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Sample records for central diabetes insipidus

  1. Intracranial calcification in central diabetes insipidus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracranial calcification is a known but extremely rare complication of diabetes insipidus. To date, only 16 patients have been reported and all had the peripheral (nephrogenic) type of diabetes insipidus. We report a child with intracranial calcification complicating central diabetes insipidus. We also report a child with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and compare the patterns of intracranial calcification. (orig.)

  2. Transient central diabetes insipidus following ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukrishnan Jayaraman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Central Diabetes Insipidus (CDI following ischemic infarction of the brain has been described as a rare presentation. Posterior pituitary ischemia has also been postulated as a possible cause of idiopathic CDI. We encountered a young male with bilateral extensive ischemic infarction sustained at high altitude, who had transient polyuria due to central diabetes insipidus, requiring desmopressin therapy. DI completely resolved during the course of his neurological recovery.

  3. Transient central diabetes insipidus following ischemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Muthukrishnan Jayaraman; Sandeep Kumar; Ahmad, F. M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Central Diabetes Insipidus (CDI) following ischemic infarction of the brain has been described as a rare presentation. Posterior pituitary ischemia has also been postulated as a possible cause of idiopathic CDI. We encountered a young male with bilateral extensive ischemic infarction sustained at high altitude, who had transient polyuria due to central diabetes insipidus, requiring desmopressin therapy. DI completely resolved during the course of his neurological recovery.

  4. Transient central diabetes insipidus following ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Muthukrishnan; Kumar, Sandeep; Ahmad, F M H

    2013-10-01

    Central Diabetes Insipidus (CDI) following ischemic infarction of the brain has been described as a rare presentation. Posterior pituitary ischemia has also been postulated as a possible cause of idiopathic CDI. We encountered a young male with bilateral extensive ischemic infarction sustained at high altitude, who had transient polyuria due to central diabetes insipidus, requiring desmopressin therapy. DI completely resolved during the course of his neurological recovery. PMID:24251140

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of central diabetes insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Aleksandrovna Pigarova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes insipidus represents a serious disease that dramatically interferes with the everyday life of patients due to the need to constantly replenish of fluid lost in the urine, which comes amid shortage of synthesis, secretion or action of pituitary hormone vasopressin. The main difficulty is the differential diagnosis of types of diabetes insipidus in patients with the syndrome of polydipsia-polyuria as the correct differential diagnosis of these forms predetermine the safety and efficacy of further treatment. This lecture presents the current concepts of etiology, diagnosis and treatment of central diabetes insipidus (CDI. We give the comparative characteristics of various preparations of desmopressin for the treatment of the central form of the disease. We also consider the features of the management of selected patient populations with CDI: during pregnancy and lactation, pathology of the thirst sensation, after traumatic brain injury and neurosurgery.

  6. Metastatic Prostate Adenocarcinoma Presenting Central Diabetes Insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakkı Yılmaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The pituitary gland and infundibulum can be involved in a variety of medical conditions, including infiltrative diseases, fungal infections, tuberculosis, and primary and metastatic tumors. Metastases to the pituitary gland are absolutely rare, and they are generally secondary to pulmonary carcinoma in men and breast carcinoma in women. Pituitary metastases more commonly affect the posterior lobe and the infundibulum than the anterior lobe. The posterior lobe involvement may explain why patients with pituitary metastases frequently present with diabetes insipidus. We are presenting a case report of a 78-year-old male patient who had metastatic prostate with sudden onset of polyuria and persistent thirst. He had no electrolyte imbalance except mild hypernatremia. The MRI scan of the brain yielded a suspicious area in pituitary gland. A pituitary stalk metastasis was found on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of pituitary. Water deprivation test was compatible with DI. A clinical response to nasal vasopressin was achieved and laboratory results revealed central diabetes insipidus. As a result, the intrasellar and suprasellar masses decreased in size, and urinary output accordingly decreased.

  7. Diabetes insipidus - nephrogenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Acquired nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Congenital diabetes insipidus; NDI ... of very dilute urine. NDI is rare. Congenital diabetes insipidus is present at birth. It is a ...

  8. Diabetes insipidus - nephrogenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Acquired nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Congenital diabetes insipidus ... be removed and returned to the blood. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) occurs when the kidney tubules do ...

  9. Central Diabetes Insipidus after Staged Spinal Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenbaum, Benjamin P.; Steinmetz, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is described following penetrating spinal cord trauma but rarely following instrumented spinal fusion. More commonly, hyponatremia is seen following spine surgery, which may be iatrogenic, attributed to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone release. The authors present a case of a 57-year-old woman who underwent a planned two-stage operation for scoliotic deformity correction. On the third postoperative day, the patient developed hypernatremia (sodium leve...

  10. Diabetes Insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain may be neces sary as well. Points to Remember • Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare dis ease that ... visit www.ClinicalTrials.gov. For More Information The Diabetes Insipidus and Related Disorders Network 535 Echo Court Saline, MI 48176–1270 Email:gsmayes@aol.com ...

  11. Diabetes Insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) causes frequent urination. You become extremely thirsty, so you drink. Then you urinate. This ... is almost all water. DI is different from diabetes mellitus (DM), which involves insulin problems and high ...

  12. Cerebral Malaria: An Unusual Cause of Central Diabetes Insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resmi Premji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central diabetes insipidus is an uncommon feature of malaria. A previously healthy 72-year-old man presented with fever, rigors, and altered mental status after a recent trip to Liberia, a country known for endemic falciparum malaria. Investigations confirmed plasmodium falciparum parasitemia. Within one week after admission, the serum sodium rose to 166 mEq/L and the urine output increased to 7 liters/day. Other labs were notable for a high serum osmolality, low urine osmolality, and low urine specific gravity. The hypernatremia did not respond to hypotonic fluids. Diabetes insipidus was suspected and parenteral desmopressin was started with a prompt decrease in urinary output and improvement in mental status. Additional testing showed normal anterior pituitary hormones. The desmopressin was eventually tapered off with complete resolution of symptoms. Central diabetes insipidus occurred likely as a result of obstruction of the neurohypophyseal microvasculature. Other endocrinopathies that have been reported with malaria include hyponatremia, adrenal insufficiency, hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, hyper-, and hypoglycemia, but none manifested in our patient. Though diabetes insipidus is a rare complication of malaria, clinicians need to be aware of this manifestation, as failure to do so may lead to fatality particularly if the patient is dehydrated.

  13. Cerebral Malaria: An Unusual Cause of Central Diabetes Insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premji, Resmi; Roopnarinesingh, Nira; Cohen, Joshua; Sen, Sabyasachi

    2016-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus is an uncommon feature of malaria. A previously healthy 72-year-old man presented with fever, rigors, and altered mental status after a recent trip to Liberia, a country known for endemic falciparum malaria. Investigations confirmed plasmodium falciparum parasitemia. Within one week after admission, the serum sodium rose to 166 mEq/L and the urine output increased to 7 liters/day. Other labs were notable for a high serum osmolality, low urine osmolality, and low urine specific gravity. The hypernatremia did not respond to hypotonic fluids. Diabetes insipidus was suspected and parenteral desmopressin was started with a prompt decrease in urinary output and improvement in mental status. Additional testing showed normal anterior pituitary hormones. The desmopressin was eventually tapered off with complete resolution of symptoms. Central diabetes insipidus occurred likely as a result of obstruction of the neurohypophyseal microvasculature. Other endocrinopathies that have been reported with malaria include hyponatremia, adrenal insufficiency, hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, hyper-, and hypoglycemia, but none manifested in our patient. Though diabetes insipidus is a rare complication of malaria, clinicians need to be aware of this manifestation, as failure to do so may lead to fatality particularly if the patient is dehydrated.

  14. Cerebral Malaria: An Unusual Cause of Central Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premji, Resmi; Roopnarinesingh, Nira; Cohen, Joshua; Sen, Sabyasachi

    2016-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus is an uncommon feature of malaria. A previously healthy 72-year-old man presented with fever, rigors, and altered mental status after a recent trip to Liberia, a country known for endemic falciparum malaria. Investigations confirmed plasmodium falciparum parasitemia. Within one week after admission, the serum sodium rose to 166 mEq/L and the urine output increased to 7 liters/day. Other labs were notable for a high serum osmolality, low urine osmolality, and low urine specific gravity. The hypernatremia did not respond to hypotonic fluids. Diabetes insipidus was suspected and parenteral desmopressin was started with a prompt decrease in urinary output and improvement in mental status. Additional testing showed normal anterior pituitary hormones. The desmopressin was eventually tapered off with complete resolution of symptoms. Central diabetes insipidus occurred likely as a result of obstruction of the neurohypophyseal microvasculature. Other endocrinopathies that have been reported with malaria include hyponatremia, adrenal insufficiency, hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, hyper-, and hypoglycemia, but none manifested in our patient. Though diabetes insipidus is a rare complication of malaria, clinicians need to be aware of this manifestation, as failure to do so may lead to fatality particularly if the patient is dehydrated. PMID:27242936

  15. History of Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Giovanna; Tamma, Grazia

    2016-02-01

    Under physiological conditions, fluid and electrolyte homoeostasis is maintained by the kidney adjusting urine volume and composition according to body needs. Diabetes Insipidus is a complex and heterogeneous clinical syndrome affecting water balance and characterized by constant diuresis, resulting in large volumes of dilute urine. With respect to the similarly named Diabetes Mellitus, a disease already known in ancient Egypt, Greece and Asia, Diabetes Insipidus has been described several thousand years later. In 1670s Thomas Willis, noted the difference in taste of urine from polyuric subjects compared with healthy individuals and started the differentiation of Diabetes Mellitus from the more rare entity of Diabetes Insipidus. In 1794, Johann Peter Frank described polyuric patients excreting nonsaccharine urine and introduced the term of Diabetes Insipidus. An hystorical milestone was the in 1913, when Farini successfully used posterior pituitary extracts to treat Diabetes Insipidus. Until 1920s the available evidence indicated Diabetes Insipidus as a disorder of the pituitary gland. In the early 1928, De Lange first observed that some patients with Diabetes Insipidus did not respond to posterior pituitary extracts and subsequently Forssman and Waring in 1945 established that the kidney had a critical role for these forms of Diabetes Insipidus resistant to this treatment. In 1947 Williams and Henry introduced the term Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus for the congenital syndrome characterized by polyuria and renal concentrating defect resistant to vasopressin. In 1955, du Vigneaud received the 1955 Nobel Prize in chemistry for the first synthesis of the hormone vasopressin representing a milestone for the treatment of Central Diabetes Insipidus. PMID:26913870

  16. MR imaging of central diabetes insipidus: a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Lee, Ho Kyu; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul; Kim, Chang Jin; Hong, Sung Kwan [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Na, Dong Gyu [Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (DI) can be the outcome of a number of diseases that affect the hypothalamic-neurohypophyseal axis. The causes of the condition can be classified as traumatic, inflammatory, or neoplastic. Traumatic causes include postoperative sella or transection of the pituitary stalk, while infectious or inflammatory causes include meningitis, lymphocytic hypophysitis, and granulomatous inflammations such as sarcoidosis and Wegener's granulomatosis. Various neoplastic conditions such as germinoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, metastasis, leukemic infiltration, lymphoma, teratoma, pituitary adenoma, craniopharyngioma, Rathke cleft cyst, hypothalamic glioma, and meningioma are also causes of central DI. In affected patients, careful analysis of these MR imaging features and correlation with the clinical manifestations can allow a more specific diagnosis, which is essential for treatment.

  17. MR imaging of central diabetes insipidus: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central diabetes insipidus (DI) can be the outcome of a number of diseases that affect the hypothalamic-neurohypophyseal axis. The causes of the condition can be classified as traumatic, inflammatory, or neoplastic. Traumatic causes include postoperative sella or transection of the pituitary stalk, while infectious or inflammatory causes include meningitis, lymphocytic hypophysitis, and granulomatous inflammations such as sarcoidosis and Wegener's granulomatosis. Various neoplastic conditions such as germinoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, metastasis, leukemic infiltration, lymphoma, teratoma, pituitary adenoma, craniopharyngioma, Rathke cleft cyst, hypothalamic glioma, and meningioma are also causes of central DI. In affected patients, careful analysis of these MR imaging features and correlation with the clinical manifestations can allow a more specific diagnosis, which is essential for treatment

  18. Caution on diagnosis of idiopathetic central diabetes insipidus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xian-ling; WANG Ying-qian; MU Yi-ming

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathetic central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is a heterogeneous hypothalamus-pituitary disease due to the absence or deficiency of arginine vasopressin (AVP).Overexcretion of dilute urine causes body's hydration state and symptoms of extraordinary thirst,even with copious water intake (up to 20 L per day).The diagnosis of CDI is commonly confirmed with water deprivation test and vasopressin analog response.1 This disorder is usually caused by the destruction or degeneration of AVP-secreting magnocellular neurons in hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei.The classical radiological change of CDI is loss of "bright spot" in MRI image,but it is always not special for differential diagnosis of underlying causes.

  19. Anterior Hypopituitarism is Rare and Autoimmune Disease is Common in Adults with Idiopathic Central Diabetes Insipidus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Objective: Central diabetes insipidus is a rare clinical condition with a heterogenous aetiology. Up to 40% of cases are classified as idiopathic, though many of these are thought to have an autoimmune basis. Published data has suggested that anterior hypopituitarism is common in childhood onset idiopathic diabetes insipidus. We aimed to assess the incidence of anterior hypopituitarism in a cohort of adult patients with idiopathic diabetes insipidus. Design and Patients: We performed a retrospective review of the databases of two pituitary investigation units. This identified 39 patients with idiopathic diabetes insipidus. All had undergone MRI scanning and dynamic pituitary testing (either insulin tolerance testing or GHRH\\/arginine and short synacthen testing) to assess anterior pituitary function. Results: One patient had partial growth hormone deficiency; no other anterior pituitary hormonal deficits were found. 33% had at least one autoimmune disease in addition to central diabetes insipidus. Conclusions: Our data suggest that anterior hypopituitarism is rare in adult idiopathic diabetes insipidus. Routine screening of these patients for anterior hypopituitarism may not therefore be indicated. The significant prevalence of autoimmune disease in this cohort supports the hypothesis that idiopathic diabetes insipidus may have an autoimmune aetiology.

  20. Generalized status epilepticus associated with massive pulmonary aspiration and transient central diabetes insipidus: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARVALHO MAURICIO

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus causes significant morbidity and mortality. A case of generalized status epilepticus followed by massive pulmonary aspiration, acute respiratory failure and transient central diabetes insipidus is presented. Seizures were promptly controlled, but the patient required mechanical ventilation and correction of polyuria with desmopressin acetate. During hospitalization mental status improved, diabetes insipidus spontaneously remitted and he was discharged without neurologic sequelae. The clinical and pathophysiological features of this case are discussed.

  1. Central pontine myelinolysis secondary to hypokalaemic nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, C

    2010-01-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) has been described in alcoholic patients and in the aftermath of rapid correction of chronic hyponatraemia. We describe a case of CPM occurring secondary to nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (DI), which developed as a consequence of severe hypokalaemia. A 63-year-old man with alcohol dependence was admitted to hospital with severe pulmonary sepsis and type 1 respiratory failure. On admission, he had euvolaemic hyponatraemia of 127 mmol\\/L, consistent with a syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secondary to his pneumonia. Following admission, his plasma potassium dropped from 3.2 to a nadir of 2.3 mmol\\/L. Mineralocorticoid excess, ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone production and other causes of hypokalaemia were excluded. The hypokalaemia provoked significant hypotonic polyuria and a slow rise in plasma sodium to 161 mmol\\/L over several days. Plasma glucose, calcium and creatinine were normal. The polyuria did not respond to desmopressin, and subsequent correction of his polyuria and hypernatraemia after normalization of plasma potassium confirmed the diagnosis of nephrogenic DI due to hypokalaemia. The patient remained obtunded, and the clinical suspicion of osmotic demyelination was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging. The patient remained comatose and passed away 10 days later. This is the first reported case of nephrogenic DI resulting in the development of CPM, despite a relatively slow rise in plasma sodium of less than 12 mmol\\/L\\/24 h. Coexisting alcohol abuse, hypoxaemia and hypokalaemia may have contributed significantly to the development of CPM in this patient.

  2. Normal MR appearances of the posterior pituitary in central diabetes insipidus associated with septo-optic dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the pituitary in children with central diabetes insipidus usually shows absence of the normal high signal within the posterior gland. The high signal of the normal posterior pituitary is thought to be due to the presence of intra- cellular storage granules of vasopressin. MR imaging has been advocated as a useful investigation to aid in the distinction between central diabetes insipidus and other causes of thirst and polydipsia. We report the case of an infant with central diabetes insipidus in association with septo-optic dysplasia in whom MR imaging showed normal appearances of the posterior pituitary. The mechanism of central diabetes insipidus in this case may be related to a failure of hypothalamic function affecting osmoreception, rather than to a deficiency of vasopressin. Normal MR appearances of the pituitary do not exclude central diabetes insipidus in infants with midline cerebral malformations. (orig.). With 1 fig

  3. Normal MR appearances of the posterior pituitary in central diabetes insipidus associated with septo-optic dysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abernethy, L.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Royal Liverpool Children`s Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Qunibi, M.A. [Depts. of Radiology and Child Health, Royal Liverpool Children`s Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Smith, C.S. [Depts. of Radiology and Child Health, Royal Liverpool Children`s Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the pituitary in children with central diabetes insipidus usually shows absence of the normal high signal within the posterior gland. The high signal of the normal posterior pituitary is thought to be due to the presence of intra- cellular storage granules of vasopressin. MR imaging has been advocated as a useful investigation to aid in the distinction between central diabetes insipidus and other causes of thirst and polydipsia. We report the case of an infant with central diabetes insipidus in association with septo-optic dysplasia in whom MR imaging showed normal appearances of the posterior pituitary. The mechanism of central diabetes insipidus in this case may be related to a failure of hypothalamic function affecting osmoreception, rather than to a deficiency of vasopressin. Normal MR appearances of the pituitary do not exclude central diabetes insipidus in infants with midline cerebral malformations. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  4. Diabetes Insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for students, postdocs, and faculty Research at NIDDK Labs, faculty, and ... diabetes, digestive and liver diseases, kidney diseases, weight control and nutrition, urologic diseases, endocrine and metabolic diseases, ...

  5. Diabetes Insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and family history physical exam urinalysis blood tests fluid deprivation test magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Medical and Family History Taking ... history, a physical exam, urinalysis, blood tests, a fluid deprivation test, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The primary treatment for diabetes ...

  6. Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistgaard, Helene

    2011-01-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is characterized by severe low-solute polyuria and polydipisa. The disease is caused by a deficient neurosecretion of the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP). The hormone is normally synthesized by the magnocellular neurons in the pa......Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is characterized by severe low-solute polyuria and polydipisa. The disease is caused by a deficient neurosecretion of the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP). The hormone is normally synthesized by the magnocellular neurons...... as one sporadic case of early-onset diabetes insipidus. Genetic testing of the sporadic case of diabetes insipidus revealed a highly unusual mosaicism for a variation in the gene encoding the AVP receptor (AVPR2). This mosaicism had resulted in a partial phenotype and initial diagnostic difficulties...

  7. Diabetes insipidus and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanson, Philippe; Salenave, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare complication of pregnancy. It is usually transient, being due to increased placental production of vasopressinase that inactivates circulating vasopressin. Gestational, transient DI occurs late in pregnancy and disappears few days after delivery. Acquired central DI can also occur during pregnancy, for example in a patient with hypophysitis or neuroinfundibulitis during late pregnancy or postpartum. Finally, pre-existing central or nephrogenic DI may occasionally be unmasked by pregnancy. Treatment with dDAVP (desmopressin, Minirin(®)) is very effective on transient DI of pregnancy and also on pre-existing or acquired central DI. Contrary to vasopressin, dDAVP is not degraded by vasopressinase. Nephrogenic DI is insensitive to dDAVP and is therefore more difficult to treat during pregnancy if fluid intake needs to be restricted. PMID:27172867

  8. A Case of Rathke's Cleft Cyst Associated with Transient Central Adrenal Insufficiency and Masked Diabetes Insipidus

    OpenAIRE

    Masahiro Asakawa; Rina Chin; Yoshihiro Niitsu; Tetsuo Sekine; Arisa Niwa; Atsuko Miyake; Naoko Inoshita; Mitsunobu Kawamura; Yoshihiro Ogawa; Yukio Hirata

    2014-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman admitted to our hospital because of headache, poor appetite, malaise, weight loss, and vomiting was found to have central adrenal insufficiency and thyrotoxicosis due to silent thyroiditis. Polyuria developed after replacement with glucocorticoid (masked diabetes insipidus), which was controlled with nasal administration of desmopressin. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a large cystic pituitary mass (18 × 18 × 12 mm) extending suprasellarly to the optic chias...

  9. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Adult Male Presenting with Central Diabetes Insipidus and Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Yeun Seoung; Lim, Jung Soo; Kwon, Woocheol; Jung, Soon-Hee; Park, Il Hwan; Lee, Myoung Kyu; Lee, Won Yeon; Yong, Suk Joong; Lee, Seok Jeong; Jung, Ye-Ryung; Choi, Jiwon; Choi, Ji Sun; Jeong, Joon Taek; Yoo, Jin Sae; Kim, Sang-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis is an uncommon diffuse cystic lung disease in adults. In rare cases, it can involve extrapulmonary organs and lead to endocrine abnormalities such as central diabetes insipidus. A 42-year-old man presented with polyphagia and polydipsia, as well as a dry cough and dyspnea on exertion. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hypothalamic-pituitary system failed to show the posterior pituitary, which is a typical finding in patients with central diabetes insipi...

  10. Animal models of Central Diabetes Insipidus: Human relevance of acquired beyond hereditary syndromes and the role of oxytocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Antonio; Mahía, Javier; Puerto, Amadeo

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to review different animal models of Central Diabetes Insipidus, a neurobiological syndrome characterized by the excretion of copious amounts of diluted urine (polyuria), a consequent water intake (polydipsia), and a rise in the serum sodium concentration (hypernatremia). In rodents, Central Diabetes Insipidus can be caused by genetic disorders (Brattleboro rats) but also by various traumatic/surgical interventions, including neurohypophysectomy, pituitary stalk compression, hypophysectomy, and median eminence lesions. Regardless of its etiology, Central Diabetes Insipidus affects the neuroendocrine system that secretes arginine vasopressin, a neurohormone responsible for antidiuretic functions that acts trough the renal system. However, most Central Diabetes Insipidus models also show disorders in other neurobiological systems, specifically in the secretion of oxytocin, a neurohormone involved in body sodium excretion. Although the hydromineral behaviors shown by the different Central Diabetes Insipidus models have usually been considered as very similar, the present review highlights relevant differences with respect to these behaviors as a function of the individual neurobiological systems affected. Increased understanding of the relationship between the neuroendocrine systems involved and the associated hydromineral behaviors may allow appropriate action to be taken to correct these behavioral neuroendocrine deficits. PMID:27118135

  11. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Adult Male Presenting with Central Diabetes Insipidus and Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yeun Seoung; Lim, Jung Soo; Kwon, Woocheol; Jung, Soon-Hee; Park, Il Hwan; Lee, Myoung Kyu; Lee, Won Yeon; Yong, Suk Joong; Lee, Seok Jeong; Jung, Ye-Ryung; Choi, Jiwon; Choi, Ji Sun; Jeong, Joon Taek; Yoo, Jin Sae; Kim, Sang-Ha

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis is an uncommon diffuse cystic lung disease in adults. In rare cases, it can involve extrapulmonary organs and lead to endocrine abnormalities such as central diabetes insipidus. A 42-year-old man presented with polyphagia and polydipsia, as well as a dry cough and dyspnea on exertion. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hypothalamic-pituitary system failed to show the posterior pituitary, which is a typical finding in patients with central diabetes insipidus. This condition was confirmed by a water deprivation test, and the patient was also found to have type 2 diabetes mellitus. Computed tomographic scanning of the lungs revealed multiple, irregularly shaped cystic lesions and small nodules bilaterally, with sparing of the costophrenic angles. Lung biopsy through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery revealed pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. On a follow-up visit, only 1 year after the patient had quit smoking, clinical and radiological improvement was significant. Here, we report an uncommon case of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis that simultaneously presented with diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. PMID:26508947

  12. Swan ganz catheter for diagnosis of transient central diabetes insipidus after mitral valve replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transient Diabetes Insipidus (DI) occurring in a patient undergoing open heart surgery is a rare occurrence. In this case report, we are presenting a 30 years old female patient with past history of stroke who underwent redo mitral valve replacement developed polyuria. The diagnosis of hypovolemia was made with the help of swan ganz catheter. The patient responded to desmopressin and completely recovered seven days after surgery. It is possible that transient cerebral ischemia given her history of Stroke resulted in the dysfunction of osmotic receptors in the hypothalamus or hypothalamus - pituitary axis during Cardiopulmonary Bypass (CPB). Therefore, we concluded that central DI is a probable cause of polyuria after CPB. (author)

  13. Diabete insípido central em um cão Central diabetes insipidus in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudete Schmidt

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Descreve-se um caso de diabete insípido central em um cão, fêmea, nove anos de idade, sem raça definida, com história de poliúria e polidipsia há 18 meses. Com o exame físico, nenhuma alteração sistêmica foi elucidada. Já nos exames laboratoriais complementares, observou-se policitemia e hiperproteinemia, e a densidade específica da urina (1002 encontrava-se abaixo do limiar fisiológico. O animal foi submetido à privação hídrica e se mostrou incapaz de concentrar a urina durante as sete horas observadas, tempo que levou para apresentar 5% de desidratação. Após isso, foi administrado acetato de desmopressina e, 5 horas após, a densidade estava em 1028, confirmando o diabete insípido de origem central. O animal recebeu terapia à base de acetato de desmopressina, apresentando melhora do quadro clínico.A case of central diabetes insipidus in a nine-year-old female dog is described. The dog presented intermitent polyuria and polydipsia in the past 18 months. In the clinical exam, complete blood count, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, BUN, creatinine, glucose and calcium dosages were normal. However, the specific urine gravity was low and presented the value 1002. The dog was unable to concentrate the urine during the seven hours of water deprivation test and presented 5% of dehydratation. The administration of desmopressin acetate elevated the specific urine gravity to 1028 five hours after the beginning of the treatment, confirming the diagnosis of diabetes insipidus of central origin.

  14. Comparison of desmopressin (DDAVP tablet and intranasal spray in the treatment of central diabetes insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Bagher Larijani

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Desmoperssin is the drug of choice for treatment of central diabetes insipidus and most commonly it is used as intranasal spray. In this study, efficacy and side effects of oral desmopressin was compared with the intranasal spray. This study was before -after clinical trial on 14 outpatients (9 F, 5 M, age 14 -50 Y with central diabetes insipidus who had been treated with intranasal spray of desmopressin previously. Weight, pulse rate and blood pressure (sitting -standing, biochemical profile, serum electrolytes, 24h urine volume, specific gravity of urine and LFT was measured before and after 1 month study. Starting dose for each patient was one oral tablet of DDAVP (0.1 mg per 8 hours. Paired Samples T-Test was used for data analysis. No clinically significant changes were found as regard to weight, pulse rate, blood pressure, blood chemistry, electrolyte and urinalysis. Single reported adverse effect was headache (43% in tablet group and dyspnea (7% in spray group. Both dosage forms were able to control diurnal polyuria and nocturnal polyuria. The antidiuretic dose - equivalence ratio for intranasal to oral desmopressin was 1: 18. Spray was superior in terms of rapid onset of action and duration of antidiuretic action in 100% and 78% of cases (not significant, respectively. Tablets were more available and much more easily consumed as reported by patients, in 86% (P=0.0006. Treatment with tablets offers a good alternative to the intranasal route, especially in patients with chronic rhinitis or common cold and similar conditions.

  15. Cutting edge: neuronal recognition by CD8 T cells elicits central diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheikl, Tanja; Pignolet, Béatrice; Dalard, Cécile; Desbois, Sabine; Raison, Danièle; Yamazaki, Masanori; Saoudi, Abdelhadi; Bauer, Jan; Lassmann, Hans; Hardin-Pouzet, Hélène; Liblau, Roland S

    2012-05-15

    An increasing number of neurologic diseases is associated with autoimmunity. The immune effectors contributing to the pathogenesis of such diseases are often unclear. To explore whether self-reactive CD8 T cells could attack CNS neurons in vivo, we generated a mouse model in which the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) is expressed specifically in CNS neurons. Transfer of cytotoxic anti-HA CD8 T cells induced an acute but reversible encephalomyelitis in HA-expressing recipient mice. Unexpectedly, diabetes insipidus developed in surviving animals. This robust phenotype was associated with preferential accumulation of cytotoxic CD8 T cells in the hypothalamus, upregulation of MHC class I molecules, and destruction of vasopressin-expressing neurons. IFN-γ production by the pathogenic CD8 T cells was necessary for MHC class I upregulation by hypothalamic neurons and their destruction. This novel mouse model, in combination with related human data, supports the concept that autoreactive CD8 T cells can trigger central diabetes insipidus. PMID:22504649

  16. A Case of Turner Syndrome with Concomitant Transient Hypogammaglobulinaemia of Infancy and Central Diabetes Insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Hüseyin Anıl; Özkan, Behzat; Hazan, Filiz; Büyükinan, Muammer; Çelik, Tanju

    2013-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disorder that affects development in females and is characterized by the complete or partial absence of the second sex chromosome, or monosomy X. TS is associated with abnormalities in lymphatic and skeletal development, in growth, and in gonadal function. Cardiac and renal malformations and a number of specific cognitive findings may also be encountered in these patients. An increased risk for hypothyroidism, sensorineural hearing loss, hypertension, and other problems has also been reported. We present the case of a patient with TS accompanied by transient hypogammaglobulinaemia of infancy (THI) and central diabetes insipidus, which we believe is the first reported TS patient with these concomitant disorders. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23419422

  17. Diabetes insipidus: The other diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sanjay; Zargar, Abdul Hamid; Jain, Sunil M.; Sethi, Bipin; Chowdhury, Subhankar; Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Thomas, Nihal; Unnikrishnan, A. G.; Thakkar, Piya Ballani; Malve, Harshad

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a hereditary or acquired condition which disrupts normal life of persons with the condition; disruption is due to increased thirst and passing of large volumes of urine, even at night. A systematic search of literature for DI was carried out using the PubMed database for the purpose of this review. Central DI due to impaired secretion of arginine vasopressin (AVP) could result from traumatic brain injury, surgery, or tumors whereas nephrogenic DI due to failure of the kidney to respond to AVP is usually inherited. The earliest treatment was posterior pituitary extracts containing vasopressin and oxytocin. The synthetic analog of vasopressin, desmopressin has several benefits over vasopressin. Desmopressin was initially available as intranasal preparation, but now the oral tablet and melt formulations have gained significance, with benefits such as ease of administration and stability at room temperature. Other molecules used for treatment include chlorpropamide, carbamazepine, thiazide diuretics, indapamide, clofibrate, indomethacin, and amiloride. However, desmopressin remains the most widely used drug for the treatment of DI. This review covers the physiology of water balance, causes of DI and various treatment modalities available, with a special focus on desmopressin. PMID:26904464

  18. Diabetes insipidus: The other diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes insipidus (DI is a hereditary or acquired condition which disrupts normal life of persons with the condition; disruption is due to increased thirst and passing of large volumes of urine, even at night. A systematic search of literature for DI was carried out using the PubMed database for the purpose of this review. Central DI due to impaired secretion of arginine vasopressin (AVP could result from traumatic brain injury, surgery, or tumors whereas nephrogenic DI due to failure of the kidney to respond to AVP is usually inherited. The earliest treatment was posterior pituitary extracts containing vasopressin and oxytocin. The synthetic analog of vasopressin, desmopressin has several benefi ts over vasopressin. Desmopressin was initially available as intranasal preparation, but now the oral tablet and melt formulations have gained significance, with benefits such as ease of administration and stability at room temperature. Other molecules used for treatment include chlorpropamide, carbamazepine, thiazide diuretics, indapamide, clofibrate, indomethacin, and amiloride. However, desmopressin remains the most widely used drug for the treatment of DI. This review covers the physiology of water balance, causes of DI and various treatment modalities available, with a special focus on desmopressin.

  19. A Case of Rathke’s Cleft Cyst Associated with Transient Central Adrenal Insufficiency and Masked Diabetes Insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Asakawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 73-year-old woman admitted to our hospital because of headache, poor appetite, malaise, weight loss, and vomiting was found to have central adrenal insufficiency and thyrotoxicosis due to silent thyroiditis. Polyuria developed after replacement with glucocorticoid (masked diabetes insipidus, which was controlled with nasal administration of desmopressin. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a large cystic pituitary mass (18 × 18 × 12 mm extending suprasellarly to the optic chiasm. Transsphenoidal surgery revealed that the pituitary tumor was Rathke’s cleft cyst. Following surgery, replacement with neither glucocorticoid nor desmopressin was needed any more. Therefore, it is suggested that Rathke’s cleft cyst is responsible for the masked diabetes insipidus and the central insufficiency. Furthermore, it is speculated that thyrotoxicosis with painless thyroiditis might induce changes from subclinical adrenal insufficiency to transiently overt insufficiency.

  20. Diabetes insipidus: the basic and clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Waseem Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes insipidus (DI is a complex disease. DI is inability of the body to conserve water. Polydipsia and polyuria are the major manifestations of DI. DI has various variants including central diabetes insipidus (due to defect in ADH secretion, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (due to defect in ADH receptors or urea receptors, gestational diabetes insipidus (due to catabolism of ADH by placental vasopressinase and primary polydipsia (due to massive fluid intake. The cause of various variants of DI is either acquired or congenital. High plasma osmolality due to hypotonic urine excretion can be fatal because it can cause psychosis, lethargy, seizures, coma or even death. Polyuria and polydipsia help in the diagnosis of DI. Differential diagnosis of various variants of DI can be carried out on the basis of water deprivation test, MRI and other radiological techniques. The proper management of DI is the replenishment of water loss and correction of clinical presentations produced as a result of DI, major is hypernatremia. The best management for primary polydipsia is fluid restriction while fluid intake is used for adipsic diabetes insipidus. ADH replacement therapy is widely used to treat DI. DDAVP or desmopressin is mostly preferred ADH analogue because it has less side effects and resistant to placental vasoprssinase. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(1.000: 5-11

  1. Familial cerebellar ataxia and diabetes insipidus.

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, I C; O'Malley, B P; Young, I D

    1988-01-01

    Two sisters are reported who both developed partial cranial diabetes insipidus in their 4th decade, followed by progressive cerebellar ataxia. This appears to be the first report of cerebellar ataxia and diabetes insipidus occurring together as a genetic entity.

  2. Apoptosis of supraoptic AVP neurons is involved in the development of central diabetes insipidus after hypophysectomy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Lijin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that various types of axonal injury of hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal tract can result in degeneration of the magnocellular neurons (MCNs in hypothalamus and development of central diabetes insipidus (CDI. However, the mechanism of the degeneration and death of MCNs after hypophysectomy in vivo is still unclear. This present study was aimed to disclose it and to figure out the dynamic change of central diabetes insipidus after hypophysectomy. Results The analysis on the dynamic change of daily water consumption (DWC, daily urine volume(DUV, specific gravity of urine(USG and plasma vasopressin concentration showed that the change pattern of them was triphasic and neuron counting showed that the degeneration of vasopressin neurons began at 10 d, aggravated at 20 d and then stabilized at 30 d after hypophysectomy. There was marked upregulation of cleaved Caspase-3 expression of vasopressin neurons in hypophysectomy rats. A "ladder" pattern of migration of DNA internucleosomal fragments was detected and apoptotic ultrastructure was found in these neurons. There was time correlation among the occurrence of diabetes insipidus, the changes of plasma vasopressin concentration and the degeneration of vasopressin neurons after hypophysectomy. Conclusion This study firstly demonstrated that apoptosis was involved in degeneration of supraoptic vasopressin neurons after hypophysectomy in vivo and development of CDI. Our study on time course and correlations among water metabolism, degeneration and apoptosis of vasopressin neurons suggested that there should be an efficient therapeutic window in which irreversible CDI might be prevented by anti-apoptosis.

  3. Pituitary Morphology and Function in 43 Children with Central Diabetes Insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendong Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In pediatric central diabetes insipidus (CDI, etiology diagnosis and pituitary function monitoring are usually delayed. This study aimed to illustrate the importance of regular follow-up and pituitary function monitoring in pediatric CDI. Methods. The clinical, hormonal, and neuroradiological characteristics of children with CDI at diagnosis and during 1.5–2-year follow-up were collected and analyzed. Results. The study included 43 CDI patients. The mean interval between initial manifestation and diagnosis was 22.29 ± 3.67 months (range: 2–108 months. The most common complaint was polyuria/polydipsia. Causes included Langerhans cell histiocytosis, germinoma, and craniopharyngioma in 2, 5, and 4 patients; the remaining were idiopathic. No significant changes were found during the 1.5–2 years after CDI diagnosis. Twenty-three of the 43 cases (53.5% had ≥1 anterior pituitary hormone deficiency. Isolated growth hormone deficiency was the most frequent abnormality (37.5% and was not associated with pituitary stalk diameter. Multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies were found in 8 cases with pituitary stalk diameter > 4.5 mm. Conclusion. Diagnosis of CDI is usually delayed. CDI with a pituitary stalk diameter > 4.5 mm carries a higher risk of multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies. Long-term MRI and pituitary function follow-ups are necessary for children with idiopathic CDI.

  4. Pituitary Morphology and Function in 43 Children with Central Diabetes Insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wendong; Wang, Limin; Liu, Minghua; Li, Guimei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. In pediatric central diabetes insipidus (CDI), etiology diagnosis and pituitary function monitoring are usually delayed. This study aimed to illustrate the importance of regular follow-up and pituitary function monitoring in pediatric CDI. Methods. The clinical, hormonal, and neuroradiological characteristics of children with CDI at diagnosis and during 1.5–2-year follow-up were collected and analyzed. Results. The study included 43 CDI patients. The mean interval between initial manifestation and diagnosis was 22.29 ± 3.67 months (range: 2–108 months). The most common complaint was polyuria/polydipsia. Causes included Langerhans cell histiocytosis, germinoma, and craniopharyngioma in 2, 5, and 4 patients; the remaining were idiopathic. No significant changes were found during the 1.5–2 years after CDI diagnosis. Twenty-three of the 43 cases (53.5%) had ≥1 anterior pituitary hormone deficiency. Isolated growth hormone deficiency was the most frequent abnormality (37.5%) and was not associated with pituitary stalk diameter. Multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies were found in 8 cases with pituitary stalk diameter > 4.5 mm. Conclusion. Diagnosis of CDI is usually delayed. CDI with a pituitary stalk diameter > 4.5 mm carries a higher risk of multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies. Long-term MRI and pituitary function follow-ups are necessary for children with idiopathic CDI. PMID:27118970

  5. ISOLATED SECONDARY HYPOGONADISM PRESENTING WITH SEVERE HYPONATREMIA AND CENTRAL DIABETES INSIPIDUS: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achouba Singh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A middle - aged educated Manipuri male patient, father of six children presented with 3 years history of progressive generalized fatigue, loss of appetite, bodyache, progressive proximal muscle weakness, bed - ridden for the past 4 months, generalized body swelling along with increased frequency of micturation associated with thirst. There was also history of progressive loss of secondary sexual chara cters with loss of axillary and pubic hairs and decreasing frequency of shaving with loss of libido and erectile dysfunction for the last 6 months. He attributed these symptoms to his ill health. During the last 2 weeks, he developed productive cough with shortness of breath with orthopnea and with low grade fever. He also gave history of persistent backache and bone pain. Past medical history presented was hypertension for which he was regularly taking amlodipine 5 mg. daily and was under control; however he was drowsier on the same dose with postural symptoms, hence stopped for the last one month. No significant past history of head injury, chronic febrile illness, drug addiction. He is a non - smoker and non - alcoholic. On physical examination, patient was conscious, drowsy, mildly febrile, generalized anasarca, P=64/min, BP=90/60, scattered crackles B/L chest, DTJs depressed with no babinski’s sign to suggest focal neurological deficit. Genital examination showed normal penile size with bilateral small (2ml by orchidometer, flabby testes with sparse pubic hairs (facial, axillary hairs were also sparse. Here we are reporting a case of severe hyponatremia with isolated primary hypogonadism and Central Diabetes Insipidus (CDI since severe hyponatremia is com monly encountered in panhypopituitarism.

  6. Diabetes Insipidus after normal vaginal delivery: a case report

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    Farideh Keypour

    2014-07-01

    Treatment was continuing, when the symptoms of central diabetes insipidus resolve and urinary concentrating ability was preferred. Maximum urinary osmolality over the next 11 hours was assessed, 730 mosm/kg was considered normal. Conclusion: Close attention to electrolyte and fluid balance is important in the postpartum period. The symptoms of transient vasopressin-resistant diabetes insipidus resolve in few days to a few weeks after vaginal delivery or when hepatic function returns to normal.

  7. Central diabetes insipidus as a very late relapse limited to the pituitary stalk in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Shinkoda, Yuichi; Hazeki, Daisuke; Imamura, Mari; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Kawakami, Kiyoshi; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2016-07-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and relapse are frequently seen in multifocal Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). We present two females with multifocal LCH who developed CDI 9 and 5 years after the initial diagnosis, respectively, as a relapse limited to the pituitary stalk. Combination chemotherapy with cytarabine reduced the mass in the pituitary stalk. Although CDI did not improve, there has been no anterior pituitary hormone deficiency (APHD), neurodegenerative disease in the central nervous system (ND-CNS) or additional relapse for 2 years after therapy. It was difficult to predict the development of CDI in these cases. CDI might develop very late in patients with multifocal LCH, and therefore strict follow-up is necessary, especially with regard to symptoms of CDI such as polydipsia and polyuria. For new-onset CDI with LCH, chemotherapy with cytarabine might be useful for preventing APHD and ND-CNS. PMID:27089406

  8. Two novel mutations in the coding region for neurophysin-II associated with familial central diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaki, Hiroshi; Ito, Masafumi; Yuasa, Hiromitsu [Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    Familial central diabetes insipidus is an autosomal dominant disease caused by a deficiency of arginine vasopressin (AVP). We previously reported three distinct mutations in the AVP gene in Japanese familial central diabetes insipidus pedigrees that result in substitution of Ser for Gly{sup 57} in the neurophysin-II (NPII) moiety of the AVP precursor, a substitution of Thr for Ala at the COOH-terminus of the signal peptide, and a deletion of Glu{sup 47} in the NPII moiety. In this study, we analyzed the AVP gene in two pedigrees by direct sequencing of the polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA and found two novel mutations in exon 2, which encodes the central part of the NPII moiety of the precursor. The mutation in one pedigree was a C to A transition at nucleotide position 1891, which replaces Cys{sup 67} (TGC) with stop codon (TGA). As the premature termination eliminates part of the COOH domain of the NPII moiety and the glycoprotein moiety, the conformation of the truncated protein is likely to be markedly different from that of normal precursor. In another pedigree, a G to T transversion was detected at nucleotide position 1874, which substitutes polar Trp (TGG) for hydrophobic Gly{sup 62}(GGG). It is possible that mutated NPII molecules, as a consequence of a conformational change, cannot bind AVP or self-associate to form higher oligomer complexes. Interestingly, all mutations we have identified to date, with the exception of the signal peptide mutation, are located in exon 2, suggesting the importance of the highly conserved central part of the NPII molecules and/or the NPII moiety in the precursor for AVP synthesis. 21 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Central diabetes insipidus in a dog with a pro-opiomelanocortin-producing pituitary tumor not causing hyperadrenocorticism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central diabetes insipidus was diagnosed by vasopressin measurements during hypertonic stimulation in a 9-year-old male giant Schnauzer with polyuria and polydipsia. The impaired release of vasopressin was believed to be caused by a large pituitary tumor, which was visualized by computed tomography. Studies of the function of the anterior lobe and the pars intermedia of the pituitary gland were conducted, and high concentrations of ACTH and alpha-melanotrophic hormone (alpha-MSH) were found without concomitant hyperadrenocorticism. Studies of the molecular size of the immunoreactive ACTH in plasma by gel filtration revealed that most of the circulating immunoreactivity was not ACTH but its precursor pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and low-molecular-weight POMC-derived peptides. The pituitary tumor of this dog probably originated from melanotrophic cells of the pars intermedia. The sensitivity of the pituitary-adrenocortical system for the suppressive effect of dexamethasone was unaffected

  10. Management of diabetes insipidus in children

    OpenAIRE

    Garima Mishra; Sudha Rao Chandrashekhar

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes Insipidus (DI) is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome of disturbance in water balance, characterized by polyuria (urine output > 4 ml/kg/hr), polydypsia (water intake > 2 L/m 2 /d) and failure to thrive. In children, Nephrogenic DI (NDI) is more common than Central DI (CDI), and is often acquired. The signs and symptoms vary with etiology, age at presentation and mode of onset. Neonates and infants with NDI are severely affected and difficult to treat. Diagnosis is based on the presenc...

  11. Efficacy of Hydrochlorothiazide and low renal solute feed in Neonatal Central Diabetes Insipidus with transition to Oral Desmopressin in early infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, Mary B; Rao, Shripada; Price, Glynis; Choong, Catherine S

    2014-01-01

    Background The treatment of central diabetes insipidus (DI) with desmopressin in the neonatal period is challenging because of the significant risk of hyponatremia with this agent. The fixed anti-diuresis action of desmopressin and the obligate high fluid intake with milk feeds lead to considerable risk of water intoxication and hyponatremia. To reduce this risk, thiazide diuretics, part of the treatment of nephrogenic DI, were used in conjunction with low renal solute feed and were effective...

  12. Langerhans cell histiocytosis in monozygotic twins with central diabetes insipidus and hypophyseal masses

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Sung-Tai; Chen, Der-Cherng; Cho, Der-Yang; Lin, Hung-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a systemic disease mainly affecting children and young adults. It can manifest as single system disorder or multi-system involvement. When the central nervous system is involved, the hypothalamic–pituitary axis is the most common location affected. Herein we report a rare case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in monozygotic twins both with central diabetes and hypophyseal masses. This is the first report about LCH in monozygotic twins with hypophyseal le...

  13. [Central diabetes insipidus in adult patients--the first sign of Langerhans cell histiocytosis and Erdheim-Chester disease. Three case studies and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Z; Balsíková, K; Krejcí, M; Pour, L; Stĕpánková, S; Svacina, P; Hermanová, M; Vanícek, J; Krupa, P; Stanícek, J; Koukalová, R; Neubauer, J; Krivanová, A; Mayer, J; Hájek, R

    2010-02-01

    Central diabetes insipidus with an onset in adulthood is very rare. Unlike in children, central diabetes insipidus in adults is more frequently caused by inflammatory processes and neoplastic infiltrations that do not originate from the neuronal tissue than primary neuronal tissue tumours. Rare histiocytic neoplasias (Langerhans cell histiocytosis, xanthogranulomatosis and Erdheim-Chester disease) have a specific affinity to hypothalamus and the pituitary stalk not only in paediatric patients but also when occurring in adults. We describe 3 cases of central diabetes insipidus with an onset in adulthood. Diabetes insipidus was the first sign of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in 2 patients, and it was the first sign of Erdheim-Chester disease in one patient. MR imaging showed pathological infiltration and dilated pituitary stalks in all 3 patients. PET-CT proved useful in differential diagnosis, showing further extracranial pathological changes either on the basis of significant glucose accumulation or on the basis of CT imaging. The Langerhans cell histiocytosis in the first patient has also manifested itself as an infiltration of the perianal area with intensive accumulation of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) - SUV 8.6 and gingival inflammation indistinguishable from parodontosis. Histology of the perianal infiltrate confirmed Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Infiltration of the pituitary stalk disappeared from the MR image after 4 cycles of 2-chlordeoxyadenosin (5 mg/m2 5 consecutive days). The PET-CT of the 2nd patient showed only borderline accumulation of FDG in the ENT area, while simultaneously performed CT imaging showed cystic restructuring of the pulmonary parenchyma and nodulations consistent with pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Bronchoalveolar lavage identified higher number of CD1 and S100 positive elements, consistent, once again, with pulmonary LCH also affecting pituitary stalk and ear canal. The PET-CT of the third patient showed increased activity

  14. Vasopressin function in familial cranial diabetes insipidus.

    OpenAIRE

    Baylis, P. H.; Robertson, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    A family suffering from cranial diabetes insipidus, that extends over 4 generations, is described. Inheritance of polyuria was autosomal dominant. Vasopressin function was studied in members of the last 2 generations, 4 of whom had polyuria. Osmoregulation of vasopressin secretion was assessed by infusion of hypertonic saline. Plasma vasopressin remained undetectable in one patient, while 2 others had very blunted vasopressin responses to osmotic stimulation. Three non-osmotic stimuli were ap...

  15. Management of diabetes insipidus in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes Insipidus (DI is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome of disturbance in water balance, characterized by polyuria (urine output > 4 ml/kg/hr, polydypsia (water intake > 2 L/m 2 /d and failure to thrive. In children, Nephrogenic DI (NDI is more common than Central DI (CDI, and is often acquired. The signs and symptoms vary with etiology, age at presentation and mode of onset. Neonates and infants with NDI are severely affected and difficult to treat. Diagnosis is based on the presence of high plasma osmolality and low urinary osmolality with significant water diuresis. Water deprivation test with vasopressin challenge, though has limitations, is done to differentiate NDI and CDI and diagnose their partial forms. Measurement of urinary aquaporin 2 and serum copeptin levels are being studied and show promising diagnostic potential. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI pituitary helps in the etiological diagnosis of CDI, absence of posterior pituitary bright signal being the pathognomic sign. If pituitary stalk thickening of < 2 mm is present, these children need to be monitored for evolving lesion. Neonates and young infants are better managed with fluids alone. Older children with CDI are treated with desmopressin. The oral form is safe, highly effective, with more flexibility of dosing and has largely replaced the intranasal form. In NDI besides treatment of the underlying cause, use of high calorie low solute diet and drugs to ameliorate water excretion (thiazide, amelioride, indomethacin are useful. Children with NDI however well treated, remain short and have mental retardation on follow up.

  16. Diabetes Insipidus after Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Cristina Capatina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in many age groups. Neuroendocrine dysfunction has been recognized as a consequence of TBI and consists of both anterior and posterior pituitary insufficiency; water and electrolyte abnormalities (diabetes insipidus (DI and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH are amongst the most challenging sequelae. The acute head trauma can lead (directly or indirectly to dysfunction of the hypothalamic neurons secreting antidiuretic hormone (ADH or of the posterior pituitary gland causing post-traumatic DI (PTDI. PTDI is usually diagnosed in the first days after the trauma presenting with hypotonic polyuria. Frequently, the poor general status of most patients prevents adequate fluid intake to compensate the losses and severe dehydration and hypernatremia occur. Management consists of careful monitoring of fluid balance and hormonal replacement. PTDI is associated with high mortality, particularly when presenting very early following the injury. In many surviving patients, the PTDI is transient, lasting a few days to a few weeks and in a minority of cases, it is permanent requiring management similar to that offered to patients with non-traumatic central DI.

  17. Gestational Diabetes Insipidus Associated with HELLP Syndrome: A Case Report

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    Renela Gambito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gestational diabetes insipidus is a rare, but well recognized, complication of pregnancy. It is related to excess vasopressinase enzyme activity which is metabolized in the liver. A high index of suspicion of gestational diabetes insipidus is required in a correct clinical setting especially in the presence of other risk factors such as preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, and twin pregnancies. We are presenting a case of gestational diabetes insipidus in a patient with HELLP syndrome. The newborn in this case also had hypernatremia thereby raising possibilities of vasopressinase crossing the placenta.

  18. Rare neonatal diabetes insipidus and associated late risks: Case report

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    Rivas-Crespo Maximiliano

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most cases of neonatal central diabetes insipidus are caused by an injury, which often results in other handicaps in the patient. The infant’s prognosis will be determined by his or her own early age and disability as well as by the physician’s skill. However, the rarity of this condition prevents the acquisition of personal experience dealing with it. Case Presentation A neonatal hemorrhagic stroke, caused by an aortic coarctation, caused right lower limb paresis, swallowing disability, and central diabetes insipidus in a term infant. The scant oral intake, as a consequence of his disability, caused progressive undernutrition which closed a vicious circle, delaying his development and his ability to overcome the swallowing handicap. On the other hand, nasal desmopressin absorption was blocked by several common colds, resulting in brain bleeding because of severe dehydration. This even greater brain damage hampered the improvement of swallowing, closing a second harmful circle. Moreover, a devastating central myelinolysis with quadriplegia, caused by an uncontrolled intravenous infusion, consummated a pernicious sequence, possibly unreported. Conclusions The child’s overall development advanced rapidly when his nutrition was improved by gastrostomy: This was a key effect of nutrition on his highly sensitive neurodevelopment. Besides, this case shows potential risks related to intranasal desmopressin treatment in young children.

  19. Diabetes insipidus secondary to sarcoidosis presenting with caseating granuloma

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, Taimour; Thomas, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a rare complication of sarcoid infiltration of the hypothalamic-pituitary region. Non-caseating granuloma formation is typical of sarcoidosis. Anterior and posterior pituitary function may be affected. MRI coupled with endocrinology assessment is the usual method of investigation. A 25-year-old Caucasian male with no significant medical history presented with polyuria and polydipsia. Water deprivation test confirmed diabetes insipidus. CT scanning of the chest confirmed ...

  20. Glu-47, which forms a salt bridge between neurophysin-II and arginine vasopressin, is deleted in patients with familial central diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuasa, Hiromitsu; Ito, Masafumi; Nagasaki, Hiroshi; Oiso, Yutaka; Saito, Hidehiko (Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan)); Miyamoto, S.; Sasaki, N. (Chiba Children' s Hospital, Chiba (Japan))

    1993-09-01

    The arginine vasopressin (AVP) gene was sequenced in a pedigree with familial central diabetes insipidus (DI). When polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNAs from affected subjects were subjected to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, fragments including exon 2 displayed two additional, slower migrating bands. These extra bands represented DNA heteroduplexes, indicating that there was a deletion or insertion mutation in exon 2. As the region with such a mutation was identified by direct sequence analysis, polymerase chain reaction-amplified fragments including the region were subcloned and sequenced. A 3-basepair deletion (AGG) out of two consecutive AGG sequences (nucleotides 1824-1829) was identified in one of two alleles. The cosegregation of the mutation with the DI phenotype in the family was confirmed by restriction enzyme analyses. This mutation should yield an abnormal AVP precursor lacking Glu[sup 47] in its neurophysin-II (NP) moiety. Since Glu[sup 47] is essential for NP molecules to form a salt bridge with AVP, it is very likely that the function of NP as a carrier protein for AVP would be impaired. The authors suggest that AVP would undergo accelerated proteolytic degradation, and this mechanism would be involved in the pathogenesis of DI in this pedigree. 34 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, optic atrophy, and deafness: A case of Wolfram (DIDMOAD) syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Maleki, Nasrollah; Bashardoust, Bahman; Zakeri, Anahita; Salehifar, Azita; Tavosi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of Wolfram syndrome (WS) characterized by diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, progressive optic atrophy, and deafness. Case report A 19-year-old female patient, a known case of diabetes mellitus type I from six years before, presented with progressive vision loss since four years earlier. On fundoscopic examination, she had bilateral optic atrophy without diabetic retinopathy. The patient also had diabetes insipidus, neurosensory deafness, and neurogenic bladder. C...

  2. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a lethargic lithium-treated patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinardi, [No Value; Donders, SHJ

    1997-01-01

    We report on a patient who developed severe lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) and neurotoxicity, despite recommended serum lithium levels. Hydrochlorothiazide and indomethacin appeared effective antipolyuric drugs, which led to a normalization of serum osmolality. After re-initiat

  3. Diabetes insipidus uncovered during conservative management of complicated acute appendicitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mamtani, Anita; Odom, Stephen R.; Butler, Kathryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Diabetes insipidus (DI) arises from impaired function of antidiuretic hormone, characterized by hypovolemia, hypernatremia, polyuria, and polydipsia. This case is a reminder of the rare but challenging obstacle that undiagnosed DI poses in fasting surgical patients, requiring prompt recognition and vigilant management of marked homeostatic imbalances.

  4. Diabetes insipidus uncovered during conservative management of complicated acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamtani, Anita; Odom, Stephen R; Butler, Kathryn L

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) arises from impaired function of antidiuretic hormone, characterized by hypovolemia, hypernatremia, polyuria, and polydipsia. This case is a reminder of the rare but challenging obstacle that undiagnosed DI poses in fasting surgical patients, requiring prompt recognition and vigilant management of marked homeostatic imbalances. PMID:27190614

  5. Pituitary metastasis from breast cancer presenting as diabetes insipidus

    OpenAIRE

    Gormally, Joseph F; Izard, Michael A.; Robinson, Bruce G.; Boyle, Frances M

    2014-01-01

    An 83-year-old woman developed pituitary metastasis while being treated for metastatic breast cancer. She presented with visual disturbance and headache followed by thirst, nocturia and polyuria. A visual field defect was present. MRI revealed a sellar mass consistent with metastasis to the pituitary gland. She was successfully treated with radiotherapy to the sella and had improvement of her visual symptoms and visual field defect. She then required ongoing treatment for diabetes insipidus. ...

  6. Diabetes insipidus: main aspects and comparative analysis with diabetes mellitus Diabetes insipidus: principais aspectos e análise comparativa com diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Lúcia Abreu Rabelo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a disease characterized by the excess of sugar in the blood and urine. The two most common types of diabetes are insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus, both presenting glycemic regulation-damage caused by insulin. Nevertheless, there is another type of diabetes that is less known but not less important, the diabetes insipidus, which is characterized by a problem with the synthesis, secretion or action of the ADH (anti-diuretic hormone that can result in polyuric syndromes with increased excretion of hypotonic urine. Physiologically, variations in the osmotic pressure activate osmoceptors that stimulate the ADH secretion, increasing water reabsorption in the kidney collection tubes. This article intends to revise a wide-ranging study on diabetes insipidus, aiming at a comparative analysis of the incidence, diagnosis, causes, types, treatment and consequences between diabetes insidipus and diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus and insipidus are two different pathologies with a single similarity that is the diabetes itself, that is, the polyuria established. The knowledge of the significant differences between the pathologies studied is important once diabetes insipidus is less known, but can lead to serious complications if not properly treated. O diabetes mellitus é uma doença caracterizada pelo excesso de açúcar no sangue e na urina. Os dois tipos mais comuns de diabetes são diabetes mellitus insulino-dependente e diabetes mellitus insulino – resistente, e que ambos apresentam comprometimento da regulação da glicemia por ação da insulina. No entanto, existe outra forma de diabetes menos conhecida, mas não menos importante, o diabetes insipidus, que é caracterizado por um distúrbio na síntese, secreção ou ação do ADH (hormônio antidiurético, que pode resultar em síndromes poliúricas com excreção aumentada de urina hipotônica. Fisiologicamente, variações na press

  7. Diabetes Insipidus in Mice with a Mutation in Aquaporin-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI is a disease characterized by failure of the kidney to concentrate urine in response to vasopressin. Human kindreds with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus have been found to harbor mutations in the vasopressin receptor 2 (Avpr2 gene or the vasopressin-sensitive water channel aquaporin-2 (Aqp2 gene. Development of a treatment is rendered difficult due to the lack of a viable animal model. Through forward genetic screening of ethylnitrosourea-mutagenized mice, we report the identification and characterization of a mouse model of NDI, with an F204V mutation in the Aqp2 gene. Unlike previously attempted murine models of NDI, our mice survive to adulthood and more exactly recapitulate the human disorder. Previous in vitro experiments using renal cell lines suggest recessive Aqp2 mutations result in improper trafficking of the mutant water pore. Using these animals, we have directly proven this hypothesis of improper AQP2 translocation as the molecular defect in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in the intact organism. Additionally, using a renal cell line we show that the mutated protein, AQP2-F204V, is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and that this abnormal localization can be rescued by wild-type protein. This novel mouse model allows for further mechanistic studies as well as testing of pharmacological and gene therapies for NDI.

  8. Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus: A Rare Presentation in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Dehghani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of multiple myeloma that presented with anorexia, fatigue, high erythrocyte sedimentation rate, bone marrow plasmacytosis of more than 30%, polyuria,and low urine specific gravity. This unusual presentation was diagnosed as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus secondary to a proximal tubular dysfunction. The tubular functional disturbance appeared to be related to thepresence of lambda-type light chains. The patient was treated withdesmopressine without response. After one month of treatment with thalidomide and dexamethasone for myeloma there was a dramatic response with decreased urine output.

  9. Heterogeneous AVPR2 gene mutations in congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildin, R.S.; Antush, M.J.; Bennett, R.L.; Schoof, J.M.; Scott, C.R. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States))

    1994-08-01

    Mutations in the AVPR2 gene encoding the receptor for arginine vasopressin in the kidney (V2 ADHR) have been reported in patients with congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, a predominantly X-linked disorder of water homeostasis. The authors have used restriction-enzyme analysis and direct DNA sequencing of genomic PCR product to evaluate the AVPR2 gene in 11 unrelated affected males. Each patient has a different DNA sequence variation, and only one matches a previously reported mutation. Cosegregation of the variations with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was demonstrated for two families, and a de novo mutation was accomplished in one family. All the variations predict frameshifts, truncations, or nonconservative amino acid substitutions in evolutionarily conserved positions in the V2 ADHR and related receptors. Of interest, a 28-bp deletion is found in one patient, while another, unrelated patient has a tandem duplication of the same 28-bp segment, suggesting that both resulted from the same unusual unequal crossing-over mechanism facilitated by 9-mer direct sequence repeats. Since the V2 ADHR is a member of the seven-transmembrane-domain, G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, the loss-of-function mutations from this study and others provide important clues to the structure-function relationship of this and related receptors. 55 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus--prodromal phase of multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goranov, S; Hristova, I; Pencheva, K

    1994-01-01

    We report on a 65-year-old female patient with an A-kappa multiple myeloma diagnosed on the grounds of bone pain, anemia and extremely elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Eight years prior to admission to the Clinic of Haematology the patient started to excrete a considerable amount of urine (4-6 liters per 24 hrs) with low specific gravity and to experience hardly controllable thirst. The disorder was specified in a specialised endocrinologic clinic as diabetes inspidus with ambiguous aetiology. The administered treatment with adiuretin had a small effect. A course of cyclophosphamide and glucocorticosteroids was started after myeloma was diagnosed--this had a considerable effect on the polyuria and polydipsia; the specific gravity of the urine increased. This effect, as well as the proven light chain proteinuria in the patient, leads to the interpretation of the early complaints of the patient as onset of the underlying disease in the form of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus--a rare light chain tubular syndrome. PMID:7601396

  11. Pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockenhauer, Detlef; Bichet, Daniel G

    2015-10-01

    Healthy kidneys maintain fluid and electrolyte homoeostasis by adjusting urine volume and composition according to physiological needs. The final urine composition is determined in the last tubular segment: the collecting duct. Water permeability in the collecting duct is regulated by arginine vasopressin (AVP). Secretion of AVP from the neurohypophysis is regulated by a complex signalling network that involves osmosensors, barosensors and volume sensors. AVP facilitates aquaporin (AQP)-mediated water reabsorption via activation of the vasopressin V2 receptor (AVPR2) in the collecting duct, thus enabling concentration of urine. In nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), inability of the kidneys to respond to AVP results in functional AQP deficiency. Consequently, affected patients have constant diuresis, resulting in large volumes of dilute urine. Primary forms of NDI result from mutations in the genes that encode the key proteins AVPR2 and AQP2, whereas secondary forms are associated with biochemical abnormalities, obstructive uropathy or the use of certain medications, particularly lithium. Treatment of the disease is informed by identification of the underlying cause. Here we review the clinical aspects and diagnosis of NDI, the various aetiologies, current treatment options and potential future developments. PMID:26077742

  12. Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus associated with a signal peptide mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLeod, J.F.; Gaskill, M.B.; Bradley, G.S.; Robertson, G.L. (Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States)); Kovacs, L. (Comenius Univ. Medical School, Bratislava (Slovakia)); Rittig, S. (Univ. of Aarhus, Aarhus (Denmark))

    1993-09-01

    The authors studied the pathophysiology, natural history, and genetic basis of familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) in a caucasian kindred. Twelve members had polyuria and a deficiency of plasma vasopressin (AVP), which progressed in severity over time. Another had normal urine volumes and plasma AVP when first tested at age 3 yr, but developed severe FNDI a year later. For unknown reasons, one man had a normal urine volume despite severe AVP deficiency and a history of polyuria in the past. When the AVP-neurophysin-II gene was amplified and sequenced, exon 2/3 was normal, but 7 of 12 clones of exon 1 contained a base substitution (G[yields]A) predicting a substitution of threonine for alanine at the -1 position of the signal peptide. Restriction analysis found the mutation in all 14 affected members, but in none of the 41 controls of 19 adult members with normal urine volumes and plasma or urinary AVP (lod score = 5.7). The mutation was also found in 2 infants in whom AVP was normal when tested at 6 and 9 months of age. We hypothesize that a mutation in exon 1 of the AVP-neurophysin-II gene caused FNDI in this kindred by making an abnormally processed precursor that gradually destroys vasopressinergic neurons. 46 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Transient lymphocytic panhypophysitis associated with SIADH leading to diabetes insipidus after glucocorticoid replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Mihoko; Takamoto, Satoru; Masuo, Masatoshi; Makita, Kozo; Saito, Toshikazu

    2003-10-01

    A 52-year-old man presented with vomiting, general fatigue and hyponatremia. His symptoms and signs were consistent with the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). Endocrine studies revealed hypopituitarism and administration of hydrocortisone resulted in a marked polyuria. The patient was diagnosed as masked diabetes insipidus. The lymphocytic hypophysitis was also diagnosed on the basis of MRI findings and anti-pituitary antibody. Six months later, these abnormalities disappeared. Diabetes insipidus may exist in a case of hyponatremia due to contrastive SIADH. Such patients may recover spontaneously and careful follow-up is required, avoiding a long-term treatment by monotonous continuation of hormonal replacement. PMID:14606714

  14. Diabetes insipidus and breast cancer - planning radiotherapy by the use of MRT. Diabetes insipidus und Mammakarzinom - Bedeutung der Kernspintomographie (MRT) zur Therapieplanung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeurer, J.; Busch, M.; Matthaei, D.; Duehmke, E. (Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie); Helwig, A. (Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie)

    1993-02-01

    In patients with advanced breast cancer the incidence of diabetes insipidus is between 0,1% and 0,9%. Satisfactory symptomatic relief can be obtained with Desmorpressin-acetat. In the presence of this symptom complex magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can aid in the detection of metastases to the posterior pituitary. By the use of magnetic resonance imaging, the incidence for and implementation of local radiotherapy can be firmly grounded. (orig.).

  15. Metastatic Prostate Adenocarcinoma Presenting Central Diabetes Insipidus

    OpenAIRE

    Hakkı Yılmaz; Mustafa Kaya; Mücteba Can; Mustafa Özbek; Bahir Keyik

    2012-01-01

    The pituitary gland and infundibulum can be involved in a variety of medical conditions, including infiltrative diseases, fungal infections, tuberculosis, and primary and metastatic tumors. Metastases to the pituitary gland are absolutely rare, and they are generally secondary to pulmonary carcinoma in men and breast carcinoma in women. Pituitary metastases more commonly affect the posterior lobe and the infundibulum than the anterior lobe. The posterior lobe involvement may explain why patie...

  16. Clinical features and molecular analysis of arginine-vasopressin neurophysin II gene in long-term follow-up patients with idiopathic central diabetes insipidus Apresentação clínica e análise molecular do gene da arginina-vasopressina neurofisina II de pacientes com diabetes insípido central idiopático com longo seguimento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio L. Batista

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Central diabetes insipidus (DI characterized by polyuria, polydipsia and inability to concentrate urine, has different etiologies including genetic, autoimmune, post-traumatic, among other causes. Autosomal dominant central DI presents the clinical feature of a progressive decline of arginine-vasopressin (AVP secretion. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we characterized the clinical features and sequenced the AVP-NPII gene of seven long-term follow-up patients with idiopathic central DI in an attempt to determine whether a genetic cause would be involved. METHODS: The diagnosis of central DI was established by fluid deprivation test and hyper-tonic saline infusion. For molecular analysis, genomic DNA was extracted and the AVP-NPII gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. RESULTS: Sequencing analysis revealed a homozygous guanine insertion in the intron 2 (IVS2 +28 InsG of the AVP-NPII gene in four patients, which represents an alternative gene assembly. No mutation in the code region of the AVP-NPII gene was found. CONCLUSIONS: The homozygous guanine insertion in intron 2 (IVS2 +28 InsG is unlikely to contribute to the AVP-NPII gene modulation in DI. In addition, the etiology of idiopathic central DI in children may not be apparent even after long-term follow-up, and requires continuous etiological surveillance.INTRODUÇÃO: O diabetes insípido (DI central, caracterizado por poliúria, polidipsia e inabilidade em concentrar a urina, apresenta diferentes etiologias, incluindo causas genética, autoimune, pós-traumática, entre outras. O DI central autossômico dominante apresenta a característica clínica de falência progressiva da secreção da arginina-vasopressina (AVP. OBJETIVO: No presente estudo, caracterizou-se a apresentação clínica e sequenciou-se o gene AVP-NPII de sete pacientes com DI central idiopático seguidos de longa data na tentativa de determinar se uma causa genética estava envolvida na

  17. Congenital Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus Presented With Bilateral Hydronephrosis and Urinary Infection: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kewen; Xie, Yi; Li, Hanzhong

    2016-05-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is a condition resulting from the kidney's impaired response to circulating antidiuretic hormone (ADH), leading to polydipsia and polyuria. Urinary tract dilatation caused by NDI is a rare situation. Here, we report a case of congenital NDI presented with bilateral hydronephrosis.A 15-year-old boy complaining a history of intermittent fever was admitted to Peking Union Medical College Hospital. He voided 10 to 15 L of urine daily. Radiographic examination revealed severe dilatation of bilateral renal pelvis, ureter, and bladder. Urinalysis shows hyposthenuria.He was diagnosed NDI since born. Transient insertion of a urethral catheter helped to relieve fever. Medical therapy of hydrochlorothiazide and amiloride was prescribed and effective.Dilatation of urinary tract caused by diabetes insipidus is rare, but may be present in severe condition. Therefore, it is crucial for clinicians to perform early treatment to avoid impairment of renal function. PMID:27258490

  18. Hypopituitarism and diabetes insipidus with localized hypertrophic pachymeningitis (Tolosa-Hunt syndrome) associated with Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakita, Noriyoshi; Hanamoto, Takayuki; Muraoka, Noriaki; Ikeda, Tsuneko; Hirata, Toshifumi; Yasuda, Keigo; Sano, Toshiaki

    2004-01-01

    We report a 69-year-old woman with intracranial pachymeningitis showing hypopituitarism, diabetes insipidus, and Tolosa-Hunt syndrome associated with Hashimoto thyroiditis confirmed by autopsy. A large tumorous lesion of the hypothalamo-pituitary gland was revealed on magnetic resonance imaging, after the patient complained of gait and visual field disturbance. These symptoms subsided after thyroid hormone supplementation. Hypopituitarism and diabetes insipidus were diagnosed after cessation of the treatment by the patient herself. Multiple cranial nerve palsies and orbito-frontalgia appeared. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy improved the symptoms, but they recurred when the dose of glucocorticoid was decreased. The patient died of brain thrombosis. Autopsy revealed typical findings of Hashimoto thyroiditis and intracranial pachymeningitis involving the cranial base and pituitary gland. The high titer of rheumatoid factor and Hashimoto thyroiditis in this patient suggest an immunological role in the pathogenesis of pachymeningitis. PMID:14722395

  19. A Case of Hypokalemic Paralysis in a Patient With Neurogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Frederic N.; Kar, Jitesh K.; Verduzco-Gutierrez, Monica; Zakaria, Asma

    2014-01-01

    Acute hypokalemic paralysis is characterized by muscle weakness or paralysis secondary to low serum potassium levels. Neurogenic diabetes insipidus (DI) is a condition where the patient excretes large volume of dilute urine due to low levels of antidiuretic hormone. Here, we describe a patient with neurogenic DI who developed hypokalemic paralysis without a prior history of periodic paralysis. A 30-year-old right-handed Hispanic male was admitted for refractory seizures and acute DI after dev...

  20. Diabetes insipidus and breast cancer - planning radiotherapy by the use of MRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In patients with advanced breast cancer the incidence of diabetes insipidus is between 0,1% and 0,9%. Satisfactory symptomatic relief can be obtained with Desmorpressin-acetat. In the presence of this symptom complex magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can aid in the detection of metastases to the posterior pituitary. By the use of magnetic resonance imaging, the incidence for and implementation of local radiotherapy can be firmly grounded. (orig.)

  1. Infundibulohypophysitis in a man presenting with diabetes insipidus and cavernous sinus involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Tubridy, N; Saunders, D; Thom, M; Asa, S; Powell, M.; Plant, G; Howard, R

    2001-01-01

    Infundibulohypophysitis is an unusual inflammatory condition that affects the infundibulum, the pituitary stalk, and the neurohypophysis and may be part of a range that includes lymphocytic hypophysitis. Lymphocytic hypophysitis occurs mainly in women and most often presents in the later stages of pregnancy. Infundibulohypophysitis usually presents with diabetes insipidus and the cause remains unclear. The case of a 46 year old man with a 12 week history of polyuria and p...

  2. A case of hypokalemic paralysis in a patient with neurogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Frederic N; Kar, Jitesh K; Verduzco-Gutierrez, Monica; Zakaria, Asma

    2014-04-01

    Acute hypokalemic paralysis is characterized by muscle weakness or paralysis secondary to low serum potassium levels. Neurogenic diabetes insipidus (DI) is a condition where the patient excretes large volume of dilute urine due to low levels of antidiuretic hormone. Here, we describe a patient with neurogenic DI who developed hypokalemic paralysis without a prior history of periodic paralysis. A 30-year-old right-handed Hispanic male was admitted for refractory seizures and acute DI after developing a dental abscess. He had a history of pituitary adenoma resection at the age of 13 with subsequent pan-hypopituitarism and was noncompliant with hormonal supplementation. On hospital day 3, he developed sudden onset of quadriplegia with motor strength of 0 of 5 in the upper extremities bilaterally and 1 of 5 in both lower extremities with absent deep tendon reflexes. His routine laboratory studies revealed severe hypokalemia of 1.6 mEq/dL. Nerve Conduction Study (NCS) revealed absent compound motor action potentials (CMAPs) with normal sensory potentials. Electromyography (EMG) did not reveal any abnormal insertional or spontaneous activity. He regained full strength within 36 hours following aggressive correction of the hypokalemia. Repeat NCS showed return of CMAPs in all nerves tested and EMG revealed normal motor units and normal recruitment without myotonic discharges. In patients with central DI with polyuria, hypokalemia can result in sudden paralysis. Hypokalemic paralysis remains an important differential in an acute case of paralysis and early recognition and appropriate management is key. PMID:24707338

  3. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus with idiopathic Fanconi′s syndrome in a child who presented as vitamin D resistant rickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Patra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi′s syndrome is a complex of multiple tubular dysfunctions of proximal tubular cells occurring alone or in association with a variety of inherited (primary or acquired (secondary disorders. It is characterized by aminoaciduria, normoglycaemic glycosuria, tubular proteinuria without hematuria, metabolic acidosis without anion gap and excessive urinary excretion of phosphorous, calcium, uric acid, bicarbonate, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Whereas diabetes insipidus is a disease of collecting tubules and child mainly presents with dehydration and hypernatremia. Though all the cases published till date were secondary to drugs, myeloma, hematological disorders, etc., we are reporting the first case of idiopathic Fanconi′s syndrome along with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a child who presented to us as resistant rickets. Medline search did not reveal any case of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus associated with idiopathic Fanconi syndrome. We hypothesized that the NDI may be due to of severe hypokalemia induced tubular dysfunction.

  4. 'Stalkitis' in a pregnant 32-year-old woman: A rare cause of diabetes insipidus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of lymphocytic infundibulo-neurohypophysitis (LINH) or 'stalkitis' in a 32-year-old woman who presented with diabetes insipidus (DI) during pregnancy is reported here. The diagnosis was made with MR imaging. The clinical and radiological features of this rare disorder and the differential diagnosis of infundibular mass lesions are discussed. The differentiation from lymphocytic adenohypophysitis (LAH) is made. No improvement of the DI accompanying LINH is achieved with trans-sphenoidal surgery. Hence, recognition of typical cases with MR imaging and appropriate medical management avoids unnecessary neurosurgery. This is the second reported case of LINH during pregnancy and may suggest an association. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  5. Intracranical calcification in siblings with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to examine three male siblings with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). The two elder brothers had varying degrees of unusual intracranial calcification; the eldest also showed involvement of the cerebral white matter on MRI. The severity of intracranial calcification was related to the time before initiation of treatment and inversely to mental ability. Brain damage and mental retardation in NDI may be caused by a delay in initiating treatment; early detection and treatment are important to prevent brain damage. (orig.)

  6. Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: what can we learn from mouse models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Michelle; Deen, Peter M T

    2009-02-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are central players in mammalian physiology, allowing efficient water transport through cellular membranes. To date, 13 different aquaporins have been identified in mammals (AQP0-AQP12). Knocking out genes in mice and identification of mutations in the human genes provided important information on the role of AQPs in normal physiology. While the physiological role of many AQPs only becomes clear when the putative function is challenged, the lack of AQP2 directly results in a disease phenotype. Aquaporin 2 is highly expressed in the principal cells of the renal collecting duct, where it shuttles between intracellular storage vesicles and the apical membrane. Upon hypernatraemia or hypovolaemia, the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin (AVP) is released from the pituitary into blood and binds to its type 2 receptor on renal principal cells. This initiates a cAMP signalling cascade resulting in the translocation of AQP2-bearing vesicles to the apical membrane. Subsequently, pro-urinary water reabsorption and urine concentration occurs. This process is reversed by a reduction in circulating AVP levels, which is obtained with the establishment of isotonicity. In humans, mutations in the AQP2 gene cause congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a disorder characterized by an inability to concentrate urine in response to vasopressin. Until the recent development of several congenital NDI mouse models, our knowledge on AQP2 regulation was primarily based on in vitro studies. This review focuses on the similarities between the in vitro and in vivo studies and discusses new insights into congenital NDI obtained from the mouse models. PMID:18790812

  7. Diabetes Insipidus and Anterior Pituitary Insufficiency Due to Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Arduç

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Metastases from breast cancer to the pituitary gland are uncommon. We present a 35-year-old woman with diabetes insipidus and anterior pituitary insufficiency resulting from breast cancer metastases to the pituitary gland. The patient presented with reduced consciousness, fatigue, polyuria, and polydipsia. Hypernatremia (sodium: 154 mmol/L, hypostenuria (urine density: 1001, and hypopituitarism were present on laboratory evaluation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed heterogeneous pituitary gland, thickened pituitary stalk (8mm, and loss of normal hyperintense signal of the posterior pituitary. Based on the clinical, laboratory, and MRI findings, the patient was diagnosed with diabetes insipidus and anterior pituitary insufficiency due to pituitary metastases from breast cancer. She received desmopressin, L-thyroxine, and prednisolone, which resulted in improvement of her symptoms and laboratory results. The patient, who also received Gamma Knife radiosurgery and chemotherapy, died six months later due to disseminated metastases. Although pituitary metastasis is rare, it should be kept in mind in patients with breast cancer since early detection and treatment can improve symptoms of patients.

  8. Diabetes Insipidus and Polydipsia in a Patient with Asperger's Disorder and an Empty Sella: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Michele; Azzoni, Antonella; Giammarco, Vincenzo

    1998-01-01

    Describes an Italian patient with Asperger disorders, Neurogenic Diabetes Insipidus, and Primary Empty Sella. His response to vasopressin treatment suggested a concomitant presence of primary polydipsia. Implications of the observed concurrence of these rare disorders are discussed in relation to diagnosis and pathogenesis. (Author/CR)

  9. Mutation Analysis of AVPR2 and AQP2 Gene in Chinese Patients with Congenital Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ying; LI Hong-jun; YU Zhen-xiang; BAO Yong-li; WU Yin; YU Chun-lei; MENG Xiang-ying; LI Yu-xin

    2008-01-01

    To detect mutations of the aquaporin 2 gene(AQP2) and the arginine vasopressin V2 receptor gene(AVPR2)of Chinese congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and to establish the foundation for further studying the emergence mechanism of the disease and clinical diagnosis, all the exons and part of introns of AQP2 and AVPR2 genes were amplified with intronic primers, using genomic DNA extracted from three patients with congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and two mothers as template, PCR product was ligated into a T-vector and then sequenced. The result was compared with the database sequence to identify the mutable sites via a BLAST search, the incidence of every mutation was analyzed, and the putative transcription factor binding sites that maybe disturbed were analyzed by MAPPER.Mutation g.1394A>G in exon 3 of AVPR2 was detected in all the subjects, g.861C>T(S167L) in exon 2 of AVPR2 and IVS1+3G>A in intron of AQP2 were detected, respectively, in two patients, and c.836A>C in 3' untranslated region of AQP2 was detected in two patients and one mother. Four mutations were identified, g.1394A>G of AVPR2 and c.836A>C of AQP2 have high incidence in patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Detection on the two sites may become auxiliary diagnosis index of congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of posterior pituitary for evaluation of the neurohypophyseal function in idiopathic and autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the role of MR imaging for evaluation of the functional status of the neurohypophyseal system in both idiopathic central diabetes insipidus (DI) and familial autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal DI. The patients and family with DI were analyzed retrospectively for the presence or absence of posterior pituitary gland hyperintense signal on MR images. A total of 19 adult patients with idiopathic central DI, 7 members of a family with autosomal dominant DI and 20 control subjects were included in the study. Diagnosis of idiopathic DI was based on the presence of central DI in the absence of any alteration that is known to be responsible for DI. The patients were studied retrospectively and the morphology and intensity of the posterior lobe by MR imaging was assessed by blinded reading. In all patients with idiopathic central DI and the affected members of the family, the posterior bright signal was absent while the stalk was normal on MR images. In contrast, normal posterior pituitary bright signal and stalk were found in unaffected members of the family and all control subjects. We conclude that MR imaging of the posterior pituitary lobe can be used to evaluate the functional status of the neurohypophyseal system in idiopathic central DI and familial autosomal dominant DI. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab

  11. 吕宏生教授治疗尿崩症的经验%Experience of Prof. LV Hong-sheng for treating diabetes insipidus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈瑞华

    2014-01-01

    Professor LV considered that diabetes insipidus belong to Xiaoke category. Diabetes insipidus was caused by Bingfu Buzu, Laoyu Guodu and Shenyang Shuaiwei, and diabetes insipidus arosed from Shen. Diabetes insipidus showed more deficiency syndrome and less excess syndrome. Doctors should treat the disease based on Yin and Yang, and the disease was easy to be cured.%吕教授认为尿崩症属“消渴”范畴,多由禀赋不足、劳欲过度、肾阳衰微所致,本病病本在肾,实证鲜见,虚证最多。当根据阴阳的偏盛偏衰程度治疗,从而达到阴阳调和,疾病可望痊愈。

  12. Diabetes Insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... substance made by the placenta that prevents the mother’s ADH from working. Desmopressin (nasal spray or pill) What is the ... Infographics Myth vs Fact Patient Alerts Scientific Statements Social Media Resources Peer Support Resources International Resource Center Online Store Pacientes y ...

  13. Diabetes insipidus: An unusual presentation of adenocarcinoma of the lung in a patient with no identifiable lung mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuchi Gulati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Lung cancers are known to metastasize to unusual sites. Despite this knowledge often times the diagnosis of a primary lung cancer gets delayed especially when the patient presents without respiratory symptoms. Case Report: The patient discussed in our review is a 47-year-old female, smoker who had presented to several hospitals with months of headache, nausea and intermittent episodes of vomiting. She was noted to have hypernatremia due to diabetes insipidus and a pituitary lesion on her magnetic resonance images. The pituitary mass on biopsy was found to represent a metastatic focus from a primary lung adenocarcinoma. Conclusion: Clinicians should be aware of malignancies that are well known to metastasize to the posterior pituitary. Conversely, since not every patient presents with symptoms of metastasis, there is a need to recognize the clinical syndromes (e. g., diabetes insipidus-like symptoms or more subtle symptoms like cranial nerve palsies associated with potential metastasis to the pituitary.

  14. Abacavir-induced reversible Fanconi syndrome with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad M

    2006-01-01

    There are several reports of Fanconi syndrome (FS) with or without nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, treated with various antiretroviral medications like cidofovir, adefovir, didenosine and tenofovir. But neither FS nor NDI has been documented with abacavir therapy. We are reporting the first case of abacavir-induced reversible FS with NDI in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, who recovered completely with suppo...

  15. Case of retroperitoneal fibrosis following dihydroergotamine therapy. With special reference to partial diabetes insipidus and positive Ga scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguma, Yutaka; Nishimura, Masaharu; Abe, Shosaku; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Kawakami, Yoshikazu (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine); Ide, Hajime

    1984-06-01

    A 72-year-old male patient who developed retroperitoneal fibrosis during treatment with dihydroergotamine, aspirin, and phenacetin was reported. The disease developed as mediastinal lesions and was accompanied by abnormal deposits of /sup 67/Ga-citrate, idiopathic partial diabetes insipidus, and hypergonadotropinism. One year later, he had fibrotic masses around the great vessels in the abdomen, which caused ureteral obstruction. Fibrous lesions completely disappeared and various laboratory findings improved by steroid therapy following the ablation and fixation of the ureter.

  16. Polyuria and polydipsia in a young child: diagnostic considerations and identification of novel mutation causing familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Matthew D; Fenwick, Raymond G; Brosnan, Patrick G

    2012-12-01

    A 3-year 5-month-old boy was seen for second opinion regarding polydipsia and polyuria. Previously, a diagnosis of primary polydipsia was made after normal urine concentration after overnight water deprivation testing. The boy's father, paternal grandfather, and paternal aunt had diabetes insipidus treated with desmopressin acetate. Based on this young boy's symptoms, ability to concentrate urine after informal overnight water deprivation, and family history of diabetes insipidus, we performed AVP gene mutation testing. Analysis of the AVP gene revealed a novel mutation G54E that changes a normal glycine to glutamic acid, caused by a guanine to adenine change at nucleotide g.1537 (exon 2) of the AVP gene. Commonly, patients with familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNHDI) present within the first 6 years of life with progressively worsening polyuria and compensatory polydipsia. Since these patients have progressive loss of arginine vasopressin (AVP), they may initially respond normally to water deprivation testing and have normal pituitary findings on brain MRI. Genetic testing may be helpful in these patients, as well as preemptively diagnosing those with a mutation, thereby avoiding unnecessary surveillance of those unaffected. PMID:20401697

  17. A case of idiopathic diabetes insipidus presented with bilateral hydroureteronephrosis and neurogenic bladder: A pediatric case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Ozgur Haki; Kivrak, Mithat; Sahin, Aytac; Akan, Serkan; Urkmez, Ahmet; Verit, Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a condition with heterogeneous clinical symptoms characterized by polyuria (urine output >4 mL/kg/hr) and polydipsia (water intake >2 L/m (2)/d). In children, acquired nephrogenic DI (NDI) is more common than central DI (CDI). Diagnosis is based on the presence of high plasma osmolality and low urinary osmolality with significant water diuresis. A water deprivation test with vasopressin challenge, though has limitations, is done to differentiate NDI from CDI and diagnose their incomplete forms. Neonates and young infants are better managed with hydration therapy alone. Older children with CDI are treated with desmopressin (1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin, dDAVP). Its oral form is safe, highly effective and has dosing flexibility. We report a case of an 8-year-old male patient with CDI with severe bilateral non-obstructive hydronephrosis and megaureter. Dramatic clinical and radiological responses to dDAVP treatment were achieved and therapy reduced urine volume and led to marked radiological improvement in hydronephrosis. PMID:26600892

  18. Home blood sodium monitoring, sliding-scale fluid prescription and subcutaneous DDAVP for infantile diabetes insipidus with impaired thirst mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hameed Shihab

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aims Infants with diabetes insipidus (DI, especially those with impaired thirst mechanism or hypothalamic hyperphagia, are prone to severe sodium fluctuations, often requiring hospitalization. We aimed to avoid dangerous fluctuations in serum sodium and improve parental independence. Methods A 16-month old girl with central DI, absent thirst mechanism and hyperphagia following surgery for hypothalamic astrocytoma had erratic absorption of oral DDAVP during chemotherapy cycles. She required prolonged hospitalizations for hypernatremia and hyponatremic seizure. Intensive monitoring of fluid balance, weight and clinical assessment of hydration were not helpful in predicting serum sodium. Discharge home was deemed unsafe. Oral DDAVP was switched to subcutaneous (twice-daily injections, starting with 0.01mcg/dose, increasing to 0.024mcg/dose. The parents adjusted daily fluid allocation by sliding-scale, according to the blood sodium level (measured by handheld i-STAT analyser, Abbott. We adjusted the DDAVP dose if fluid allocation differed from maintenance requirements for 3 consecutive days. Results After 2.5 months, sodium was better controlled, with 84% of levels within reference range (135-145 mmol/L vs. only 51% on the old regimen (p = 0.0001. The sodium ranged from 132-154 mmol/L, compared to 120–156 on the old regimen. She was discharged home. Conclusion This practical regimen improved sodium control, parental independence, and allowed discharge home.

  19. Deletion of the V2 vasopressin receptor gene in two Chinese patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Jun

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI is a rare X-linked inherited disorder characterized by the excretion of large volumes of diluted urine and caused by mutations in arginine vasopressin receptor 2 (AVPR2 gene. To investigate the mutation of AVPR2 gene in a Chinese family with congenital NDI, we screened AVPR2 gene in two NDI patients and eight family members by PCR amplification and direct sequencing. Results Five specific fragments, covering entire coding sequence and their flanking intronic sequences of AVPR2 gene, were not observed in both patients, while those fragments were all detected in the control subjects. Several different fragments around the AVPR2 locus were amplified step by step. It was revealed that a genomic fragment of 5,995-bp, which contained the entire AVPR2 gene and the last exon (exon 22 of the C1 gene, was deleted and a 3-bp (GAG was inserted. Examination of the other family members showed that the mothers and the grandmother were carriers for this deletion. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the two patients in a Chinese family suffering from congenital NDI had a 5,995-bp deletion and 3-bp (GAG insertion at Xq28. The deletion contained the entire AVPR2 gene and exon 22 of the C1 gene.

  20. X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: From the ship Hopewell to RFLP studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bichet, D.G.; Lonergan, M.; Arthus, M.F.; Ligier, S.; Kluge, R. (Universite de Montreal (Canada)); Hendy, G.N.; Pausova, Z.; Zingg, H.; Morgan, K.; Saenger, P. (McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)) (and others)

    1992-11-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI; designated 304800 in Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is an X-linked disorder with abnormal renal and extrarenal V[sub 2] vasopression receptor responses. The mutant gene has been mapped to Xq28 by analysis of RFLPs, and tight linkage between DXS52 and DNI has been reported. In 1969, Bode and Crawford proposed, under the term, the Hopewell hypothesis' that most cases in North America could be traced to descendants of Ulster Scots who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1761 on the ship Hopewell. They also suggested a link between this family and a large Mormon pedigree. DNA samples obtained from 13 independent affected families, including 42 members of the Hopewell and Mormon pedigrees, were analyzed with probes in the Xq28 region. Genealogical reconstructions were performed. Linkage between NDI and DXS304 (probe U6:2.spl), DXS305 (St35-691), DXS52 (St14-1), DXS15 (DX13), and F8C (F814) showed no recombination in 12 families, with a maximum lod score of 13.5 for DXS52. A recombinant between NDI and DXS304, DXS305, was identified in one family. The haplotype segregating with the disease in the Hopewell pedigree was not shared by other North American families. PCR analysis of the St14 VNTR allowed the distinction of two alleles that were not distinguishable by Southern analysis. Carrier status was predicted in 24 of 26 at-risk females. The Hopewell hypothesis cannot explain the origin of NDI in many of the North American families, since they have no apparent relationship with the Hopewell earlier settlers, either by haplotype or by genealogical analysis. PCR analysis of the DXS52 VNTR in NDI families is very useful for carrier testing and presymptomatic diagnosis, which can prevent the first manifestations of dehydration. 39 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Nature and recurrence of AVPR2 mutations in X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bichet, D.G.; Lonergan, M.; Arthus, M.F. (Universite de Montreal (Canada)); Goodyer, P. (McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)); Birnbaumer, M.; Rosenthal, W. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Nivet, H.; Benoit, S.; Giampietro, P.; Simonetti, S. (and others)

    1994-08-01

    X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is a rare disease with defective renal and extrarenal arginine-vasopressin V[sub 2] receptor responses due to mutations in the AVPR2 gene in Xq28. The authors analyzed 31 independent NDI families to determine the nature and recurrence of AVPR2 mutations. Twenty-one new putative disease-causing mutations were identified: 113delCT, 253del35, 255del9, 274insG, V88M, R106C, 402delCT, C112R, Y124X, S126F, W164S, S167L, 684delTA, 804insG, W284X, A285P, W293X, R337X, and three large deletions or gene rearrangements. Five other mutations - R113W, Y128S, R137H, R181C, and R202C - that previously had been reported in other families were detected. There was evidence for recurrent mutation for four mutations (R113W, R137H, S167L, and R337X). Eight de novo mutation events were detected (274insG, R106C, Y128S, 167L [twice], R202C, 684delTA, and R337X). The origins were maternal (one), grandmaternal (one), and grandpaternal (six). In the 31 NDI families and 6 families previously reported, there is evidence both for mutation hot spots for nucleotide substitutions and for small deletions and insertions. More than half (58%) of the nucleotide substitutions in 26 families could be a consequence of 5-methyl-cytosine deamination at a CpG dinucleotide. Most of the small deletions and insertions could be attributed to slipped mispairing during DNA replication. 25 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Recurring dominant-negative mutations in the AVP-NPII gene cause neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repaske, D.R. [Children`s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Phillips, J.A.; Krishnamani, M.R.S. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (ADNDI) is a familial form of arginine vasopressin (or antidiuretic hormone) deficiency that is usually manifest in early childhood with polyuria, polydipsia and an antidiuretic response to exogenous vasopressin or its analogs. The phenotype is postulated to arise from gliosis and depletion of the magnocellular neurons that produce vasopressin in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus. ADNDI is caused by heterozygosity for a variety of mutations in the AVP-NPII gene which encodes vasopressin, its carrier protein (NPII) and a glycoprotein (copeptin) of unknown function. These mutations include: (1) Ala 19{r_arrow}Thr (G279A) in AVP`s signal peptide, (2) Gly 17{r_arrow}Val (G1740T), (3) Pro 24{r_arrow}Leu (C1761T), (4) Gly 57{r_arrow}Ser (G1859A) and (5) del Glu 47({delta}AGG 1824-26), all of which occur in NPII. In characterizing the AVP-NPII mutations in five non-related ADNDI kindreds, we have detected two kindreds having mutation 1 (G279A), two having mutation 3 (C1761T) and one having mutation 4 (G1859A) without any other allelic changes being detected. Two of these recurring mutations (G279A and G1859A) are transitions that occur at CpG dinucleotides while the third (C1761T) does not. Interestingly, families with the same mutations differed in their ethnicity or in their affected AVP-NPII allele`s associated haplotype of closely linked DNA polymorphisms. Our data indicated that at least three of five known AVP-NPII mutations causing ADNDI tend to recur but the mechanisms by which these dominant-negative mutations cause variable or progressive expression of the ADNDI phenotype remain unclear.

  3. Defective Store-Operated Calcium Entry Causes Partial Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamenko, Mykola; Dhande, Isha; Tomilin, Viktor; Zaika, Oleg; Boukelmoune, Nabila; Zhu, Yaming; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Doris, Peter A

    2016-07-01

    Store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) is the mechanism by which extracellular signals elicit prolonged intracellular calcium elevation to drive changes in fundamental cellular processes. Here, we investigated the role of SOCE in the regulation of renal water reabsorption, using the inbred rat strain SHR-A3 as an animal model with disrupted SOCE. We found that SHR-A3, but not SHR-B2, have a novel truncating mutation in the gene encoding stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1), the endoplasmic reticulum calcium (Ca(2+)) sensor that triggers SOCE. Balance studies revealed increased urine volume, hypertonic plasma, polydipsia, and impaired urinary concentrating ability accompanied by elevated circulating arginine vasopressin (AVP) levels in SHR-A3 compared with SHR-B2. Isolated, split-open collecting ducts (CD) from SHR-A3 displayed decreased basal intracellular Ca(2+) levels and a major defect in SOCE. Consequently, AVP failed to induce the sustained intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization that requires SOCE in CD cells from SHR-A3. This effect decreased the abundance of aquaporin 2 and enhanced its intracellular retention, suggesting impaired sensitivity of the CD to AVP in SHR-A3. Stim1 knockdown in cultured mpkCCDc14 cells reduced SOCE and basal intracellular Ca(2+) levels and prevented AVP-induced translocation of aquaporin 2, further suggesting the effects in SHR-A3 result from the expression of truncated STIM1. Overall, these results identify a novel mechanism of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and uncover a role of SOCE in renal water handling. PMID:26574044

  4. Novel mutations in the V2 vasopressin receptor gene in two pedigrees with congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuasa, Hiromitsu; Ito, Masafumi; Oiso, Yutaka; Kurokawa, Masaei; Saito, Hidehiko [Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine, Aichi (Japan); Watanabe, Tohru; Oda, Yoshihiko; Ishizuka, Toshie; Tani, Nagayuki; Ito, Seiki; Shibata, Akira [Niigata City General Hospital (Japan)

    1994-08-01

    Novel mutations in the V2 vasopressin receptor gene were identified in two Japanese pedigrees with X-linked congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. The V2 receptor belongs to the family of G-protein-coupled receptors that contain seven distinct transmembrane domains, and the V2 receptor gene is encoded by three exons. The coding regions amplified by polymerase chain reaction were directly sequenced. In a pedigree, one of four consecutive guanine sequences (nucleotides 528-531) in the second exon was deleted (528delG). This deletion mutation results in a frame shift beginning at codon 154 in the second intracellular domain and a premature termination at codon 161. In another pedigree, a missense mutation (A{yields}G) was identified at nucleotide position 310 in the second exon. This point mutation, H80R, changes a histidine at codon 80 in the second transmembrane domain to an arginine that is more positively charged than histidine under the neutral environment. Each mutation cosegregated with the phenotype of diabetes insipidus and supposed to be a cause for resistance to arginine vasopressin. 35 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Clinical and molecular evidence of abnormal processing and trafficking of the vasopressin preprohormone in a large kindred with familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus due to a signal peptide mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siggaard, C; Rittig, S; Corydon, T J;

    1999-01-01

    The autosomal dominant form of familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (adFNDI) is a rare disease characterized by postnatal onset of polyuria and a deficient neurosecretion of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Since 1991, adFNDI has been linked to 31 different mutations ...

  6. Novel mutation in the AVPR2 gene in a Danish male with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus caused by ER retention and subsequent lysosomal degradation of the mutant receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nejsum, L.N.; Christensen, T.M.; Robben, J.H.; Milligan, G.; Deen, P.M.T.; Bichet, D.G.; Levin, K.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 (AVPR2) gene can cause X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) characterized by the production of large amounts of urine and an inability to concentrate urine in response to the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin. We have identified a novel mutati

  7. Analysis of clinical course and magnetic resonance imaging of posttraumatic diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Yoshiaki; Hirota, Tetsuya; Kohno, Masanobu; Iwai, Atsushi; Abe, Yoshio; Ikeuchi, Hisashi; Yoshioka, Toshiharu [Osaka Prefectural General Hospital (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    We analyzed the relationship between posttraumatic diabetes insipidus (DI) onset and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the last 5 years, 13 survivors of head injury were diagnosed with DI. We divided them into 2 groups, early and delayed, by DI onset. The early group consisted of 5 patients diagnosed with DI within 12 hours of injury. The delayed group consisted of 8 diagnosed after 12 hours or more. We analyzed differences between groups for factors such as Glasgow coma scale (GCS) on admission, Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) at discharge, DI duration, intracranial pressure (ICP) when diagnosed with DI, maximum ICP during observation, and MRI findings. In the early group, mean onset of DI was about 40 hours earlier than that in the delayed group, 7{+-}2 vs. 47{+-}19 hours, p<0.05. No significant differences were seen between groups for GCS, ISS, or GOS. Although no significant difference was seen in ICP, barbiturate therapy was needed in 7 cases, craniotomy in 4, and hypothermia therapy in 5 to control ICP in the delayed group. Barbiturate therapy was needed in only 2 cases and no indications were seen for craniotomy or hypothermia therapy in the early group. All cases in the delayed group recovered from DI within 3 weeks, but 3 in the early group were diagnosed with permanent DI and 1 needed antidiuretic hormone (ADH) during 75 days. All of the early group was recognized to have hypothalamic injury and diffuse axonal injury in MRI, but none in the delayed group was recognized for these MRI findings. In the delayed group, the high-intensity signal of the posterior pituitary gland in T1 weighted MRI, thought to represent the granule of ADH, disappeared in the early period and reappeared gradually after recovery from DI, but this signal did not reappear in the early group. We therefore conducted that the crucial cause of posttraumatic DI in the early group is direct hypothalamic injury, perhaps due to diffuse axonal injury, and that in the delayed group, secondary

  8. Analysis of clinical course and magnetic resonance imaging of posttraumatic diabetes insipidus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyzed the relationship between posttraumatic diabetes insipidus (DI) onset and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the last 5 years, 13 survivors of head injury were diagnosed with DI. We divided them into 2 groups, early and delayed, by DI onset. The early group consisted of 5 patients diagnosed with DI within 12 hours of injury. The delayed group consisted of 8 diagnosed after 12 hours or more. We analyzed differences between groups for factors such as Glasgow coma scale (GCS) on admission, Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) at discharge, DI duration, intracranial pressure (ICP) when diagnosed with DI, maximum ICP during observation, and MRI findings. In the early group, mean onset of DI was about 40 hours earlier than that in the delayed group, 7±2 vs. 47±19 hours, p<0.05. No significant differences were seen between groups for GCS, ISS, or GOS. Although no significant difference was seen in ICP, barbiturate therapy was needed in 7 cases, craniotomy in 4, and hypothermia therapy in 5 to control ICP in the delayed group. Barbiturate therapy was needed in only 2 cases and no indications were seen for craniotomy or hypothermia therapy in the early group. All cases in the delayed group recovered from DI within 3 weeks, but 3 in the early group were diagnosed with permanent DI and 1 needed antidiuretic hormone (ADH) during 75 days. All of the early group was recognized to have hypothalamic injury and diffuse axonal injury in MRI, but none in the delayed group was recognized for these MRI findings. In the delayed group, the high-intensity signal of the posterior pituitary gland in T1 weighted MRI, thought to represent the granule of ADH, disappeared in the early period and reappeared gradually after recovery from DI, but this signal did not reappear in the early group. We therefore conducted that the crucial cause of posttraumatic DI in the early group is direct hypothalamic injury, perhaps due to diffuse axonal injury, and that in the delayed group, secondary

  9. Competing interests in a lung cancer with metastasis to the pituitary gland: syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion versus diabetes insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulsin, Gaurav Singh; Jacobs, Madeleine Louisa Bryson; Gohil, Shailesh; Thomas, Adam; Levy, Miles

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the pituitary gland are rare; cancers that most commonly metastasize to the pituitary are breast and lung cancers. No specific computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging features reliably distinguish primary pituitary masses from metastases. A combination of a detailed clinical assessment together with specialist endocrine and neuroradiology support is essential to make the rare diagnosis of a pituitary metastasis. We present the case of a man with metastatic lung cancer, initially presenting as hypopituitarism. Subtle features in the history, together with neuroimaging findings atypical for pituitary adenomas, provided clues that the diagnosis was one of the pituitary metastases. Treatment of diabetes insipidus (DI) with replacement antidiuretic hormone (ADH) was complicated by extreme difficulties in achieving a satisfactory sodium and water balance. This was the result of coexistent DI and syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion perpetuated by the patient's primary lung cancer, a phenomenon not previously described in the literature. PMID:27274855

  10. On the Treatment of 20 Cases of Children With Diabetes Insipidus%浅谈20例小儿尿崩症的治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉芹

    2015-01-01

    目的:对小儿尿崩症及其治疗方法进行探讨。方法随机选取我院2014年1月~2014年12月间收治的经临床确诊为患有小儿尿崩症的患儿26例进行探讨分析。结果经过临床治疗,26例患儿均可痊愈。结论小儿尿崩症经过治疗,可以取得明显有效的治疗效果,临床上常采取因病治疗与药物治疗等方法。%Objective Its treatment of diabetes insipidus in children are discussed. Methods Our hospital between January 2014 to December 2014 were treated with clinically diagnosed 26 cases of pediatric diabetes insipidus in children explore analysis. Results After clinical treatment, 26 cases of children can be cured. Conclusion Pediatric diabetes insipidus after treatment, can achieve signiifcant and effective treatment, often take treatment of illness and drug treatment methods in clinical practice.

  11. A novel point mutation in the translation initiation codon of the pre-pro-vasopressin-neurophysin II gene: Cosegregation with morphological abnormalities and clinical symptoms in autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutishauser, J.; Boeni-Schnetzler, M.; Froesch, E.R.; Wichmann, W.; Huisman, T. [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (ADNDI) is a rare variant of idiopathic central diabetes insipidus. Several different mutations in the human vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NP II) gene have been described. We studied nine family members from three generations of an ADNDI pedigree at the clinical, morphological, and molecular levels. AVP concentrations were measured during diagnostic fluid restriction tests. Coronal and sagittal high resolution T1-weighted images of the pituitary were obtained from affected and healthy family members. PCR was used to amplify the AVP-NP II precursor gene, and PCR products were directly sequenced. Under maximal osmotic stimulation, AVP serum levels were close to or below the detection limit in affected individuals. Magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed the characteristic hyperintense ({open_quotes}bright spot{close_quotes}) appearance of the posterior pituitary in two healthy family members. This signal was absent in all four ADNDI patients examined. The coding sequences of AVP and its carrier protein, neurophysin II, were normal in all family members examined. Affected individuals showed a novel single base deletion (G 227) in the translation initiation codon of the AVP-NP II signal peptide on one allele. The mutation in the AVP-NP II leader sequence appears to be responsible for the disease in this kindred, possibly by interfering with protein translocation. The absence of the hyperintense posterior pituitary signal in affected individuals could reflect deficient posterior pituitary function. 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Identification of Potential Pharmacoperones Capable of Rescuing the Functionality of Misfolded Vasopressin 2 Receptor Involved in Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Emery; Janovick, Jo Ann; Bannister, Thomas D; Shumate, Justin; Scampavia, Louis; Conn, P Michael; Spicer, Timothy P

    2016-09-01

    Pharmacoperones correct the folding of otherwise misfolded protein mutants, restoring function (i.e., providing "rescue") by correcting their trafficking. Currently, most pharmacoperones possess intrinsic antagonist activity because they were identified using methods initially aimed at discovering such functions. Here, we describe an ultra-high-throughput homogeneous cell-based assay with a cAMP detection system, a method specifically designed to identify pharmacoperones of the vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2R), a GPCR that, when mutated, is associated with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Previously developed methods to identify compounds capable of altering cellular trafficking of V2R were modified and used to screen a 645,000 compound collection by measuring the ability of library compounds to rescue a mutant hV2R [L83Q], using a cell-based luminescent detection system. The campaign initially identified 3734 positive modulators of cAMP. The confirmation and counterscreen identified only 147 of the active compounds with an EC50 of ≤5 µM. Of these, 83 were reconfirmed as active through independently obtained pure samples and were also inactive in a relevant counterscreen. Active and tractable compounds within this set can be categorized into three predominant structural clusters, described here, in the first report detailing the results of a large-scale pharmacoperone high-throughput screening campaign. PMID:27280550

  13. Binding-, intracellular transport-, and biosynthesis-defective mutants of vasopressin type 2 receptor in patients with X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsukaguchi, H; Matsubara, H.; Taketani, S; Mori, Y.; Seido, T; Inada, M

    1995-01-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is most often an X-linked disorder in which urine is not concentrated due to renal resistance to arginine vasopressin. We recently identified four vasopressin type 2 receptor gene mutations in unrelated X-linked NDI families, including R143P, delta V278, R202C, and 804insG. All these mutations reduced ligand binding activity to < 10% of the normal without affecting mRNA accumulation. To elucidate whether the receptors are expressed on the cell surface, we ...

  14. A novel mutation affecting the arginine-137 residue of AVPR2 in dizygous twins leads to nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and attenuated urine exosome aquaporin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichs, Gitte R; Hansen, Louise H; Nielsen, Maria R;

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor gene AVPR2 may cause X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus by defective apical insertion of aquaporin-2 in the renal collecting duct principal cell. Substitution mutations with exchange of arginine at codon 137 can cause nephrogenic syndrome of inappropr...... administration. While a similar urine exosome release rate was shown between probands and controls by western blotting for the marker ALIX, there was a selective decrease in exosome aquaporin-2 versus aquaporin-1 protein in probands compared to controls....

  15. P2Y12 Receptor Localizes in the Renal Collecting Duct and Its Blockade Augments Arginine Vasopressin Action and Alleviates Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Müller, Christa E; Carlson, Noel G; Baqi, Younis; Strasburg, David L; Heiney, Kristina M; Villanueva, Karie; Kohan, Donald E; Kishore, Bellamkonda K

    2015-12-01

    P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12-R) signaling is mediated through Gi, ultimately reducing cellular cAMP levels. Because cAMP is a central modulator of arginine vasopressin (AVP)-induced water transport in the renal collecting duct (CD), we hypothesized that if expressed in the CD, P2Y12-R may play a role in renal handling of water in health and in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. We found P2Y12-R mRNA expression in rat kidney, and immunolocalized its protein and aquaporin-2 (AQP2) in CD principal cells. Administration of clopidogrel bisulfate, an irreversible inhibitor of P2Y12-R, significantly increased urine concentration and AQP2 protein in the kidneys of Sprague-Dawley rats. Notably, clopidogrel did not alter urine concentration in Brattleboro rats that lack AVP. Clopidogrel administration also significantly ameliorated lithium-induced polyuria, improved urine concentrating ability and AQP2 protein abundance, and reversed the lithium-induced increase in free-water excretion, without decreasing blood or kidney tissue lithium levels. Clopidogrel administration also augmented the lithium-induced increase in urinary AVP excretion and suppressed the lithium-induced increase in urinary nitrates/nitrites (nitric oxide production) and 8-isoprostane (oxidative stress). Furthermore, selective blockade of P2Y12-R by the reversible antagonist PSB-0739 in primary cultures of rat inner medullary CD cells potentiated the expression of AQP2 and AQP3 mRNA, and cAMP production induced by dDAVP (desmopressin). In conclusion, pharmacologic blockade of renal P2Y12-R increases urinary concentrating ability by augmenting the effect of AVP on the kidney and ameliorates lithium-induced NDI by potentiating the action of AVP on the CD. This strategy may offer a novel and effective therapy for lithium-induced NDI. PMID:25855780

  16. Diabetes insípida adípsica en un operado de craneofaringioma Adipsic diabetes insipidus after surgery for craniopharyngioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Insúa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available La variada clínica de la enfermedad hipotalámica (convulsiones, hidrocefalia, hipopituitarismo, alteraciones del apetito, el sueño y la temperatura corporal incluye también los desórdenes regulatorios de la tonicidad y el volumen del líquido extracelular, debidos a la disrupción de la secreción de ADH (hormona antidiurética, vasopresina y/o del mecanismo de la sed. Se presenta un caso de un paciente operado de un craneofaringioma, que desarrolló diabetes insípida adípsica, que ilustra la alteración conjunta de los mecanismos regulatorios del balance hídrico. Los autores declaran no poseer conflictos de interés.The varied manifestations of hypothalamic disease (seizures, hydrocephalus, hypopytuitarism, altered appetite, sleep and body temperature regulation also include plasma tonicity and extracellular volume regulation disorders, due to the disruption of ADH (antidiuretic hormone, vasopressin secretion and/ or thirst mechanisms. We report the case of a patient operated on craniopharyngioma, who developed adipsic diabetes insipidus which illustrates the combined alterations of the mechanisms regulating water balance. No financial conflicts of interest exist.

  17. Diffuse malignant lymphoma type B with optic chiasm infiltration, visual disturbances, hypopituitarism, hyperprolactinaemia and diabetes insipidus. Case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The case is reported of a 55-year-old man with diffuse malignant lymphoma type B associated with transient optic chiasm infiltration and visual disturbances but with persistent hypopituitarism, hyperprolactinaemia and diabetes insipidus. The patient was administered chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Repeated MR and CT scans showed optic chiasm infiltration, which disappeared in the course of the chemotherapy but then recurred, changed its appearance and finally disappeared again. In the meantime visual disturbances occurred and disappeared during the therapy. Hypopituitarism, diabetes insipidus and hyperprolactinaemia were diagnosed and replacement therapy was administered. Later on abdominal pain occurred, and a CT scan revealed bilateral kidney masses and enlarged retroperitoneal lymph nodes. These were diffuse malignant lymphoma with regional lymphonodulitis in histology. Finally, hydrothorax and hydroretroperitoneum were diagnosed. The patient died as a result of systemic complications of the disease. The length of survival time documented following the hypothalamochiasmatic infiltration and diagnosis of lymphoma makes the case an unusual one for patients with CNS lymphoma. Hormonal disturbances accompanying the suprasellar region infiltration are very important from the practical point of view. (author)

  18. Characterization of an aquaporin-2 water channel gene mutation causing partial nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a Mexican family: evidence of increased frequency of the mutation in the town of origin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boccalandro, C.; Mattia, F.P. de; Guo, D.C.; Xue, L.; Orlander, P.; King, T.M.; Gupta, P.; Deen, P.M.T.; Lavis, V.R.; Milewicz, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    A Mexican family with partial congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) that resulted from a mutation in the aquaporin-2 water channel (AQP2) was characterized, and the source of this rare mutation was traced to the family's town of origin in Mexico. Affected individuals with profound polyuria

  19. Three families with autosomal dominant nephrogenic diabetes insipidus caused by aquaporin-2 mutations in the C-terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, M; Iwai, K; Ooeda, T; Igarashi, T; Ogawa, E; Katsushima, Y; Shinbo, I; Uchida, S; Terada, Y; Arthus, M F; Lonergan, M; Fujiwara, T M; Bichet, D G; Marumo, F; Sasaki, S

    2001-10-01

    The vasopressin-regulated water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is known to tetramerize in the apical membrane of the renal tubular cells and contributes to urine concentration. We identified three novel mutations, each in a single allele of exon 4 of the AQP2 gene, in three families showing autosomal dominant nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). These mutations were found in the C-terminus of AQP2: a deletion of G at nucleotide 721 (721 delG), a deletion of 10 nucleotides starting at nucleotide 763 (763-772del), and a deletion of 7 nucleotides starting at nucleotide 812 (812-818del). The wild-type AQP2 is predicted to be a 271-amino acid protein, whereas these mutant genes are predicted to encode proteins that are 330-333 amino acids in length, because of the frameshift mutations. Interestingly, these three mutant AQP2s shared the same C-terminal tail of 61 amino acids. In Xenopus oocytes injected with mutant AQP2 cRNAs, the osmotic water permeability (Pf) was much smaller than that of oocytes with the AQP2 wild-type (14%-17%). Immunoblot analysis of the lysates of the oocytes expressing the mutant AQP2s detected a band at 34 kD, whereas the immunoblot of the plasma-membrane fractions of the oocytes and immunocytochemistry failed to show a significant surface expression, suggesting a defect in trafficking of these mutant proteins. Furthermore, coinjection of wild-type cRNAs with mutant cRNAs markedly decreased the oocyte Pf in parallel with the surface expression of the wild-type AQP2. Immunoprecipitation with antibodies against wild-type and mutant AQP2 indicated the formation of mixed oligomers composed of wild-type and mutant AQP2 monomers. Our results suggest that the trafficking of mutant AQP2 is impaired because of elongation of the C-terminal tail, and the dominant-negative effect is attributed to oligomerization of the wild-type and mutant AQP2s. Segregation of the mutations in the C-terminus of AQP2 with dominant-type NDI underlies the importance of this

  20. Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: what can we learn from mouse models?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, M.; Deen, P.M.T.

    2009-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are central players in mammalian physiology, allowing efficient water transport through cellular membranes. To date, 13 different aquaporins have been identified in mammals (AQP0-AQP12). Knocking out genes in mice and identification of mutations in the human genes provided importan

  1. Acute presentation of gestational diabetes insipidus with pre-eclampsia complicated by cerebral vasoconstriction: a case report and review of the published work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Amir; Fuchs, Yael; Zafra, Kathleen; Haberman, Shoshana; Tal, Reshef

    2015-08-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus (GDI) is a rare, self-limited complication of pregnancy. As it is related to excess placental vasopressinase enzyme activity, which is metabolized in the liver, GDI is more common in pregnancies complicated by conditions associated with liver dysfunction. We present a case of a 41-year-old woman at 38 weeks' gestation who presented with pre-eclampsia with severe features, including impaired liver function and renal insufficiency. Following cesarean section she was diagnosed with GDI, which was further complicated by cerebral vasoconstriction as demonstrated by magnetic resonance angiography. This case raises the possibility that cerebral vasoconstriction may be related to the cause of GDI. A high index of suspicion of GDI should be maintained in patients who present with typical signs and symptoms, especially in the setting of pregnancy complications associated with liver dysfunction. PMID:25832854

  2. Case report of severe Cushing’s syndrome in medullary thyroid cancer complicated by functional diabetes insipidus, aortic dissection, jejunal intussusception, and paraneoplastic dysautonomia: remission with sorafenib without reduction in cortisol concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Hammami, Muhammad M.; Duaiji, Najla; Mutairi, Ghazi; Aklabi, Sabah; Qattan, Nasser; Abouzied, Mohei El-Din M.; Sous, Mohamed W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Normalization of cortisol concentration by multikinase inhibitors have been reported in three patients with medullary thyroid cancer-related Cushing’s syndrome. Aortic dissection has been reported in three patients with Cushing’s syndrome. Diabetes insipidus without intrasellar metastasis, intestinal intussusception, and paraneoplastic dysautonomia have not been reported in medullary thyroid cancer. Case presentation An adult male with metastatic medullary thyroid cancer presented ...

  3. Identification of 13 new mutations in the vasopressin-neurophysin II gene in 17 kindreds with familial autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittig, S.; Siggaard, C.; Pedersen, E.B. [Aahus Univ. Hospital and Faculty of Health Sciences (Denmark)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive postnatal deficiency of arginine vasopressin as a result of mutation in the gene that encodes the hormone. To determine the extent of mutations in the coding region that produce the phenotype, we studied members of 17 unrelated kindreds with the disorder. We sequenced all 3 exons of the gene by using a rapid, direct dye-terminator method and found the causative mutation in each kindred. In four kindreds, the mutations were each identical to mutations described in other affected families. In the other 13 kindreds each mutation was unique. There were two missense mutations that altered the cleavage region of the signal peptide, seven missense mutations in exon 2, which codes for the conserved portion of the protein, one nonsense mutation in exon 2, and three nonsense mutations in exon 3. These findings, together with the clinical features of FNDI, suggest that each of the mutations exerts an effect by directing the production of a pre-prohormone that cannot be folded, processed, or degraded properly and eventually destroys vasopressinergic neurons. 63 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Long-term replacement of a mutated nonfunctional CNS gene: reversal of hypothalamic diabetes insipidus using an EIAV-based lentiviral vector expressing arginine vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienemann, Alison S; Martin-Rendon, Enca; Cosgrave, Anna S; Glover, Colin P J; Wong, Liang-Fong; Kingsman, Susan M; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; Uney, James B

    2003-05-01

    Due to the complexity of brain function and the difficulty in monitoring alterations in neuronal gene expression, the potential of lentiviral gene therapy vectors to treat disorders of the CNS has been difficult to fully assess. In this study, we have assessed the utility of a third-generation equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) in the Brattleboro rat model of diabetes insipidus, in which a mutation in the arginine vasopressin (AVP) gene results in the production of nonfunctional mutant AVP precursor protein. Importantly, by using this model it is possible to monitor the success of the gene therapy treatment by noninvasive assays. Injection of an EIAV-CMV-AVP vector into the supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus resulted in expression of functional AVP peptide in magnocellular neurons. This was accompanied by a 100% recovery in water homeostasis as assessed by daily water intake, urine production, and urine osmolality lasting for a 1-year measurement period. These data show that a single gene defect leading to a neurological disorder can be corrected with a lentiviral-based strategy. This study highlights the potential of using viral gene therapy for the long-term treatment of disorders of the CNS. PMID:12718901

  5. A case of myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA)-associated hypertrophic pachymeningitis presenting with multiple cranial nerve palsies and diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Ken; Sainouchi, Makoto; Goto, Masahiro; Murase, Nagako; Ohtani, Ryo; Nakamura, Michikazu

    2016-05-31

    A 61-year-old woman developed hearing difficulties and became thirsty after experiencing cold symptoms. A neurological examination revealed a loss of odor sensation, facial palsy, dysphasia, and dysarthria. Vocal cord palsy was observed during pharyngoscopy. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a thickened pituitary stalk and swelling of the pituitary gland, but no high signal intensity regions were seen in the posterior portion of the pituitary gland. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI demonstrated a thickened dura mater over the anterior cranial fossa. A biopsy specimen of the thickened dura mater showed fibrosis, granulomatous inflammation, and necrotic foci. Blood tests detected myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA). The patient's urine osmolarity was low even though she exhibited hypernatremia. We diagnosed her with hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with MPO-ANCA and diabetes insipidus. The patient received two courses of 5-day high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone (1.0 g/day), and was subsequently administered oral prednisolone, which gradually relieved her symptoms. However, the patient's symptoms recurred despite the high-dose prednisolone treatment. It was difficult to control the patient's symptoms in this case with oral prednisolone monotherapy, but combined treatment with cyclosporine resulted in sustained remission. It is considered that patients with MPO-ANCA-positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis require combination therapy with prednisolone and immunosuppressive agents at an early stage. PMID:27098904

  6. Challenges in management of patients with intracranial germ cell tumor and diabetes insipidus treated with cisplatin and/or ifosfamide based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Samina; Wherrett, Diane; Bartels, Ute; Tabori, Uri; Huang, Annie; Stephens, Derek; Bouffet, Eric

    2010-05-01

    Patients with intracranial germ cell tumor (IGCT) often present with pituitary dysfunction, including diabetes insipidus (DI). Recent protocols have used pre-radiation chemotherapy with combinations of etoposide, carboplatin and/or cisplatin, and ifosfamide. Management of DI in these patients requires monitoring of electrolytes and fluids during chemotherapy and hyperhydration. All consecutive patients treated with chemotherapy for an IGCT during the period 1990-2007 at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto were reviewed. Out of 32 patients who received chemotherapy, 21 had DI. Only cycles containing cisplatin and/or ifosfamide and hyperhydration were considered. DI and non-DI patients were compared for each cycle of chemotherapy. Patients were studied for number of days in hospital per chemotherapy course, daily fluid input and output, changes in dose, schedule and route of administration of desmopressin (DDAVP) during chemotherapy, daily variations in sodium level, electrolyte monitoring requirements per day, and complications related to fluid and electrolyte disturbances. Fifty-four cycles of chemotherapy in DI patients were compared to 25 cycles in non DI patients. All 21 patients with DI required daily change in dosage and schedule of DDAVP. Marked variations in daily sodium level were observed in the DI group. Seventeen courses required prolonged admission in the DI group (one in non DI patients) and 6 patients experienced serious complications. In conclusion, DI is a risk factor for complications when cisplatin and/or ifosfamide based protocols are used. The role of these agents in the management of ICGT should be carefully evaluated and guidelines for management of DI established. PMID:19820898

  7. Identification of eight new mutations in familial neurogenic diabetes insipidus supports the concept that defective folding of the mutant provasopressin-neurophysin causes the disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittig, S.; Siggaard, C.; Pedersen, E.B. [University Hospital in Aarhus (Denmark)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Familial neurogenic diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is an autosomal dominant disorder with a uniform phenotype characterized by polyuria, polydipsia and a severe deficiency of arginine vasopressin (AVP). These abnormalities develop postnatally and appear to be due to progressive degeneration of AVP producing neurons. Previous studies in 8 FNDI kindreds have identified 5 different mutations in the gene that codes for the AVP-neurophysin (NP) precursor, AVP-NP. Four kindreds had the same missense mutation in the part of exon 1 that codes for the C-terminal amino acid of the signal peptide (SP). The other 4 had different missense mutations or a codon deletion in exon 2 which codes for the highly conserved part of NP. In the present study, the AVP-NP genes from 8 other kindreds with FNDI were sequenced bidirectionally using sequence and single-stranded DNA amplified by PCR with biotinylated primers flanking each of the 3 exons. We find that each of the 8 kindreds has a different, previously unreported mutation in either the SP coding part of exon 1, in exon 2 or in the variable, NP-coding part of exon 3. Combining these 8 new mutations with the 5 described previously reveals a distribution pattern that corresponds closely to the domains involved in the mutually interactive processes of AVP binding, folding and dimerization of NP. Based on these findings and the clinical features of FNDI, we postulate that the precursors produced by the mutant alleles are cytotoxic because they do not fold or dimerize properly for subsequent packaging and processing.

  8. Diabetes insipidus-rarely symptom of renal failure on multiple organs failure%多器官功能衰竭中肾衰的少见症—尿崩

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋嘉振; 胡玲

    2001-01-01

    目的 报道因多器官功能衰竭(MOF)产生尿崩症状的病例。方法 MOF14例,在病因治疗和程序化脏器支持的同时,监测其尿量、血、尿晶体渗透量、血电解质、血气分析等指标,观察使用垂体后叶素前、后的变化。结果 2例治愈,12例死亡。病程第2~9d出现尿崩症状,持续时间为43±22h(±s,n=14),高峰尿量9753±2461ml/d(±s,n=14),并有排出等渗尿、血电解质浓度升高、酸血症等变化。垂体后叶素静滴(1U/h)后,3例尿量减少,8例2~4h尿量减少,3例无效。结论 MOF病人产生尿崩是肾浓缩功能衰竭的结果。%Objective To report diabetes insipidus cases caused by multipleorgans failure(MOF).Methods 14 cases suffered from MOF,etiological treatment and programmatic organ supporting were performed.Urine volume,crystal osmotic pressure of blood and urine,free water clean rate,blood electrolyte,blood gas analysis etc.were monitored.Their changes before and after pituitrin infusion were observed.Results 2 cases were cured,12 cases died.Diabetes insipidus was appeared from 2ed to 9th day of course and its time was maintained on 43±22 hours (±s,n=14),peak urine volume was reached 9 753±2 461 ml/d(±s,n=14).At same time,isotonic urine discharged,electrolytic concentration of blood rised and acidemia happened could be seen.When pituitrin was infused by 1U/h dosage,urine volume decreased in 3 cases,8 cases decreased in short time(2~4 h)and 3 cases were no reaction.Conclusions Diabetes insipidus caused by MOF was the result of renal concentrative function failure.

  9. Diabetes insípida adípsica en un operado de craneofaringioma Adipsic diabetes insipidus after surgery for craniopharyngioma

    OpenAIRE

    A Insúa

    2011-01-01

    La variada clínica de la enfermedad hipotalámica (convulsiones, hidrocefalia, hipopituitarismo, alteraciones del apetito, el sueño y la temperatura corporal) incluye también los desórdenes regulatorios de la tonicidad y el volumen del líquido extracelular, debidos a la disrupción de la secreción de ADH (hormona antidiurética, vasopresina) y/o del mecanismo de la sed. Se presenta un caso de un paciente operado de un craneofaringioma, que desarrolló diabetes insípida adípsica, que ilustra la al...

  10. A de Novo mutation in the coding sequence for neurophysin-II (Pro{sup 24} {yields} Leu) is associated with onset and transmission of autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repaske, D.R.; Browning, J.E. [Children`s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The molecular basis of autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, a hereditary deficiency of vasopressin, was determined by nucleotide sequence analysis of the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin-II gene. A C{yields}T mutation at nucleotide 1761 was detected in one allele of this gene in each affected individual in three generations of one family. This mutant gene encodes a normal arginine vasopressin peptide, but predicts a substitution of leucine for proline at amino acid 24 of neurophysin-II, the arginine vasopressin carrier protein. This mutation was not detected in 50 control individuals, thus demonstrating that it is not a common silent genetic polymorphism. The disease arose in the second generation of the studied family, and the chromosome 20 carrying this new mutation was identified by polymorphic CA microsatellite haplotype analysis. The first affected individual inherited this chromosome segment from her mother, who had neither the disease nor this mutation in her somatic cell DNA. Third generation individuals who subsequently inherited this mutation were affected. These data demonstrate that this amino acid substitution in neurophysin-II causes this disease. Two possibilities to explain the mechanism by which clinical deficiency of arginine vasopressin develops even in the presence of one normal arginine vasopressin-neurophysin-II allele are discussed. 40 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. 继发于肾源性尿崩症的巨输尿管-巨膀胱综合征(附一例报告并文献复习)%Megaureter-megacystis syndrome secondary to congenital nephrogenic diabets insipidus (a case report and literature review)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小东; 朱积川; 姜辉; 王晓峰; 洪铠; 侯树坤

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical features and the urologicalcomplications of congenital diabetes insipidus. Methods A case of congenital diabetse insipidus was presented with review of the li-terature.The urodynamics and the isotopic renal dynamic imaging of the patient were studied. Results The patient had megahydronephrosis,megaureter and megacystis with very low specific gravity of the urine (1.000) yet with normal blood chemistry,normal blood electrolytes and with no urinary tract outflow obstruction.The urine volume could be decreased by medication. Conclusions Early diagnosis of congenital diabetes insipidus and the prevention of urological complications are important.Automatic urinary tract rupture secondary to congenital diabetes insipidus is rarely seen.%目的 探讨肾源性尿崩症所致巨输尿管-巨膀胱综合征的临床特点及诊治措施。 方法 分析1999年12月收治的1例病历资料,结合文献复习讨论。 结果 病人为重度尿路积水,血生化、血电解质正常,尿比重1.000。尿动力学检查和肾动态显影未见尿路梗阻表现。利钠利尿剂等药物有助于减少患者尿量。治疗后随访6个月,患者尿量5000~6000ml。B超复查肾盂积水较治疗前有所减轻,膀胱剩余尿量明显减少。 结论 肾源性尿崩症导致巨输尿管-巨膀胱综合征合并尿路破裂者罕见,药物治疗可明显减少尿量,减轻和阻止尿路积水的发生。临床早期诊断采取防治措施十分重要。

  12. 关于股骨头坏死、骨髓炎、脑垂体瘤、尿崩症的患者临床观察与宣教%Patients with Clinical Observation and Education on Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head, Osteomyelitis, Pituitary tumor, Diabetes insipidus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李娟

    2015-01-01

    Through the introduction of avascular necrosis of the femoral head, osteomyelitis, pituitary tumor and diabetes insipidus(DI)in patients with clinical observation process and the nursing operation technique, explains the related health care workers to guide the patients correctly understand the disease, establish the confidence to overcome the disease’s method.%通过介绍股骨头坏死、骨髓炎、脑垂体瘤和尿崩症(DI)患者的临床观察过程和护理操作技术,阐述了相关医护工作者指导患者正确认识疾病、树立战胜疾病信心的方法。

  13. Economic evaluation of a diabetes disease management programme with a central role for the diabetes nurse specialist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steuten, L.M.G.; Bruijsten, M.W.A.M.; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: In the region of Maastricht, The Netherlands, a disease management programme (DMP) for patients with diabetes mellitus was implemented. The programme aims to improve quality of care within existing budgets. To achieve this, diabetes nurse specialists (DNSs) were given a central role with

  14. Disease: H00253 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00253 Neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (NPDI); Central Diabetes Insipidus Centr...D:16713494 Christensen JH, Rittig S Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus--an update. Semin Nephrol 2...6:209-23 (2006) PMID:12874957 Christensen JH, Siggaard C, Rittig S Autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus. APMIS Suppl 92-5 (2003) ...

  15. Type 2 diabetes mellitus: A central nervous system etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Jannetta, Peter J.; Fletcher, Lynn H.; Grondziowski, Peter M.; Casey, Kenneth F.; Sekula Jr, Raymond F.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Insulin resistance (hyperinsulinemia) is said to be the signal event and causal in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Pulsatile arterial compression of the right anterolateral medulla oblongata is associated with autonomic dysfunction, including “driving” the pancreas, which increases insulin resistance causing type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this prospective study, we hypothesize that decompressing the right cranial nerve X and medulla will result in better glycemic contro...

  16. Targeting AGEs Signaling Ameliorates Central Nervous System Diabetic Complications in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Mohamed Naguib; El-Bassossy, Hany M; Barakat, Waleed

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic endocrine disorder associated with several complications as hypertension, advanced brain aging, and cognitive decline. Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is an important mechanism that mediates diabetic complications. Upon binding to their receptor (RAGE), AGEs mediate oxidative stress and/or cause cross-linking with proteins in blood vessels and brain tissues. The current investigation was designed to investigate the effect of agents that decrease AGEs signaling, perindopril which increases soluble RAGE (sRAGE) and alagebrium which cleaves AGEs cross-links, compared to the standard antidiabetic drug, gliclazide, on the vascular and central nervous system (CNS) complications in STZ-induced (50 mg/kg, IP) diabetes in rats. Perindopril ameliorated the elevation in blood pressure seen in diabetic animals. In addition, both perindopril and alagebrium significantly inhibited memory decline (performance in the Y-maze), neuronal degeneration (Fluoro-Jade staining), AGEs accumulation in serum and brain, and brain oxidative stress (level of reduced glutathione and activities of catalase and malondialdehyde). These results suggest that blockade of AGEs signaling after diabetes induction in rats is effective in reducing diabetic CNS complications. PMID:26491434

  17. Targeting AGEs Signaling Ameliorates Central Nervous System Diabetic Complications in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Naguib Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic endocrine disorder associated with several complications as hypertension, advanced brain aging, and cognitive decline. Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs is an important mechanism that mediates diabetic complications. Upon binding to their receptor (RAGE, AGEs mediate oxidative stress and/or cause cross-linking with proteins in blood vessels and brain tissues. The current investigation was designed to investigate the effect of agents that decrease AGEs signaling, perindopril which increases soluble RAGE (sRAGE and alagebrium which cleaves AGEs cross-links, compared to the standard antidiabetic drug, gliclazide, on the vascular and central nervous system (CNS complications in STZ-induced (50 mg/kg, IP diabetes in rats. Perindopril ameliorated the elevation in blood pressure seen in diabetic animals. In addition, both perindopril and alagebrium significantly inhibited memory decline (performance in the Y-maze, neuronal degeneration (Fluoro-Jade staining, AGEs accumulation in serum and brain, and brain oxidative stress (level of reduced glutathione and activities of catalase and malondialdehyde. These results suggest that blockade of AGEs signaling after diabetes induction in rats is effective in reducing diabetic CNS complications.

  18. Central adiposity is significantly higher in female compared to male in Pakistani type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    OpenAIRE

    Omer Akhter; Faraz Fiazuddin; Ayesha Shaheryar; Warda Niaz; Danial Siddiqui; Safia Awan; Nanik Ram; Jaweed Akhter

    2015-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) rates are increasing rapidly in South Asians. Cardiovascular complications are more frequent and occur earlier in our patients than patients in many other ethnic groups. Reasons for this are not fully understood. Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate the body total and central fat percentage in type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients and to check correlation with BMI, waist circumference and metabolic profile. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional stu...

  19. The Influence of Type-1 Diabetes Mellitus on Central Corneal Thickness in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Yüksekkaya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the central corneal thickness (CCT in children with diabetes mellitus (DM, to compare the results with those of age- and sex-matched healthy subjects, and to assess the presence of any relationship between the disease-variable parameters and CCT. Materials and Methods: This prospective, cross-sectional study included 138 eyes of 138 subjects. The CCT was measured by ultrasonic pachymetry in 66 children with type-1 DM and in 72 healthy subjects. The effects of the duration of DM, current hemoglobin A1c levels (HbA1c, and fasting blood glucose (FBG levels on CCT were also evaluated. Results: The demographic characteristics of the study and control groups were similar (p>0.05. The average CCT was greater in the study (555.2±38.6 µm than in the control group (547.7±31.5 µm, but the difference was not statistically significant (independent t-test, p=0.211. CCT was also not significantly different in children with diabetes >5 years’ duration (554.6±39.3 µm compared to diabetes ≤5 years’ duration (555.6±38.6 µm (p>0.05, and there was no significant correlation between the CCT- and the DM-related parameters in the study group (p>0.05. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that DM does not affect the corneal thickness in adolescents. We also did not find any significant correlation between disease-related variables and the CCT. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 445-8

  20. Hypoadiponectinemia in obese subjects with type II diabetes: A close association with central obesity indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorban Mohammadzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adiponectin is an adipocyte secreted protein with important biological functions Hypoadiponectinemia is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and type II diabetes This study aimed to evaluate serum adiponectin level in obese subjects with type II diabetes and its correlation with metabolic parameters Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 40 obese subjects with type II diabetes and 40 non-diabetic obese control subjects Fasting lipid profile was measured by the enzymatic methods The NycoCard HbA1c protocol was used to measure HbAlc The Serum adiponectin, insulin and glucose levels were measured using an enzyme immunoassay and glucose oxidase methods respectively Results: Type II diabetes was associated with hypoadiponectinemia, in both men and women Serum adiponectin level in non-diabetic subjects (6.44 ± 2.47 μg/ml was significantly higher than diabetics (4.55 ± 1.88 μg/ml Furthermore, serum adiponectin concentration in females was significantly higher than males in non-diabetics (7.18 ± 2.68 vs 5.61 ± 0.57 and diabetic groups (5.18 ± 2.08 vs 3.99 ± 1.5 There was a negative and significant correlation between serum adiponectin level with waist (r = -0.451, p = 0.003, waist to hip ratio (r = -0.404, p = 0.01 and BMI (r = - 0.322, p = 0.042 and a positive correlation with HDL (r = 0.337, p = 0.034 in non-diabetic group In diabetic group, there was only found a negative correlation between adiponectin and waist size (r = -0.317, p = 0.046 Conclusions: Obesity and type II diabetes are associated with low serum adiponectin concentration

  1. PREVALENCE OF DIABETES MELLITUS IN TUBERCULOSIS PATIENT: A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE STUDY FROM CENTRAL INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupendra Kumar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The coexistence of diabetes and tuberculosis is common and challenge to the community. Diabetes predisposes to tuberculosis and treatment often become complicated. Though the prevalence of tuberculosis is decreasing due to success of combination chemotherapy but coexistence of diabetes with tuberculosis poses a threat to success of anti-tubercular program. India has huge burden of the both diabetes and tuberculosis. We did a prospective study to know the prevalence of diabetes in tuberculosis patients in a tertiary care hospital. MATERIAL AND METHOD: We recruited the patient with tuberculosis in department of general medicine and department of TB and Chest. We screened them for diabetes with fasting blood sugar. RESULTS: Out of total 419 patients who were included in the study 135 patients were found to be diabetic. A prevalence of 32.2% was found in the study. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of diabetes in tuberculosis is very high as compared to that of general population. We recommend that the entire tubercular patients should be screened for diabetes and vice versa at the time of diagnosis, and effective management of both diseases will leads to improve treatment outcome.

  2. Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2015-01-01

    For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women with gestat......For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women...... with gestational diabetes mellitus is highly relevant....

  3. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nurse educator. Getting better control over your blood sugar, cholesterol, and blood pressure levels helps reduce the risk of kidney disease, eye disease, nervous system disease, heart attack, and stroke. To prevent diabetes ...

  4. Diabetic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    I. A. Strokov; V. V. Zakharov; K. I. Strokov

    2012-01-01

    The epidemiology, clinical presentation, morphology, and pathogenesis of central nervous system lesion in types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) are considered, by using the results of experimental and clinical studies. The definition of diabetic encephalopathy is given. Whether there is a relationship between diabetic encephalopathy and diabetic polyneuropathy is considered. It is concluded that it is expedient to identify diabetic encephalopathy as a complication of DM. The capacities of path...

  5. Increased Spontaneous Central Bleeding and Cognition Impairment in APP/PS1 Mice with Poorly Controlled Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Rodriguez, Juan José; Infante-Garcia, Carmen; Galindo-Gonzalez, Lucia; Garcia-Molina, Yaiza; Lechuga-Sancho, Alfonso; Garcia-Alloza, Mónica

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are the most common causes of dementia, and borderlines are blurred in many cases. Aging remains the main risk factor to suffer dementia; however, epidemiological studies reveal that diabetes may also predispose to suffer AD. In order to further study this relationship, we have induced hypoinsulinemic diabetes to APPswe/PS1dE9 (APP/PS1) mice, a classical model of AD. APP/PS1 mice received streptozotocin (STZ) ip at 18 weeks of age, when AD pathology is not yet established in this animal model. Cognition was evaluated at 26 weeks of age in the Morris water maze and the new object discrimination tests. We observed that STZ-induced episodic and working memory impairment was significantly worsened in APP/PS1 mice. Postmortem assessment included brain atrophy, amyloid-beta and tau pathology, spontaneous bleeding, and increased central inflammation. Interestingly, in APP/PS1-STZ diabetic mice, we detected a shift in Aβ soluble/insoluble levels, towards more toxic soluble species. Phospho-tau levels were also increased in APP/PS1-STZ mice, accompanied by an exacerbated inflammatory process, both in the close proximity to senile plaque (SP) and in SP-free areas. The presence of hemorrhages was significantly higher in APP/PS1-STZ mice, and although pericytes and endothelium were only partially affected, it remains possible that blood-brain barrier alterations underlie observed pathological features. Our data support the implication of the diabetic process in AD and VaD, and it is feasible that improving metabolic control could delay observed central pathology. PMID:26156287

  6. Corneal endothelial morphology and central thickness in patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storr-Paulsen, Allan; Singh, Amardeep; Jeppesen, Helene; Norregaard, Jens C; Thulesen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    size was based on a power calculation (power = 0.90; p = 0.05). The diabetic patients had on average more than four HbA1c tests performed (mean 4.1; range 2-14) with intervals of at least 3 months as a reflection of the long-term glycaemic status. The controls had no diabetes confirmed by two causal...

  7. Endogenous GLP-1 mediates postprandial reductions in activation in central reward and satiety areas in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ten Kulve, Jennifer S; Veltman, Dick J; van Bloemendaal, Liselotte;

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis The central nervous system (CNS) is a major player in the regulation of food intake. The gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been proposed to have an important role in this regulation by relaying information about nutritional status to the CNS. We hypothesised that...... endogenous GLP-1 has effects on CNS reward and satiety circuits. Methods This was a randomised, crossover, placebo-controlled intervention study, performed in a university medical centre in the Netherlands. We included patients with type 2 diabetes and healthy lean control subjects. Individuals were eligible...

  8. DIABETIC AND HYPERTENSIVE EYE DISEASE, AWARENESS AND EVALUATION - A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY IN CENTRAL INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Diabetes Mellitus, particularly the Type 2 is a major health problem and of great concern worldwide and so is the Hypertension, the prevalence of which is rising and both combined together may lead to economical blindness if not treated adequately and in time. Hypertension was also identified as the 3 rd ranked factor for disability adjusted life years by the world health report 2002. MATERIAL AND METHODS : A total of 1306 patients attending eye department for either routine checkup or referred by physicians for ophthalmoscopic examinations were studied. Relevant questions were asked regarding the presence of disease and their ocular problems along with the visual status. RESULTS : Mean age of the patients was 55.5 years, males 53.2% and females 46.75%. 118 pa tients were diabetic, 375 patients were hypertensive and 132 patients had combined disease. Awareness of diabetic retinopathy in the disease specific group was 61.01% and hypertensive retinopathy was 19.46%. It was found that awareness of diabetic retinopa thy was more in diabetic population compared to the non - diabetic group, whereas knowledge of hypertension affecting the eye was much poor. Lack of awareness was found directly related to the level of illiteracy and ignorance. Prevalence of retinopathy in t his series was found 24.57% in diabetics & 64.8% in hypertensives. CONCLUSION : People’s education regarding the systemic disease related eye problems and formal education of general public especially of females will be a great step towards reducing the vis ual impairment. Importance of regular follow - up once diagnosed should be emphasized for early detection and management thereby

  9. Central adiposity is significantly higher in female compared to male in Pakistani type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Akhter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM rates are increasing rapidly in South Asians. Cardiovascular complications are more frequent and occur earlier in our patients than patients in many other ethnic groups. Reasons for this are not fully understood. Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate the body total and central fat percentage in type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients and to check correlation with BMI, waist circumference and metabolic profile. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study conducted at endocrine clinic, Aga Khan University Hospital Karachi, Pakistan, from May to December 2012. Materials and Methods: Patients of either gender with type 2 diabetes mellitus were randomly selected. A separate proforma for each patient was recorded for demographics, risk factors, bioelectrical impedance measurement for body fat and investigations. Statistical Analysis: Correlation between body fat and other covariate were compared by Pearson correlation coefficient test. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. SPSS19.0 was used to analyze the data. Results: One hundred and seventy five patients (95 male and 80 female with mean age of 54.1 ± 12 years were evaluated. Mean duration of diabetes was 8.1 years, mean HbA1c was 8.1% and 53.7% were on oral agents and rest were on insulin with or without oral agents. Hypertension was present in 65.7%, 13.7% had known coronary artery disease and 2.3% had cerebrovascular disease. Mean BMI in males was 29.1 ± 4.74 kg/m 2 and females 31.7 ± 5.3 kg/m 2 . Mean waist circumference in males was 107.3 ± 16.6 cm and 103 ± 12 cm in females. Total body fat percentage (%BF in males was 30.9 ± 7.1% and females 40 ± 8.2% with 89% of the total cohort having total body fat percentage above the normal, less than 25% central fat percentage was 13.3 ± 5.2% in males and 14.6 ± 5.5% in females with 79.4% of cohort having increased central fat (normal <9%. Total and central body fat correlated with BMI (r = 0.68, P < 0

  10. Optimal central obesity measurement site for assessing cardiometabolic and type 2 diabetes risk in middle-aged adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seán R Millar

    Full Text Available Despite recommendations that central obesity assessment should be employed as a marker of cardiometabolic health, no consensus exists regarding measurement protocol. This study examined a range of anthropometric variables and their relationships with cardiometabolic features and type 2 diabetes in order to ascertain whether measurement site influences discriminatory accuracy. In particular, we compared waist circumference (WC measured at two sites: (1 immediately below the lowest rib (WC rib and (2 between the lowest rib and iliac crest (WC midway, which has been recommended by the World Health Organisation and International Diabetes Federation.This was a cross-sectional study involving a random sample of 2,002 men and women aged 46-73 years. Metabolic profiles and WC, hip circumference, pelvic width and body mass index (BMI were determined. Correlation, logistic regression and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were used to evaluate obesity measurement relationships with metabolic risk phenotypes and type 2 diabetes.WC rib measures displayed the strongest associations with non-optimal lipid and lipoprotein levels, high blood pressure, insulin resistance, impaired fasting glucose, a clustering of metabolic risk features and type 2 diabetes, in both genders. Rib-derived indices improved discrimination of type 2 diabetes by 3-7% compared to BMI and 2-6% compared to WC midway (in men and 5-7% compared to BMI and 4-6% compared to WC midway (in women. A prediction model including BMI and central obesity displayed a significantly higher area under the curve for WC rib (0.78, P=0.003, Rib/height ratio (0.80, P<0.001, Rib/pelvis ratio (0.79, P<0.001, but not for WC midway (0.75, P=0.127, when compared to one with BMI alone (0.74.WC rib is easier to assess and our data suggest that it is a better method for determining obesity-related cardiometabolic risk than WC midway. The clinical utility of rib-derived indices, or

  11. Diabetic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Strokov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology, clinical presentation, morphology, and pathogenesis of central nervous system lesion in types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus (DM are considered, by using the results of experimental and clinical studies. The definition of diabetic encephalopathy is given. Whether there is a relationship between diabetic encephalopathy and diabetic polyneuropathy is considered. It is concluded that it is expedient to identify diabetic encephalopathy as a complication of DM. The capacities of pathogenetic treatment for diabetic encephalopathy are shown.

  12. Chronic central leptin infusion restores cardiac sympathetic-vagal balance and baroreflex sensitivity in diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    do Carmo, Jussara M.; Hall, John E.; da Silva, Alexandre A.

    2008-01-01

    This study tested whether leptin restores sympathetic-vagal balance, heart rate (HR) variability, and cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. Sprague-Dawley rats were instrumented with arterial and venous catheters, and a cannula was placed in the lateral ventricle for intracerebroventricular (ICV) leptin infusion. Blood pressure (BP) and HR were monitored by telemetry. BRS and HR variability were estimated by linear regression between HR and BP response...

  13. Everything in Moderation--Dietary Diversity and Quality, Central Obesity and Risk of Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia C de Oliveira Otto

    Full Text Available Diet guidelines recommend increasing dietary diversity. Yet, metrics for dietary diversity have neither been well-defined nor evaluated for impact on metabolic health. Also, whether diversity has effects independent of diet quality is unknown. We characterized and evaluated associations of diet diversity and quality with abdominal obesity and type II diabetes (T2D in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. At baseline (2000-02, diet was assessed among 5,160 Whites, Hispanic, Blacks, and Chinese age 45-84 y and free of T2D, using a validated questionnaire. Three different aspects of diet diversity were characterized including count (number of different food items eaten more than once/week, a broad measure of diversity, evenness (Berry index, a measure of the spread of the diversity, and dissimilarity (Jaccard distance, a measure of the diversity of the attributes of the foods consumed. Diet quality was characterized using aHEI, DASH, and a priori pattern. Count and evenness were weakly positively correlated with diet quality (r with AHEI: 0.20, 0.04, while dissimilarity was moderately inversely correlated (r = -0.34. In multivariate models, neither count nor evenness was associated with change in waist circumference (WC or incident T2D. Greater food dissimilarity was associated with higher gain in WC (p-trend<0.01, with 120% higher gain in participants in the highest quintile of dissimilarity scores. Diet diversity was not associated with incident T2D. Also, none of the diversity metrics were associated with change in WC or incident T2D when restricted to only healthier or less healthy foods. Higher diet quality was associated with lower risk of T2D. Our findings provide little evidence for benefits of diet diversity for either abdominal obesity or diabetes. Greater dissimilarity among foods was actually associated with gain in WC. These results do not support the notion that "eating everything in moderation" leads to greater diet quality or

  14. Central obesity and risk for type 2 diabetes in Maori, Pacific and European young men in New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty healthy male volunteers between the ages of 18 and 27 and of a wide range of fatness were recruited for this study. Equal numbers (10) self identified as belonging to each of the Maori Pacific and European ethnic groups. Originally it was intended that 90 men(30 in each group) should be measured but the cost and availability of the doubly-labelled water prevented this. Specific measurements undertaken included resting metabolic rate by indirect calorimetry, total energy expenditure over 14 days by the doubly-labelled water technique; total and regional body fat from dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; anthropometry (body mass index, skinfold thicknesses and girths); fat and carbohydrate utilisation from respiratory quotients and from carbon-13 analysis of expired breath; and dietary intake of macronutrients. Glucose tolerance, insulin, thyroid hormone, leptin and blood lipid determinations were also performed. The groups did not differ significantly in BMI, height body mass or fat mass - but the European group had significantly lower subscapular to triceps skinfolds and fat free mass than the Maori and Pacific group. Resting metabolic rate adjusted for fat mass and fat free mass was not different among the groups. Carbon-13 in expired breath was positively correlated to the subscapular to triceps skinfold ratio and insulin. Reported intake of dietary fibre was negatively related to blood lipids and subscapular to triceps skinfold ratio. Central obesity showed strong associations with biochemical measures of Type 2 diabetes risk These findings emphasise the relationships between body composition and fat distribution with risk of diabetes independent of ethnicity. (author)

  15. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis and Diabetes Insipidus in a Young Smoker

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    K. Earlam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis is characterized by the abnormal nodular proliferation of histiocytes in various organ systems. Pulmonary involvement seen in young adults is nearly always seen in the context of past or current cigarette smoking. Although it tends to be a single-system disease, extrapulmonary manifestations involving the skin, bone, and hypothalamic-pituitary-axis are possible. High resolution CT (HRCT of the thorax findings includes centrilobular nodules and cysts that are bizarre in shape, variable in size, and thin-walled. Often the diagnosis can be made based on the appropriate clinical presentation and typical imaging findings. Treatment includes smoking cessation and the potential use of glucocorticoids or cytotoxic agents depending on the severity of disease and multisystem involvement.

  16. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis and Diabetes Insipidus in a Young Smoker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earlam, K.; Souza, C. A.; Glikstein, R.; Gomes, M. M.; Pakhalé, S.

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is characterized by the abnormal nodular proliferation of histiocytes in various organ systems. Pulmonary involvement seen in young adults is nearly always seen in the context of past or current cigarette smoking. Although it tends to be a single-system disease, extrapulmonary manifestations involving the skin, bone, and hypothalamic-pituitary-axis are possible. High resolution CT (HRCT) of the thorax findings includes centrilobular nodules and cysts that are bizarre in shape, variable in size, and thin-walled. Often the diagnosis can be made based on the appropriate clinical presentation and typical imaging findings. Treatment includes smoking cessation and the potential use of glucocorticoids or cytotoxic agents depending on the severity of disease and multisystem involvement.

  17. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis and Diabetes Insipidus in a Young Smoker

    OpenAIRE

    Earlam, K.; Souza, C.A.; Glikstein, R.; Gomes, M. M.; Pakhalé, S.

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is characterized by the abnormal nodular proliferation of histiocytes in various organ systems. Pulmonary involvement seen in young adults is nearly always seen in the context of past or current cigarette smoking. Although it tends to be a single-system disease, extrapulmonary manifestations involving the skin, bone, and hypothalamic-pituitary-axis are possible. High resolution CT (HRCT) of the thorax findings includes centrilobular nodules and cysts that are biz...

  18. Using skew-symmetric mixed models for investigating the effect of different diabetic macular edema treatments by analyzing central macular thickness and visual acuity responses

    OpenAIRE

    Marjan Mansourian; Anoshirvan Kazemnejad; Iraj Kazemi; Farid Zayeri; Masoud Soheilian

    2011-01-01

    Background: Diabetic Macular Edema (DME) is one of the major causes of visual loss and increase in central macular thickness (CMT). The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of a single intravitreal injection of bevacizumab (IVB) alone or in combination with intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (IVB/IVT) versus macular laser photocoagulation (MPC) as primary treatment for DME when confounders were considered. Methods: Skew-symmetric bivariate mixed modeling according to best cor...

  19. Validation of Indian diabetic risk score in diagnosing type 2 diabetes mellitus against high fasting blood sugar levels among adult population of central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadoria, Ajeet Singh; Kasar, Pradeep Kumar; Toppo, Neelam Anupama

    2015-01-01

    Globally the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is major public health concern. The Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS) was developed by Madras Diabetes Research Foundation (MDRF) as a simple tool to help detect undiagnosed type 2 DM (T2DM) in the community. We conducted a study among 911 adults of Jabalpur District to validate the IDRS score against increased fasting blood sugar levels in diagnosing T2DM. T2DM was confirmed either by history of previously known disease or fasting plasma glucose ≥126 mg/dl on two occasions. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, Youden index (sensitivity + specificity -1), likelihood ratio for positive test, and likelihood ratio for negative test were calculated for IDRS cut-offs of ≥20, ≥40, ≥60, and ≥80 against the presence of T2DM (either known diabetic or fasting plasma glucose >126 mg/dl on two occasions). The overall prevalence of T2DM was 9.99% (95% confidence interval, 8.04-11.94%). In the Receiver operating characteristic analysis, IDRS had an area under the curve of 0.736 (P indicate that IDRS has excellent predictive value for detecting undiagnosed diabetes in the community and IDRS is also a much stronger risk indicator than examining individual risk factors like age, family history, obesity, or physical activity. PMID:25355391

  20. Central corneal thickness in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and the effect of metabolic control on corneal thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Cinici

    2015-09-01

    Result: CCT is increased in the patients compared to the control group even before diabetes mellitus (DM has developed a retinopathy. A relation of this increase with period of diabetes, HbA1C level and hypoglycemia attack number could not be detected. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(3.000: 148-152

  1. Aquaporin-2: new mutations responsible for autosomal-recessive nephrogenic diabetes insipidus—update and epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Bichet, Daniel G.; El Tarazi, Abdulah; Matar, Jessica; Lussier, Yoann; Arthus, Marie-Françoise; Lonergan, Michèle; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Bissonnette, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    It is clinically useful to distinguish between two types of hereditary nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI): a ‘pure’ type characterized by loss of water only and a complex type characterized by loss of water and ions. Patients with congenital NDI bearing mutations in the vasopressin 2 receptor gene, AVPR2, or in the aquaporin-2 gene, AQP2, have a pure NDI phenotype with loss of water but normal conservation of sodium, potassium, chloride and calcium. Patients with hereditary hypokalemic salt...

  2. Technologies to better serve the millions of diabetic patients: a holistic, interactive and persuasive ICT model to facilitate self care, in extremely poor rural zones of Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Lombardo, Miguel; Jipsion, Armando; Vejarano, Rafael; Camargo, Ismael; Alvarez, Humberto; Mora, Elena Villalba; Ruíz, Ernestina Menasalva

    2012-04-01

    Health indicators express remarkable gaps between health systems at a world-wide level. Countries of the entire world are overflowed by the need of new strategies, methodologies and technologies to better serve the millions of patients, who demand better medical attention. The present archaic and ephemerally systematized systems widen the gap even more than the quality of medical services that should be provided for the millions of diabetic patients. It is therefore necessary to develop highly familiar environments with diabetic patients and their care needs. A Holistic, Interactive and Persuasive ICT model to facilitate self care of patients with diabetes (hIPAPD), is proposed as an innovative technological development in Panama to health optimized treatment for diabetic patients. Three health centers located in the District of Aguadulce, Province of Cocle, located on Panama's Pacific Coast, were selected to validate the model; the area presents extremely poor population, mostly with one daily meal, without any health insurance and with a high illiteracy rate. A series of experiences in the application and validation process are presented and analyzed in order to confirm the application, value and contribution of ICTs in health care in poor regions of Central America. PMID:20703674

  3. INSULIN IN THE BRAIN: ITS PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS FOR STATES RELATED WITH CENTRAL INSULIN RESISTANCE, TYPE 2 DIABETES AND ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ENRIQUE eBLÁZQUEZ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the brain has been considered an insulin-insensitive organ, recent reports on the location of insulin and its receptors in the brain have introduced new ways of considering this hormone responsible for several functions. The origin of insulin in the brain has been explained from peripheral or central sources, or both. Regardless of whether insulin is of peripheral origin or produced in the brain, this hormone may act through its own receptors present in the brain. The molecular events through which insulin functions in the brain are the same as those operating in the periphery. However, certain insulin actions are different in the CNS, such as hormone-induced glucose uptake due to a low insulin-sensitive GLUT-4 activity, and because of the predominant presence of GLUT-1 and GLUT-3. In addition, insulin in the brain contributes to the control of nutrient homeostasis, reproduction, cognition and memory, as well as to neurotrophic, neuromodulatory, and neuroprotective effects. Alterations of these functional activities may contribute to the manifestation of several clinical entities, such as central insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes (T2DM and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. A close association between T2DM and AD has been reported, to the extent that AD is twice more frequent in diabetic patients, and some authors have proposed the name type 3 diabetes for this association. There are links between AD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM through mitochondrial alterations and oxidative stress, altered energy and glucose metabolism, cholesterol modifications, dysfunctional protein OGlcNAcylation, formation of amyloid plaques, altered Aβ metabolism, and tau hyperphosphorylation. Advances in the knowledge of preclinical AD and T2DM may be a major stimulus for the development of treatment for preventing the pathogenic events of

  4. Data on medicinal plants used in Central America to manage diabetes and its sequelae (skin conditions, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, urinary problems and vision loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Giovannini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The data described in this article is related to the review article “Medicinal plants used in the traditional management of diabetes and its sequelae in Central America: a review” (Giovannini et al., 2016 [1]. We searched publications on the useful plants of Central America in databases and journals by using selected relevant keywords. We then extracted reported uses of medicinal plants within the disease categories: diabetes mellitus, kidney disease, urinary problems, skin diseases and infections, cardiovascular disease, sexual dysfunction, vision loss, and nerve damage. The following countries were included in our definition of Central America: Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama. Data were compiled in a bespoke Access database. Plant names from the published sources were validated against The Plant List (TPL, (The Plant List, 2013 [2] and accepted names and synonyms were extracted. In total, the database includes 607 plant names obtained from the published sources which correspond to 537 plant taxa, 9271 synonyms and 1055 use reports.

  5. Diabetes, diabetes treatment and breast cancer prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Juhua; Virnig, Beth; Hendryx, Michael; Wen, Sijin; Chelebowski, Rowan; Chen, Chu; Rohan, Tomas; Tinker, Lesley; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Lessin, Lawrence; Margolis, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to assess the impact of pre-existing diabetes and diabetes treatment on breast cancer prognosis. 8,108 women with centrally confirmed invasive breast cancer in the Women’s Health Initiative diagnosed between 1998 and 2013 were followed through the date of death or September 20, 2013. Information on diabetes and diabetes therapy were obtained via self-report and face-to-face review of current medication containers, respectively. Cox proportional hazard regressi...

  6. Central blood pressure and pulse wave velocity: relationship to target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in diabetic patients or metabolic syndrome. An observational prospective study. LOD-DIABETES study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castaño-Sánchez Carmen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic patients show an increased prevalence of non-dipping arterial pressure pattern, target organ damage and elevated arterial stiffness. These alterations are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The objectives of this study are the following: to evaluate the prognostic value of central arterial pressure and pulse wave velocity in relation to the incidence and outcome of target organ damage and the appearance of cardiovascular episodes (cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, chest pain and stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome. Methods/Design Design: This is an observational prospective study with 5 years duration, of which the first year corresponds to patient inclusion and initial evaluation, and the remaining four years to follow-up. Setting: The study will be carried out in the urban primary care setting. Study population: Consecutive sampling will be used to include patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between 20-80 years of age. A total of 110 patients meeting all the inclusion criteria and none of the exclusion criteria will be included. Measurements: Patient age and sex, family and personal history of cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular risk factors. Height, weight, heart rate and abdominal circumference. Laboratory tests: hemoglobin, lipid profile, creatinine, microalbuminuria, glomerular filtration rate, blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, blood insulin, fibrinogen and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. Clinical and 24-hour ambulatory (home blood pressure monitoring and self-measured blood pressure. Common carotid artery ultrasound for the determination of mean carotid intima-media thickness. Electrocardiogram for assessing left ventricular hypertrophy. Ankle-brachial index. Retinal vascular study based on funduscopy with non-mydriatic retinography and evaluation of pulse wave morphology and pulse wave velocity using the SphygmoCor system. The

  7. Central nervous system changes complicating the use of radiotherapy for the treatment of a nasopharyngeal neoplasm in a diabetic patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case is reported of a diabetic patient with a nasopharyngeal neoplasm who developed radiation induced brainstem damage even though irradiated at a conventional time-dose-volume relationship. The clinical course was correlated with autopsy findings which revealed radiation changes in the brainstem consisting primarily of vascular hyalinization with foci of infarction, edema, and demyelination. Atherosclerotic changes were conspicuously absent and therefore not the cause of the alterations. The changes occurred three months after completion of therapy, which was more rapid than expected for radiation injury. It is hypothesized that diabetes may have predisposed the patient to this severe complication of standard therapy. More needs to be learned concerning the relationship between diabetes mellitus and radiation complications. Perhaps a modified time-dose relationship should be considered

  8. Does a central MHC gene in linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DRB1*0401 affect susceptibility to type 1 diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, L; Puschendorf, M; Allcock, R; Scott, A; Sayer, D; Kucharzak, R; Gut, I; McCann, V; Davis, E; Witt, C; Christiansen, F; Price, P

    2005-06-01

    Subtypes of HLA-DR4 are associated with susceptibility or protection against type 1 diabetes (T1DM). We addressed whether this reflects linkage disequilibrium with the true susceptibility locus by studying broader MHC haplotypes marked by alleles of HLA-B, IKBL (adjacent to TNFA) and complement C4. The study used a largely Caucasian cohort from Western Australia. HLA-DRB1*0401 and HLA-DRB1*0405 marked susceptibility to T1DM. In Caucasians, DRB1*0401 occurs predominantly in the 44.1 ancestral haplotype (AH; HLA-A2,B44, DRB1*0401,DQB1*0301) and the 62.1AH (HLA-A2,B15(62),DRB1*0401,DQB1*0302). HLA-B15 marked susceptibility and HLA-B44 marked with resistance to T1DM in patients and controls preselected for HLA-DRB1*0401. A gene between TNFA and HLA-B on the 8.1AH (HLA-A1,B8,;DR3,DQ2) modifies the effects of the class II alleles. Here, alleles characteristic of the 62.1AH (C4B3, IKBL+446*T and HLA-A2,B15) were screened in donors preselected for HLA-DRB1*0401. C4B3 was associated with diabetes, consistent with a diabetes gene telomeric of MHC class II. However, increases in carriage of IKBL+446*T and HLA-A2,B15 were marginal, as too few control subjects were available with the diabetogenic alleles. However, with these tools, selection of HLA-DRB1*0401, DQB1*0302 donors who are positive and negative for C4B3 will allow bidirectional mapping of diabetes genes in the central MHC. PMID:15858601

  9. Fixed-Combination Olmesartan/Amlodipine Was Superior to Perindopril + Amlodipine in Reducing Central Systolic Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruilope, Luis M

    2016-06-01

    This post hoc analysis from the Sevikar Compared to the Combination of Perindopril Plus Amlodipine on Central Arterial Blood Pressure in Patients With Moderate-to-Severe Hypertension (SEVITENSION) study assessed the efficacy and tolerability of olmesartan (OLM) and amlodipine (AML) in reducing central systolic blood pressure (CSBP) compared with perindopril (PER) plus AML in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients were randomized to OLM/AML 40/10 mg or PER/AML 8/10 mg for 24 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was the absolute change in CSBP from baseline to week 24, which was greater with OLM/AML (-13.72±1.14 mm Hg) compared with PER/AML (-10.21±1.11 mm Hg). The between-group difference was -3.51±1.60 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, -6.66 to -0.36 mm Hg) and was within the noninferiority margin (2 mm Hg) as well as the superiority margin (0 mm Hg). In addition, OLM/AML was associated with a higher proportion of patients achieving blood pressure normalization. In hypertensive patients with diabetes, the fixed-dose combination of OLM/AML was superior to PER/AML in reducing CSBP, as well as other secondary endpoints. PMID:26395174

  10. Regular, high, and moderate intake of vegetables rich in antioxidants may reduce cataract risk in Central African type 2 diabetics

    OpenAIRE

    Mvitu M; Longo-Mbenza B; Tulomba D; Nge A

    2012-01-01

    Moise Mvitu,1 Benjamin Longo-Mbenza,2 Dieudonné Tulomba,3 Augustin Nge31Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo; 2Faculty of Health Sciences, Walter Sisulu University, South Africa; 3Biostatistics Unit, Lomo Medical Center and Heart of Africa Center of Cardiology, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of CongoBackground: Antioxidant nutrients found in popularly consumed vegetables, including red beans, are thought to prevent diabetic complications....

  11. Prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus, its associated risk factors and pregnancy outcomes at a rural setup in Central India

    OpenAIRE

    Kanika R. Kalyani; Shubhada Jajoo; Chella Hariharan; Swarnalata Samal

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is characterised by carbohydrate intolerance of varying severity with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. GDM is an important public health problem in India. Method: The present study was carried out in 300 antenatal women. Fasting blood glucose was measured after which they were given 75 g oral glucose and plasma glucose was estimated at 2 h. Patients with plasma glucose >140 mg/dl were labelled as GDM. Thus WHO criteria were used f...

  12. Regular, high, and moderate intake of vegetables rich in antioxidants may reduce cataract risk in Central African type 2 diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mvitu M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Moise Mvitu,1 Benjamin Longo-Mbenza,2 Dieudonné Tulomba,3 Augustin Nge31Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo; 2Faculty of Health Sciences, Walter Sisulu University, South Africa; 3Biostatistics Unit, Lomo Medical Center and Heart of Africa Center of Cardiology, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of CongoBackground: Antioxidant nutrients found in popularly consumed vegetables, including red beans, are thought to prevent diabetic complications. In this study, we assessed the frequency and contributing factors of intake of fruits and vegetables rich in antioxidants, and we determined their impact on the prevention of diabetes-related cataract extraction.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study, run in Congo among 244 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. An intake of ≥three servings of vegetables rich in antioxidants/day, intake of red beans, consumption of fruit, and cataract extraction were considered as dependent variables.Results: No patient reported a fruit intake. Intake of red beans was reported by 64 patients (26.2%, while 77 patients (31.6% reported ≥three servings of vegetables rich in antioxidants. High socioeconomic status (OR = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.1–12.5; P = 0.030 and moderate alcohol intake (OR = 4; 95% CI: 1.1–17.4; P = 0.049 were the independent determinants of eating ≥three servings of vegetables rich in antioxidants. Red beans intake (OR = 0.282; 95% CI: 0.115–0.687; P > 0.01 and eating ≥three servings of vegetables rich in antioxidants (OR = 0.256; 95% CI: 0.097–0.671; P = 0.006 were identified as independent and protective factors against the presence of cataracts (9.8% n = 24, whereas type 2 diabetes mellitus duration ≥3 years was the independent risk factor for cataract extraction (OR = 6.3; 95% CI: 2.1–19.2; P > 0.001 in the model with red beans intake and OR = 7.1; 95% CI: 2.3–22.2; P > 0.001 in the model with ≥three servings of vegetables rich in antioxidants

  13. Diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tien Y; Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Larsen, Michael; Sharma, Sanjay; Simó, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus and is a major cause of vision loss in middle-aged and elderly people. One-third of people with diabetes have DR. Severe stages of DR include proliferative DR, caused by the abnormal growth of new retinal blood vessels, and diabetic macular oedema, in which there is exudation and oedema in the central part of the retina. DR is strongly associated with a prolonged duration of diabetes, hyperglycaemia and hypertension. It is traditionally regarded as a microvascular disease, but retinal neurodegeneration is also involved. Complex interrelated pathophysiological mechanisms triggered by hyperglycaemia underlie the development of DR. These mechanisms include genetic and epigenetic factors, increased production of free radicals, advanced glycosylation end products, inflammatory factors and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Optimal control of blood glucose and blood pressure in individuals with diabetes remains the cornerstone for preventing the development and arresting the progression of DR. Anti-VEGF therapy is currently indicated for diabetic macular oedema associated with vision loss, whereas laser photocoagulation prevents severe vision loss in eyes with proliferative DR. These measures, together with increasing public awareness and access to regular screening for DR with retinal photography, and the development of new treatments to address early disease stages, will lead to better outcomes and prevent blindness for patients with DR. PMID:27159554

  14. Assessment of cerebral perfusion and cerebrovascular reserve in insulin-dependent diabetic patients without central neurological symptoms by means of 99mTc-HMPAO SPET with acetazolamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection of subclinical abnormalities in cerebral blood flow could be of great value in identifying diabetic patients at risk of stroke. The aim of this study was to assess the contribution of semiquantified post-acetazolamide technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime single-photon emission tomography (99mTc-HMPAO SPET) in 15 diabetic patients with no clinical history of central neurological disease. After baseline 99mTc-HMPAO SPET, a second SPET scan was acquired after activation of the cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) with an injection of 1 g of acetazolamide (post-ACZ SPET). Semiquantitative analysis was made in 16 regions of interest (ROIs) drawn for each of the three supratentorial slices selected, and in two ROIs in the infratentorial slice. The CVR was calculated in each ROI by subtracting the decay-corrected baseline images from those obtained in the post-ACZ SPET and expressed as the percent increase in the average counts between the two scans. Baseline perfusion and CVR values in the study group were compared with the corresponding values in a control group. Of 750 cortical ROIs studied, 332 showed a decreased CVR (44.3%). The baseline perfusion SPET study showed hypoperfusion in 65 ROIs (8.6%) and hyperperfusion in 56 (7.4%). Of the 65 hypoperfused regions, 66.2% had a normal CVR and 33.8% had a decreased CVR, whereas of the 56 hyperperfused regions, 51.8% had a CVR within normal limits and 48.2% showed a decreased CVR. In conclusion, in comparison with baseline 99mTc-HMPAO SPET, the ACZ activation test provided additional information in the study of cerebrovascular impairment, and allowed characterisation of the subclinical abnormalities in the population studied. The technique may therefore prove useful in evaluating future preventive strategies for stroke in diabetic patients. (orig.)

  15. Long-term central pathology and cognitive impairment are exacerbated in a mixed model of Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante-Garcia, Carmen; Ramos-Rodriguez, Juan Jose; Galindo-Gonzalez, Lucia; Garcia-Alloza, Monica

    2016-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a well-characterized risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia. Since both, T2D and dementia are closely related to aging and they chronically coexist in elderly patients, it is of particular relevance to know whether long-term evolution of T2D and dementia interfere with each other years after the onset of the diseases. In order to elucidate this interaction, we have characterized a mixed model of T2D and AD, the APP/PS1xdb/db mouse, at 36 weeks of age, when both diseases have long coexisted and evolved. In aged APP/PS1xdb/db mice we observed dysfunctional metabolic control, when compared with diabetic mice alone, suggesting that AD may also contribute to T2D pathology in the long-term. Learning and memory were severely impaired in APP/PS1xdb/db mice, accompanied by reduced cortical size, neuronal branching simplification and reduction of dendritic spine density. Increased tau phosphorylation was also observed in old APP/PS1xdb/db mice. A shift in amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology was detected, and while insoluble Aβ was reduced, more toxic soluble species were favoured. Microglia burden was significantly increased in the proximity of senile plaques and an overall increase of spontaneous haemorrhages was also observed in APP/PS1xdb/db mice, suggesting a possible disruption of the blood brain barrier in the mixed model. It is therefore feasible that strict metabolic control may slow or delay central complications when T2D and dementia coexist in the long term. PMID:26708068

  16. Glomerular extraction of antiglomerular basement membrane antibody in normal Wistar and in Brattleboro rats with hereditary diabetes insipidus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our results show that A-GBM antibody is, unfortunably, not a suitable indicator for glomerular plasma flow distribution studies. Its fixation is influenced by other factors, among which the size of the glomeruli and hence the glomerular basement membrane surface area are probably predominant. This is suggested: 1) by the parallel patterns of antibody fixation and glomerular size found in normal and in DI rats; 2) by the simultaneous restoration of size and A-GBM fixation heterogeneity in treated DI rats; 3) by the correlation between size and A-GBM fixation found in the various glomeruli of a given rat. Further experiments are required to determine whether other factors are also involved in the process of A-GBM fixation. Because the A-GBM antibody is not an adequate blood flow indicator, it was not possible to study the influence of ADH on GPF distribution as we had first intended. Nevertheless, the use of Brattleboro rats in these experiments disclosed the fact that their deep glomeruli are abnormally small and that this anomaly can be reversed, or prevented, by chronic vasopressin treatment. It is not possible to determine from the present experiments whether ADH has a direct effect on kidney morphology or acts indirectly through the correction of the DI and its consequences or other mechanisms. (orig.)

  17. X-ray structure of human aquaporin 2 and its implications for nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and trafficking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frick, A.; Eriksson, U.K.; Mattia, F.P. de; Oberg, F.; Hedfalk, K.; Neutze, R.; Grip, W.J. de; Deen, P.M.T.; Tornroth-Horsefield, S.

    2014-01-01

    Human aquaporin 2 (AQP2) is a water channel found in the kidney collecting duct, where it plays a key role in concentrating urine. Water reabsorption is regulated by AQP2 trafficking between intracellular storage vesicles and the apical membrane. This process is tightly controlled by the pituitary h

  18. Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease > Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease Points to Remember Diabetic eye disease ... existing therapies for different patient groups. What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease can affect many ...

  19. Diabetes - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - diabetes ... The following sites provide further information on diabetes : American Diabetes Association -- www.diabetes.org Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International -- www.jdrf.org National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion -- ...

  20. Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cases of Diabetic Retinopathy (in thousands) by Age, Gender, and Race/Ethnicity Diabetic retinopathy affects men and ... Cases of Diabetic Retinopathy (in thousands) by Age, Gender, and Race/Ethnicity Projections for Diabetic Retinopathy (2010- ...

  1. Central role for sodium in the pathogenesis of blood pressure changes independent of angiotensin, aldosterone and catecholamines in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Mathiesen, E R; Deckert, T; Giese, J; Christensen, N J; Bent-Hansen, L; Nielsen, M D

    1987-01-01

    We studied 73 Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients, 18 to 50 years of age, with a diabetes duration of more than five years. Group 1: normal urinary albumin excretion below 30 mg per 24 h (n = 19); group 2: microalbuminuria, 30-300 mg per 24 h (n = 36); and group 3: diabetic nephropathy...... = 0.41, p less than 0.01). Extracellular volume was increased in patients (p less than 0.05), whereas plasma volume wasnormal. Supine serum angiotensin II was suppressed in the patients (p less than 0.001). A negative correlation was found between mean blood pressure and supine serum aldosterone (n...

  2. Women and Diabetes -- Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes - Diabetes Medicines Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... 1-800-332-1088 to request a form. Diabetes Medicines The different kinds of diabetes medicines are ...

  3. Near Normalization of Metabolic and Functional Features of the Central Nervous System in Type 1 Diabetic Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease After Kidney-Pancreas Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Fiorina, Paolo; Vezzulli, Paolo; Bassi, Roberto; Gremizzi, Chiara; Falautano, Monica; D’Addio, Francesca; Vergani, Andrea; Chabtini, Lola; Altamura, Erica; Mello, Alessandra; Caldara, Rossana; Scavini, Marina; Magnani, Giuseppe; Falini, Andrea; Secchi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The pathogenesis of brain disorders in type 1 diabetes (T1D) is multifactorial and involves the adverse effects of chronic hyperglycemia and of recurrent hypoglycemia. Kidney-pancreas (KP), but not kidney alone (KD), transplantation is associated with sustained normoglycemia, improvement in quality of life, and reduction of morbidity/mortality in diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The aim of our study was to evaluate with magnetic reso...

  4. Successful treatment with cladribine of Erdheim-Chester disease with orbital and central nervous system involvement developing after treatment of langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perić Predrag

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD is a rare, systemic form of non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the juvenile xantho-granuloma family with characteristic bilateral symmetrical long bone osteosclerosis, associated with xanthogranulomatous extras-keletal organ involvement. In ECD, central nervous system (CNS and orbital lesions are frequent, and more than half of ECD patients carry the V600E mutation of the proto-oncogene BRAF. The synchronous or metachronous development of ECD and Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH in the same patients is rare, and the possible connection between them is still obscure. Cladribine is a purine substrate analogue that is toxic to lymphocytes and monocytes with good hematoencephalic penetration. Case report. We presented a 23-year-old man successfully treated with cladribine due to BRAF V600E-mutation-negative ECD with bilateral orbital and CNS involvement. ECD developed metachronously, 6 years after chemotherapy for multisystem LCH with complete disease remission and remaining central diabetes insipidus. During ECD treatment, the patient received 5 single-agent chemotherapy courses of cladribine (5 mg/m2 for 5 consecutive days every 4 weeks, with a reduction in dose to 4 mg/m2 in a fifth course, delayed due to severe neutropenia and thoracic dermatomal herpes zoster infection following the fourth course. Radiologic signs of systemic and CNS disease started to resolve 3 months after the end of chemotherapy, and CNS lesions completely resolved within 2 years after the treatment. After 12-year follow-up, there was no recurrence or appearance of new systemic or CNS xanthogranu-lomatous lesions or second malignancies. Conclusion. In accordance with our findings and recommendations provided by other authors, cladribine can be considered an effective alternative treatment for ECD, especially with CNS involvement and BRAF V600E-mutation-negative status, when interferon-α as the first-line therapy fails.

  5. Year in diabetes 2012: The diabetes tsunami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwin, R; Jastreboff, A M

    2012-12-01

    Diabetes affects more than 300 million individuals globally, contributing to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. As the incidence and prevalence of diabetes continue to escalate with the force of an approaching tsunami, it is imperative that we better define the biological mechanisms causing both obesity and diabetes and identify optimal prevention and treatment strategies that will enable a healthier environment and calmer waters. New guidelines from the American Diabetes Association/European Association of the Study of Diabetes and The Endocrine Society encourage individualized care for each patient with diabetes, both in the outpatient and inpatient setting. Recent data suggest that restoration of normal glucose metabolism in people with prediabetes may delay progression to type 2 diabetes (T2DM). However, several large clinical trials have underscored the limitations of current treatment options once T2DM has developed, particularly in obese children with the disease. Prospects for reversing new-onset type 1 diabetes also appear limited, although recent clinical trials indicate that immunotherapy can delay the loss of β-cell function, suggesting potential benefits if treatment is initiated earlier. Research demonstrating a role for the central nervous system in the development of obesity and T2DM, the identification of a new hormone that simulates some of the benefits of exercise, and the development of new β-cell imaging techniques may provide novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers of early diabetes detection for optimization of interventions. Today's message is that a diabetes tsunami is imminent, and the only way to minimize the damage is to create an early warning system and improve interventions to protect those in its path. PMID:23185035

  6. Causes of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help for Diabetes Care Diabetes Statistics Causes of Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes is a complex group of diseases with ... and type 2 diabetes. What causes type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is caused by a lack ...

  7. V ISUAL EVOKED POTENTIALS IN TYPE - 1 DIABETES WITHOUT RETINOPATHY: CO - RELATIONS WITH DURATION OF DIABETES

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjeev Kumar; Virendra; Tonpay; Milind; Nikhil

    2014-01-01

    20 diabetic (Type 1) patients have been studied in order to investigate the possible effects of the type 1 diabetes mellitus on the central nervous system by means of pattern shift visual evoked potentials. Patients with diabetic retinopathy , glaucoma and cataract were excluded from the study. To evaluate central optic pathways involvement in diabetics , visual evoked po tentials (VEP) , in particular the latency of positive peak (P100) , were stu...

  8. Hypothalamic pituitary dysfunction in acute nonmycobacterial infections of central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh K Dhanwal

    2011-01-01

    central diabetes insipidus. Conclusion: Acute infections of the CNS are associated with abnormalities in the pituitary hormone profile. Further studies are required to evaluate the hypothalamic pituitary axis using dynamic tests and imaging by MRI.

  9. Central nervous system PET-CT imaging reveals regional impairments in pediatric patients with Wolfram syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Zmyslowska

    Full Text Available Wolfram syndrome (WFS is inherited as an autosomal recessive disease with main clinical features of diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, diabetes insipidus and deafness. However, various neurological defects may also be detected. The aim of this study was to evaluate aspects of brain structure and function using PET-CT (positron emission tomography and computed tomography and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric patients with WFS. Regional changes in brain glucose metabolism were measured using standardized uptake values (SUVs based on images of (18F fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG uptake in 7 WFS patients aged 10.1-16.0 years (mean 12.9±2.4 and in 20 healthy children aged 3-17.9 years (mean 12.8±4.1. In all patients the diagnosis of WFS was confirmed by DNA sequencing of the WFS1 gene. Hierarchical clustering showed remarkable similarities of glucose uptake patterns among WFS patients and their differences from the control group. SUV data were subsequently standardized for age groups 13 years old to account for developmental differences. Reduced SUVs in WFS patients as compared to the control group for the bilateral brain regions such as occipital lobe (-1.24±1.20 vs. -0.13±1.05; p = 0.028 and cerebellum (-1.11±0.69 vs. -0.204±1.00; p = 0.036 were observed and the same tendency for cingulate (-1.13±1.05 vs. -0.15±1.12; p = 0.056, temporal lobe (-1.10±0.98 vs. -0.15±1.10; p = 0.057, parietal lobe (-1.06±1.20 vs. -0.08±1.08; p = 0.058, central region (-1.01±1.04 vs. -0.09±1.06; p = 0.060, basal ganglia (-1.05±0.74 vs. -0.20±1.07; p = 0.066 and mesial temporal lobe (-1.06±0.82 vs. -0.26±1.08; p = 0.087 was also noticed. After adjusting for multiple hypothesis testing, the differences in glucose uptake were non-significant. For the first time, regional differences in brain glucose metabolism among patients with WFS were shown using PET-CT imaging.

  10. Gestational diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar ( diabetes ) that starts or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. ... woman's blood. You are at greater risk for gestational diabetes if you: Are older than 25 when you ...

  11. Diabetes Superfoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Find Your Local Office Find your local diabetes education program Calendar of Events Wellness Lives Here Drive ... can fund critical diabetes research and support vital diabetes education services that improve the lives of those with ...

  12. Diabetic Dermopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Diabetic Dermopathy Information for adults A A A Brown, ... on the legs are typical in long-standing diabetics. Overview Diabetic dermopathy, also known as shin spots ...

  13. Diabetic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Diabetic Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... Trials Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Diabetic Neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a peripheral nerve disorder ...

  14. Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

  15. Diabetic ketoacidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ketoacidosis Images Food and insulin release Oral glucose tolerance test Insulin pump References American Diabetes Association. Standards ... PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Diabetes Complications Diabetes Type ...

  16. Diabetes and kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic nephropathy; Nephropathy - diabetic; Diabetic glomerulosclerosis; Kimmelstiel-Wilson disease ... Diabetic kidney disease is a major cause of sickness and death in people with diabetes. It can ...

  17. The central role of vascular extracellular matrix and basement membrane remodeling in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes: the matrix preloaded

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagi Suresh C

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The vascular endothelial basement membrane and extra cellular matrix is a compilation of different macromolecules organized by physical entanglements, opposing ionic charges, chemical covalent bonding, and cross-linking into a biomechanically active polymer. These matrices provide a gel-like form and scaffolding structure with regional tensile strength provided by collagens, elasticity by elastins, adhesiveness by structural glycoproteins, compressibility by proteoglycans – hyaluronans, and communicability by a family of integrins, which exchanges information between cells and between cells and the extracellular matrix of vascular tissues. Each component of the extracellular matrix and specifically the capillary basement membrane possesses unique structural properties and interactions with one another, which determine the separate and combined roles in the multiple diabetic complications or diabetic opathies. Metabolic syndrome, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and their parallel companion (atheroscleropathy are associated with multiple metabolic toxicities and chronic injurious stimuli. The adaptable quality of a matrix or form genetically preloaded with the necessary information to communicate and respond to an ever-changing environment, which supports the interstitium, capillary and arterial vessel wall is individually examined.

  18. Find a Diabetes Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CE Program Accreditation Favorably Reviewed What is Diabetes Education? Have Diabetes? Learn More How a Diabetes Educator Can Help ... Provider Information and Referrals Why Refer for Diabetes Education? Benefits of Diabetes Education Working with a Diabetes Educator Diabetes Education ...

  19. Types of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help for Diabetes Care Diabetes Statistics Types of Diabetes Learn about Diabetes You can learn how to take care of ... to take care of your diabetes. What is diabetes? Diabetes is when your blood glucose, also called ...

  20. Gestational Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Gestational diabetes 3:46 Gestational diabetes is a kind of diabetes that can happen ... some of the complications that can arise from gestational diabetes and what you can do to manage this ...

  1. Purinergic signalling and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    The pancreas is an organ with a central role in nutrient breakdown, nutrient sensing and release of hormones regulating whole body nutrient homeostasis. In diabetes mellitus, the balance is broken-cells can be starving in the midst of plenty. There are indications that the incidence of diabetes...... type 1 and 2, and possibly pancreatogenic diabetes, is rising globally. Events leading to insulin secretion and action are complex, but there is emerging evidence that intracellular nucleotides and nucleotides are not only important as intracellular energy molecules but also as extracellular signalling...... molecules in purinergic signalling cascades. This signalling takes place at the level of the pancreas, where the close apposition of various cells-endocrine, exocrine, stromal and immune cells-contributes to the integrated function. Following an introduction to diabetes, the pancreas and purinergic...

  2. Assessment of cerebral perfusion and cerebrovascular reserve in insulin-dependent diabetic patients without central neurological symptoms by means of {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPET with acetazolamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Bonilla, J.F.; Quirce, R.; Hernandez, A.; Vallina, N.K.; Guede, C.; Banzo, I.; Amado, J.A.; Carril, J.M. [Nuclear Medicine Service, University Hospital Marques de Valdecilla, Santander (Spain)

    2001-11-01

    The detection of subclinical abnormalities in cerebral blood flow could be of great value in identifying diabetic patients at risk of stroke. The aim of this study was to assess the contribution of semiquantified post-acetazolamide technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime single-photon emission tomography ({sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPET) in 15 diabetic patients with no clinical history of central neurological disease. After baseline {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPET, a second SPET scan was acquired after activation of the cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) with an injection of 1 g of acetazolamide (post-ACZ SPET). Semiquantitative analysis was made in 16 regions of interest (ROIs) drawn for each of the three supratentorial slices selected, and in two ROIs in the infratentorial slice. The CVR was calculated in each ROI by subtracting the decay-corrected baseline images from those obtained in the post-ACZ SPET and expressed as the percent increase in the average counts between the two scans. Baseline perfusion and CVR values in the study group were compared with the corresponding values in a control group. Of 750 cortical ROIs studied, 332 showed a decreased CVR (44.3%). The baseline perfusion SPET study showed hypoperfusion in 65 ROIs (8.6%) and hyperperfusion in 56 (7.4%). Of the 65 hypoperfused regions, 66.2% had a normal CVR and 33.8% had a decreased CVR, whereas of the 56 hyperperfused regions, 51.8% had a CVR within normal limits and 48.2% showed a decreased CVR. In conclusion, in comparison with baseline {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPET, the ACZ activation test provided additional information in the study of cerebrovascular impairment, and allowed characterisation of the subclinical abnormalities in the population studied. The technique may therefore prove useful in evaluating future preventive strategies for stroke in diabetic patients. (orig.)

  3. Prevalencia de nefropatía diabética y sus factores de riesgo en un área urbano marginal de la meseta Central de Costa Rica Prevalence and Risk Factors of Diabetic Nephropathy in a Peripheral Urban Area of the Central Plateau of Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Laclé-Murray

    2009-03-01

    para estimar en un área de salud la prevalencia y los factores asociados de esta patología. Los métodos diagnósticos para valorar la microalbuminuria deberían estar a la disposición a nivel de atención primaria, para poder afinar este indicador en el contexto de la vigilancia de la DM a nivel nacional.Background and aim: Diabetic nephropathy affects approximately 40% of type 2 diabetic patients and is the leading cause of kidney disease in patients starting renal replacement therapy in developed countries. The same seems to be true in Costa Rica. Knowing its prevalence and associated factors is fundamental to plan and to evaluate health services for the diabetic population. The main objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy and its risk factors in type 2 diabetic patients from a poor marginal urban community of the central plateau of Costa Rica. Methodology: Five hundred and seventy two type 2 diabetics from the Health Area 3 of Desamparados, were identified in 2000, sociodemographic data, metabolic control, comorbidities and microvascular diabetic complications variables were studied. The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy and its associated factors were determined using a multivariate logistic regression analysis for the latter. Results: The cohort had an average age of 58.5 years low education and low income and consisted predominantly of women (63.8%. The group had a high prevalence of hypertension (53.2%, obesity (78.5%, and dyslipidemia (41.5%. Sixty-one percent had the diagnosis of diabetes before age 60 and an average of 8 years with the disease. The prevalence of microvascular complications was high: retinopathy (19.6%, neuropathy (30.6%, nephropathy (33.6%, microproteinuria (24.8%, macroproteinuria (7%, nephrotic syndrome (1.4% and chronic renal insufficiency (7.1% without sex differences. Associated risk factors and odds ratio found for diabetic nephropathy were: diabetic retinopathy (4,6 IC:2.5-8, years of

  4. Control and chronic complications of diabetes mellitus in an outpatient atention center in Medellín, Colombia, 1998-2001 Control y complicaciones crónicas de la diabetes mellitus en el Centro de Atención Ambulatorio central, Instituto de Seguro Social 1998-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Bedoya Gómez

    2004-01-01

    were: cardiovascular 48,4%, eyerelated 57.4%, renal 31,5%, neuropathy 28,6% and diabetic foot 24%. Less than 50% of the patients had reached goals in controlling glycemia, HbA1c, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and systolic blood pressure. In the control of triglycerides and diastolic blood pressure, 62% and 76.3%, respectively had reached the goals of control. When association tests among different variables were performed, we only found association between the type of diabetes and the presence of hypertension and cardiovascular disease (p <0.000 for both. Conclusions: in diabetic patients attending the outpatient diabetes control program of the iss sectional Antioquia, diabetes is associated to other metabolic syndrome components in high proportion; these patients have a high incidence of chronic complications which varies from 24 to 58%, thus enhancing their morbility and mortality and they represent an important burden to the health system. We emphasize on the need of early detection in order to do a proper control and to carry out therapeutic and educational strategies to prevent or slow down the appearance of complications. El control de la diabetes mellitus requiere la evaluación continua y estricta de un gran número de factores que lo afectan, no solo desde el punto de vista de la glucemia sino de otros participantes en el trastorno metabólico por ella producida, de otras enfermedades asociadas a ella y de hábitos de salud que influyen en su control y en la aparición de diferentes complicaciones. Para identificar esta situación en el programa de diabetes del Centro de Atención Ambulatoria (CAA central del Instituto del Seguro Social (ISS, seccional Antioquia se evaluaron el control de la diabetes, la presencia de enfermedades asociadas, los hábitos de salud, las complicaciones crónicas presentadas y el grado de control de los diferentes parámetros. Metodología: entre enero de 1998 y diciembre de 2001, mediante un muestreo aleatorio simple con

  5. Central obesity and risk for type 2 diabetes in Maori, Pacific and European young men in New Zealand. Highlights and achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weight gain is associated with the incidence of Type 2 diabetes. Maori and Pacific people in New Zealand have a greater prevalence of obesity and Type 2 diabetes compared to NZ European people. We hypothesised that this difference is related to metabolic and fat distribution differences as previously demonstrated in a study of Polynesian and European women. Thirty healthy male volunteers between the ages of 18 and 27 years were selected for a wide range of fatness. Equal numbers, 10 in each group, self-identified as belonging to either the Maori, Pacific or European ethnic groups. Specific measurements undertaken included resting metabolic rate by indirect calorimetry; total energy expenditure over 14 days by the doubly-labelled water technique; total and regional body fat from dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; anthropornetry (body mass index, skinfold thicknesses and girths); fat and carbohydrate utilisation from respiratory quotients and from carbon-13 analysis of expired breath; and dietary intake of macronutrients. Glucose tolerance, insulin, glycosylated haemoglobin, thyroid hormone, leptin and blood lipid determinations were also performed and HOMA and ISIO-120 indices calculated

  6. Malta : Mediterranean Diabetes hub : a journey through the years

    OpenAIRE

    Cuschieri, Sarah; Mamo, Julian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus in Malta has been an established major health problem for years. It has been linked with cultural, geographical, historical, genetic as well and a change from a Mediterranean diet to a Westernized diet. This diabetes burden has lead to establishment of diabetes clinics both in the central general hospital, as well as in the community. Over the past 50 years, there have been two major epidemiological diabetes studies conducted to evaluate diabetes in the Maltese...

  7. Screening for Gestational Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or obese or having a family history of diabetes. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after the baby is ... Click Here to Learn More About Preventing Gestational Diabetes Gestational Diabetes ( healthfinder. gov) Diabetes and Pregnancy: Gestational Diabetes ( ...

  8. Carbohydrates and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... When You Have Diabetes Meal Plans and Diabetes Smart Supermarket Shopping Diabetes Control: Why It's Important Diabetes: What's True and False? Type 2 Diabetes: What Is It? Food Labels Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It? Contact Us ...

  9. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take diabetes ... talk with your health care provider about your diabetes treatment. Diabetes Medicines - easy-to-read booklet for women ...

  10. Diabetic Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergencies A-Z Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Diabetic Emergencies It is estimated that more than 20 ... they have it. The best way to prevent diabetic emergencies is to effectively manage the disease through ...

  11. Diabetic Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health or management, contact your veterinarian. In addition, diabetic pets should be monitored for long-term complications such as cataracts, which commonly develop in diabetic dogs and cats. Other problems that can occur ...

  12. Diabetes Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can cause problems with other body ... as your kidneys, nerves, feet, and eyes. Having diabetes can also put you at a higher risk ...

  13. Gestational Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... page It's been added to your dashboard . Gestational diabetes 3:46 Gestational diabetes is a kind of ... between pregnancies Nutrition, weight & fitness Prenatal care Body & lifestyle changes Is it safe? Labor & birth Postpartum care ...

  14. Gestational Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your e-mail was sent. Save to my dashboard Sign in or Sign up to save this ... saved this page It's been added to your dashboard . Gestational diabetes 3:46 Gestational diabetes is a ...

  15. Societal costs of diabetes mellitus in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sortsø, C; Green, A; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To provide comprehensive real-world evidence on societal diabetes-attributable costs in Denmark. METHODS: National register data are linked on an individual level through unique central personal registration numbers in Denmark. All patients in the Danish National Diabetes Register in 2011 (N...... = 318 729) were included in this study. Complication status was defined according to data from the Danish National Hospital Register. Diabetes-attributable costs were calculated as the difference between costs of patients with diabetes and the expected costs given the annual resource consumption of the...... diabetes-free population. RESULTS: Societal costs attributable to diabetes were estimated to be at least 4.27 billion EUR in 2011, corresponding to 14,349 EUR per patient-year. A twofold higher healthcare resource usage was found for patients with diabetes as compared with the diabetes-free population...

  16. [Diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, E

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases characterized by high levels of blood glucose resulting from defects in insulin production, insulin action, or both. Diabetes is a serious health concern. The number of cases of diabetes mellitus is estimated to grow at a rate of 50% between 2000 and 2010. There are several types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes, and other specific types of diabetes. Beta cell dysfunction plays a key role in the physiopathology of diabetes, even when insulin resistance, which is often present in several diabetes-related diseases, is considered among the causes of hyperglycemic type 2 diabetes. The prolonged hyperglycemia that is peculiar to all kind of diabetes has long term complications on several organs and systems. The diagnosis of diabetes is based on the evaluation of glucose plasma levels performed under fasting conditions or two hours after the oral ingestion of 75 grams of glucose. Currently, achieving and maintaining normal plasma levels of glucose are the aims of therapy for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Particularly, the therapy for type 1 diabetes is based on the administration of insulin, whereas that of type 2 diabetes changes over the time: diet and physical activity are the first treatments; oral hypoglycemic drugs are used as a second therapeutic step; and the administration of insulin is the last therapeutic option. The principal therapeutic innovation of the past ten years is represented by the tight and flexible control of glucose plasma level obtained by using the insulin analogues produced by recombinant DNA technology. PMID:14523905

  17. Diabetic osteopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Ilić Jana; Kovačev Branka

    2005-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to point out some dilemmas about the existence and pathogenesis of primary diabetic osteopathy as a separate entity, based on currently available studies. Expert disagreements are present not only about the occurrence of generalized osteopathy with diabetic disease, but also about direct relationship between metabolic diabetes control and bone metabolism and influence of disease duration and sex on bone changes. Pathogenesis of diabetic osteopathy Decre...

  18. Diabetic retinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Mendrinos, Efstratios; Stangos, Alexandros; Pournaras, Constantin

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of blindness in the UK, with older people and those with worse diabetic control, hypertension, and hyperlipidaemia most at risk. Diabetic retinopathy can cause microaneurysms, haemorrhages, exudates, changes to blood vessels, and retinal thickening.

  19. PRIMARY SJOGREN’S SYNDROME AND DISTAL RENAL TUBULAR ACIDOSIS: PRESENTING WITH NEPHROGENIC DIABETES INSI PIDUS SECONDARY TO SEVERE HYPOKALEMIA-A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksh. Achouba

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available NTRODUCTION: Sjogren’s syndrome is a slowly progressing autoimmun e disease characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the exo crine glands, mainly the lacrimal and salivary glands, resulting in their impaired secreto ry function. Simultaneously, systemic involvement and symptoms of cutaneous, respiratory, r enal, hepatic, neurologic, and vascular systems often occur.[ 1 ] This syndrome can present either alone (as primary Sjogren’s syndrome or in the context of an underlying connec tive tissue disease (as secondary Sjogren’s syndrome.[ 2 ] Renal involvement is a well recognized extra glan dular manifestation of primary Sjogren’s syndrome (pSS. Most common manifestations are related to tubular dysfunction, resulting from chronic interstitial nephritis, which can manifest as distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA, proximal RTA(pRTA, tubular proteinuria, or nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.[ 3 , 4 ] Hypokalemic periodic paralysis, urolithiasis, or osteo malacia are uncommon renal manifestations of pSS.[ 1 ] Here, we present a case of primary Sjogren’s syndr ome predominantly presenting as a renal manifestation in the form of nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus secondary to severe hypokalemia due to dRTA .

  20. Ranolazine: a Potential Anti-diabetic Drug

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaoxiao

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a life-long chronic disease that affects more than 24 million Americans. Loss of pancreatic beta-cell mass and function is central to the development of both type 1 (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Therefore, preservation or regeneration of functional beta-cell mass is one of the essential strategies to treat diabetes [1]. In my study, I tested if ranolazine, a synthetic compound, has potential to prevent or treat diabetes. Diabetes were induced in mice by giving multiple low-dose...

  1. Gestational diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Dragoš, Andreja

    2014-01-01

    Gestational diabetes is diabetes that occurs for the first time during pregnancy. In Slovenia, between 2.8 and 4.5 percent of pregnant women are affected by this disease. The number of women with gestational diabetes is increasing due to unhealthy lifestyle and most of all due to increasing occurrence of obesity. Gestational diabetes is a growing problem in Slovenia, as well as in the world. The purpose of the thesis is to establish the main risk factors for gestational diabetes and determ...

  2. Managing Diabetes: 4 Steps to Manage Your Diabetes for Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Financial Help for Diabetes Care Diabetes Statistics Managing Diabetes 4 Steps to Manage Your Diabetes for Life | NDEP Step 1: Learn about diabetes. ... diabetes care each day. Step 1: Learn about diabetes. What is diabetes? There are three main types ...

  3. V ISUAL EVOKED POTENTIALS IN TYPE - 1 DIABETES WITHOUT RETINOPATHY: CO - RELATIONS WITH DURATION OF DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 20 diabetic (Type 1 patients have been studied in order to investigate the possible effects of the type 1 diabetes mellitus on the central nervous system by means of pattern shift visual evoked potentials. Patients with diabetic retinopathy , glaucoma and cataract were excluded from the study. To evaluate central optic pathways involvement in diabetics , visual evoked po tentials (VEP , in particular the latency of positive peak (P100 , were studied in 20 patients and 20 normal controls using reversal pattern VEP. P100 latency was significantly increased in diabetics. A positive co - relation was also found between latencies of VEP and duration of disease. Relationship between blood sugar level and P 100 wave latencies and amplitudes in diabetic patients was not significant . VEP measurement seems a simple and sensitive method for detecting early involvement and changes in opti c pathways in diabetics

  4. Diabetic osteopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Jana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to point out some dilemmas about the existence and pathogenesis of primary diabetic osteopathy as a separate entity, based on currently available studies. Expert disagreements are present not only about the occurrence of generalized osteopathy with diabetic disease, but also about direct relationship between metabolic diabetes control and bone metabolism and influence of disease duration and sex on bone changes. Pathogenesis of diabetic osteopathy Decreased bone formation is the basic mechanism leading to decreased bone mass. Biochemical markers showed no clear connection with bone density measurement. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF affect bone metabolism. Osteopathy in patients with diabetic disease-type 1 Some clinical studies have shown that patients with diabetic disease-type 1 have a mild decrease in bone mass, while others have not presented such results. Osteopathy in patients with diabetic disease-type2 In patients with diabetic disease-type 2 the risk for osteopathy is even less defined. Patients treated with oral hypoglycemics present with higher decrease of bone mass has than patients treated with insulin therapy. This could partly be explained by anabolic effects of insulin on bones. Bone fractures in patients with diabetic disease Literature data are contradictory concerning the occurrence of bone fractures in diabetic patients. A survey of bone fracture occurrence in diabetic patients was performed in "Veljko Vlahović Medical Center" in Vrbas and it included a group of 100 patients with diabetic disease. The results show that 12 patients had some fractures: mostly females in postmenopause, aged and with secondary insulin-dependent diabetes and most frequently arm fractures. Considering contradictory literature data, further longitudinal studies are necessary. .

  5. Brain MRI in Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Tiehuis, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years is has become clear that type 2 diabetes affects the central nervous system. These long-term complications manifest as structural changes on brain imaging, cognitive decrements and a 1.5-2 fold increased risk for the development of dementia, in particular in the elderly. The pathogenesis of diabetes-induced brain damage is not completely understood. Both vascular and metabolic disturbances may play an important role in the impact of diabetes on the brain. The course of develop...

  6. Clinical and Experimental Approach to the Benefits and Risks of Laser Treatment for Diabetic Macular Edema

    OpenAIRE

    T-Khani, Poya

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is an ophthalmic complication of diabetes that currently affects 93 million people worldwide. Diabetic macular edema is a subtype of diabetic retinopathy that is characterized by leaking blood vessels in the central part of the retina, and it is a major cause of vision loss in individuals with diabetes. Screening for retinopathy is performed at regular intervals to identify subjects in need of treatment. In Sweden, the recommended screening interval for type 2 diabetic su...

  7. Diabetic Neuropathies: The Nerve Damage of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Organizations (PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Español Diabetic Neuropathies: The Nerve Damage of Diabetes Page Content ... treated? Points to Remember Clinical Trials What are diabetic neuropathies? Diabetic neuropathies are a family of nerve ...

  8. Expression of three different mutations in the arginine vasopressin gene suggests genotype-phenotype correlation in familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus kindreds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siggaard, Charlotte; Christensen, Jane Hvarregaard; Corydon, Thomas Juhl;

    2005-01-01

    significant reduction of the amount of immunoreactive AVP in the cell culture medium and severe impairment of the intracellular trafficking and processing of the AVP prohormone, supporting the disease causing nature of all three mutations. However, the A19T mutation was associated with some capacity for...... processing and trafficking consistent with the clinical observations. Immunoflourescence studies provided evidence of reticular accumulation of protein within the ER in the A19T and C110X mutants but a unique accumulation of much larger aggregates in the L81P, which were localized both within and immediately...

  9. Genetics of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A A Listen En Español Genetics of Diabetes You've probably wondered how you developed diabetes. ... to develop diabetes than others. What Leads to Diabetes? Type 1 and type 2 diabetes have different ...

  10. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take diabetes ... with your health care provider about your diabetes treatment. Diabetes Medicines - easy-to-read booklet for women ...

  11. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diabetes. Food Safety for People with Diabetes Your Glucose Meter - easy-to-read booklet for women Other ... Information on Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need ...

  12. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes: Lindsey's Story (Video) Diabetes Center Movie: Endocrine System Diabetes Center Diabetes: DJ's Story (Video) Diabetes: Marco's ... Use Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  13. Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Woodcock, Alison; Bradley, Clare

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disorder, characterised by raised glucose levels in blood (hyperglycaemia) and urine (glycosuria). The cause may be inherited and/or acquired deficiency of insulin production by the pancreas, or insulin resistance, where the insulin produced is ineffective. Increased blood glucose concentrations can cause structural damage, particularly to blood vessels and nerves. Microvascular complications of diabetes (diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy) bring p...

  14. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005179 The association of LMNA1908C/T polymorphism with insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in diabetic patients. SU Ben-li (苏本利), et al. Dept Endocrinol, 2nd Affili Hosp, Dalian Med Univ, Dalian 116027. Chin J Diabetes, 2005;13(1) :27-30. Objective: To study the association of LMhlA 1908 C/T polymorphism with insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods:

  15. Increasing incidence of diabetes after gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Jeannet; Hansen, Torben; Jensen, Dorte Møller;

    2004-01-01

    To study the incidence of diabetes among women with previous diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the light of the general increasing incidence of overweight and diabetes and to identify risk factors for the development of diabetes.......To study the incidence of diabetes among women with previous diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the light of the general increasing incidence of overweight and diabetes and to identify risk factors for the development of diabetes....

  16. Disease: H00252 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00252 Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) Nephrogenic diabetes insipid...eSH: D018500 OMIM: 304800 125800 PMID:17908859 Linshaw MA Back to basics: congenital nephrogenic diabetes in...sipidus. Pediatr Rev 28:372-80 (2007) PMID:16580609 Bichet DG Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Adv Chronic Ki... defects in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Pediatr Nephrol 16:1146-52 (2001) ... ...dney Dis 13:96-104 (2006) PMID:11793119 Knoers NV, Deen PM Molecular and cellular

  17. Diabetes knowledge translation status in developing countries: A mixed method study among diabetes researchers in case of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Valinejadi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The overall status of diabetes KT in Iran was lower than the ideal situation. There are many challenges that require great interventions at the organizational or macro level. To reinforce diabetes KT in Iran, it should hold a more leading and centralized function in the strategies of the country′s diabetes research system.

  18. Diabetes and Pregnancy: Gestational Diabetes

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-14

    Gestational diabetes happens in a woman who develops diabetes during pregnancy. This podcast discusses its potential effects and action steps to avoid complications.  Created: 11/14/2007 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Diabetes Translation (DDT) and National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD), Prevention Research Branch.   Date Released: 11/27/2007.

  19. Diabetes Dyslipidemia

    OpenAIRE

    Schofield, Jonathan D.; Liu, Yifen; Rao-Balakrishna, Prasanna; Malik, Rayaz A.; Soran, Handrean

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with a considerably increased risk of premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Intensive glycemic control has essentially failed to significantly improve cardiovascular outcomes in clinical trials. Dyslipidemia is common in diabetes and there is strong evidence that cholesterol lowering improves cardiovascular outcomes, even in patients with apparently unremarkable lipid profiles. Here, the authors review the pathophysiology and implications of the alt...

  20. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008395 Evaluating the feature of hypoglycemia detected by continuous glucose monitoring system during temporary continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in type 2 diabetes patients. LI Ming(李鸣), et al.Shanghai Diabet Clin Center, Dept Endocrinol & Metab, Shanghai Jiaotong Univ, Shanghai 200233. Natl Med J China 2008;88(24):1679-1682.

  1. Somatotype in Elderly Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Buffa, Roberto; Floris, Giovanni; F. Putzu, Paolo; Carboni, Luciano; Marini, Elisabetta

    2007-01-01

    Somatotyping is a practical technique for the description of physique. Individuals with Type 2 diabetes are characterized by physical peculiarities, such as overweight, obesity and a central pattern of body fat distribution. Somatotype applications to diabetes are limited. The objective of this study is to describe the somatotype of elderly type 2 diabetes patients. The sample consisted of 110 patients with type 2 diabetes (45 men, mean age 69.4±7.0 years; 65 women, mean age 72.9±...

  2. Advances in the management of diabetic macular oedema based on evidence from the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Lik Thai; Chia, Seen Nee; Ah-kee, Elliott Yann; Chew, Nejia; Gupta, Manish

    2015-01-01

    The Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network (DRCR.net) performs studies on new treatments for diabetic retinopathy. This review aims to summarise recent findings from DRCR.net studies on the treatment of diabetic macular oedema. We performed a PubMed search of articles from the DRCR.net, which included all studies pertaining to the treatment of diabetic maculopathy. The main outcome measures were retinal thickening as assessed by central subfield thickness on optical coherence tomograp...

  3. Diabetic encephalopathy: the role of oxidative stress and inflammation in type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Flávio; Soares, MR; Nunes, Sara; Pereira,Frederico

    2012-01-01

    Edna Soares, Sara Nunes, Flávio Reis, Frederico C PereiraLaboratory of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics/IBILI, Coimbra University, Coimbra, PortugalAbstract: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a heterogeneous metabolic disorder associated with an increased risk for central nervous system disorders. Diabetic encephalopathy is a relatively unknown diabetes complication, characterized by electrophysiological, structural, neurochemical, and degenerative neuronal changes that ...

  4. Diabetes and the brain: Cognitive performance in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Brands, A.M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus are associated with altered brain function, a complication referred to as diabetic encephalopathy. The issues surrounding the cognitive and emotional status in chronic, older diabetic patients remain complex. The literature shows contrasting findings and especially the role of recurrent hypoglycemic episodes remains controversial. The research of this thesis was designed to further unravel the clinical and cognitive characteristics of altered central n...

  5. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also have eyelid drooping. Prevention Controlling your blood sugar level may reduce the risk of developing this disorder. Alternative Names Diabetic third nerve palsy; Pupil-sparing third cranial nerve palsy Images Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system References Rucker JC. Cranial ...

  6. Quality of Care for First-Degree Relatives of Type 2 Diabetes Patients Diagnosed with Diabetes at a Screening Program One Year After Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Amini, Massoud; Timori, Azam; Aminorroaya, Ashraf

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: Diabetes screening is an effective tool for diagnosing patients who are unaware of their diabetes and for providing them with optimal treatment. The quality of care and treatment of diabetic patients diagnosed at a screening program during one year in Isfahan, a centrally located Iranian city, was assessed. METHODS: In a prospective study, 1640 first-degree relatives of diabetic patients (aged 35-55) were screened for diabetes mellitus at Isfahan Endocrine and Metabolism Research Center...

  7. Falls and Balance Impairments in Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: Thinking Beyond Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewston, Patricia; Deshpande, Nandini

    2016-02-01

    Older adults with type 2 diabetes have significantly higher incidence of falls than those without type 2 diabetes. The devastating consequences of falls include declines in mobility, activity avoidance, institutionalization and mortality. One of the most commonly identified risk factors associated with falls is impaired balance. Balance impairments and subsequent increased fall risk in older adults with type 2 diabetes are most commonly associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Consequently, DPN has been the central focus of falls prevention research and interventions for older adults with type 2 diabetes. However, isolated studies have identified adults with type 2 diabetes without overt complications of DPN to also be at increased fall risk. It is known that the ability to maintain balance is a complex skill that requires the integration of multiple sensorimotor and cognitive processes. Emerging evidence suggests that diabetes-related subtle declines in sensory functions (somatosensory, visual and vestibular), metabolic muscle function and executive functions may also contribute to increased fall risk in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Knowledge of these type 2 diabetes-related sensorimotor and cognitive deficits may help to broaden approaches to falls prevention in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, the purpose of this mini review is to describe the impact of type 2 diabetes on sensorimotor and cognitive systems that may contribute to increased fall risk in older adults with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26778679

  8. Gestational Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Just a moment, please. You've saved this page It's been added to your dashboard . Gestational diabetes ... Map Premature birth report card Careers Archives Health Topics Pregnancy Before or between pregnancies Nutrition, weight & fitness ...

  9. Diabetes Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to weight gain. Research has shown that drinking sugary drinks is linked to type 2 diabetes. The American ... drinks energy drinks sports drinks sweet tea other sugary drinks. These will raise blood glucose and can provide ...

  10. Gestational Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Gestational diabetes Description | Related videos | Most played video E-mail to a friend Please fill in all fields. Please enter a valid e-mail address. Your information: Your recipient's information: Your ...

  11. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010297 Effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid on diabetic nephropathy rats.LUO Zhifeng(罗志锋),et al.Dept Nephrol,Xinqiao Hosp,3rd Milit Med Univ,Chongqing 400037.Chin J Nephrol 2010;26(5):358-363. Objective To investigate the effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) on the renal pathogenesis of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes and its mechanism.Methods

  12. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008025 Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ agonists improves arterial stiffness in type 2 diabetic patients with coronary artery disease. YU Jie(于婕), et al. Dept Cardiovasc Med, Peking Univ 3rd Hosp, Beijing 100083. Chin Cir J 2007;22(6):418-422. Objective Arterial stiffness is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events in diabetic patients, and it may be assessed by measurement of pulse wave velocity(PWV).

  13. Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Retinopathy Causes Diabetic Retinopathy Symptoms Who Is at Risk for Diabetic Retinopathy? Diabetic Retinopathy Diagnosis Diabetic Retinopathy ... blood sugar will significantly reduce the long-term risk of vision loss. Treatment usually won't cure ...

  14. Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have more than one pregnancy affected by gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes usually shows up in the middle of ... gestational diabetes must also take insulin. Problems of Gestational Diabetes in Pregnancy Blood sugar that is not well ...

  15. Diabetes and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. When ... pregnant women in the United States get gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is diabetes that happens for the ...

  16. Diabetes and Foot Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes and Foot Problems How can diabetes affect my feet? Too much glucose, also called ... you have any of these signs. How can diabetes change the shape of my feet? Nerve damage ...

  17. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Mar 23,2016 The following statistics speak ... disease. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  18. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recruiting Patients & Families Consortia, Networks & Centers Reports & Planning Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) Page Content On this page: ... increased risk of developing diabetes. [ Top ] Type 2 Diabetes and Prediabetes Type 2 diabetes is a disorder ...

  19. Kidney Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Kidney Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 26,2016 One of the more ... thereafter.) This content was last reviewed January 2016. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  20. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Beware of Illegally Sold Diabetes Treatments Diabetes and Pregnancy Some women develop diabetes for the first time ... care provider about how to manage diabetes during pregnancy. Medicine and Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy Registries - Sign- ...

  1. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take ...

  2. Women and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take ...

  3. Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education ... Retinopathy Causes Diabetic Retinopathy Symptoms Who Is at Risk for Diabetic Retinopathy? Diabetic Retinopathy Diagnosis Diabetic Retinopathy ...

  4. Diabetes - eye care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000078.htm Diabetes - eye care To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. Diabetic retinopathy - care Diabetes and your eyes Diabetes can harm your eyes. It can damage ...

  5. Evaluation of the correlation between type 1 diabetes and cognitive function in children and adolescents, and comparison of this correlation with structural changes in the central nervous system: a study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourabbasi, Ata; Tehrani-Doost, Mehdi; Ebrahimi Qavam, Soqra; Larijani, Bagher

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM) affects nearly 15 million children worldwide and failure to achieve and maintain good glycaemic control in this group can lead to diabetes-related complications. Children with T1DM can experience impairment in cognitive function such as memory, attention and executive function. This study is designed to evaluate the correlation between diabetes and cognitive dysfunction as well as to clarify whether this correlation can be linked to neurological structural changes in 6–11-year-old children with diabetes. Methods and analysis 310 eligible children with diabetes will be divided into two groups based on glycaemic control according to their HbA1c index. The control group will include 150 children aged 6–11 without diabetes. The following parameters will be measured and investigated: duration of the disease since diagnosis, required daily insulin dose, frequency of insulin administration, hospital admissions due to diabetes, hypoglycaemic episodes during the last year, and episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis. The following components of cognitive function will be evaluated: memory, attention, executive function, decision-making and academic performance. Cognitive function and subsequent subtests will be assessed using Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) tools. Brain structural indices such as intracranial vault (ICV), as well as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), ventricle, hippocampus, total intracranial, total brain, grey matter and white matter volume will be measured using MRI. ANOVA, correlational tests (Spearman) and regression models will be used to evaluate the hypothesis. Ethics and dissemination This study is approved by the ethics committee of the Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Institute (EMRI) of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) under reference number 00300. Our findings are to be published in a peer-reviewed journal and disseminated both electronically and in print. PMID

  6. Diabetes y embarazo

    OpenAIRE

    María Scucces

    2011-01-01

    Objetivo: Evaluar los efectos de la diabetes sobre el embarazo y las complicaciones materno-fetales en las gestantes diabéticas. Métodos: Estudio retrospectivo, epidemiológico, descriptivo de 197 casos de gestantes diabéticas de 1999 a 2008. Ambiente: Departamento de Obstetricia, Hospital Central de Maracay. Resultados: La incidencia fue del 0,067 % del total de casos atendidos en el Departamento. La edad promedio fue de 28,9 años. En paridad 53,3 % tenían de dos a cuatro embarazos. El 42,65 ...

  7. American Association of Diabetes Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Program Provider Resources Why Refer for Diabetes Education Benefits of Diabetes Education Working with a Diabetes Educator Jason Baker, ... Prevention Program Provider Resources Why Refer for Diabetes Education Benefits of Diabetes Education Working with a Diabetes Educator Jason Baker, ...

  8. Influência do diabete melito nos resultados imediatos do implante de stent coronário: uma análise dos dados da Central Nacional de Intervenções Cardiovasculares (CENIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moscoso Isaac

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a influência do diabete melito (DM nos resultados imediatos do implante de stent coronário (SC, de acordo com o quadro clínico de apresentação. MÉTODOS: Entre janeiro/1997 e dezembro/2003, segundo a Central Nacional de Intervenções Cardiovasculares (CENIC, 11.874 pacientes diabéticos foram submetidos a implante de SC: 7.386 (62,3% com insuficiência coronária crônica (ICO, 3.142 (26,4%, em síndrome isquêmica instável sem elevação ST (SIASEST e 1.346 (11,3%, com infarto agudo do miocárdio (IAM com supradesnivelamento de ST. Estes grupos foram comparados com 48.103 não-diabéticos: 30.980 (64,5% com ICO, 10.938 (22,7% em SIASEST e 6.185 (12,8% com IAM. RESULTADOS: Os diabéticos apresentaram características clínicas e angiográficas de maior risco. Os diabéticos com ICO apresentaram taxa de eventos adversos semelhantes aos não-diabéticos (0,98% x 0,91%, p=0,5971, porém, os diabéticos em SIASEST e IAM apresentaram maior incidência de eventos: 2,76% x 1,46% (p<0,0001 e 7,87% x 4,1% (p<0,0001, respectivamente. A análise multivariada mostrou o DM como preditor independente de risco para eventos adversos maiores na SIASEST (OR: 1,92 IC: 1,46-2,52 p<0,0001 e no IAM (OR: 2,0 IC: 1,57-2,54 p<=0,0001 e não na ICO (OR: 1,08 IC: 0,83-1,42 p=0,5470. CONCLUSÃO: Os pacientes diabéticos portadores de ICO apresentaram evolução hospitalar semelhante aos não diabéticos, porém, os com SIASEST e IAM demonstraram maior taxa de eventos cardíacos adversos comparados com a população não-diabética.

  9. MR findings in three pituitary abscesses. Case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present MR findings in 3 surgically proved cases of pituitary abscess. All lesions were seen as a sellar cystic mass with a thin rim of enhancement. In addition, the pituitary stalk was thickened in 2 cases in which central diabetes insipidus developed. These findings may be suggestive of pituitary abscess. (orig.)

  10. Nonobstructive hydronephrosis due to social polydipsia: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Maroz Natallia; Maroz Uladzimir; Iqbal Saima; Ayer Ravi; Kambhampati Ganesh; Ejaz A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Excessive fluid intake can lead to water intoxication, electrolyte abnormalities, exacerbation of heart failure and anatomical changes in the urinary tract that may present diagnostic and therapeutic challenges for patients and physicians. Although the development of nonobstructive hydronephrosis is recognized in patients with central and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, pregnancy or psychiatric polydipsia, it is rarely a diagnostic consideration in healthy individuals wi...

  11. Unexpected Fatal Hypernatremia after Successful Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation with Therapeutic Hypothermia: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Sang-Sik; Kim, Won Young; Kim, Won; Lim, Kyung-Su

    2012-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (DI), characterized by unexpected fatal hypernatremia, is a rare complication after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation with therapeutic hypothermia, but may be potentially fatal if recognition is delayed. We describe here a patient who experienced cardiac arrest due to a pulmonary embolism, followed by successful resuscitation after induction of therapeutic hypothermia. The patient, however, suddenly developed unexpected hypernatremia with increased urine outp...

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Oshitari

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Toshiyuki Oshitari1,2, Natsuyo Hata1, Shuichi Yamamoto11Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba City, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kimitsu Central Hospital, Kisarazu City, Chiba, JapanAbstract: Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases including Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. Many recent studies have shown that ER stress is related to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, and with the death of pancreatic β-cells, insulin resistance, and the death of the vascular cells in the retina. Diabetic retinopathy is a major complication of diabetes and results in death of both neural and vascular cells. Because the death of the neurons directly affects visual function, the precise mechanism causing the death of neurons in early diabetic retinopathy must be determined. The ideal therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy would be to treat the factors involved with both the vascular and neuronal abnormalities in diabetic retinopathy. In this review, we present evidence that ER stress is involved in the death of both retinal neurons and vascular cells in diabetic eyes, and thus reducing or blocking ER stress may be a potential therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy.Keywords: endoplasmic reticulum stress, diabetic retinopathy, vascular cell death, neuronal cell death

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Oshitari

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Toshiyuki Oshitari1,2, Natsuyo Hata1, Shuichi Yamamoto11Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba City, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kimitsu Central Hospital, Kisarazu City, Chiba, JapanAbstract: Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases including Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. Many recent studies have shown that ER stress is related to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, and with the death of pancreatic β-cells, insulin resistance, and the death of the vascular cells in the retina. Diabetic retinopathy is a major complication of diabetes and results in death of both neural and vascular cells. Because the death of the neurons directly affects visual function, the precise mechanism causing the death of neurons in early diabetic retinopathy must be determined. The ideal therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy would be to treat the factors involved with both the vascular and neuronal abnormalities in diabetic retinopathy. In this review, we present evidence that ER stress is involved in the death of both retinal neurons and vascular cells in diabetic eyes, and thus reducing or blocking ER stress may be a potential therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy.Keywords: endoplasmic reticulum stress, diabetic retinopathy, vascular cell death, neuronal cell death

  14. Informing the development of a national diabetes register in Ireland: a literature review of the impact of patient registration on diabetes care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica O'Mullane

    2010-09-01

    Conclusions This review suggested that registers are generally assumed to be an essential element of quality improvement interventions rather than an optional addition. A diabetes register is central to the development of a comprehensive diabetes management system in primary care, which can lead to improvements in the processes and outcomes of diabetes care.

  15. Diabetes research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to determine the long-term effects of alpha-particle pituitary irradiation in patients being treated for diabetic retinopathy. Of particular interest is whether the altered hormonal environment influences vision, renal function, and survival

  16. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970258 Relationship between non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and lipoprotein(a)in aged patients.CHI Jiamin(迟家敏), et al. Dept Endocrinol, BeijingHosp, Beijing, 100730. Chin J Geriatr 1997; 16(1): 39-42.

  17. Gestational Diabetes and Future Risk of Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Sivaraman, Subash Chander; Vinnamala, Sudheer; Jenkins, David

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study of women with gestational diabetes we attempted to (a) Determine the magnitude of the long term risk of progression to diabetes and (b) Identify factors that predict the development of diabetes. Methods All women diagnosed with gestational diabetes (GDM) at Worcestershire Royal Hospital, UK from 1995 to 2003 were included in this observational cohort study and followed up till 2009. Diabetes was diagnosed if fasting glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L, random/two-hour glucose follow...

  18. Diabetic Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetic Eye Disease How can diabetes affect my eyes? Too much glucose, also called sugar, in your blood from diabetes ... diabetes can also affect the nerves to the eye. Having high blood glucose from diabetes causes decreased blood supply to the ...

  19. Fats for diabetics. (Letter).

    OpenAIRE

    Katan, M B

    1994-01-01

    Opinion. Comments on the treatment of type 2 diabetes from the interaction between nature and nurture. Effective form of treatment for type 2 diabetes; Composition of the diet for diabetics; Identification of unsaturated fats in the diabetic diet; Risks faced by diabetic patients.

  20. What Is Diabetic Retinopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ophthalmologist Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Diabetic Retinopathy Sections What Is Diabetic Retinopathy? Diabetic Retinopathy Causes ... Non-Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator What Is Diabetic Retinopathy? Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: Robert H ...

  1. Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ophthalmologist Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Diabetic Retinopathy Sections What Is Diabetic Retinopathy? Diabetic Retinopathy Causes ... Vision Simulator Non-Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: Robert ...

  2. Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ophthalmologist Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Diabetic Retinopathy Sections What Is Diabetic Retinopathy? Diabetic Retinopathy Causes ... Vision Simulator Non-Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: Robert ...

  3. Tips for Teens with Diabetes: What Is Diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Teens with Diabetes What is Diabetes? National Diabetes Education Program Learn about diabetes and how to manage ... normal as possible. Learn more! Check out… National Diabetes Education Program to get free copies of other tip ...

  4. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Caring for Your Child All About Food Allergies Diabetes Movie KidsHealth > For Parents > Diabetes Movie Print A A A Text Size Kids who have diabetes have trouble taking energy from food and delivering ...

  5. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... these resources to help you talk with your health care provider about your diabetes treatment. Diabetes Medicines - easy- ... these resources to help you talk to your health care provider about how to manage diabetes during pregnancy. ...

  6. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  7. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Diabetes Center Diabetes: Marco's Story (Video) Diabetes: ... Resources Send to a friend Reprint Guidelines Share this page using: What are these? Note: Clicking these ...

  8. "Diabetes Has Instant Consequences..."

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Stories "Diabetes has instant consequences…" Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of ... you want to chuck it all. But Diabetes has instant consequences. You learn to be responsible pretty ...

  9. Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS) is a complication of type 2 diabetes . It involves extremely high blood ... Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome is a condition of: Extremely high blood sugar (glucose) level Extreme lack of ...

  10. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cerebral Palsy: Caring for Your Child All About Food Allergies Diabetes Movie KidsHealth > For Parents > Diabetes Movie ... who have diabetes have trouble taking energy from food and delivering it to the trillions of cells ...

  11. Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Retinopathy Sections What Is Diabetic Retinopathy? Diabetic Retinopathy Causes Diabetic Retinopathy Symptoms Who Is at Risk for ... macula (called PRP, or panretinal photocoagulation). This treatment causes abnormal new vessels to shrink and often prevents ...

  12. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes: Lindsey's Story (Video) Diabetes Center Movie: Endocrine System Diabetes ... Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  13. Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Announcer: People with diabetes should work with their doctors to monitor the ABCs of diabetes. Judith Fradkin, ... want patients who have diabetes to ask their doctors, "What is my A1C, my blood pressure, my ...

  14. Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Non-Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: Robert H Janigian Jr MD Sep. 01, 2013 The best treatment for diabetic retinopathy is to prevent it. Strict ...

  15. Diabetes and nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve damage that occurs in people with diabetes is called diabetic neuropathy. This condition is a complicaiton ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by ... sugar level . This condition is more likely when the blood sugar ...

  16. Pregnancy Complications: Preexisting Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Preexisting diabetes Preexisting diabetes E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... and your baby are healthy. What is preexisting diabetes? About 9 out of 100 women (9 percent) ...

  17. Living With Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Follow Us Health Information > Health Communication Programs > National Diabetes Education Program > Living With Diabetes | Share External Link Disclaimer National Diabetes Education Program NDEP Health Information A-Z Expand By ...

  18. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get ... you change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. ...

  19. Hyperglycemia and Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Hyperglycemia and Diabetic Ketoacidosis KidsHealth > For Parents > Hyperglycemia and Diabetic Ketoacidosis ... sugar levels need to be addressed. previous continue Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Insulin allows glucose to get into ...

  20. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing ... Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  1. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing ... & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  2. "Stop Diabetes Now!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Stop Diabetes Now!" Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... Tips for Seniors at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Lifestyle changes that lead to weight loss—such ...

  3. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes and Kidney Disease What are my kidneys and ... urine until releasing it through urination. How can diabetes affect my kidneys? Too much glucose , also called ...

  4. Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... between diabetes and heart disease. Judith Fradkin, M.D.: What most people don't know is that ... stroke among people with diabetes. Judith Fradkin, M.D.: We call this approach "the ABCs of diabetes." ...

  5. Native Americans and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... high numbers of diabetes cases. Peter Bennett, M.D.: People with diabetes suffer roughly twice the mortality ... diabetes population in the world. Peter Bennett, M.D.: Given the fact that the epidemic has occurred ...

  6. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Diabetes Movie KidsHealth > For Parents > Diabetes Movie Print A A A Text Size Kids who have diabetes have trouble taking energy from food and delivering ...

  7. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Treatments Diabetes and Pregnancy General Tips Check these resources for tips to help you manage your ... and the type of diabetes you have. Use these resources to help you talk with your health ...

  8. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tips to help you manage your diabetes. Food Safety for People with Diabetes Your Glucose Meter - easy- ... to Store your Insulin during Storms and Blackouts Safety Information for Diabetes Medicines and Devices Beware of ...

  9. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resources to help you talk with your health care provider about your diabetes treatment. Diabetes Medicines - easy- ... resources to help you talk to your health care provider about how to manage diabetes during pregnancy. ...

  10. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NKF Newsroom Contact Us You are here Home » Diabetes - A Major Risk Factor for Kidney Disease Diabetes ... of your body. Are there different types of diabetes? The most common ones are Type 1 and ...

  11. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diabetes for the first time when they become pregnant. This is called gestational (jes-Tay-shun-ul) diabetes. Other women have diabetes before they get pregnant. Use these resources to help you talk to ...

  12. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ... Information Safety Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials ...

  13. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... day. FDA has lots of free information to help you manage your diabetes. General Tips Diabetes Treatments ... General Tips Check these resources for tips to help you manage your diabetes. Food Safety for People ...

  14. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Diabetes Movie KidsHealth > For Parents > Diabetes Movie Print A A A Text Size Kids who have diabetes have trouble taking energy from food and delivering ...

  15. Diabetes - foot ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the ulcer area. This will help speed healing. Be sure to wear shoes that do not ... American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical care in diabetes -- 2014. Diabetes Care. 2014;37:S14-S80. PMID: 24357209 www. ...

  16. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information on WebMD Order Free Women's Health Publications Information from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression in Older Women ...

  17. Economic costs of diabetes in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkarim K Alhowaish

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes imposes a large economic burden on the individual, national healthcare systems, and countries. Objective: To determine the economic impact of diabetes mellitus on Saudi healthcare system, both now and in the future. Materials and Methods: This research study uses a prevalence-based approach that combines the demographics of the population (classified by nationality, sex and age group with and without diagnosed diabetes in 1992 and 2010. The economic impact of diabetes is estimated in this study, using secondary sources of information provided by Ministry of Health, Ministry of Finance and Central Department of Statistics and Information databases. Results: People diagnosed with diabetes, on average, have medical healthcare expenditures that are ten times higher ($3,686 vs. $380 than what expenditures would be in the absence of diabetes. Over 96% of all medical healthcare expenditures attributed to diabetes are incurred by persons of Saudi nationality, with the remaining 4% incurred by persons of non-Saudi nationality. The population age 45-60 incurs 45% of diabetes-attributed costs, with the remaining population under age 15 incurs 3.8%, age 15-44 incurs 27.5%, and age 60 and above incurs 23.8%. Conclusion: The actual national healthcare burden because of diabetes is likely to exceed the $0.87 billion estimated in this study, because it omits the indirect costs associated with diabetes, such as absenteeism, lost productivity from disease-related absenteeism, unemployment from disease-related disability, lost productivity due to early mortality by disease. The social cost of intangibles such as pain and suffering and care provided by non-paid caregivers as well as healthcare system administrative costs, cost of medications, clinician training programs, and research and infrastructure development is also omitted from this research study. Further studies are needed to confirm the present findings and to improve our

  18. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes or prediabetes ... can help prevent future health problems. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disorder of metabolismthe way our ...

  19. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920537 The urinary activity of N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase and diabetic nephropa-thy. XU Dashun (徐大顺), et al. Shanghai 1stPeople Hosp, 200085. Shanghai Med J 1992;15(8): 439-442. Urinary activity of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosa-minidase (NAG) and NAG: Creatinine(NAGI)in 24-hour urine and NAG-I in a single random

  20. Thalamic amplification of sensory input in experimental diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Oliver J; Evans, Mathew H; Cooper, Garth J S; Petersen, Rasmus S; Gardiner, Natalie J

    2016-07-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a common, and often debilitating, secondary complication of diabetes mellitus. As pain, hypersensitivity and paraesthesias present in a distal-proximal distribution, symptoms are generally believed to originate from damaged afferents within the peripheral nervous system. Increasing evidence suggests altered processing within the central nervous system in diabetic neuropathy contributes towards somatosensory dysfunction, but whether the accurate coding and relay of peripherally encoded information through the central nervous system is altered in diabetes is not understood. Here, we applied the strengths of the rodent whisker-barrel system to study primary afferent-thalamic processing in diabetic neuropathy. We found that neurons in the thalamic ventral posteromedial nucleus from rats with experimental diabetic neuropathy showed increased firing to precisely graded, multidirectional whisker deflection compared to non-diabetic rats. This thalamic hyperactivity occurred without any overt primary afferent dysfunction, as recordings from the trigeminal ganglion showed these primary afferents to be unaffected by diabetes. These findings suggest that central amplification can substantially transform ascending sensory input in diabetes, even in the absence of a barrage of ectopic primary afferent activity. PMID:27152754

  1. Uric acid as a mediator of diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalal, Diana I; Maahs, David M; Hovind, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in the management of patients with diabetes, diabetic nephropathy (DN) remains the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in the United States and worldwide. Inflammation and endothelial dysfunction appear to play a central role in the onset and the progression of DN. Recent...

  2. Diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is believed that the pancreas is low sensitive to radiation. In this chapter, the effect of radiation on the pancreas is discussed in the light of the radiosensitivity of the pancreas in animal experiments and the occurrence of diabetes mellitus in A-bomb survivors. In an experiment on the whole-body irradiation with 800 rad using rats, a decrease in insulin secretion itself has not been noted, although a decrease in blood insulin and an increase in glucagon were associated with transiently increased blood glucose. In other studies, there was neither histologically nor endocrinologically abnormal findings due to several hundreds rad of radiation in the acute stage. For A-bomb survivors, blood levels of insulin tended to be slightly increased in the 40-59 age group of A-bomb survivors exposed at ≤1.5 km than those exposed at ≥3.0 km; and in the other age groups, there was no tendency for decreased blood levels of insulin. The ABCC-RERF Adult Health Study data (1958-1960) has revealed that there is no statistically significant correlation between the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and A-bomb radiation; nor has this been noted in any other study. Neither the prevalence of diabetes mellitus nor its complications is found to be independent upon distance from the hypocenter. (N.K.)

  3. The renal concentrating mechanism and the clinical consequences of its loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel I Agaba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The integrity of the renal concentrating mechanism is maintained by the anatomical and functional arrangements of the renal transport mechanisms for solute (sodium, potassium, urea, etc and water and by the function of the regulatory hormone for renal concentration, vasopressin. The discovery of aquaporins (water channels in the cell membranes of the renal tubular epithelial cells has elucidated the mechanisms of renal actions of vasopressin. Loss of the concentrating mechanism results in uncontrolled polyuria with low urine osmolality and, if the patient is unable to consume (appropriately large volumes of water, hypernatremia with dire neurological consequences. Loss of concentrating mechanism can be the consequence of defective secretion of vasopressin from the posterior pituitary gland (congenital or acquired central diabetes insipidus or poor response of the target organ to vasopressin (congenital or nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. The differentiation between the three major states producing polyuria with low urine osmolality (central diabetes insipidus, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and primary polydipsia is done by a standardized water deprivation test. Proper diagnosis is essential for the management, which differs between these three conditions.

  4. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For More Information American Diabetes Association JDRF MedlinePlus Diabetes Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients ... 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-onset Diabetes of ...

  5. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and MODY Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and MODY The most common forms of ... is inherited from each parent. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes Some rare forms of diabetes result from mutations ...

  6. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D M; Assendelft, W. J. J.; Valk, G. D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS: Eligible studies were identified by searching The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 1 August 2012); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Librar...

  7. Tips for Teens with Diabetes: About Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes is a serious disease. It means that one's blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Having too much glucose in a person's blood is not healthy. This paper offers tips for managing diabetes.

  8. Year in Diabetes 2012: The Diabetes Tsunami

    OpenAIRE

    Sherwin, R; Jastreboff, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 300 million individuals globally, contributing to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. As the incidence and prevalence of diabetes continue to escalate with the force of an approaching tsunami, it is imperative that we better define the biological mechanisms causing both obesity and diabetes and identify optimal prevention and treatment strategies that will enable a healthier environment and calmer waters. New guidelines from the American Diabetes Associat...

  9. Diabetes mellitus.

    OpenAIRE

    Hurwitz, B; Yudkin, J.

    1992-01-01

    1. Diabetes mellitus is diagnosed by finding a random plasma glucose > 11 mmol/L, or a fasting plasma glucose > 8 mmol/L. The prevalence in the general population is between 1-2% rising to approximately 4-9% in the age group 65+ (Williams, 1985; Croxson et al., 1991). It is more prevalent in people from the Indian subcontinent and in Afro-Caribbeans. 2. Approximately 75% of patients can be treated without recourse to insulin. The development of non-fasting ketonuria and/or significant weight ...

  10. The relationship of depression and diabetes: pathophysiological and treatment implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, James K; Musselman, Dominique L; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2011-10-01

    Diabetes is a highly prevalent, chronic disease that requires ongoing, multi-specialty medical care combined with patient self-management, family support, and education to prevent or delay end-organ morbidity and mortality. There is clearly an increased prevalence of major depressive disorder, a relatively common and costly central nervous system syndrome, in diabetic patients. During the past two decades, multiple studies reveal that not only are depressive symptoms a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes, but they have also been shown to contribute to hyperglycemia, diabetic complications, functional disability and all-cause mortality among diabetic patients. This article reviews studies examining the relationship between depression and diabetes, neurochemical underpinnings of the two disorders, and the diagnosis and treatment of depression associated with diabetes. We examine the validity of rating scales used to diagnose depression in diabetic patients and review the literature on psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic management for these patients. The challenges of optimal depression screening and treatment in primary care settings of diabetic patients are currently under close scrutiny, especially regarding their potential impact related to improvements in diabetes-related outcomes and decreased health care costs, be it "depression" or "diabetes" relevant. Much of the current literature regarding the intertwined nature of diabetes and depression is cross-sectional in nature. Future research should focus on longitudinal, prospective studies to determine causal factors. What is clear from the research reviewed in this article is that depression and diabetes should be treated together rather than as isolated diseases. The mind/body dualism is a false dichotomy and a truly team-based approach is necessary to address both issues of depression and diabetes. Collaborative care and the "patient-centered medical home" have emerged as potentially

  11. Peripheral Artery Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Risk for Diabetes Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring of Diabetes Prevention & Treatment of Diabetes Diabetes Tools & Resources Heart Attack About ... Your Risk for Diabetes • Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring of Diabetes • Prevention & Treatment • Diabetes Tools & Resources Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood ...

  12. Diabetic Wound Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RSS Home » Learn About Feet » Foot Health Information Diabetic Wound Care What is a Diabetic Foot Ulcer? A diabetic foot ulcer is an open sore or wound ... key factors in the appropriate treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer: Prevention of infection Taking the pressure ...

  13. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resources to help you talk with your health care provider about your diabetes treatment. Diabetes Medicines - easy-to-read booklet for women ... resources to help you talk to your health care provider about how to manage diabetes ... can help doctors learn more about treatments for diabetes. The FDA Office of Women's Health ...

  14. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Information on WebMD Order Free Women's Health Publications Information from Other Government Agencies and Offices National ... YourDiabetesInfo.org American Diabetes Association Get Other FDA Publications for Women For Women Homepage FDA Diabetes Information ...

  15. Genes and diabetic retinopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Radha Venkatesan; Rema Mohan; Mohan Viswanathan

    2002-01-01

    Several recent studies have provided evidence that good diabetes control is important to prevent diabetic retinopathy. However, some groups of patients develop diabetic retinopathy despite good control and others escape retinopathy despite poor control. This suggests the role of genetic factors in susceptibility to retinopathy. This article reviews the role of genetic factors in determining diabetic retinopathy.

  16. Somatotype in elderly type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffa, Roberto; Floris, Giovanni; Putzu, Paolo F; Carboni, Luciano; Marini, Elisabetta

    2007-09-01

    Somatotyping is a practical technique for the description of physique. Individuals with Type 2 diabetes are characterized by physical peculiarities, such as overweight, obesity and a central pattern of body fat distribution. Somatotype applications to diabetes are limited. The objective of this study is to describe the somatotype of elderly type 2 diabetes patients. The sample consisted of 110 patients with type 2 diabetes (45 men, mean age 69.4 +/- 7.0 years; 65 women, mean age 72.9 +/- 7.1 years). The pathological subjects were compared with a control group consisting of 280 healthy individuals (134 men, mean age 74.2 +/- 7.3 years; 146 women, mean age 74.9 +/- 7.4 years). The Heath-Carter somatotype was applied. Diabetic men and women (mean somatotype, respectively: 6.8-5.6-0.6 and 8.6-6.4-0.2) presented significantly higher values of endomorphy than the controls (p = 0.043 in men, p = 0.003 in women); men also had a lower mesomorphic component (p = 0.000). The somatotype method revealed physical peculiarities in type 2 diabetes patients. The marked endomorphy in the pathological individuals can be related to general fatness, which is a well known disease risk factor. The somatotype appears to be a suitable technique for the assessment of physique in type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:18041381

  17. Genomet og diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine Højgaard; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf Borbye

    2014-01-01

    In terms of their genetic architecture monogenic diabetes and type 2 diabetes represent two extremes. Whereas each subtype of monogenic diabetes is caused by one penetrant, rare mutation in a single gene, the genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes can be attributed to many low-penetrant variants...... across the genome. At present, only 10% of the genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes can be explained by the hitherto identified 90 genomic loci. Here we briefly review the genetics of monogenic diabetes and type 2 diabetes and outline future directions of research within this field....

  18. Management of diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saxena Sandeep

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy remains a major cause of blindness despite increased understanding of this disease and identification of successful treatments. The Diabetic Retinopathy Study identified risk factors associated with a high risk of blindness and confirmed the benefits of panretinal photocoagulation. The Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study defined the retinal characteristics, indications of treatment and results of laser treatment of clinically significant macular oedema. The Diabetic Retinopathy Vitrectomy study established the benefits and timing of vitrectomy for non-clearing vitreous haemorrhage and severe proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial and the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study have also demonstrated the value of tight control of blood sugar and blood pressure in diabetic retinopathy. These studies developed specific recommendations for the management of diabetic retinopathy. Optimum use of this information can minimize visual loss due to diabetic retinopathy.

  19. Awareness of diabetic retinopathy amongst diabetic patients at the murtala mohammed hospital, Kano, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:Blindness from diabetic retinopathy is a preventable complication of diabetes if the retinopathy is detected early. Among other approaches, strong awareness of retinopathy by diabetic patients could help in the early detection, management and prevention of this complication. This study sets out to determine the general awareness of diabetic retinopathy amongst diabetic patients attending the outpatient diabetes clinic of the Murtala Muhammad hospital, Kano. This is the central reference general hospital within the ancient and historic walls of the traditional city of Kano. The hospital has an eye unit but with a paucity of manpower and equipment. Most diabetic patients often on self-referral usually present to the eye clinic only when they experience a marked reduction in vision. In the case of diabetic retinopathy, this is unfortunately late for any meaningful intervention. Although primary diabetic caregivers are usually aware of the possibility of eye complications from diabetes, they tend to wait until patients make visual complaints before screening them or inviting eye care personnel to join in the management. Diabetic retinopathy screening protocols are in most cases either not available, or not strictly followed. Patient awareness of diabetic retinopathy and its associated risk factors should aid compliance with risk control measures, and help drive patient demand for retinopathy screening. Method:This is a cross sectional study conducted using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. All consenting adult patients seen at the diabetes clinic over a one-month period were recruited for the study. Results:A total of 185 patients were involved with a mean age of 55.4 years. The majority of the patients (78.4% had no formal western education and were mainly traders, farmers or housewives. 84.3% of the patients were generally aware of diabetic retinopathy with their main source of information being hospital staff and fellow

  20. Peripheral blood flow control in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, Jannik

    1991-01-01

    Long term diabetes has a profound effect on the peripheral circulation. This has been demonstrated to be due to the presence of angiopathy and autonomic neuropathy, affecting autoregulation and distensibility of the vessels as well as local and central reflex regulation of the vascular resistance...

  1. Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Tuğrul, Armağan

    2002-01-01

    Hypertension is a major worldwide health problem. Its prevalence is 1.5-2 times higher in diabetic population than that in non-diabetic individuals. Its pathogenesis depends on diabetic nephropathy in type 1, whereas may be multifactorial in type 2 diabetes mellitus. In diabetics, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors are most widely preferred in the treatment of hypertension because of their numerous desirable effects. In this article, the most recent data are presented on the relationshi...

  2. Diabetes in African Americans

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, M.

    2005-01-01

    African Americans have a high risk for type 2 diabetes. Genetic traits, the prevalence of obesity, and insulin resistance all contribute to the risk of diabetes in the African American community. African Americans have a high rate of diabetic complications, because of poor glycaemic control and racial disparities in health care in the USA. African Americans with diabetes may have an atypical presentation that simulates type 1 diabetes, but then their subsequent clinical course is typical of t...

  3. Diabetes and pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    MUNIRAJ, T.; Chari, S.T.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is complex. Diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance is present in more than 2/3rd of pancreatic cancer patients. Epidemiological studies have consistently shown a modest increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer in type 2 diabetes, with an inverse relationship to duration of disease. Additionally, recent studies suggest that anti-diabetic medications may modulate the risk of pancreatic cancer in type 2 diabetes. Subjects >50 years of age ...

  4. Diabetic cardiomyopathy in Zucker diabetic fatty rats: the forgotten right ventricle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubberink Mark

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with myocardial infarction or heart failure, right ventricular (RV dysfunction is associated with death, shock and arrhythmias. In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, structural and functional alterations of the left ventricle (LV are highly prevalent, however, little is known about the impact of diabetes on RV characteristics. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether LV changes are paralleled by RV alterations in a rat model of diabetes. Methods Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF and control (ZL rats underwent echocardiography and positron emission tomography (PET scanning using [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose under hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp conditions. Glucose, insulin, triglycerides and fatty acids were assessed from trunk blood. Another group of rats received an insulin or saline injection to study RV insulin signaling. Results ZDF rats developed hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia and dyslipidaemia (all p M-value (r = 0.91, p M-value (r = 0.77, p Conclusions LV changes were paralleled by RV alterations in insulin-stimulated glucose utilisation and RV systolic function in a rat model of diabetes, which may be attributed to ventricular interdependence as well as to the uniform effect of diabetes. Since diabetic patients are prone to develop diabetic cardiomyopathy and myocardial ischaemia, it might be suggested that RV dysfunction plays a central role in cardiac abnormalities in this population.

  5. Diabetes management in OLDES project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, D; Uller, M; Rousseaux, S; Mraz, M; Smrz, J; Stepankova, O; Haluzik, M; Busuoli, M

    2009-01-01

    EU project OLDES (Older People's e-services at home) develops easy to use and low cost ICT platform in order to offer a better quality of life to elderly people directly in their homes through innovative systems of tele-accompany, tele-assistance and tele-medicine. The elderly are able to access the services and send relevant medical data from their home by being connected to the central server via a low cost PC which is based on Negroponte paradigm. The OLDES platform interface uses television screens controlled through a remote control customized for the elderly. The feasibility of OLDES project is evaluated by the pilot study concentrating on compensation of diabetic patients. Compensation of diabetes is achieved by monitoring glucose glycemia level, blood pressure and weight. Moreover, the patient feeds into OLDES system daily consumption of food using interactive food scales and obtains advice if necessary. PMID:19965284

  6. [Diabetic eye disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, José; Vaz-Pereira, Sara; Nascimento, João; Rosa, Paulo Caldeira

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease characterized by sustained hyperglycemia leading to macro and microvascular complications. The eye is one of the main organs affected by this disease, being diabetic retinopathy the most well-known microvascular complication and the leading cause of blindness in the working age population. However, diabetic ocular disease is not only characterized by diabetic retinopathy. Other important ocular manifestations of diabetes mellitus include cataract, glaucoma, ischemic optic neuropathy, cranial nerve palsies and recurrent corneal erosion syndrome. Here, we emphasize diabetic retinopathy as the most important and characteristic complication of diabetes mellitus, but also review less well-known complications with the aim to alert and sensitize non-ophthalmologist clinicians that treat diabetic individuals, in order to promote an early diagnosis and treatment of the sight-threatening complications of diabetes. PMID:25817504

  7. Flaxseed and Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Kailash; Dhar, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Flaxseed contains 32% to 45% of its mass as oil of which 51% to 55% is α-linolenic acid. Flax lignan complex and secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) have been isolated from flaxseed. Flaxseed and its components have antioxidant, hypolipidemic and hypoglycemic effects. These are mostly due to the SDG content. Oxidative stress has been implicated in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Flaxseed, flaxseed oil and flax lignan complex have not been investigated as to whether they reduce the incidence of diabetes and/or delay the development of diabetes. However, their effects on serum glucose have been studied. Flaxseed and flax lignan complex improve glycemic control. Animal models of type I diabetes involving streptozotocin administration or utilizing Bio-Breed diabetic (BBdp) prone rats are associated with oxidative stress. SDG treatment reduced the incidence of diabetes using serum glucose levels by 75% in the streptozotocin model of diabetes and by 72% in the BBdp rat model of diabetes. These reductions in development of diabetes were associated with decreases in oxidative stress measured by serum and pancreatic malondialdehyde (MDA). SDG delays the development of diabetes in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat model of type 2 diabetes and this effect was associated with a reduction in serum MDA and glycated haemoglobin A1C. The data suggest that SDG may have a great potential for reducing the incidence of type 1 diabetes and delaying the development of type 2 diabetes in humans. PMID:26561065

  8. "Control Your Diabetes. For Life."

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Control Your Diabetes. For Life." Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents For information about "Control Your Diabetes. For Life" campaign, visit www.YourDiabetesInfo.org or call toll- ...

  9. "Control Your Diabetes. For Life."

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Control Your Diabetes. For Life." Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents For information about "Control Your Diabetes. For Life" campaign, visit www.YourDiabetesInfo. ...

  10. Diabetes Resources for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Follow Us Health Information > Health Communication Programs > National Diabetes Education Program > Living With Diabetes > Diabetes in Older Adults | ... it's more common in older adults. The National Diabetes Education Program offers access to a range of resources ...

  11. How to Treat Gestational Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Listen En Español How to Treat Gestational Diabetes Be sure to see the latest Diabetes Forecast ... and a healthy start for your baby. Gestational Diabetes – Looking Ahead Gestational diabetes usually goes away after ...

  12. Diabetes: What's True and False?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Diabetes: What's True and False? KidsHealth > For Teens > Diabetes: ... which are false. Eating too much sugar causes diabetes. False: Type 1 diabetes happens when the cells ...

  13. Diagnosis of Diabetes and Prediabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medicines Questions to Ask about Your Diabetes Medicines Diabetes Diet and Eating Carbohydrate Counting and Diabetes Diabetes and ... at NIDDK Meetings & Events Technology Transfer Health Information ... Diseases Diet & Nutrition Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información de ...

  14. Diabetes: What's True and False?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Diabetes: What's True and False? KidsHealth > For Kids > Diabetes: ... True or False: Eating Too Much Sugar Causes Diabetes False: When kids get type 1 diabetes , it's ...

  15. Snacking when you have diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood sugar. This will be based on your: Diabetes treatment plan from your provider Expected physical activity Lifestyle ... a position statement of the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes ... recommendations for the management of adults with diabetes. ...

  16. Diabetes Monitoring System Using Mobile Computing Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashael Saud Bin-Sabbar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic disease that needs to regularly be monitored to keep the blood sugar levels within normal ranges. This monitoring depends on the diabetic treatment plan that is periodically reviewed by the endocrinologist. The frequent visit to the main hospital seems to be tiring and time consuming for both endocrinologist and diabetes patients. The patient may have to travel to the main city, paying a ticket and reserving a place to stay. Those expenses can be reduced by remotely monitoring the diabetes patients with the help of mobile devices. In this paper, we introduce our implementation of an integrated monitoring tool for the diabetes patients. The designed system provides a daily monitoring and monthly services. The daily monitoring includes recording the result of daily analysis and activates to be transmitted from a patient’s mobile device to a central database. The monthly services require the patient to visit a nearby care center in the patient home town to do the medical examination and checkups. The result of this visit entered into the system and then synchronized with the central database. Finally, the endocrinologist can remotely monitor the patient record and adjust the treatment plan and the insulin doses if need.

  17. Delaying or Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Diabetes Statistics Delaying or Preventing Type 2 Diabetes What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset diabetes, ... for some, taking aspirin daily. Can type 2 diabetes be delayed or prevented? Yes. The results of ...

  18. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Depression in Older Women More in Women's Health Topics Mammography Women and Diabetes HPV, HIV, Birth Control ...

  19. Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Boykin has diabetes. She has suffered from heart disease and required bypass surgery because she was unaware of the link between diabetes and heart disease. Judith Fradkin, M.D.: What most people don' ...

  20. Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... among people with diabetes. Judith Fradkin, M.D.: We call this approach "the ABCs of diabetes." A ... the importance of all three of these and we know that controlling the three can dramatically reduce ...

  1. Native Americans and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mortality rates of people without diabetes. And what we've seen in the Pima population over -- even ... in here, Ramona. Ramona: Okay. Lona Brown: Now we're going to be doing a diabetic foot ...

  2. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diabetes medicines or insulin to help keep their blood sugar at a healthy level. What you need depends on your health and the type of diabetes you have. Use these resources to ...

  3. Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sharon Boykin has diabetes. She has suffered from heart disease and required bypass surgery because she was unaware of the link between diabetes and heart disease. Judith Fradkin, M.D.: What most people don' ...

  4. Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Sharon Boykin: From the side effects of the diabetes I've had five strokes. I've had ... to correct it all. Announcer: Sharon Boykin has diabetes. She has suffered from heart disease and required ...

  5. Diabetes Health Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor  What you need to know about diabetic retinopathy From Medline Plus  Interactive tutorial on eye disease, diabetes, retinopathy prevention and treatment Foot Problems From the CDC  Take ...

  6. Adrenomedullin and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hoi Kin; Tang, Fai; Cheung, Tsang Tommy; Cheung, Bernard Man Yung

    2014-06-15

    Adrenomedullin (ADM) is a peptide hormone widely expressed in different tissues, especially in the vasculature. Apart from its vasodilatatory and hypotensive effect, it plays multiple roles in the regulation of hormonal secretion, glucose metabolism and inflammatory response. ADM regulates insulin balance and may participate in the development of diabetes. The plasma level of ADM is increased in people with diabetes, while in healthy individuals the plasma ADM concentration remains low. Plasma ADM levels are further increased in patients with diabetic complications. In type 1 diabetes, plasma ADM level is correlated with renal failure and retinopathy, while in type 2 diabetes its level is linked with a wider range of complications. The elevation of ADM level in diabetes may be due to hyperinsulinemia, oxidative stress and endothelial injury. At the same time, a rise in plasma ADM level can trigger the onset of diabetes. Strategies to reduce ADM level should be explored so as to reduce diabetic complications. PMID:24936257

  7. Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... effects of the diabetes I've had five strokes. I've had eight stents put into my ... cholesterol are critical in preventing heart disease and stroke among people with diabetes. Judith Fradkin, M.D.: ...

  8. Native Americans and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and grandmother in developing diabetes. Lona Brown: From what I knew when I was younger, you get ... The odds are stacked against them. Much of what the world now knows about Type II diabetes ...

  9. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & ... diabetes medicines. Veal el video en espanol . Get tips on testing your blood sugar. There is good news. Diabetes ...

  10. MedlinePlus: Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney Problems Diabetic Nerve Problems Hyperglycemia Hypoglycemia Islet Cell Transplantation Pancreas Transplantation Prediabetes National Institutes of Health The primary NIH organization for research on Diabetes is the National Institute ...

  11. Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000304.htm Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS) is a complication of ...

  12. Diabetic Eye Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... damage your eyes. The most common problem is diabetic retinopathy. It is a leading cause of blindness ... You need a healthy retina to see clearly. Diabetic retinopathy damages the tiny blood vessels inside your ...

  13. Native Americans and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lona Brown: Do you want another pickle? Child: I got a big pickle! Announcer: The 48-year- ... grandmother in developing diabetes. Lona Brown: From what I knew when I was younger, you get diabetes, ...

  14. Glycemic Index and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A Listen En Español Glycemic Index and Diabetes The glycemic index, or GI, measures how a ... 08-book-sabores-de-cuba.html More from diabetes.org Shopdiabetes.org: Take the Guesswork out of ...

  15. Tight Diabetes Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Tight Diabetes Control Keeping your blood glucose levels as close ... and syringes, than before. What About Type 2 Diabetes? The DCCT studied only people with type 1 ...

  16. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients & Families Consortia, Networks & Centers Reports & Planning Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) Page Content On this page: DPP ... to Remember Hope through Research Availability The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) was a major multicenter clinical research ...

  17. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... video en espanol . Get tips on testing your blood sugar. There is good news. Diabetes can be controlled ... diabetes medicines or insulin to help keep their blood sugar at a healthy level. What you need depends ...

  18. Diabetes and Dietary Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Diabetes and Dietary Supplements: In Depth Share: On This ... health product or practice. Are dietary supplements for diabetes safe? Some dietary supplements may have side effects, ...

  19. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... million people in the United States. Watch and learn helpful tips about managing your diabetes medicines. Veal ... Sign-up for a study to help doctors learn more about how diabetes medicines affect women during ...

  20. Native Americans and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... children have inherited genes from the three highest-risk groups for developing diabetes. The odds are stacked against them. Much of what the world now knows about Type II diabetes is a result of work carried ...

  1. Tuberculosis and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... immune systems, such as people living with HIV, malnutrition or diabetes, or people who use tobacco, have ... was the direct cause of 1.5 million deaths.  WHO projects that diabetes will be the 7th ...

  2. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... women Other FDA Information on Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people ... back to top Popular Content Home Latest Recalls Report an Adverse Event MedWatch Safety Alerts News Releases ...

  3. Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out what I needed to do to correct it all. Announcer: Sharon Boykin has diabetes. She has ... the proportion of people with diabetes and though it seems simple, it's amazing how few people with ...

  4. Diabetes and Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or low blood glucose. You can manage your diabetes with diet, exercise, and medicines (if needed). Questions to ask your doctor • What type of diabetes do I have? • What kind of medicine do ...

  5. Diabetes: Dealing With Feelings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Diabetes: Dealing With Feelings KidsHealth > For Teens > Diabetes: Dealing With Feelings Print ... bad to deserve this." continue Dealing With Your Feelings Here are a few things you can do ...

  6. Themenheft 24 "Diabetes mellitus"

    OpenAIRE

    Icks, Andrea; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rosenbauer, Joachim; Giani, Guido

    2005-01-01

    Bei etwa 5 % der Bevölkerung in Deutschland ist ein Diabetes mellitus, die sog. Zuckerkrankheit, diagnostiziert worden, rund 90 % davon haben einen Typ 2-Diabetes, der vorwiegend im höheren Lebensalter auftritt. 5 % der Diabeteskranken leiden am insulinpflichtigen Typ 1-Diabetes, der sich vorwiegend im Kindes- und Jugendalter manifestiert. Weitere Diabetesformen sind eher selten. Außerdem gibt es viele Menschen mit einem unentdeckten Diabetes.

  7. Diabetes in Navajo Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Dabelea, Dana; DeGroat, Joquetta; Sorrelman, Carmelita; Glass, Martia; Percy, Christopher A.; Avery, Charlene; Hu, Diana; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Beyer, Jennifer; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Testaverde, Lisa; Klingensmith, Georgeanna; Hamman, Richard F.; ,

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To estimate the prevalence and incidence of diabetes, clinical characteristics, and risk factors for chronic complications among Navajo youth, using data collected by the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study (SEARCH study). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—The SEARCH study identified all prevalent cases of diabetes in 2001 and all incident cases in 2002–2005 among Navajo youth. We estimated denominators with the user population for eligible health care facilities. Youth with diabetes also ...

  8. Burns in diabetic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Maghsoudi, Hemmat; Aghamohammadzadeh, Naser; Khalili, Nasim

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT AND AIMS: Diabetic burn patients comprise a significant population in burn centers. The purpose of this study was to determine the demographic characteristics of diabetic burn patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective data were collected on 94 diabetic burn patients between March 20, 2000 and March 20, 2006. Of 3062 burns patients, 94 (3.1%) had diabetes; these patients were compared with 2968 nondiabetic patients with burns. Statistical analysis was performed using the statistical...

  9. Obesity and Diabetes:

    OpenAIRE

    Diamant, Allison L.; Babey, Susan H.; Wolstein, Joelle; Jones, Malia

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of both diabetes and obesity has grown significantly in California. Six million adults are obese and an additional 9.3 million are overweight. Obesity is a significant risk factor for diabetes; more than two million adults have been diagnosed with diabetes in California. Obesity and diabetes disproportionately affect people of color, the poor and those with the least education in California. Policy and environmental changes that promote and encourage physical activity and healt...

  10. Diabetes mellitus and pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Abourawi, Fathi I

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common medical complication of pregnancy and it carries a significant risk to the foetus and the mother. Congenital malformations and perinatal morbidity remain common compared with the offspring of non diabetic pregnancies. Diabetic mothers are at risk of progression of microvascular diabetic complications as well as early pregnancy loss, pre-eclampsia, polyhydramnios and premature labour. Glycaemic control before and during pregnancy is critical and the benefit...

  11. Cancer biology in diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Shi; He, Yanzheng; Koya, Daisuke; Kanasaki, Keizo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Diabetes is a serious metabolic disease that causes multiple organ dysfunctions. Recent evidence suggests that diabetes could contribute to the initiation and progression of certain cancers in addition to the classic diabetic complications. Furthermore, some of the drugs used clinically to treat patients with diabetes might affect cancer initiation, progression and mortality. The recent discovery of the possible anticancer effects of metformin, a classic antidiabetic drug, has led ph...

  12. Diabetic Retinopathy Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sivakumar, R.; Ravindran, G.; Muthayya, M.; Lakshminarayanan, S.; Velmurughendran, C. U.

    2005-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the common complications of diabetes. Unfortunately, in many cases the patient is not aware of any symptoms until it is too late for effective treatment. Through analysis of evoked potential response of the retina, the optical nerve, and the optical brain center, a way will be paved for early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy and prognosis during the treatment process. In this paper, we present an artificial-neural-network-based method to classify diabetic retin...

  13. Diabetic retinopathy analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sivakumar, R.; Muthayya, M.; Lakshminarayanan, S.; Velmurughendran, C. U.

    2003-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the common complications of diabetes. Unfortunately, in many cases the patient is not aware any symptom until it is too late for effective treatment. Through analysis of evoked potential response of the optical nerve and optical brain centre will pave a way for early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy and prognosis during the treatment process. In this paper, we present a method to classify diabetic retinopathy subjects from changes in visual evoked potential spe...

  14. Diabetes, Type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Riazi, Afsane; Bradley, Clare

    2007-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the role of psychological stress in Type 1 diabetes. Studies relating to stress and Type 1 diabetes onset and control, as well as the evidence relating to stress management training in people with Type 1 diabetes are discussed.

  15. Weight and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... influence diabetes, and diabetes can influence weight. This relationship may be ... 1 diabetes, the body can't use glucose (pronounced: GLOO-kose) properly ...

  16. Diabetes Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults ...

  17. Diabetes Type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not ... You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, obese, have a family ...

  18. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health for Women Pregnancy Menopause More Women's Health Topics Resources for You YourDiabetesInfo.org American Diabetes Association Get Other FDA Publications for Women For Women Homepage FDA Diabetes Information for Patients Page Last Updated: 04/07/2016 Note: If you ...

  19. Glukagonomsyndrom uden diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Carsten Sauer; Mikkelsen, Dorthe Bisgaard; Vestergaard, Vibeke;

    2008-01-01

    without diabetes. Glucagonoma syndrome is characterized by glucagon overproduction, diabetes, depression, deep venous thrombosis and necrolytic migrating erythema. Glucagonoma is frequently diagnosed late which increases the risk of metastases. It is important not to rule out glucagonoma in patients...... with a relevant clinical picture but without diabetes. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Nov-17...

  20. Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cardiovascular disease and other complications of diabetes. Announcer: Diabetes is most common in adults over age 40 but many of them don't realize what they can do to prevent two of the disease's most serious ... of people with diabetes and though it seems simple, it's amazing how ...

  1. DIABETES PREVENTION PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) was a major clinical trial, or research study, aimed at discovering whether either diet and exercise or the oral diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage) could prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in people with impaired glucose toleranc...

  2. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression in Older Women More in Women's Health Topics Mammography Women and Diabetes HPV, HIV, Birth Control Heart Health for Women Pregnancy Menopause More Women's Health Topics Resources for You ...

  3. Diabetic retinopathy (treatment)

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Quresh Amir; Ross, Adam; Chu, Colin Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of blindness in the UK, with older people and those with worse diabetes control, hypertension, and hyperlipidaemia most at risk. Diabetic retinopathy can cause microaneurysms, haemorrhages, exudates, changes to blood vessels, and retinal thickening.

  4. N-acetylcysteine and allopurinol synergistically enhance cardiac adiponectin content and reduce myocardial reperfusion injury in diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Tingting Wang; Shigang Qiao; Shaoqing Lei; Yanan Liu; Kwok F J Ng; Aimin Xu; Karen S L Lam; Irwin, Michael G; Zhengyuan Xia

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress plays a central role in the development of diabetic myocardial complications. Adiponectin (APN), an adipokine with anti-diabetic and anti-ischemic effects, is decreased in diabetes. It is unknown whether or not antioxidant treatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and/or allopurinol (ALP) can attenuate APN deficiency and myocardial ischemia reperfusion (MI/R) injury in the early stage of diabetes. Methodology/Principal Findings: Control or strept...

  5. Update on Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Murray Korc

    2004-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a complex multi-system disorder that may be classified as autoimmune mediated type 1 diabetes, or as insulin resistance associated type 2 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, there is selective loss of the beta cells within the endocrine islets, as a consequence of T-cell and cytokine mediated destruction of these cells, perhaps in conjunction with destruction of the peri-islet Schwann cells. In type 2 diabetes, the etiology of the resistance ranges from post-receptor defects in...

  6. Diabetes, Dementia and Hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneilly, Graydon S; Tessier, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    We are experiencing an epidemic of both diabetes and dementia among older adults in this country. The risk for dementia appears to be increased in patients with diabetes, and patients with dementia and diabetes appear to be at greater risk for severe hypoglycemia. In addition, there may be an increased risk for developing dementia by older patients with diabetes who have had episodes of severe hypoglycemia, although this issue is controversial. In this article, we review the factors that contribute to the increased risk for dementia in older adults with diabetes and outline the complex relationships between hypoglycemia and dementia. PMID:26778684

  7. Europa central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel BARTOSEK

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available La investigación francesa continúa interesándose por Europa Central. Desde luego, hay límites a este interés en el ambiente general de mi nueva patria: en la ignorancia, producto del largo desinterés de Francia por este espacio después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, y en el comportamiento y la reflexión de la clase política y de los medios de comunicación (una anécdota para ilustrar este ambiente: durante la preparación de nuestro coloquio «Refugiados e inmigrantes de Europa Central en el movimiento antifascista y la Resistencia en Francia, 1933-1945», celebrado en París en octubre de 1986, el problema de la definición fue planteado concreta y «prácticamente». ¡Y hubo entonces un historiador eminente, para quién Alemania no formaría parte de Europa Central!.

  8. Fenofibrate and Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knickelbein, Jared E; Abbott, Akshar B; Chew, Emily Y

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a common and sight-threatening microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus, is a leading cause of blindness among working-aged adults. Medical therapies including intensive control of hyperglycemia and hypertension have been shown to reduce the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy. The association of dyslipidemia and treatment with statins with diabetic retinopathy is inconsistent in epidemiologic studies. However, two recent randomized clinical trials have demonstrated beneficial effects of systemic fenofibrate therapy in reducing the progression of diabetic retinopathy independently of serum lipid levels. These findings suggest that fenofibrate may be an effective strategy for reducing the progression of diabetic retinopathy, thus reducing the large and growing public health burden of treating the sight-threatening complications of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27525681

  9. Diabetes and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Ruderman, N B; Schneider, S H

    1981-01-01

    This review describes (1) the metabolic and hormonal response to exercise in normal and diabetic man, and (2) the potential benefits of physical training in diabetes. Whereas in normal man plasma glucose varies little during exercise, the insulin-dependent diabetic subject may experience...... its site of injection. The response to exercise of noninsulin-dependent diabetic subjects and of diabetic subjects with autonomic neuropathy is also described. Physical training improves glucose tolerance in some noninsulin-dependent diabetic subjects and in insulin-dependent patients, it may diminish...... insulin requirements. It may also have a role in retarding the development of cardiovascular complications. Physical training is not totally innocuous, however, and in many patients with diabetes special precautions are required....

  10. CERN diabetes awareness days

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Do you have diabetes without knowing it? The Medical Service invites everyone working at CERN to participate in the above PREVENTION and DETECTION campaign on the: 8 and 9 November 2004 from 9 am to 4 pm at the infirmary, bldg. 57, ground floor Personal evaluation of diabetes risks, (blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels, Body Mass Index measurements and more...) will be offered as well as leaflets, information and advice, (diet, exercise). A dietician specialised in diabetes will be on hand from 2 pm until 4 pm. Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in many countries due to an increase in obesity, sedentary lifestyles and poor diet. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, cardio-vascular and kidney disease. An estimated 30-50% of these cases of diabetes go undetected, despite de fact that easy and efficient prevention exists. Diabetes discovered and treated early is not a severe condition but untreated and ignored it can have dire consequences.

  11. Egenvård hos personer med typ 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Holmberg, Carina

    2012-01-01

    Bakgrund: Våra levnadsvanor har en central roll vid uppkomsten och utvecklandet av diabetes. Det primära vid vård av personer med typ 2 diabetes är att stödja egenvården. Målet med behandling av diabetes är att behålla en god livskvalitet samt förhindra komplikationer orsakade av sjukdomen. Syfte: Syftet var att undersöka den egenvård som personer med typ 2 diabetes utför. Metod: En kvalitativ intervjustudie med semistrukturerade frågor användes. Tio personer med typ 2 diabetes intervjuades....

  12. The epidemiology and molecular mechanisms linking obesity, diabetes, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Rosalyn D; Gallagher, Emily J; Scheinman, Eyal J; Damouni, Rawan; LeRoith, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of obesity is associated with increasing rates of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Epidemiological studies have reported that these conditions are linked to increased rates of cancer incidence and mortality. Obesity, particularly abdominal obesity, is associated with insulin resistance and the development of dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and ultimately type 2 diabetes. Although many metabolic abnormalities occur with obesity and type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia appear to be central to these conditions and may contribute to dyslipidemia and altered levels of circulating estrogens and androgens. In this review, we will discuss the epidemiological and molecular links between obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cancer, and how hyperinsulinemia and dyslipidemia may contribute to cancer development. We will discuss how these metabolic abnormalities may interact with estrogen signaling in breast cancer growth. Finally, we will discuss the effects of type 2 diabetes medications on cancer risk. PMID:23810003

  13. Diabetic Kidney Disease (Diabetic Nephropathy) (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SP, et al. Diabetic nephropathy: diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. Diabetes Care 2005; 28:164. Writing Team for the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and ... of intensive treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus on development and ...

  14. Charcot foot in diabetes and an update on imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ergen, Fatma Bilge; Sanverdi, Saziye Eser; Oznur, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus that can cause major morbidity including limb amputation. Since it was first described in 1883, and attributed to diabetes mellitus in 1936, the diagnosis of CN has been very challenging even for the experienced practitioners. Imaging plays a central role in the early and accurate diagnosis of CN, and in distinction of CN from osteomyelitis. Conventional radiography, computed tomography, nuclear medicine scintigraphy...

  15. Optimization of ingredients for formulating a diabetic dietary supplement

    OpenAIRE

    Pawar, Kanika; Thompkinson, D. K.

    2011-01-01

    A diabetic dietary supplement comprising of multiple ingredients was designed based on recommendation of Indian Council of Medical Research for a diabetic adult. Central composite rotatable design using three variables (ingredient source) and five responses comprising of sensory and physico-chemical attributes were used for computation of an optimized solution. All the responses fitted well into quadratic equation with R2 > 0.80. The optimum levels of ingredient combinations recommended with ...

  16. Mechanistic Insights Into Diabetes Mellitus and Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Maiese, Kenneth; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Shang, Yan Chen

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a significant healthcare concern worldwide that affects more than 165 million individuals leading to cardiovascular disease, nephropathy, retinopathy, and widespread disease of both the peripheral and central nervous systems. The incidence of undiagnosed diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and impaired fasting glucose levels raises future concerns in regards to the financial and patient care resources that will be necessary to care for patients with DM. Interesting...

  17. Brain changes in diabetes mellitus patients with gastrointestinal symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Drewes, Anne M; Søfteland, Eirik; Dimcevski, Georg; Farmer, Adam D; Brock, Christina; Jens B. Frøkjær; Krogh, Klaus; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common disease and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. In various studies up to 30%-70% of patients present dysfunction and complications related to the gut. To date several clinical studies have demonstrated that autonomic nervous system neuropathy and generalized neuropathy of the central nervous system (CNS) may play a major role. This systematic review provides an overview of the neurodegenerative changes that occur as a consequence of diabetes with a focus on t...

  18. Psychological aspects of diabetes care: Effecting behavioral change in patients

    OpenAIRE

    Chew, Boon-How; Shariff-Ghazali, Sazlina; Fernandez, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) need psychological support throughout their life span from the time of diagnosis. The psychological make-up of the patients with DM play a central role in self-management behaviors. Without patient’s adherence to the effective therapies, there would be persistent sub-optimal control of diseases, increase diabetes-related complications, causing deterioration in quality of life, resulting in increased healthcare utilization and burden on healthcare systems. ...

  19. Usefulness of electronic databases for the detection of unrecognized diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhayany Asher

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Even mild hyperglycemia is associated with future acute and chronic complications. Nevertheless, many cases of diabetes in the community go unrecognized. The aim of the study was to determine if national electronic patient records could be used to identify patients with diabetes in a health management organization. Methods The central district databases of Israel's largest health management organization were reviewed for all patients over 20 years old with a documented diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM in the chronic disease register or patient file (identified diabetic patients or a fasting serum glucose level of >126 mg/100 ml according to the central laboratory records (suspected diabetic patients. The family physicians of the patients with suspected diabetes were asked for a report on their current diabetic status. Results The searches yielded 1,694 suspected diabetic patients; replies from the family physicians were received for 1,486. Of these, 575 (38.7% were confirmed to have diabetes mellitus. Their addition to the identified patient group raised the relative rate of diabetic patients in the district by 3.2%. Conclusion Cross-referencing existing databases is an efficient, low-cost method for identifying hyperglycemic patients with unrecognized diabetes who require preventive treatment and follow-up. This model can be used to advantage in other clinical sites in Israel and elsewhere with fully computerized databases.

  20. What I Need to Know about Gestational Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and MODY Gestational Diabetes What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that ... 8747 and request a copy. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes happens when your body can't ...

  1. Insulin and type 1 diabetes: immune connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culina, Sloboda; Brezar, Vedran; Mallone, Roberto

    2013-02-01

    Insulin is the hormone produced by pancreatic β-cells, with a central role in carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Together with its precursors preproinsulin and proinsulin, insulin is also a key target antigen (Ag) of the autoimmune islet destruction leading to type 1 diabetes. Being recognized by both autoantibodies (aAbs) and autoreactive T cells, insulin plays a triggering role, at least in rodent models, in diabetes pathogenesis. It is expressed not only by β-cells but also in the thymus, where it plays a major role in central tolerance mechanisms. We will summarize current knowledge concerning insulin, its role in β-cell autoimmunity as initial target Ag, its recognition by aAbs and autoreactive T cells, and the detection of these immune responses to provide biomarkers for clinical trials employing insulin as an immune modulatory agent. PMID:23065992

  2. Diabetes in the Aged

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobin, Wulf

    1970-01-01

    In keeping with the already known high prevalence of diabetes among residents of the Jewish Home for the Aged, Toronto, annual screening disclosed an average incidence of 25.5% of abnormal glucose tolerance (two-hour post-glucose blood sugars above 140 mg./100 ml.) in residents not known to be diabetic. Forty-five (47%) of the 94 residents with abnormal screening values were considered subsequently to be diabetic according to our criteria. Long-term follow-up, particularly of 81 residents initially normoglycemic in 1964-5, confirmed that the natural course of glucose tolerance in this population was one of progressive deterioration. By contrast, improvement amounting to remission has been demonstrated in nine out of 20 residents several years after they had been declared diabetic, and is thought to have been induced by dietotherapy. Moderate hyperglycemia per se did not cause symptoms in these almost always keto-resistant and usually aglycosuric aged diabetics, who often claimed they felt better when hyperglycemic. Hypoglycemia was an ever present danger when anti-diabetic medication was used; it was the main reason for undertreatment. So far, data from our long-term study have not shown morbidity to be markedly increased in the diabetics, and mortality was found to be evenly distributed among diabetic and non-diabetic male residents. However, in the females there was a clear correlation between mortality rate and the diminished glucose tolerance. What may appear as overdiagnosis of diabetes in the aged is recommended in the hope that early institution of dietary treatment will delay the development of clinical diabetes and the need for anti-diabetic agents. This, in turn, would prevent iatrogenic hypoglycemia. It would also reduce the severity and frequency of spontaneous hypoglycemia which, we believe, occurs more commonly in the early phase of diabetes in the aged than is generally realized. PMID:5476778

  3. Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Diabetes under Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for students, postdocs, and faculty Research at NIDDK Labs, faculty, and ... Español Prevent diabetes problems: Keep your diabetes under control Page Content On this page: What are diabetes ...

  4. Diabetic Neuropathies: The Nerve Damage of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for students, postdocs, and faculty Research at NIDDK Labs, faculty, and ... diabetes, digestive and liver diseases, kidney diseases, weight control and nutrition, urologic diseases, endocrine and metabolic diseases, ...

  5. Patients' management of type 2 diabetes in Middle Eastern countries: review of studies

    OpenAIRE

    Alsairafi, Z.; Taylor, K M G; Smith, F J; Alattar, A. T.

    2016-01-01

    The increased prevalence of diabetes in Middle Eastern countries is a health policy priority. Important risk factors for diabetes have been identified. Lifestyle interventions and adherence to medications are central to disease prevention and management. This review focuses on the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Middle Eastern countries. The aim is to identify the ways in which knowledge, health beliefs, and social and cultural factors influence adherence to medication and lifestyle...

  6. Anthropometric predictors of incident type 2 diabetes mellitus in Iranian women

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Studies have shown a strong association between excess weight and risk of incident diabetes in Iranian women. Therefore, we investigated anthropometric indices in the prediction of diabetes in Iranian women. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We examined 2801 females aged ≥220 years (mean [SD] age, 45.2 [12.9] years) in an Iranian urban population who were non-diabetic or had abnormal glucose tolerance at baseline. We estimated the predictive value of central obesity parameters ...

  7. Periodontal health and diabetes awareness among Saudi diabetes patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bahammam MA

    2015-01-01

    Maha A BahammamDepartment of Periodontology, King Abdulaziz University Faculty of Dentistry, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaPurpose: This study aimed to examine diabetic patients in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, regarding their general diabetic and oral health-related awareness and practices, their awareness of the association of diabetes with periodontal disease, and their sources of diabetes-related information.Methods: Diabetic patients (n=454) who were receiving care at the diabete...

  8. Gestational diabetes versus pregestational diabetes. Perinatal results.

    OpenAIRE

    Cristóbal Torres González; Joselin Moreno Torres; Juan Carlos Pastrana Tapia; Vivian Vázquez Martínez

    2004-01-01

    Fundament: Diabetes Mellitus is one of the most affecting diseases in the development of pregnancy. This greatly depends on the metabolic control achieved, which has demanded several proyects of treatment, thus decreasing the risks that the gestational process carries out. Objective: to compare the perinatal results between the diabetic gestational women and pregestational ones admitted at Cienfuegos Hospital. Method: Comparative study developed at the Gynecological-Obstetric Universitary Hos...

  9. Diabetes Device Interoperability for Improved Diabetes Management

    OpenAIRE

    Silk, Alain D.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific and technological advancements have led to the increasing availability and use of sophisticated devices for diabetes management, with corresponding improvements in public health. These devices are often capable of sharing data with a few other specific devices but are generally not broadly interoperable; they cannot work together with a wide variety of other devices. As a result of limited interoperability, benefits of modern diabetes devices and potential for development of innova...

  10. Gestational diabetes versus pregestational diabetes. Perinatal results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristóbal Torres González

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Fundament: Diabetes Mellitus is one of the most affecting diseases in the development of pregnancy. This greatly depends on the metabolic control achieved, which has demanded several proyects of treatment, thus decreasing the risks that the gestational process carries out. Objective: to compare the perinatal results between the diabetic gestational women and pregestational ones admitted at Cienfuegos Hospital. Method: Comparative study developed at the Gynecological-Obstetric Universitary Hospital from Cienfuegos province, from January to december 2003, including 167 pregnant women with Diabetes mellitus during pregnancy. The variables under study were: type of Diabetes, Márquez Guillén classification about good or bad fetal-maternal prognosis , treatment used, type of delivery, gestational age at labor, newborn weight, prenatal and maternal complication. Results: There was a predominance of gestational diabetes (73, 6 % over the cases with pregestational diabetes (26,3 %. According to Marquez Guillén classification , the bad fetal-maternal prognosis (X=16.37, p

  11. Islamic Fasting and Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereidoun Azizi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to review health-related aspects of Ramadan fasting in normal individuals and diabetics. During fasting days of Ramadan, glucose homeostasis is maintained by meal taken bepore dawn and by liver glycogen stores. Changes in serum lipids are variable and defend on the quality and quantity of food consumption and changes in weight. Compliant, well controlled type 2 diabetics may observe Ramadan fasting; but fasting is not recommended for type 1, non complaint, poorly controlled and pregnant diabetics. Although Ramadan fasting is safe for all healthy individuals and well controlled diabetics, those with uncontrolled diabetics and diabetics with complications should consult physicians and follow scientific recommendations.

  12. Angiopoietins and diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnudi, Luigi

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the main cause of end-stage renal failure in the Western world. In diabetes, metabolic and haemodynamic perturbations disrupt the integrity of the glomerular filtration barrier, leading to ultrastructural alterations of the glomeruli, including podocyte foot process fusion and detachment, glomerular basement membrane thickening, reduced endothelial cell glycocalyx, and mesangial extracellular matrix accumulation and glomerulosclerosis, ultimately leading to albuminuria and end-stage renal disease. Many vascular growth factors, such as angiopoietins, are implicated in glomerular biology. In normal physiology angiopoietins regulate the function of the glomerular filtration barrier. When they are dysregulated, however, as they are in diabetes, they drive the cellular mechanisms that mediate diabetic glomerular pathology. Modulation of angiopoietins expression and signalling has been proposed as a tool to correct the cellular mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of diabetic microvascular disease, such as retinopathy in humans. Future work might evaluate whether this novel therapeutic approach should be extended to diabetic kidney disease. PMID:27207083

  13. Islamic fasting and diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereidoun Azizi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to review health-related aspects of Ramadan fasting in normal individuals and diabetics. During fasting days of Ramadan, glucose homeostasis is maintained by meal taken bepore dawn and by liver glycogen stores. Changes in serum lipids are variable and defend on the quality and quantity of food consumption and changes in weight. Compliant, well controlled type 2 diabetics may observe Ramadan fasting; but fasting is not recommended for type 1, non complaint, poorly controlled and pregnant diabetics. Although Ramadan fasting is safe for all healthy individuals and well controlled diabetics, those with uncontrolled diabetics and diabetics with complications should consult physicians and follow scientific recommendations.

  14. Introduction to diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Kirti; Tarr, Joanna M; Ahmad, Shamim I; Kohner, Eva M; Chibber, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    The chronic metabolic disorder diabetes mellitus is a fast-growing global problem with huge social, health, and economic consequences. It is estimated that in 2010 there were globally 285 million people (approximately 6.4% of the adult population) suffering from this disease. This number is estimated to increase to 430 million in the absence of better control or cure. An ageing population and obesity are two main reasons for the increase. Furthermore it has been shown that almost 50% of the putative diabetics are not diagnosed until 10 years after onset of the disease, hence the real prevalence of global diabetes must be astronomically high. This chapter introduces the types of diabetes and diabetic complications such as impairment of immune system, periodontal disease, retinopathy, nephropathy, somatic and autonomic neuropathy, cardiovascular diseases and diabetic foot. Also included are the current management and treatments, and emerging therapies. PMID:23393665

  15. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Diabetes Educators JDRF American Heart Association MedlinePlus Diabetes Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Page Content On this ...

  16. Diabetic Complications and Amputation Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Text Size Print Bookmark Diabetic Complications and Amputation Prevention People with diabetes are prone to having ... complication is so severe that surgery, and occasionally amputation, may become necessary. Poor blood flow. In diabetes, ...

  17. What is Diabetic Eye Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... least half will show signs of a diabetic eye disease and the most common of these by far ... vision. Announcer: Diabetic retinopathy is not the only eye disease that may affect people with diabetes. Others include ...

  18. What is Diabetic Eye Disease?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... least half will show signs of a diabetic eye disease and the most common of these by far ... vision. Announcer: Diabetic retinopathy is not the only eye disease that may affect people with diabetes. Others include ...

  19. Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En español Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Browse Sections The Basics Overview Types of Diabetes ... 1 of 9 sections The Basics: Types of Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease. People ...

  20. Diabetes and exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Peirce, N. S.

    1999-01-01

    Exercise is frequently recommended in the management of type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus and can improve glucose uptake by increasing insulin sensitivity and lowering body adiposity. Both alone and when combined with diet and drug therapy, physical activity can result in improvements in glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes. In addition, exercise can also help to prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes, in particular in those at higher risk, and has an important role in reducing the significa...

  1. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Mukesh M Agarwal; Dhatt, Gurdeep S.; Syed M Shah

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the impact of the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Group (IADPSG) criteria on 1) gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) diagnosis compared with the American Diabetes Association (ADA) criteria and 2) the fasting plasma glucose (FPG) to predict GDM. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In 10,283 pregnant women undergoing a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) for universal screening of GDM, two FPG thresholds (of the OGTT) were used to rule in and to rule...

  2. Comparative Healthcare: Diabetes Mellitus.

    OpenAIRE

    Dr Mohammed Ali; Dr. Andrew Knight

    2009-01-01

    In the third in this series of ‘comparative healthcare’ medical practitioners explore the approach to diabetes inBangaldesh and Australia respectively. The social and medical consequences of this chronic conditionare highlighted through the approach to patients at various stages of the disease from two nationalperspectives. An astonishing 7% of the 153 million people are reported to have diabetes in Bangladesh. Manyremain undiagnosed. Delays in diagnosis or management of diabetes have life li...

  3. Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Matary, Abdulrahman; Hussain, Mushtaq; Nahari, Ahmed; Ali, Jaffar

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Neonatal diabetes is a rare cause of hyperglycemia, affecting 1: 500,000 births, with persistent hyperglycemia occurring in the first months of life lasting more than 2 weeks and requiring insulin. This condition in infants less than 6 months of age is considered as permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus. Case Report: A rare case of permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus presented with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR; birth weight: 1460 grams; female), hyperglycemia, gly...

  4. [The infected diabetic foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voide, C; Trampuz, A; Orasch, C

    2012-10-31

    Disorders of local immunity associated with diabetes, neuropathy, vascular disease and pressure lesions all contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic foot lesions. Diabetic foot infections are frequently encountered, comprising multifactorial pathology and high morbidity and mortality rates. Microbiological sampling is indicated only when infection is suspected clinically, that is, when a lesion presents a minimum of two of the following six signs: erythema, heat, pain, tumefaction, induration or purulent discharge. PMID:23117963

  5. Diabetes Screening Among Immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Creatore, Maria I.; Gillian L Booth; Manuel, Douglas G.; Moineddin, Rahim; Glazier, Richard H.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine diabetes screening, predictors of screening, and the burden of undiagnosed diabetes in the immigrant population and whether these estimates differ by ethnicity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A population-based retrospective cohort linking administrative health data to immigration files was used to follow the entire diabetes-free population aged 40 years and up in Ontario, Canada (N = 3,484,222) for 3 years (2004–2007) to determine whether individuals were screened for diabe...

  6. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Donghui

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associat...

  7. Multiple Myeloma and Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Azar, Sami T.; Mira S. Zantout; Zeinab A. Issa

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant plasma cell disorder that accounts for approximately 10% of all hematologic cancers. It is characterized by accumulation of clonal plasma cells, predominantly in the bone marrow. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing; therefore, it is expected that there will be an increase in the diagnosis of multiple myeloma with concomitant diabetes mellitus. The treatment of multiple myeloma and diabetes mellitus is multifaceted. The coexistence of the two conditi...

  8. Diagnosing gestational diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, E. A.

    2011-01-01

    The newly proposed criteria for diagnosing gestational diabetes will result in a gestational diabetes prevalence of 17.8%, doubling the numbers of pregnant women currently diagnosed. These new diagnostic criteria are based primarily on the levels of glucose associated with a 1.75-fold increased risk of giving birth to large-for-gestational age infants (LGA) in the Hyperglycemia Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study; they use a single OGTT. Thus, of 23,316 pregnancies, gestational diabetes wo...

  9. Diabetic parturient - Anaesthetic implications

    OpenAIRE

    Nibedita Pani; Shakti Bedanta Mishra; Shovan Kumar Rath

    2010-01-01

    Pregnancy induces progressive changes in maternal carbohydrate metabolism. As pregnancy advances insulin resistance and diabetogenic stress due to placental hormones necessitate compensatory increase in insulin secretion. When this compensation is inadequate gestational diabetes develops. ‘Gestational diabetes mellitus’ (GDM) is defined as carbohydrate intolerance with onset or recognition during pregnancy. Women diagnosed to have GDM are at increased risk of future diabetes predominantly typ...

  10. Diabetes and Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Goebel-Fabbri, Ann E.

    2008-01-01

    The problem of insulin restriction is an important women's health issue in type 1 diabetes. This behavior is associated with increased rates of diabetes complications and decreased quality of life. Clinical and technological research is greatly needed to improve treatment tools and strategies for this problem. In this commentary, the author describes the scope of the problem of eating disorders and diabetes, as well as offers ideas about ways technology may be applied to help solve this compl...

  11. Management of diabetic retinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Saxena Sandeep; Jalali Subhadra; Meredith Travis; Holekamp Nancy; Kumar Dipak

    2000-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy remains a major cause of blindness despite increased understanding of this disease and identification of successful treatments. The Diabetic Retinopathy Study identified risk factors associated with a high risk of blindness and confirmed the benefits of panretinal photocoagulation. The Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study defined the retinal characteristics, indications of treatment and results of laser treatment of clinically significant macular oedema. The Diabeti...

  12. Diabetes mellitus type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Tøraasen, Lisa Vangen; Al-Sultan, Zainab

    2014-01-01

    Hvert år blir rundt 600 nordmenn diagnostisert med sykdommen diabetes type 1, og Norge er et av landene i verden med størst andel av barnediabetes. I dag er det 15 000- 20 000 personer i Norge som har diabetes type 1, og antall barn som får diabetes har fordoblet seg de siste 30 årene (Diabetesforbundet, 2014). Problemstillingen vår gikk ut på hvordan sykepleiere kan veilede og undervise ungdom med nyoppdaget diabetes type på sykehus. Ut i fra litteraturstudiet har vi arbeidet oss frem for å ...

  13. PRE-DIABETES

    OpenAIRE

    Akula Annapurna

    2013-01-01

    Pre-diabetes is a condition where the body's cells begin to show resistance to insulin. Glucose circulates in the blood instead of being used by the cells for energy. Blood sugar levels become elevated. Increased weight, unhealthy diet and a sedentary lifestyle can lead to pre-diabetes. WHAT IS PRE-DIABETES A diagnosis of pre-diabetes means that the cells in your body are becoming resistant to insulin and your blood glucose levels are higher than they should be. Since the levels aren't as hig...

  14. Type 2 diabetes models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Dorte Xenia

    2012-01-01

    This chapter deals with type 2 diabetes in vivo models and techniques suitable for testing new anti-diabetic compounds. In particular, the testing of TRP antagonist for beneficial effects against type 2 diabetes is considered. There are many choices of both in vitro techniques and in vivo models......, impaired glucose tolerance, impaired insulin secretion, and insulin resistance in vivo and should, thus, be sufficient to demonstrate preclinical proof of concept of a TRP antagonist in type 2 diabetes in rodents. The experiments are suggestions and could be replaced or supplemented by others....

  15. Connexins and Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine A. Wright

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell-to-cell interactions via gap junctional communication and connexon hemichannels are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes. Gap junctions are highly specialized transmembrane structures that are formed by connexon hemichannels, which are further assembled from proteins called “connexins.” In this paper, we discuss current knowledge about connexins in diabetes. We also discuss mechanisms of connexin influence and the role of individual connexins in various tissues and how these are affected in diabetes. Connexins may be a future target by both genetic and pharmacological approaches to develop treatments for the treatment of diabetes and its complications.

  16. [Cardiovascular complications of diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Yoshihiko

    2015-12-01

    Several lines of epidemical evidence have shown that type 2 diabetes is the most important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). It has been shown that the risk of primary prevention of CVD in patients with diabetes is equal to that of the secondary prevention in general population. In this manuscript, recent reports on the cardiac tests to detect the cardiovascular lesions will be reviewed. The data suggest that MDCT is a promising test even in the patients with diabetes. Furthermore, recent evidence of the treatment of diabetes with insulin or the drugs available recently such as DPP-4 inhibitors and SGLT-2 inhibitors will be reviewed. PMID:26666152

  17. Osteoporosis and diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barbagallo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus and osteoporosis are chronic diseases with an elevated and growing incidence in the elderly. Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated an elevated risk of hip, humerus and foot fractures in elder diabetic subjects. While type 1 diabetes is generally associated with a mild reduction in bone mineral density (BMD, type 2 diabetes, more prevalent in old subjects, is frequently linked to a normal or high BMD. Studies on experimental models of diabetes have suggested an altered bone structure that may help to explain the elevated risk of fractures observed in these animals and may as well help to explain the paradox of an incremented risk of fractures in type 2 diabetic elderly in the presence of normal or elevated BMD. In addition, diabetic elderly have an increased risk of falls, consequent at least in part to a poor vision, peripheral neuropathy, and weaken muscular performance. Diabetes may affect bone tissue by different mechanisms including obesity, hyperinsulinemia, deposit of advanced glycosilation end products in collagen fibre, reduced circulating levels of IGF-1, hypercalciuria, renal function impairment, microangiopathy and chronic inflammation. A better understanding of these mechanisms may help implement the prevention of fractures in the growing population of mature diabetics.

  18. The Catalase –262C/T Promoter Polymorphism and Diabetic Complications in Caucasians with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Gonçalves dos Santos

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalase is a central antioxidant enzyme constituting the primary defense against oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated whether the functional –262C/T polymorphism in the promoter of catalase gene is associated with the presence of diabetic retinopathy (DR, diabetic nephropathy (DN and ischemic heart disease (IHD in 520 Caucasian-Brazilians with type 2 diabetes. The –262C/T polymorphism was also examined in 100 Caucasian blood donors. Patients underwent a clinical and laboratory evaluation consisting of a questionnaire, physical examination, assessment of diabetic complications and laboratory tests. Genotype analysis was performed using the polymerase chain reaction followed by digestion with restriction enzyme. The genotype and allele frequencies of the –262C/T polymorphism in patients with type 2 diabetes were very similar to those of blood donors (T allele frequency = 0.20 and 0.18, respectively. Likewise, there were no differences in either genotype or allele frequencies between type 2 diabetic patients with or without DR, DN or IHD. Thus, our results do not support the hypothesis that the –262C/T polymorphism is related to the development of DR, DN or IHD in patients with type 2 diabetes. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the role of catalase gene polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications.

  19. Diabetic Retinopathy: Nature and Extent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, W. Ronald; Patz, Arnall

    1978-01-01

    The authors discuss the incidence and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in juvenile and maturity onset diabetics, background and proliferative retinopathy, and current modalities of treatment. (Author)

  20. Study of 123I-IMP SPECT on diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The involvement of peripheral nerves and nerve roots often leads to neurological manifestations which have frequently been described in association with diabetes mellitus. Whether there is any specific involvement of the central nervous system in this process has yet to be determined. Recently, many reports have suggested that significant neurophysiologic abnormalities in the central nervous system can sometimes be found in diabetic patients. In order to accurately examine the existence of central nervous system involvement in patients with diabetes mellitus, comparisons of 123I-IMP (IMP) washout rates were made between normal adults (n=19, average age 43.3 years) and diabetic patients (n=23, average age 43.3 years), and these results were graphically demonstrated by color images. Early images were obtained 30 minutes after intravenous injection, while delayed images were made 4 hours after injection. The IMP washout rate was obtained by subtracting the values of the delayed image with the early image. The standard deviation (SD) of the IMP washout rate for each patient was compared to the averaged SD obtained from healthy adults. After calculating the deviation from SD levels of healthy adults, we made an image of the patient's IMP washout rates. These images were divided into seven degrees (I, II: normal, III, IV: borderline, V∼VII: abnormal) and the ratio of each degree was expressed by a histogram in each cerebral hemisphere as the washout rate index. In 23 diabetic subjects, seven patients were found to be borderline while sixteen patients were abnormal. These impairments were not related either to the presence of diabetic triopathy or the duration of disease. By utilising such a noninvasive method, we were able to accurately evaluate the extent of diabetic central neuropathy. Therefore this subtraction method, which uses the specificity of IMP SPECT, is thus considered to be highly useful for broad clinical application. (author)

  1. Detection of a novel arginine vasopression defect by dideoxy fingerprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamani, M.R.S.; Phillips, J.A. III; Copeland, K.C. (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States) Univ. of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus is a familial form of diabetes insipidus. This disorder is associated with variable levels of arginine vasopressin (AVP) and diabetes insipidus of varying severity, which responds to exogenous AVP. To determine the molecular basis of autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, the AVP genes of members of a large kindred were analyzed. A new method, called dideoxy fingerprinting, was used to detect an AVP mutation that was characterized by DNA sequencing. The novel defect found changes the last codon of the AVP signal peptide from alanine to threonine, which should perturb cleavage of mature AVP from its precursor protein and inhibit its secretion or action. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Hartsfield holoprosencephaly-ectrodactyly syndrome in five male patients: further delineation and review.

    OpenAIRE

    Vilain, Catheline; Mortier, Geert; Van Vliet, Guy; Dubourg, Christèle; Heinrichs, Claudine; De Silva, Deephti; Verloes, Alain; Baumann, Clarisse

    2009-01-01

    International audience We report on five male subjects with a triad of signs compatible with Hartsfield syndrome: ectrodactyly, holoprosencephaly, and mental retardation. Only six patients with this distinctive association have been reported over the past 20 years, all of them being males. Of the patients described here, some have unreported findings such as vermian hypoplasia in one and prolonged survival into adulthood in two. Two patients developed central diabetes insipidus. All were m...

  3. Water balance disorders after neurosurgery: The triphasic response revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Hoorn, Ewout; Zietse, Robert

    2010-01-01

    textabstractWater balance disorders after neurosurgery are well recognized, but detailed reports of the triphasic response are scarce. We describe a 55-year-old woman, who developed the triphasic response with severe hyper- and hyponatraemia after resection of a suprasellar meningioma. The case illustrates how sudden and dramatic the changes in water balance after neurosurgery can be. The biochemical profile suggested central diabetes insipidus and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic h...

  4. Hypernatremia secondary to post-stroke hypodipsia: just add water!

    OpenAIRE

    Ramthun, Maikel; Mocelin, Altair Jacob; Alvares Delfino, Vinicius Daher

    2011-01-01

    Disorders in water metabolism may occur in stroke patients. When hypernatremia arises in this setting, it is usually secondary to the development of central diabetes insipidus or it is the result of neurologic lesions that prevent patients from having free access to water. Much rarer are the cases of post-stroke hypernatremia caused by hypodipsia secondary to lesions of the thirst center. We report the case of a patient with severe hypernatremia, probably secondary to post-hemorrhagic stroke ...

  5. A pituitary abscess masquerading as recurrent hypernatremia and aseptic meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzales, Michael; Marik, Paul Ellis; Khardori, Romesh K.; O'Brian, John T

    2012-01-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare condition. In the setting of multiple surgical interventions, the risk of its development increases. A 49-year-old man presented with episodes of altered mental status. He had two surgeries for a recurrent suprasellar arachnoid cyst. The second surgery was complicated by a persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak that required two repairs following which he developed panhypopituitarism and central diabetes insipidus. Twelve months after his last surgery he was dia...

  6. Hypernatremia in patients with severe traumatic brain injury: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Kolmodin, Leif; Sekhon, Mypinder S; Henderson, William R.; Turgeon, Alexis F; Griesdale, Donald EG

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypernatremia is common following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and occurs from a variety of mechanisms, including hyperosmotic fluids, limitation of free water, or diabetes insipidus. The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the relationship between hypernatremia and mortality in patients with TBI. Methods We searched the following databases up to November 2012: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL. Using a combination of MeSH and text terms, we developed search filters for the ...

  7. Diabetes mellitus in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Heidemann, Christin; Du, Yong; Scheidt-Nave, Christa

    2011-01-01

    This issue of GBE kompakt focuses on diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disease. Prevalence of and complications due to diabetes mellitus will be displayed on the basis of data of the telephone survey GEDA 2009 and other data sources. Another focus is on medical care and the use of medical services.

  8. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say ... Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Diabetes Movie KidsHealth > For Parents > Diabetes Movie Print A A A Text Size ...

  9. Native Americans and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The odds are stacked against them. Much of what the world now knows about Type II diabetes is a result of work carried on at the National Institutes of Health in Phoenix. Doctors started working with ... without diabetes. And what we've seen in the Pima population over -- ...

  10. Native Americans and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have inherited genes from the three highest-risk groups for developing diabetes. The odds are stacked against them. Much of what the world now knows about Type II diabetes is a result of work carried on at the National Institutes of Health ...

  11. Vitamin D and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolden-Kirk, Heidi; Overbergh, Lut; Christesen, Henrik Thybo;

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that vitamin D may play a role in the defense against type 1 diabetes (T1D) as well as type 2 diabetes (T2D). Epidemiological data have established a link between vitamin D deficiency and an increased incidence of both T1D and T2D, whereas early and long-term vitamin...

  12. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you need depends on your health and the type of diabetes you have. Use these resources to help you ... FDA Publications for Women For Women Homepage FDA Diabetes Information for Patients ... 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Silver Spring, MD 20993 1-888-INFO-FDA (1-888-463-6332) Contact ...

  13. Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... somebody who's already had a heart attack. Announcer: Research shows that controlling blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol are critical in preventing heart disease and stroke among people with diabetes. Judith Fradkin, M.D.: We call this approach "the ABCs of diabetes." A is the A1C, ...

  14. National Diabetes Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals Community Organizations​ ​​ HealthSense Alternate Language URL National Diabetes Education Program Page Content What's New ​ ​ Visit our ... told that your are at risk for developing diabetes or that you have prediabetes, you should know ...

  15. Diabetic foot risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbury, M Gail

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes is a serious chronic disease that results in foot complications for many people world-wide. In 2014, the World Health Organization estimated the global prevalence of diabetes in adults to be 9%. To ascertain the risk that an individual patient might develop a diabetic foot ulcer that could lead to an amputation, clinicians are strongly encouraged to perform a risk assessment. Monteiro-Soares and Dinis-Ribeiro have presented a new DIAbetic FOot Risk Assessment with the acronym DIAFORA. It is different from other risk assessments in that it predicts the risk of developing both diabetic foot ulcers and amputation specifically. The risk variables were derived by regression analysis based on a data set of 293 patients from a high-risk setting, a Hospital Diabetic Foot Clinic, who had diabetes and a diabetic foot ulcers. Clear descriptions of the risk variables are provided as well as sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for the risk categories. As an added benefit, likelihood ratios are provided that will help clinicians determine the risk of amputation for individual patients. Having a risk assessment form is important for clinician use and examples exist. A question is raised about the effectiveness of risk assessment and how effectiveness might be determined. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26825436

  16. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for tips to help you manage your diabetes. Food Safety for People with Diabetes Your Glucose Meter - easy- ... Home Latest Recalls Report an Adverse Event MedWatch Safety Alerts News ... Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & ...

  17. Diabetes, Distress, and Depression

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-10

    This webinar is a discussion on incorporating the emotional side of diabetes into clinical care.  Created: 7/10/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention’s Division of Diabetes Translation (NCCDP/DDT).   Date Released: 7/10/2014.

  18. Diabetes eye exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... catch problems early if you get regular eye exams. ... diabetes checks your eyes, you need an eye exam every 1 to 2 years by an eye ... problems with your vision. Many can do screening exams for damage from diabetes. Once you have eye ...

  19. Living With Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... twice a year to find and treat any problems early. Ask what steps you can take to reach your goals. ​​ Youth and Teens​ Learn more about lowering the risk for and managing type 2 diabetes in children and teens. W hat is Diabetes? Be Active Stay at a H ealthy Weight Make Healthy Food ...

  20. Diabetic retinopathy: An update

    OpenAIRE

    Singh Ramandeep; Ramasamy Kim; Abraham Chandran; Gupta Vishali; Gupta Amod

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major cause of avoidable blindness in both the developing and the developed countries. Significant technological advances have taken place to improve the diagnostic accuracy of diabetic retinopathy. In the last three decades, the treatment strategies have been revised to include, besides laser photocoagulation, early surgical interventions and pharmacotherapies.

  1. Diabetes Treatment Breakthrough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Shelly; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Eight experts in visual impairment respond briefly to reports that intensive monitoring of blood glucose levels by persons with diabetes can lead to a 70% reduction in the progression of detectable diabetic retinopathy. Comments are generally optimistic, though some cautions are raised. (DB)

  2. Brainstem auditory evoked potential abnormalities in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharat Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus represents a syndrome complex in which multiple organ systems, including the central nervous system, are affected. Aim: The study was conducted to determine the changes in the brainstem auditory evoked potentials in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on 126 diabetic males, aged 35-50 years, and 106 age-matched, healthy male volunteers. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials were recorded and the results were analyzed statistically using student′s unpaired t-test. The data consisted of wave latencies I, II, III, IV, V and interpeak latencies I-III, III-V and I-V, separately for both ears. Results: The latency of wave IV was significantly delayed only in the right ear, while the latency of waves III, V and interpeak latencies III-V, I-V showed a significant delay bilaterally in diabetic males. However, no significant difference was found between diabetic and control subjects as regards to the latency of wave IV unilaterally in the left ear and the latencies of waves I, II and interpeak latency I-III bilaterally. Conclusion: Diabetes patients have an early involvement of central auditory pathway, which can be detected with fair accuracy with auditory evoked potential studies.

  3. Tips for Teens with Diabetes: What Is Diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diabetes? | Share External Link Disclaimer Youth and Teens What i​s diabetes? Lower Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Be Active Stay at a Healthy ... control and prevent weight gain. Ask your doctor what a healthy weight is for ... your medicine Teens with type 1 need insulin. Teens with type 2 diabetes ...

  4. Diabetes Technologies and Their Role in Diabetes Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollipara, Sobha; Silverstein, Janet H.; Marschilok, Katie

    2009-01-01

    The 1993 Diabetes Complications and Control Trial (DCCT) showed that controlling blood glucose prevents and delays the progression of long term complications of diabetes. New diabetes technologies can make control of diabetes possible and safer. This paper reviews these technologies used to monitor blood glucose, administer insulin and evaluate…

  5. Diabetes and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvisaari, Jaana; Keinänen, Jaakko; Eskelinen, Saana; Mantere, Outi

    2016-02-01

    People with schizophrenia have 2- to 5-fold higher risk of type 2 diabetes than the general population. The traditional risk factors for type 2 diabetes, especially obesity, poor diet, and sedentary lifestyle, are common in people with schizophrenia already early in the course of illness. People with schizophrenia also often have low socioeconomic status and income, which affects their possibilities to make healthy lifestyle choices. Antipsychotic medications increase the risk of type 2 diabetes both directly by affecting insulin sensitivity and indirectly by causing weight gain. Lifestyle modification interventions for prevention of diabetes should be an integral part of treatment of patients with schizophrenia. In the treatment of type 2 diabetes in patients with schizophrenia, communication and collaboration between medical care and psychiatric treatment providers are essential. PMID:26803652

  6. [Diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, E.R.; Rasmussen, K.L.; Laugesen, C.S.;

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim was to evaluate the prevalence and progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Dilated fundal photography was performed at approximately 10 and 28 gestational weeks in 58 and 18 women with type 1 and type...... 2 diabetes, respectively. Retinopathy was classified as five stages +/- macular oedema. Progression was defined as deterioration corresponding to at least one stage between the two examinations. Clinical parameters were obtained from the medical records. RESULTS: Diabetic retinopathy was found in 36...... (62%) women with type 1 and three (17%) with type 2 diabetes at the first examination. In 26 (34%) retinopathy progressed; four women developed proliferations, three macular oedema and three reduction of visual acuity >/=0.2 on Snellen's chart in at least one eye. HbA1c in early pregnancy was the only...

  7. Pharmacogenomics in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Kaixin; Pedersen, Helle Krogh; Dawed, Adem Y.;

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies have greatly advanced our understanding of the multifactorial aetiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) as well as the multiple subtypes of monogenic diabetes mellitus. In this Review, we discuss the existing pharmacogenetic evidence in both monogenic diabetes mellitus and T2DM....... We highlight mechanistic insights from the study of adverse effects and the efficacy of antidiabetic drugs. The identification of extreme sulfonylurea sensitivity in patients with diabetes mellitus owing to heterozygous mutations in HNF1A represents a clear example of how pharmacogenetics can direct...... future pharmacogenomic findings could provide insights into treatment response in diabetes mellitus that, in addition to other areas of human genetics, facilitates drug discovery and drug development for T2DM....

  8. Diabetes and thalassaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Barnard

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a significant complication of b-thalassaemia major. The aetiology includes iron overload causing b-cell destruction, autoimmunity, insulin resistance secondary to liver disease and development of type 1 or 2 diabetes. There are specific issues for patients with diabetes and thalassaemia which will be discussed here. Impaired carbohydrate metabolism must be detected early, to allow intensification of iron chelation. As life expectancy in thalassaemia rises, diabetic complications are seen. Optimising blood glucose and cardiovascular risk factor control is essential. Insulin remains critical for severely symptomatic patients. With milder hyperglycaemia, oral antidiabetic drugs are increasingly used. At Whittington Hospital, we wanted to address these issues. In 2005, we developed a unique Joint Diabetes Thalassaemia Clinic, where patients are reviewed jointly by specialist teams, including Consultant Diabetologist and Haematologist. The Joint Clinic aims to optimise diabetes, endocrine and thalassaemia care, while supporting patient self-management. A retrospective audit of the Joint Clinic (2005-09, showed improvement in glycaemic control, (Fructosamine falling from 344 umol/l to 319 umol/l. We compared our cohort to the National Diabetes Audit for England (2007-08. Patients attending the Joint Clinic achieved better glycaemic control (target reached: 73% Joint Clinic vs. 63% Nationally, blood pressure control (target reached: 58% Joint Clinic vs. 30% Nationally and cholesterol control (target reached: 81% Joint Clinic vs. 78% Nationally. 22.7% of our patients had ≥1 microvascular complication. A significant proportion had endocrinopathies (86% hypogonadism, 23% hypoparathyroidism, 18% hypothyroidism. Managing diabetes is one of the greatest challenges a person with thalassaemia can face. Training people to self-manage their diabetes and providing support from specialist teams working together are critical. The unique partnership

  9. Epidemiological Perspectives of Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ziqi; Shi, Aimin; Zhao, Jing

    2015-09-01

    The global statistics of diabetes mellitus in year 2013 indicated, about 382 million people had this disease worldwide, with type 2 diabetes making up about 90 % of the cases. This is equal to 8.3 % of the adult population with equal rates in both women and men. In year 2012 and 2013 diabetes resulted in mortality of 1.5-5.1 million people per year, making it the 8th leading cause of death in the world. It is predicted that by year 2035 about 592 million people will die of diabetes. The economic cost of diabetes seems to have increased worldwide. An average age of onset of diabetes is 42.5 years and could be due to consumption of high sugar and high-calorie diet, low physical activity, genetic susceptibility, and lifestyle. Approximately 8 % children and about 26 % young adults have diabetes mellitus in the world. The results of epidemiological study of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) are presented by demographic, geographic, biologic, cultural, and other factors in human populations. The prevalence of T1D has been increased by 2-5 % worldwide and its prevalence is approximately one in 300 in US by 18 years of age. The epidemiological studies are important to study the role, causes, clinical care, prevention, and treatment of type1 diabetes in pregnant women and their children before and after birth. In this article, causes, diagnosis, symptoms, treatment and medications, and epidemiology of diabetes will be described. PMID:25711186

  10. Beta cell imaging - a key tool in optimized diabetes prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotthardt, Martin; Eizirik, Decio L; Cnop, Miriam; Brom, Maarten

    2014-08-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is 382 million worldwide, and is expected to rise to 592 million in 2035 (http://www.idf.org/diabetesatlas); 2.5-15% of national annual healthcare budgets are related to diabetes care, potentially increasing to 40% in high-prevalence countries. Beta cell dysfunction and death are central events in diabetes pathogenesis, but the natural history of beta cell loss remains unknown. Clinical imaging of beta cells will play a pivotal role in developing strategies for optimized diabetes prevention and treatment. PMID:24726483

  11. Neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers – evidence-to-practice

    OpenAIRE

    Ako, Agbor

    2012-01-01

    Agbor Ndip1–3, Leonard Ebah3,4, Aloysius Mbako51Department of Diabetes and Medicine, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, UK; 2Department of Medicine, Royal Bolton Hospital, Bolton, UK; 3Cardiovascular Research Group, School of Biomedicine, University of Manchester, UK; 4Department of Renal Medicine, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, UK; 5Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Wrexham Maelor Hospital, Wales, UKAbstract: Foot ulc...

  12. Undiagnosed Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes in Health Disparities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan P Fisher-Hoch

    Full Text Available Globally half of all diabetes mellitus is undiagnosed. We sought to determine the extent and characteristics of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus and pre-diabetes in Mexican Americans residing in the United States. This disadvantaged population with 50% lifetime risk of diabetes is a microcosm of the current pandemic. We accessed baseline data between 2004 and 2014 from 2,838 adults recruited to our Cameron County Hispanic Cohort (CCHC; a two-stage randomly selected 'Framingham-like' cohort of Mexican Americans on the US Mexico border with severe health disparities. We examined prevalence, risk factors and metabolic health in diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes. Two thirds of this Mexican American population has diabetes or pre-diabetes. Diabetes prevalence was 28.0%, nearly half undiagnosed, and pre-diabetes 31.6%. Mean BMI among those with diabetes was 33.5 kg/m2 compared with 29.0 kg/m2 for those without diabetes. Significant risk factors were low income and educational levels. Most with diabetes had increased waist/hip ratio. Lack of insurance and access to health services played a decisive role in failure to have diabetes diagnosed. Participants with undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes had similar measures of poor metabolic health similar but generally not as severe as those with diagnosed diabetes. More than 50% of a minority Mexican American population in South Texas has diabetes or pre-diabetes and is metabolically unhealthy. Only a third of diabetes cases were diagnosed. Sustained efforts are imperative to identify, diagnose and treat individuals in underserved communities.

  13. Diabetic retinopathy in the dog.

    OpenAIRE

    Barnett, K C

    1981-01-01

    The literature on diabetic retinopathy in the dog is reviewed. A case report, including the ophthalmoscopic appearance of typical diabetic retinopathy, in an 8 1/2-year old standard poodle known to be diabetic for over 7 years, is given. The relationship between the duration of diabetes and the retinopathy is discussed.

  14. Brain changes in diabetes mellitus patients with gastrointestinal symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drewes, Anne M; Søfteland, Eirik; Dimcevski, Georg;

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common disease and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. In various studies up to 30%-70% of patients present dysfunction and complications related to the gut. To date several clinical studies have demonstrated that autonomic nervous system neuropathy and generalized...... neuropathy of the central nervous system (CNS) may play a major role. This systematic review provides an overview of the neurodegenerative changes that occur as a consequence of diabetes with a focus on the CNS changes and gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction. Animal models where diabetes was induced...... experimentally support that the disease induces changes in CNS. Recent investigations with electroencephalography and functional brain imaging in patients with diabetes confirm these structural and functional brain changes. Encephalographic studies demonstrated that altered insular processing of sensory stimuli...

  15. Impact of diabetes on cognitive function and brain structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moheet, Amir; Mangia, Silvia; Seaquist, Elizabeth R

    2015-09-01

    Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes have been associated with reduced performance on multiple domains of cognitive function and with structural abnormalities in the brain. With an aging population and a growing epidemic of diabetes, central nervous system-related complications of diabetes are expected to rise and could have challenging future public health implications. In this review, we will discuss the brain structural and functional changes that have been associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Diabetes duration and glycemic control may play important roles in the development of cognitive impairment in diabetes, but the exact underlying pathophysiological mechanisms causing these changes in cognition and structure are not well understood. Future research is needed to better understand the natural history and the underlying mechanisms, as well as to identify risk factors that predict who is at greatest risk of developing cognitive impairment. This information will lead to the development of new strategies to minimize the impact of diabetes on cognitive function. PMID:26132277

  16. Cardiovascular consequences of diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Baan, Caroline

    1999-01-01

    textabstractDiabetes mellitus comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders that have one common feature: abnormally high levels of glucose in the blood. The most common form is non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NlDDM); about 80-90% of all diabetic patients has NlDDM. Other forms of diabetes are insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (lDDM) and gestational diabetes. • In 1985, the World Health Organization (WHO) defined new criteria for diabetes mellitus based up...

  17. Non-coding genome functions in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebola, Inês; Pasquali, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Most of the genetic variation associated with diabetes, through genome-wide association studies, does not reside in protein-coding regions, making the identification of functional variants and their eventual translation to the clinic challenging. In recent years, high-throughput sequencing-based methods have enabled genome-scale high-resolution epigenomic profiling in a variety of human tissues, allowing the exploration of the human genome outside of the well-studied coding regions. These experiments unmasked tens of thousands of regulatory elements across several cell types, including diabetes-relevant tissues, providing new insights into their mechanisms of gene regulation. Regulatory landscapes are highly dynamic and cell-type specific and, being sensitive to DNA sequence variation, can vary with individual genomes. The scientific community is now in place to exploit the regulatory maps of tissues central to diabetes etiology, such as pancreatic progenitors and adult islets. This giant leap forward in the understanding of pancreatic gene regulation is revolutionizing our capacity to discriminate between functional and non-functional non-coding variants, opening opportunities to uncover regulatory links between sequence variation and diabetes susceptibility. In this review, we focus on the non-coding regulatory landscape of the pancreatic endocrine cells and provide an overview of the recent developments in this field. PMID:26438568

  18. In situ bypass og diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Leif Panduro; Schroeder, T V; Lorentzen, J E

    1993-01-01

    From 1986 through to 1990 a total of 483 in situ bypass procedures were performed in 444 patients. Preoperative risk-factors were equally distributed among diabetic (DM) and non-diabetic (NDM) patients, except for smoking habits (DM:48%, NDM:64%, p = 0.002) and cardiac disease (DM:45%, NDM:29%, p...... = 0.005). Critical limb-ischaemia was more often present in diabetic than non-diabetic patients (DM:57%, NDM:36%, p = 0.0002). Diabetic patients had a significantly lower distal anastomosis than non-diabetic patients (p = 0.00001). There were no differences among diabetic and non-diabetic patients...... regarding three years primary and secondary patency (58% and 64% respectively), and regarding major amputations. However, the rate of minor amputations was higher in insulin-dependent compared with non-insulin-dependent diabetics, who in turn had a higher rate than non-diabetics (p

  19. Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy Affects Symptom Generation and Brain-Gut Axis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, Christina; Søfteland, Eirik; Gunterberg, Veronica;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVELong-term diabetes leads to severe peripheral, autonomous, and central neuropathy in combination with clinical gastrointestinal symptoms. The brain-gut axis thus expresses a neurophysiological profile, and heart rate variability (HRV) can be correlated with clinical gastrointestinal symp...... autonomic neuropathy and peripheral nervous degeneration, as well as changes in dipole sources in diabetic patients with gastrointestinal symptoms. The findings may lead to improved treatment modalities targeting pharmacological neuroprotection or neuromodulation.......OBJECTIVELong-term diabetes leads to severe peripheral, autonomous, and central neuropathy in combination with clinical gastrointestinal symptoms. The brain-gut axis thus expresses a neurophysiological profile, and heart rate variability (HRV) can be correlated with clinical gastrointestinal...... symptoms.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSFifteen healthy volunteers and 15 diabetic patients (12 with type 1 diabetes) with severe gastrointestinal symptoms and clinical suspicion of autonomic neuropathy were included. Psychophysics and evoked brain potentials were assessed after painful rectosigmoid...

  20. CERN diabetes awareness days

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Do you have diabetes without knowing it? The Medical Service invites everyone working at CERN to participate in the above PREVENTION and DETECTION campaign on the: 8 and 9 November 2004 from 9:00 to 16:00 at the infirmary, bldg. 57, ground floor Personal evaluation of diabetes risks, (blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels, Body Mass Index measurements and more...) will be offered as well as leaflets, information and advice, (diet, exercise). A dietician specialised in diabetes will be on hand from 14:00 until 16:00. Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in many countries due to an increase in obesity, sedentary lifestyles and poor diet. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, cardio-vascular and kidney disease. An estimated 30-50% of these cases of diabetes go undetected, despite de fact that easy and efficient prevention exists. Diabetes discovered and treated early is not a severe condition but untreated and ignored it can have dire consequences.