especially in dry and seasonal tropical habitats, hummingbirds may often rely on non-ornithophilous plants to meet their energy requirements. However, quantitative studies evaluating the relative importance of ornithophilous vs. non-ornithophilous plants...... greatly to increase the overall nectar availability. We showed that mean nectar offer, at the transect scale, was the only parameter related to hummingbird visitation frequency, more so than nectar offer at single flowers and at the plant scale, or pollination syndrome. Centrality indices, calculated...

  7. Diet, Sleep and Metabolic Syndrome Among a Legal Amazon Population, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    dos Santos, Poliana Rodrigues; Ferrari, Graziele Souza Lira; Ferrari, Carlos K B

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome incidence is increasing worldwide then it is important to study the possible risk and protective factors. Our previous study suggested an association between coffee consumption and metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to address possible associations between dietary lifestyle factors with metabolic syndrome. In a case-control study we compared 74 metabolic syndrome patients with 176-matched controls attended at a public health central unit. Incident cases diagnosed...

  8. Acute Cavernous Sinus Syndrome from Metastasis of Lung Cancer to Sphenoid Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Zelenak, Marianna; Doval, Mariana; Gorscak, Jason J.; Cuscela, Daniel O.

    2012-01-01

    Cavernous sinus syndrome is a rare entity in oncology reported only in occasional case reports. Optimal therapy is thus poorly defined with rapidly progressive disease dominating the picture. Management includes prompt diagnosis, attempts at stabilization of cranial nerve function, and aggressive control of central pain syndrome. Here, we report cavernous sinus syndrome secondary to the original squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. With common presenting causes of this syndrome being infectio...

  9. Parental migration and Asperger's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehti, Venla; Cheslack-Postava, Keely; Gissler, Mika; Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, Susanna; Brown, Alan S; Sourander, Andre

    2015-08-01

    Parental immigration has been suggested as a possible risk factor for autism spectrum disorders (ASD), but findings have been inconsistent. Very few studies have focused specifically on Asperger's syndrome. The aim of this study was to examine the association between maternal and paternal immigration and the diagnosis of Asperger's syndrome in offspring. The study was a nested case-control study based on a national birth cohort in Finland. Children born in 1987-2005 and diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome by the year 2007 were identified from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register (N = 1,783). Four matched controls for each case were selected from the Finnish Medical Birth Register (N = 7,106). Information on maternal and paternal country of birth and mother tongue was collected from the Finnish Central Population Register. The study showed that children whose parents are both immigrants have a significantly lower likelihood of being diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome than those with two Finnish parents [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.2, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.1-0.4]. No significant associations were found between having only one immigrant parent and the diagnosis of Asperger's syndrome. A regional analysis showed a significantly decreased likelihood of the diagnosis of Asperger's syndrome in children whose mother (aOR 0.1, 95 % CI 0.01-0.5) or father (aOR 0.2, 95 % CI 0.05-0.5) was born in Sub-Saharan Africa. The findings may help in identifying risk factors for different ASD subtypes. On the other hand, they might reflect service use of immigrant families in Finland. PMID:25381114

  10. Correlates of obesity-related chronic ventilatory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Stradling, J; Manuel, A; Hart, N.

    2016-01-01

    "Take home" message: It remains unclear why only some obese patients develop hypoventilation syndrome. In the largest cross-sectional study to date, exploring a wide range of potential factors provoking the obesity hypoventilation syndrome, we have found that intra-abdominal obesity and a poor response to hypoxia appear to be the dominant factors associated with hypoventilation, thus providing further insights into the pathophysiology of this condition.The question addressed by the study: ...

  11. Hepatorenal syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan Lata

    2012-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is defined as a functional renal failure in patients with liver disease with portal hypertension and it constitutes the climax of systemic circulatory changes associated with portal hypertension.This term refers to a precisely specified syndrome featuring in particular morphologically intact kidneys,where regulatory mechanisms have minimised glomerular filtration and maximised tubular resorption and urine concentration,which ultimately results in uraemia.The syndrome occurs almost exclusively in patients with ascites.Type 1 HRS develops as a consequence of a severe reduction of effective circulating volume due to both an extreme splanchnic arterial vasodilatation and a reduction of cardiac output.Type 2 HRS is characterised by a stable or slowly progressive renal failure so that its main clinical consequence is not acute renal failure,but refractory ascites,and its impact on prognosis is less negative.Liver transplantation is the most appropriate therapeutic method,nevertheless,only a few patients can receive it.The most suitable "bridge treatments" or treatment for patients ineligible for a liver transplant include terlipressin plus albumin.Terlipressin is at an initial dose of 0.5-1 mg every 4 h by intravenous bolus to 3 mg every 4 h in cases when there is no response.Renal function recovery can be achieved in less than 50% of patients and a considerable decrease in renal function may reoccur even in patients who have been responding to therapy over the short term.Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt plays only a marginal role in the treatment of HRS.

  12. Morvan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskery, Mark; Chhetri, Suresh K.; Dayanandan, Rejith; Gall, Claire

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old gentleman was admitted to the regional neurosciences center with encephalopathy, myokymia, and dysautonomia. Chest imaging had previously identified an incidental mass in the anterior mediastinum, consistent with a primary thymic tumor. Antivoltage-gated potassium channel (anti-VGKC) antibodies were positive (titer 1273 pmol/L) and he was hypokalemic. Electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were in keeping with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome, and an electroencephalogram was consistent with encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Morvan syndrome was made, for which he was initially treated with high-dose steroids, followed by a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He also underwent thymectomy, followed by a postexcision flare of his symptoms requiring intensive care management. Further steroids, plasmapheresis, and IVIG achieved stabilization of his clinical condition, enabling transfer for inpatient neurorehabilitation. He was commenced on azathioprine and a prolonged oral steroid taper. A subsequent presumed incipient relapse responded well to further IVIG treatment. This case report documents a thymoma-associated presentation of anti-VGKC-positive Morvan syndrome supplemented by patient and carer narrative and video, both of which provide valuable further insights into this rare disorder. There are a limited number of publications surrounding this rare condition available in the English literature. This, combined with the heterogenous presentation, association with underlying malignancy, response to treatment, and prognosis, provides a diagnostic challenge. However, the association with anti-VGKC antibody-associated complexes and 2 recent case series have provided some scope for both accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:26740856

  13. Epilepsy in Muenke syndrome: FGFR3-related craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agochukwu, Nneamaka B; Solomon, Benjamin D; Gropman, Andrea L; Muenke, Maximilian

    2012-11-01

    Epilepsy, a neurologic disorder characterized by the predisposition to recurrent unprovoked seizures, is reported in more than 300 genetic syndromes. Muenke syndrome is an autosomal-dominant craniosynostosis syndrome characterized by unilateral or bilateral coronal craniosynostosis, hearing loss, intellectual disability, and relatively subtle limb findings such as carpal bone fusion and tarsal bone fusion. Muenke syndrome is caused by a single defining point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene. Epilepsy rarely occurs in individuals with Muenke syndrome, and little detail is reported on types of epilepsy, patient characteristics, and long-term outcomes. We present seven patients with Muenke syndrome and seizures. A review of 789 published cases of Muenke syndrome, with a focus on epilepsy and intracranial anomalies in Muenke syndrome, revealed epilepsy in six patients, with intracranial anomalies in five. The occurrence of epilepsy in Muenke syndrome within our cohort of 58 patients, of whom seven manifested epilepsy, and the intracranial anomalies and epilepsy reported in the literature, suggest that patients with Muenke syndrome may be at risk for epilepsy and intracranial anomalies. Furthermore, the impact of Muenke syndrome on the central nervous system may be greater than previously thought. PMID:23044018

  14. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzovic, S.; Fiebach, B.J.O.; Magnus, L.; Sauerbrei, H.U.

    1982-11-01

    This article reports on 14 cases of a trichorhinophalangeal syndrome in five successive generations. Besides the well-known characteristics of the TRPS the following symptoms observed in this family are new: Teething was considerably delayed, intelligence was reduced, and there were skin manifestations resembling eczema. Besides, struma colli and colitis ulcerosa were also observed. Subsequent observations have to clarify whether these symptoms are a facultative part of the TRPS pattern. The constant appearance of carriers of these characteristics during five generation points to dominant heredity.

  15. Olmsted Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirka C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old Sikh man had palmoplantar keratoderma, flexion deformity of digits, universal alopecia, keratotic plaques at the angles of mouth, gluteal cleft, knees and dorsal aspects of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the hand; features of Olmsted syndrome. He had normal nails, teeth, oral mucosa and normal joint movements. Treatment with acitretin, 25mg/day for three and a half months, followed by 25mg once daily alternating with 50mg once daily for 3 months resulted in significant improvement.

  16. [Piriformis syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erauso, Thomas; Pégorie, Anne; Gaveau, Yves-Marie; Tardy, Dominique

    2010-09-20

    Sciatic pain is often misleading and establishing the link with a local muscular cause can be difficult and lead to errors, especially when faced with a young sportsman, with typical discogenic pain. Simple, specific and reproducible tests enable a better identification and treatment of a muscular cause or canal syndrome. Physiotherapy, or local infiltrations are generally very efficient, and sufficient. Surgery may be considered only in a very limited number of cases, lack of response to the first line treatment and then only if it is the absolute diagnosis, diagnosis which must remain a diagnosis of exception, more so of exclusion. PMID:21033479

  17. CREST Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Tuğçe Köksüz; Zeynep Nurhan Saraçoğlu; Ayşe Esra Koku-Aksu; İlham Sabuncu; Cengiz Korkmaz

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of CREST syndrome (calsinosis cutis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, oesophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia) with all of the five major symptoms. A 46-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic with the complaint of erythema, rigidity and pain on the plantar surface of the feet. She had had Raynaud’s phenomenon for 20 years and oesophageal reflux for five years. Her face had become masklike and there was prominent telangiectasies on her face and hands. Sclerosis were ...

  18. Rett Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sitholey, Prabhat; Agarwal, Vivek; Srivastava, Rohit

    2012-01-01

    Rett syndrome is one of the most common causes of complex disability in girls. It is characterized by early neurological regression that severely affects motor, cognitive and communication skills, by autonomic dysfunction and often a seizure disorder. It is a monogenic X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder related to mutation in MECP2, which encodes the methyl-CpG-binding protein MeCP2. There are several mouse models either based on conditional knocking out of the Mecp2 gene or on a t...

  19. [Ascher's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halling, F; Sandrock, D; Merten, H A; Hönig, J F

    1991-01-01

    Ascher's syndrome is composed of the triad blepharochalasis, double lip and goitre. In many of the cases reported in the literature this typical constellation of symptoms is not complete; particularly the struma is not mandatorily involved. A 58-year-old patient with this rare disease who exhibited blepharochalasis and double upper and lower lip is presented. Additionally, subclinical hypothyroidism and alopecia areata totalis were found. In differential diagnosis other causes of double lips or enlargement of the lips must be considered. PMID:1817784

  20. Mazabraud syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Anulekha Mary; Behera, Kishore Kumar; Mathai, Thomas; Parmar, Harshad; Paul, Thomas V.

    2013-01-01

    A 25 year old lady presented with pain and swelling of left thigh. On examination she was found to have tenderness of left femur with a separate soft tissue swelling within the thigh muscle. Further evaluation revealed expansile bony lesion on X-ray of left tibia and multiple hot spots on bone scan suggestive of fibrous dysplasia. The soft tissue swelling on excision and histopathological examination was found to be intramuscular myxoma. The combination of the above two, called Mazabraud syndrome is being reported. PMID:23961498

  1. Mazabraud syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anulekha Mary John

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25 year old lady presented with pain and swelling of left thigh. On examination she was found to have tenderness of left femur with a separate soft tissue swelling within the thigh muscle. Further evaluation revealed expansile bony lesion on X-ray of left tibia and multiple hot spots on bone scan suggestive of fibrous dysplasia. The soft tissue swelling on excision and histopathological examination was found to be intramuscular myxoma. The combination of the above two, called Mazabraud syndrome is being reported.

  2. Griscelli syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariffin, H; Geikowski, A; Chin, T F; Chau, D; Arshad, A; Abu Bakar, K; Krishnan, S

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of Griscelli Syndrome (GS). Our patient initially presented with a diagnosis of haemophagocytic lymphistiocytosis (HLH). Subsequent microscopic analysis of the patient's hair follicle revealed abnormal distribution of melanosomes in the shaft, which is a hallmark for GS. Analysis of RAB27A gene in this patient revealed a homozygous mutation in exon 6, c.550C>T, p.R184X . This nonsense mutation causes premature truncation of the protein resulting in a dysfunctional RAB27A. Recognition of GS allows appropriate institution of therapy namely chemotherapy for HLH and curative haemotopoeitic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25500851

  3. HELLP syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Acar

    2014-08-01

    Suggested treatment modality consists, stabilization of blood pressure and magnesium sulfate infusion. Then evaluation of fetal status and planning delivery method and time if maternal status remains unstable. If prognosis seems favorable without urgent delivery and fetus can benefit from it, a course of betamethasone can be given to fetuses between 24 and 34 weeks of gestational age. The only and definite treatment of HELLP syndrome is delivering the baby. Suggested benefits of steroid therapy and other experimental treatments are still to be proven effective by large randomized controlled trials. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 735-760

  4. OCULO-CEREBRO-RENAL SYNDROME (LOWE'S SYNDROME)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Oculo-cerebro-renal syndrome (Lowe's syndrome) is characterized by mental and motor retardation, cataract, glaucoma and renal abnormalities. It is an X-linked recessive metabolic disease. Two brothers suffering from Lowe's syndrome are reported. Their mother with lenticular opacities and peculiar facial appearance is in concordance with the obligate carrier. The ocular changes and heridity are discussed.

  5. A case of Joubert syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joubert et al. first reported a familial syndrome which showed episodic tachypena, abnormal eye movement, mental and motor retardation. Since then eighteen cases have been reported in the world. In this paper, we reported a male baby with Joubert syndrome who was observed since the newborn period. He showed episodic tachypnea (respiratory rate over 100/min), apnea, severe mental and motor retardation, no normal eye movements, occipital meningocele, high arched palate and poor sucking. CT scan revealed vermian agenesis, hypoplasia and deformity of brainstem, enlarged fourth ventricle and cisterna magna. EEG showed episodic discharges. Laboratory test investigations including amino acids, lactate, pyruvate, ammonia, chromosomal analysis, IVP and renogram showed no abnormal findings. He showed poor development and at eleventh month of age he died at home because of respiratory arrest. Similar syndromes were reported by Koya et al., Dekaban, Gardner et al., D'Agostino et al. and Friede. They reported syndromes consisting of abnormal respiration, abnormal eye movements, mental and motor retardation, occipital meningocele, retinal degeneration and polycystik kidney. Some causative events may have occurred at 6 to 7 weeks of gestation affecting central nervous system as well as other organs. (author)

  6. Neuroimaging experience in pediatric Horner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadom, Nadja [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Rosman, N.P. [Boston Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Departments of Pediatrics and Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jubouri, Shams; Trofimova, Anna; Egloff, Alexia M. [Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Washington, DC (United States); Zein, Wadih M. [National Eye Institute (NEI), Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Horner syndrome in children is rare. The frequency and spectrum of malignancy as the cause of Horner syndrome in children remains unclear. Also unclear is whether the imaging work-up should include the entire oculo-sympathetic pathway or should be more targeted. In addition, the value of cross-sectional angiographic imaging in Horner syndrome is uncertain. To review imaging pathology in a cohort of children with Horner syndrome at a major academic pediatric medical center. We reviewed a 22-year period of CT and MR imaging studies in children with a clinical diagnosis of Horner syndrome referred for imaging. We found 38 patients who fulfilled study criteria of Horner syndrome and 6/38 had relevant imaging findings: 2/6 etiologies were neoplastic (congenital neuroblastoma and central astrocytoma), 1/6 had a vascular abnormality (hypoplastic carotid artery), 1/6 had maldevelopment (Chiari I malformation), and 2/6 had inflammatory/traumatic etiology (viral cervical lymphadenopathy, post jugular vein cannulation). There was a similar number of congenital and acquired pathologies. The malignancies were found at any level of the oculosympathetic pathway. There are treatable causes, including malignancies, in children presenting with Horner syndrome, which justify imaging work-up of the entire oculosympathetic pathway, unless the lesion level can be determined clinically. (orig.)

  7. Neuroimaging experience in pediatric Horner syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horner syndrome in children is rare. The frequency and spectrum of malignancy as the cause of Horner syndrome in children remains unclear. Also unclear is whether the imaging work-up should include the entire oculo-sympathetic pathway or should be more targeted. In addition, the value of cross-sectional angiographic imaging in Horner syndrome is uncertain. To review imaging pathology in a cohort of children with Horner syndrome at a major academic pediatric medical center. We reviewed a 22-year period of CT and MR imaging studies in children with a clinical diagnosis of Horner syndrome referred for imaging. We found 38 patients who fulfilled study criteria of Horner syndrome and 6/38 had relevant imaging findings: 2/6 etiologies were neoplastic (congenital neuroblastoma and central astrocytoma), 1/6 had a vascular abnormality (hypoplastic carotid artery), 1/6 had maldevelopment (Chiari I malformation), and 2/6 had inflammatory/traumatic etiology (viral cervical lymphadenopathy, post jugular vein cannulation). There was a similar number of congenital and acquired pathologies. The malignancies were found at any level of the oculosympathetic pathway. There are treatable causes, including malignancies, in children presenting with Horner syndrome, which justify imaging work-up of the entire oculosympathetic pathway, unless the lesion level can be determined clinically. (orig.)

  8. Myasthenic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, M E

    2011-03-01

    The neuromuscular junction is vulnerable to autoimmune attack both at the pre-synaptic nerve terminal and at the post-synaptic muscle membrane. Antibodies directed to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the muscle surface are the cause of myasthenia gravis in the majority of cases. Myasthenia gravis is an acquired condition, characterised by weakness and fatigability of the skeletal muscles. The ocular muscles are commonly affected first, but the disease often generalises. Treatment includes symptom control and immunosuppression. The thymus gland plays an important role in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis and thymectomy is indicated in certain subgroups. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is associated with antibodies directed to the voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies at the pre-synaptic nerve terminal. It is an acquired condition and, in some cases, may be paraneoplastic, often secondary to underlying small cell lung carcinoma. Clinical presentation is distinct from myasthenia gravis, with patients often first presenting with lower limb muscle fatigability and autonomic symptoms. Congenital myasthenic syndromes are inherited neuromuscular disorders due to mutations in proteins at the neuromuscular junction. Various phenotypes exist depending on the protein mutation. Treatment is directed towards symptom control and immunosuppression is not indicated. PMID:21365067

  9. Marfan Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Marfan Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Marfan Syndrome Print A ... the Doctor en español Síndrome de Marfan About Marfan Syndrome Marfan syndrome is a progressive genetic disorder ...

  10. Facts about Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts about Down Syndrome Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... with Down syndrome. View charts » What is Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is a condition in which a ...

  11. Solitary Median Maxillary Central Incisor Versus Agenesis of the Maxillary Central Incisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Fabrício Kitazono; Arid, Juliana; De Rossi, Andiara; Paula-Silva, Francisco W G; Nelson-Filho, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    A solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) is rare and affected individuals may carry a potentially serious condition known as SMMCI syndrome. However, many of these cases do not receive proper attention because they are misdiagnosed as agenesis of the maxillary central incisor. The purpose of this manuscript is to report two cases of children with only one maxillary central incisor and draw diagnostic differences between the entities. A correct diagnosis is very important because if an SMMCI is confirmed, the patient should be referred for genetic counseling. PMID:27098718

  12. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Qvist, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus;

    2014-01-01

    -intestinal symptoms and types of cancers differs.Clinical awareness and early diagnosis of HPS is important, as affected patients and at-risk family members should be offered genetic counselling and surveillance. Surveillance in children with HPS might prevent or detect intestinal or extra-intestinal complications......Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as......-intestinal cancer. The syndromes are rare and inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.The diagnosis of HPS has traditionally been based on clinical criteria, but can sometimes be difficult as the severity of symptoms range considerably from only a few symptoms to very severe cases - even within the same family...

  13. Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome or Wilkie Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We described three cases of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome, also known as Wilkie's syndrome, chronic duodenal ileus, or cast syndrome. This syndrome occurs when the third portion of the duodenum is compressed between the SMA and the aorta. The major risk factors for development of SMA syndrome are rapid weight loss and surgical correction of spinal deformities. The clinical presentation of SMA syndrome is variable and nonspecific, including nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and weight loss. The diagnosis is based on endoscopic, radiographic and tomographic findings of duodenal compression by the SMA. The treatment of SMA syndrome is aimed at the precipitating factor, which usually is related to weight loss. Therefore, conservative therapy with nutritional supplementation is the initial approach, and surgery is reserved for those who do not respond to nutritional therapy.

  14. A rare cause of tall stature: Sotos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagehan Aslan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sotos syndrome is an excessive growth syndrome and is characterized by macrocephaly, typical facial appearance and mental retardation. The majority of cases are sporadic, autosomal dominant inheritance pattern matching families have been reported. Syndrome responsible for gen encodes the nuclear receptor-binding SET domain1 (NSD1 protein. This rare genetic syndrome firstly described by Sotos et al. in 1964 at five cases with excessive height, acromegalic appearance and mild mental retardation. Hairline high forehead, macrocephaly, frontal bossing, long and thin face, frontotemporal hair sparseness, down slanting palpebral fissures and prominent mandible creating characteristic facial appearance and advanced bone age and varying degrees of mental retardation are other diagnostic criteria. Cardiovascular, central nervous system and genitourinary system anomalies may be associated with syndrome. In this case report we presenting a case who admitted to our clinic because of the rapid growth and mild mental retardation and diagnosed with Sotos syndrome for emphasize the importance of growth monitoring.

  15. Leopard syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallapiccola Bruno

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract LEOPARD syndrome (LS, OMIM 151100 is a rare multiple congenital anomalies condition, mainly characterized by skin, facial and cardiac anomalies. LEOPARD is an acronym for the major features of this disorder, including multiple Lentigines, ECG conduction abnormalities, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonic stenosis, Abnormal genitalia, Retardation of growth, and sensorineural Deafness. About 200 patients have been reported worldwide but the real incidence of LS has not been assessed. Facial dysmorphism includes ocular hypertelorism, palpebral ptosis and low-set ears. Stature is usually below the 25th centile. Cardiac defects, in particular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mostly involving the left ventricle, and ECG anomalies are common. The lentigines may be congenital, although more frequently manifest by the age of 4–5 years and increase throughout puberty. Additional common features are café-au-lait spots (CLS, chest anomalies, cryptorchidism, delayed puberty, hypotonia, mild developmental delay, sensorineural deafness and learning difficulties. In about 85% of the cases, a heterozygous missense mutation is detected in exons 7, 12 or 13 of the PTPN11 gene. Recently, missense mutations in the RAF1 gene have been found in two out of six PTPN11-negative LS patients. Mutation analysis can be carried out on blood, chorionic villi and amniotic fluid samples. LS is largely overlapping Noonan syndrome and, during childhood, Neurofibromatosis type 1-Noonan syndrome. Diagnostic clues of LS are multiple lentigines and CLS, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and deafness. Mutation-based differential diagnosis in patients with borderline clinical manifestations is warranted. LS is an autosomal dominant condition, with full penetrance and variable expressivity. If one parent is affected, a 50% recurrence risk is appropriate. LS should be suspected in foetuses with severe cardiac hypertrophy and prenatal DNA test may be performed. Clinical management should

  16. Metabolic Syndrome: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortada, Rami; Williams, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by androgen excess, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. It is the most common endocrinopathy among women of reproductive age, affecting between 6.5% and 8% of women, and is the most common cause of infertility. Insulin resistance is almost always present in women with PCOS, regardless of weight, and they often develop diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The Rotterdam criteria are widely used for diagnosis. These criteria require that patients have at least two of the following conditions: hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. The diagnosis of PCOS also requires exclusion of other potential etiologies of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction. The approach to PCOS management differs according to the presenting symptoms and treatment goals, particularly the patient's desire for pregnancy. Weight loss through dietary modifications and exercise is recommended for patients with PCOS who are overweight. Oral contraceptives are the first-line treatment for regulating menstrual cycles and reducing manifestations of hyperandrogenism, such as acne and hirsutism. Clomiphene is the first-line drug for management of anovulatory infertility. Metformin is recommended for metabolic abnormalities such as prediabetes, and a statin should be prescribed for cardioprotection if the patient meets standard criteria for statin therapy. PMID:26280343

  17. [Hepatopulmonary syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thévenot, Thierry; Weil, Delphine; Garioud, Armand; Lison, Hortensia; Cadranel, Jean-François; Degano, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is defined by the association of portal hypertension, increased alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient and intrapulmonary vascular dilations. Pathophysiological mechanisms of hypoxemia are characterized by ventilation-perfusion mismatch, oxygen diffusion limitation between alveolus and the centre of the dilated capillary, and right-to-left shunting. An excess of vasodilator molecules (like nitric monoxide) and proangiogenic factors (like VEGF) play an important role in the occurrence of HPS. Symptoms of HPS are not specific and dominated by a progressive dyspnea in upright position. Pulse oximetry is a simple non-invasive screening test but only detect the most severe forms of HPS. Medical treatment is disappointing and only liver transplantation may lead to resolution of HPS. Survival following liver transplantation is promising when hypoxemia is not severely decreased. PMID:27021476

  18. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Diane; Erkan, Doruk

    2009-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune systemic disease that is diagnosed when there is vascular thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity occurring with persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) (lupus anticoagulant test, anticardiolipin antibodies, and/or anti-beta(2)-glycoprotein I antibodies). Although International APS Classification Criteria have been formulated to provide a uniform approach to APS research, aPL may cause a spectrum of clinical manifestations, some of which are not included in these criteria. The main aPL-related cardiac manifestations include valve abnormalities (vegetations and/or thickening), myocardial infarction (MI), intracardiac thrombi, and myocardial microthrombosis. In this article, we will review the definition, etiopathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of aPL-related clinical events with emphasis on cardiac manifestations. PMID:19732604

  19. Noonan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Burgt Ineke

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Noonan Syndrome (NS is characterised by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The main facial features of NS are hypertelorism with down-slanting palpebral fissures, ptosis and low-set posteriorly rotated ears with a thickened helix. The cardiovascular defects most commonly associated with this condition are pulmonary stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Other associated features are webbed neck, chest deformity, mild intellectual deficit, cryptorchidism, poor feeding in infancy, bleeding tendency and lymphatic dysplasias. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Recently, mutations in the KRAS gene have been identified in a small proportion of patients with NS. A DNA test for mutation analysis can be carried out on blood, chorionic villi and amniotic fluid samples. NS should be considered in all foetuses with polyhydramnion, pleural effusions, oedema and increased nuchal fluid with a normal karyotype. With special care and counselling, the majority of children with NS will grow up and function normally in the adult world. Management should address feeding problems in early childhood, evaluation of cardiac function and assessment of growth and motor development. Physiotherapy and/or speech therapy should be offered if indicated. A complete eye examination and hearing evaluation should be performed during the first few years of schooling. Preoperative coagulation studies are indicated. Signs and symptoms lessen with age and most adults with NS do not require special medical care.

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction in metabolic syndrome and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ghosh, Balaram

    2013-01-01

    Though severe or refractory asthma merely affects less than 10% of asthma population, it consumes significant health resources and contributes significant morbidity and mortality. Severe asthma does not fell in the routine definition of asthma and requires alternative treatment strategies. It has been observed that asthma severity increases with higher body mass index. The obese-asthmatics, in general, have the features of metabolic syndrome and are progressively causing a significant burden for both developed and developing countries thanks to the westernization of the world. As most of the features of metabolic syndrome seem to be originated from central obesity, the underlying mechanisms for metabolic syndrome could help us to understand the pathobiology of obese-asthma condition. While mitochondrial dysfunction is the common factor for most of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, such as central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, the involvement of mitochondria in obese-asthma pathogenesis seems to be important as mitochondrial dysfunction has recently been shown to be involved in airway epithelial injury and asthma pathogenesis. This review discusses current understanding of the overlapping features between metabolic syndrome and asthma in relation to mitochondrial structural and functional alterations with an aim to uncover mechanisms for obese-asthma. PMID:23840225

  1. Study of central coherence in children with high functioning autism and asperger syndrome%高功能孤独症和Asperger综合征儿童的中央凝聚性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李咏梅; 邹小兵; 李建英; 唐春; 邓红珠; 李巧毅; 陈凯云; 邹圆圆; 鄢月华

    2006-01-01

    [目的]探讨高功能孤独症(high function autism,HFA)和Asperger综合征(Asperger syndrom,AS)儿童在中央凝聚性方面的认知神经心理特征,为其治疗提供理论依据.[方法]应用视觉和言语语义记忆任务和木块图形测验分别对19例学龄前及学龄期HFA儿童、26例AS儿童和20例正常健康儿童(normal controls,NC)进行测试,为其治疗提供理论依据.[结果]在视觉模式或言语模式下,给予语义相关系列的刺激时,三组儿童组能回忆的正确图片或词语数目均比非相关系列刺激能回忆正确的图片或词语数目显著增多(P<0.05);各组儿童在视觉模式下能回忆的图片数目均比在言语模式下能回忆的词语数目显著增多(P<0.01);HFA组儿童在视觉模式相对言语的记忆优势比正常组更明显.HFA组木块图量表分明显低于正常儿童组(P<0.05),AS组量表分与正常儿童组差异无显著性(P>0.05).[结论]学龄前及学龄期HFA和AS儿童的中央凝聚性薄弱并不明显,推测HFA和AS患者的中央凝聚性薄弱的认知特征可能会随着年龄的增长逐渐明显.

  2. Hyper IgE syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Dang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyper IgE syndrome (HIES is a rare disorder characterized by eczema, recurrent infections of the skin and lungs, typically with Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and certain viruses, and elevated levels of serum IgE. Other clinical manifestations include characteristic facies (prominent forehead, broad nasal bridge and facial asymmetry, chronic eczematous dermatitis, retained primary dentition, recurrent pathological fractures, hyper-extensibility and scoliosis. The central nervous system (CNS involvement in HIES has been rarely reported. Here we presented a case of HIES with rare associations of epilepsy in a young patient to raise awareness for this disorder.

  3. 2013 Space Radiation Standing Review Panel Status Review for: The Risk of Acute and Late Central Nervous System Effects from Radiation Exposure, The Risk of Acute Radiation Syndromes Due to Solar Particle Events (SPEs), The Risk Of Degenerative Tissue Or Other Health Effects From Radiation Exposure, and The Risk of Radiation Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Space Radiation Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) was impressed with the strong research program presented by the scientists and staff associated with NASA's Space Radiation Program Element and National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI). The presentations given on-site and the reports of ongoing research that were provided in advance indicated the potential Risk of Acute and Late Central Nervous System Effects from Radiation Exposure (CNS) and were extensively discussed by the SRP. This new data leads the SRP to recommend that a higher priority should be placed on research designed to identify and understand these risks at the mechanistic level. To support this effort the SRP feels that a shift of emphasis from Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) and carcinogenesis to CNS-related endpoints is justified at this point. However, these research efforts need to focus on mechanisms, should follow pace with advances in the field of CNS in general and should consider the specific comments and suggestions made by the SRP as outlined below. The SRP further recommends that the Space Radiation Program Element continue with its efforts to fill the vacant positions (Element Scientist, CNS Risk Discipline Lead) as soon as possible. The SRP also strongly recommends that NASA should continue the NASA Space Radiation Summer School. In addition to these broad recommendations, there are specific comments/recommendations noted for each risk, described in detail below.

  4. Intestinal malrotation in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Cathy A

    2015-10-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome which may include malformations of the central nervous system, heart, genitourinary tract, and other organs. However, intestinal malrotation has not been previously known to be associated with RSTS. This report documents six persons with RSTS who also had malrotation of the intestine requiring surgical repair. This suggests a possible increased frequency of malrotation in RSTS. Diagnostic studies for malrotation should be considered if recurrent vomiting, abdominal pain, and other symptoms of possible malrotation are present. PMID:26097216

  5. The fat embolism syndrome. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, D

    1990-12-01

    While fat embolism occurs in most (more than 90%) patients with traumatic injury, the fat embolism syndrome (FES) occurs in only 3%-4% of patients with long-bone fractures. FES involves multiple organ systems and can cause a devastating clinical deterioration within hours. The major clinical features of FES include hypoxia, pulmonary edema, central nervous system depression, and axillary or subconjunctive petechiae. Improvements have been made in supporting the respiratory compromise and adult respiratory distress syndrome that these patients develop. Aggressive measures to improve the pulmonary function, i.e., positive pressure ventilation and effective fluid management, are important and expedite fixation of bone fractures. PMID:2245559

  6. Seckel syndrome: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinky Sisodia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seckel syndrome (SS is a rare, autosomal recessive syndrome; characterized by severe intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, microcephaly, mental retardation, and typical facial appearance with beaklike protrusion of the midface (bird headed. In addition to the characteristic craniofacial dysmorphism and skeletal defects, abnormalities have been described in the cardiovascular, hematopoietic, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and central nervous systems. Usually such patients have poor psychomotor development. This case report presents an 8-year-old child with SS born to parents, exposed in Bhopal gas disaster.

  7. Seckel syndrome: a rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisodia, Rinky; Raj, Ravi Kadur Sundar; Goel, Vipin

    2014-01-01

    Seckel syndrome (SS) is a rare, autosomal recessive syndrome; characterized by severe intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, microcephaly, mental retardation, and typical facial appearance with beaklike protrusion of the midface (bird headed). In addition to the characteristic craniofacial dysmorphism and skeletal defects, abnormalities have been described in the cardiovascular, hematopoietic, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and central nervous systems. Usually such patients have poor psychomotor development. This case report presents an 8-year-old child with SS born to parents, exposed in Bhopal gas disaster. PMID:24739918

  8. Fetal alcohol syndrome: a cautionary note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Ernest L

    2006-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a pattern of anomalies occurring in children born to alcoholic women. The main features of this pattern are pre and/or postnatal growth retardation, characteristic facial abnormalities, and central nervous system dysfunction, including mental retardation. Since its clinical recognition in 1973 it has progressed from an unrecognized condition to a major public health concern with exaggerated and unfounded claims as to causality and impact. This review summarizes some of the basic facts about fetal alcohol syndrome with respect to terminology, prevalence, and mechanisms, in the context of exposure risk. PMID:16611132

  9. Prenatal Tests for Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME S HARE W ITH W OMEN PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME What Is Down Syndrome? ... suggests that you consult your health care provider. PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME 256 Volume 50, No. ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Rett syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Rett syndrome Rett syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... autism-dementia-ataxia-loss of purposeful hand use syndrome Rett disorder Rett's disorder Rett's syndrome RTS RTT Related ...

  11. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cannot control. The condition is commonly called Tourette syndrome. ... Tourette syndrome ... fewer people have more severe forms of Tourette syndrome. Tourette syndrome is four times as likely to occur ...

  12. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Request Permissions Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 04/2016 What is Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome? Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) is ...

  13. Pain in Down's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Mafrica

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a homeostatic mechanism that intervenes to protect the organism from harmful stimuli that could damage its integrity. It is made up of two components: the sensory-discriminative component, which identifies the provenance and characteristics of the type of pain; and the affective-motivational component, on which emotional reflexes, following the painful sensation, depend.There is a system for pain control at an encephalic and spinal level, principally made up of the periaqueductal grey matter, the periventricular area, the nucleus raphe magnus, and the pain-inhibition complex situated in the posterior horns of the spinal cord. Through the activation of these pain-control systems, the nervous system suppresses the afference of pain signals. Endogenous opioids represent another analgesic system.In the course of various studies on pain transmission in Down patients, the reduced tolerance of pain and the incapacity to give a qualitative and quantitative description emerged in a powerful way. All of these aspects cause difficulty in evaluating pain. This is linked to several learning difficulties. However, it cannot be excluded that in these anomalies of pain perception, both the anatomical and the neurotransmitter alteration, typical of this syndrome, may hold a certain importance.This fact may have important clinical repercussions that could affect the choice of therapeutic and rehabilitative schemes for treatment of pathologies in which pain is the dominant symptom, such as postoperative pain. It could influence research on analgesics that are more suitable for these patients, the evaluation of the depth of analgesia during surgical operation, and ultimately, absence of obvious pain manifestations. In conclusion, alterations of the central nervous system, neurotransmitters, pain transmission, and all related problems should be considered in the management of pain in patients with Down's syndrome, especially by algologists and

  14. Mowat-Wilson syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainardi Paola

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by a distinct facial phenotype (high forehead, frontal bossing, large eyebrows, medially flaring and sparse in the middle part, hypertelorism, deep set but large eyes, large and uplifted ear lobes, with a central depression, saddle nose with prominent rounded nasal tip, prominent columella, open mouth, with M-shaped upper lip, frequent smiling, and a prominent but narrow and triangular pointed chin, moderate-to-severe intellectual deficiency, epilepsy and variable congenital malformations including Hirschsprung disease (HSCR, genitourinary anomalies (in particular hypospadias in males, congenital heart defects, agenesis of the corpus callosum and eye anomalies. The prevalence of MWS is currently unknown, but 171 patients have been reported so far. It seems probable that MWS is under-diagnosed, particularly in patients without HSCR. MWS is caused by heterozygous mutations or deletions in the Zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 2 gene, ZEB2, previously called ZFHX1B (SIP1. To date, over 100 deletions/mutations have been reported in patients with a typical phenotype; they are frequently whole gene deletions or truncating mutations, suggesting that haploinsufficiency is the main pathological mechanism. Studies of genotype-phenotype analysis show that facial gestalt and delayed psychomotor development are constant clinical features, while the frequent and severe congenital malformations are variable. In a small number of patients, unusual mutations can lead to an atypical phenotype. The facial phenotype is particularly important for the initial clinical diagnosis and provides the hallmark warranting ZEB2 mutational analysis, even in the absence of HSCR. The majority of MWS cases reported so far were sporadic, therefore the recurrence risk is low. Nevertheless, rare cases of sibling recurrence have been observed. Congenital malformations and seizures require

  15. Health, social and economical consequences of sleep-disordered breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Kjellberg, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The objective direct and indirect costs of sleep-disordered breathing (snoring, sleep apnoea (SA) and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)) and the treatment are incompletely described.......The objective direct and indirect costs of sleep-disordered breathing (snoring, sleep apnoea (SA) and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)) and the treatment are incompletely described....

  16. Burning Mouth Syndrome and "Burning Mouth Syndrome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifkind, Jacob Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is distressing to both the patient and practitioner unable to determine the cause of the patient's symptoms. Burning mouth syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, which is used only after nutritional deficiencies, mucosal disease, fungal infections, hormonal disturbances and contact stomatitis have been ruled out. This article will explore the many causes and treatment of patients who present with a chief complaint of "my mouth burns," including symptomatic treatment for those with burning mouth syndrome. PMID:27209717

  17. Mobbing syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakoula Z.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The term mobbing comes from the English word mob, meaning attack, Compass bother. Today is the systematic psychological attack and a strategic marginalization accepted at the workplace from their superiors or colleagues unwanted, for various reasons, employees. The term was used in 1800 by British biology, description of aggressive behavior in flight, certain species of migratory birds. In 1900, ethologist Konrad Lorenz uses it to interpret the hostility of the majority of the herd, compared to lean animals of the same breed. The German psychologist Heinz Leyman, is the first, which is in the 80s, attributes the condition in human society, describing all the negative health effects of mobbing in the workplace as a "syndrome mobbing». Purpose: To work is to illustrate the phenomenon mobbing, which can appear as a problem in the relationship of the perpetrator to the victim, but also implies the presence of such conditions to occur and flourish. Literature Review: searched the literature, internet, Keyword: Work or Employee Abuse, Mistreatment, Emotional Abuse, Bossing, Victimization, Intimidation, Psychological terrorization, Psychological violence. The mobbing syndrome is defined as "repeated abusive behavior, manifested through actions, words, intimidation, acts, gestures, ways of organizing work and have the character or purpose to offend the personality, dignity or physical or mental integrity of the worker in the performance of his work, to jeopardize the employment status or to create a hostile, intimidating, degrading, humiliating or offensive working environment. According to the French psychiatrist Marie France Hirigoyen, the "offender" is a personality that satisfied 'hurting' his fellows and develops self-esteem, conveying to others the "pain" that cannot feel, but also the internal contradictions that refuses edited. Conclusions: the mobbing is the reason for the development of mental and physical diseases as an

  18. Hepatorenal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Zeyneloğlu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Renal failure is a common major complication in patients with advanced cirrhosis and generally indicates a poor prognosis when combined with liver failure. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is characterised by a combination of disturbances in circulatory and kidney function. Arterial pressure is decreased in the systemic circulation due to reduced total systemic vascular resistance. Kidney dysfunction is caused by reduction in renal blood flow. The diagnosis of HRS is based on exclusion of other disorders that cause acute kidney injury in cirrhosis as there are no specific tests. There are two types of HRS with different characteristics and prognostics. Liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for all patients without contraindication. The best approach to the pharmacologic management is the administration vasoconstrictor drugs based on the pathogenesis. Many vasoconstrictors including vasopressin analogues (terlipressin, ornipressin and vasopressin, somatostatin analogues (octreotide and alpha-adrenergic analogues (midodrine and norepinephrine have been studied. In most of the studies intravenous albumin therapy was coadministered with vasoconstrictor drugs and suggested that albumin should be considered as the component of pharmacologic intervention in patients with HRS. Renal replacement therapy in the form of hemodialysis or continuous venovenous hemofiltration has been used in the management of HRS patients awaiting transplantation or in those with acute potentially reversible conditions. The artificial hepatic support systems require further investigation. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2012; 10: 37-44

  19. Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanna, Andrea E; Termine, Cristiano

    2012-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder consisting of multiple motor and one or more vocal/phonic tics. TS is increasingly recognized as a common neuropsychiatric disorder usually diagnosed in early childhood and comorbid neuropsychiatric disorders occur in approximately 90% of patients, with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) being the most common ones. Moreover, a high prevalence of depression and personality disorders has been reported. Although the mainstream of tic management is represented by pharmacotherapy, different kinds of psychotherapy, along with neurosurgical interventions (especially deep brain stimulation, DBS) play a major role in the treatment of TS. The current diagnostic systems have dictated that TS is a unitary condition. However, recent studies have demonstrated that there may be more than one TS phenotype. In conclusion, it appears that TS probably should no longer be considered merely a motor disorder and, most importantly, that TS is no longer a unitary condition, as it was previously thought. PMID:22411257

  20. Leigh syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A male infant developed hypotonia at 5 months, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, generalized clonic convulsion, tonic spasm and periodical opisthotonus at 8 months, swallowing difficulty at 10 months, pes equinovarus and optic atrophy at 11 months, and then tachypnea, and died at 14 months of age. Parents were consanguinous. Laboratory studies revealed elevated serum LDH, CPK, lactate and Pyruvate. TPP-ATP phosphoryl transferase inhibitor was negative in urine. EEG showed irregular and diffuse slow waves and periodic diffuse spike and waves. CT scan at 9 months of age showed slightly low attenuation areas in the putamen bilaterally. At 11 months, a diffuse cerebral atrophy was found, and the low attenuation of the basal ganglia became more definite. No enhanced lesion was seen at 13 months of age. Thiamine tetra-hydrofurfuryl disulfide and lipoic acid were tried without success. The pathological findings of the brain were astrogliosis and proliferation of capillaries in putamen, thalamus, caudate neucleus, substantia nigra, pontine brachium and cerebral cortex, which were symmetrically involved. The symmetrical cavitation was found in putamen. Optic nerve and mamillary body were spared. CT scan findings corresponded well with the pathology of the necrotic lesions of the brain. It was concluded that these CT scan pictures described above may be diagnostic of Leigh syndrome. (author)

  1. Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Ernest; Clauw, Daniel J.; Goldenberg, Don L.; Harris, Richard E.; Helfenstein, Milton; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Noguchi, Koichi; Silverman, Stuart L.; Ushida, Takahiro; Wang, Guochun

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript, developed by a group of chronic pain researchers and clinicians from around the world, aims to address the state of knowledge about fibromyalgia (FM) and identify ongoing challenges in the field of FM and other chronic pain syndromes that may be characterized by pain centralization/amplification/hypersensitivity. There have been many exciting developments in research studies of the pathophysiology and treatment of FM and related syndromes that have the potential to improve the recognition and management of patients with FM and other conditions with FM-like pain. However, much of the new information has not reached all clinicians, especially primary care clinicians, who have the greatest potential to use this new knowledge to positively impact their patients’ lives. Furthermore, there are persistent misconceptions about FM and a lack of consensus regarding the diagnosis and treatment of FM. This paper presents a framework for future global efforts to improve the understanding and treatment of FM and other associated chronic pain syndromes, disseminate research findings, identify ways to enhance advocacy for these patients, and improve global efforts to collaborate and reach consensus about key issues related to FM and chronic pain in general. PMID:27022674

  2. Milk-alkali syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000332.htm Milk-alkali syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Milk-alkali syndrome is a condition in which there ...

  3. Androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001180.htm Androgen insensitivity syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is when a person who ...

  4. Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS) is a complication of type 2 diabetes . It involves extremely high blood ... Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome is a condition of: Extremely high blood sugar (glucose) level Extreme lack of ...

  5. Chinese restaurant syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinese restaurant syndrome is a set of symptoms that some people have after eating Chinese food. A food additive ... Chinese restaurant syndrome is most often diagnosed based on the symptoms. The health care provider may ask the following ...

  6. International Rett Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Website What’s in Your State? For Families: Find Rett syndrome related resources in your state! State Resources Rettsyndrome.org is the world's leading Rett syndrome research funding organization We have invested $38 million ...

  7. What Causes Rett Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What causes Rett syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... as bad for development as too little. Is Rett syndrome passed from one generation to the next? In ...

  8. What Is Marfan Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 11:11 Size: 10.5 MB November 2014 What Is Marfan Syndrome? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Being Done on Marfan Syndrome? For More Information What Is Connective Tissue? Connective tissue supports many parts ...

  9. Moebius Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FRAME video on Moebius syndrome The Moebius Syndrome Foundation is excited to announce the premiere of the FRAME video, produced by Rick Guidotti and his non-profit organization, Positive Exposure! FRAME is a web-based ...

  10. Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000304.htm Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS) is a complication of ...

  11. Green Nail Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Green Nail Syndrome Share | Green nail syndrome (GNS) is an infection of the ... discoloration of nails, also known as chloronychia. The green discoloration varies from blue-green to dark green ...

  12. Sick sinus syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chambers is a common cause of sick sinus syndrome. Coronary artery disease , high blood pressure, and aortic and ... pressure may be normal or low. Sick sinus syndrome may cause symptoms of heart failure to start or get worse. Sick sinus ...

  13. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Median nerve dysfunction; Median nerve entrapment ... Calandruccio JH. Carpal tunnel syndrome, ulnar tunnel syndrome, and stenosing tenosynovitis. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2013: ...

  14. Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inspection of a drop of urine), and urine culture for bacterial infection. Stools can be analyzed for ... Hepatitis C Inflammatory Bowel Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome Obesity Digestive Health Topics Abdominal Pain Syndrome Belching, Bloating, ...

  15. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) is a problem that is sometimes seen in women who take fertility medicines ... the belly and chest area. This is called ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). OHSS occurs only after the ...

  16. What is Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Syndrome/Down-Syndrome-Facts/ [top] What are common symptoms? » ​​ Last Reviewed: 01/17/2014 Related A-Z Topics Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Early Learning Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDDs) All related ...

  17. Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein syndrome, RTS ... Rubinstein-Taybi Parents Group USA: www.rubinstein-taybi.org ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 14. Stevens CA. Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. Gene Reviews. 2014;8. PMID: 20301699 ...

  18. Munchausen syndrome by proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001555.htm Munchausen syndrome by proxy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Munchausen syndrome by proxy is a mental illness and a form of ...

  19. Learning about Klinefelter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the genetic terms used on this page Learning About Klinefelter Syndrome What is Klinefelter syndrome? What ... they are referred to a doctor to evaluate learning disabilities. The diagnosis may also be considered in ...

  20. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome? Antiphospholipid (AN-te-fos-fo-LIP-id) antibody ... weeks or months. This condition is called catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). People who have APS also are at ...

  1. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Movie: Digestive System Winter Sports: Sledding, ... people who have it. What's Life Like for Kids With Down Syndrome? Many kids with Down syndrome ...

  2. Down Syndrome: Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kit Financials Newsroom Shop NDSS Home » Resources » Education Education This section includes information about inclusion, elementary and ... and postsecondary options for students with Down syndrome. Education & Down Syndrome This section provides an overview and ...

  3. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . Hantavirus Share Compartir Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Severe HPS. Image courtesy D. ... the workers showed evidence of infection or illness. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Topics Transmission Where HPS is ...

  4. Turner Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... special blood test that looks at chromosomes — a karyotype — is used to diagnose Turner syndrome. Several physical ... and prompt him or her to order a karyotype. Results that indicate Turner syndrome show 45 chromosomes ...

  5. Metabolic Syndrome and Migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Sachdev, Amit; Marmura, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Migraine and metabolic syndrome are highly prevalent and costly conditions. The two conditions coexist, but it is unclear what relationship may exist between the two processes. Metabolic syndrome involves a number of findings, including insulin resistance, systemic hypertension, obesity, a proinflammatory state, and a prothrombotic state. Only one study addresses migraine in metabolic syndrome, finding significant differences in the presentation of metabolic syndrome in migraineurs. However, ...

  6. The wellness syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mik-Meyer, Nanna

    2015-01-01

    Klumme. Wellness er blevet et syndrom, og dets symptomer er angst, selvbebrejdelser og skyldfølelse. Kommentar med udgangspunkt i: Carl Cederström & Andre Spicer, "The Wellness Syndrome" (Polity Books, 2015. 200 p.).......Klumme. Wellness er blevet et syndrom, og dets symptomer er angst, selvbebrejdelser og skyldfølelse. Kommentar med udgangspunkt i: Carl Cederström & Andre Spicer, "The Wellness Syndrome" (Polity Books, 2015. 200 p.)....

  7. PRES syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiological entity characterized by headache, confusion, visual disturbances, seizures and posterior transient changes on neuroimaging. PRES has been described in several conditions including hypertensive encephalopathy, preeclampsia, eclampsia, infections, electrolyte imbalance, hypercalcaemia and use of several drugs. It occurs due to elevated blood pressure which exceeds the autoregulatory capacity of brain vasculature. The posterior circulation supplied by vertibro-basilar system has poor sympathetic innervation and, therefore, is frequently involved. The role of neuroimaging is to establish the initial diagnosis and to exclude other causes of neurological symptoms and signs. NCCT is sufficient to make the diagnosis in a proper clinical setting. MRI features are characteristic and has diagnostic and prognostic value. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) can differentiate this condition from ischemia/cytotoxic edema. Differential diagnosis of PRES includes PCA territory infarcts, venous thrombosis, demyelinating disorders, vasculitis and encephalitis. The diagnosis has important implications because the reversibility of the clinico-radiological abnormalities is contingent on the prompt control of blood pressure and/or withdrawing of the offending drug. We describe here a case of PRES in a 12 years old girl with acute lymphoblasts leukaemia, treated with cytostatics-vincristine, pharmorubycin and methotrexate. After 39 days from the beginning of the treatment there are good results in the myelogram and the flowcytometric examination, but the patient made two tonic-clonic seizures. CT and MRI were made and signs of leucoencephalopathy were diagnosed. Several control MRI examinations after cessation of the therapy and disappearance of the neurologic symptoms were made. The normal findings and the clinical course were the reasons for the PRES diagnosis

  8. Brugada syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priori Silvia G

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A novel clinical entity characterized by ST segment elevation in right precordial leads (V1 to V3, incomplete or complete right bundle branch block, and susceptibility to ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden cardiac death has been described by Brugada et al. in 1992. This disease is now frequently called "Brugada syndrome" (BrS. The prevalence of BrS in the general population is unknown. The suggested prevalence ranges from 5/1,000 (Caucasians to 14/1,000 (Japanese. Syncope, typically occurring at rest or during sleep (in individuals in their third or fourth decades of life is a common presentation of BrS. In some cases, tachycardia does not terminate spontaneously and it may degenerate into ventricular fibrillation and lead to sudden death. Both sporadic and familial cases have been reported and pedigree analysis suggests an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. In approximately 20% of the cases BrS is caused by mutations in the SCN5A gene on chromosome 3p21-23, encoding the cardiac sodium channel, a protein involved in the control of myocardial excitability. Since the use of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD is the only therapeutic option of proven efficacy for primary and secondary prophylaxis of cardiac arrest, the identification of high-risk subjects is one of the major goals in the clinical decision-making process. Quinidine may be regarded as an adjunctive therapy for patients at higher risk and may reduce the number of cases of ICD shock in patients with multiple recurrences.

  9. CONSTIPATION IN RETT SYNDROME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastrointestinal problems occur frequently in girls with Rett syndrome. Constipation is a common problem in girls with Rett syndrome because of their neurological abnormalities. Research studies to better understand the abnormalities of large bowel function in our girls with Rett syndrome have not b...

  10. What Is Usher Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... into electrical impulses that transfer messages to the brain. How is Usher syndrome inherited? Usher syndrome is ... required for the child to be affected. A person with only one copy of the gene is a ... in deafness and deaf-blindness, but are not related to Usher syndrome. ...

  11. Stiff skin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, S; Lei, X; Toyohara, J P; Zhan, P; Wang, J; Tan, S

    2006-07-01

    Stiff skin syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by pronounced skin induration, mild hypertrichosis and limited joint mobility, predominantly on the buttocks and thighs. Many heterogeneous cases have been reported under the name of stiff skin syndrome. We present a case of stiff skin syndrome from China, the diagnosis based on the patient's typical clinical and histopathological features. PMID:16836505

  12. Munchausen syndrome by proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munchausen syndrome by proxy is a mental illness and a form of child abuse . The caretaker of ... No one is sure what causes Munchausen syndrome by proxy. Sometimes, the person was abused as a child or has Munchausen syndrome (fake illness for themselves).

  13. Fragile X Syndrome Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Fragile X Syndrome: Overview Skip sharing on social media links Share ... menu on the left. ​ Common Name Fragile X syndrome or Fragile X Medical or Scientific Names Martin-Bell syndrome Last ...

  14. Management of acute neurologic syndromes in infants and children.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaywitz, B A

    1984-01-01

    Neurological problems in the pediatric intensive care unit all too frequently seem to be among the most mysterious of disorders. This review provides a framework to diagnose and treat four frequently observed neurological syndromes: coma, status epilepticus, central nervous system infections, and post-infectious polyneuropathy (Guillain-Barré syndrome). An emphasis is placed on the diagnosis of coma due to metabolic disorders, the most common cause of coma, and coma as a result of supratentor...

  15. The clinical and polysomnographic features in complex sleep apnea syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    İNÖNÜ, Handan; ÇİFTÇİ, Tansu Ulukavak; KÖKTÜRK, Oğuz

    2010-01-01

    Complex sleep apnea syndrome (CompSAS) is characterized by the onset of central apneas or a Cheyne-Stokes breathing pattern in some patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) who were treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). The etiology of CompSAS is unclear, but derangement of respiratory control has been proposed. We sought to compare clinical and polysomnography (PSG) features of patients with CompSAS and OSAS. Materials and methods: Records of PSG were evaluat...

  16. Clinical, imagiological and etiological spectrum of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, PR; Pinho, J; Rodrigues, M; Sousa, F; Amorim, J; Ribeiro, M.; Rocha, J.; Ferreira, C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Analyze the cases of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) admitted in a Neurology Department during an 8-year period. Method Retrospective observational study in a central hospital in the north of Portugal. Results 14 patients were identified, mean age 52.3 years. Precipitating factors included: eclampsia, isolated arterial hypertension, spinal trauma and autonomic dysreflexia, Guillain-Barré syndrome, sepsis, sarcoidosis and pulmonary cryptococcosis and drugs. Most p...

  17. Cushing syndrome and the anesthesiologist, two case reports

    OpenAIRE

    Rudin Domi; Hektor Sula

    2011-01-01

    Cushing′s syndrome (CS) is associated with reduced life quality and increased mortality, mostly due to cardiovascular disease. The features of this syndrome are central obesity, moon facies, facial plethora, supraclavicular fat pads, buffalo hump, and purple striae. Other complications include hyperglycemia, hypertension, proximal muscle weakness, skin thinning, menstrual irregularities, amenorrhea and osteopenia. These make perioperative and anesthetic management difficult and present a chal...

  18. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome: A Paradoxical Cannabis Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivonne Marie Figueroa-Rivera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite well-established antiemetic properties of marijuana, there has been increasing evidence of a paradoxical effect in the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system, given rise to a new and underrecognized clinical entity called the Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Reported cases in the medical literature have established a series of patients exhibiting a classical triad of symptoms: cyclic vomiting, chronic marijuana use, and compulsive bathing. We present a case of a 29-year-old man whose clinical presentation strongly correlates with cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. Despite a diagnosis of exclusion, this syndrome should be considered plausible in the setting of a patient with recurrent intractable vomiting and a strong history of cannabis use as presented in this case.

  19. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome: A Paradoxical Cannabis Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Rivera, Ivonne Marie; Estremera-Marcial, Rodolfo; Sierra-Mercado, Marielly; Gutiérrez-Núñez, José; Toro, Doris H

    2015-01-01

    Despite well-established antiemetic properties of marijuana, there has been increasing evidence of a paradoxical effect in the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system, given rise to a new and underrecognized clinical entity called the Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Reported cases in the medical literature have established a series of patients exhibiting a classical triad of symptoms: cyclic vomiting, chronic marijuana use, and compulsive bathing. We present a case of a 29-year-old man whose clinical presentation strongly correlates with cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. Despite a diagnosis of exclusion, this syndrome should be considered plausible in the setting of a patient with recurrent intractable vomiting and a strong history of cannabis use as presented in this case. PMID:26266060

  20. CANDLE syndrome: a recently described autoinflammatory syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüfekçi, Özlem; Bengoa, ŞebnemYilmaz; Karapinar, Tuba Hilkay; Ataseven, Eda Büke; İrken, Gülersu; Ören, Hale

    2015-05-01

    CANDLE syndrome (chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature) is a recently described autoinflammatory syndrome characterized by early onset, recurrent fever, skin lesions, and multisystemic inflammatory manifestations. Most of the patients have been shown to have mutation in PSMB8 gene. Herein, we report a 2-year-old patient with young onset recurrent fever, atypical facies, widespread skin lesions, generalized lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, joint contractures, hypertrglyceridemia, lipodystrophy, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Clinical features together with the skin biopsy findings were consistent with the CANDLE syndrome. The pathogenesis and treatment of this syndrome have not been fully understood. Increased awareness of this recently described syndrome may lead to recognition of new cases and better understanding of its pathogenesis which in turn may help for development of an effective treatment. PMID:25036278

  1. To centralize or not to centralize?

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Andrew; Kunisch, Sven; Müller-Stewens, Günter

    2011-01-01

    The CEO's dilemma-were the gains of centralization worth the pain it could cause?-is a perennial one. Business leaders dating back at least to Alfred Sloan, who laid out GM's influential philosophy of decentralization in a series of memos during the 1920s, have recognized that badly judged centralization can stifle initiative, constrain the ability to tailor products and services locally, and burden business divisions with high costs and poor service.1 Insufficient centralization can deny bus...

  2. Adult-onset bulbar ptosis in Joubert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burt B

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Benjamin Burt, Johanan Levine, Kim LeTexas Tech University, Department of Ophthalmology, Paul L Foster School of Medicine, El Paso, TexasAbstract: In this case report, we describe a case of adult-onset bulbar ptosis in a patient with Joubert syndrome. Joubert syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder with malformations in cerebellum and brainstem. Many ocular abnormalities have been noted in Joubert syndrome, but the association of this syndrome with adult-onset ptosis has not been described to date. This 24-year-old Joubert patient developed a cerebrospinal fluid cyst in her midbrain. She had signs of bilateral third nerve palsy and abducens palsy in the left eye. The bilateral central third nerve palsy causing functional blindness secondary to severe bilateral levator palsy was treated successfully with silicone sling frontalis suspension, as the seventh nerve nucleus was not involved.Keywords: Joubert syndrome, ptosis, diplopia, molar tooth formation, silicone sling implants

  3. 以中心性漿液性脉络膜视网膜和Cushing综合征为首发症状的肾上腺髓脂肪瘤1例报告%One case report of combined central serous chorioretinopathy and Cushing's syndrome associated with adrenal myelolipoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玲; 杨昉; 张仁良

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction Although adrenal myelolipoma was considered to be a non-functioning benign tumor composed of mature adipose cells and hematopoietic elements in the past, accumulating evidence suggested that adrenal myelolipoma sometimes associated with adrenocortical dysfunction, endocrine or ocular disorders. And there have been several reports that patients with adrenal myelolipoma simultaneously sufferred from Cushing ' s syndrome, Conn ’ s syndrome,pheochromocytoma, adrenogenital syndrome or virilization[1 - 2].

  4. Barth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke Sarah LN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract First described in 1983, Barth syndrome (BTHS is widely regarded as a rare X-linked genetic disease characterised by cardiomyopathy (CM, skeletal myopathy, growth delay, neutropenia and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3-MGCA. Fewer than 200 living males are known worldwide, but evidence is accumulating that the disorder is substantially under-diagnosed. Clinical features include variable combinations of the following wide spectrum: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE, left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC, ventricular arrhythmia, sudden cardiac death, prolonged QTc interval, delayed motor milestones, proximal myopathy, lethargy and fatigue, neutropenia (absent to severe; persistent, intermittent or perfectly cyclical, compensatory monocytosis, recurrent bacterial infection, hypoglycaemia, lactic acidosis, growth and pubertal delay, feeding problems, failure to thrive, episodic diarrhoea, characteristic facies, and X-linked family history. Historically regarded as a cardiac disease, BTHS is now considered a multi-system disorder which may be first seen by many different specialists or generalists. Phenotypic breadth and variability present a major challenge to the diagnostician: some children with BTHS have never been neutropenic, whereas others lack increased 3-MGCA and a minority has occult or absent CM. Furthermore, BTHS was first described in 2010 as an unrecognised cause of fetal death. Disabling mutations or deletions of the tafazzin (TAZ gene, located at Xq28, cause the disorder by reducing remodeling of cardiolipin, a principal phospholipid of the inner mitochondrial membrane. A definitive biochemical test, based on detecting abnormal ratios of different cardiolipin species, was first described in 2008. Key areas of differential diagnosis include metabolic and viral cardiomyopathies, mitochondrial diseases, and many causes of neutropenia and

  5. Poland-Möbius syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, D. L.; Mitchell, P. R.; Holmes, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    A patient with stigmata of both the Möbius syndrome and the Poland syndrome is presented. This is now the twelfth well-documented patient with a combination of the two syndromes. The association of the Poland syndrome and the Möbius syndrome occurs with sufficient frequency that the combination probably represents a formal genesis malformation syndrome of unknown aetiology that should be designated the Poland-Möbius syndrome.

  6. Macrodontic maxillary incisor in alagille syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Cozzani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the surgical-orthodontic guided-eruption of a deeply impacted macrodontic maxillary central incisor in a 10-year-old patient with Alagille syndrome (ALGS. In the first stage, orthodontic treatment with fixed appliance on deciduous teeth allowed to create enough space for the eruption of the maxillary right central incisor. The second stage included closed surgical exposure and vertical traction. After impacted tooth erupted in the proper position, accessory periodontal treatment and dental reshaping procedures may be indicated to camouflage macrodontic incisor with the adjacent teeth. This is the first report that presents a patient with ALGS undergoing orthodontic and surgical treatment.

  7. Cerebral involvement in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Involvement of the central nervous system in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is usually due to opportunistic infections; these frequently offer a difficult differential diagnostic problem. Imaging methods play an important part in the elucidation of symptoms. CT and MR findings were analysed in 13 patients with AIDS and neurological symptoms. Some infections of the central nervous system (encephalitis of unknown aetiology, cytomegalic encephalitis, meningitis) may show cerebral atrophy or even no morphological changes. Toxoplasmosis and PML are the most common opportunistic infections typical changes on CT and MR may lead to diagnosis. MR offers advantages compared with CT in its higher sensitivity for the demonstration even of small lesions. (orig.)

  8. Imaging of Horner's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, A.; Haydar, A.A. [Derriford Hospital Plymouth, Derriford, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Adams, W.M. [Derriford Hospital Plymouth, Derriford, Plymouth (United Kingdom)], E-mail: william.adams@phnt.swest.nhs.uk

    2008-05-15

    Horner's syndrome, or oculosympathetic paresis, results from interruption of the sympathetic trunk innervation to the eye and presents typically with meiosis, ptosis and facial anhydrosis on the affected side.{sup 1} The pathological process ranges from benign, such as cluster headache, or life threatening, such as lung malignancy. Appropriate imaging requires an anatomical appreciation of the complex and circuitous route the neuronal pathway takes as it passes from the central nervous system to the eye.

  9. Understanding Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gina Rutherford; Philip Manning; Newton, Julia L

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a debilitating disorder of unknown aetiology, characterised by severe disabling fatigue in the absence of alternative diagnosis. Historically, there has been a tendency to draw psychological explanations for the origin of fatigue; however, this model is at odds with findings that fatigue and accompanying symptoms may be explained by central and peripheral pathophysiological mechanisms, including effects of the immune...

  10. Prevalence of Hypertension within the Metabolic Syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomečková, Marie; Grünfeldová, H.; Peleška, Jan; Hanuš, P.; Marušiaková, Miriam

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 30 (2007), s. 371-372. ISSN 1420-4096. [Central European Meeting on Hypertension and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention. 11.10.2007-13.10.2007, Kraków] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : metabolic syndrome * hypertension Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  11. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome: the diagnostic dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    Ivana Stasevic Karlicic; Jelena Djordjevic; Milena Stasevic; Slavica Djukic Dejanovic; Dragan Pavlovic; Slobodan Jankovic

    2016-01-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a life-threatening, often fatal idiosyncratic reaction to neuroleptic or other drug therapies that antagonise the central dopaminergic neurotransmission. The clinical presentation of NMS is very heterogeneous. The lack of specific levels of symptom severity in currently used diagnostic criteria dims the diagnosis of NMS. Therefore differential diagnosis is of priority, because NMS is a diagnosis of exclusion. The aim of this paper is to present a comple...

  12. Alobar holoprosencephaly and Trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    Andressa Dias Costa; Regina Schultz; Sérgio Rosemberg

    2013-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a congenital defect of the brain, median structures, and face resulting from an incomplete cleavage of the primitive brain during early embryogenesis. The authors report a case of trisomy 13 syndrome diagnosed at prenatal follow up. The preterm newborn lived only 5 hours, and died because of severe respiratory failure. The autopsy findings disclosed facial, skull, limbs, cardiac, and cerebral malformations. Among the latter, the presence of alobar HPE, the central t...

  13. Complex pleiotropy characterizes the pollen hoarding syndrome in honey bees (Apis mellifera L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Page, Robert E.; Fondrk, M. Kim; Rueppell, Olav

    2012-01-01

    The pollen hoarding syndrome consists of a large suite of correlated traits in honey bees that may have played an important role in colony organization and consequently the social evolution of honey bees. The syndrome was first discovered in two strains that have been artificially selected for high and low pollen hoarding. These selected strains are used here to further investigate the phenotypic and genetic links between two central aspects of the pollen hoarding syndrome, sucrose responsive...

  14. Cutaneous and ocular manifestations of neurocutaneous syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernoff, Karen A; Schaffer, Julie V

    2016-01-01

    Neurocutaneous syndromes are a heterogeneous group of congenital and hereditary disorders with manifestations in the skin and the nervous system, usually together with ocular features that represent diagnostic clues and potential sources of morbidity. Dermatologists and ophthalmologists often need to work together in identifying and managing patients with these conditions; herein, we focus on classic and under-recognized neurocutaneous syndromes. We begin with autosomal dominant genodermatoses characterized by hamartomas and tumors in the skin, eyes, and central nervous system: neurofibromatosis type 1, tuberous sclerosis complex, and PTEN hamartoma-tumor syndrome. This is followed by a discussion of two mosaic disorders, Sturge-Weber syndrome and neurocutaneous melanocytosis. In addition to providing an update on clinical presentations and evaluation of patients with these conditions, we review recent insights into their pathogenesis, drawing attention to relationships among the diseases on a molecular level and implications regarding treatment. We also highlight the major features of other neurocutaneous syndromes that have ocular findings plus pigmentary, vascular, hyperkeratotic, adnexal, connective tissue, photosensitive, and inflammatory manifestations in the skin. PMID:26903185

  15. Savant Syndrome: Clinical and Neuropsychological Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Durukan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Savant syndrome defines the people who have severe developmental and mental disabilities but also have extraordinary mental skills which are missing in many people. Although general mental capacity is under average mental level, savant has excessive knowledge about one or more domains. It is accepted that as many as one in 10 persons with autistic disorder have such remarkable abilities in varying degrees, although savant syndrome occurs in other developmental disabilities or in other types of central nervous system injury or disease as well. Males outnumber females by an approximate 6 : 1 ratio in savant syndrome. Savant skills are limited to five general categories. These are music, art, calender calculating, mathematics and mechanical or spatial skills. Savant skills can also be divided into three as savants who have splinter skills, talented savants and prodigious savants. A remarkable memory welds to the special abilities determined in savant syndrome. Savant syndrome can be congenital or it can be acquired. Most often savant skills emerge in childhood, superimposed on some underlying developmental disability present at birth. However, acquired savant skills can also appear, when none were previously present, in neurotypical individuals following brain injury or disease later in infancy, childhood or adult life. Savant skills don’t depend on only rote memory. It is approved that an enhanced or spared ability to represent and manipulate highly organised domain-specific information. Various theoretic models were defined to explain the neuropsychological profile in savant syndrome. Interest in savants has a long history, stretching back to the early 18th century; nevertheless, the savant syndrome remains as much a mystery now as it did when it was first described. Given that many questions about the existence and nature of savant talent remain unanswered, it seems likely that research efforts will continue unabated.

  16. [Tic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czapliński, Adam; Steck, Andreas J; Fuhr, Peter

    2002-01-01

    A tic is an involuntary, sudden, rapid, recurrent, nonrrhythmic, stereotyped, motor movement or vocalization. This paper reviews clinical, pathophysiological, epidemiological and treatment issues of tic disorders. The clinical presentation of tic disorders with simple and complex motor or vocal tics is reviewed in detail. The most common psychiatric comorbid conditions, such as personality disorder (PD), Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Self-Destructive Behavior (SDB) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are presented too. All forms of tics may be exacerbated by anger or stress, but they are usually markedly diminished during sleep. Premonitory feelings or "sensory experiences", which are distinct from the actual motor or phonic tics and precede the tics, occur in over 80% of tic-patients and in 95% of patients with Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (GTS). The American Psychiatric Association recognizes three types of tic disorders on the basis of clinical criteria: Transient Tic Disorder, Chronic Motor or Vocal Tic Disorder and GTS. The diagnostic criteria for these types are described. According to epidemiological data, up to 10% of children have at least somewhere a transient tic disorder. The onset of tics, whether simple or multiple, occurs at approximately 7 years of age. The accepted prevalence figure for GTS is 0.05-3%. Although tics can appear as the result of brain injury, Huntington chorea or encephalitis, they are most commonly idiopathic. Genetic factors appear to be present in many but not in all cases of tic disorders. Autosomal dominant, sex-linked models or semirecessive-semidominant-oligogenic models have been considered. Based on the review of the literature we believe that tic disorders are related to altered neurotransmitter function within the CNS, especially that the functional abnormality is somehow related to dopaminergic mechanism. Several authors have recently investigated the possible role of autoimmune response to

  17. JOUBERT SYNDROME IN THREE ADULTS IN A FAMILY: A CASE SERIES

    OpenAIRE

    Dipu; Pankaj Kr; Rohit Kr.; Sushant; Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Joubert syndrome (JS) is a rare autosomal recessive central nervous system malformation characterized by hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis, hypotonia and abnormal psychomotor development, along with altered respiratory pattern and various ophthalmologic features. Here, we describe three adult with Joubert syndrome in a family that had almost similar ...

  18. A Case of Goldenhar Syndrome Associated with a New Retinal Presentation: Exudative Vitelliform Maculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Bruè; Cesare Mariotti; Silvia Celani; Ilaria Rossiello; Alfonso Giovannini

    2015-01-01

    Goldenhar syndrome is a rare clinical disturbance with a wide range of clinical manifestations. We report on a 6-year-old male with peculiar retinal presentation of Goldenhar syndrome. The patient was referred to Ophthalmology for central scotoma in the left eye, where visual acuity was 20/100. Fundus examination was unremarkable, except for yellowish material in the central macula. SD-OCT revealed interruption of the external limiting membrane and inner and outer segment junctions, with diso...

  19. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic ...

  20. NIDDK Central Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIDDK Central Repository stores biosamples, genetic and other data collected in designated NIDDK-funded clinical studies. The purpose of the NIDDK Central...

  1. Central and peripheral demyelination

    OpenAIRE

    Man Mohan Mehndiratta; Natasha Singh Gulati

    2014-01-01

    Several conditions cause damage to the inherently normal myelin of central nervous system, perepheral nervous system or both central and perepheral nervous system and hence termed as central demyelinating diseases, perepheral demyelinating diseases and combined central and perepheral demyelinating diseases respectively. Here we analysed and foccused on the etiology, prevalance, incidence and age of these demyelinating disorders. Clinical attention and various diagnostic tests are needed to ad...

  2. Metabolic syndrome and migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit eSachdev

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Migraine and metabolic syndrome are highly prevaleirnt and costly conditions.The two conditions coexist, but it is unclear what relationship may exist between the two processes. Metabolic syndrome involves a number of findings, including insulin resistance, systemic hypertension, obesity, a proinflammatory state, and a prothrombotic state. Only one study addresses migraine in metabolic syndrome, finding significant differences in the presentation of metabolic syndrome in migraineurs. However, controversy exists regarding the contribution of each individual risk factor to migraine pathogensis and prevalence. It is unclear what treatment implications, if any, exist as a result of the concomitant diagnosis of migraine and metabolic syndrome. The cornerstone of migraine and metabolic syndrome treatments is prevention, relying heavily on diet modification, sleep hygiene, medication use, and exercise.

  3. Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, C. P.; Townsend, J J

    2012-01-01

    The dialysis disequilibrium syndrome is a rare but serious complication of hemodialysis. Despite the fact that maintenance hemodialysis has been a routine procedure for over 50 years, this syndrome remains poorly understood. The signs and symptoms vary widely from restlessness and headache to coma and death. While cerebral edema and increased intracranial pressure are the primary contributing factors to this syndrome and are the target of therapy, the precise mechanisms for their development ...

  4. Gambaran Radiografi Crouzon Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Chairani

    2010-01-01

    Crouzon’s syndrome merupakan penyakit autosomal dominan yang disebabkan oleh mutasi gen pertumbuhan FGFR 2 (Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2) kromosom 10, kepala tidak berkembang dengan sempurna. Insiden crouzon syndrome berkisar antara 1: 25000 sampai 1: 60000 kelahiran. Secara klinis mempunyai kepala yang pendek dan lebar, atau sekitar 30% penderita crouzon’s syndrome mengalami hydrocephalus. Manifestasi penyakit ini di rongga mulut antara lain: protrusi mandibula, gigi berjejal pad...

  5. Rubinsten Taybi Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    J. Jannati

    2008-01-01

    Rubinstein Taybi syndrome or Broad Thumb and Hallux syndrome is a genetic multisystem disorder with unknown mode of inheritance. "nThis syndrome characterized by Broad terminal phalange of the thumbs and /or hallucess broad terminal phalanges of other fingers, characteristic facies (small head, beaked nose, hypertelorism, antimongoloid slant of the palpebral fissures, strabismus, high arch palate, abnormalities of ears, mental and motor retardation."nRadiologic manifestations are sh...

  6. [Paraneoplastic syndromes: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardi, R; Grilli, G; Romagnoli, E; Saladino, T; Freddari, F; Tamburrano, T; Galizia, E; Carbonari, G; Mariani, C; Braconi, C; Pierantoni, C; Battelli, N; Scartozzi, M; Cascinu, S

    2005-01-01

    Modern oncology often obtains good results against earlier neoplasms, whilst it's still in difficulties against the advanced ones. The knowledge of paraneoplastic syndromes is crucial both to cure patients and to do an earlier diagnosis. When we recognize a paraneoplastic syndrome that comes before the clinic beginning of a neoplasm, perhaps we save a life. This review discusses all the main paraneoplastic syndromes, focusing mainly on their clinical aspect and reminding the most commonly associated cancers. PMID:16463565

  7. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Galli, Jonathan A.; Sawaya, Ronald Andari; Friedenberg, Frank K.

    2011-01-01

    Coinciding with the increasing rates of cannabis abuse has been the recognition of a new clinical condition known as Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is characterized by chronic cannabis use, cyclic episodes of nausea and vomiting, and frequent hot bathing. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome occurs by an unknown mechanism. Despite the well-established anti-emetic properties of marijuana, there is increasing evidence of its paradoxical effects on the gastrointes...

  8. Introduction: Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    In the nearly 50 years since the description of Williams syndrome by Williams et al. in 1961, the focus of scientific inquiry has shifted from identification, definition, and description of the syndrome in small series to genotype-phenotype correlation, pathophysiologic investigation in both humans and in animal models, and therapeutic outcomes in large cohorts. Study of this rare syndrome has provided insight into the structure and function of the extracellular matrix, has contributed to und...

  9. Understanding Brugada syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehshan, Janine Mary; Rizzolo, Denise

    2015-06-01

    Brugada syndrome is an established cause of sudden cardiac arrest in patients without structural cardiac abnormalities. Recognition and diagnosis of this syndrome has been slowly increasing. Syncope, ventricular dysrhythmia, or sudden cardiac arrest may be the presenting symptom, although detection of the characteristic right precordial ST-segment elevation on ECG can be a potentially lifesaving intervention. This article reviews the clinical presentation, pathophysiology, genetics, and current management of Brugada syndrome. PMID:25932713

  10. Coeliac artery compression syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    OKTAY, Özgür; MEMİŞ, Ahmet; Parildar, Mustafa; Oran, İsmail

    2003-01-01

    Celiac artery compression syndrome, also called median arcuate ligament compression syndrome, causes gastrointestinal ischemia secondary to compression of the proximal portion of the celiac artery just beyond its origin by the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm. This syndrome is frequently demonstrated on aortography performed in patients without complaints of intestinal angina. Isolated stenosis or even occlusion of the celiac artery is always compensated for by collateral circul...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Waardenburg syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Waardenburg syndrome Waardenburg syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Waardenburg syndrome is a group of genetic conditions that can ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Rotor syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Rotor syndrome Rotor syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Rotor syndrome is a relatively mild condition characterized by ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Joubert syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Joubert syndrome Joubert syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Joubert syndrome is a disorder that affects many parts ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Turner syndrome Turner syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Turner syndrome is a chromosomal condition that affects development in ...

  15. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Children Page Content On this page: What is hemolytic ... spine. [ Top ] What causes hemolytic uremic syndrome in children? The most common cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome ...

  16. First Trimester Down Syndrome Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? First Trimester Down Syndrome Screen Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... is carrying has a chromosomal abnormality such as Down syndrome (trisomy 21) or Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18) . The ...

  17. Features of Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Figuring Out CGG Repeats! Donate | Print Fragile X Syndrome Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic condition that causes ... health concerns associated with the condition. Features of Fragile X Syndrome in Males Read our Story The majority of ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Arts syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Arts syndrome Arts syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Arts syndrome is a disorder that causes serious neurological ...

  19. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-01-01

    Investigators at Children's Hospital of Montefiore, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, NY, determined the incidence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in a pediatric critical care unit.

  20. Neonatal abstinence syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JR, Isemann B, Ward LP, et al. Current management of neonatal abstinence syndrome secondary to ... MD, MSc, IBCLC, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Medical University of ...

  1. Short Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may include nutritional support medications surgery intestinal transplant Nutritional Support The main treatment for short bowel syndrome is nutritional support, which may include the following: Oral rehydration. Adults ...

  2. Organic brain syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBS; Organic mental disorder (OMS); Chronic organic brain syndrome ... Listed below are disorders associated with OBS. Brain injury caused by ... the brain ( subarachnoid hemorrhage ) Blood clot inside the ...

  3. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Azhar, Salman

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of risk factors including insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension that markedly increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) isotypes, PPARα, PPARδ/β and PPARγ are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors, which modulate the expression of an array of genes that play a central role in regulating glucose, lipid and cholesterol meta...

  4. Do you know this syndrome? *

    OpenAIRE

    Rosmaninho, A.; Pinto-Almeida, T.; Fernandes, I; Machado, S; Selores, M.

    2013-01-01

    Noonan Syndrome is one of the most common genetic syndromes and also an important differential diagnosis in children presenting with syndromic facies similar to Turner's syndrome phenotype. This syndrome is characterized by facial dysmorphism, congenital heart defects, short stature and also a wide phenotypic variation. This article discusses the case of a 10 year-old patient with Noonan syndrome that presented typical facies, cardiac defects (pulmonary dilatation and mitral regurgitation), d...

  5. Metabolic syndrome in acute coronary syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome in male patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome Study design: A Descriptive study Place and duration of study: Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology and National Institute of Heart Diseases, Rawalpindi, from October 2007 to September 2008 Patients and Methods: Male patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) were included. Patients having angioplasty (PCI), coronary artery bypass surgery in the past and other co-morbid diseases were excluded. All patients were assessed for the presence of five components of metabolic syndrome including hypertension, HDL-Cholesterol and triglycerides, glucose intolerance and abdominal obesity. Systolic, diastolic blood pressures, waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. ECG, cardiac enzymes, fasting glucose and lipid profile were also done. Results: A total of 135 male patients of ACS were studied with a mean age of 54.26 +- 11 years. Metabolic syndrome (MS) was present in 55 (40.7%) patients. MS with all five components was documented in 4 (7.27%) while MS with four and three components was seen in 23 (41.81%) and 28 (50.90%) patients respectively. Only 24 (43.63%) patients with MS had diabetes mellitus, remaining 31(56.36%) were non diabetic. Frequencies of diabetes, hypertension and family history of CAD were significantly higher (p<0.05) in patients with metabolic syndrome as compared to patients with normal metabolic status. Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome is fairly common and important risk factor in patients of IHD. Other risk factors like smoking, dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes were also frequently found. Public awareness to control the risk factors can reduce the prevalence of CAD in our country. (author)

  6. MRI of Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galluzzi, P.; Filosomi, G.; Vallone, I.M.; Venturi, C. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Policlinico ' ' Le Scotte' ' , Siena (Italy); Bardelli, A.M. [Dept. of Ophthalmological Sciences, Unit of Paediatric Ophthalmology, University of Siena (Italy)

    1999-10-01

    Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD) is a rare diffuse neurodegenerative disorder characterised by diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness, and a wide variety of abnormalities of the central nervous system, urinary tract and endocrine glands. It may be familial or sporadic. Reported features on MRI of the brain are absence of the physiological high signal of the posterior lobe of the pituitary, shrinkage of optic nerves, chiasm and tracts, atrophy of the hypothalamic region, brain stem, cerebellum, and cerebral cortex. We report a 12-year-old girl with a 5-year history without brain stem, cerebellar or cerebral atrophy. MRI showed an unusual feature: a focus of high signal on PD- and T2-weighted images in the right substantia nigra. This is consistent with previously reported neuropathological post-mortem studies, but has never been reported in vivo. (orig.)

  7. MRI of Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD) is a rare diffuse neurodegenerative disorder characterised by diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness, and a wide variety of abnormalities of the central nervous system, urinary tract and endocrine glands. It may be familial or sporadic. Reported features on MRI of the brain are absence of the physiological high signal of the posterior lobe of the pituitary, shrinkage of optic nerves, chiasm and tracts, atrophy of the hypothalamic region, brain stem, cerebellum, and cerebral cortex. We report a 12-year-old girl with a 5-year history without brain stem, cerebellar or cerebral atrophy. MRI showed an unusual feature: a focus of high signal on PD- and T2-weighted images in the right substantia nigra. This is consistent with previously reported neuropathological post-mortem studies, but has never been reported in vivo. (orig.)

  8. PROTEUS SYNDROME: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad HEYDARIAN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveProteus Syndrome is an extremely rare, sporadic and progressive disorder. We describe a four-month-old male baby with central nervous system manifestations in this article.Clinical presentationA four-month-old boy was admitted into our hospital with three tonic - clonic generalized seizure attacks which started from the day before admission. Each seizure attack lasted less than 10 minutes and the baby was well between attacks. No fever was detected. On physical examination, abnormal facial features, macrocrania, a wide nasal bridge, overgrowth of the right lower limb, macrodactyly in the third left toe, epidermal nevus on the left side of the abdomen and skin vascular abnormalities were detected. His developmental status was normal. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI revealed left sided hemihypertrophy, ventricle enlargement and macrocrania on the same side.

  9. PROTEUS SYNDROME: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad HEYDARIAN

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveProteus Syndrome is an extremely rare, sporadic and progressive disorder. We describe a four-month-old male baby with central nervous system manifestations in this article.Clinical presentationA four-month-old boy was admitted into our hospital with three tonic - clonic generalized seizure attacks which started from the day before admission. Each seizure attack lasted less than 10 minutes and the baby was well between attacks. No fever was detected. On physical examination, abnormal facial features, macrocrania, a wide nasal bridge, overgrowth of the right lower limb, macrodactyly in the third left toe, epidermal nevus on the left side of the abdomen and skin vascular abnormalities were detected. His developmental status was normal. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI revealed left sided hemihypertrophy, ventricle enlargement and macrocrania on the same side.Keywords:hemihypertrophy, macrocrania, vascular abnormalities, seizure,hemimegalencephaly

  10. Multifocal spinal hemangioblastoma in von Hippel-Lindau syndrome: A case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemangioblastoma is a benign vascular neoplasm of the central nervous system that occurs frequently in the cerebellum and other areas of the central nervous system including spinal cord and brainstem. Spinal hemangioblastoma can present as a sporadic isolated lesion or as a component of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. The author presents a case of 32-year-old man with von Hippel-Lindau syndrome and spinal hemangioblastomas represented by multiple small spinal lesions, with an emphasis on the magnetic resonance imaging findings and clinical characteristics of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome-associated spinal hemangioblastomas.

  11. Joubert Syndrome in Three Children in A Family: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad AKHONDIAN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Joubert syndrome (JS is a rare autosomal recessive central nervous system malformation characterized by hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis,hypotonia and abnormal psychomotor development, along with altered respiratory pattern and various ophthalmologic features.Here, we describe three children with Joubert syndrome in a family that had almost similar presentations, including ataxia, developmental delay, mental retardation and ocular disorders.Prevalence of Joubert syndrome is about 1 in 100,000 live birth. It may be accompanied by other organs’ disorders. The molar tooth sign is pathognomonic for joubert syndrome that is ascertained by brain MRI.

  12. JOUBERT SYNDROME IN THREE ADULTS IN A FAMILY: A CASE SERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Joubert syndrome (JS is a rare autosomal recessive central nervous system malformation characterized by hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis, hypotonia and abnormal psychomotor development, along with altered respiratory pattern and various ophthalmologic features. Here, we describe three adult with Joubert syndrome in a family that had almost similar presentations, including ataxia, developmental delay, mental retardation and ocular disorders. Prevalence of Joubert syndr ome is about 1 in 100,000 live birth. It may be accompanied by other organs’ disorders. The molar tooth sign is pathognomonic for joubert syndrome that is ascertained by brain MRI. KEYWORDS: Joubert syndrome; Molar tooth sign; Vermian dysgenesis .

  13. Genetics Home Reference: cri-du-chat syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1:33. Review. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Hills C, Moller JH, Finkelstein M, Lohr J, Schimmenti L. Cri du chat syndrome and congenital heart disease: a review of previously reported cases and presentation ...

  14. Epilepsy in Individuals with a History of Asperger's Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rich, Bente; Isager, Torben; Mouridsen, Svend Erik Birkebæk

    2013-01-01

    We performed a nationwide, register-based retrospective follow-up study of epilepsy in all people who were born between January 1, 1980 and June 29, 2006 and registered in the Danish Psychiatric Central Register with Asperger's syndrome on February 7, 2011. All 4,180 identified cases with AS (3...

  15. Prenatal diagnosis and postmortem findings of Neu-laxova syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Tarim, Ebru; Filiz BOLAT

    2010-01-01

    Neu-laxova syndrome is a lethal, autosomal recessive condition associated with ectodermal abnormalities and other characteristic features, including microcephaly, marked intrauterine growth restriction, limb deformities, central nervous system malformations and abnormal facial features, consisting of severe proptosis with ectropion, hypertelorism, micrognathia, flattened nose, malformed ears, and gaping mouth. Here we present a fetus having a dysmorphic face with proptotic eyes, retracted eye...

  16. How Relevant Are GFAP Autoantibodies in Autism and Tourette Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Nikki J.; Libbey, Jane E.; Sweeten, Thayne L.; Coon, Hilary H.; Miller, Judith N.; Stevenson, Edward K.; Lainhart, Janet E.; McMahon, William M.; Fujinami, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Controversy exists over the role of autoantibodies to central nervous system antigens in autism and Tourette Syndrome. We investigated plasma autoantibody titers to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in children with classic onset (33) and regressive onset (26) autism, controls (25, healthy age- and gender-matched) and individuals with…

  17. Syndrome in question*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruzzo, Juliano; Nazar, Fernanda Luca; Tubone, Mariana Quirino; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentation changes and minor facial malformations. It has four clinical variants. We report the case of a girl who, like her mother, was affected by this syndrome. The diagnosis was made after detection and treatment of deafness. PMID:26375234

  18. Syndrome in Question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruzzo, Juliano; Nazar, Fernanda Luca; Tubone, Mariana Quirino; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentation changes and minor facial malformations. It has four clinical variants. We report the case of a girl who, like her mother, was affected by this syndrome. The diagnosis was made after detection and treatment of deafness. PMID:26375234

  19. Syndrome in question*

    OpenAIRE

    Peruzzo, Juliano; Nazar, Fernanda Luca; Tubone, Mariana Quirino; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentation changes and minor facial malformations. It has four clinical variants. We report the case of a girl who, like her mother, was affected by this syndrome. The diagnosis was made after detection and treatment of deafness.

  20. Chediak-Higashi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P; Rao, K S; Shashikala, P; Chandrashekar, H R; Banapurmath, C R

    2000-08-01

    A case of Chediak-Higashi syndrome is reported in a four-year-old boy who presented with recurrent chest infection, partial albinism, hyperpigmentation of the extremities and presence of giant granules in leucocytes and melanocytes in the skin. Parental consanguinity was present. Though uncommon, hyperpigmentation of sun exposed areas may be the initial symptom in Chediak-Higashi syndrome. PMID:10985003