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Sample records for central chilean andes

  1. Bayesian spatiotemporal interpolation of rainfall in the Central Chilean Andes

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    Ossa-Moreno, Juan; Keir, Greg; McIntyre, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Water availability in the populous and economically significant Central Chilean region is governed by complex interactions between precipitation, temperature, snow and glacier melt, and streamflow. Streamflow prediction at daily time scales depends strongly on accurate estimations of precipitation in this predominantly dry region, particularly during the winter period. This can be difficult as gauged rainfall records are scarce, especially in the higher elevation regions of the Chilean Andes, and topographic influences on rainfall are not well understood. Remotely sensed precipitation and topographic products can be used to construct spatiotemporal multivariate regression models to estimate rainfall at ungauged locations. However, classical estimation methods such as kriging cannot easily accommodate the complicated statistical features of the data, including many 'no rainfall' observations, as well as non-normality, non-stationarity, and temporal autocorrelation. We use a separable space-time model to predict rainfall using the R-INLA package for computationally efficient Bayesian inference, using the gridded CHIRPS satellite-based rainfall dataset and digital elevation models as covariates. We jointly model both the probability of rainfall occurrence on a given day (using a binomial likelihood) as well as amount (using a gamma likelihood or similar). Correlation in space and time is modelled using a Gaussian Markov Random Field (GMRF) with a Matérn spatial covariance function which can evolve over time according to an autoregressive model if desired. It is possible to evaluate the GMRF at relatively coarse temporal resolution to speed up computations, but still produce daily rainfall predictions. We describe the process of model selection and inference using an information criterion approach, which we use to objectively select from competing models with various combinations of temporal smoothing, likelihoods, and autoregressive model orders.

  2. Paleomagnetism of Permian and Triassic rock, central Chilean Andes

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    Forsythe, Randall D.; Kent, Dennis V.; Mpodozis, Constantino; Davidson, John

    The first paleomagnetic data from Permian and Triassic formations west of the Andean divide are presented. Four formations of Permian or Triassic age in the central Chilean Andes have been investigated: two are located in the coastal ranges, and two are in the main cordillera. Of the formations in the main cordillera (Pastos Blancos and Matahuaico formations), only the Pastos Blancos Formation has yielded characteristic directions. While a fold test is absent, magnetizations are most likely secondary and yield pre-tilt corrected concordant inclinations, but yield declinations discordant 30° clockwise in comparison to the South American apparent polar wander path. Both formations from the coastal ranges (Cifuncho and Pichidangui formations) yielded stable directions. Postfolding magnetizations in the Cifuncho Formation also show declinations discordant 30° clockwise and concordant inclinations. The Pichidangui Formation has two stable components: one of postfolding age is concordant to apparent polar wander path data, and one of probable prefolding (Late Triassic) age is concordant in declination, but discordant in inclination. Further work is needed to better define the prefolding magnetizations in the Pichidangui Formation, but at present these preliminary results are the first paleomagnetic signs of displaced terranes along the Pacific margin of Chile. If correct, the results suggest that the Pichidangui Formation was some 15° of latitude farther south during the Late Triassic and had likely moved northward to its present latitudinal position with respect to cratonic South America by Middle to Late Jurassic.

  3. Recent glacier variations at the Aconcagua basin, central Chilean Andes

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    Bown, Francisca; Rivera, Andrés; Acuña, César

    The majority of glaciers in central Chile have receded in recent decades, from >50 m to only a few meters per year, mainly in response to an increase in the 0°C isotherm altitude. The Aconcagua river basin (33° S) is one of the major glaciated basins in central Chile, with 121 km2 of ice in 2003. An earlier inventory using 1955 aerial photographs yielded a total surface area of 151 km2, implying a reduction in glacier area of 20% (0.63 km2 a-1) over the 48 years. Photographic stereo models, high-resolution satellite images (Landsat, ASTER) and SRTM data have been used to delineate glacier basins. A focus on Glaciar Juncal Norte, one of the largest glaciers in the basin, allows a more detailed analysis of changes. The glacier has exhibited a smaller reduction (14%) between 1955 and 2006, and the resulting elevation changes over this smaller period are not significant. The above reduction rates are lower than in other glaciers of central Chile and Argentina. This trend emphasizes water runoff availability in a river where most of the water in the dry summers is generated by glaciers and snowpack, and where most of the superficial water rights are already allocated. Ongoing hydrological research including modelling of future water runoff will improve our understanding.

  4. Seismic imaging of a megathrust splay fault in the North Chilean subduction zone (Central Andes)

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    Storch, Ina; Buske, Stefan; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Wigger, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Prominent trench-parallel fault systems in the arc and fore-arc of the Chilean subduction zone can be traced for several thousand kilometers in north-south direction. These fault systems possibly crosscut the entire crust above the subduction megathrust and are expected to have a close relationship to transient processes of the subduction earthquake cycles. With the motivation to image and characterize the structural inventory and the processes that occur in the vicinity of these large-scale fault zones, we re-processed the ANCORP'96 controlled-source seismic data set to provide images of the faults at depth and to allow linking geological information at the surface to subsurface structures. The correlation of the imaging results with observed hypocenter locations around these fault systems reveals the origin and the nature of the seismicity bound to these fault systems. Active and passive seismic data together yield a picture of a megathrust splay fault beneath the Longitudinal Valley at mid-crustal level, which can be observed from the top of the subduction plate interface and which seems to be connected to the Precordilleran Fault System (PFS) known at the surface. This result supports a previously proposed tectonic model where a megathrust splay fault defines the Western Altiplano as a crustal-scale fault-bend-fold. Furthermore, we clearly imaged two branches of the Uyuni-Kenayani Fault (UKF) in a depth range between 0 and 20 km. In summary, imaging of these faults is important for a profound understanding of the tectonic evaluation and characterization of the subduction zone environment, for which the results of this study provide a reliable basis.

  5. A glaciological baseline for the upper Olivares basin, Chilean Central Andes

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    Loriaux, T.; Bown, F.; Burger, F.; Cisternas, S.; Gacitúa, G.; Hernández, J.; Malmros, J.; Muñoz, C.; Oberreuter, J.; Rivera, A.; Silva, R.

    2013-12-01

    Santiago de Chile, with near 6.7 million of inhabitants, is located at the foot of the Andes, in the Maipo river basin, where there are approximately 424 km2 of ice, being the biggest glaciers, those located at the upper Olivares basin. Very little has been researched in recent years about the ongoing changes taking place in the area or about the glacier meltwater contribution or about the human impact on the glaciers. In order to tackle this deficiency, we began a research program in 2012, aiming to complete a glaciological baseline for this area, including glacier mass, energy and hydrological studies. For this purpose, we have established a detailed monitoring program on two glaciers where we installed 3 automatic weather stations, two arrays of stakes for mass balance studies, two automatic photographic cameras for monitoring albedo changes and two runoff stations, among several other instruments. Also, we have surveyed 5 glaciers with our airborne radar and lidar systems, allowing mapping their surface topographies at different seasons and the bedrocks underneath the ice. Analysis of satellite images shows generalized glacier area shrinkage, with a mean area lost of 25.5% since 1967 (total of 68.6 km2 in 1967 among 6 studied glaciers). The collected radar ice thickness data (maximum ice thickness of 223 m), allowed calculating a total volume of water equivalent of 3 km3 storage in 5 main glaciers of the basin. The GPS surveys of several stakes resulted in surface ice velocities between 1 and 5 m/yr. The mass balance studies showed high summer ablation rates, with an important role of sublimation, expressed as penitentes with heights of up to 1.5 m. Runoff contributed by Olivares Alfa glacier averaged 461 l/s between January and April 2013 with peaks of up to 2000 l/s, confirming the importance of glacier meltwater for the basin during summer months (January-March). The above numbers are some of the results obtained in the area, illustrating the importance of

  6. Dynamics of rock glaciers and debris-covered glaciers in the Central Chilean Andes over the last 50 years

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    Bodin, Xavier; Brenning, Alexander; Rojas Marchini, Fernanda

    2010-05-01

    temperature ranged from 7.9°C at 2987 m asl to 0.8°C at 4020 m asl, displaying a linear relationship with altitude similar to the air temperature lapse rate and that the snow cover lasted between 3 and 8 months. A negative winter thermal equilibrium was observed only at the highest (4020 m asl) site, suggesting the presence of perennial frozen ground underneath. GPS monitoring of the surface displacement between 2004 and 2009 revealed horizontal velocities ranging from 0.25 to 0.5 m/yr on the rock glaciers and the debris-covered glacier. The latter is affected by stronger vertical lowering (12-22 cm/yr), which is attributed to the intense downwasting and thermokarst development. As depicted by our study, the evolution of the cryosphere in the Central Chilean Andes during the last 50 years highlights the very different responses of glacier and permafrost to climate change. It also suggests an increasing relative importance of debris-covered glaciers and especially rock glaciers as stores of water compared to uncovered glaciers and thus ongoing changes in geomorphic and hydrological processes that still need to be investigated.

  7. Magmatism and the Shallowing of the Chilean Flatslab in the Central Andes

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    Kay, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    The magmatic history of the flatslab region between the Central and Southern Andean volcanic zones reflects shallowing of the slab, lithospheric thinning, narrowing of the asthenospheric wedge, crustal thickening and forearc removal by subduction erosion. Newly revised contours on the northern margin of the modern flatslab (Mulcahy et al. 2014) show the flattest part extends from ~28° to 33°S and is bounded by Pleistocene volcanic activity. An eastward broadening of the magmatic arc began after 18 Ma as westward drift of South America accelerated, but the most distinctive retroarc magmatism occurred after near normal subduction of the southward drifting Juan Fernandez Ridge began at ~11 Ma and ended as magmatism ceased in the Pampean ranges, ~ 700 km east of the trench at ~4.7 Ma. Recent seismic work in the retroarc area indicate a ~60 km thick crust under the Precordillera fold-thrust belt with transitions at ~20 and ~40 km that are considered to be the top of crystalline basement and an eclogitic facies transition. Chemical constraints from ~15-7 Ma magmatic rocks suggest eclogization is related to crustal thickening over the shallowing slab in accord with field relations for major thrusting in the region by ~8-7 Ma. High Ba/Th ratios in volcanic rocks are interpreted to reflect phengite breakdown in the mantle wedge with the fluids facilitating eclogization of the lower crust. Evidence for mantle melt contributions in the magmas up until ~7 Ma comes from more primitive isotopic values in 1088-1251 Ma amphibolite and granulite facies xenoliths (eNd = 0 to -3; 87Sr/86Sr =704-0.710) than in Miocene volcanic rocks (eNd = 0-1.7; 0.70325-0.70345; zircon eHf ~ 0). From ~8 to 3 Ma, the active volcanic arc front near 28°S and 33°S was translated ~ 40-50 km eastward in a suspected response to forearc removal by subduction erosion. Given the position of the arc and distance to the trench, the same amount of forearc was likely removed in the intervening flatslab region

  8. Parasite loads and altitudinal distribution of Liolaemus lizards in the central Chilean Andes Cargas parasitarias y distribución de lagartijas Liolaemus en los Andes de Chile central

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    JOHN H. CAROTHERS

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the distributions of ten species of Liolaemus lizards in the central Chilean Andes to the distributions of four types of parasites: malaria-causing Plasmodium, gut nematodes, ticks, and mites. We wanted to see if parasite numbers might be a factor in determining distributional limits of the lizards. We found that there was no evidence of malarial infestation of the lizards, that ticks were almost absent, that more often than not mite numbers decreased at the distributional limits of the lizards, and that gut nematodes confined to the herbivorous lizards in our sample may well be beneficial rather than detrimental. Rather than parasitism, other biotic interactions (e.g., predation or competition are more likely candidates as factors influencing lizard elevational distributions, as are abiotic characteristics such as microhabitat availabilities and thermal factorsEste estudio compara las distribuciones de diez especies de lagartijas Liolaemus en los Andes de Chile central, con las distribuciones de cuatro tipos de parásitos: Plasmodium causantes de malaria, nemátodos intestinales, garrapatas y ácaros. Quisimos verificar si los números de parásitos pudieran ser un factor determinante de los límites de distribución de las lagartijas. Encontramos que no había evidencia de infestación por malaria en las lagartijas; que las garrapatas estaban casi ausentes; que los números de ácaros más a menudo decrecían que aumentaban en los límites distribucionales de las lagartijas; y que los nemátodos intestinales confinados a las lagartijas herbívoras en nuestra muestra bien podían ser beneficiosos antes que dañinos. Más bien que parasitismo, otras interacciones bióticas (e.g., depredación o competencia son candidatos más probables como factores que influyen las distribuciones altitudinales de las lagartijas, además de características abióticas tales como la disponibilidad de microhábitats y los factores térmicos

  9. Geomorphic consequences of two large glacier and rock glacier destabilizations in the Central and northern Chilean Andes

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    Iribarren Anacona, Pablo; Bodin, Xavier

    2010-05-01

    Mountain areas are occasionaly affected by complex mass movements of high magnitude and large extent, which generally involve water, snow, rock and ice in variable proportions. Those events can take the form of rock avalanche, landslide, debris flow, glacier collapse or a combination of these phenomenons. In the Central Andes of Chile, they affect hardly accessible regions with low population, explaining the scarcity of previous studies. Nevertheless, during the last 30 years, some documented examples of such events in this region have shown that the volume of material involved is in the order of several millions of m³, the areas affected can reach several tenth of km² and the velocity of the movement can exceed several tenths of m/s. In this context, this study intends i) to inventory and to describe the main characteristics of events previously documented in the Central Andes of Chile, and ii) analyse in detail two recent events (2005-2007) never described before which have affected in one case a glacier and in another case a rock glacier. With the objectives of determining the possible chain of triggering factors and interpreting the event's significance in terms of geomorphic, cryogenic and climatic dynamics, we used air photographs, satellite imagery (Landsat TM & ETM+; Quick Bird when available in Google Earth 5.0), data from the closest meteorological stations, glacier mass balance data and seismic records to investigate the collapse of a rock glacier occurred in 2006 on the west-facing flank of the Cerro Las Tórtolas (6160 m asl; 29°58' S. - 69°55' W.), in the arid North of Chile, and the collapse of a glacier that occurred during austral summer 2006-2007 on the South side of the Tinguiririca Volcano (4075 m asl; 34°48' S. - 70°21' W.). The rock glacier collapse of the Cerro Las Tórtolas West flank occurred during the spring of 2006, but signs of destabilization were already observable since the end of 2005. The deposit of the collapsed mass of the

  10. Privatizing Water in the Chilean Andes: The Case of Las Vegas de Chiu-Chiu

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    Manuel Prieto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Chilean water model has been described as a textbook example of a free-market water system. This article contributes to the critiques of this model by showing the effect of its implementation in the Atacameño community of Chiu-Chiu, located in the Atacama Desert in the south-central Andes. In this community, the privatization of water rights ignored local water management practices that had produced a high-altitude wetland (known as a vega. This led to the inhabitants’ dispossession of crucial water rights and to wetland degradation. This process belies statements that the Chilean model relies on an unregulated market and instead highlights the state’s role in marginalizing local irrigation practices by reducing the water consumption of the indigenous population while keeping the copper mining industry (the main source of Chilean income and related growing urban populations supplied with water.

  11. Meteorological Conditions of Floods In The Chilean Andes Mountains

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    Vergara, J.

    Catastrophic floods occurred on mountains River during 2000 and 2001. The meteo- rological conditions of flood during the last five years have analyzed. For example, the flood of June 29 of 2000 occurred after one of extremely wettest June of the last 40 years were snowfall was 991cm in the Aconcagua Valley. Infrequently storms activ- ity generated a huge snowfall and rainfall over the Andes mountains on June of 2000 (1525mm in El Maule Valley) and the end of the unusually period, the flood was trig- gered by rising temperatures on the mountains and heavy rain (199mm in 24 hours) fall over the fresh snow on the morning of June 29 and floods wave developed and moved down along of the all river located on Central part of Chile, the foods peak was 2970.5m3/s on the El Maule basin in the morning of June 29. The regional meteoro- logical models with the hydrological forecasting was used for alert of the floods.

  12. Permafrost Distribution Modeling in the Semi-Arid Chilean Andes

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    Azócar, Guillermo F.; Brenning, Alexander; Bodin, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Mountain permafrost and rock glaciers in the dry Andes are of growing interest due to the increase in human activities in this remote area. Empirical models of mountain permafrost distribution based on the spatial analysis of intact and relict rock glaciers and mean annual air temperature (MAAT) have been established as a tool for regional-scale assessments of permafrost favorability across entire mountain ranges; however, this kind of model approach has never been applied for a large portion...

  13. Oroclinal Bending and Mountain Uplift in the Central Andes

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    Mpodozis, C.; Arriagada, C.; Roperch, P.

    2007-05-01

    The large paleomagnetic database now available for the Central Andes permits a good understanding of the overall spatial and temporal variations of rotations. Mesozoic to Early Paleogene rocks along the forearc of northern Chile (23°-28°S) record significant clockwise rotations (>25°) [Arriagada et al., 2006, Tectonics, doi:10.1029/2005TC001923]. Along the forearc of southern Peru, counterclockwise rotations recorded within flat lying red-beds (Moquegua Formation) increase from about -30° at 17.5°S to - 45° at15.5°S and decrease through time from the late Eocene to the late Oligocene-early Miocene [Roperch et al., 2006, Tectonics, doi:10.1029/2005TC001882]. Recently published thermo-chronological studies show evidence for strong exhumation within Bolivian Eastern Cordillera and the Puna plateau starting in the Eocene while structural studies indicate that the majority of crustal shortening in the Eastern Cordillera occurred during the Eocene-Oligocene, although the final stages of deformation may have continued through the Early Miocene. Rotations in the Peruvian and north Chilean forearc thus occurred at the same time than deformation and exhumation/uplift within the Eastern Cordillera. In contrast Neogene forearc rocks in southern Peru and northern Chile do not show evidences of rotation but low magnitude (10°) counterclockwise rotations are usually found in mid to late Miocene rocks from the northern Altiplano. These Neogene rotations are concomitant with shortening in the Sub-Andean zone and sinistral strike-slip faulting along the eastern edge of the northern Altiplano. We interpret the rotation pattern along the southern Peru and north Chile forearc as a result of strong late Eocene- late Oligocene oroclinal bending of the Central Andes associated with shortening gradients along the Eastern Cordillera associated both with the Abancay deflection and the Arica bend. The amount and spatial distribution of pre-Neogene shortening needed to account for

  14. Lycaenid caterpillars (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae eating flowers of Dalea pennellii var. chilensis (Fabaceae in the northern Chilean Andes

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    Héctor A. Vargas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Lycaenid caterpillars (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae eating flowers of Dalea pennellii var. chilensis (Fabaceae in the northern Chilean Andes. The shrub Dalea pennellii var. chilensis (Fabaceae is reported for the first time as a host plant for three Neotropical Polyommatini (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae, Polyommatinae: Hemiargus ramon (Dognin, 1887, Leptotes trigemmatus (Butler, 1881 and Nabokovia faga (Dognin, 1895, based on two collections performed in the western slopes of the northern Chilean Andes in two consecutive summers. The relative abundance was always above 90% for N. faga while it was always less than 5% for H. ramon and L. trigemmatus. Furthermore, N. faga was not found on inflorescences of other native Fabaceae examined in the study site. This pattern suggests a close relationship between N. faga and D. pennellii var. chilensis, at least at a local scale.

  15. Migrating deformation in the Central Andes from enhanced orographic rainfall

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    Norton, Kevin; Schlunegger, Fritz

    2011-12-01

    Active shortening in the Central Andes shifted from the western to the eastern margin between 10-7Ma. Here we propose that this shift was primarily controlled by changes in erosion patterns. The uplift of the Andes blocked easterly winds, resulting in enhanced orographic rainfall on the eastern margin and reduced rainfall on the western margin. Lower erosion rates, associated with the arid conditions, caused the western margin to steepen inhibiting internal deformation and the migration of deformation to the eastern margin where it is active today. River channel profiles on the western margin are indicative of long-term transience from an older tectonic event whereas those on the eastern margin reflect ongoing coupled climatic-tectonic feedback. Both critical wedge theory and local-scale fault friction calculations support this interpretation. This work emphasizes the role that orographic rainfall and erosion can have on the orogen-scale development of mountain belts.

  16. Paleoatimetry of southern Tibet and the central Andes

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    Quade, J.; Dettinger, M. P.; DeCelles, P. G.; Leary, R.; Kapp, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Here we explore a variety of isotopic systems to reconstruct paleoatitude in southern Tibet and the central Andes. A multi-system approach is essential since the necessary mineral archives are not always available, and because diagenetic resetting of some systems clearly occurs. In the central Andes at ~24°S, carbonate is rare due to hyperaridity, and where present, evaporation in soils and lakes completely alters the primary meteoric signal. Waters of hydration of volcanic glass are a much more promising target in this region given the prevalence of volcanic tuffs. We have analyzed the δD value of a suite of modern and ancient glasses back to 34 Ma that show little change in elevation in the western Cordillera of the Andes. By contrast, the eastern Cordillera of the Andes rose in the last 15 Ma. This pattern is consistent with gradual eastward propagation of the whole orogen at this latitude, including the trench, forearc, magmatic arc, and foreland. The paleoaltimetry of Tibet poses quite different challenges to those in South America. Volcanic glass archives are so far unavailable, whereas carbonate archives are common but in some cases diagenetically reset. We have focused on records of conventional δ18O values and clumped isotope thermometry. One must treat both archives with great caution due to resetting, especially clumped isotopes. Available evidence suggests that southern Tibet has been near current elevations since the early Miocene. For the pre- Miocene we present new isotopic/paleosol records found along the suture zone of India and Asia that we believe partly chronicle the rise of the suture zone from near sea-level to >4000 m today.

  17. Crustal-thickness variations in the central Andes

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    Beck, Susan L.; Zandt, George; Myers, Stephen C.; Wallace, Terry C.; Silver, Paul G.; Drake, Lawrence

    1996-05-01

    We estimated the crustal thickness along an east-west transect across the Andes at lat 20°S and along a north-south transect along the eastern edge of the Altiplano from data recorded on two arrays of portable broadband seismic stations (BANJO and SEDA). Waveforms of deep regional events in the downgoing Nazca slab and teleseismic earthquakes were processed to isolate the P-to-S converted phases from the Moho in order to compute the crustal thickness. We found crustal-thickness variations of nearly 40 km across the Andes. Maximum crustal thicknesses of 70 74 km under the Western Cordillera and the Eastern Cordillera thin to 32 38 km 200 km east of the Andes in the Chaco Plain. The central Altiplano at 20°S has crustal thicknesses of 60 to 65 km. The crust also appears to thicken from north (16°S, 55 60 km) to south (20°S, 70 74 km) along the Eastern Cordillera. The Subandean zone crust has intermediate thicknesses of 43 to 47 km. Crustal-thickness predictions for the Andes based on Airy-type isostatic behavior show remarkable overall correlation with observed crustal thickness in the regions of high elevation. In contrast, at the boundary between the Eastern Cordillera and the Subandean zone and in the Chaco Plain, the crust is thinner than predicted, suggesting that the crust in these regions is supported in part by the flexural rigidity of a strong lithosphere. With additional constraints, we conclude that the observation of Airy-type isostasy is consistent with thickening associated with compressional shortening of a weak lithosphere squeezed between the stronger lithosphere of the subducting Nazca plate and the cratonic lithosphere of the Brazilian craton.

  18. Glacier area changes in the Rio Olivares catchment, Central Andes 1955-2013

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    Malmros, Jeppe.; Wilson, Ryan; Mernild, Sebastian; Fensholt, Rasmus

    2014-05-01

    Here, we present a new glacier inventory for the Rio Olivares catchment (531 km2), Central Chilean Andes (33°14`44 S, 70°07`26 V). Area changes for 145 glaciers were analyzed for the period 1955 through 2013 based on terrestrial photogrammetry, aerial photography, and satellite imagery. The results show that glacier area not including rock glaciers reduced by ~18 % - from 93.8 (1955) to 75.9 km2 (2013), equivalent to an estimated volume loss of 40 % (2.9 km3) based on volume-area scaling functions. Rock glacier area increased from 10.4 (1955) to 10.7 km2 (2013). Additionally, a detailed area, hypsometry, and elevation time series analysis for the five largest glaciers in the catchment was conducted, showing that terminus positions ascended by an average of 351 ± 8 meters and slope increased 0.7° on average. A comparison between changes in glacier area and variations in the El Niño Southern Oscillation index indicates a significant climatic link.

  19. Reconsidering the glacier to rock glacier transformation problem: New insights from the central Andes of Chile

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    Monnier, Sébastien; Kinnard, Christophe

    2015-06-01

    The glacier to rock glacier transformation problem is revisited from a previously unseen angle. A striking case in the Juncal Massif (located in the upper Aconcagua Valley, Chilean central Andes) is documented. There, the Presenteseracae debris-covered glacier has advanced several tens of metres and has developed a rock glacier morphology in its lower part over the last 60 years. The conditions for a theoretically valid glacier to rock glacier transformation are discussed and tested. Permafrost probability in the area of the studied feature is highlighted by regional-scale spatial modelling together with on-site shallow ground temperature records. Two different methods are used to estimate the mean surface temperature during the summer of 2014, and the sub-debris ice ablation rates are calculated as ranging between 0.05 and 0.19 cm d- 1, i.e., 0.04 and 0.17 m over the summer. These low ablation rates are consistent with the development of a coherent surface morphology over the last 60 years. Furthermore, the rates of rock wall retreat required for covering the former glacier at Presenteseracae lie within the common 0.1-2 mm y- 1 range, assuming an average debris thickness and a range of debris-covering time intervals. The integration of the geomorphological observations with the numerical results confirms that the studied debris-covered glacier is evolving into a rock glacier.

  20. New isotopic ages and the timing of orogenic events in the Cordillera Darwin, southernmost Chilean Andes

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    Hervé, F.; Nelson, E.; Kawashita, K.; Suárez, M.

    1981-10-01

    The Cordillera Darwin, a structural culmination in the Andes of Tierra del Fuego, exposes an orogenic core zone that has undergone polyphase deformation and metamorphism. Some of the classic problems of orogenic zones have remained unanswered in the Cordillera Darwin: the age of deformed plutonic rocks, the distinction of structurally reactivated basement and metamorphosed cover rocks, and the timing of orogenic events. This study addresses and partially answers these questions. A well-constrained Rb-Sr isochron age of157±8m.y. and an initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio of 0.7087 obtained from a pre-tectonic granitic suite suggest a genetic relation between this suite and Upper Jurassic silicic volcanic rocks in the cover sequence (Tobifera Formation), and also suggest involvement of continental crust in formation of these magmas. A poorly constrained Rb-Sr isochron age of240±40m.y. obtained from supposed basement schists is consistent with field relations in the area which suggest a late Paleozoic/early Mesozoic metamorphism for these pre-Late Jurassic rocks. However, because of scatter in the data and the uncertainties involved in dating metasedimentary rocks, the significance of the isotopic age is dubious. Compilation of previously published ages in the area [9] with new mineral ages reported here indicate that "early Andean" orogenic events occurred between 100 and 84 m.y. ago, and that subduction-related magmatism has contributed, probably discontinuously, to the crustal evolution of the region throughout the Mesozoic.

  1. Thermal remote sensing of ice-debris landforms using ASTER: an example from the Chilean Andes

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    Brenning, A.; Peña, M. A.; Long, S.; Soliman, A.

    2012-03-01

    Remote sensors face challenges in characterizing mountain permafrost and ground thermal conditions or mapping rock glaciers and debris-covered glaciers. We explore the potential of thermal imaging and in particular thermal inertia mapping in mountain cryospheric research, focusing on the relationships between ground surface temperatures and the presence of ice-debris landforms on one side and land surface temperature (LST) and apparent thermal inertia (ATI) on the other. In our case study we utilize ASTER daytime and nighttime imagery and in-situ measurements of near-surface ground temperature (NSGT) in the Mediterranean Andes during a snow-free and dry observation period in late summer. Spatial patterns of LST and NSGT were mostly consistent with each other both at daytime and at nighttime. Daytime LST over ice-debris landforms was decreased and ATI consequently increased compared to other debris surfaces under otherwise equal conditions, but NSGT showed contradictory results, which underlines the complexity and possible scale dependence of ATI in heterogeneous substrates with the presence of a thermal mismatch and a heat sink at depth. While our results demonstrate the utility of thermal imaging and ATI mapping in a mountain cryospheric context, further research is needed for a better interpretation of ATI patterns in complex thermophysical conditions.

  2. Gravity modelling of the Ramadas Caldera (Argentinean Puna, central Andes)

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    Casas, A. [Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Facultad de Geologia; Hernandez, E.; Marti, J. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Barcelona (Spain). Inst. de Ciencias de la Terra Jaume Almera; Petrinovic, I. [Universidad Nacional de Salta (Argentina)

    1995-12-31

    In order to identify and characterize the event area of abundant Upper Miocene proximal rhyolitic pyroclastic deposits and extrusive domes which concentrate in the Ramadas area, near Sant`Antonio de los Cobres (Salta) at the Puna Altiplano (Central Andes), a detailed gravity survey has been carried out. Regional Bouguer gravity data were augmented with new 173 gravity observations measured sufficiently close-spaced to resolve the short wavelength produced by the structure of interest. Besides, the geophysical survey was done in conjunction with geologic and geochemical studies which were critically important to our interpretation. After the separation of the regional trend, the residual anomaly map displays a circular gravity low reaching-80 m Gal centered over scarce outcrops of rhyolitic and pyroclastic. This gravity low is interpreted as produced by block subsidence along ring fractures during eruption and/or deflation of the chamber. As the accumulation of thick, low density rock types in the zone of collapse is responsible of the prominent negative gravity anomalies, them has been used to estimated the thickness of caldera infill. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs

  3. Bofedales: high altitude peatlands of the central Andes Bofedales: turberas de alta montaña de los Andes centrales

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    FRANCISCO A SQUEO

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an exceptional group of alpine peatlands in the world situated in the arid grasslands of the central Andes. The peatlands in northern Chile occur in the most arid part of their range. Members of the Juncaceae are the primary peat-forming plant species. Fresh and mildly saline groundwaters originate from glaciers, snowmelt and rain are the water sources for the northern Chile peatlands. Paleoecological investigations suggest that some peatlands are recent features of the landscape having developed within the last three thousand years or less. These peatlands are unique, extremely fragile water features sensitive to climate changes and human disturbances such as regional mining activity. Much more work is required to develop scientifically based sound management and conservation programs for the rare plants and animals that live in them and to ensure the future livelihoods of the indigenous peoples who depend on themExiste un grupo excepcional de turberas (bofedales de alta montaña en el mundo situados en la estepa árida de los Andes centrales. Los bofedales en el norte de Chile están presentes en la parte más árida de su rango. Las principales especies de plantas responsables de la formación de turba corresponden a miembros de Juncaceae. El agua fresca y medianamente salina de los bofedales proviene de agua subterránea asociada a riachuelos proveniente de glaciares, derretimiento de nieve y lluvia. Investigaciones paleoecológicas sugieren que algunos bofedales son integrantes recientes del paisaje, habiéndose desarrollado durante los últimos tres mil años o menos. Estos bofedales son entidades únicas, extremadamente frágiles por su dependencia del agua, sensibles a los cambios climáticos y vulnerables a la alteración humana tal como la actividad minera en la región. Se requiere mucho más trabajo para desarrollar programas de manejo y conservación, con sólidas bases científicas, de las plantas y animales que viven en

  4. Evolution of Irruputuncu volcano, Central Andes, northern Chile

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    Rodríguez, I.; Roche, O.; Moune, S.; Aguilera, F.; Campos, E.; Pizarro, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Irruputuncu is an active volcano located in northern Chile within the Central Andean Volcanic Zone (CAVZ) and that has produced andesitic to trachy-andesitic magmas over the last ˜258 ± 49 ka. We report petrographical and geochemical data, new geochronological ages and for the first time a detailed geological map representing the eruptive products generated by the Irruputuncu volcano. The detailed study on the volcanic products allows us to establish a temporal evolution of the edifice. We propose that the Irruputuncu volcanic history can be divided in two stages, both dominated by effusive activity: Irruputuncu I and II. The oldest identified products that mark the beginning of Irruputuncu I are small-volume pyroclastic flow deposits generated during an explosive phase that may have been triggered by magma injection as suggested by mingling features in the clasts. This event was followed by generation of large lava flows and the edifice grew until destabilization of its SW flank through the generation of a debris avalanche, which ended Irruputuncu I. New effusive activity generated lavas flows to the NW at the beginning of Irruputuncu II. In the meantime, lava domes that grew in the summit were destabilized, as shown by two well-preserved block-and-ash flow deposits. The first phase of dome collapse, in particular, generated highly mobile pyroclastic flows that propagated up to ˜8 km from their source on gentle slopes as low as 11° in distal areas. The actual activity is characterized by deposition of sulfur and permanent gas emissions, producing a gas plume that reaches 200 m above the crater. The maximum volume of this volcanic system is of ˜4 km3, being one of the smallest active volcano of Central Andes.

  5. The nature of orogenic crust in the central Andes

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    Beck, Susan L.; Zandt, George

    2002-10-01

    The central Andes (16°-22°S) are part of an active continental margin mountain belt and the result of shortening of the weak western edge of South America between the strong lithospheres of the subducting Nazca plate and the underthrusting Brazilian shield. We have combined receiver function and surface wave dispersion results from the BANJO-SEDA project with other geophysical studies to characterize the nature of the continental crust and mantle lithospheric structure. The major results are as follows: (1) The crust supporting the high elevations is thick and has a felsic to intermediate bulk composition. (2) The relatively strong Brazilian lithosphere is underthrusting as far west (65.5°W) as the high elevations of the western part of the Eastern Cordillera (EC) but does not underthrust the entire Altiplano. (3) The subcrustal lithosphere is delaminating piecemeal under the Altiplano-EC boundary but is not completely removed beneath the central Altiplano. The Altiplano crust is characterized by a brittle upper crust decoupled from a very weak lower crust that is dominated by ductile deformation, leading to lower crustal flow and flat topography. In contrast, in the high-relief, inland-sloping regions of the EC and sub-Andean zone, the upper crust is still strongly coupled across the basal thrust of the fold-thrust belt to the underthrusting Brazilian Shield lithosphere. Subcrustal shortening between the Altiplano and Brazilian lithosphere appears to be accommodated by delamination near the Altiplano-EC boundary. Our study suggests that orogenic reworking may be an important part of the "felsification" of continental crust.

  6. Forecasting the impact of global changes on the water resources of a mountainous catchment in the Chilean Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelland, D.; Campéon, C.; Dezetter, A.; Jourde, H.

    2012-04-01

    This study aims to simulate the complex interrelationships between climate forcing, human pressure and dynamics of groundwater and surface water of the upper Elqui catchment (5 660 km2) in the Chilean Andes. The water resources of this mountainous, semi-arid catchment has been undergoing a growing pressure because of high climate variability and of the economic mutations of various sectors (agriculture, tourism), which have impacted water availability of the area. Due to the agriculture-based development in the region, water scarcity is thus a matter of great concern for this basin. Hydrological simulations were performed with a conceptual model that takes into account a shallow reservoir supplied by precipitation and feeding evapotranspiration, surface/sub-surface runoff and infiltration, and (ii) a deep reservoir fed by infiltration and generating the baseflow. A third reservoir, in which fluxes are controlled by temperature, has been introduced to account for the snowmelt regime of the catchment. A 30-year period (1979-2008) was chosen to capture long-term hydro-climatic variability due to alternating ENSO and LNSO events. Then water uses (dam functioning, agricultural and domestic withdrawals) were integrated into the model. The model was calibrated and validated with streamflow data on the basis of a multi-objective function that aggregates a variety of goodness-of-fit criteria. Prospective climatic and anthropogenic scenarios were finally elaborated and forced into the model in order to propose midterm (2050 horizon) simulations. The model correctly reproduces the observed discharge at the basin outlet. Depending on the modelling complexity, NSE coefficients are about 0.82-0.90 over the calibration period (1979-1990) and 0.78-0.84 over the validation period (1991-2008). The volume error between observation and simulation is lower than 15% over the whole period studied. The dynamics of both the water level in the deep conceptual reservoir and the water table

  7. Glaciation and topographic evolution of the Central Patagonian Andes since 6 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christeleit, E. C.; Laemel, R.; De Wolf, W. E.; Shuster, D. L.; Brandon, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    New and existing thermochronological data are used to model glacial erosion and topographic evolution of the central Patagonian Andes (~47S) over the last 6 Ma. The modern Andes are cut by large valleys and fjords with local valley relief of at least 2.5 km. It is currently thought that a formerly uniformly high Andes was 'buzzed' down to the elevation of the equilibrium line altitude, presumably in the last 2 Ma concurrent with late Cenozoic global cooling. However, studies of glacial debris show that glaciers were present in Patagonia as early as 6 Ma. The extent of these early glaciations is unclear, but recent work suggests that glacial valleys in the central Patagonian Andes were carved at a steady rate beginning at 6 Ma, implying that valley incision may be an important process in the topographic evolution of glaciated mountain ranges, rather than cirque retreat. To understand how valley relief has formed in the Andes, we dated 30 samples from Steffen Fjord in Chile using apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology. We use this new data and existing thermochronological data in the region to estimate the topographic form of the central Andes at 6 Ma and model how the valley relief has evolved since the initiation of glaciation using Pecube.

  8. Evolution of crustal thickening in the central Andes, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, Nathan; McQuarrie, Nadine; Ryan, Jamie; Karimi, Bobak; Beck, Susan; Zandt, George

    2015-09-01

    Paleoelevation histories from the central Andes in Bolivia have suggested that the geodynamic evolution of the region has been punctuated by periods of large-scale lithospheric removal that drive rapid increases in elevation at the surface. Here, we evaluate viable times and locations of material loss using a map-view reconstruction of the Bolivian orocline displacement field to forward-model predicted crustal thicknesses. Two volumetric models are presented that test assumed pre-deformation crustal thicknesses of 35 km and 40 km. Both models predict that modern crustal thicknesses were achieved first in the northern Eastern Cordillera (EC) by 30-20 Ma but remained below modern in the southern EC until ≤10 Ma. The Altiplano is predicted to have achieved modern crustal thickness after 10 Ma but only with a pre-deformation thickness of 50 km, including 10 km of sediment. At the final stage, the models predict 8-25% regional excess crustal volume compared to modern thickness, largely concentrated in the northern EC. The excess predicted volume from 20 to 0 Ma can be accounted for by: 1) crustal flow to the WC and/or Peru, 2) localized removal of the lower crust, or 3) a combination of the two. Only models with initial crustal thicknesses >35 km predict excess volumes sufficient to account for potential crustal thickness deficits in Peru and allow for lower crustal loss. However, both initial thickness models predict that modern crustal thicknesses were achieved over the same time periods that paleoelevation histories indicate the development of modern elevations. Localized removal of lower crust is only necessary in the northern EC where crustal thickness exceeds modern by 20 Ma, prior to paleoelevation estimates of modern elevations by 15 Ma. In the Altiplano, crustal thicknesses match modern values at 10 Ma and can only exceed modern values by 5 Ma, post-dating when modern elevations were thought to have been established. Collectively, these models predict that

  9. The Largest Holocene Eruption of the Central Andes Found

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Turiel, J.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Saavedra, J.; Perez-Torrado, F.; Carracedo, J.; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J.; Esteban, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present new data and interpretation about a major eruption -spreading ˜110 km3 ashes over 440.000 km2- long thought to have occurred around 4200 years ago in the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex (CBVC) in NW Argentina. This eruption may be the biggest during the past five millennia in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes, and possibly one of the largest Holocene eruptions in the world. The environmental effects of this voluminous eruption are still noticeable, as evidenced by the high content of arsenic and other trace elements in the groundwaters of the Chacopampean Plain. The recognition of this significant volcanic event may shed new light on interpretations of critical changes observed in the mid-Holocene paleontological and archaeological records, and offers researchers an excellent, extensive regional chronostratigraphic marker for reconstructing mid-Holocene geological history over a wide geographical area of South America. More than 100 ashes were sampled in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay during different field campaigns. Ash samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), grain size distributions laser diffraction, and geochemically by electron microprobe (EMPA) and laser ablation-HR-ICP-MS. New and published 14C ages were calibrated to calendar years BP. The age of the most recent CBVC eruption is 4407-4093 cal y BP, indirectly dated by 14C of associated organic sediment within the lower part of a proximal fall deposit of this event (26°53'16.05"S-67°44'48.68"W). This is the youngest record of a major volcanic event in the Southern Puna. This age is consistent with other radiocarbon dates of organic matter in palaeosols underlying or overlying distal ash fall deposits. Based on their products, all of rhyolitic composition, we have distinguished 8 main episodes during the evolution of the most recent CBVC eruption: 1) the eruption began with a white rhyolite lava dome extrusion; 2) followed by a Plinian

  10. Deformation, deposition, and surface uplift in the hinterland of the Central Andes, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leier, A.; McQuarrie, N.; Garzione, C. N.; Eiler, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Paleoelevation histories from mountain belts like the Central Andes of Bolivia provide important constraints on the timing and geodynamic mechanisms associated with surface uplift. New stable isotope data from paleosol carbonate nodules in the Altiplano and Eastern Cordillera of the Central Andes of Bolivia indicate a previously undocumented episode of surface uplift occurred in the region between ca. 24 and 17 Ma. Oxygen isotope and clumped-isotope thermometry values from paleosol carbonate in strata >24 Ma suggest paleoelevations as low as sea-level. Paleosol carbonate in strata ca. 17 Ma have oxygen isotope and clumped-isotope thermometry values, which using modern lapse rates, indicate an increase in elevation of approximately 3 km. Relatively undeformed Oligocene and Miocene strata overlap faulted Paleozoic rocks of the Bolivian Eastern Cordillera, indicating deposition and surface uplift post-dated and was decoupled from upper crustal deformation. Together, geological data from the area record an initial period of deformation and exhumation, a subsequent period of sediment deposition and overlap, and then an episode of surface uplift that was not accompanied by upper crustal deformation. We propose accommodation for the Oligocene-Miocene strata was associated with mantle and lowermost crustal processes, and the subsequent increase in surface elevation was an isostatic response to removal of dense material through delamination or drip. Combined with existing data sets in the Central Andes, these new data suggest multiple, regionally-variable, and diachronous periods of surface uplift occurred within the Central Andes during the Cenozoic Era.

  11. Altitudinal vegetation belts in the high-Andes of central Chile (33°S Pisos altitudinales de vegetación en los Andes de Chile central (33°S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohengrin A. Cavieres

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The limits of alpine vegetation belts have been established mainly based on physiognomic criteria. However, a more objective approach for fixing limits of vegetation belts are methods based on species composition and relative abundance of each species. While these methods are more time consuming, they are more detailed and permit the detection of physical factors affecting the limits of vegetation belts. In this paper we: 1 describe the altitudinal changes of vegetation above timberline, 2 compare vegetation belts defined with physiognomy and two floristic methods (a qualitative one based on altitudinal changes in species composition, and a quantitative one based on changes in dominant species; and 3 detect some environmental factors responsible for the altitudinal distribution of alpine vegetation between 2100 and 3700 masl in the Andes of Santiago, central Chile (33°S. There was a complete agreement between the different methods in delimiting the subalpine belt. However, in the lower alpine belt (the cushion's belt floristic methods subdivided it in 2-3 sub-belts. In the floristic methods, elevations 3500-3700 that formed the higher alpine belt segregated in separate ways because they have no species in common. Physiognomic descriptions lose relevant information about species distribution, especially at higher elevations. Mean annual temperature and nitrogen content of soil are the main environmental factors affecting the altitudinal limits of vegetation belts in the central Chilean AndesLa delimitación de los pisos altitudinales de vegetación andina se ha basado principalmente en criterios fisionómicos. Sin embargo, un criterio más objetivo para la delimitación es usar métodos basados en la composición y abundancia relativa de las especies presentes. Mientras estos métodos requieren de un mayor esfuerzo de muestreo, son más detallados y permiten detectar factores físicos involucrados en la delimitación altitudinal de la vegetaci

  12. Contemporary ice-elevation changes on central Chilean glaciers using SRTM1 and high-resolution DEMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivero, Sebastian; MacDonell, Shelley

    2016-04-01

    Glaciers located in central Chile have undergone significant retreat in recent decades. Whilst studies have evaluated area loss of several glaciers, there are no detailed studies of volume losses. This lack of information restricts not only estimations of current and future contributions to sea level rise, but also has limited the evaluation of freshwater resource availability in the region. Recently, the Chilean Water Directorate has supported the collection of field and remotely sensed data in the region which has enabled glacier changes to be evaluated in greater detail. This study aims to compare high-resolution laser scanning DEMs acquired by the Chilean Water Directorate in April 2015 with the recently released SRTM 1 arc-second DEM (˜30 m) acquired in February 2000 to calculate geodetic mass balance changes for three glaciers in a catchment in central Chile over a 15-year period. Detailed analysis of the SRTM and laser scanning DEMs, together with the glacier outlines enable the quantification of elevation and volume changes. Glacier outlines from February 2000 were obtained using the multispectral analysis of a Landsat TM image, whereas outlines from April 2015 were digitised from high resolution glacier orthophotomosaics. Additionally, we accounted for radar penetration into snow and/or ice by evaluating elevation differences between SRTM C-and X-bands, as well as mis-registration between SRTM DEM and the high-resolution DEMs. Over the period all glaciers show similar ice wastage in the order of 0.03 km3 for the debris-covered and non-covered glaciers. However, whilst on the non-covered glaciers mass loss is largely related to elevation and the addition of surface sediment, on the debris-covered glacier, losses are related to the development of thermokarst features. By analysing the DEM in conjunction with Landsat images, we have detected changes in the sediment cover of the non-covered glaciers, which is likely to change the behaviour of the surface mass

  13. Origin of the regional stress field along the Liquine-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ), Southern Chilean Andes by means of FE Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md. Rafiqul Islam

    2009-01-01

    The Liquine-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ) of southern Chilean Andes is one of the largest active strike-slip fault zones. There is an ongoing debate regarding the origin of the stress field along the LOFZ due to its complex geometry. This paper represents a study of the origins of the LOFZ regional stress field. Stress fields are calculated by finite element (FE) analysis. The two possible stress origins, i.e., oblique plate convergence and ridge collision/indenter tectonics of Chile ridge against Peru-Chile trench, have been emphasized in the present study. Three types of boundary conditions for the three particular models have been applied to calculate stress fields. Models are assumed to be elastic and plane stress condition. Modeling results are presented in terms of four parameters, i. e., orientation of maximum horizontal stress (σHmax), displacement vector, strain distribution, and maximum shear stress (τmax) contour line within the model. The results of the first model with oblique plate convergence show inconsistency between the geometric shape of the LOFZ and the distribution of the four parameters. Although more realistic results are obtained from the second model with normal ridge collision, there are few coincident in the LOFZ geometry and regional stress field. The third model with normal and oblique ridge collision is reasonable in understanding the origin of stress field and geometrical condition in the lithosphere of the LOFZ.

  14. Holocene denudation rates from the superhumid southernmost Chilean Patagonian Andes (53°S) deduced from lake sediment budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Sonja; Kilian, Rolf; Baeza, Oscar; Lamy, Frank; Arz, Helge

    2013-04-01

    Holocene denudation rates and their regional variations in the superhumid and temperate climate of the southernmost Patagonian Andes are poorly surveyed. Therefore we have investigated denudation in five small lake catchments (0.11-1.62 km2) across a precipitation gradient from 600 to > 9000 mm yr- 1 in southernmost Chile at 53°S. Variations in denudation rates can be defined most precisely by using small catchments and short time spans (Holocene) thus can be related to variable bedrock types, vegetation cover, elevation, and climate. Minimum physical denudation rates were determined from sediment budgets based on sediment echosounder data and physical properties of sediment cores. The Holocene denudation rates vary from 0.08 mm kyr- 1 in the highly elevated, bare granitic rock catchments to 9.01 mm kyr- 1 in the low and vegetated catchments with a basement of sedimentary rocks. These values are comparable with those from similar areas in Norway, Sweden, and NW Iceland. The high annual precipitation in the study area has only a minor effect on denudation. Enhanced geomorphic activity during paraglacial conditions caused a faster denudation after the glacier retreat until either the clastic, glacial detritus was removed or the catchment was covered with vegetation. Chemical comparisons between basement rocks and lake sediments indicate a pronounced chemical denudation in catchments with peaty soils and low soil water pH values of 3 to 5. The Holocene surface lowering rates are on average 200 fold lower than Cenozoic surface lowering rates calculated from fission-track data for the southern Andes. This discrepancy can be explained by significantly higher erosion rates during glacial periods.

  15. Surface uplift in the Central Andes driven by growth of the Altiplano Puna Magma Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Jonathan P.; Ward, Kevin M.; de Silva, Shanaka L.; Zandt, George; Beck, Susan L.; Finnegan, Noah J.

    2016-10-01

    The Altiplano-Puna Magma Body (APMB) in the Central Andes is the largest imaged magma reservoir on Earth, and is located within the second highest orogenic plateau on Earth, the Altiplano-Puna. Although the APMB is a first-order geologic feature similar to the Sierra Nevada batholith, its role in the surface uplift history of the Central Andes remains uncertain. Here we show that a long-wavelength topographic dome overlies the seismically measured extent of the APMB, and gravity data suggest that the uplift is isostatically compensated. Isostatic modelling of the magmatic contribution to dome growth yields melt volumes comparable to those estimated from tomography, and suggests that the APMB growth rate exceeds the peak Cretaceous magmatic flare-up in the Sierran batholith. Our analysis reveals that magmatic addition may provide a contribution to surface uplift on par with lithospheric removal, and illustrates that surface topography may help constrain the magnitude of pluton-scale melt production.

  16. Miocene orographic uplift forces rapid hydrological change in the southern central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmann, Alexander; Sachse, Dirk; Mulch, Andreas; Pingel, Heiko; Tofelde, Stefanie; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2016-10-01

    Rainfall in the central Andes associated with the South American Monsoon and the South American Low-Level Jet results from orographic effects on atmospheric circulation exerted by the Andean Plateau and the Eastern Cordillera. However, despite its importance for South American climate, no reliable records exist that allow decoding the evolution of thresholds and interactions between Andean topography and atmospheric circulation, especially regarding the onset of humid conditions in the inherently dry southern central Andes. Here, we employ multi-proxy isotope data of lipid biomarkers, pedogenic carbonates and volcanic glass from the Eastern Cordillera of NW Argentina and present the first long-term evapotranspiration record. We find that regional eco-hydrology and vegetation changes are associated with initiation of moisture transport via the South American Low-Level Jet at 7.6 Ma, and subsequent lateral growth of the orogen at 6.5 Ma. Our results highlight that topographically induced changes in atmospheric circulation patterns, not global climate change, were responsible for late Miocene environmental change in this part of the southern hemisphere. This suggests that mountain building over time fundamentally controlled habitat evolution along the central Andes.

  17. Active orogeny of the south-central Andes studied with GPS geodesy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kendrick

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We present GPS measurements of the crustal velocity field in the southern Central Andes between the Santa Cruz corner and the Malargüe fold and thrust belt, and model this interseismic velocity field as the combination of an ephemeral, elastic signal associated with locking of the main plate boundary, and a steady and non-reversing component of displacement associated with localized backarc convergence and growth of the mountain belt. We find that this second component, i.e. the ongoing and permanent displacement of the forearc and the high Andes relative to the craton, can be modeled very well as a steady clockwise rotation of an Andean microplate about a pole located in southern Argentina. Near the Malargüe Basin, this microplate (or block is moving nearly parallel to the strike of the orogen, transporting material towards the bend in the central Andes. Farther north, in the southern limb of the Central Andes, the motion of this same crustal block is directed nearly perpendicular to the strike of the mountain belt. Our results suggest that permanent deformation rates in the backarc range from a maximum of ~ 6-7 mm/yr in the Bolivian Subandes to less than ~ 3 mm/yr in the Argentine Precordillera and Malargue fold and thrust belt. It is likely that most active backarc deformation is accruing in a narrow zone (~ 50 km wide associated with the backarc boundary (usually defined as the thrust front though at this stage it is impossible to distinguish whether specific backarc structures are actively accruing strain.

  18. Facing unprecedented drying of the Central Andes? Precipitation variability over the period AD 1000-2100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukom, Raphael; Rohrer, Mario; Calanca, Pierluigi; Salzmann, Nadine; Huggel, Christian; Acuña, Delia; Christie, Duncan A.; Morales, Mariano S.

    2015-08-01

    Projected future trends in water availability are associated with large uncertainties in many regions of the globe. In mountain areas with complex topography, climate models have often limited capabilities to adequately simulate the precipitation variability on small spatial scales. Also, their validation is hampered by typically very low station density. In the Central Andes of South America, a semi-arid high-mountain region with strong seasonality, zonal wind in the upper troposphere is a good proxy for interannual precipitation variability. Here, we combine instrumental measurements, reanalysis and paleoclimate data, and a 57-member ensemble of CMIP5 model simulations to assess changes in Central Andes precipitation over the period AD 1000-2100. This new database allows us to put future projections of precipitation into a previously missing multi-centennial and pre-industrial context. Our results confirm the relationship between regional summer precipitation and 200 hPa zonal wind in the Central Andes, with stronger Westerly winds leading to decreased precipitation. The period of instrumental coverage (1965-2010) is slightly dryer compared to pre-industrial times as represented by control simulations, simulations from the past Millennium, ice core data from Quelccaya ice cap and a tree-ring based precipitation reconstruction. The model ensemble identifies a clear reduction in precipitation already in the early 21st century: the 10 year running mean model uncertainty range (ensemble 16-84% spread) is continuously above the pre-industrial mean after AD 2023 (AD 2028) until the end of the 21st century in the RCP2.6 (RCP8.5) emission scenario. Average precipitation over AD 2071-2100 is outside the range of natural pre-industrial variability in 47 of the 57 model simulations for both emission scenarios. The ensemble median fraction of dry years (defined by the 5th percentile in pre-industrial conditions) is projected to increase by a factor of 4 until 2071-2100 in

  19. SPOC Experiment: First Results From Seismological Studies Along the Central Chilean Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierer, P. O.; Tilmann, F.; Flueh, E. R.; Kopp, H.; Gossler, J.

    2002-12-01

    The investigations of the RV SONNE cruise SO161 during the SPOC experiment (Subduction Processes Off Chile) concentrated on the area of the central Chilean margin west off Valparaiso. The main goal of this experiment is to investigate the effects of subducting oceanic seafloor relief on the seismicity of this domain. A marine array of 23 ocean bottom hydrophones and seismometers (OBH/S) was deployed for a period of ten weeks to monitor local earthquakes from this part of the Chilean margin where volcanic structures like the aseismic Juan Fernandez Ridge enter the trench. A strong decrease in dip angle of the subducting plate (flat slab) is observed here, resulting in a segmentation of the margin. The flat slab segment correlates with the absence of Quaternary volcanism and a central valley on the South American plate. It is assumed that a connection between the buoyancy of thickened oceanic crust and the occurrence of shallow subduction earthquakes exists. We present preliminary results of hypocenter determinations, founded on about 300 localisable events based on the OBH/S recordings. The distribution of hypocenters shows a considerable seismic activity within the 15 km - 50 km depth range. The special focus on the transitional domain of the slope allowed us to map in detail the seaward termination of the seismogenic zone. In addition, we used seismological land data, recorded from the Central Chilean Network (CCN) and a number of temporary landstations to supplement the marine data set. Comparative and joint hypocenter analysis from both marine and land data, increases the precision of locations and allows an assessment of systematic errors. We can show the need of both, on- and offshore data sets, to determine offshore earthquake locations with high precision. The seismological investigations are in close collaboration with the active seismic studies carried out during the scope of the SPOC experiment.

  20. The Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans originated in central Mexico rather than the Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Erica M; Tabima, Javier F; Cooke, David E L; Restrepo, Silvia; Fry, William E; Forbes, Gregory A; Fieland, Valerie J; Cardenas, Martha; Grünwald, Niklaus J

    2014-06-17

    Phytophthora infestans is a destructive plant pathogen best known for causing the disease that triggered the Irish potato famine and remains the most costly potato pathogen to manage worldwide. Identification of P. infestan's elusive center of origin is critical to understanding the mechanisms of repeated global emergence of this pathogen. There are two competing theories, placing the origin in either South America or in central Mexico, both of which are centers of diversity of Solanum host plants. To test these competing hypotheses, we conducted detailed phylogeographic and approximate Bayesian computation analyses, which are suitable approaches to unraveling complex demographic histories. Our analyses used microsatellite markers and sequences of four nuclear genes sampled from populations in the Andes, Mexico, and elsewhere. To infer the ancestral state, we included the closest known relatives Phytophthora phaseoli, Phytophthora mirabilis, and Phytophthora ipomoeae, as well as the interspecific hybrid Phytophthora andina. We did not find support for an Andean origin of P. infestans; rather, the sequence data suggest a Mexican origin. Our findings support the hypothesis that populations found in the Andes are descendants of the Mexican populations and reconcile previous findings of ancestral variation in the Andes. Although centers of origin are well documented as centers of evolution and diversity for numerous crop plants, the number of plant pathogens with a known geographic origin are limited. This work has important implications for our understanding of the coevolution of hosts and pathogens, as well as the harnessing of plant disease resistance to manage late blight.

  1. On Restoring Sedimentary Basins for Post-Depositional Deformation - Paleozoic Basins of the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlburg, H.

    2015-12-01

    The reconstruction and interpretation of sedimentary basins incorporated into folded and thrusted mountain belts is strongly limited by the style and intensity of shortening. This problem is exacerbated if deformation is polyphasic as is the case for the Paleozoic basins in the central Andes. Some of these have been deformed by folding and thrusting during at least 3 events in the Late Ordovician, the Late Paleozoic and Cenozoic. A realistic reconstruction of the original basin dimensions and geometries from outcrops and maps appears to be almost impossible. We present results of a stepwise reconstruction of the Paleozoic basins of the central Andes by restoring basin areas and fills accounting for crustal shortening. The structurally most prominent feature of the central Andes is the Bolivian Orocline which accomodated shortening in the last 45 Ma on the order of between 300 and 500 km. In a first step basins were restored by accounting for Cenozoic rotation and shortening by deconvolving the basins using an enhanced version of the oroclinal bending model of Ariagada et al. (2008). Results were then restored stepwise for older deformation. Constraints on these subsequent steps are significantly poorer as values of shortening can be derived only from folds and thusts apparent in outcrops. The amount of shortening accomodated on unexposed and therefore unknown thrusts can not be quantified and is a significant source of error very likely leading to an underestimation of the amount of shortening. Accepting these limitations, basin restoration results in an increase in basin area by ≥100%. The volumes of stratigraphically controlled basin fills can now be redistributed over the wider, restored area, translating into smaller rates of accumulation and hence required subsidence. The restored rates conform to those of equivalent modern basin settings and permit a more realistic and actualistic analysis of subsidence drivers and the respective tectonic framework.

  2. Fore-arc structure, plate coupling and isostasy in the Central Andes: Insight from gravity data modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Sophia; Mahatsente, Rezene

    2017-02-01

    The central segment of the Peru-Chile subduction zone has not seen a major earthquake of similar scale to the megathrust Iquique event in 1877 (Magnitude ∼8.8). The plate interface between the subducting and overriding plates in the central segment of the subduction zone is highly coupled and is accumulating elastic energy. Here, we assessed the locking mechanism and isostatic state of the Central Andes based on gravity models of the crust and upper mantle structure. The density models are based on satellite gravity data and are constrained by velocity models and earthquake hypocenters. The gravity models indicate a high density batholithic structure in the fore-arc, overlying the subducting Nazca plate. This high density crustal structure is pressing downward into the slab and locking the plate interface. Thus, plate coupling in the Central Andes may result from pressure exerted by high density fore-arc structures and buoyancy force on the subducting Nazca plate. The increased compressive stress closer to the trench, due to the increased contact between the subducting and overriding plates, may increase the intraplate coupling in the Central Andes. To assess the isostatic state of the Central Andes, we determined the residual topography of the region (difference between observed and isostatic topography). There is a residual topography of ∼800 m in the western part of the Central Andes that cannot be explained by the observed crustal thicknesses. The residual topography may be attributed to mantle wedge flow and subduction of the Nazca plate. Thus, part of the observed topography in the western part of the Central Andes may be dynamically supported by mantle wedge flow below the overriding plate.

  3. Prediction of extreme floods in the Central Andes by means of Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boers, Niklas; Bookhagen, Bodo; Barbosa, Henrique; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen; Marengo, Jose

    2014-05-01

    Based on a non-linear synchronisation measure and complex network theory, we present a novel framework for the prediction of extreme events of spatially embedded, interrelated time series. This method is general in the sense that it can be applied to any type of spatially sampled time series with significant interrelations, ranging from climate observables to biological or stock market data. In this presentation, we apply our method to extreme rainfall in South America and show how this leads to the prediction of more than 60% (90% during El Niño conditions) of extreme rainfall events in the eastern Central Andes of Bolivia and northern Argentina, with only 1% false alarms. From paleoclimatic to decadal time scales, the Central Andes continue to be subject to pronounced changes in climatic conditions. In particular, our and past work shows that frequency as well as magnitudes of extreme rainfall events have increased significantly during past decades, calling for a better understanding of the involved climatic mechanisms. Due to their large spatial extend and occurrence at high elevations, these extreme events often lead to severe floods and landslides with disastrous socioeconomic impacts. They regularly affect tens of thousands of people and produce estimated costs of the order of several hundred million USD. Alongside with the societal value of predicting natural hazards, our study provides insights into the responsible climatic features and suggests interactions between Rossby waves in polar regions and large scale (sub-)tropical moisture transport as a driver of subseasonal variability of the South American monsoon system. Predictable extreme events result from the propagation of extreme rainfall from the region of Buenos Aires towards the Central Andes given characteristic atmospheric conditions. Our results indicate that the role of frontal systems originating from Rossby waves in polar latitudes is much more dominant for controlling extreme rainfall in

  4. Interseismic coupling and seismic potential along the Central Andes subduction zone

    OpenAIRE

    Chlieh, Mohamed; Perfettini, Hugo; Tavera, Hernando; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Remy, Dominique; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu; Rolandone, Frédérique; Bondoux, Francis; Gabalda, Germinal; Bonvalot, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    We use about two decades of geodetic measurements to characterize interseismic strain build up along the Central Andes subduction zone from Lima, Peru, to Antofagasta, Chile. These measurements are modeled assuming a 3-plate model (Nazca, Andean sliver and South America Craton) and spatially varying interseismic coupling (ISC) on the Nazca megathrust interface. We also determine slip models of the 1996 M(w) = 7.7 Nazca, the 2001 M(w) = 8.4 Arequipa, the 2007 M(w) = 8.0 Pisco and the M(w) = 7....

  5. Active orogeny of the south-central Andes studied with GPS geodesy Orogenia activa de los Andes centro-australes estudiada mediante geodesia de GPS

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    E. Kendrick

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We present GPS measurements of the crustal velocity field in the southern Central Andes between the Santa Cruz corner and the Malargüe fold and thrust belt, and model this interseismic velocity field as the combination of an ephemeral, elastic signal associated with locking of the main plate boundary, and a steady and non-reversing component of displacement associated with localized backarc convergence and growth of the mountain belt. We find that this second component, i.e. the ongoing and permanent displacement of the forearc and the high Andes relative to the craton, can be modeled very well as a steady clockwise rotation of an Andean microplate about a pole located in southern Argentina. Near the Malargüe Basin, this microplate (or block is moving nearly parallel to the strike of the orogen, transporting material towards the bend in the central Andes. Farther north, in the southern limb of the Central Andes, the motion of this same crustal block is directed nearly perpendicular to the strike of the mountain belt. Our results suggest that permanent deformation rates in the backarc range from a maximum of ~ 6-7 mm/yr in the Bolivian Subandes to less than ~ 3 mm/yr in the Argentine Precordillera and Malargue fold and thrust belt. It is likely that most active backarc deformation is accruing in a narrow zone (~ 50 km wide associated with the backarc boundary (usually defined as the thrust front though at this stage it is impossible to distinguish whether specific backarc structures are actively accruing strain.Se presentan mediciones GPS del campo de velocidad en los Andes centro-australes entre el extremo norte de Santa Cruz y la faja plegada de Malargüe. Se modela el campo de velocidad intersísmico como la combinación de una señal elástico/efímera asociada con el anclaje del límite principal de placas, y una componente constante, no reversible de desplazamiento asociada con una convergencia localizada en el retroarco y crecimiento del

  6. Hydrological Modeling of Highly Glacierized Basins (Andes, Alps, and Central Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Omani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT was used to simulate five glacierized river basins that are global in coverage and vary in climate. The river basins included the Narayani (Nepal, Vakhsh (Central Asia, Rhone (Switzerland, Mendoza (Central Andes, Argentina, and Central Dry Andes (Chile, with a total area of 85,000 km2. A modified SWAT snow algorithm was applied in order to consider spatial variation of associated snowmelt/accumulation by elevation band across each subbasin. In previous studies, melt rates varied as a function of elevation because of an air temperature gradient while the snow parameters were constant throughout the entire basin. A major improvement of the new snow algorithm is the separation of the glaciers from seasonal snow based on their characteristics. Two SWAT snow algorithms were evaluated in simulation of monthly runoff from the glaciered watersheds: (1 the snow parameters are lumped (constant throughout the entire basin and (2 the snow parameters are spatially variable based on elevation bands of a subbasin (modified snow algorithm. Applying the distributed SWAT snow algorithm improved the model performance in simulation of monthly runoff with snow-glacial regime, so that mean RSR decreased to 0.49 from 0.55 and NSE increased to 0.75 from 0.69. Improvement of model performance was negligible in simulations of monthly runoff from the basins with a monsoon runoff regime.

  7. Bird conservation would complement landslide prevention in the Central Andes of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Peñuela, Natalia; Pimm, Stuart L

    2015-01-01

    Conservation and restoration priorities often focus on separate ecosystem problems. Inspired by the November 11th (2011) landslide event near Manizales, and the current poor results of Colombia's Article 111 of Law 99 of 1993 as a conservation measure in this country, we set out to prioritize conservation and restoration areas where landslide prevention would complement bird conservation in the Central Andes. This area is one of the most biodiverse places on Earth, but also one of the most threatened. Using the case of the Rio Blanco Reserve, near Manizales, we identified areas for conservation where endemic and small-range bird diversity was high, and where landslide risk was also high. We further prioritized restoration areas by overlapping these conservation priorities with a forest cover map. Restoring forests in bare areas of high landslide risk and important bird diversity yields benefits for both biodiversity and people. We developed a simple landslide susceptibility model using slope, forest cover, aspect, and stream proximity. Using publicly available bird range maps, refined by elevation, we mapped concentrations of endemic and small-range bird species. We identified 1.54 km(2) of potential restoration areas in the Rio Blanco Reserve, and 886 km(2) in the Central Andes region. By prioritizing these areas, we facilitate the application of Article 111 which requires local and regional governments to invest in land purchases for the conservation of watersheds.

  8. Bird conservation would complement landslide prevention in the Central Andes of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Ocampo-Peñuela

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Conservation and restoration priorities often focus on separate ecosystem problems. Inspired by the November 11th (2011 landslide event near Manizales, and the current poor results of Colombia’s Article 111 of Law 99 of 1993 as a conservation measure in this country, we set out to prioritize conservation and restoration areas where landslide prevention would complement bird conservation in the Central Andes. This area is one of the most biodiverse places on Earth, but also one of the most threatened. Using the case of the Rio Blanco Reserve, near Manizales, we identified areas for conservation where endemic and small-range bird diversity was high, and where landslide risk was also high. We further prioritized restoration areas by overlapping these conservation priorities with a forest cover map. Restoring forests in bare areas of high landslide risk and important bird diversity yields benefits for both biodiversity and people. We developed a simple landslide susceptibility model using slope, forest cover, aspect, and stream proximity. Using publicly available bird range maps, refined by elevation, we mapped concentrations of endemic and small-range bird species. We identified 1.54 km2 of potential restoration areas in the Rio Blanco Reserve, and 886 km2 in the Central Andes region. By prioritizing these areas, we facilitate the application of Article 111 which requires local and regional governments to invest in land purchases for the conservation of watersheds.

  9. Tectonic imprint in magnetic fabrics in sediments from the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roperch, P.; Arriagada, C.; Chauvin, A.; Carlotto, V.

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic fabrics recorded by continental sediments from the Central Andes were systematically measured for about 200 sites also studied for tectonic rotation. Most sediments of Cenozoic age are fine-grained red beds with a significant content of magnetite of volcanoclastic origine. 80 sites were collected in the Puna and Argentinan Andes, 40 sites in the Bolivian Altiplano, 63 sites in the Abancay- Cusco region of Southern Peru and 27 sites in the Moquegua basin in the forearc of southern Peru. In the Moquegua basin where the sedimentary beds are nearly horizontal, samples from the Eocene - Oligocene Moquegua formation have an oblate magnetic fabrics parallel to bedding and scaterred lineations. In contast, to the east within the Altiplano and Puna Plateaus, a triaxial ellipsoid with a well-defined magnetic lineation is usually recorded. At most localities, the orientation of the magnetic lineation correlates with the orientation of fold axes. Along the Central Andes from north to south, the orientation of magnetic lineations rotates from NW-SE to NE-SW. Compaction and tectonic strain appear to be the two main factors controlling AMS in these continental red beds. The information related to the hydrodynamic conditions acting when the sediments were deposited appears to be fully overprinted. Incipient tectonic strain is recorded during the early stages of deformation. When the sediments are not strongly deformed, the magnetic lineation behaves apparently like a passive marker recording tectonic rotations about vertical and horizontal axes. In most paleomagnetic studies applied to tectonics, tilted sedimentary beds are assumed to have been rotated around an horizontal axis. Without a detailed local structural study, the classic tilt correction leads to an apparent rotation when a possible plunge of the fold axis is not detected (MacDonald, 1980). Non-horizontal magnetic lineation suggests either non-cylindrical folding and/or interference of two phases of compressive

  10. Characterization of Baker Fjord region through its heavy metal content on sediments (Central Chilean Patagonia

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    Ramón Ahumada

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of heavy metals content (Ba, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sr and Zn in sediments of the Baker Fjord and surrounding channels in the central region of the Chilean fjords (47°45'S, 48°15'S is analyzed. The aim of the study was characterized the patterns of abundance and distribution of these metals in surface sediments. The area corresponds to a poorly studied zone with low human activity. Distribution patterns would be influenced by rainfall conditions (local erosion, fluvial (continental sediments carried by rivers, glacier (glacier flour and estuarine circulation. Cluster analysis allows differentiation among the sampled sites and group with similar characteristics. Finally, the concentrations found were contrasted with average values of metamorphic rocks and show with some certainty that the values found for calendar for this area and the greatest concentrations are the result of natural enrichment.

  11. Historical Glacier Variations in Southern South America since the Little Ice Age: Examples from Lago Viedma (Southern Patagonia) and Mendoza (Central Andes), Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaumer, S. U.; Masiokas, M.; Pitte, P.; Berthier, E.; Guerrido, C.; Luckman, B. H.; Villalba, R.

    2013-12-01

    The evaluation of historical information can give valuable insight into past glacier dynamics, especially before the onset of modern measurements. Early photographs and maps depict changes for selected glaciers in southern South America. Within this study, written documents and pictorial historical records (drawings, sketches, engravings, photographs, chronicles, topographic maps) are analysed critically, with a particular focus on two regions: Lago Viedma (El Chaltén, southern Patagonia, 49.5°S, 73.0°W) and the Río Mendoza basin (Mendoza, central Andes, 33.1°S, 69.9°W). For the Lago Viedma area, early historical data for the end of the 19th century stem from the expedition of the Chilean-Argentinean border commission. In addition, the expedition by the German Scientific Society, conducted between 1910 and 1916, and the later photographs by Alberto M. de Agostini give an excellent depiction of the glaciers. Glaciar Viedma is a calving glacier which shows distinct retreat from 1896 until the present (though with a stationary or possibly advancing glacier front between 1930/31 and 1951/52), similar to the neighbouring glaciers. On the contrary, nearby Glaciar Perito Moreno shows an exceptional behaviour: the glacier front has been advancing during the first half of the 20th century, staying in an advanced position until the present. At the beginning of the 20th century, Robert Helbling explored the Argentinean-Chilean Andes together with his friend Friedrich Reichert. In the summer of 1909/10, they started a detailed survey of the highly glacierized Juncal-Tupungato mountains (Río Mendoza basin), leading to the first accurate topographic map of the area published in 1914. Its outstanding quality allows a comparison with contemporary satellite imagery. The area received attention in 1934, when the sudden drainage of a glacier-dammed lake in the upper Río del Plomo valley caused fatalities and considerable damage to constructions and the Transandine Railway. A

  12. The Bolivian Orocline and its implications for the origin of the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriagada, C.

    2015-12-01

    The tectonic evolution of the Central Andes includes a complex combination of thrusting, wrenching and block rotation leading progressively to the curvature of the orogenic system of the South American continental margin at 18ºS (Bolivian Orocline). Tectonic deformation in the Bolivian Orocline cannot be realistically restored using information from balanced cross sections alone, as the deformation includes an important component of block rotation, associated to counterclockwise block rotation in southern Peru and clockwise rotation in northern Chile. Recent work shows that block rotations in the forearc are essentially pre-early Miocene, predating the onset of Neogene shortening in the Sub Andean zone. Most rotations in the forearc of northern Chile where acquired through a single tectonic event during the Paleogene-early Miocene which probably coincides with the Eocene orogen-wide Incaic event which affected large regions of the central Andes between ca. 50 and 40 Ma. Results from 2D restoration experiments support the hypothesis of the Paleogene formation of the Bolivian Orocline, as a consequence of differential shortening, concentrated in the Eastern Cordillera of Bolivia, southern Peru and northwestern Argentina. Within the southern central Andes four additional curvatures including striking changes in the pattern of rotations have been discovered. From north to south these are the Antofagasta-Calama Lineament, Vallenar, Maipo and Arauco oroclines. However, an important part of rotation needs to be balanced, in the forearc region, by two major conjugate oblique shear zones (Abancay Deflection and Antofagasta-Calama Lineament). These structural features are probably related to inherited lithospheric discontinuities associated with the accretion of basement terranes which could be responsible for producing and delimitating significant and abrupt changes in the magnitude of the Central Andean Rotation Pattern along the margin. While shortening and crustal

  13. The Glacier Inventory of the Central Andes of Argentina (31°-35°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri Hidalgo, L.; Zalazar, L.; Castro, M.; Pitte, P.; Masiokas, M. H.; Ruiz, L.; Villalba, R.; Delgado, S.; Gimenez, M.; Gargantini, H.

    2015-12-01

    The National Law for protection of glaciers in Argentina envisages the development of a National Inventory of Glaciers. All glaciers and periglacial landforms which are important as strategic water resource must be properly identified and mapped. Here we present a detailed and complete glacier and rock glacier inventory of the Central Andes of Argentina between 31° and 35°S. This semi-arid region contains some of the highest mountains of South America and concentrates the second most glacierized area in Argentina after the Patagonian Andes. To develop the inventory, we used remotely sensed data and related techniques complemented with field surveys. Clean ice and perennial snowfields were identified applying an automatic extraction method on medium spatial-resolution images. Debris-covered and rock glaciers were manually digitized on higher spatial-resolution images. With minor modifications, the present digital inventory is consistent with GLIMS standards. For each glacier, we derived 38 database fields, adding five specific attributes for rock glaciers, which are not included in the original GLIMS database. In total we identified 8069 glaciers covering an area of 1768 km2. Debris-covered ice and rock glaciers represent 57% of the total inventoried area. In this region, rock glaciers are a common feature in the arid landscape and constitute an important water reserve at regional scale. Many glaciers were characterized by gradual transition from debris-covered glaciers, in the upper part, to rock glaciers, in the lower sector. The remaining 43% includes clean ice glaciers and permanent snowfields. These are mostly mountain and valley-type glaciers with medium-to-small sizes. This detailed inventory constitutes a valuable contribution to the ongoing global efforts (e.g. WGI, RGI and GLIMS) to map the world's glaciers. It is also the base for ongoing glaciological, climatological and hydrological studies in this portion of southern Andes.

  14. Subduction Zone Science - Examples of Seismic Images of the Central Andes and Subducting Nazca Slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Scire, A. C.; Ward, K. M.; Portner, D. E.; Bishop, B.; Ryan, J. C.; Wagner, L. S.; Long, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Subduction has shaped large regions of the Earth and constitute over 55,000 km of convergent plate margin today. The subducting slabs descend from the surface into the lower mantle and impacts earthquake occurrence, surface uplift, arc volcanism and mantle convection as well as many other processes. The subduction of the Nazca plate beneath the South America plate is one example and constitutes the largest present day ocean-continent convergent margin system and has built the Andes, one of the largest actively growing mountain ranges on Earth. This active margin is characterized by along-strike variations in arc magmatism, upper crustal shortening, crustal thickness, and slab geometry that make it an ideal region to study the relationship between the subducting slab, the mantle wedge, and the overriding plate. After 20 years of portable seismic deployments in the Central Andes seismologists have combined data sets and used multiple techniques to generate seismic images spanning ~3000 km of the South American subduction zone to ~800 km depth with unprecedented resolution. For example, using teleseismic P- waves we have imaged the Nazca slab penetrating through the mantle transition zone (MTZ) and into the uppermost lower mantle. Our tomographic images show that there is significant along-strike variation in the morphology of the Nazca slab in the upper mantle, MTZ, and the lower mantle, including possible tears, folding, and internal deformation. Receiver function studies and surface wave tomography have revealed major changes in lithospheric properties in the Andes. Improved seismic images allow us to more completely evaluate tectonic processes in the formation and uplift of the Andes including: (1) overthickened continental crust driven by crustal shortening, (2) changes in slab dip and coupling with the overlying plate (3) localized lithospheric foundering, and (4) large-scale mantle and crustal melting leading to magmatic addition and/or crustal flow. Although

  15. Albedo changes, Milankovitch forcing, and late quaternary climate changes in the central Andes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kull, C.; Grosjean, M. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Geography

    1998-11-01

    Late quaternary humidity changes resulted in substantial modifications of the land surface characteristics in the Altiplano of the Atacama desert, central Andes. Reconstructions of surface albedo, top-of-atmosphere (TOA) albedo, and shortwave net radiation in the Andes of northern Chile for 20,14,10,7 and 0 ka suggest that surface and TOA albedo increased substantially during periods of relatively humid environmental conditions (i.e., with large palaeolakes, glaciers and dense vegetation). The decrease of summer shortwave net radiation and seasonality during the late-glacial/early Holocene humid phase (14 to 10 ka) due to Earth`s surface and atmospheric characteristics added to the effect of orbitally driven negative deviations of southern Hemisphere austral summer insolation and minimum seasonality at 20 S. Therefore, in situ radiative forcing is, in contrast to the Northern Hemisphere tropics, not a suitable explanation for enhanced convective precipitation and, ultimately, humid climatic conditions. Our results suggest that late Quaternary humidity changes on the Altiplano reflect a collective response to (1) environmental changes in the source area of the moisture (e.g., reexpansion of the rain forest and increased release of latent heat over Amazonia and the Chaco, warm sea surface temperatures in the E Pacific) and, (2) large-scale circulation patterns and wave structures in the upper troposphere (strength and position of the Bolivian high, divergent flow stimulating convection over the Altiplano), or that they even reflect a response to (3) interhemispherical teleconnections. (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 45 refs.

  16. Landsat Thematic Mapper observations of debris avalanche deposits in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, P. W.; Wells, G. L.

    1988-01-01

    Remote sensing with the Landsat Thematic Mapper of debris avalanche deposits in the Central Andes between 18 and 27 deg S revealed, for the first time, the presence of 28 breached volcanic cones and 11 major volcanic debris avalanche deposits, several of which cover areas in excess of 100 sq km. It is concluded that such avalanche deposits are normal products of the evolution of large composite volcanoes, comparable with lava and pyroclastic flow deposits. A statistical survey of 578 composite volcanoes in the same area indicated that a majority of cones which achieve edifice heights between 2000 and 3000 m may undergo sector collapse. The paper describes morphological criteria for identifying breached composite cones and volcanic debris avalanches using orbital images.

  17. Contenidos de uranio de lavas recientes en el sector sur de los Andes centrales

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    Guerra, N.

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the distribution of U in modern lava -flows of the southern part from the Central Andes (16°-28° S. For a given SiO2, content of the rocks, U abundance increases from west to east in a transects to the Andean Belt, while the depth of the subduction zone increases and the thickness of the continental curst decreases. Besides, U content tends to inerease steadly with the latitude, while the thick of the continental crust and the depth of the seismic zone decreases southward. Thus, on the basis of the available data, we are in a position to suggest that the U behavior in the studied lavas depends on the alkalanity and magmatic history of each volcanic center.

    Se presenta un estudio de distribución de U en lavas modernas del sector sur de los Andes centrales (16°-28° S. Para rocas de contenidos similares en SiO2 la abundancia de U crece de oeste a este en un perfil transversal al cordón andino, mientras que aumenta la profundidad de subducción, y disminuye la potencia de la corteza continental. Además, mientras la potencia de la corteza continental y la profundidad de la zona sísmica de Benioff disminuyen hacia el sur, U tiende a aumentar con la latitud. Así, y basado en los datos disponibles, estamos en posición de sugerir que el comportamiento de U en las rocas estudiadas, depende de la alcalinidad y de la historia magmática de cada centro volcánico.

  18. Subduction and collision processes in the Central Andes constrained by converted seismic phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, X; Sobolev, S V; Kind, R; Oncken, O; Bock, G; Asch, G; Schurr, B; Graeber, F; Rudloff, A; Hanka, W; Wylegalla, K; Tibi, R; Haberland, C; Rietbrock, A; Giese, P; Wigger, P; Röwer, P; Zandt, G; Beck, S; Wallace, T; Pardo, M; Comte, D

    The Central Andes are the Earth's highest mountain belt formed by ocean-continent collision. Most of this uplift is thought to have occurred in the past 20 Myr, owing mainly to thickening of the continental crust, dominated by tectonic shortening. Here we use P-to-S (compressional-to-shear) converted teleseismic waves observed on several temporary networks in the Central Andes to image the deep structure associated with these tectonic processes. We find that the Moho (the Mohorovicić discontinuity--generally thought to separate crust from mantle) ranges from a depth of 75 km under the Altiplano plateau to 50 km beneath the 4-km-high Puna plateau. This relatively thin crust below such a high-elevation region indicates that thinning of the lithospheric mantle may have contributed to the uplift of the Puna plateau. We have also imaged the subducted crust of the Nazca oceanic plate down to 120 km depth, where it becomes invisible to converted teleseismic waves, probably owing to completion of the gabbro-eclogite transformation; this is direct evidence for the presence of kinetically delayed metamorphic reactions in subducting plates. Most of the intermediate-depth seismicity in the subducting plate stops at 120 km depth as well, suggesting a relation with this transformation. We see an intracrustal low-velocity zone, 10-20 km thick, below the entire Altiplano and Puna plateaux, which we interpret as a zone of continuing metamorphism and partial melting that decouples upper-crustal imbrication from lower-crustal thickening.

  19. Classification of debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers in the Andes of central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Jason R.; Bellisario, Antonio C.; Ferrando, Francisco A.

    2015-07-01

    In the Dry Andes of Chile (17 to 35° S), debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers are differentiated from true glaciers based on the percentage of surface debris cover, thickness of surface debris, and ice content. Internal ice is preserved by an insulating cover of thick debris, which acts as a storage reservoir to release water during the summer and early fall. These landforms are more numerous than glaciers in the central Andes; however, the existing legislation only recognizes uncovered or semicovered glaciers as a water resource. Glaciers, debris-covered glaciers, and rock glaciers are being altered or removed by mining operations to extract valuable minerals from the mountains. In addition, agricultural expansion and population growth in this region have placed additional demands on water resources. In a warmer climate, as glaciers recede and seasonal water availability becomes condensed over the course of a snowmelt season, rock glaciers and debris-covered glaciers contribute a larger component of base flow to rivers and streams. As a result, identifying and locating these features to implement sustainable regional planning for water resources is important. The objective of this study is to develop a classification system to identify debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers based on the interpretation of satellite imagery and aerial photographs. The classification system is linked to field observations and measurements of ice content. Debris-covered glaciers have three subclasses: surface coverage of semi (class 1) and fully covered (class 2) glaciers differentiates the first two forms, whereas debris thickness is critical for class 3 when glaciers become buried with more than 3 m of surface debris. Based on field observations, the amount of ice decreases from more than 85%, to 65-85%, to 45-65% for semi, fully, and buried debris-covered glaciers, respectively. Rock glaciers are characterized by three stages. Class 4 rock glaciers have pronounced

  20. Interseismic coupling and seismic potential along the Central Andes subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlieh, Mohamed; Perfettini, Hugo; Tavera, Hernando; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Remy, Dominique; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu; Rolandone, FréDéRique; Bondoux, Francis; Gabalda, Germinal; Bonvalot, Sylvain

    2011-12-01

    We use about two decades of geodetic measurements to characterize interseismic strain build up along the Central Andes subduction zone from Lima, Peru, to Antofagasta, Chile. These measurements are modeled assuming a 3-plate model (Nazca, Andean sliver and South America Craton) and spatially varying interseismic coupling (ISC) on the Nazca megathrust interface. We also determine slip models of the 1996 Mw = 7.7 Nazca, the 2001 Mw = 8.4 Arequipa, the 2007 Mw = 8.0 Pisco and the Mw = 7.7 Tocopilla earthquakes. We find that the data require a highly heterogeneous ISC pattern and that, overall, areas with large seismic slip coincide with areas which remain locked in the interseismic period (with high ISC). Offshore Lima where the ISC is high, a Mw˜8.6-8.8 earthquake occurred in 1746. This area ruptured again in a sequence of four Mw˜8.0 earthquakes in 1940, 1966, 1974 and 2007 but these events released only a small fraction of the elastic strain which has built up since 1746 so that enough elastic strain might be available there to generate a Mw > 8.5 earthquake. The region where the Nazca ridge subducts appears to be mostly creeping aseismically in the interseismic period (low ISC) and seems to act as a permanent barrier as no large earthquake ruptured through it in the last 500 years. In southern Peru, ISC is relatively high and the deficit of moment accumulated since the Mw˜8.8 earthquake of 1868 is equivalent to a magnitude Mw˜8.4 earthquake. Two asperities separated by a subtle aseismic creeping patch are revealed there. This aseismic patch may arrest some rupture as happened during the 2001 Arequipa earthquake, but the larger earthquakes of 1604 and 1868 were able to rupture through it. In northern Chile, ISC is very high and the rupture of the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake has released only 4% of the elastic strain that has accumulated since 1877. The deficit of moment which has accumulated there is equivalent to a magnitude Mw˜8.7 earthquake. This study thus

  1. Shortening in the Central Andes at the transition to flat slab subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safipour, R.; DeCelles, P. G.; Carrapa, B.; Kapp, P. A.; Gehrels, G. E.; Reiners, P. W.

    2011-12-01

    Shortening in the Central Andes is considered to decrease north and south of the apex of the Bolivian orocline, mainly owing to differences in the pre-existing stratigraphic architecture of the continental margin. Estimates of shortening in the central Andes of northern Argentina remain poorly documented, but are required for assessment of the regional kinematic history of the orogenic system. The problem is acute at the north to south transition from the high elevation Puna plateau to the lower elevation region of the Sierras Pampeanas intra-foreland block uplifts, which corresponds with a transition to a flat segment of the subducting Nazca plate. Although deformation in the Eastern Cordillera appears to have propagated forelandward from west to east, the trend in the Sierras Pampeanas is not clear from existing data. We mapped the structures along a roughly E-W transect at latitude 28°S in the Sierra de Las Planchadas of the northern Sierras Pampeanas to measure finite strain and kinematic indicators, and to develop a regional restorable cross section for measuring total shortening. We also sampled for low-T thermochronology in order to determine the timing of exhumation and inferred thrust propagation. A minimum of 40 km of shortening in the Sierra de Las Planchadas is estimated from our restored cross section. When added to the 20 km shortening documented in ranges to the east by previous studies, this brings the total minimum estimated shortening at this latitude to ~60 km. Apatite fission track ages from the hanging walls of thrusts are ~20 Ma, and apatite helium ages range from 10 Ma west of the range to 2.3 Ma in the Fiambalá basin which borders the range to the east. Cretaceous and Paleogene cooling ages are observed in ranges to the east of the Sierra de Las Planchadas, so the young cooling ages found in this study suggest that exhumation was complex and possibly diachronous at this latitude. To the extent that exhumation occurs simultaneously with

  2. Las ignimbritas del complejo volcánico Coranzuli (Puna Argentina-Andes Centrales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martí, J.

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available The Coranzulí is a large Upper Miocene volcanic complex located on a NE-SW and NW-SE regional faults intersection, at 66º 15' W 23º S, in the Northwest of Argentina in Jujuy province. It corresponds to one of four large volcanic complexes which represent the end of Transversal Volcanic Chaines in La Puna Argentina in the Central Andes. The volcanic activity was characterized by at least four separate ignimbrite eruptions which produced four different ignimbrite sheets. These are well welded, very crystal-rich, lithie poor ignimbrites and have a moderate to high pumice content. The total volume of the Coranzuli ignimbrites exeededs 650 Km3. Preliminary data indicate that the eruption oeeurred from a homogeneous magmatic chamber without zoning. The emplacement characteristics of the ignimbrites and the lack of basal or interbedded plinian fall deposits suggest that the eruptions developed quickly to massive proportions.El Coranzuli es uno de los grandes complejos volcánicos que representan el remate final de las Cadenas Volcánicas Transversales de la Puna Argentina, en los Andes Centrales. Se trata de un complejo volcánico del Mioceno superior situado a los 66º 15' W 23º S en el NW de Argentina en la provincia de Jujuy, en la intersección entre dos fallas regionales de dirección NE-SW y NW-SE, respectivamente. La actividad eruptiva se caracterizó por la existencia de, al menos, cuatro erupciones ignimbríticas que produjeron cuatro diferentes mantos ignimbríticos. Se trata de ignimbritas bien soldadas, muy ricas en cristales, pobre en fragmentos líticos y que presentan un contenido en fragmentos pumíticos de moderado a alto. El volumen total que representan estas ignimbritas supera los 650 km3. Los datos preliminares indican que el magma juvenil deriva de una cámara magmática homogénea no zonada. Las características de emplazamiento de estas ignimbritas, así como la falta de depósitos plinianos de caída en la base o

  3. Surface exposure dating of moraines and alluvial fans in the Southern Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrizzano, Carla; Zech, Roland; García Morabito, Ezequiel; Haghipour, Negar; Christl, Marcus; Likermann, Jeremías; Tobal, Jonathan; Yamin, Marcela

    2016-04-01

    The role of tectonics versus climate in controlling the evolution of alluvial fans in discussed controversially. The southern Central Andes and their forelands provide a perfect setting to study climate versus tectonic control of alluvial fans. On the one hand, the region is tectonically active and alluvial fan surfaces are offset by faults. The higher summits, on the other hand, are glaciated today, and glacial deposits document past periods of lower temperatures and increased precipitation. We applied 10Be surface exposure dating on 5 fan terraces 4 moraines of the Ansilta range (31.6°S - 69.8°W) using boulders and amalgamated pebbles to explore their chronological relationship. From youngest to oldest, the alluvial fan terraces yield minimum ages of 15 ± 1 ka (T1), 97 ± 9 ka (T2), 141 ± 9 ka (T3), 286 ± 14 ka (T4) and 570 ± 57 ka (T5). Minimum ages derived from moraines are 14 ± 1 ka (M1), 22 ± 2 ka (M2), 157 ± 14 ka (M3) and 351 ± 33 ka (M4), all calculations assuming no erosion and using the scaling scheme for spallation based on Lal 1991, Stone 2000. The moraines document glacial advances during cold periods at the marine isotope stages (MIS) 2, 6 and 10. The terraces T1, T3 seem to be geomorphologic counterparts during MIS 2 and 6. We suggest that T2, T4 and T5 document aggradation during the cold periods MIS 5d, 8 and 14 in response to glacial advances, although the respective moraines are not preserved. Our results highlight: i) the arid climate in the Southern Central Andes favors the preservation of glacial and alluvial deposits allowing landscape and climate reconstructions back to ~570 ka), ii) alluvial deposits correlate with moraines or fall into cold glacial times, so that climate, and in particular the existence of glaciers, seems to be the main forcing of alluvial fan formation at our study site. References Lal, D., 1991: Cosmic ray labeling of erosion surfaces: In situ nuclide production rates and erosion models. Earth and Planetary

  4. Salar de Atacama basin: A record of compressional tectonics in the central Andes since the mid-Cretaceous

    OpenAIRE

    ARRIAGADA, César; Cobbold, Peter,; Roperch, Pierrick

    2006-01-01

    19 p.; International audience; The Salar de Atacama basin lies in the inner fore arc of northern Chile. Topographically and structurally, it is a first-order feature of the central Andes. The sedimentary fill of the basin constrains the timing and extent of crustal deformation since the mid-Cretaceous. We have studied good exposures along the western edge of the basin and have correlated them with seismic reflection sections and data from an exploration well. Throughout most of its history, t...

  5. Photosynthetic performance of Colobanthus quitensis (Kunth Bartl. (Caryophyllaceae in a high-elevation site of the Andes of central Chile Desempeño fotosintético de Colobanthus quitensis (Kunth Bartl. (Caryophyllaceae en los Andes de Chile central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. ANGÉLICA CASANOVA-KATNY

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis of Colobanthus quitensis and mesoclimatic conditions of air temperature and light intensity during the growing season were investigated at 2,650 m in the central Chilean Andes. On three typical days of the growing period (January, March and May, CO2 exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured. In addition, a series of fluorescence response curves with increasing light intensity at different temperatures were performed to estimate the propensity of Andean C. quitensis populations to be photoinhibited. Net Photosynthesis (Pn was low (ca. 2.0 mmol CO2 m-2s-1 during the morning and noon in days with high photosynthetic active radiation (PAR, above 1,800 mmol photons m-2s-1. Pn increased in the afternoon (3.5-4.8 mmol CO2 m-2s-1 when PAR decreased to ca. 1,400 mmol photons m-2s-1 and leaf temperature were ca. 20 °C. Fv/Fm in the diurnal periods was between 0.7-0.75 without evidence of photoinhibition. Leaves at 15 and 22 °C exhibited a slow decrease of F PSII with the increase in actinic light intensity, although the fraction of reaction centers open (expressed by qP remained higher at 22 °C. NPQ was saturated at light intensities close to 500 mmol photons m-2s-1 in leaves at 22 °C and at higher intensities at 15 °C, suggesting that NPQ could be a mechanism of energy dissipation at high light intensity and high leaf temperature in the field. Our results indicated that C. quitensis is not photodamaged during the diurnal cycle and that the low Pn registered during some diurnal periods are likely to be related with photorespiration, which has been suggested as an efficient protective mechanism for photoinhibition in alpine plants. Our results are also compared with the photosynthetic performance of C. quitensis populations from the maritime AntarcticSe estudió la fotosíntesis de Colobanthus quitensis y las condiciones mesoclimáticas de temperatura del aire e intensidad lumínica a 2.650 m en los Andes de Chile central. Se

  6. Unravel biophysical factors on river water quality response in Chilean Central-Southern watersheds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yevenes, Mariela A; Arumí, José L; Farías, Laura

    2016-05-01

    Identifying the key anthropogenic (land uses) and natural (topography and climate) biophysical drivers affecting river water quality is essential for efficient management of water resources. We tested the hypothesis that water quality can be predicted by different biophysical factors. Multivariate statistics based on a geographical information system (GIS) were used to explore the influence of factors (i.e., precipitation, topography, and land uses) on water quality (i.e., nitrate (NO 3 (-)), phosphate (PO 4 (3-)), silicate (Si(OH)4), dissolved oxygen (DO), suspended solids (TSS), biological oxygen demand (DO), temperature (T), conductivity (EC), and pH) for two consecutive years in the Itata and Biobío river watersheds, Central Chile (36° 00' and 38° 30'). The results showed that (NO 3 (-)), (PO 4 (3-)), Si(OH)4, TSS, EC, and DO were higher during rainy season (austral fall, winter, and spring), whereas BOD and temperature were higher during dry season. The spatial variation of these parameters in both watersheds was related to land use, topography (e.g., soil moisture, soil hydrological group, and erodability), and precipitation. Soil hydrological group and soil moisture were the strongest explanatory predictors for PO 4 (3-) , Si(OH)4 and EC in the river, followed by land use such as agriculture for NO 3 (-) and DO and silviculture for TSS and Si(OH)4. High-resolution water leaching and runoff maps allowed us to identify agriculture areas with major probability of water leaching and higher probability of runoff in silviculture areas. Moreover, redundancy analysis (RDA) revealed that land uses (agriculture and silviculture) explained in 60 % the river water quality variation. Our finding highlights the vulnerability of Chilean river waters to different biophysical drivers, rather than climate conditions alone, which is amplified by human-induced degradation.

  7. The Basement of the Central Andes: The Arequipa and Related Terranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Victor A.

    2008-05-01

    The basement of the Central Andes provides insights for the dispersal of Rodinia, the reconstruction of Gondwana, and the dynamics of terrane accretion along the Pacific. The Paleoproterozoic Arequipa terrane was trapped during collision between Laurentia and Amazonia in the Mesoproterozoic. Ultrahigh-temperature metamorphism correlates with the collapse of the Sunsás-Grenville orogen after 1000 Ma and is related to slab break-off and dispersal of Rodinia. The Antofalla terrane separated in the Neoproterozoic, forming the Puncoviscana basin. Its closure was coeval with the collision of the eastern Sierras Pampeanas. The rift-drift transitions of the early Paleozoic clastic platform showed a gradual younging to the north, in agreement with counterclockwise rotation based on paleomagnetic data of Antofalla. North of Arequipa arc magmatism and high-grade metamorphism are linked to collision of the Paracas terrane in the Ordovician, during the Famatinian orogeny in the Sierras Pampeanas. The early Paleozoic history of the Arequipa massif is explained by a backarc, which further south changed to open oceanic conditions and subsequent collision. The Antofalla terrane reaccreted to the continental margin by the late Ordovician. These accretions and subsequent separations during the Mesoproterozoic, Neoproterozoic early Cambrian, and late Cambrian middle Ordovician are explained by changes in absolute motion of the Gondwana supercontinent during plate global reorganization.

  8. Future runoff from glacierized catchments in the Central Andes could substantially decrease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Marlene; Schauwecker, Simone; Huggel, Christian; Salzmann, Nadine; Drenkhan, Fabian; Frey, Holger; Giráldez, Claudia; Gurgiser, Wolfgang; Kaser, Georg; Suarez, Wilson; García Hernández, Javier; Fluixá-Sanmartín, Javier; Ayros, Edwin; Rohrer, Mario

    2016-04-01

    In Peru, about 50% of the energy is produced from hydropower plants. An important amount of this energy is produced with water from glaciated catchments. In these catchments river streamflow is furthermore needed for other socio-economic activities such as agriculture. However, the amount and seasonality of water from glacial melt is expected to undergo strong changes. As glaciers are projected to further decline with continued warming, runoff will become more and more sensitive to possible changes in precipitation patterns. Moreover, as stated by a recent study (Neukom et al., 2015), wet season precipitation sums in the Central Andes could decrease up to 19-33 % by the end of the 21st century compared to present-day conditions. Here, we investigate future runoff availability for selected glacierized catchments in the Peruvian Andes. In a first step, we apply a simplified energy balance and runoff model (ITGG-2.0-R) for current conditions. Thereafter, we model future runoff for different climate scenarios, including the possibility of strongly reduced precipitation. Preliminary findings indicate (i) changes in the seasonal distribution of runoff and (ii) significant reductions of the annual runoff in future for the mentioned scenario with significant precipitation decreases. During early phases of glacier recession, melt leads to increased runoff - respectively compensates for the precipitation reduction in the corresponding scenario - depending on the fraction of catchment glaciation. Glaciers are acting as natural water reservoirs and may buffer the decreasing precipitation in glacierized catchments for a limited period. However, strongly reduced precipitation will have noticeable consequences on runoff, particularly when glacier melt contribution gets smaller and finally is completely missing. This will have consequences on the water availability for hydropower production, agriculture, mining and other water uses. Critical conditions may emerge in particular

  9. Wide-Angle Seismic Experiment Across the Oeste Fault Zone, Central Andes, Northern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Yáñez, G. A.; Vera, E. E.; Sepúlveda, J.

    2008-12-01

    From December 6-21, 2007, we conducted a 3-component, radio-telemetric, seismic survey along a ~ 15-km wide E-W transect in the Central Andes, at a latitude of ~ 22.41° S, centered north of the city of Calama (68.9° W), Chile. The study area is sandwiched between the Central Depression in the west and the Andean Western Cordillera of Chile. Recording stations, nominally spaced at intervals of either 125 or 250 m collected up to 3.5 s of refracted seismic arrivals at maximum source-receiver offsets exceeding 15 km. Ten shothole sources, spaced 2-6 km apart focused energy on the shallow (0-3 km), crustal, Paleogene-age structures. Preliminary, tomographic inversions of refracted first arrivals show the top of a shallow ( 600 km), strike-slip fault zone known as the Oeste fault. Turning ray densities suggest the base of the overlying velocity gradient unit (VP, 2-4 km/s) dips inwardly from both east and west directions toward the Oeste fault to depths of almost 1 km. Plate reorganization commencing at least by the latter half of the Oligocene led from oblique to more orthogonal convergence between the South American and the Nazca (Farallon) Plates. We interpret previously mapped, older, minor faults as being generated within the right-lateral, orogen-parallel, Oeste strike-slip fault zone, and postdated by Neogene, N-S striking thrust faults. In this context we also interpret that the spatial distribution of velocity units requires an period of extensional activity that may (1) postdate the transpressional strike slip fault activity of the Neogene, (2) be related to a later releasing bend through the translation and interaction of rigid blocks hidden at depth or even (3) be the consequence of inelastic failure from the result of flexural loading.

  10. Preliminary Results From the CAUGHT Experiment: Investigation of the North Central Andes Subsurface Using Receiver Functions and Ambient Noise Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. C.; Ward, K. M.; Porter, R. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2011-12-01

    Jamie Ryan, Kevin M. Ward, Ryan Porter, Susan Beck, George Zandt, Lara Wagner, Estela Minaya, and Hernando Tavera The University of Arizona The University of North Carolina San Calixto Observatorio, La Paz, Bolivia IGP, Lima, Peru In order to investigate the interplay between crustal shortening, lithospheric removal, and surface uplift we have deployed 50 broadband seismometers in northwestern Bolivia and southern Peru as part of the interdisciplinary Central Andean Uplift and Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project. The morphotectonic units of the central Andes from west to east, consist of the Western Cordillera, the active volcanic arc, the Altiplano, an internally drained basin (~4 km elevation), the Eastern Cordillera, the high peaks (~6 km elevation) of an older fold and thrust belt, the Subandean zone, the lower elevation active fold and thrust belt, and the foreland Beni basin. Between northwestern Bolivia and southern Peru, the Altiplano pinches out north of Lake Titicaca as the Andes narrow northward. The CAUGHT seismic instruments were deployed between 13° to 18° S latitudes to investigate the crust and mantle lithosphere of the central Andes in this transitional zone. In northwest Bolivia, perpendicular to the strike of the Andes, there is a total of 275 km of documented upper crustal shortening (15° to 17°S) (McQuarrie et al, 2008). Associated with the shortening is crustal thickening and possibly lithospheric removal as the thickening lithospheric root becomes unstable. An important first order study is to compare upper crustal shortening estimates with present day crustal thickness. To estimate crustal thickness, we have calculated receiver functions using an iterative deconvolution method and used common conversion point stacking along the same profile as the geologically based shortening estimates. In our preliminary results, we observed a strong P to S conversion corresponding to the Moho at approximately 60-65 km depth underneath the

  11. Tectonomagmatic characteristics of the back-arc portion of the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro Fault Zone, Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acocella, V.; Gioncada, A.; Omarini, R.; Riller, U.; Mazzuoli, R.; Vezzoli, L.

    2011-06-01

    Post-20 Ma magmatism in the Central Andes is either localized in the magmatic arc or distributed east of it, on the Altiplano-Puna Plateau. Here there is a distinct concentration of magmatic centers on NW-SE trending lineaments, such as the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro (COT), that extends into the Eastern Cordillera to the east of the Puna. Understanding the possible genetic relationship between prominent structures and magmatic centers on these lineaments is important to elucidate the tectonomagmatic evolution of the Central Andes. We investigated the back-arc area of the COT using remote sensing, geological, structural, and petrochemical data. Our study demonstrates that this portion of the COT consists of NW-SE striking faults, formed under overall left-lateral transtension that decreases in activity toward the COT termini. Deformation on the COT occurred during and after activity of prominent N-S striking transpressive fault systems and is coeval with magmatism, which is focused on the central COT. The most evolved magmatic rocks, with an upper crustal imprint, are exposed on the central COT, whereas more primitive, mantle-derived mafic to moderately evolved magmatic rocks, are found toward the COT termini. This points to a genetic relationship between upper crustal deformation and magmatic activity that led to enhanced magma storage in the central COT. COT magmas may result either from slab steepening or episodic delamination of the asthenospheric mantle.

  12. Multi-sensor geophysical constraints on crustal melt in the central Andes: the PLUTONS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Comeau, M. J.; West, M. E.; Christensen, D. H.; Mcfarlin, H. L.; Farrell, A. K.; Del Potro, R.; Gottsmann, J.; McNutt, S. R.; Michelfelder, G.; Diez, M.; Elliott, J.; Henderson, S. T.; Keyson, L.; Delgado, F.; Unsworth, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The central Andes is a key global location to quantify storage, transport, and volumes of magma in the Earth's crust as it is home to the world's largest zone of partial melt (the Altiplano-Puna Magma or Mush Body, APMB) as well as the more recently documented Southern Puna Magma Body (SPMB). We describe results from the recently completed international PLUTONS project that focused inter-disciplinary study on two sites of large-scale surface uplift that presumably represent ongoing magmatic intrusions in the mid to upper crust - Uturuncu, Bolivia (in the center of the APMB) and Lazufre on the Chile-Argentina border (on the edge of the SPMB). In particular, a suite of geophysical techniques (seismology, gravity, surface deformation, and electro-magnetic methods) have been used to infer the current subsurface distribution and quantity of partial melts in combination with geochemical and lab studies on samples from the area. Both Uturuncu and Lazufre show separate geophysical anomalies in the upper and mid/lower crust (e.g., low seismic velocity, low resistivity, etc.) indicating multiple distinct reservoirs of magma and/or hydrothermal fluids with different properties. The characteristics of the geophysical anomalies differ somewhat depending on the technique used - reflecting the different sensitivity of each method to subsurface melt of different compositions, connectivity, and volatile content. For example, the depth to the top of the APMB is shallower in a joint ambient noise tomography and receiver function analysis compared to a 3D magnetotelluric inversion. One possibility is that the seismic methods are detecting brines above the APMB that do not have a large electromagnetic signature. Comparison of the geophysical measurements with laboratory experiments at the APMB indicate a minimum of 4-25% melt averaged over the region is needed -- higher melt volumes are permitted by the gravity and MT data and may exist in small regions. However, bulk melt values above

  13. Miocene fossil hydrothermal system associated with a volcanic complex in the Andes of central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Francisco; Aguirre, Luis; Vergara, Mario; Valdebenito, Leticia; Fonseca, Eugenia

    2004-11-01

    Cenozoic deposits in the Andes of central Chile have been affected by very low-grade burial metamorphism. At about 33°S in the Cuesta de Chacabuco area, approximately 53 km north of Santiago, two Oligocene and Miocene volcanic units form a ca. 1300-m-thick rock pile. The Miocene unit corresponds to a volcanic complex composed of two eroded stratovolcanoes. Secondary mineral assemblages in both units were studied petrographically and using X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analyses. Most of the igneous minerals are wholly or partially preserved, and the ubiquitous secondary minerals are zeolites and mafic phyllosilicates. The alteration pattern observed is characterized by a lateral zonation in secondary mineralogy related to a lateral increase in temperature but not to stratigraphic depth. The following three zones were established, mainly based on the distribution of zeolites: zone I comprises heulandite, thomsonite, mesolite, stilbite and tri-smectite; zone II contains laumontite, yugawaralite, prehnite, epidote and chlorite; and zone III comprises wairakite, epidote, chlorite, diopside, biotite and titanite. For each zone, the following temperature ranges were estimated: zone I, 100-180 °C; zone II, 180-270 °C; and zone III, 245-310 °C. The alteration episode was characterized by a high Pfluid/ Ptotal ratio (ca. 1.0), although slightly variable, a high geothermal gradient of ca. 160 °C km -1 and fluid pressures below 500 bars. Although temperature was the main control on the mineral zonation, several interrelated parameters, mainly fluid composition, porosity and permeability, were also important. Hot, near neutral to slightly alkaline pH, alkali chloride hydrothermal fluids with very low dissolved CO 2 contents deposited the secondary minerals. The alteration pattern is the result of depositing fluids in outflow regions from a hydrothermal system developed inside a volcanic complex during the Miocene. The hydrothermal system has been eroded to a

  14. A paleolimnological perspective on industrial-era metal pollution in the central Andes, Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, Colin A. [Department of Geology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E3 (Canada)], E-mail: cacooke@ualberta.ca; Abbott, Mark B. [Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E3 (Canada); Section of Anthropology, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, PA 15206 (United States)

    2008-04-15

    To date, few studies have investigated the environmental legacy associated with industrialization in the South American Andes. Here, we present an environmental archive of industrial pollution from {sup 210}Pb-dated lake cores recovered from Laguna Chipian, located near the Cerro de Pasco metallurgical region and Laguna Pirhuacocha, located near the Morococha mining region and the La Oroya smelting complex. At Laguna Chipian, trace metal concentrations increase beginning {approx} 1900 AD, coincident with the construction of the central Peruvian railway, and the rapid industrial development of the Cerro de Pasco region. Trace metal concentrations and fluxes peak during the 1950s before subsequently declining up-core (though remaining well above background levels). While Colonial mining and smelting operations are known to have occurred at Cerro de Pasco since at least 1630 AD, our sediment record preserves no associated metal deposition. Based on our {sup 14}C and {sup 210}Pb data, we suggest that this is due to a depositional hiatus, rather than a lack of regional Colonial pollution. At Laguna Pirhuacocha, industrial trace metal deposition first begins {approx} 1925 AD, rapidly increasing after {approx} 1950 AD and peaking during either the 1970s or 1990s. Trace metal concentrations from these lakes are comparable to some of the most polluted lakes in North America and Europe. There appears to be little diagenetic alteration of the trace metal record at either lake, the exception being arsenic (As) accumulation at Laguna Pirhuacocha. There, a correlation between As and the redox-sensitive element manganese (Mn) suggests that the sedimentary As burden is undergoing diagenetic migration towards the sediment-water interface. This mobility has contributed to surface sediment As concentrations in excess of 1100 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The results presented here chronicle a rapidly changing Andean environment, and highlight a need for future research in the rate and magnitude

  15. A paleolimnological perspective on industrial-era metal pollution in the central Andes, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Colin A; Abbott, Mark B

    2008-04-15

    To date, few studies have investigated the environmental legacy associated with industrialization in the South American Andes. Here, we present an environmental archive of industrial pollution from (210)Pb-dated lake cores recovered from Laguna Chipian, located near the Cerro de Pasco metallurgical region and Laguna Pirhuacocha, located near the Morococha mining region and the La Oroya smelting complex. At Laguna Chipian, trace metal concentrations increase beginning ~1900 AD, coincident with the construction of the central Peruvian railway, and the rapid industrial development of the Cerro de Pasco region. Trace metal concentrations and fluxes peak during the 1950s before subsequently declining up-core (though remaining well above background levels). While Colonial mining and smelting operations are known to have occurred at Cerro de Pasco since at least 1630 AD, our sediment record preserves no associated metal deposition. Based on our (14)C and (210)Pb data, we suggest that this is due to a depositional hiatus, rather than a lack of regional Colonial pollution. At Laguna Pirhuacocha, industrial trace metal deposition first begins ~1925 AD, rapidly increasing after ~1950 AD and peaking during either the 1970s or 1990s. Trace metal concentrations from these lakes are comparable to some of the most polluted lakes in North America and Europe. There appears to be little diagenetic alteration of the trace metal record at either lake, the exception being arsenic (As) accumulation at Laguna Pirhuacocha. There, a correlation between As and the redox-sensitive element manganese (Mn) suggests that the sedimentary As burden is undergoing diagenetic migration towards the sediment-water interface. This mobility has contributed to surface sediment As concentrations in excess of 1100 microg g(-1). The results presented here chronicle a rapidly changing Andean environment, and highlight a need for future research in the rate and magnitude of atmospheric metal pollution.

  16. Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Model Simulations of Precipitation in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Stephen D.; Mohr, Karen I.

    2015-01-01

    The meridional extent and complex orography of the South American continent contributes to a wide diversity of climate regimes ranging from hyper-arid deserts to tropical rainforests to sub-polar highland regions. In addition, South American meteorology and climate are also made further complicated by ENSO, a powerful coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomenon. Modelling studies in this region have typically resorted to either atmospheric mesoscale or atmosphere-ocean coupled global climate models. The latter offers full physics and high spatial resolution, but it is computationally inefficient typically lack an interactive ocean, whereas the former offers high computational efficiency and ocean-atmosphere coupling, but it lacks adequate spatial and temporal resolution to adequate resolve the complex orography and explicitly simulate precipitation. Explicit simulation of precipitation is vital in the Central Andes where rainfall rates are light (0.5-5 mm hr-1), there is strong seasonality, and most precipitation is associated with weak mesoscale-organized convection. Recent increases in both computational power and model development have led to the advent of coupled ocean-atmosphere mesoscale models for both weather and climate study applications. These modelling systems, while computationally expensive, include two-way ocean-atmosphere coupling, high resolution, and explicit simulation of precipitation. In this study, we use the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST), a fully-coupled mesoscale atmosphere-ocean modeling system. Previous work has shown COAWST to reasonably simulate the entire 2003-2004 wet season (Dec-Feb) as validated against both satellite and model analysis data when ECMWF interim analysis data were used for boundary conditions on a 27-9-km grid configuration (Outer grid extent: 60.4S to 17.7N and 118.6W to 17.4W).

  17. Giant magmatic water reservoir beneath Uturuncu volcano and Altiplano-Puna region (Central Andes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumonier, Mickael; Gaillard, Fabrice; Muir, Duncan; Blundy, Jon; Unsworth, Martyn

    2016-04-01

    Volcanism at continental arcs is the surface manifestation of long-lived crustal magmatic processes whereby mantle-derived hydrous basalt magma differentiates to more silica-rich magmas by a combination of crystallization and crustal melting. What erupts is just a fraction of the total volume of magma produced by these processes; the unerupted, plutonic residues solidify and are inaccessible to direct study until millions of years of uplift and erosion bring them to the surface. In contrast, geophysical surveys, using electromagnetic and seismic waves, can provide real-time images of subduction zone magmatic systems. Several such studies have revealed that arc volcanoes are underlain by large partially molten regions at depths of >10 km, the largest known example being the Altiplano-Puna magma body (APMB) in central Andes. Interpreting such geophysical images in terms of amount, composition and distribution of partial melts is limited by our lack of knowledge of the physical properties of silicate melts at elevated pressures and temperatures. Here we present high-pressure, in situ experimental data showing that the electrical conductivity of andesitic melts is primarily controlled by their dissolved water contents. Linking our new measurements to petrological constraints from andesites erupted on the Altiplano, we show that the APMB is composed of 10-20% of an andesitic melt containing 8-10 wt% dissolved water. This implies that the APMB is a giant water anomaly in the global subduction system, with a total mass of dissolved magmatic water about half of the water contained within the Adriatic Sea. In addition to the controls on the physical properties of the melts, the abundance of dissolved water governs the structural levels of magma ponding, equivalent to the depth of water saturation, where degassing and crystallisation promote partial melting and weakening of the upper crust. Unexpectedly, very high concentrations of water in andesite magmas shall impede their

  18. Pucarilla-Cerro Tipillas volcanic complex: the oldest recognized caldera in the southeastern portion of central volcanic zone of Central Andes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman, Silvina; Petrinovic, Ivan [CONICET -IBIGEO. Museo de Cs. Naturales, Universidad de Salta, Mendoza 2 (4400), Salta (Argentina)], E-mail: guzmansilvina@gmail.com

    2008-10-01

    We recognize the most eastern and oldest collapse caldera structure in the southern portion of the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes. A description of Middle-Upper Miocene successions related to explosive- effusive events is presented. The location of this centre close to Cerro Galn Caldera attests a recurrence in the volcanism between 12 and 2 Ma in this portion of the Altiplano - Puna Plateau.

  19. Variation of the upper mantle velocity structure along the central-south Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaofeng; Sandvol, Eric; Shen, Yang; Gao, Haiying

    2014-05-01

    Variations in the subduction angle of the Nazca plate beneath the South American plate has lead to different modes of deformation and volcanism along the Andean active margin. The volcanic gap between the central and southern Andean volcanic zones is correlated with the Pampean flat-slab subduction zone, where the subducting Nazca slab changes from a 30-degree dipping slab beneath the Puna plateau to a horizontal slab beneath the Sierras Pampeanas, and then to a 30-degree dipping slab beneath the south Andes from north to south. The Pampean flat-slab subduction correlates spatially with the track of the Juan Fernandez Ridge, and is associated with the inboard migration of crustal deformation. A major Pliocene delamination event beneath the southern Puna plateau has previously been inferred from geochemical and geological and preliminary geophysical data. The mechanisms for the transition between dipping- and flat-subduction slab and the mountain building process of the central Andean plateau are key issues to understanding the Andean-type orogenic process. We use a new frequency-time normalization approach with non-linear stacking to extract very-broadband (up to 300 second) empirical Green's functions (EGFs) from continuous seismic records. The long-period EGFs provide the deeper depth-sensitivity needed to constrain the mantle structure. The broadband waveform data are from 393 portable stations of four temporary networks: PUNA, SIEMBRA, CHARGE, RAMP, East Sierras Pampeanas, BANJO/SEDA, REFUCA, ANCORP, and 31 permanent stations accessed from both the IRIS DMC and GFZ GEOFON DMC. A finite difference waveform propagation method is used to generate synthetic seismograms from 3-D velocity model. We use 3-D traveltime sensitivity kernels, and traveltime residuals measurement by waveform cross-correlation to directly invert the upper mantle shear-wave velocity structure. The preliminary model shows strong along-strike velocity variations within in the mantle wedge and

  20. New and Evolving Seismic Images of the Central Andes and Subducting Nazca Slab: 20 Years of Portable Seismology Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Beno Gutenberg first identified a seismic low velocity zone in the upper mantle that we now refer to as the asthenosphere that is still the focus of many studies in active tectonic regions. The upper-most mantle is very heterogeneous and occupies the depth range where much of the tectonic action occurs especially in subduction zones and convergent margins. The central South American convergent margin is the result of the subduction of the Nazca Plate beneath the South American Plate and includes the Andes, one of the largest actively growing mountain ranges on Earth. The South American subduction zone has two regions of "flat" subduction in Peru and central Chile and Argentina separated by a segment of "normal" subduction and an active magmatic arc. The central Andean plateau has an average elevation of 3-4 km and some of the thickest crust on Earth with deformation reaching ~800 km inland. This active margin is characterized by along-strike variations in magmatism, upper crustal shortening, crustal thickness, and slab geometry that make it an ideal region to study the relationship between the subducting slab, the mantle wedge, and the overriding plate. After 20 years of portable seismic deployments in the Central Andes seismologists have generated unprecedented seismic images spanning ~3000 km of the Andean lithosphere, the subducting Nazca slab, and the surrounding mantle. Seismic travel-time, ambient noise and earthquake surface-wave tomography, receiver function imaging, and joint receiver function - surface wave dispersion inversions have produced along strike images of the Central Andes from the surface to a depth of ~700 km. These new images were made possible by PI-driven portable broadband seismic deployments and data sharing by many international groups. I will highlight images of along-strike variations in crustal properties and thickness, mantle lithospheric structure, and slab geometry. These seismic images allow us to more completely evaluate the role

  1. Along-Strike Variations in Crustal Seismicity in the Central Andes and Geodynamic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, K.; Pearson, D. M.; Kapp, P. A.; McGroder, M.; Kendall, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    For the central Andes, we compiled relocated crustal earthquakes (magnitude ≥ 4.5) from the EHB Bulletin and Nipress et al. [2007] and focal mechanisms from the Global CMT catalog and published literature [Alvarado et al., 2005]. These data were plotted in map, cross section, and 3D views in the context of local tomography [Koulakov et al., 2006] and lithospheric boundaries [Tassara et al., in prep]. The results imply major along-strike variations in the mechanisms of crustal deformation. At the latitude of the Altiplano, there is scarce forearc seismicity. The thin-skinned Bolivian retroarc thrust belt shows no seismic events (magnitude ≥ 4.5), suggesting that it is deforming aseismically or locked. In contrast, at the latitude of the Puna to the south (20-25°S), crustal seismicity is more prevalent in both the forearc and retroarc. Within this region, active deformation in the Coastal Cordillera near Antofagasta is occurring along steeply east-dipping normal faults at 15-41 km depth; this is the only part of the central Andean forearc that displays prominent extension. Outboard of this, thrust events at ~15 km depth in the forearc wedge display gently dipping nodal planes, and may be signatures of underplating crust that was tectonically eroded at the trench. Underplating is a likely process by which this region of the forearc has undergone ~1 km of surface uplift during the Neogene. Seismicity with thrust or reverse and oblique focal mechanisms in the retroarc wedge is localized beneath the frontal part of the thick-skinned Eastern Cordilleran thrust belt and the Santa Barbara ranges. Seismicity along discrete, east- and west-dipping planes occurs to near Moho depths (~50 km). While retroarc crustal seismicity continues to the south toward the Juan Fernandez flat slab, there is a concentration of seismic events in the retroarc at the latitude (22-23°S) where there is prominent normal faulting in the forearc. We interpret the compiled data to suggest that

  2. Cloud forest restoration for erosion control in a Kichwa community of the Ecuadorian central Andes Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, L.; Giordanengo, J.; Sacatoro, I.

    2013-12-01

    The Denver Professional Chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWB) has begun conducting erosion control projects in the Kichwa communities of Malingua Pamba in the Andes Mountains south of Quito, Ecuador. In many high elevation areas in this region, erosion of volcanic soils on steep hillsides (i.e., teach these skills to adjacent villages.

  3. Reconstruction of cryospheric changes in the Maipo and Juncal river basins, central Andes of Chile: an integrative geomorphological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaumer, Samuel U.; García, Juan L.; Gómez, Gabriel; Vega, Rodrigo M.; Gärtner-Roer, Isabelle; Salzmann, Nadine

    2016-04-01

    Water in the central Andes (32-38° S), a semi-arid mountainous area with elevations over 6000 m asl., is of great importance and a critical resource especially in the dry summer months. Ice bodies, such as glaciers and rock glaciers (permafrost) in the high mountains, provide a substantial part of the fresh-water resources but also for intensive economical use for the lowlands including Santiago metropolitan region, Chile. However the evolution of these ice bodies since the last deglaciation (i.e., Holocene, last ˜12,000 years), and in particular during historical times, and their feedback with climate is fairly unknown. In view of projected climate change, this is striking because it is also unknown whether these natural resources could be used as sustainable fresh-water source in the future. Within the presented project, we develop and apply an integrative geomorphologic approach to study glaciers and their long-term evolution in the central Andes of Chile. Apart from glaciers (with variable debris-coverage), rock glaciers have evolved over time as striking geomorphological landforms in this area. We combine geomorphologic mapping using remote-sensing and in-situ data with an innovative surface exposure dating technique to determine the ages of distinct moraine ridges at three study sites in watersheds of the Santiago region: Juncal Norte, Loma Larga and Nieves Negras glaciers. First results of the project are presented, including a detailed geomorphological mapping and first analysis of the landform dynamics. At all three sites, we distinguished at least three moraine systems of a Holocene putative age. These prominent moraine belts show that glaciers were at least 5 km longer than at present. Deglaciation from these ice marginal positions was gradual and complex in response to the detrital cover on the glaciers. Differences in ice thickness of the main glaciers in the respective valleys amount to about 100 m. Due to the partial, extensive debris coverage, the

  4. Modelling distributed ablation on Juncal Norte Glacier, dry Andes of central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carenzo, Marco; Pellicciotti, Francesca; Helbing, Jakob; Dadic, Ruzica; Burlando, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    In the Aconcagua River Basin, in the dry Andes of central Chile, water resources in summer originate mostly from snow and ice glacier melt. Summer seasons are dry and stable, with precipitation close to zero, low relative humidity and very intense solar radiation. The region's economic activities are dependent on these water resources, but their assessment is still incomplete and an effort is needed to evaluate present and future changes in water from glacier and seasonal snow covers in this area. The main aim of this paper is to simulate glacier melt and runoff from Juncal Norte Glacier, in the upper Aconcagua Basin, using models of various complexity and data requirement. We simulate distributed glacier ablation for two seasons using an energy-balance model (EB) and an enhanced temperature-index model (ETI). Meteorological variables measured at Automatic Weather Stations (AWSs) located on and off-glacier are extrapolated from point observations to the glacier-wide scale. Shortwave radiation is modelled with a parametric model taking into account shading, reflection from slopes and atmospheric transmittance. In the energy-balance model, the longwave radiation flux is computed from Stefan-Boltzmann relationships and turbulent fluxes are calculated using the bulk aerodynamic method. The EB model includes subsurface heat conduction and gravitational redistribution of snow. Glacier runoff is modelled using a linear reservoir approach accounting for the temporal evolution of the system. Hourly simulations of glacier melt are validated against ablation observations (ultrasonic depth gauge and ablation stakes) and runoff measured at the glacier snout is compared to a runoff record obtained from a combination of radar water level measurements and tracer experiments. Results show that extrapolation of meteorological input data, and of temperature in particular, is the largest source of model uncertainty, together with snow water equivalent initial conditions. We explore

  5. Asynchronous Glacial Chronologies in the Central Andes (15-40°S) and Paleoclimatic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, R.; Kull, C.; Kubik, P. W.; Veit, H.

    2006-12-01

    We have established glacial chronologies along a N-S transect over the Central Andes using 10Be surface exposure dating. Our results show that maximum glacial advances occurred asynchronously and reflect the varying influence and shifts of the major atmospheric circulation systems during the Late Quaternary: the tropical circulation in the north and the westerlies in the south. In Bolivia (three research areas in the Cordillera Real and the Cordillera Cochabamba, ~15°S) glacial advances could be dated to ~20 and 12 ka BP. This is in good agreement with published exposure age data from moraines in Bolivia and Peru (provided that all ages are calculated following the same scaling system). Accordingly, the maximum glaciation there probably occurred roughly synchronous to the temperature minimum of the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the lateglacial cold reversals. Strict correlation with neither the Younger Dryas in the northern hemisphere, nor the Antarctic Cold Reversal is possible due to the current systematic exposure age uncertainties (~10%). Glacier-Climate-Modelling corroborates the sensitivity of the reconstructed glaciers to temperature changes, rather than precipitation. On the contrary, there is good evidence for the dominant role of precipitation changes on the glacial chronologies in the lee of the Cordillera Occidental, i.e. on the Altiplano and further south. The pronounced lateglacial wet phase, which is well documented in lake transgression phases as far south as 28°S (-> tropical moisture source), seems to have caused glacial advances even at ~30°S. In two research areas in Chile at that latitude, we were able to date several lateglacial moraines. Besides, the maximum datable glaciation there occurred at ~30 ka BP. That is significantly earlier than the LGM (sensu strictu) and points to favourable climate conditions for glaciation at that time (particularly increased precipitation). We conclude that the westerlies were more intensive or

  6. Eocene extensional exhumation of basement and arc rocks along southwesternmost Peru, Central Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noury, Mélanie; Bernet, Matthias; Sempéré, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    The overthickened crust of the current Central Andes is commonly viewed as the result of tectonic shortening. However, in the present-day terrestrial forearc and arc of southwesternmost Peru, crustal thickness increases from 30 km along the coastline to >60 km below the active arc, whereas the upper crust exhibits little to no evidence of crustal shortening and, in constrast, many extensional features. How (and when) crustal overthickness was acquired in this region is thus little understood. Because crustal overthickening often results in extensional collapse and/or significant erosion, here we address this issue through a regional-scale study of exhumation using fission-track thermochronology. The limited fission-track data previously available in the area suggested that exhumation began during the Mesozoic. In this study, we present new apatite and zircon fission-track data obtained along the current terrestrial forearc of southwesternmost Peru. This relatively restricted area presents the interest of providing extensive outcrops of Precambrian to Ordovician basement and Early Jurassic to Late Cretaceous arc plutons. In order to compare the chronology of exhumation of these units, we performed extensive sampling for fission-track dating, as well as structural mapping. Our results indicate that the basement rocks and Jurassic plutons that crop out in the Arequipa region, where the crust is now >50 km-thick, experienced a rapid cooling through the 240-110°C temperature range between ~65 and ~35 Ma. This period of rapid exhumation coincided in time with the accumulation of terrestrial forearc deposits (the Lower Moquegua Group), that exhibit many syn-sedimentary extensional features and are bounded by conspicuous normal faults, specifically along the region where intense activity of the main arc between ~90 and ~60 Ma had led to voluminous magma emplacement. This close succession of (1) intense magmatic activity and (2) regional-scale exhumation associated with

  7. Regional distance shear-coupled PL propagation within the northern Altiplano, central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Jennifer L.; Beck, Susan L.; Zandt, George

    1999-12-01

    Properties of the shear-coupled P wavetrain (SPL) from regional earthquakes provide important information about the structure of the crust and upper mantle. We investigate broad-band seismic data from intermediate-depth earthquakes and develop a grid search technique using synthetic seismograms to study the sensitivity of SPL and to model the crustal structure of the northern Altiplano, central Andes. Waveforms from an earthquake that occurred on 1994 December 12 within the Nazca slab beneath the Altiplano display a clear SPL wavetrain at the temporary stations deployed during the BANJO and SEDA experiments. We relocate this event and determine the moment tensor by inverting the complete long-period waveforms. With these source parameters fixed, we perform sensitivity analyses using a reflectivity technique to compute synthetic seismograms at a distance of 313 km (BANJO station 2, SALI). We find that, at this distance, the long-period SPL wavetrain is sensitive to the following model parameters, in order of decreasing sensitivity: crustal VP/VS, mantle VP/VS, average crustal velocity, crustal thickness, focal depth, distance (location), crustal Qα and Qβ, and mantle velocity. We develop a grid search method to investigate the four parameters of the crust/upper mantle model to which the synthetic seismograms are most sensitive at SALI (crustal VP/VS, mantle VP/VS, average crustal velocity, crustal thickness). Trade-offs exist among all four of the model parameters, resulting in a range of acceptable crustal models that provide excellent fits between the data and synthetic seismograms in the passband of 15-100 s at a single station. However, by using data at a range of distances (150-450 km) we find that the model that provides the best overall fit between the data and synthetic seismograms, and thus best approximates the average characteristics of the crust and upper mantle structure of the northern Altiplano, is characterized by an average crustal velocity of 6

  8. Broadband regional waveform modeling to investigate crustal structure and tectonics of the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Jennifer Lyn

    We use broadband regional waveform modeling of earthquakes in the central Andes to determine seismic properties of the Altiplano crust. Properties of the shear-coupled P-wavetrain (SPL ) from intermediate-depth events provide particularly important information about the structure of the crust. We utilize broadband seismic data recorded at the BANJO and SEDA stations, and synthetic seismograms computed with a reflectivity technique to study the sensitivity of SPL to crustal and upper mantle parameters at regional distances. We find that the long-period SPL-wavetrain is most sensitive to crustal and mantle Poisson's ratios, average crustal velocity, and crustal thickness. A comprehensive grid search method developed to investigate these four parameters suggests that although trade-offs exist between model parameters, models of the Altiplano which provide the best fit between the data and synthetic seismograms are characterized by low Poisson's ratios, low average crustal velocity and thick crust. We apply our grid search technique and sensitivity analysis results to model the full waveforms from 6 intermediate-depth and 2 shallow-focus earthquakes recorded at regional distances by BANJO and SEDA stations. Results suggest that the Altiplano crust is much thicker (55--65 km) and slower (5.75--6.25 km/s) than global average values. Low crustal and mantle Poisson's ratios together with the lack of evidence for a high-velocity lower crust suggests a bulk felsic crustal composition, resulting in an overall weak crust. Our results favor a model of crustal thickening involving large-scale tectonic shortening of a predominantly felsic crust. To better understand the mechanics of earthquake rupture along the South American subduction zone, we have analyzed broadband teleseismic P-waves and utilize single- and multi-station inversion techniques to constrain source characteristics for the 12 November 1996 Peru subduction zone earthquake. Aftershock locations, intensity reports

  9. Paleozoic evolution of active margin basins in the southern Central Andes (northwestern Argentina and northern Chile)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlburg, H.; Breitkreuz, C.

    The geodynamic evolution of the Paleozoic continental margin of Gondwana in the region of the southern Central Andes is characterized by the westward progression of orogenic basin formation through time. The Ordovician basin in the northwest Argentinian Cordillera Oriental and Puna originated as an Early Ordovician back-arc basin. The contemporaneous magmatic arc of an east-dipping subduction zone was presumably located in northern Chile. In the back-arc basin, a ca. 3500 meter, fining-up volcaniclastic apron connected to the arc formed during the Arenigian. Increased subsidence in the late Arenigian allowed for the accomodation of large volumes of volcaniclastic turbidites during the Middle Ordovician. Subsidence and sedimentation were caused by the onset of collision between the para-autochthonous Arequipa Massif Terrane (AMT) and the South American margin at the Arenigian-Llanvirnian transition. This led to eastward thrusting of the arc complex over its back-arc basin and, consequently, to its transformation into a marine foreland basin. As a result of thrusting in the west, a flexural bulge formed in the east, leading to uplift and emergence of the Cordillera Oriental shelf during the Guandacol Event at the Arenigian-Llanvirnian transition. The basin fill was folded during the terminal collision of the AMT during the Oclóyic Orogeny (Ashgillian). The folded strata were intruded post-tectonically by the presumably Silurian granitoids of the "Faja Eruptiva de la Puna Oriental." The orogeny led to the formation of the positive area of the Arco Puneño. West of the Arco Puneño, a further marine basin developed during the Early Devonian, the eastern shelf of which occupied the area of the Cordillera Occidental, Depresión Preandina, and Precordillera. The corresponding deep marine turbidite basin was located in the region of the Cordillera de la Costa. Deposition continued until the basin fill was folded in the early Late Carboniferous Toco Orogeny. The basin

  10. High-Resolution ∂18O record of middle-late Holocene hydrologic variability from the central Peruvian Andes (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodbell, D. T.; Abbott, M.; Bird, B. W.; Stansell, N.

    2009-12-01

    Laguna Yuraicocha in the western cordillera of the central Peruvian Andes (12.53°S; 75.50°W; 4460 masl) is dammed by late glacial moraines and is underlain and surrounded by Jurassic and Cretaceous limestone interbedded with siliciclastic rocks. A 6.9 meter-long sediment core from the distal end of the lake is dominated by authigenic calcite (marl) with a mean concentration of 82 weight percent that has accumulated at a rate of ~ 1 mm yr-1 for the past 6200 years. The age model for the core is based on a combination of 210Pb and AMS 14C ages from charcoal; modern lake water is ~1‰ evaporatively enriched from mean regional precipitation. Marl samples were taken with an average sampling interval of 8 years; samples were treated to remove organic matter, sieved to concentrate the Andes. Subcentennial variance in 18O with an ~2‰ amplitude is persistent throughout the record. Time series analysis reveals strength in the 5-12 year window, which may record the influence of ENSO on the hydrologic balance of the region through its effect on the strength of the South American summer monsoon. Spectral strength is also present in the 40-200 year periodicity and this spectral component appears to weaken in the last millennium. The progressive increase in hydrologic balance during the middle-late Holocene is consistent with glacial geologic evidence for the onset of neoglaciation in the Peruvian Andes, including the dramatic reformation of the Quelccaya Ice Cap ~5100 years ago. This appears to confirm the notion that Andean glaciers, especially those in the southern and western cordillera of Peru and Bolivia, are especially sensitive to changes in regional moisture balance.

  11. Latitudinal environmental niches and riverine barriers shaped the phylogeography of the Central Chilean endemic Dioscorea humilis (Dioscoreaceae.

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    Juan Viruel

    Full Text Available The effects of Pleistocene glaciations and geographical barriers on the phylogeographic patterns of lowland plant species in Mediterranean-climate areas of Central Chile are poorly understood. We used Dioscorea humilis (Dioscoreaceae, a dioecious geophyte extending 530 km from the Valparaíso to the Bío-Bío Regions, as a case study to disentangle the spatio-temporal evolution of populations in conjunction with latitudinal environmental changes since the Last Inter-Glacial (LIG to the present. We used nuclear microsatellite loci, chloroplast (cpDNA sequences and environmental niche modelling (ENM to construct current and past scenarios from bioclimatic and geographical variables and to infer the evolutionary history of the taxa. We found strong genetic differentiation at nuclear microsatellite loci between the two subspecies of D. humilis, probably predating the LIG. Bayesian analyses of population structure revealed strong genetic differentiation of the widespread D. humilis subsp. humilis into northern and southern population groups, separated by the Maipo river. ENM revealed that the ecological niche differentiation of both groups have been maintained up to present times although their respective geographical distributions apparently fluctuated in concert with the climatic oscillations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM and the Holocene. Genetic data revealed signatures of eastern and western postglacial expansion of the northern populations from the central Chilean depression, whereas the southern ones experienced a rapid southward expansion after the LGM. This study describes the complex evolutionary histories of lowland Mediterranean Chilean plants mediated by the summed effects of spatial isolation caused by riverine geographical barriers and the climatic changes of the Quaternary.

  12. Population genetic structure of traditional populations in the Peruvian Central Andes and implications for South American population history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabana, Graciela S; Lewis, Cecil M; Tito, Raúl Y; Covey, R Alan; Cáceres, Angela M; Cruz, Augusto F De La; Durand, Diana; Housman, Genevieve; Hulsey, Brannon I; Iannacone, Gian Carlo; López, Paul W; Martínez, Rolando; Medina, Ángel; Dávila, Olimpio Ortega; Pinto, Karla Paloma Osorio; Santillán, Susan I Polo; Domínguez, Percy Rojas; Rubel, Meagan; Smith, Heather F; Smith, Silvia E; Massa, Verónica Rubín de Celis; Lizárraga, Beatriz; Stone, Anne C

    2014-01-01

    Molecular-based characterizations of Andean peoples are traditionally conducted in the service of elucidating continent-level evolutionary processes in South America. Consequently, genetic variation among "western" Andean populations is often represented in relation to variation among "eastern" Amazon and Orinoco River Basin populations. This west-east contrast in patterns of population genetic variation is typically attributed to large-scale phenomena, such as dual founder colonization events or differing long-term microevolutionary histories. However, alternative explanations that consider the nature and causes of population genetic diversity within the Andean region remain underexplored. Here we examine population genetic diversity in the Peruvian Central Andes using data from the mtDNA first hypervariable region and Y-chromosome short tandem repeats among 17 newly sampled populations and 15 published samples. Using this geographically comprehensive data set, we first reassessed the currently accepted pattern of western versus eastern population genetic structure, which our results ultimately reject: mtDNA population diversities were lower, rather than higher, within Andean versus eastern populations, and only highland Y-chromosomes exhibited significantly higher within-population diversities compared with eastern groups. Multiple populations, including several highland samples, exhibited low genetic diversities for both genetic systems. Second, we explored whether the implementation of Inca state and Spanish colonial policies starting at about ad 1400 could have substantially restructured population genetic variation and consequently constitute a primary explanation for the extant pattern of population diversity in the Peruvian Central Andes. Our results suggest that Peruvian Central Andean population structure cannot be parsimoniously explained as the sole outcome of combined Inca and Spanish policies on the region's population demography: highland populations

  13. River-discharge dynamics in the Southern Central Andes and the 1976-77 global climate shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castino, F.; Bookhagen, B.; Strecker, M. R.

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that the 1976-77 global climate shift strongly affected the South American climate. In our study, we observed a link between this climate shift and river-discharge variability in the subtropical Southern Central Andes. We analyzed the daily river-discharge time series between 1940 and 1999 from small to medium mountain drainage basins (102-104 km2) across a steep climatic and topographic gradient. We document that the discharge frequency distribution changed significantly, with higher percentiles exhibiting more pronounced trends. A change point between 1971 and 1977 marked an intensification of the hydrological cycle, which resulted in increased river discharge. In the upper Rio Bermejo basin of the northernmost Argentine Andes, the mean annual discharge increased by 40% over 7 years. Our findings are important for flood risk management in areas impacted by the 1976-77 climate shift; discharge frequency distribution analysis provides important insights into the variability of the hydrological cycle in the Andean realm.

  14. VIOLENCIA POLÍTICA, ASISTENCIA MILITAR DE ESTADOS UNIDOS Y PRODUCCIÓN DE COCA EN LOS ANDES CENTRALES

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    Moisés Arce

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available ¿Tiene la violencia política un impacto significativo sobre la producción de drogas en los Andes Centrales? ¿Disminuye la ayuda militar estadounidense la oferta de drogas ilícitas que se origina en los Andes Centrales? ¿Qué otros factores ayudan a explicar dicha producción? ¿Tiene la lucha estadounidense contra el narcotráfico las mismas consecuencias en cada país? Este trabajo evalúa de manera empírica los efectos de la violencia política y la ayuda exterior de Estados Unidos (EE.UU. en los tres países productores de droga más prolíficos de América Latina: Colombia, Bolivia y Perú. Los resultados guardan relación directa con la literatura existente que recalca los obstáculos que los gobiernos enfrentan cuando pretenden regular los mercados de bienes de contrabando. Un análisis comparativo de la política antidrogas de EE.UU. aclara los éxitos y las limitaciones de la estrategia que actualmente se lleva a cabo, particularmente en Colombia, donde la violencia política ha facilitado el fortalecimiento del narcotráfico a nivel internacionalWhat is the effect of political violence on the production of coca in the Central Andes? Does U.S. military aid reduce the amount of drugs that originate from this region? What other factors help explain the production of coca? Are the effects of U.S. military aid the same across the Andean nations? This paper tests the effects of political violence and U.S. military aid in the drug producing nations of Colombia, Bolivia and Peru. Our results are consistent with existing literature that emphasizes the obstacles that governments face as they attempt to suppress markets for prohibited goods. Our comparative analysis sheds new light on the limitations of the current U.S. policy, particularly in Colombia, where political violence has strengthened the global drug trade

  15. Estructura litosférica de los Andes centrales a partirde un modelo gravimétrico 3D

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    Claudia B. Prezzi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A través del modelado directode la anomalía de Bouguer se desarrolló un modelo de densidades en 3D de lacorteza continental, la placa subducida y el manto superior, para los AndesCentrales entre los 20-29°S y los 74-61°O. El objetivo de este trabajo escontribuir a un mejor conocimiento de la estructura litosférica, integrando lainformación disponible (geofísica, geológica, petrológica y geoquímica en unúnico modelo. La geometría del modelo está definida y limitada por la ubicaciónde hipocentros, líneas sísmicas de reflexión y refracción, tomografías deatenuación y de tiempos de arribo, estudios magnetotelúricos, modelos térmicosy secciones estructurales balanceadas. Las densidades asignadas a losdiferentes cuerpos fueron calculadas a partir de datos petrológicos ygeoquímicos, estimando las condiciones de presión y temperatura. El modeloconsiste de 31 planos verticales E-O paralelos, donde la corteza continentalestá compuesta por distintos cuerpos que representan a las diferentes unidadesmorfotectónicas de los Andes Centrales. Se generaron mapas isocóricos del techode la placa subducida, del Moho continental y del techo de la astenósferadebajo de Sudamérica. Se calculó la anomalía residual mediante la sustracciónde los efectos gravimétricos de la placa subducida modelada y del Moho modeladode la anomalía de Bouguer. Este estudio demuestra como el modelado gravimétrico3D, integrando información geofísica, geológica y petrológica, puede contribuiral mejor conocimiento de la estructura litosférica de los Andes Centrales.

  16. Tomographic imaging of the Nazca slab and surrounding mantle in the mantle transition zone beneath the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scire, A. C.; Biryol, C. B.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Wagner, L. S.; Long, M. D.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2013-12-01

    The central Andes in South America is an ideal location to investigate the interaction between a subducting slab and the surrounding mantle to the base of the mantle transition zone (MTZ). We used finite-frequency teleseismic P-wave tomography to image velocity anomalies in the mantle from 100 - 700 km between 10° and 28°S in the central Andes by combining data from twelve separate networks deployed in the region between 1994 and 2013. P- and PKIKP- (diffracted PKP) arrivals were picked in multiple frequency bands for earthquakes at distances between 30° and 90° and between 155° to 180° from the array, respectively. The tomographic algorithm used calculates approximate finite frequency kernels for each ray, providing additional sampling for each model layer to potentially increase the resolution of our images. The trench-parallel, fast anomaly which appears to correspond with the subducting Nazca slab is the most prominent anomaly in our tomograms. Variations in the width of the slab anomaly in the deeper parts of the model show evidence for deformation of the slab between 300 and 660 km. Our results show localized thickening of the Nazca slab in the MTZ north of 14°S, between 16° and 18°S, and south of 25°S, in agreement with the idea that the Nazca slab stagnates at least temporarily in the transition zone before resuming subduction into the lower mantle. Our images of the deeply subducted Nazca slab also show evidence of varying degrees of thinning in the mantle transition zone, particularly at 20° and 24°S, possibly indicating that the stress state changes along strike as the slab deforms in the MTZ before resuming subduction into the lower mantle. We also image along-strike variations in the sub-slab mantle in the MTZ including a strong low velocity anomaly between 22° and 28°S which is similar to those seen in other subduction zones, and is interpreted as either a local thermal anomaly or a region of hydrated material in the MTZ. A similar

  17. Spatiotemporal variability of modern precipitation δ18O in the central Andes and implications for paleoclimate and paleoaltimetry estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorella, Richard P.; Poulsen, Christopher J.; Pillco Zolá, Ramiro S.; Barnes, Jason B.; Tabor, Clay R.; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the patterns of rainfall isotopic composition in the central Andes is hindered by sparse observations. Despite limited observational data, stable isotope tracers have been commonly used to constrain modern-to-ancient Andean atmospheric processes, as well as to reconstruct paleoclimate and paleoaltimetry histories. Here, we present isotopic compositions of precipitation (δ18Op and δDp) from 11 micrometeorological stations located throughout the Bolivian Altiplano and along its eastern flank at ~21.5°S. We collected and isotopically analyzed 293 monthly bulk precipitation samples (August 2008 to April 2013). δ18Op values ranged from -28.0‰ to 9.6‰, with prominent seasonal cycles expressed at all stations. We observed a strong relationship between the δ18Op and elevation, though it varies widely in time and space. Constraints on air sourcing estimated from atmospheric back trajectory calculations indicate that continental-scale climate dynamics control the interannual variability in δ18Op, with upwind precipitation anomalies having the largest effect. The impact of precipitation anomalies in distant air source regions to the central Andes is in turn modulated by the Bolivian High. The importance of the Bolivian High is most clearly observed on the southern Bolivian Altiplano. However, monthly variability among Altiplano stations can exceed 10‰ in δ18Op on the plateau and cannot be explained by elevation or source variability, indicating a nontrivial role for local scale effects on short timescales. The strong influence of atmospheric circulation on central Andean δ18Op requires that paleoclimate and paleoaltimetry studies consider the role of South American atmospheric paleocirculation in their interpretation of stable isotopic values as proxies.

  18. Space geodetic observations of nazca-south america convergence across the central andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norabuena; Leffler-Griffin; Mao; Dixon; Stein; Sacks; Ocola; Ellis

    1998-01-16

    Space geodetic data recorded rates and directions of motion across the convergent boundary zone between the oceanic Nazca and continental South American plates in Peru and Bolivia. Roughly half of the overall convergence, about 30 to 40 millimeters per year, accumulated on the locked plate interface and can be released in future earthquakes. About 10 to 15 millimeters per year of crustal shortening occurred inland at the sub-Andean foreland fold and thrust belt, indicating that the Andes are continuing to build. Little (5 to 10 millimeters per year) along-trench motion of coastal forearc slivers was observed, despite the oblique convergence.

  19. Fostering Teaching Quality in Chilean Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman Cruzat, Jose Antonio

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to explain the strategies that have been carried out by three Chilean universities in order to advance the quality of their teaching. The studied institutions are the Universidad de los Andes, the Universidad de Talca and the Universidad Catolica de Chile. In each of these three cases the analysis included, both the policies…

  20. InSAR Observations Of Crustal Deformation Mechanics In The Interior Of The Puna Plateau Of The Southern Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckelmann, Felix; Motagh, Mahdi; Bokhagen, Bodo; Strecker, Manfred

    2013-12-01

    Crustal deformation evidences in the orogenic interior of the Southern Central Andes at different time scales are observed by applying ENVISAT InSAR time series from 2005 - 2009 and differential GPS data taken in the study area of the palaeo-lake Salar de Pocitos (24.5°S, 67°W, 3650 m asl). Ongoing shortening in the region from the Tertiary to the present-day is indicated by an uplift of Quaternary palaeo-lake terraces of about 4 to 5m within the last 44ka as well as by the growth of an anticline in Tertiary sediments and the reactivation of the reverse-fault bounded Sierra de Macón, both with uplift rates of 2 - 5mm/a. In summary, this study emphasizes the diachronous and spatially disparate character of the tectonic regime at the Puna Plateau.

  1. The Mass Elevation Effect of the Central Andes and Its Implications for the Southern Hemisphere's Highest Treeline

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    Wenhui He

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the highest treelines in the world is at 4810 m above sea level on the Sajama Volcano in the central Andes. The climatological cause of that exceptionally high treeline position is still unclear. Although it has been suggested that the mass elevation effect (MEE explains the upward shift of treelines in the Altiplano region, the magnitude of MEE has not yet been quantified for that region. This paper defines MEE as the air temperature difference in summer at the same elevation between the inner mountains/plateaus (Altiplano and the free atmosphere above the adjacent lowlands of the Andean Cordillera. The Altiplano air temperature was obtained from the Global Historical Climatology Network-Monthly temperature database, and the air temperature above the adjacent lowlands was interpolated based on the National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis 1 data set. We analyzed the mean air temperature differences for January, July, and the warm months from October to April. The air temperature was mostly higher on the Altiplano than over the neighboring lowlands at the same altitude. The air temperature difference increased from the outer Andean east-facing slope to the interior of the Altiplano in summer, and it increased from high latitudes to low latitudes in winter. The mean air temperature in the Altiplano in summer is approximately 5 K higher than it is above the adjacent lowlands at the same mean elevation, averaging about 3700 m above sea level. This upward shift of isotherms in the inner part of the Cordillera enables the treeline to climb to 4810 m, with shrub-size trees reaching even higher. Therefore, the MEE explains the occurrence of one of the world’s highest treelines in the central Andes.

  2. U/Pb ages on detrital zircons in the southern central Andes Neogene foreland (36°-37°S): Constraints on Andean exhumation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagripanti, Lucía; Bottesi, Germán; Naipauer, Maximiliano; Folguera, Andrés; Ramos, Victor A.

    2011-12-01

    U/Pb dating on detrital zircons was performed in the Pampa de Carrizalito depocenter of the Late Miocene foreland basin associated with the Southern Central Andes orogenic front. This reveals Andean and pre-Andean components in magmatic derived zircons inhomogeneously distributed through the sequence. Andean, Grenville, Pampean, Famatinian and Gondwanic components reveal a complex source distribution from either the Main Andes, Coastal Cordillera and basement foreland areas. These are discussed showing different patterns in the context of the Andean orogenic cycle. Cretaceous and Jurassic components that are partly related to Mesozoic batholiths, developed at the western slope of the Andes at these latitudes, have a very contrasting behavior through the sequence: While Jurassic grains are represented from base to top, Cretaceous ones dilute upwardly. This is explained through the progressive uplift of the Southern Central Andes that could have created a barrier to Cretaceous and Jurassic detritus, while the older ones could have had either an alternative source area represented by the inverted rift system of the Huincul Ridge in the foreland area and the Cordillera del Viento in the hinterland area or the reworking of Jurassic sedimentary sequences of the Neuquén basin. Finally, a progressive enrichment in pre-Andean components to the top of the sequence is interpreted as related to the development of a broken foreland and the consequent rapid expansion of the orogenic front at the time of development of a slab shallowing setting in the region as shown by previous works.

  3. Cenozoic uplift of the Central Andes in northern Chile and Bolivia - reconciling paleoaltimetry with the geological evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    The Cenozoic geological evolution of the Central Andes, along two transects between ~17.5°S and 21°S, is compared with paleo-topography, determined from published paleo-altimetry studies. Surface and rock uplift are quantified using simple 2-D models of crustal shortening and thickening, together with estimates of sedimentation, erosion and magmatic addition. Prior to ~25 Ma, during a phase of amagmatic flat-slab subduction, thick skinned crustal shortening and thickening was focused in the Eastern and Western Cordilleras, separated by a broad basin up to 300 km wide and close to sea level, which today comprises the high Altiplano. Surface topography in the Eastern Cordillera appears to be ~1 km lower than anticipated from crustal thickening, which may be due to the pull-down effect of the subducted slab, coupled to the overlying lithosphere by a cold mantle wedge. Oligocene steepening of the subducted slab is indicated by the initiation of the volcanic arc at ~27 - 25 Ma, and widespread mafic volcanism in the Altiplano between 25 and 20 Ma. This may have resulted in detachment of mantle lithosphere and possibly dense lower crust, triggering 1 - 1.5 km of rapid uplift (over << 5 Myrs) of the Altiplano and western margin of the Eastern Cordillera and establishing the present day lithospheric structure beneath the high Andes. Since ~25 Ma, surface uplift has been the direct result of crustal shortening and thickening, locally modified by the effects of erosion, sedimentation and magmatic addition from the mantle. The rate of crustal shortening and thickening varies with location and time, with two episodes of rapid shortening in the Altiplano, lasting < 5 Myrs, that are superimposed on a long term history of ductile shortening in the lower crust, driven by underthrusting of the Brazilian Shield on the eastern margin.

  4. Thermo-mechanical segmentation of the Nazca plate in Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouard, Valerie

    2010-05-01

    The dynamics of the Chilean subduction is not uniform and presents along-strike variations controlled by plate interactions and pre-existing heterogeneity's in the upper plate. This study determines the variations of thermo-mechanical characteristics of the subducting Nazca plate before subduction, and their relations with the known South America plate segmentation. Thermal variations are derived from the regional depth anomalies of the seafloor. Seafloor depth anomalies are used to obtain maps of corrected ages and thickness of the oceanic lithosphere and compared to the heat flow anomaly data. It is abnormally colder/thicker to the north of the Iquique Ridge at 22°S and hotter/thinner to the south. Mechanical characteristics come from the shape of the bending prior to subduction. After age correction and filtering of the bathymetric data, the along-strike variations of the elastic thicness are traduced in mechanical thickness. A limit between strong and weak lithosphere appears at 28°S. To completely describe the Nazca plate and its correlation with interplate seismicity, the compositional characteristics are the third and necessary parameter. Finally, the Nazca plate can be divided in five main segments directly correlated with the seismic segmentation of the subduction. One interesting point is that the wavelength of measured lithospheric anomalies in front of the flat-slab is greater than the Juan Fernandez (JF) Ridge. It strongly suggests that it the oceanic lithosphere that is responsible for the flat-slab, and not only the JF Ridge.

  5. Snakes of an urban-rural landscape in the central Andes of Colombia: species composition, distribution, and natural history

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    Julián Andrés Rojas-Morales

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available From 2005 to 2011, I studied the composition, distribution and natural history of an Andean urban-rural snake assemblage at the Cordillera Central of Colombia, based on three data sources: (1 examination of specimens in the MHN-UC [Museo de Historia Natural, Universidad de Caldas], (2 incidental encounters by author, and (3 collection of data by other researchers. Additionally, I provide natural history notes for the species involved. A total of 14 species, including two subspecies of snakes, belonging to 12 genera and four families, have been found in the studied area (municipality of Manizales, Caldas. Taking into account this total, 10 had atleast one record in the urban area, 13 in the rural area and 14 in forested areas. Only Liophis epinephelus bimaculatus was found exclusively in forest environment. Three species (21.4% are apparently endemic to the region, six species (42.8% correspond to afauna representative of the Tropical–Andean range of South America, four species (28.5% are distributed from Central America to the tropical Andes, and only one species is widely distributed in the whole continent. The snake assemblage in Manizales is mostly terrestrial, and in general, the species tend to be more active in the rainy periods of the year (mainly from October–December, and most of them may occasionally be found in urban areas, mainly close to areas of vegetation such as crops and pastures.

  6. The ash deposits of the 4200 BP Cerro Blanco eruption: the largest Holocene eruption of the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Turiel, Jose-Luis; Saavedra, Julio; Perez-Torrado, Francisco-Jose; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Carracedo, Juan-Carlos; Lobo, Agustin; Rejas, Marta; Gallardo, Juan-Fernando; Osterrieth, Margarita; Carrizo, Julieta; Esteban, Graciela; Martinez, Luis-Dante; Gil, Raul-Andres; Ratto, Norma; Baez, Walter

    2015-04-01

    We present new data about a major eruption -spreading approx. 110 km3 ashes over 440.000 km2- long thought to have occurred around 4200 years ago in the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex (CBVC) in the Central Andes of NW Argentina (Southern Puna, 26°45' S, 67°45' W). This eruption may be the biggest during the past five millennia in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes, and possibly one of the largest Holocene eruptions in the world. Discrimination and correlation of pyroclastic deposits of this eruption of Cerro Blanco was conducted comparing samples of proximal (domes, pyroclastic flow and fall deposits) with distal ash fall deposits (up to 400 km from de vent). They have been characterized using optical and electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction, particle-size distribution by laser diffraction and electron microprobe and HR-ICP-MS with laser ablation for major and trace element composition of glass, feldspars and biotite. New and published 14C ages were calibrated using Bayesian statistics. An one-at-a-time inversion method was used to reconstruct the eruption conditions using the Tephra2 code (Bonadonna et al. 2010, https://vhub.org/resources/tephra2). This method allowed setting the main features of the eruption that explains the field observations in terms of thickness and grain size distributions of the ash fall deposit. The main arguments that justify the correlation are four: 1) Compositional coincidence for glass, feldspars, and biotite in proximal and distal materials; 2) Stratigraphic and geomorphological relationships, including structure and thickness variation of the distal deposits; 3) Geochronological consistency, matching proximal and distal ages; and 4) Geographical distribution of correlated outcrops in relation to the eruption centre at the coordinates of Cerro Blanco. With a magnitude of 7.0 and a volcanic explosivity index or VEI 7, this eruption of ~4200 BP at Cerro Blanco is the largest in the last five millennia known in the Central

  7. Age and chemical constraints of Volcán Tunupa: Implications for behind arc volcanism in the Bolivian central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    salisbury, M. J.; Kent, A. J.; Jiménez, N.; Jicha, B. R.

    2011-12-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations of groundmass separates and whole-rock geochemical data constrain the Pleistocene eruptive history of Volcán Tunupa, a glacially-dissected composite volcano (~50 km3) situated between the Salar de Uyuni and Salar de Coipasa. Tunupa erupted ~110 km east of the arc front of the Western Cordillera of the central Andes near the eastern edge of the Intersalar Volcanic Field, an arc-perpendicular expression of volcanism that extends to the central Altiplano basin of Bolivia. 40Ar/39Ar age determinations indicate that the edifice was constructed between ~1.40 and 1.55 Ma, whereas nearby Cerro Huayrana lavas erupted ~ 11 Ma. Published ages from the Western Cordillera that are concordant with both Tunupa and Huayrana lavas demonstrate that the central Altiplano lavas are a long-lived expression of behind arc volcanism. The Tunupa lavas define a calc-alkaline trend from trachyandesite to trachydacite (wt.% SiO2 = 60.6 - 63.6; wt.% K2O + Na2O = 7.5 - 8.3) and are overlain by younger, more silicic (wt.% SiO2 = 66) trachydacitic domes. Major element compositions of Tunupa and Huayrana are enriched in FeO and TiO2 compared to the arc front. These lavas are also enriched in high field strength elements, notably Nb and Ta, and are characterized by considerably lower Ba/Nb and La/Ta ratios than arc front lavas in northern Chile. The geochemical and spatiotemporal patterns of the behind arc Tunupa and Huayrana lavas suggest different petrogenetic histories from typical central Andean arc lavas.

  8. Compositional variations of ignimbrite magmas in the Central Andes over the past 26 Ma - A multivariate statistical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandmeier, M.; Wörner, G.

    2016-10-01

    Multivariate statistical and geospatial analyses based on a compilation of 890 geochemical and 1200 geochronological data for 194 mapped ignimbrites from the Central Andes document the compositional and temporal patterns of large-volume ignimbrites (so-called "ignimbrite flare-ups") during Neogene times. Rapid advances in computational science during the past decade led to a growing pool of algorithms for multivariate statistics for large datasets with many predictor variables. This study applies cluster analysis (CA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) on log-ratio transformed data with the aim of (1) testing a tool for ignimbrite correlation and (2) distinguishing compositional groups that reflect different processes and sources of ignimbrite magmatism during the geodynamic evolution of the Central Andes. CA on major and trace elements allows grouping of ignimbrites according to their geochemical characteristics into rhyolitic and dacitic "end-members" and to differentiate characteristic trace element signatures with respect to Eu anomaly, depletions in middle and heavy rare earth elements (REE) and variable enrichments in light REE. To highlight these distinct compositional signatures, we applied LDA to selected ignimbrites for which comprehensive datasets were available. In comparison to traditional geochemical parameters we found that the advantage of multivariate statistics is their capability of dealing with large datasets and many variables (elements) and to take advantage of this n-dimensional space to detect subtle compositional differences contained in the data. The most important predictors for discriminating ignimbrites are La, Yb, Eu, Al2O3, K2O, P2O5, MgO, FeOt, and TiO2. However, other REE such as Gd, Pr, Tm, Sm, Dy and Er also contribute to the discrimination functions. Significant compositional differences were found between (1) the older (> 13 Ma) large-volume plateau-forming ignimbrites in northernmost Chile and southern Peru and (2) the

  9. Bimodal volcanism in a tectonic transfer zone: Evidence for tectonically controlled magmatism in the southern Central Andes, NW Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrinovic, I. A.; Riller, U.; Brod, J. A.; Alvarado, G.; Arnosio, M.

    2006-04-01

    This field-based and analytical laboratory study focuses on the genetic relationship between bimodal volcanic centres and fault types of an important tectonic transfer zone in the southern Central Andes, the NW-SE striking Calama-Olacapato-Toro (COT) volcanic belt. More specifically, tectono-magmatic relationships are examined for the 0.55 Ma Tocomar, the 0.78 Ma San Jerónimo and the 0.45 Ma Negro de Chorrillos volcanic centres in the Tocomar area (66°30 W-24°15 S). Structures of the COT volcanic belt, notably NW-SE striking strike-slip faults and NE-SW trending normal faults, accommodated differential shortening between major N-S striking thrust faults on the Puna Plateau. We present evidence that bimodal volcanism was contemporaneous with activity of these fault types in the COT volcanic belt, whereby eruption and composition of the volcanic rocks in the Tocomar and San Jerónimo-Negro de Chorrillos areas appear to have been controlled by the kinematics of individual faults. More specifically, rhyolitic centres such as the Tocomar are associated with normal faults, whereas shoshonitic-andesitic monogenetic volcanoes, e.g., the San Jerónimo and Negro de Chorrillos centres, formed at strike-slip dominated faults. Thus, the eruption of higher viscous rhyolite magmas appears to have been facilitated in tectonic settings characterized by horizontal dilation whereas ascent and effusive volcanic activity of less viscous and hot basaltic andesites to shoshonites were controlled by subvertical strike-slip faults. While the Tocomar rhyolites are interpreted to be derived from an anatectic crustal source, geochemical characteristics of the San Jerónimo and Negro de Chorrillos shoshonitic andesites are in agreement with a deeper source. This suggests that the composition of erupted volcanic rocks as well as their spatial distribution in the Tocomar area is controlled by the activity of specific fault types. Such volcano-tectonic relationships are also evident from older

  10. A multi-institutional and interdisciplinary approach to the assessment of vulnerability and adaptation to climate change in the Peruvian Central Andes: problems and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Martínez

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A local integrated assessment of the vulnerability and adaptation to climate change in the Mantaro River Basin, located in Peruvian Central Andes, was developed between years 2003 to 2005. In this paper we present some lessons learned during the development of this study, emphasizing the multi-institutional and interdisciplinary efforts, briefly showing the methodological aspects, and pointing out the main problems found.

  11. Pluri-decadal (1955–2014) evolution of glacier–rock glacier transitional landforms in the central Andes of Chile (30–33° S)

    OpenAIRE

    S. Monnier; Kinnard, C.

    2016-01-01

    This study deals with relationships between debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers in the central Andes of Chile. Three glacier–rock glacier transitional landforms are investigated over the last decades in order to highlight and question the significance of their landscape evolution and dynamics. We use series of historical air photos and Geoeye satellite images together with common remote sensing operations including imagery orthorectification, digital elevation model generation, an...

  12. A Bayesian Approach for Apparent Inter-plate Coupling in the Central Andes Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega Culaciati, F. H.; Simons, M.; Genrich, J. F.; Galetzka, J.; Comte, D.; Glass, B.; Leiva, C.; Gonzalez, G.; Norabuena, E. O.

    2010-12-01

    We aim to characterize the extent of apparent plate coupling on the subduction zone megathrust with the eventual goal of understanding spatial variations of fault zone rheology, inferring relationships between apparent coupling and the rupture zone of big earthquakes, as well as the implications for earthquake and tsunami hazard. Unlike previous studies, we approach the problem from a Bayesian perspective, allowing us to completely characterize the model parameter space by searching a posteriori estimates of the range of allowable models instead of seeking a single optimum model. Two important features of the Bayesian approach are the possibility to easily implement any kind of physically plausible a priori information and to perform the inversion without regularization, other than that imposed by the way in which we parameterize the forward model. Adopting a simple kinematic back-slip model and a 3D geometry of the inter-plate contact zone, we can estimate the probability of apparent coupling (Pc) along the plate interface that is consistent with a priori information (e.g., approximate rake of back-slip) and available geodetic measurements. More generally, the Bayesian approach adopted here is applicable to any region and eventually would allow one to evaluate the spatial relationship between various inferred distributions of fault behavior (e.g., seismic rupture, postseismic creep, and apparent interseismic coupling) in a quantifiable manner. We apply this methodology to evaluate the state of apparent inter-seismic coupling in the Chilean-Peruvian subduction margin (12 S - 25 S). As observational constraints, we use previously published horizontal velocities from campaign GPS [Kendrick et al., 2001, 2006] as well as 3 component velocities from a recently established continuous GPS network in the region (CAnTO). We compare results from both joint and independent use of these data sets. We obtain patch like features for Pc with higher values located above 60 km

  13. Determinación de procesos y áreas de riesgos en los Andes centrales de Chile mediterráneo: Casos de estudio

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    Quintanilla, Víctor

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available ln the course of the Mountain Hazards Mapping Project in the Central Andes from Chile (Project FONDECYT Nº 482-91 natural hazards were assessed and mapped in the Aconcagua Bassin Test area of the high Andes (2.500 to 4.000 m.. Various geomorphic hazard processes (avalanches, rockfalls, landslide hazards, water activity were mapped on the scale 1:50.000 with a simplified legend. The mountainous area seems to be relatively stable and the rock substratum (mainly granitic is resistant to weathering. The greatest hazards are avalanches and landslides, which have a long recurrence interval and are difficult to predict, although their source areas can be identified.

    [es] Durante la realización del proyecto de Cartografía de Riesgos de Montaña en los Andes Centrales de Chile (Proyecto FONDECYT nº 482- 91 se cartografiaron los riesgos naturales en la cuenca del Aconcagua, altos Andes (2.500 a 4.000 m. Varios riesgos geomorfológicos (avalanchas, caídas de piedras, erosión hídrica fueron cartografiados a escala 1:50.000 con una leyenda simplificada. Las áreas de montaña parecen relativamente estables y el sustrato rocoso (principalmente granítico es resistente a la meteorización.
    Los mayores riesgos son las avalanchas y los deslizamientos, que tienen un largo periodo de recurrencia y son difíciles de predecir, aunque sus áreas fuente pueden ser fácilmente identificadas.
    [fr] Durant la réalisation du projet de cartographie des risques de montagne dans les Andes Centrales du Chili (Projet FONDECYT nº 482-91 on a réalisé des cartographies des risques naturels dans le bassin de Aconcagua, Hautes Andes (2500 à 4000 m. Des risques géomorphologiques variés (avalanches, chutes de pierres, érosion hydrique ont été représentés au 1:50.000ième avec une légende simplifiée. Les zones de montagne paraissent relativement stables et la roche mère (principalement granitique est résistante à la d

  14. Modern and long-term evaporation of central Andes surface waters suggests paleo archives underestimate Neogene elevations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorella, Richard P.; Poulsen, Christopher J.; Pillco Zolá, Ramiro S.; Jeffery, M. Louise; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2015-12-01

    Central Andean paleoelevations reconstructed from stable isotope and paleofloral data imply a large magnitude (>2 km) Miocene-to-modern surface uplift. However, the isotopic relationships between precipitation, surface waters, and soil waters upon which these reconstructions are based remain poorly constrained for both past, and in many cases, modern conditions. We quantify the relationships between central Andean precipitation and surface waters by measuring the isotopic composition of 249 stream water samples (δ18O and δD) collected between April 2009 and October 2012. The isotopic compositions of stream waters match precipitation along the eastern flank. In contrast, Altiplano surface waters possess a lower δD-δ18O slope (4.59 vs ∼8 for meteoric waters) not observed in precipitation, which signals heavy isotope evaporative enrichment in surface waters. Paleoclimate models indicate that highly evaporative conditions have persisted on the plateau throughout Andean uplift, and that conditions may have been more evaporative when the Andes were lower. Thus, more ancient proxy materials may have a greater evaporative bias than previously recognized and paleoelevation reconstructions from stable isotope based central Andean plateau proxy materials likely overstate Miocene-to-present surface uplift. We propose Altiplano paleoelevations of 1-2 km at 24.5 Ma, 1.5-2.9 km by 11.45 Ma, and modern elevations by ∼6 Ma based on the lightest isotopic compositions observed in Altiplano proxy materials, which are least likely to be influenced by evaporation. These constraints limit total late-Miocene-to-modern uplift to <2.2 km, are more consistent with crustal shortening records, and suggest that plateau uplift may have been more spatially uniform than suggested by previous interpretations of stable isotope proxies.

  15. Modelling wet snow avalanche runout to assess road safety at a high-altitude mine in the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Cesar Vera; Wever, Nander; Bühler, Yves; Stoffel, Lukas; Margreth, Stefan; Bartelt, Perry

    2016-11-01

    Mining activities in cold regions are vulnerable to snow avalanches. Unlike operational facilities, which can be constructed in secure locations outside the reach of avalanches, access roads are often susceptible to being cut, leading to mine closures and significant financial losses. In this paper we discuss the application of avalanche runout modelling to predict the operational risk to mining roads, a long-standing problem for mines in high-altitude, snowy regions. We study the 35 km long road located in the "Cajón del rio Blanco" valley in the central Andes, which is operated by the Codelco Andina copper mine. In winter and early spring, this road is threatened by over 100 avalanche paths. If the release and snow cover conditions can be accurately specified, we find that avalanche dynamics modelling is able to represent runout, and safe traffic zones can be identified. We apply a detailed, physics-based snow cover model to calculate snow temperature, density and moisture content in three-dimensional terrain. This information is used to determine the initial and boundary conditions of the avalanche dynamics model. Of particular importance is the assessment of the current snow conditions along the avalanche tracks, which define the mass and thermal energy entrainment rates and therefore the possibility of avalanche growth and long runout distances.

  16. Zonda downslope winds in the central Andes of South America in a 20-year climate simulation with the Eta model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antico, Pablo L.; Chou, Sin Chan; Mourão, Caroline

    2015-12-01

    The Zonda wind is a local version of the alpine foehn in the central Andes Mountains in South America. It blows on the eastern slopes and produces an extremely warm and dry condition in Argentina. In this study, the occurrence of Zonda wind events during a 20-year simulation from the regional Eta model is analyzed and results are compared to previous studies of Zonda wind events based on weather observations. We define a set of parameters to account for the zonal pressure gradient across the mountain, vertical movement, and air humidity typical of Zonda wind events. These parameters are applied to characterize Zonda wind events in model run and to classify them as surface-level or high-level episodes. The resulting annual distribution of Zonda occurrences based on composite analyses shows a preference for winter and spring with rare occurrences during summer. For the surface-level Zonda wind events, the highest frequency occurs during spring. Whereas surface-level Zonda wind episodes more commonly initiate in the afternoon, high-level Zonda wind events show no preference for a given initiation time. Our results are mostly in agreement with previous observational results.

  17. Estimating glacier and snowmelt contributions to stream flow in a Central Andes catchment in Chile using natural tracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rodriguez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology for hydrograph separation in high elevation watersheds, which aims at identifying individual flow sources such as snow- and ice melt, rainfall and soil water. Daily summer and bi-daily spring water samples from the outlet of the Juncal River were analyzed for all major ions as well as stable water isotopes, δ18O and δ2H. Additionally, various water sources such as rain, springs, snow- and glacial melt were sampled throughout the catchment. A principal component analysis (PCA was performed in order to reduce the dimensionality of the problem. Potential sources were identified in a two-component U space that explains 77% of variability. Hydrograph separation (HS was performed through three models: (i Isotopic model, (ii Mixing–PCA model, and (iii Informative–Bayesian model, with very similar results in each case. At the Juncal River outlet, summer flows were composed by at least 50% of water originating in highly glaciarized headwaters in 2011–2012 (a dry period in the Central Andes. Autumn and winter flows were highly influenced by soil water and affect total annual discharge. Before the high flow season, snow melt accounted for approximately 25% of streamflow, However during summer, when streamflow was highest, snowmelt contribution was minimal, while glacier melt and soil water were the most important sources.

  18. Organic pollutant burden of the giant mussels Choromytilus chorus from the south-central Chilean coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Beatriz; Palma-Fleming, Hernán; Navarro, Jorge M

    2004-04-01

    A comparative quantitative analysis was made on the contents of organochlorines (OCh) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in tissues of the giant mussel Choromytilus chorus from three bays in south-central Chile exposed to various degrees of pollutant input. Mussels from the three bays contained levels of OCh near the detection limits of method, with a tendency to be slightly higher in the polluted bay (San Vicente) than in the other bays (Corral and Yaldad). PAH levels and types in Corral and Yaldad were well below of carcinogenicity permitted in mussels for human consumption.

  19. Phylogeny and biogeography of the New World siskins and goldfinches: rapid, recent diversification in the Central Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Elizabeth J; Witt, Christopher C

    2015-06-01

    Time-calibrated molecular phylogenies can help us to understand the origins of the diverse and unique Andean avifauna. Previous studies have shown that the tempo of diversification differed between the Andes and adjacent lowland regions of South America. Andean taxa were found to have speciated more recently and to have avoided the decelerated diversification that is typical of Neotropical lowland clades. The South American siskins, a Pleistocene finch radiation, may typify this Andean pattern. We investigated the phylogenetic biogeography of all the New World siskins and goldfinches in new detail. To understand the specific role of the Andes in siskin diversification, we asked: (1) Was diversification faster in Andean siskin lineages relative to non-Andean ones? (2) Did siskin lineages move into and out of the Andes at different rates? We found that siskin lineages in the Andes had higher diversification rates and higher outward dispersal rates than siskin lineages outside the Andes. We conclude that páramo expansion and contraction in response to Pleistocene climatic cycles caused accelerated diversification and outward dispersal in Andean siskins. The younger average age of bird species in the Andes compared to lowland South America may be attributable to bursts of recent diversification in siskins and several other vagile, open-habitat clades.

  20. Elevation-dependent changes in n-alkane δD and soil GDGTs across the South Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Moreno, Vanesa; Rohrmann, Alexander; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Sachse, Dirk; Tofelde, Stefanie; Niedermeyer, Eva M.; Strecker, Manfred R.; Mulch, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    Surface uplift of large plateaus may significantly influence regional climate and more specifically precipitation patterns and temperature, sometimes complicating paleoaltimetry interpretations. Thus, understanding the topographic evolution of tectonically active mountain belts benefits from continued development of reliable proxies to reduce uncertainties in paleoaltimetry reconstructions. Lipid biomarker-based proxies provide a novel approach to stable isotope paleoaltimetry and complement authigenic or pedogenic mineral proxy materials, in particular outside semi-arid climate zones where soil carbonates are not abundant but (soil) organic matter has a high preservation potential. Here we present δD values of soil-derived n-alkanes and mean annual air temperature (MAT) estimates based on branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGT) distributions to assess their potential for paleoelevation reconstructions in the southern central Andes. We analyzed soil samples across two environmental and hydrological gradients that include a hillslope (26-28°S) and a valley (22-24°S) transect on the windward flanks of Central Andean Eastern Cordillera in NW Argentina. Our results show that present-day n-alkane δD values and brGDGT-based MAT estimates are both linearly related with elevation and in good agreement with present-day climate conditions. Soil n-alkanes show a δD lapse rate (Δ (δD)) of - 1.64 ‰ / 100 m (R2 = 0.91, p alkane δD values and MAT reconstructions based on brGDGTs distributions from the hillslope transect (Δ (δD) = - 1.64 ‰ / 100 m, R2 = 0.91, p < 0.01 and ΔT = - 0.51 °C / 100 m, R2 = 0.91, p < 0.01) track the direct effects of orography on precipitation and temperature and hence the combined effects of local and regional hydrology as well as elevation.

  1. Early Cenozoic Shortening and Foreland Basin Sedimentation in the Marañon Fold-thrust Belt, Central Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, L. J.; Carlotto, V.; Horton, B. K.; Rosell, L. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Marañon fold-thrust belt in the westernmost Andes of Peru has long been considered a robust signature of early Cenozoic shortening in the Andean orogenic belt. However, the structural details and potential records of coeval synorogenic sedimentation remain elusive. We report results from new geologic mapping (1:50,000), cross-section construction, and U-Pb geochronology for the Matucana-Ticlio region at 11-12°S along the Lima-La Oroya highway. Zircon U-Pb age data from volcanic rocks and clastic basin fill provide a maximum depositional age of ~43 Ma for a middle Eocene syndeformational unit that we identify as the Anta Formation, which overlies the Paleocene Casapalca Formation. Sedimentary lithofacies and unconformable relationships within the volcaniclastic Anta Formation reveal mixed fluvial, alluvial-fan, and volcanic depositional conditions during shortening accommodated by a NE-verging thrust/reverse fault and corresponding backthrust (here named the Chonta fault system). Our cross-section reconstruction and geochronological data indicate that the region is a critical, possibly unique, zone of the broader NE-directed Marañon fold-thrust belt where pre-Neogene synorogenic sediments and their associated structures are preserved. We interpret this combined structural and basin system as an Eocene-age (Incaic) frontal thrust belt and corresponding foredeep to wedge-top depozone in central Peru. As one of the better-constrained segments of the Marañon fold-thrust belt, this zone provides insight into potential linkages with elusive early Cenozoic (Incaic) structures and foreland basin fill of the Western Cordillera and Altiplano farther south in the central Andean plateau.

  2. The Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system in the Puna Plateau, Central Andes: Geodynamic implications and stratovolcanoes emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norini, Gianluca; Baez, Walter; Becchio, Raul; Viramonte, Jose; Giordano, Guido; Arnosio, Marcelo; Pinton, Annamaria; Groppelli, Gianluca

    2013-11-01

    The structural evolution of the Puna Plateau is characterized by the activity of both orogen-parallel and orogen-oblique faults. Understanding the possible relationship between these two structural styles, their geodynamic implications and the influence on the migration of magmas is important to get insights into the tectonic and magmatic evolution of the Central Andes. In this study, we present a structural analysis of the orogen-oblique Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system and the surrounding orogen-parallel thrust faults in the central-eastern Puna Plateau. Morphostructural analysis and field mapping reveal the geometry, kinematics and dynamics of the tectonic features in the studied area. We propose a three-dimensional geometrical reconstruction of the main fault planes showing their attitude and intersections at depth. The study indicates that the crust underwent simultaneous deformation along both the vertical transcurrent Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system and the low-angle thrust faults, and that the back-arc portion of the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system developed as a transfer zone among the main N-striking thrusts. Our model considers that both orogen-parallel and orogen-oblique fault systems should be regarded as parts of the same tectonic system, accommodating crustal shortening of a thickened crust. The study suggests that the tectonic control on the magma and fluid circulation in the crust is mainly related to the geometry of the fault planes and the orientation of the stress field, with a previously unrecognized important role played by the orogen-parallel thrust faults on the emplacement of the stratovolcanoes.

  3. Lacustrine sedimentation in an altitude forest site, central Andes, Bolivia. Palaeo-climatic implications; Etude de la sedimentation lacustre d`un site de foret d`altitude des Andes centrales Bolivie. Implications paleoclimatiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sifeddine, A.; Bertaux, J. [ORSTOM, 93 - Bondy (France); Mourguiart, Ph. [Bordeaux-1 Univ. URA 197 CNRS, ORSTOM-AIMPACT, 33 (France). Dept. de Geologie et d`Oceanographie; Martin, L. [ORSTOM-AIMPACT, PPPG, IG/UFBA, Salvador (Brazil); Disnar, J.R.; Laggoun-Defarge, F. [Orleans Univ. URA 724-CNRS, 45 (France); Argollo, J. [Universidad Mayor de San Andre, IIG, La Paz (Bolivia)

    1998-12-31

    A sedimentological study of a 755 cm length core sampled in the middle of a marshy depression surrounded by a cloud forest in the central Andes reveals that this site has recorded important environmental variations during the last 50 000 years. For the most part (625 cm) the core is composed of detrital rich sediments deposited during the Upper Pleistocene. The highest amount of detrital influx underlines the Last Glacial Maximum which ranges from ca 29,000 {sup 14}C yr B.P. to ca 16,000 {sup 14}C yr B.P. (ca 18,500 cal yr B.P.), between two relatively humid phases. The sedimentation of the present Interglacial, starting at ca 12,500 {sup 14}C yr B.P. (14,500 cal yr B.P.), is mainly organic, as a consequence of the great development of soils and the forest vegetal cover the catchment area. The maximum extension of this vegetal cover ranging from 12,500 to ca 10,500 {sup 14}C yr B.P. (14,500 and 12,400 cal yr B.P.) is followed from 10,500 to 8,000 {sup 14}C yr B.P. (12,400 and 8,800 cal yr B.P.) by a drier period is revealed by the occurrence of micro-charcoals in the sediment. Between ca 8,000 and 4,000 {sup 14}C yr B.P. (8,800 and 4,500 cal yr B.P.), the sharp increase of micro-charcoals content, likely related to palaeo-fires, underlines an intensification of this dry trend. (authors) 30 refs.

  4. Synergistic effects of hypoxia and increasing CO2 on benthic invertebrates of the central Chilean coast

    KAUST Repository

    Steckbauer, Alexandra

    2015-07-10

    Ocean acidification (OA) and hypoxic events are an increasing worldwide problem, but the synergetic effects of these factors are seldom explored. However, this synergetic occurrence of stressors is prevalent. The coastline of Chile not only suffers from coastal hypoxia but the cold, oxygen-poor waters in upwelling events are also supersaturated in CO2, a study site to explore the combined effect of OA and hypoxia. We experimentally evaluated the metabolic response of different invertebrate species (2 anthozoans, 9 molluscs, 4 crustaceans, 2 echinoderms) of the coastline of central Chile (33°30′S, 71°37′W) to hypoxia and OA within predicted levels and in a full factorial design. Organisms were exposed to 4 different treatments (ambient, low oxygen, high CO2, and the combination of low oxygen and high CO2) and metabolism was measured after 3 and 6 days. We show that the combination of hypoxia and increased pCO2 reduces the respiration significantly, compared to a single stressor. The evaluation of synergistic pressures, a more realistic scenario than single stressors, is crucial to evaluate the effect of future changes for coastal species and our results provide the first insight on what might happen in the next 100 years.

  5. [Nutritional status of preschool children attending the Chilean National Nursery Schools Council Programs (JUNJI): assessment of the agreement among anthropometric indicators of obesity and central obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérez-Gómez, Yareni; Kain, Juliana; Uauy, Ricardo; Galván, Marcos; Corvalán, Camila

    2009-03-01

    Historically, the anthropometric assessment of nutritional welfare programs has been targeted to assess nutritional deficiencies based on weight-to-age and height-to-age indicators. Recently, given the increase on childhood obesity, it has been also recommended the measurement of indicators of obesity (i.e., weight-to-height) and central obesity (i.e., waist circumference). However, the agreement of these indicators in preschool children is unclear. The aims of this study were: (1) assess the nutritional status of children attending the Chilean National Nursery Schools Council Program (JUNJI); (2) assess the agreement between general and central obesity anthropometric measurements in these children. In 574 girls and 580 boys, 3.0 to 5.9 years old, we measured: weight, height, waist and hip circumference, and five skinfolds. We used the WHO 2006 growth standards to estimate Z-scores. We defined general obesity as WHZ or BAZ= 2, and central obesity as waist circumference > or =90 percentile of NHANES III. The participants were on average slightly shorter but considerably heavier and obese than the reference populations. Prevalence of general obesity was close to 16% with both indicators while prevalence of central obesity reached 15%. There was good agreement among general obesity indicators and central obesity indicators (Kappa = 0.6-0.7). In summary, we found a high prevalence of obesity and central obesity among Chilean preschool children beneficiaries of a welfare program. At this age, there was a good agreement among general obesity indicators and central obesity indicators. These results suggest that waist circumferences measurements should not be incorporated to the program.

  6. Geometric evolution of the Horcones Inferior Glacier (Mount Aconcagua, Central Andes) during the 2002-2006 surge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitte, Pierre; Berthier, Etienne; Masiokas, Mariano H.; Cabot, Vincent; Ruiz, Lucas; Ferri Hidalgo, Lidia; Gargantini, Hernán.; Zalazar, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The Central Andes of Chile and Argentina (31-35°S) contain a large number and variety of ice masses, but only two surging glaciers have been studied in this region. We analyzed the 2002-2006 surge of the Horcones Inferior Glacier, Mount Aconcagua, Argentina, based on medium spatial resolution (15-30 m) satellite images and digital elevation models. During the buildup phase the glacier was stagnant, with velocities lower than 0.1 m/d. In the active-phase velocities reached 14 m/d and the glacier front advanced 3.1 km. At the peak of the active phase (2003-2004), the area-averaged elevation change was -42 m in the reservoir zone (2.53 km2) and +30 m in the receiving zone (3.31 km2). The estimated ice flux through a cross section located at 4175 meter above sea level was 108 m3 during a period of 391 days, a flux that suggests a mean glacier thickness at this location of ~90 m. The depletion phase showed a recovery of the reservoir zone elevation, the down wasting of the receiving zone (-17 m, 2007-2014), and a return to quiescent velocities. The short active phase, the abrupt change in the velocities, and the high level of the proglacial stream indicate a hydrological switch (Alaska type) trigger. The 2002-2006 and 1984-1990 surges of Horcones Inferior were synchronous with the surges of nearby Grande del Nevado Glacier. These events occurred after periods of positive mass balance, so we hypothesize a climate driver.

  7. Studies of Quaternary deformation zones through geomorphic and geophysical evidence: A case in the Precordillera Sur, Central Andes of Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrizzano, Carla M.; Fazzito, Sabrina Y.; Cortés, José M.; Rapalini, Augusto E.

    2010-07-01

    At the northern sector of the Precordillera Sur (31° 50'-32° 40' SL/68° 45'-69° 20' WL), Central Andes of Argentina, NW-trending sinistral transpressive shear zones at different scales, product of the Late Cenozoic Andean deformation, are recognized. The most significant of them is the 120 km long Barreal-Las Peñas Belt and within it, a small-scale (7 km long) Quaternary sinistral transpressive shear zone, called Los Avestruces, has been detected from geomorphological and geophysical analysis (32° SL/69° 21 WL). Geophysical techniques were applied to better characterize the shallow structure and kinematics of some representative structures in this shear zone. In particular, the use of tomography of electrical resistivity methods allowed characterizing the subsurface geometry of some areas of interest, enabling the recognition of Quaternary layers against their original slope, the geometry of the reverse fault which uplifted the Pleistocene deposits of one of the highs, the geometry of a likely previous extensional fault reactivated and inverted during the Quaternary as well as the presence of a reverse blind fault, which has uplifted the Quaternary deposits of the Los Avestruces bog. The location of the above mentioned shear zones coincides with the northern branch of the NW-trending extensional Triassic Cuyana basin. Thus, their presence appears to be related to Andean reactivation of older (Triassic), mainly NW-trending, structures. In the northern area of the Precordillera Sur, as well as in other places of the world here discussed, these kinds of paleotectonic oblique features play a major role in defining the geometry and kinematics of Late Cenozoic deformation.

  8. Cenozoic stratigraphic development in the north Chilean forearc: Implications for basin development and uplift history of the Central Andean margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Adrian J.; Evenstar, Laura

    2010-11-01

    Analysis of the Cenozoic stratigraphic development of the forearc of northern Chile between 18°S and 23°30'S, allows constraints to be placed on the timing and nature of basin formation and the uplift history of the Central Andes. Chronostratigraphic charts have been constructed from 20 lithostratigraphic sections distributed throughout the forearc. Sections were taken from the Longitudinal Valley, Central Depression, Calama Basin, Salar de Atacama, Precordillera and the western flank of the Western Cordillera. Correlation and timing of events is largely based on the presence of dated volcanic horizons in all the studied sections. Three chronostratigraphic units are defined based upon the presence of regional unconformities. Deposition of the Late Eocene to Early Miocene chronostratigraphic unit (38-19 Ma) commenced across an irregular unconformity surface between ˜ 38 and 30 Ma with alluvial fan and fluvial sediments derived from the east interbedded with rhyolitic ignimbrites. Aggradation after 25 Ma resulted in development of a large broad basin over much of northern Chile that expanded eastwards through onlap onto basement. Deposition terminated around 19 Ma with the development of an angular unconformity over much, but not all of the study area. During deposition of the Early to Late Miocene chronostratigraphic unit (18-10 Ma) emergent volcanic source areas to the east provided catchments for large fluvial systems that drained westwards into endorheic ephemeral lacustrine basins. Fold growth affected sedimentation restricting accommodation space to small intra-thrust basins in the Precordillera and localised disruption and unconformity development in the Longitudinal Valley. The Late Miocene to present day chronostratigraphic unit (10-0 Ma) followed the development of a regional angular unconformity at 10 Ma. Sedimentation was restricted to a series of thrust-bounded endorheic basins in both the Central Depression and the Precordillera sourced from the east

  9. Constraining the Lithospheric Structure of the Central Andes Using P- and S- wave Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Central Andean Plateau (CAP) has elevations in excess of 3 km, and is part of the Andean Cordillera that resulted in part from shortening along the western edge of South America as it was compressed between the subducting Nazca plate and underthrusting Brazilian cratonic lithosphere. We calculated P- and S-wave receiver functions for the Central Andean Uplift and Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) temporary deployment of broadband seismometers in the Bolivian orocline (12°-20°S) region to investigate crustal thickness and lithospheric structure. Migration of the receiver functions is done using common conversion point (CCP) stacks through a 3D shear velocity model from ambient noise tomography (Ward et al., 2013). The P- and S-wave receiver functions provide similar estimates of the depth to Moho under the CAP. Crustal thicknesses include 60-65 km thick crust underneath the Bolivian Altiplano, crust that varies from ~70 km to ~50 km underneath the Eastern Cordillera and Interandean zone, and thins to 50 to 40 km crust in the Subandes and the edge of the foreland. The variable crustal thickness of the Eastern Cordillera and Interandean zone ranges from >70 km associated with the Los Frailes volcanic field at 19°-20°S to ~55 km beneath the 6 km peaks of the Cordillera Real at ~16°S. From our S-wave receiver functions, that have no multiples that can interfere with deeper structure, we also identify structures below the Moho. Along a SW-NE line that runs near La Paz where we have our highest station density, the S-wave CCP receiver-function stacks show a strong negative polarity arrival at a depth of ~120 km from the eastern edge of the Altiplano to the Subandean zone. We suggest this may be a good candidate for the base of the CAP lithosphere. In addition, above this depth the mantle is strongly layered, suggesting that there is not a simple high velocity mantle lithosphere associated with the continental lithosphere underthrusting the Andean orogen

  10. Structural control on volcanoes and magma paths from local- to orogen-scale: The central Andes case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibaldi, A.; Bonali, F. L.; Corazzato, C.

    2017-03-01

    Assessing the parameters that control the location and geometry of magma paths is of paramount importance for the comprehension of volcanic plumbing systems and geo-hazards. We analyse the distribution of 1518 monogenic and polygenic volcanoes of Miocene-Quaternary age of the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes (Chile-Bolivia-Argentina), and reconstruct the magma paths at 315 edifices by analysing the morphostructural characteristics of craters and cones. Then we compare these data with outcropping dykes, tectonic structures and state of stress. Most magma paths trend N-S, NW-SE, and NE-SW, in decreasing order of frequency. The N-S and NW-SE paths coexist in the northern and southern part of the study area, whereas N-S paths dominate east of the Salar de Atacama. Outcropping dykes show the same trends. The regional Holocene stress state is given by an E-W greatest horizontal principal stress. N-S and NNE-SSW reverse faults and folds affect deposits of 4.8, 3.2 and 1.3 Ma BP, especially in the central and southern study areas. A few NW-SE left-lateral strike-slip faults are present in the interior of the volcanic arc, part of which belong to the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault. The volcanic chain is also affected by several N-S- and NW-SE-striking normal faults that offset Pliocene and Quaternary deposits. The results indicate different scenarios of magma-tectonic interaction, given by N-S normal and reverse faults and N-S fold hinges that guide volcano emplacement and magma paths. Magma paths are also guided by strike-slip and normal NW-SE faults, especially in the northern part of the study area. Zones with verticalized strata, with bedding striking NE-SW, also acted as preferential magma paths. These data suggest that at convergence zones with continental crust, shallow magma paths can be more sensitive to the presence and geometry of upper crustal weakness zones than to the regional state of stress.

  11. A first shallow firn-core record from Glaciar La Ollada, Cerro Mercedario, central Argentine Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolius, David; Schwikowski, Margit; Jenk, Theo; Gäggeler, Heinz W.; Casassa, Gino; Rivera, Andrés

    In January 2003, shallow firn cores were recovered from Glaciar Esmeralda on Cerro del Plomo (33°14‧ S, 70°13‧ W; 5300 ma.s.l.), central Chile, and from Glaciar La Ollada on Cerro Mercedario (31°58‧ S, 70°07‧ W; 6070 ma.s.l.), Argentina, in order to find a suitable archive for paleoclimate reconstruction in a region strongly influenced by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. In the area between 28° S and 35° S, the amount of winter precipitation is significantly correlated to the Southern Oscillation Index, with higher values during El Niño years. Glaciochemical analysis indicates that the paleo-record at Glaciar La Ollada is well preserved, whereas at Glaciar Esmeralda the record is strongly influenced by meltwater formation and percolation. A preliminary dating of the Mercedario core by annual-layer counting results in a time-span of 17 years (1986-2002), yielding an average annual net accumulation of 0.45 m w.e.

  12. El tarwi o chocho: una de las principales fuentes de proteína vegetal de las comunidades indígenas de los Andes Centrales

    OpenAIRE

    PLANCHUELO Ana m.; Fuentes, Esteban P.

    2005-01-01

    El lupino andino (Lupinus mutabilis Sweet) conocido también como tarwi o chocho, es una especie de leguminosa nativa de los Andes Centrales. Su domesticación se remonta a los principios de la cultura Nazca y desde ese entonces hasta la actualidad el cultivo está ampliamente difundido en las laderas montañosas y en los altos valles de Ecuador, Perú y Bolivia. La importancia del lupino para las comunidades andinas prehispánicas quedo documentada en pinturas de cerámicas y en tributos encontrado...

  13. Thin and Thick Skinned Foreland Deformation in the Central Andes: A Numerical Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babeyko, A. Y.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2004-12-01

    The two main segments of the Central Andean plateau, Altiplano and Puna, demonstrate since the Late Miocene different styles of tectonic shortening. Initially pure shear shortening in the Altiplano plateau switched at 13-9 Ma into the simple shear mode accompanied by formation of one of the world largest thin skinned foreland belt. Further to the south, in the Puna, the pure shear shortening continued until much more recently, gradually transforming into mixed pure and simple shear mode with thick skinned deformation in the foreland (the Santa Barbara System). Through numerical simulation of thermo-mechanical processes we show that different shortening modes - pure and simple shear accompanied by thin or thick skinned tectonics - might be controlled by (i) strength of the foreland uppermost crust and (ii) temperature of the foreland lithosphere. As a numerical tool we use a 2-D parallel thermo-mechanical finite element code LAPEX-2D. The code combines explicit lagrangian finite element FLAC algorithm with particle-in-cell technique. Particles track not only material properties but also full strain and stress tensors minimizing numerical diffusion. We employ Maxwell visco-elastic rheology with temperature- and stress-dependent viscosity, simulating ductile flow, as well as Mohr-Coulomb elasto-plastic rheology, simulating brittle deformation. Both rheological models may experience strain softening. Previous geodynamic models indicated the importance of the lateral temperature variations in the lithosphere on the style of tectonic shortening. However, they failed to reproduce migration of the deformation from the Altiplano plateau into its foreland before the major uplift of the plateau. We show that deformation may easily migrate from the plateau into the foreland by rapidly propagating thin skinned thrust belt as a consequence of dramatic mechanical weakening of the Palaeozoic sediments overlying the cold lithosphere of the Altiplano foreland. The processes in the

  14. Paleomagnetism in the Precordillera of northern Chile (22°30'S): implications for the history of tectonic rotations in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoza, Rubén; Tomlinson, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Widespread clockwise rotations in Mesozoic and Lower Tertiary rocks of northern Chile have been interpreted as the sum of two rotational events separated in time: an early rotation related to local deformation plus a late rotation related to wholesale rotation of northern Chile linked to Late Cenozoic oroclinal bending in the Central Andes. In this paper we report new paleomagnetic data from Cretaceous, upper Oligocene and Miocene sedimentary rocks in the Precordillera of northern Chile. The results suggest that all these rocks acquired their remanence at or close to the time of deposition. The lack of rotation in undeformed lower Miocene strata clearly indicates that clockwise rotations found in underlying, faulted and folded Cretaceous rocks were completed before the Late Cenozoic. Results from nearby localities in deformed upper Oligocene strata would argue for little (˜5°) rotation since the late Oligocene. Data from widely separated Miocene localities covering an area of about 5000 km 2 in the Calama basin strongly suggest that northern Chile did not undergo significant wholesale rotation during the Late Cenozoic. This, together with previous paleomagnetic evidence against Neogene rigid-body-like rotation of the southern Peruvian forearc, suggests that the curved shape of the Central Andean forearc was not significantly enhanced during the Late Cenozoic. By inference, all of the rotation in most Mesozoic and Lower Tertiary rocks of northern Chile was accomplished in the Cretaceous and/or Early Cenozoic, when the locus of deformation in the Central Andes was localized in the present forearc region.

  15. Unraveling an antique subduction process from metamorphic basement around Medellín city, Central Cordillera of Colombian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Andres; Juliani, Caetano

    2011-10-01

    varies between 400 and 555 °C at pressures of 5-6 kbar in the retrograde metamorphic path. The El Retiro rocks evidence strong decompression with narrow variation in temperature, showing pressure values between 8.7 and 2.7 kbar at temperatures of 740-633 °C. These metamorphic fragments of the basement in the Central Cordillera of the Colombian Andes could represent a close relationship with an antique subduction zone.

  16. Stress patterns of the Plio-Quaternary brittle deformation along the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro Fault, Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, F.; Tibaldi, A.; Waite, G. P.; Corazzato, C.; Bonali, F.; Nardin, A.

    2012-04-01

    Understanding the geometry and kinematics of the major structures of an orogen is essential to elucidate its style of deformation, as well as its tectonic evolution. We describe the temporal and spatial changes in the state of stress of the trans-orogen area of the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro (COT) Fault Zone in the Central Andes, at about 24° S within the northern portion of the Puna Plateau between the Argentina-Chile border. The importance of the COT derives principally from the Quaternary-Holocene activity recognized on some segments, which may shed new light on its possible control on Quaternary volcanism and on the seismic hazard assessment of the area. Field geological surveys along with kinematic analysis and numerical inversion of ~ 280 new fault-slip measurements have revealed that this portion of the COT consists mainly of NW-SE striking faults, which have been reactivated under three different kinematic regimes: 1) a Miocene transpressional phase with the maximum principal stress (σ1) chiefly trending NW-SE; 2) an extensional phase that started by 9 Ma, with a horizontal NW-SE-trending minimum principal stress (σ3) - permutations between σ2 and σ3 axes have been recognized at three sites - and 3) a left-lateral strike-slip phase with an ~ ENE-WSW σ1 and a ~ NNW-SSE σ3 dating to the late Pliocene-Quaternary. Spatially, in the Quaternary, the left-lateral component decreases toward the westernmost tip of the COT, where it transitions to extension; this produced to a N-S horst and graben structure. Hence, even if trascurrence is still active in the eastern portion of the COT, as focal mechanisms of crustal earthquakes indicate, our study demonstrates that extension is becoming the predominant structural style of deformation, at least in the western region. These major temporal and spatial changes in the tectonic regimes are attributed in part to changes in the magnitude of the boundary forces due to subduction processes. The overall perpendicular

  17. Trees in the Andes:

    OpenAIRE

    Jost, François Paul

    2017-01-01

    High mountain regions including the Andean region are very sensitive to climate change. Farmers in the central Andes of Peru are increasingly being exposed to the impacts of climate variability. This transdisciplinary research uses field laboratories, combining the farming system and the sustainable livelihood approaches, to carry out social, ecological, and financial assessments so as to identify sustainable and resilient livelihood strategies for small-scale Andean farmers. The first r...

  18. Regional climate of the subtropical central Andes using high-resolution CMIP5 models—part I: past performance (1980-2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazulie, Natalia; Rusticucci, Matilde; Raga, Graciela B.

    2017-02-01

    This study assesses the performance of 15 high resolution global climate models (GCMs) over the complex orographic region of the subtropical central Andes from available simulations of the Fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). The simulated past climate (1980-2005) was compared against the Climate Research Unit (CRU) dataset and the ERA-Interim reanalysis, considered as reference datasets, to evaluate regional and seasonal surface temperature and precipitation, as well as sea level pressure and circulation. A good agreement was found between the simulations and the reference datasets for winter precipitation and for temperature over both seasons. Whilst all models correctly reproduce the annual cycle of precipitation, some of them overestimate winter totals. ERA-Interim does not adequately represent summer precipitation over the region, and some of the models analyzed also show the same deficiency. All models correctly reproduce the northward migration of the South Pacific subtropical high during winter, although some of them underestimate the maximum central pressure. During summer, most models fail to show the low level north-south flow parallel to the eastern foothills of the Andes, a feature known as the Low Level Jet. Further analysis of the results of the simulations led to the selection of a sub-set of five CMIP5 GCMs to construct a reduced ensemble. This reduced ensemble is a better representation than the multi-model mean of the 15 GCMs of the past climate at this region and would be recommended for future studies.

  19. The Under-side of the Andes: Using Receiver Functions to Map the North Central Andean Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Central Andean Uplift and Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project is an interdisciplinary project to investigate connections between lithospheric removal, crustal shortening and surface uplift in the northern Bolivia and southern Peru region of the South American Andean orogen. The central Andes are defined by six major tectonomorphic provinces; the forearc, the volcanically active Western Cordillera (WC, ~6 km elevation), the internally drained Altiplano (~4 km elevation), an inactive fold and thrust belt in the Eastern Cordillera (EC, ~6 km elevation), a lower elevation active fold and thrust belt in the Subandean (SA) zone and the Beni, a foreland basin. Forty seismic stations installed for the CAUGHT project were deployed between 13° and 18° S latitude, covering the transition zone where the Altiplano region pinches out in southern Peru, in an effort to better constrain the changing character of the crust and mantle lithosphere. Geologic studies across the northern Bolivian portion of the eastern Andean margin (15-17° S) have documented a total of 275 km of upper crustal shortening (McQuarrie et al, Tectonics, v27, 2008), which may be associated with crustal thickening and/or the removal of lithospheric material as a thickened lithosphere root becomes unstable. For this receiver function (converted wave) study, we have little coverage in the forearc and foreland, ~75 km spacing in most of the array, and a relatively dense ~20 km spaced profile along the Charaña-La Paz-Yucumo transect, the eastern portion of which is nearly coincident with the balanced cross-section of McQuarrie et al. (2008). Using the first year of available data, more than 1200 receiver functions have been calculated using an iterative deconvolution method, and stacked using the common conversion point (CCP) method, along profiles parallel to and nearly coincident to those used for the geologic shortening estimates. We identified arrivals for the Moho and generated a 3D map of

  20. Reconstructing glacier mass balances in the Central Andes of Chile and Argentina using local and regional hydro-climatic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Masiokas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great number and variety of glaciers in southern South America, in situ glacier mass balance records are extremely scarce and glacier–climate relationships are still poorly understood in this region. Here we use the longest (> 35 years and most complete in situ mass balance record, available for glaciar Echaurren Norte in the Andes at ~34° S, to develop a minimal glacier surface mass balance model that relies on nearby monthly precipitation and air temperature data as forcing. This basic model is able to explain 78 % of the variance in the annual glacier mass balance record over the 1978–2013 calibration period. An attribution assessment indicates that precipitation variability constitutes the most important forcing modulating annual glacier mass balances at this site. A regionally-averaged series of mean annual streamflow records from both sides of the Andes is then used to estimate, through simple linear regression, this glacier's annual mass balance variations since 1909. The reconstruction model captures 68 % of the observed glacier mass balance variability and shows three periods of sustained positive mass balances embedded in an overall negative trend totaling almost −42 m w.eq. over the past 105 years. The three periods of sustained positive mass balances (centered in the 1920s–1930s, in the 1980s and in the first decade of the 21st century coincide with several documented glacier advances in this region. Similar trends observed in other shorter glacier mass balance series suggest the glaciar Echaurren Norte reconstruction is representative of larger-scale conditions and could be useful for more detailed glaciological, hydrological and climatological assessments in this portion of the Andes.

  1. Studies in Neotropical Paleobotany. XV. A Mio-Pliocene palynoflora from the Eastern Cordillera, Bolivia: implications for the uplift history of the Central Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, A; Gregory-Wodzicki, K M; Wright, K L

    2001-09-01

    An assemblage of 33 fossil pollen and spores, recovered from the 3600-m high Pislepampa locality of E. W. Berry, Eastern Cordillera, Bolivia, adds considerably to our knowledge of three aspects of the region in late Neogene time: (1) the paleovegetation, (2) the paleoclimate, and (3) the paleoelevation of the Central Andes. The plant microfossils recognized are Isoetes, Lycopodium (three types), Cnemidaria, Cyathea (three types), Grammitis, Hymenophyllum, Pteris, trilete fern spores (two types), Danaea, monolete fern spores (four types), Podocarpus, Gramineae, Palmae, Ilex, cf. Oreopanax, Cavanillesia, cf. Pereskia, Compositae (three types), Ericaceae, Tetrorchidium, and unknowns (three types). The diversity of the Compositae suggest that this flora has a maximum age around the Miocene-Pliocene boundary, that is, 6-7 million years. All members of the paleocommunity presently grow in the bosque montano húmedo (cloud forest) along the eastern slope of the Central Andes of Bolivia, which occurs between MATs (mean annual temperatures) of ∼10° and 20°C. The Pislepampa flora probably represents the lower limits of this forest because the fossil leaves collected by Berry from the same locality all have entire margins, suggesting that the flora grew near the cloud forest-tropical forest transition. Presently, the lower limit of the cloud forest forest has MATs of ∼20°C, a mean annual precipitation between 1000 and 1500 mm, and that part containing most of the identified genera of fossil pollen is found at elevations ∼1200-1400 m. These conditions are thus inferred for the Pislepampa flora; however, because of the uncertainty of the magnitude of global climate change and of possible changes in the ecological range of plant genera, we estimate an error of at least ±1000 m for the paleoelevation estimate. When the total uplift is corrected for probable amounts of erosionally driven isostatic rebound, the paleoelevation estimate suggests that from one-third to one

  2. Migrating Ignimbrite Flares in the Central Andes, Implications for Crustal Evolution Based on Chemical, Isotopic, Geochronological, and GIS-Based Volumetric Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worner, G.; Brandmeier, M.; Freymuth, H.; Heistek, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Temporal and compositional patterns of Neogene ignimbrites in the Central Andes were analysed using GIS and geostatistical modelling based on 203 digitized ignimbrite sheets for which geochronological, geochemical, and Sr-Nd-Pb-isotopic data on pumices as well as Sr-O isotopes on minerals from selected samples were compiled and compared to compositional and isotopic data from andesite lavas. Composition, timing, volumes and sources of erupted ignimbrite deposits are thus constrained and magma volumes through space and time are calculated. The total erupted ignimbrite magma volume of 31,000 km3 (minimum value) in the past 30 Ma indicate an average magmatic addition of 20-30 km3*Ma/km, similar to the basaltic "base"-flux for arc magmatism. Ignimbrite flare-ups are, however, rather punctuated, short-lived events well separated in space and time. There is a clear N-S "younging" of ignimbrite pulses from N to S at 19-24 Ma, 13-14 Ma, 6-10 Ma and 3-6 Ma. Ignimbrite eruptions occurred in the wake of subduction of the Juan-Fernandez ridge on the Nazca Plate passing below the Central Andes from N to S. Low angle subduction caused compression and fluid release is followed by massive inflow and melting of asthenospheric mantle when the slab steepened again after the passing of the ridge. This in turn caused massive melting within the crust aided by advective heat transport. Differences in chemical and isotopic composition of the large-volume ignimbrites are related to changes in crustal thickness, and different "preconditioning" during the Andean orogeny at a given space in time. Isotope data and whole rock compositional data suggest a higher degree of crustal assimilation for the younger Altiplano ignimbrites in the S (c. 50%) compared to the older (22-19 Ma) ignimbrites in the N were the crustal component is significantly less (20%). REE compositions reflect changes in crustal thickness with a "transition" at c. 13-9 Ma that can be related to accelerated crustal shortening

  3. Constuccion social de comuninad y migración en Usibamba : un estudio sobre el impacto de los procesos de globalización en los Andes centrales del Perú

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilvonio Perez, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The research for the thesis was conducted in the village of Usibamba, located in a high-Andean area called Alto Cunas east from the Mantaro Valley in the Peruvian Central Andes. Special attention was paid to the institutional context and the everyday life conditions in which the social construction

  4. Late Quaternary Glaciations in the Central Peruvian Andes (10°-11°S) and Evidence for a Link to Heinrich Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.; Farber, D. L.; Finkel, R. C.; Rodbell, D. T.; Seltzer, G. O.

    2009-05-01

    Seven cosmogenic 10Be ages from a moraine in the Santuario Nacional Bosque de Piedras de Huayllay (BP) in the Western Cordillera of the central Peruvian Andes (10°59'S, 76°20'W, 4180-4200 masl) are consistent with 10Be ages on moraines in both the Eastern Cordillera (40-45 km to the east) and Nevado Jeulla Rajo (NJR) massif (10°00'S, 77°16'W) at the southern end of the Cordillera Blanca (150 km to the northwest). In the BP, 10Be ages are ~14-15 ka on four ignimbrite boulders, ~26 and ~20 ka on two quartz boulders, and ~45 ka on ignimbrite bedrock below the trimline in the valley wall. In the Eastern Cordillera bordering Lake Junin, the most extensive glaciations are >150 ka, but end moraines farther upvalley date to the local last glacial maximum (LLGM; 25-30 ka) and a late-glacial stillstand or readvance (14-18 ka). In NJR, 10Be ages indicate that the largest lateral moraines were deposited during similar intervals (27-32 ka and 14-18 ka). Avulsion of a glacial valley preserved an older, smaller pair of lateral moraines (56-65 ka) in NJR; correlative moraines were apparently not preserved in the Junin valleys. We have found no moraines in NJR that date to the global LGM (ca. 19-24 ka), but see some evidence for an advance ca. 40-48 ka. Outwash deposits (ca. 43-50 ka) located beyond the termini of NJR moraines are underlain by lodgement till that extends ca. 6 km across the Conococha Plain, suggesting that at least one older glaciation was far more extensive than any of the late Quaternary NJR advances dated by 10Be (ages calculated using CRONUS-Earth Online Calculator v. 2.2, Lal/Stone time-dependent scaling, and zero erosion). The timing of glacial advances in the central Peruvian Andes since 70 ka suggests a correlation to Heinrich events and associated southward shifts of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in the Atlantic Ocean. We propose that Peruvian glaciers typically expanded when southward migration of the ITCZ resulted in increased

  5. Evaluation of TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA performance in the Central Andes region and its dependency on spatial and temporal resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. M. Scheel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Climate time series are of major importance for base line studies for climate change impact and adaptation projects. However, in mountain regions and in developing countries there exist significant gaps in ground based climate records in space and time. Specifically, in the Peruvian Andes spatially and temporally coherent precipitation information is a prerequisite for ongoing climate change adaptation projects in the fields of water resources, disasters and food security. The present work aims at evaluating the ability of Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA to estimate precipitation rates at daily 0.25° × 0.25° scale in the Central Andes and the dependency of the estimate performance on changing spatial and temporal resolution. Comparison of the TMPA product with gauge measurements in the regions of Cuzco, Peru and La Paz, Bolivia were carried out and analysed statistically. Large biases are identified in both investigation areas in the estimation of daily precipitation amounts. The occurrence of strong precipitation events was well assessed, but their intensities were underestimated. TMPA estimates for La Paz show high false alarm ratio.

    The dependency of the TMPA estimate quality with changing resolution was analysed by comparisons of 1-, 7-, 15- and 30-day sums for Cuzco, Peru. The correlation of TMPA estimates with ground data increases strongly and almost linearly with temporal aggregation. The spatial aggregation to 0.5°, 0.75° and 1° grid box averaged precipitation and its comparison to gauge data of the same areas revealed no significant change in correlation coefficients and estimate performance.

    In order to profit from the TMPA combination product on a daily basis, a procedure to blend it with daily precipitation gauge measurements is proposed.

    Different sources of errors and uncertainties introduced by the sensors, sensor-specific algorithm aspects

  6. Cenozoic forearc basin sediments in Southern Peru (15-18°S): Stratigraphic and heavy mineral constraints for Eocene to Miocene evolution of the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decou, A.; von Eynatten, H.; Mamani, M.; Sempere, T.; Wörner, G.

    2011-05-01

    A large sedimentary forearc basin developed in Cenozoic times between the present-day Coastal Cordillera and the Western Cordillera of the Central Andes, called Moquegua basin in southern Peru. The basin is filled by Moquegua Group deposits (~ 50 to 4 Ma) comprising mostly siliciclastic mudstones, sandstones and conglomerates as well as volcanic intercalations. Several facies changes both, along orogenic strike and through time, are described and have led to subdivision into four sedimentary units (Moquegua A, B, C and D). In this paper we present a refined stratigraphic scheme of the Moquegua Group combined with the first provenance analysis of the Moquegua basin based on (i) semi-quantitative analysis of heavy mineral abundance, (ii) electron microprobe (EMP) and laser ablation (LA) ICP-MS analyses of single detrital amphibole and Fe-Ti oxide grains, and (iii) comparative analysis of the different potential source rocks to clearly identify the most likely sources. Results allow us to reconstruct sediment provenance and to relate changes of the erosion-sedimentation system in the Moquegua basin to the evolution of the Andean orogen. At ~ 50 to ~ 40 Ma the Moquegua basin was close to sea level and fed by low energy rivers transporting mainly metamorphic basement and Jurassic-Cretaceous sedimentary detritus from local and distal sources. The latter might be as far as the present Eastern Cordillera. From ~ 35 Ma on the distal sediment sources were cut off by the uplift of the Altiplano and Eastern Cordillera leading to higher energy fluvial systems and increasing importance of local sources, especially the relevant volcanic arcs. From 25 Ma on volcanic arc rocks became the predominant sources for Moquegua Group sediments. The 10 Ma time lag observed between the onset of uplift-induced facies and provenance changes (at ~ 35 Ma) and the onset of intense magmatic activity (at ~ 25 Ma) suggests that magmatic addition was not the main driver for crustal thickening and

  7. Topaz magmatic crystallization in rhyolites of the Central Andes (Chivinar volcanic complex, NW Argentina): Constraints from texture, mineralogy and rock chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioncada, Anna; Orlandi, Paolo; Vezzoli, Luigina; Omarini, Ricardo H.; Mazzuoli, Roberto; Lopez-Azarevich, Vanina; Sureda, Ricardo; Azarevich, Miguel; Acocella, Valerio; Ruch, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Topaz-bearing rhyolite lavas were erupted as domes and cryptodomes during the early history of the Late Miocene Chivinar volcano, in Central Andes. These are the only topaz rhyolite lavas recognized in Central Andes. Textural, mineralogical and geochemical data on the Chivinar rhyolites suggest that topaz crystallized from strongly residual, fluorine-rich, peraluminous silicate melts of topazite composition before the complete solidification of the lava domes. Crystallization of the rhyolitic magma began with sodic plagioclase and alkali feldspar phenocrysts in the magma chamber, followed by groundmass quartz + alkali feldspar + minor sodic plagioclase during dome emplacement, and terminated with quartz + topaz + vapour bubbles forming small scattered miaroles. Fluorine partitioning into the fluid phase occurred only in the final stage of groundmass crystallization. The magmatic origin of topaz indicates the presence of a fluorine-rich highly differentiated magma in the early history of the Chivinar volcano and suggests the possibility of rare metals mineralizations related to the cooling and solidification of a silicic magma chamber. A late fluid circulation phase, pre-dating the andesitic phase of the Chivinar volcano, affected part of the topaz rhyolite lavas. The presence of Nb, Ta and Mn minerals as primary accessories in the rhyolites and as secondary minerals in veins suggests a connection of the fluid circulation phase with the silicic magmatic system. Although at the edge of the active volcanic arc, the Chivinar topaz rhyolites are in correspondence of the transtensive Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system, suggesting preferred extensional conditions for the formation of magmatic topaz in convergent settings, consistently with evidence from other known cases worldwide.

  8. A new species of Phymaturus of the P. mallimaccii Group from the Andes of central Chile (Iguania: Liolaemidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Troncoso-Palacios

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Phymaturus from the Provincia Mountain in the San Ramón Mountains in the Metropolitan Region of Chile is described. It is a member of the P. palluma Group and the P. mallimaccii subgroup. The new species can be distinguished from other members of the P. mallimaccii subgroup by having a highly fragmented subocular scale (4 or 5, a preocular scale that is smaller than the canthal, males having a olive dorsum with a diffuse pattern of light bands on the paravertebral fields and a light triangle between the shoulders, which has the apex of the triangle oriented toward the snout. The distribution of new species lies south of that of other members of the P. mallimaccii subgroup, from which it is completely isolated. The low abundance of the new species is noteworthy. Information about the natural history of the lizard is provided and some aspects of unnamed populations of Chilean Phymaturus are discussed.

  9. Geomorphology, internal structure, and successive development of a glacier foreland in the semiarid Chilean Andes (Cerro Tapado, upper Elqui Valley, 30°08‧ S., 69°55‧ W.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, Sébastien; Kinnard, Christophe; Surazakov, Arzhan; Bossy, William

    2014-02-01

    We use geomorphological analysis, sedimentological survey, remote sensing, and ground penetrating radar (GPR) in order to understand the complex landform assemblage found in front of the Cerro Tapado glacier in the upper Elqui River catchment, semiarid Andes of Chile. The geomorphological analysis highlights prominent boundaries dividing the landform assemblage into (from the upper part to the lower part) an upper latero-frontal moraine complex, an upper debris-covered glacier, a lower debris-covered glacier, two rock glaciers, and a lower morainic complex. The sedimentological survey highlights the rather small size of the surface debris (in general 400 m) receding of the glacier occurred, along with downslope displacements (dm-m·y- 1) of most of the landform units and a significant evolution of the thermokarst features on the debris-covered glaciers. Considerable surface lowering occurred in the upper part of the assemblage, while localized bulging is seen along the morphological boundaries in the lower units. The GPR profiles highlight spectacular internal structure in the upper debris-covered glacier with up to 80 m of buried ice. In the other landform units, the internal structure is less visible and more heterogeneous. The analysis of the radar wave velocity along the GPR profiles reveals the occurrence of air-filled and moist zones in the internal structure. The geomorphological assemblage is fundamentally characterized by its morphological, structural, and dynamical boundaries and defined as a young (probably rock glaciers do not derive from the present debris-covered glacier but preexist to it.

  10. New Elemental and Isotopic Data From Mafic Lavas on the Puna Plateau and Re-Examining the Geochemical Signature of Convective Lithospheric Removal in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, K. E.; Ducea, M. N.; Reiners, P. W.

    2009-12-01

    Foundering or delamination of the lower lithosphere into the convecting mantle is required by mass balance in convergent orogens such as the central Andes. In the central Andean volcanic zone (CVZ), late Miocene to Recent mafic lavas erupted on the Puna plateau are small volume fissure flows and cinder cones classically cited as evidence of convective lithospheric removal, in concert with a suite of observations including high surface elevation (>4000m) and anomalously thin lithosphere relative to other parts of the CVZ. Mafic lavas provide the best available geochemical window into the recent history of the upper mantle in this and other regions. However, an increasing number of elemental and isotopic data suggest that these melts are less distinct from the neighboring arc magmatism than originally predicted. This observation weakens the hypothesis that there is a distinct geochemical fingerprint for so-called delamination magmatism, while advancing our understanding of the size of delaminating bodies and the timescales over which they detach from the lithosphere and interact with the mantle wedge. In this contribution, we present elemental and radiogenic isotopic data from 20 newly sampled mafic lavas from the Puna plateau (24.5°S to 27°S). Preliminary major element analyses show that the Puna lavas are high-K to shoshonitic in composition, in broad agreement with other mafic lavas sampled though out the region. Several sampled flows contain xenotliths of granitoid composition, which likely represent the crustal end member that contributed to the more evolved lavas. Along with major, trace and rare earth element analyses, we will present 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd data to further characterize source regions of these melts. In sum, these data will allow us to (1) expand the spatial coverage of this dataset in the central Andes, (2) contribute to the effort to parse contributions from the subcontinental lithosphere, asthenosphere, subduction-related fluids, and

  11. Depositación atmosférica de nitrógeno en un transecto valle longitudinal-cordillera de Los Andes, centro-sur de Chile Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen in a transect from the Central Valley to Cordillera de Los Andes, south-central Chile

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    CARLOS E. OYARZÚN

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available El aumento de las actividades agrícolas y ganaderas en el centro-sur de Chile puede producir elevadas emisiones de nitrógeno hacia la atmósfera (mayormente NH3. El amoniaco es transportado por corrientes de aire y depositado en el suelo y vegetación. El presente estudio evalúa la depositación atmosférica de compuestos nitrogenados (NO3- y NH4+ en la química de las precipitaciones en un transecto altitudinal de 66 km, desde los alrededores de la ciudad de Osorno (40º 35' S, 72º 57' O, 55 m de altitud hasta la cordillera de Los Andes, Parque Nacional Puyehue (40º 46' S, 72º 11' O, 1.120 m de altitud. En siete sitios, durante el período anual junio-1999 hasta mayo-2000, se registró la precipitación y mensualmente se colectaron muestras de agua para determinar: pH, conductividad y las concentraciones de NO3- y NH4+. La precipitación anual se incrementó desde 1.103 mm en la zona de Osorno hasta 6.799 mm en el sector Antillanca, Parque Nacional Puyehue. Los valores promedio anual del pH registraron escasa variación desde 6,3 en el valle central hasta 5,8 en la cordillera de Los Andes. La conductividad presentó los máximos valores en la proximidad de Osorno (22,9 myS cm-1 para descender a través del transecto en zonas intermedias y alcanzar en la Cordillera de los Andes un valor de 11,3 myS cm-1. Las concentraciones promedio de NO3-Nen la lluvia fluctuaron entre 52,3 myg L-1 en la zona agrícola-ganadera y 6,9 myg L-1 en los bosques del Parque Nacional Puyehue. Las concentraciones de NH4-N variaron entre 699,4 myg L-1 en el sector de Osorno y 37,8 myL-1 en la cordillera de Los Andes. Los valores de N-inorgánico poseen una marcada tendencia estacional en el sector agrícola, con valores máximos en primavera-verano y los mínimos en invierno. Las tasas anuales de depositación atmosférica de NO3-N fluctuaron entre 0,53 y 0,57 kg ha-1 año-1 y las de NH4-N fueron entre 6,4 y 2,8 kg ha-1 año-1 para los sitios agrícola-ganaderos de

  12. A Bayesian approach for Inter-seismic Inter-plate Coupling Probabilities for the Central Andes Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega Culaciati, F. H.; Simons, M.

    2009-12-01

    We aim to characterize the apparent extent of plate coupling on subduction zone megathrusts with the eventual goal of understanding spatial variations of fault zone rheology. In this study we approach the problem from a Bayesian perspective, where we ask not for a single optimum model, but rather for a posteriori estimates of the range of allowable models, exploiting the full potential of Bayesian methods to completely characterize the model parameter space. Adopting a simple kinematic back-slip model and a 3D geometry of the inter-plate contact zone, we use the Bayesian approach to provide the inter-seismic inter-plate coupling probabilities that are consistent with physically plausible a-priori information and available geodetic measurements. We highlight the importance of using the vertical component of the velocity field to properly constrain the downdip limit of the coupled zone, and also we show how the chosen parameterization of the model plays an important role along with the a-priori, and a-posteriori information on the model parameters. We apply this methodology in the Chilean-Peruvian subduction zone (12S - 24S) with the desire to understand the state of inter-seismic coupling on that margin. We obtain patch like features for the probability of 100% apparent inter-seismic coupling with higher values located between 15km and 60km depth. The larger of these features are located in the regions associated with the rupture process of the 2001 (Mw 8.4) Arequipa and the 2007 (Mw 8.0) Pisco Earthquakes, both occurred after the time period where the measurements take place; and the region identified as the Arica bend seismic gap, which has not experienced a large earthquake since 1877.

  13. Geodynamical evolution of Central Andes at 24°S as inferred by magma composition along the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro transversal volcanic belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteini, M.; Mazzuoli, R.; Omarini, R.; Cas, R.; Maas, R.

    2002-11-01

    Miocene to Recent volcanism on the Puna plateau (Central Andes) developed in three geological settings: (a) volcanic arc in the Western Cordillera (Miocene-Recent); (b) trans-arc along the main NW-SE transverse fault systems (Miocene); and (c) back-arc, mainly monogenic volcanic centres (Pliocene-Quaternary). We have studied the evolution of the arc-trans-arc volcanism along one of the most extensive transverse structures of Central Andes, the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro, at 24°S. Compositional variations from arc to trans-arc volcanism provide insights into petrogenesis and magma source regions. Puntas Negras and Rincon volcanic centres are arc-type and have typical calc-alkaline geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic characteristics. East of the arc, lavas of the Tul-Tul, Del Medio and Pocitos complexes (TUMEPO) are heavy rare earth element-depleted and could be derived from 20-30% of partial melting of a lower crustal garnet-bearing metabasite. These liquids could be variably mixed with arc magmas at the base of the crust (MASH). This suggests important contributions from lower crustal sources to TUMEPO centres. Products at the Quevar and Aguas Calientes volcanic complexes to the east of TUMEPO show a prominent upper crustal signature (high 86Sr/ 87Sr, low 143Nd/ 144Nd) and could represent mixtures of 20-30% TUMEPO-type liquids with up to 70-80% of upper crustal melts. We propose a geodynamic model to explain geochemical variations for the arc-trans-arc transverse volcanism from the Upper Miocene to Recent. In our model, arc volcanism is linked to dehydration of the subducting Nazca plate, which produces typical calc-alkaline compositions. During the Upper Miocene (10-5 Ma), lithospheric evolution in the Puna plateau was dominated by thickening of ductile lower crust and thinning of the lithosphere. Lower crustal melting was promoted by concomitant asthenospheric upwelling and water release from the amphibolite-eclogite transformation, yielding TUMEPO magmas with lower

  14. Improved 3D density modelling of the Central Andes from combining terrestrial datasets with satellite based datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Theresa; Sobiesiak, Monika; Götze, Hans-Jürgen; Ebbing, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    As horizontal gravity gradients are proxies for large stresses, the uniquely high gravity gradients of the South American continental margin seem to be indicative for the frequently occurring large earthquakes at this plate boundary. It has been observed that these earthquakes can break repeatedly the same respective segment but can also combine to form M>9 earthquakes at the end of longer seismic cycles. A large seismic gap left behind by the 1877 M~9 earthquake existed in the northernmost part of Chile. This gap has partially been ruptured in the Mw 7.7 2007 Tocopilla earthquake and the Mw 8.2 2014 Pisagua earthquake. The nature of this seismological segmentation and the distribution of energy release in an earthquake is part of ongoing research. It can be assumed that both features are related to thickness variations of high density bodies located in the continental crust of the coastal area. These batholiths produce a clear maximum in the gravity signal. Those maxima also show a good spatial correlation with seismic asperity structures and seismological segment boundaries. Understanding of the tectonic situation can be improved through 3D forward density modelling of the gravity field. Problems arise in areas with less ground measurements. Especially in the high Andes severe gaps exist due to the inaccessibility of some regions. Also the transition zone between on and offshore date data displays significant problems, particularly since this is the area that is most interesting in terms of seismic hazard. We modelled the continental and oceanic crust and upper mantle using different gravity datasets. The first one includes terrestrial data measured at a station spacing of 5 km or less along all passable roads combined with satellite altimetry data offshore. The second data set is the newly released EIGEN-6C4 which combines the latest satellite data with ground measurements. The spherical harmonics maximum degree of EIGEN-6C4 is 2190 which corresponds to a

  15. Essential oils of medicinal plants from the central andes of Argentina: chemical composition, and antifungal, antibacterial, and insect-repellent activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Beatriz; López, Sandra; Luna, Lorena; Agüero, María B; Aragón, Liliana; Tapia, Alejandro; Zacchino, Susana; López, María L; Zygadlo, Julio; Feresin, Gabriela E

    2011-05-01

    The antifungal, antibacterial, and insect-repellent activities of the essential oils (EOs) of Acantholippia seriphioides, Artemisia mendozana, Gymnophyton polycephalum, Satureja parvifolia, Tagetes mendocina, and Lippia integrifolia, collected in the Central Andes area, province of San Juan, Argentina, were investigated. The dermatophytes Microsporum gypseum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and T. rubrum were inhibited by the EOs of G. polycephalum, L. integrifolia, and S. parvifolia, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) between 31.2 and 1000 μg/ml. Moreover, all EOs presented moderate activity against the bacteria tested, and the L. integrifolia and G. polycephalum EOs showed excellent repellent properties against Triatoma infestans, the Chagas disease vector, with repellency values between 60 and 100%. The A. seriphioides, G. polycephalum, and L. integrifolia EOs, obtained by hydrodistillation, were characterized by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. The highest number of components (40) was identified in L. integrifolia EO, which, along with that of A. seriphioides, contained important amounts of oxygenated monoterpenes (44.35 and 29.72%, resp.). Thymol (27.61%) and carvacrol (13.24%) were the main components of A. seriphioides EO, and borneol, lippifoli-1(6)-en-5-one, and terpinen-4-ol (>8.5%) were the principal compounds of L. integrifolia EO. These results support the idea that oxygenated monoterpenes are the bioactive fractions of the EOs. Finally, the study shows that these Andean species might be used to treat superficial fungal infections and to improve the local Chagas disease situation by vector-control.

  16. The visual system of a palaeognathous bird: visual field, retinal topography and retino-central connections in the Chilean tinamou (Nothoprocta perdicaria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabichler, Quirin; Vega-Zuniga, Tomas; Morales, Cristian; Luksch, Harald; Marín, Gonzalo J

    2015-02-01

    Most systematic studies of the avian visual system have focused on Neognathous species, leaving virtually unexplored the Palaeognathae, comprised of the flightless ratites and the South American tinamous. We investigated the visual field, the retinal topography, and the pattern of retinal and centrifugal projections in the Chilean tinamou, a small Palaeognath of the family Tinamidae. The tinamou has a panoramic visual field with a small frontal binocular overlap of 20°. The retina possesses three distinct topographic specializations: a horizontal visual streak, a dorsotemporal area, and an area centralis with a shallow fovea. The maximum ganglion cell density is 61,900/ mm(2) , comparable to Falconiformes. This would provide a maximal visual acuity of 14.0 cycles/degree, in spite of relatively small eyes. The central retinal projections generally conform to the characteristic arrangement observed in Neognathae, with well-differentiated contralateral targets and very few ipsilateral fibers. The centrifugal visual system is composed of a considerable number of multipolar centrifugal neurons, resembling the "ectopic" neurons described in Neognathae. They form a diffuse nuclear structure, which may correspond to the ancestral condition shared with other sauropsids. A notable feature is the presence of terminals in deep tectal layers 11-13. These fibers may represent either a novel retinotectal pathway or collateral branches from centrifugal neurons projecting to the retina. Both types of connections have been described in chicken embryos. Our results widen the basis for comparative studies of the vertebrate visual system, stressing the conserved character of the visual projections' pattern within the avian clade.

  17. Petrology and mineralogy of the La Peña igneous complex, Mendoza, Argentina: An alkaline occurrence in the Miocene magmatism of the Southern Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Diego Sebastián; Galliski, Miguel Ángel; Márquez-Zavalía, María Florencia; Colombo, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The La Peña alkaline igneous complex (LPC) is located in the Precordillera (32°41‧34″ S - 68°59‧48″ W) of Mendoza province, Argentina, above the southern boundary of the present-day flat-slab segment. It is a 19 km2 and 5 km diameter subcircular massif emplaced during the Miocene (19 Ma) in the Silurian-Devonian Villavicencio Fm. The LPC is composed of several plutonic and subvolcanic intrusions represented by: a cumulate of clinopyroxenite intruded by mafic dikes and pegmatitic gabbroic dikes, isolated bodies of malignite, a central intrusive syenite that develops a wide magmatic breccia in the contact with clinopyroxenite, syenitic and trachytic porphyries, a system of radial and ring dikes of different compositions (trachyte, syenite, phonolite, alkaline lamprophyre, tephrite), and late mafic breccias. The main minerals that form the LPC, ordered according to their abundance, are: pyroxene (diopside, hedenbergite), calcium amphibole (pargasite, ferro-pargasite, potassic-ferro-pargasite, potassic-hastingsite, magnesio-hastingsite, hastingsite, potassic-ferro-ferri-sadanagaite), trioctahedral micas (annite-phlogopite series), plagioclase (bytownite to oligoclase), K-feldspar (sanidine and orthoclase), nepheline, sodalite, apatite group minerals (fluorapatite, hydroxylapatite), andradite, titanite, magnetite, spinel, ilmenite, and several Cu-Fe sulfides. Late hydrothermal minerals are represented by zeolites (scolecite, thomsonite-Ca), epidote, calcite and chlorite. The trace element patterns, coupled with published data on Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes, suggest that the primary magma of the LPC was generated in an initially depleted but later enriched lithospheric mantle formed mainly by a metasomatized spinel lherzolite, and that this magmatism has a subduction-related signature. The trace elements pattern of these alkaline rocks is similar to other Miocene calc-alkaline occurrences from the magmatic arc of the Southern Central Andes. Mineral and whole

  18. Biogeografía histórica de la familia Curculionidae (Coleoptera en las subregiones Subantártica y Chilena Central Historical biogeography of family Curculionidae (Coleoptera on Subantarctic and Central Chilean subregions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Posadas

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available El análisis de los patrones de distribución y la información filogenética de 71 especies de Curculionidae, distribuidas en las subregiones Subantártica y Chilena Central, aplicando los métodos biogeográficos de los árboles reconciliados y análisis de parsimonia de Brooks (BPA, resulta en un único cladograma general de áreas: ((Chile Central (Maule, Bosque Valdiviano (Islas Malvinas (Páramo Magallánico, Bosque Magallánico. La aplicación del análisis de dispersión-vicarianza (DIVA muestra que el evento vicariante más frecuente es el que separa las Islas Malvinas de las otras dos provincias subantárticas meridionales. Por otra parte, de acuerdo con los resultados del DIVA, se evidencia que las relaciones entre el Maule, Bosque Valdiviano y Chile Central no se deberían a eventos de vicarianza sino a eventos de dispersión, ya que el 61% del total de los eventos de dispersión implica a estas tres áreas. Aún más, los eventos de dispersión más frecuentes implican al Maule, ya sea en relación con Chile Central o con el Bosque Valdiviano, por lo que se deduce que la aparente complejidad de las relaciones biogeográficas del Maule podría estar relacionada con dichos eventos de dispersión.The application of the historical biogeographic techniques of reconciled trees and Brooks parsimony analysis (BPA to the distributional and phylogenetic information of 71 species of Curculionidae ranged in the Subantarctic and Central Chilean subregions results in a single general area cladogram: ((Central Chile (Maule, Valdivian Forest (Malvinas Islands (Magellanic Moorland, Magellanic Forest. The application of dispersal-vicariance analysis (DIVA to the same data set shows as the most frequent vicariant event the split of Islas Malvinas from the two southern Subantarctic provinces. In addition, DIVA results evidenced that the relationship among Maule, Valdivian Forest, and Central Chile did not arise from vicariance events (common history

  19. El tarwi o chocho: una de las principales fuentes de proteína vegetal de las comunidades indígenas de los Andes Centrales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Planchuelo, Ana M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available El lupino andino (Lupinus mutabilis Sweet conocido también como tarwi o chocho, es una especie de leguminosa nativa de los Andes Centrales. Su domesticación se remonta a los principios de la cultura Nazca y desde ese entonces hasta la actualidad el cultivo está ampliamente difundido en las laderas montañosas y en los altos valles de Ecuador, Perú y Bolivia. La importancia del lupino para las comunidades andinas prehispánicas quedo documentada en pinturas de cerámicas y en tributos encontrados en tumbas de 100-150 años AC. Diversas técnicas de lavado y de mejoramiento vegetal fueron aplicadas desde la antigüedad para eliminar los alcaloides tóxicos que le confieren el sabor amargo a la planta y los granos. El tarwi, el maíz. los frijoles, los pseudocereales, quinoa y amaranto y la papa junto a otras raíces y tubérculos constituyen la comida básica de muchas culturas andinas. El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar los componentes nutricionales de los granos del lupino andino para compararlos con los otros constituyentes de la dieta de las comunidades campesinas. Se analizaron por medio de técnicas fitoquímicas distintas variedades de tarwi. Se determinaron los contenidos de proteínas y grasas y los patrones de ácidos grasos. Los resultados muestran que la ingesta de lupinos, que provee un buen balance de proteínas y grasas en combinación con el maíz y los tubérculos, que aportan los hidratos de carbono, forman una dieta balanceada y de alto valor nutricional.

  20. Space-time variations of stresses in the Miocene-Quaternary along the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro Fault Zone, Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, F.; Tibaldi, A.; Bonali, F. L.; Corazzato, C.

    2013-05-01

    We describe the temporal and spatial changes in the tectonic state of stress occurred during the Miocene-Quaternary in the trans-orogen area of the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro (COT) fault zone in the Central Andes, at about 24°S within the northern portion of the Puna Plateau. This work sheds new light on the complexity of stress pattern distribution in general, and contributes to the analysis of the relationships between tectonics and volcanism, and of the seismic hazard of the area. Field geological surveys, along with kinematic analysis and numerical inversion of ~ 140 new fault-slip measurements, have revealed that this portion of the COT zone, previously considered a continuous, long-lived lineament, in reality has been subjected to three different kinematic regimes: 1) a Miocene transpressional phase with the maximum principal stress (σ1) chiefly trending NNE-SSW; 2) an extensional phase that started by 9 Ma, with a horizontal NW-SE-trending minimum principal stress (σ3), and 3) a left-lateral strike-slip phase with a horizontal ~ E-W σ1 and ~ N-S σ3 dating to the late Pliocene-Quaternary, which decreases toward the westernmost part of the studied zone, where it transitions to extension producing a N-S-trending graben structure. Hence, even if transcurrence is still active in the eastern portion of the COT, as focal mechanisms of crustal earthquakes indicate, our study demonstrates that extension is becoming the predominant structural style of deformation, at least in the western region. The major changes in the tectonic regimes are attributed to changes in the magnitude of the boundary forces due to subduction processes, whereas gravitational effect of a thickened crust might be responsible for the overall orogen-perpendicular extension.

  1. Sedimentary record of regional deformation and dynamics of the thick-skinned southern Puna Plateau, central Andes (26-27°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renjie; Schoenbohm, Lindsay M.; Sobel, Edward R.; Carrapa, Barbara; Davis, Donald W.

    2016-01-01

    The Puna Plateau, adjacent Eastern Cordillera and the Sierras Pampeanas of the central Andes are largely characterized by thick-skinned, basement-involved deformation. The Puna Plateau hosts ∼N-S trending bedrock ranges bounded by deep-seated reverse faults and sedimentary basins. We contribute to the understanding of thick-skinned dynamics in the Puna Plateau by constraining regional kinematics of the poorly understood southern Puna Plateau through a multidisciplinary approach. On the southeastern plateau, sandstone modal composition and detrital zircon U-Pb and apatite fission-track data from Cenozoic strata indicate basin accumulation during the late Eocene to early Oligocene (∼38-28 Ma). Provenance analysis reveals the existence of a regional-scale basin covering the southern Puna Plateau during late Eocene to early Oligocene time (∼38-28 Ma) that was sourced from both the western plateau and the eastern plateau margin and had a depocenter located to the west. Petrographic and detrital zircon U-Pb data reveal erosion of proximal western and eastern sources after ∼12 Ma, in mid-late Miocene time. This indicates that the regional basin was compartmentalized into small-scale depocenters by the growth of basement-cored ranges continuing into the late Miocene (∼12-8 Ma). We suggest that the Cenozoic history of the southern Puna Plateau records the formation of a regional basin that was possibly driven by lithospheric flexure during the late Eocene to early Oligocene, before the growth of distributed basement-cored ranges starting as early as the late Oligocene.

  2. Arc-oblique fault systems: their role in the Cenozoic structural evolution and metallogenesis of the Andes of central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquer, Jose; Berry, Ron F.; Scott, Robert J.; Cooke, David R.

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of the Main Cordillera of Central Chile is characterized by the formation and subsequent inversion of an intra-arc volcano-tectonic basin. The world's largest porphyry Cu-Mo deposits were emplaced during basin inversion. Statistically, the area is dominated by NE- and NW-striking faults, oblique to the N-striking inverted basin-margin faults and to the axis of Cenozoic magmatism. This structural pattern is interpreted to reflect the architecture of the pre-Andean basement. Stratigraphic correlations, syn-extensional deposits and kinematic criteria on fault surfaces show several arc-oblique structures were active as normal faults at different stages of basin evolution. The geometry of syn-tectonic hydrothermal mineral fibers, in turn, demonstrates that most of these structures were reactivated as strike-slip ± reverse faults during the middle Miocene - early Pliocene. Fault reactivation age is constrained by 40Ar/39Ar dating of hydrothermal minerals deposited during fault slip. The abundance and distribution of these minerals indicates fault-controlled hydrothermal fluid flow was widespread during basin inversion. Fault reactivation occurred under a transpressive regime with E- to ENE-directed shortening, and was concentrated around major plutons and hydrothermal centers. At the margins of the former intra-arc basin, deformation was largely accommodated by reverse faulting, whereas in its central part strike-slip faulting was predominant.

  3. [Chilean nuclear policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobadilla, E

    1996-06-01

    This official document is statement of the President of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission, Dr. Eduardo Bobadilla, about the nuclear policy of the Chilean State, Thanks to the international policy adopted by presidents Aylwin (1990-1994) and his successor Frei Ruiz Tagle (1994-), a nuclear development plan, protected by the Chilean entrance to the nuclear weapons non proliferation treaty and Tlatelolco Denuclearization treaty, has started. Chile will be able to develop without interference, an autonomous nuclear electrical system and other pacific uses of nuclear energy. Chile also supports a new international treaty to ban nuclear weapon tests.

  4. Nazca-South America interactions and the late Eocene-late Oligocene flat-slab episode in the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, Leland J.; Richards, Mark A.; Humphreys, Eugene D.

    2012-04-01

    The most prominent features of the Andean range are the Altiplano and Puna plateaus, which were constructed by crustal shortening and uplift over the past ˜45 Myr. The early construction of these plateaus may have controlled subsequent growth of the orogen. Proposed models have suggested that an abrupt acceleration in relative motion between the Nazca plate and the South American plate at ˜30 Ma may have led to compression of the continent. However, the major plate motion change occurred at 25-23 Ma, and paleomagnetic rotations and crustal shortening of the Andean forearc require that the Arica Bend formed prior to about 25 Ma. Inferred history of flat-slab subduction along the Altiplano section of the Andean margin and the structure of the adjacent South American cratonic shield combine to suggest an alternate scenario, based partly upon geodynamic models of oceanic-continental plate interactions in subduction zones. We propose that central Andean tectonism may have been controlled by two distinct regimes of subduction: (1) oblique subduction along the central Andean margin during the late Eocene and Oligocene accompanied by downdip alignment with the center of the Amazonian Shield (flat-slab activity in this phase of orogenesis may have been caused by a combination of cratonic root enhanced tectonics and oceanic plateau subduction) and (2) an abrupt transition to trench-normal subduction after ˜25 Ma toward the more distal São Francisco Craton was accompanied by a return to normal angle subduction. Similar interactions are hypothesized to have occurred during the Laramide Orogeny in western North America.

  5. Vivid valleys, pallid peaks? Hypsometric variations and rural-urban land change in the Central Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    What happens to the land cover within the hinterland's altitudinal belts while Central Andean cities are undergoing globalization and urban restructuring? What conclusions can be drawn about changes in human land use? By incorporating a regional altitudinal zonation model, direct field observations and GIS analyses of remotely sensed long term data, the present study examines these questions using the example of Huancayo Metropolitano - an emerging Peruvian mountain city of 420,000 inhabitants, situated at 3260 m asl in the Mantaro Valley. The study's results indicate that rapid urban growth during the late 1980s and early 1990s was followed by the agricultural intensification and peri-urban condominization at the valley floor (quechua) - since the beginning of Peru's neoliberal era. Moreover, regarding the adjoining steep slopes (suni) and subsequent grassland ecosystems (puna), the research output presents land cover change trajectories that clearly show an expansion of human land use, such as reforestation for wood production and range burning for livestock grazing, even at high altitudes - despite rural-urban migration trends and contrary to several results of extra-Andean studies. Consequently, rural-urban planners and policy makers are challenged to focus on the manifold impacts of globalization on human land use - at all altitudinal belts of the Andean city's hinterland: toward sustainable mountain development that bridges the social and physical gaps - from the bottom up.

  6. Preliminary Depositional and Provenance Records of Mesozoic Basin Evolution and Cenozoic Shortening in the High Andes, La Ramada Fold-Thrust Belt, Southern-Central Andes (32-33°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackaman-Lofland, C.; Horton, B. K.; Fuentes, F.; Constenius, K. N.; McKenzie, R.; Alvarado, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Argentinian Andes define key examples of retroarc shortening and basin evolution above a zone of active subduction. The La Ramada fold-thrust belt (RFTB) in the High Andes provides insights into the relative influence and temporal records of diverse convergent margin processes (e.g. flat-slab subduction, convergent wedge dynamics, structural inversion). The RFTB contains Mesozoic extensional basin strata deformed by later Andean shortening. New detrital zircon U-Pb analyses of Mesozoic rift sediments reveal: (1) a dominant Permo-Triassic age signature (220-280 Ma) associated with proximal sources of effective basement (Choiyoi Group) during Triassic synrift deposition; (2) upsection younging of maximum depositional ages from Late Triassic through Early Cretaceous (230 to 100 Ma) with the increasing influence of western Andean arc sources; and (3) a significant Late Cretaceous influx of Paleozoic (~350-550 Ma) and Proterozoic (~650-1300 Ma) populations during the earliest shift from back-arc post-extensional subsidence to upper-plate shortening. The Cenozoic detrital record of the Manantiales foreland basin (between the Frontal Cordillera and Precordillera) records RFTB deformation prior to flat-slab subduction. A Permo-Triassic Choiyoi age signature dominates the Miocene succession, consistent with sources in the proximal Espinacito range. Subordinate Mesozoic (~80-250 Ma) to Proterozoic (~850-1800 Ma) U-Pb populations record exhumation of the Andean magmatic arc and recycling of different structural levels in the RFTB during thrusting/inversion of Mesozoic rift basin strata and subjacent Paleozoic units. Whereas maximum depositional ages of sampled Manantiales units cluster at 18-20 Ma, the Estancia Uspallata basin (~50 km to the south) shows consistent upsection younging of Cenozoic populations attributed to proximal volcanic centers. Ongoing work will apply low-temperature thermochronology to pinpoint basin accumulation histories and thrust timing.

  7. Héritages glaciaires, périglaciaires et évolution récente : le cas du Nevado Coropuna (Andes centrales, sud du Pérou)

    OpenAIRE

    Forget, Marie-Emilie; Thouret, Jean-Claude; Kuentz, Adèle; Fontugne, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Les glaciers tropicaux sont très sensibles aux variations climatiques et notamment à celles engendrées dans les Andes centrales par les phénomènes ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation). Afin de mieux saisir ces variations à court terme, il est nécessaire de déchiffrer les héritages glaciaires et périglaciaires. La calotte glaciaire du massif du Nevado Coropuna, divisée en dix-huit bassins glaciaires, a donné lieu à une carte géomorphologique du massif volcanique, recouvert par la calotte glacia...

  8. New stratigraphic, chronologic, and magnetic fabric constraints for Neogene and Quaternary ignimbrites in the Central Andes (South Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Rupelle, A.; Thouret, J. C.; Cubukcu, H. E.; Jicha, B.; Bréard, E.; Gerbe, M.-C.; Le Pennec, J.-L.; Diot, H.; Boivin, P.

    2012-04-01

    Central Andean deformation history in southern Peru is recorded in Neogene volcanic units of Ocoña and Cotahuasi canyons that cut across the western Cordillera. Acceleration (100 km3) Nazca (c.24.6 Ma), Alpabamba (19.4-18.0 Ma), and Huaylillas (14.25-12.7 Ma) ignimbrite sheets preceded the canyon incision, whereas sheets of smaller volume (welded, eutaxitic, crystal-rich facies overlain by a thick, multi-bedded ash-flow tuff and a lithic-rich, indurated flow unit. The Huaylillas ignimbrite sheet comprises a strongly welded, crystal-rich, lithic-poor, columnar lithofacies, with devitrified pumice. The Caraveli ignimbrite sheet has a jointed vitrophyre overlain by a welded, blocky, crystal-rich flow unit. A vacuolar, saccharolytic unit forms the top of the sequence. The Lower Sencca ignimbrite sheet comprises of a basal vitrophyre and a slightly welded, fibrous pumice-rich flow unit, which grades into a welded, vapor-phase unit that contains more crystals than pumice and lithics. The Upper Sencca ignimbrite sheet consists of a black vitrophyre, grading into a strongly welded, crystal-rich, eutaxitic cooling unit. The latter is capped by a slightly welded unit, and an indurated pumice-rich, crystal-poor vapour-phase facies. Quaternary valley-fill termed Las Lomas consists of unwelded, crystal-poor pumice-flow deposits. Eighteen new 40Ar/39Ar analyses have been carried out on feldspar/glass separates from pumice and lavas. Results for the Caraveli ignimbrite (9.35±0.06 Ma), Upper Barroso lavas (2.24±0.45 Ma) and Upper Sencca ignimbrite (2.00-2.06±0.09 Ma) are in good agreement with previous data. New ages for the Lower Barroso lavas (7.32±0.05; 5.36±0.12 Ma) and Lower Sencca ignimbrites (5.13±0.01, 5.09±0.03, 4.65±0.11, 4.36 ± 0.16) extend their temporal history towards older times. Lower Barroso lava flow activity occurred as early as~7.3 and lasted until 5.4 Ma just before the Lower Sencca eruptions. The Lower Sencca ignimbrites spanned at least 1.5 Ma and

  9. El alto de Copahue - Pino Hachado y la fosa de Loncopué: un comportamiento tectónico episódico, Andes neuquinos (37º - 39ºS The Copahue-Pino Hachado high and the Loncopuè trough: An episodic tectonic behaviour, Neuquén Andes (37º- 39ºS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. García Morabito

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Los Andes de la parte central de Neuquén (38º-39ºS, enmarcados en los Andes Centrales Australes (35º-39ºS, han poseído una cronología de levantamiento similar al resto de los Andes Patagónicos Septentrionales (39º-46ºS construyéndose a través de sucesivas fases de alzamiento en el Cretácico medio, Eoceno medio y Mioceno superior. Sin embargo, se han diferenciado con respecto al resto de los Andes Patagónicos, ubicados hacia el sur, en lo relativo a las distintas fases de relajamiento extensional que han sufrido, tanto en el Oligoceno superior como en el Plio-Cuaternario. Existen evidencias que sugieren un comportamiento episódico de la faja plegada y corrida neuquina dado por regímenes tectónicos compresivos seguidos por estadios de extensión generalizados al menos desde el Cretácico medio. El estudio de dos unidades morfoestructurales desarrolladas entre los 37º y los 39ºS ejemplifican este comportamiento peculiar, el alto de Copahue - Pino Hachado ubicado en la zona limítrofe argentino-chilena y su extensión hacia el norte en territorio chileno, en la laguna de la Laja, y la fosa de Loncopué en el retroarco. El estudio de la estructura miocena a cuaternaria y la descripción detallada de la estratigráfía de este sector cordillerano han aportado un nuevo cuadro de evolución para este sector de los Andes.The Andes located in the central Neuquén (38º-39ºS, which belong to the southern Central Andes (35º-39ºS, have recorded a similar chronology of uplift than the neighbor northern Patagonian Andes (39º-46ºS. Both areas have been formed trough successive phases of contraction in the Late Cretaceous, Middle Eocene and Late Miocene respectively. However, the Neuquén Andes have experienced two discrete phases of orogenic relaxation, during the Late Oligocene and Pliocene-Quaternary, which make then distinctive respect to the area located to the south. Field studies have shown new evidences of an episodic behavior of

  10. Mapping South American Summer Monsoon Changes during Heinrich Event 1 and the LGM: Insights from New Paleolake Records from the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. Y.; McGee, D.; Quade, J.

    2015-12-01

    Cave stalagmite records show strong evidence of abrupt changes in summer monsoons during Heinrich events, but we lack rigorous constraints on the amount of wetting or drying occurring in monsoon regions. Studies on shoreline deposits of closed-basin lakes can establish quantitative bounds on water balance changes through mapping-based estimates of lake volume variations. We present new dating constraints on lake level variations in Agua Caliente I and Laguna Loyoques, two closed-basin, high-altitude paleolakes on the Altiplano-Puna plateau of the Central Andes (23.1°S, 67.4°W, 4250 masl). Because this area receives >70% of its total annual precipitation during austral summer, the region is ideally suited to capture a pure response to changes in the South American summer monsoon (SASM). The plateau is home to several small (<40 km2) lakes surrounded by well-preserved paleoshorelines that indicate past wetter conditions. Agua Caliente I is unique, having multiple shorelines encrusted with biologically-mediated calcium carbonate "tufa" deposits. Initial U-Th dating of these massive shoreline tufas reveals that these deposits are dateable to within ±50 to 300 years due to high U concentrations and low initial Th content (as indicated by high 230Th/232Th). Our U-Th dates show that Agua Caliente I was greater in lake surface area during two periods: 17.5-14.5 kyrs BP, coincident with Heinrich Event 1 (HE1), and 24-23 kyrs BP, roughly coincident with the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). At these times, Agua Caliente I also overflowed into a neighboring lake basin (Loyoques) through an 8-km long southeast-trending stream channel. Thus, during HE1 and the LGM, the lake was ~9 times larger in surface area relative to modern. Hydrologic modeling constrained by paleotemperature estimates is used to provide bounds for these past precipitation changes. We also tentatively explore physical mechanisms linking Heinrich events and the regional hydroclimate by comparing freshwater

  11. Modelling the hydrological response of debris-free and debris-covered glaciers to present climatic conditions in the semiarid Andes of central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Alvaro; Pellicciotti, Francesca; MacDonell, Shelley; McPhee, James; Vivero, Sebastián; Campos, Cristián; Egli, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the main contributors to runoff of a 62 km2 glacierized catchment in the semiarid Andes of central Chile, where both debris-free and debris-covered glaciers are present, combining an extensive set of field measurements, remote sensing products and an advanced glacio-hydrological model (TOPKAPI-ETH). The catchment contains two debris-free glaciers reaching down to 3900 m asl (Bello and Yeso Glaciers) and one debris-covered avalanche-fed glacier reaching to 3200 m asl (Piramide Glacier). A unique dataset of field measurements collected in the ablation seasons 2013-14 and 2014-15 included four automatic weather stations, manual measurements of snow depth and debris cover thickness, discharge measurements at glaciers outlets, photographic monitoring of surface albedo as well as ablation stakes measurements and snow pits. TOPKAPI-ETH combines physically-oriented parameterizations of snow and ice ablation, gravitational distribution of snow, snow albedo evolution, glacier dynamics, runoff routing and the ablation of debris-covered ice.We obtained the first detailed estimation of mass balance and runoff contribution of debris-covered glaciers in this mountainous region. Results show that while the mass balance of Bello and Yeso Glaciers is mostly controlled by air temperature lapse rates, the mass balance of Piramide Glacier is governed by debris thickness and avalanches. In fact, gravitational distribution by avalanching on wet years plays a key role and modulates the mass balance gradient of all glaciers in the catchment and can turn local mass balance from negative to positive. This is especially the case for Piramide Glacier, which shows large amounts of snow accumulation below the steep walls surrounding its upper area. Despite the thermal insulation effect of the debris cover, the contribution to runoff from debris-free and debris-covered glaciers is similar, mainly due to elevation differences. At the catchment scale, snowmelt represents more than 60

  12. El clima de la vertiente del Pacífico de los Andes Centrales y sus implicaciones geomorfológicas El clima de la vertiente del Pacífico de los Andes Centrales y sus implicaciones geomorfológicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Úbeda Palenque

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate studies are of main importance to explain the external geodynamics of the Pacific Basin of the Central Andes between 15°S and 19°S. This is because the processes by which the relief modeling or morphogenesis develop are controlled by pluviometric variables and phyto stabilization. Moreover, the internal geodynamic of the region is related to the climatic conditions that determine the amounts of sediments aported to the Ocean basin (Kulm et al. 1977, affecting the erosion rate by subduction in the plane of contact between the tectonic plates and the composition of the magazas formed below the Andean erogene.In this paper we analyze the climatic effects in the external geodynamics, within a theoric framework that considers a morphoclimatic system as a set formed by the morphogenetic agents and processes that work the relief modeling in a territory, in function of its bioclimatic characteristics; and a morphoclimatic dominion is the spatial environment where a specific morphoclimatic system develops.First, we present the clima of the Central Andes, the factors that control its mean configuration and its main characteristics with diagrams made from the pluviometric data collected in a series of stations regularly distributed in the region. Second, we differentiate two climatic dominions, one in the Altiplano, related to Amazonia precipitations and the other at the Pacific side, associated to the anticyclonic permanency in the western cordillera. Third, we propose a subdivision of the western façade of the cordillera in altitudinal intervals or bioclimatics sections using bioindicators such as the vegetation absence or presence with altitudinal change. Fourth, we give a new division in altitudinal intervals or morphoclimatic zones, using the existence of some geoindicators, such as the endemic geomorphic units of each morphoclimatic zone.El estudio del clima es imprescindible para explicar la geodinámica externa en la vertiente del Pac

  13. The role of changing geodynamics in the progressive contamination of Late Cretaceous to Late Miocene arc magmas in the southern Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rosemary E.; Kirstein, Linda A.; Kasemann, Simone A.; Litvak, Vanesa D.; Poma, Stella; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Hinton, Richard

    2016-10-01

    The tectonic and geodynamic setting of the southern Central Andean convergent margin changed significantly between the Late Cretaceous and the Late Miocene, influencing magmatic activity and its geochemical composition. Here we investigate how these changes, which include changing slab-dip angle and convergence angles and rates, have influenced the contamination of the arc magmas with crustal material. Whole rock geochemical data for a suite of Late Cretaceous to Late Miocene arc rocks from the Pampean flat-slab segment (29-31 °S) of the southern Central Andes is presented alongside petrographic observations and high resolution age dating. In-situ U-Pb dating of magmatic zircon, combined with Ar-Ar dating of plagioclase, has led to an improved regional stratigraphy and provides an accurate temporal constraint for the geochemical data. A generally higher content of incompatible trace elements (e.g. Nb/Zr ratios from 0.019 to 0.083 and Nb/Yb from 1.5 to 16.4) is observed between the Late Cretaceous (~ 72 Ma), when the southern Central Andean margin is suggested to have been in extension, and the Miocene when the thickness of the continental crust increased and the angle of the subducting Nazca plate shallowed. Trace and rare earth element compositions obtained for the Late Cretaceous to Late Eocene arc magmatic rocks from the Principal Cordillera of Chile, combined with a lack of zircon inheritance, suggest limited assimilation of the overlying continental crust by arc magmas derived from the mantle wedge. A general increase in incompatible, fluid-mobile/immobile (e.g., Ba/Nb) and fluid-immobile/immobile (e.g., Nb/Zr) trace element ratios is attributed to the influence of the subducting slab on the melt source region and/or the influx of asthenospheric mantle. The Late Oligocene (~ 26 Ma) to Early Miocene (~ 17 Ma), and Late Miocene (~ 6 Ma) arc magmatic rocks present in the Frontal Cordillera show evidence for the bulk assimilation of the Permian-Triassic (P

  14. History of Lake Andes

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Information about the history and management of Lake Andes is compiled in this report. It is intended to help future refuge managers become acquainted with the...

  15. Floristic changes in alpine plant communities induced by the cushion plant Azorella madreporica (Apiaceae in the Andes of central Chile Cambios florísticos en comunidades de plantas alpinas inducidos por la planta en cojín Azorella madrepórica (Apiaceae en los Andes de Chile central

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    CONSTANZA L QUIROZ

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the number of plant species associated with nurse plants increases with elevation. However, studies conducted so far have largely ignored the effect of nurse plants on other community attributes, such as the species abundances, diversity and evenness. Moreover, changes in these community attributes along environmental gradients have also been seldom examined. The present study evaluates the effect of the cushion plant Azorella madrepórica (Apiaceae on species richness, species abundance, diversity and evenness of vascular plants at two elevations in the Andes of central Chile. Theoretically, the impact of this nurse cushion plant on these community attributes should be grater at a higher elevation. Results showed that the proportion of plant species associated with cushion plants increases with elevation, and the abundance of some species is also greater within cushions than on bare ground. Although the proportion of species growing within cushions increased with elevation, diversity and evenness were higher on bare ground. This is due to some few species that attained very high densities within cushions, generating assemblages highly dominated by some few species. Ordination analyses indicated differences in species assemblages within and outside A. madrepórica at the higher elevation. Therefore, the influence of cushion plants on community structure changes with elevation. Accordingly, we suggest that attributes other than species richness must be included in future studies in order to analyze the impact of nurse species on community structure along environmental gradients.Se sabe que el número de especies asociado a plantas nodrizas aumenta con la altitud. Sin embargo, el efecto de plantas nodrizas sobre otros atributos de las comunidades, como la abundancia de especies, diversidad y equidad, ha sido largamente ignorado. Más aún, cambios en estos atributos en gradientes ambientales han sido pocas veces examinados

  16. Mixed bird flocks: patterns of activity and species composition in a region of the Central Andes of Colombia Bandadas mixtas de aves: patrones de actividad y composición de especies en una región de la Cordillera Central de los Andes de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Arbeláez-Cortés

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mixed bird flocks are groups of individuals from different species that travel and forage together. Such groups are common in several bird communities around the world. We present species composition and activity patterns of mixed bird flocks in a region of the Central Andes of Colombia. We compared the number of species per flock, as well as the number of flocks among 3 different habitats. We tested hypotheses concerning the flocks daily activity and the co-occurrences of species within them. We recorded 75 species, and the species number per flock varied from 4 to 21. Our data suggest that habitat affects the number of flocks but not their species number, and that the activity of flocks is similar throughout the day. In addition, the association of birds in flocks is affected by interspecific facilitation, with some species co-occurrences found more times than expected by chance. We hypothesize that some tanager species could have a role in flock cohesion. We witnessed 2 predator attacks upon flocks, a number of agonistic interactions among flock members, and squirrels following bird flocks. Our results meet some general patterns described for mixed bird flocks.Las bandadas mixtas de aves son grupos de individuos de diferentes especies que viajan y forrajean juntos, y son comunes en varias comunidades de aves alrededor del mundo. Presentamos la composición de especies y los patrones de actividad de las bandadas mixtas de aves en una región de la Cordillera Central de los Andes Colombianos. Comparamos el número de especies por bandada y el número de bandadas en 3 hábitats distintos. Evaluamos hipótesis relacionadas con la actividad de las bandadas durante el día y la presencia simultánea de especies en estos grupos. Observamos 75 especies, y el número de especies por bandada varió entre 4 y 21. Nuestros datos indican que el hábitat parece afectar el número de bandadas pero no su número de especies y que la actividad de las bandadas

  17. Present and future water resources supply and demand in the Central Andes of Peru: a comprehensive review with focus on the Cordillera Vilcanota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenkhan, Fabian; Huggel, Christian; Salzmann, Nadine; Giráldez, Claudia; Suarez, Wilson; Rohrer, Mario; Molina, Edwin; Montoya, Nilton; Miñan, Fiorella

    2014-05-01

    Glaciers have been an important element of Andean societies and livelihoods as direct freshwater supply for agriculture irrigation, hydropower generation and mining activities. Peru's mainly remotely living population in the Central Andes has to cope with a strong seasonal variation of precipitations and river runoff interannually superimposed by El Niño impacts. Direct glacier and lake water discharge thus constitute a vital continuous water supply and represent a regulating buffer as far as hydrological variability is concerned. This crucial buffer effect is gradually altered by accelerated glacier retreat which leads most likely to an increase of annual river runoff variability. Furthermore, a near-future crossing of the 'peak water' is expected, from where on prior enhanced streamflow decreases and levels out towards a new still unknown minimum discharge. Consequently, a sustainable future water supply especially during low-level runoff dry season might not be guaranteed whereas Peru's water demand increases significantly. Here we present a comprehensive review, the current conditions and perspectives for water resources in the Cusco area with focus on the Vilcanota River, Cordillera Vilcanota, Southern Peru. With 279 km2 the Cordillera Vilcanota represents the second largest glacierized mountain range of the tropics worldwide. Especially as of the second half of the 1980s, it has been strongly affected by massive ice loss with around 30% glacier area decline until present. Furthermore, glacier vanishing triggers the formation of new lakes and increase of lake levels and therefore constitutes determining hazardous drivers for mass movements related to deglaciation effects. The Vilcanota River still lacks more profound hydrological studies. It is likely that its peak water has already been or might be crossed in near-future. This has strong implications for the still at 0.9% (2.2%) annually growing population of the Cusco department (Cusco city). People mostly

  18. Nurse effect in seedling establishment: facilitation and tolerance to damage in the Andes of central Chile Efecto nodriza en el establecimiento de plántulas: facilitación y tolerancia al daño en los Andes de Chile central

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    IAN S ACUÑA-RODRÍGUEZ

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Nurse effects, which occur when one plant species enhances the survival or growth of another plant species, are predicted to be most relevant in stressful environments. These effects are particulary important during seedling establishment due to their vulnerability to both biotic and abiotic factors, such as herbivory and drought. Tolerance to herbivory reflects the degree to which plants are able to regrow and reproduce after damage, and should vary with resource availability. In the high Andes of central Chile, the cushion plant Laretia acaulis (Apiaceae acts as a buffer against environmental stress, enhancing survival of several associated plant species. We hypothesized that tolerance to herbivory of seedlings growing inside the canopy of L. acaulis should be greater than that of seedlings growing outside the cushion plant. We conducted a field experiment to test this hypothesis for two native perennial species in the high Andes of central Chile: Hordeum comosum (Poaceae and Haplopappus anthylloides (Asteraceae. Seedlings of each species were planted inside and outside L. acaulis cushions and half of them received manual damage (50 % foliar tissue removed. Seedlings growing inside the nurse species showed high survival independent of the damage treatment. Whereas position (inside or outside the cushion plant did not affect tolerance of Haplopappus anthylloides, it significantly affected tolerance of Hordeum comosum. Thus, we found similar survival of damaged and control seedlings of H. comosum inside the cushions, but survival of damaged seedlings in the bare ground was lower than that of control seedlings. We verified the occurrence of nurse effects of Laretia acaulis on the establishment of both species, and detected enhancement of tolerance to damage in Hordeum comosum in this stressful habitatSe ha sugerido que el efecto nodriza, el cual se evidencia cuando una especie vegetal incrementa la supervivencia o el crecimiento de otra, es m

  19. Temporal variation of the stress field during the construction of the central Andes: Constrains from the volcanic arc region (22-26°S), Western Cordillera, Chile, during the last 20 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambiagi, Laura; Alvarez, Pamela; Spagnotto, Silvana

    2016-09-01

    In order to understand the response of the stress field state to intrinsic processes during the construction of the Andes, such as thickening of the continental crust, lithospheric delamination, and/or thermal weakening, we investigate the stress field evolution of the arc region since the last 20 Myr, in the central Andes (22-26.5°S). The 43 reduced paleostress tensors derived from inversion of 682 fault slip data reveal a complex pattern of stress states during the last episode of orogenic construction and topographic uplift. We identify two geodynamic stages: the first stage corresponds to the construction of the Altiplano/Puna plateau and the second one to its gravitational collapse. Four stress states that have prevailed in the Altiplano/Puna plateau since middle Miocene times characterize the transition from one stage to the other. Along the study latitudes, a spatiotemporal change in stress state is clearly observed, which led to an understanding that a change in the stress field may be related not only to the boundary conditions but also to intrinsic factors associated with the construction of the Andean orogeny. Our results suggest that approximately at 13-10 Ma and approximately 8-5 Ma, in the southern Altiplano and northern Puna, and in the southern Puna, respectively, regional elevation and crustal thicknesses reached threshold values necessary to generate the orogenic collapse.

  20. The geochemical variations of the upper cenozoic volcanism along the Calama Olacapato El Toro transversal fault system in central Andes (˜24°S): petrogenetic and geodynamic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteini, M.; Mazzuoli, R.; Omarini, R.; Cas, R.; Maas, R.

    2002-02-01

    In this paper, we present new geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic data for several Upper Miocene volcanic centres aligned along one of the most extensive transcurrent lineament in the Central Andes, the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro (COT). The transversal volcanic belt along COT is constituted by large composite volcanoes and a caldera structure; they are, from NW to SE, Puntas Negras, Rincon, Tul Tul, Del Medio and Pocitos (TUMEPO), Quevar Aguas Calientes and Tastil. In order to compare chemical data from the different centres along the COT transect, differentiation effects were minimised by using data extrapolated at 60% SiO2 with least-square regression method. In the western sector of the COT, the volcanic products of Puntas Negras and Rincon show relatively high K2O and 87Sr/86Sr and low Rb/Cs, Ta/Th, La/Yb, 143Nd/144Nd. To the east, the TUMEPO products have high Sr and 143Nd/144Nd, La/Yb and Ba/Rb and low Y, 87Sr/86Sr. In the easternmost COT sector, Quevar, Aguas Calientes and Tastil volcanic complexes exhibit low La/Yb, high87Sr/Sr86 and low 143Nd/144Nd. On the basis of these data, we propose a petrogenetic and geodynamical model for Central Andes at 24°S. In correspondence of Miocene-Quaternary volcanic arc (Puntas Negras and Rincon), the magmas inherited a calcalkaline signature partly modified by upper crustal and/or sediment assimilation. In the central eastern sector, melting, assimilation, storage and homogenisation (MASH) processes occurred at the base of a thickened crust. In this COT sector, TUMEPO products show an evident lower crust signature and could be considered representative for MASH derived magmas. In the easternmost sector, Quevar, Aguas Calientes and Tastil products could represent magmas generated by partial melting of underthrusted Brasilian shield and mixed with magmas derived by MASH processes.

  1. Cuando ya no se puede tomar trago ni chacchar coca. When alcohol can no longer be drunk or coca leaves chewed. the case of the “protestants” in the Peruvian central Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Magny

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Desde hace mucho tiempo el alcohol y la coca ocupan un lugar central en las comunidades andinas. Hasta ahora en el distrito de Churcampa (Huancavelica, Perú, los católicos, mayoritarios, siguen explicando al visitante lo siguiente: “acá no se puede hacer nada sin trago ni coca”. No obstante, durante las ultimas décadas, muchas personas en este distrito – así como en muchos otros distritos de los Andes peruanos – se han convertido y siguen convirtiéndose al “protestantismo” (termino genérico usado por los católicos para referirse en forma general a las Iglesias evangélicas. Esta conversión implica, entre otras cosas, dejar completamente de masticar hojas de coca y de beber cualquier tipo de bebidas alcohólicas. En esta exposición proponemos analizar hasta qué punto y bajo qué modalidades estas restricciones alimenticias afectan a los conversos (quienes siguen siendo minoritarios en el distrito en su vida social cotidiana.Alcohol and coca have played a central role in Andean communities for many centuries. Nowadays, in the district of Churcampa (Huancavelica, Peru, the Catholic people, who are the majority, still explain to visitors that “here you can’t do anything without trago [alcohol] and coca”. Yet, over the past decades, many men and women in this district - as well as in many other districts of the Peruvian Andes - have been converting to “Protestantism” (a generic term used by Catholics to refer to the Evangelical Churches. This conversion implies, among other things, completely giving up chewing of coca leaves and drinking of any type of alcoholic drink. The aim of this article is to analyze to what extent and how these restrictions in the dietary habits affect converted people in their everyday social life.alcohol, coca leaves, religion, conversion, evangelic Churches, Peru

  2. [Chilean's nursing knowledge organization and their tendencies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Sara Mendoza; Klijin, Tatiana Paravic

    2004-01-01

    A Quantitative, descriptive and retrospective research that explored the Chilean Nursing knowledge organization an their tendencies. The universe was composed by scientists reports published in the Chilean nursing journals between 1965 and 2003 (N=214). Data were collected by an instrument based on the CIPE's and Nogueira's classification and cienciometría indications. Statistics measures of central tendency analysis was managed with SPSS. Some of the results obtained were: the more frequent study subject's was the professional nursing and the tendency is to be focused at the mature people's health necessities and their risk of being ill. It was found: little theoretical nursing sustenance at the reports. The "Ciencia y Enfermería" is the journal that exhibits the best scientific quality of alls.

  3. Isotopic composition of river waters and early stage carbonates crusts along an elevation transect at 33 degrees south latitude, southern central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, G. D.; Williams, K.; Garzione, C. N.; Araneo, D.; Strecker, M. R.

    2008-12-01

    We assess the quality of the transfer of elevation specific isotopic information into the rock record by comparing the stable isotopic composition of Quaternary to recent authigenic carbonates and river waters along a 3000 m elevation transect across the Andes at 33°S. Carbonate and water samples are from the Río Aconcagua (Chile) and Río Mendoza (Argentina) watersheds. Isotopic data from small tributaries of these rivers show similar elevation gradients on both sides of the range despite different initial moisture sources. The δ18O of authigenic carbonates correlate well with elevation and yield an elevation gradient which is shallower than that of the rivers. These data confirm that carbonate material is indeed an accurate recorder of information about elevation, and show that in some instances, different moisture sources do not result in drastically different isotope-elevation gradients.

  4. Classification of Debris-Covered Glaciers and Rock Glaciers in the Andes of Central Chile - An Approach Integrating Field Measurements, High-Resolution Satellite Imagery, and Coring Data to Estimate Water Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, J. R.; Bellisario, A. C.; Ferrando, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    In the Dry Andes of Chile (17 to 35° S), debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers are differentiated from "true" glaciers based on the percentage of surface debris cover, thickness of surface debris, and ice content. These landforms are more numerous than glaciers in the Central Andes; however, there are often omitted from inventories. Glaciers, debris covered glaciers, and rock glaciers are being removed by mining, while agricultural expansion and population growth have placed an additional demand on water resources. As a result, it is important to identify and locate these features to implement sustainable solutions. The objective of this study is to develop a classification system to identify debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers based on satellite imagery interpretation. The classification system is linked to field observations and measurements of ice content. Debris covered glaciers have three subclasses: surface coverage of semi (Class 1) and fully covered (Class 2) glaciers differentiates the first two forms, whereas debris thickness is critical for Class 3 when glaciers become buried with more than 3 m of surface debris. The amount of ice decreases from more than 85%, to 65-85%, to 45-65% for semi, fully, and buried debris-covered glaciers, respectively. Rock glaciers are characterized by three stages. Class 4 rock glaciers have pronounced transverse ridges and furrows that arch across the surface, which indicate flow produce via ice. Class 5 rock glaciers have ridges and furrows that appear linear in the direction of flow, and Class 6 rock glaciers have subdued surface topography that has been denudated as the rock glacier ceases movement. Ice content decreases from 25-45% ice, to 10-25% ice, to less than 10% ice from Class 4 to 6, respectively. The classification scheme can be used to identify and map debris covered glaciers and rock glaciers to create an inventory to better estimate available water resources at the basin-wide scale.

  5. Late Oligocene-Early Miocene compressional tectosedimentary episode and associated land-mammal faunas in the Andes of central Chile and adjacent Argentina (32 37°s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semper, Thierry; Marshall, Larry G.; Rivano, Sergio; Godoy, Estanislao

    1994-01-01

    A reassessment of the geologic and land-mammal fossil evidence used in attribution of a tectosedimentary episode in the Andes between 32 and 37°S to the Middle Eocene "Incaic tectonic phase" of Peru indicates that the episode occurred during Late Oligocene-Early Miocene times(~ 27-20 Ma). From west to east, three structural domains are recognized for this time span in the study area: a volcanic arc (Chile); a thin-skinned, E-verging fold-thrust belt (Cordillera Principal, Chile-Argentina border strip); and a foreland basin (Argentina). Initiation of thrusting in the Cordillera Principal fold-thrust belt produced the coeval initiation of sedimentation in the foreland basin of adjacent Argentina. This onset of foreland deposition postdates strata bearing a Divisaderan Land Mammal Age fauna (i.e. ~ 35-30 Ma) and is marked at ~ 36°30'S by the base of the "Rodados Lustrosos" conglomerates, which are conformably overlain by sedimentary rocks containing a Deseadan Land Mammal Age fauna (i.e. ~ 29-21 Ma). Geologic relationships between the thick volcanic Abanico (Coya-Machalí) and Farellones formations also demonstrate that this tectosedimentary episode practically ended at ~ 20 Ma at least in the volcanic arc, and was therefore roughly coeval with the major tectonic crisis (~ 27-19 Ma) known in northwestern Andean Bolivia some 1500 km to the north. This strongly suggests that a long, outstanding tectonic upheaval affected at least an extended 12-37°S segment of the Andean margin of South America during Late Oligocene and Early Miocene times.

  6. Quantification of glacier contribution to runoff in a Chilean Andean basin with snow-glacier driven regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobadilla, M. Paz; Vargas, Ximena

    2016-04-01

    Glaciers in mountainous regions play an important role in the basins located in such landscape. However, assessing their contribution is a complex task due to difficulties in taking appropriate measurements that could help to clarify this aspect. Most of the glaciers in the Andes within Chilean territory have shown glacier recession, which added to the hydric stress in the zone, making interesting to quantify their contribution. The Cachapoal river basin is located in the Andes in central Chile. The study area is defined by the Cachapoal en Puente Termas gauge, covering approximately 2448 km2, where 9% is cover by glacier. The basin shows a snow driven hydrological regime, strongly conditioned by the presence of glaciers, which are distributed in 4 of the 6 main sub-basins. The basin hydrology is modeled in natural regime at daily scale using the WEAP model (Water Evaluation And Planning System), using scarce meteorological information as input. A simplified glacier module is included to characterize its processes and estimate its contribution to the total runoff. The glacier contribution to runoff is studied, differentiating between normal, wet and dry years, which are defined by exceedance probability intervals of the annual precipitation using 44 years of information of the Rengo gauge. Thus, a normal year shows an annual precipitation between 473 mm and 622 mm, while the annual rainfall in a wet year is higher than a normal year and lower in a dry year. The results show that glacier contribution to the total runoff is significant, reaching 42%, 65% y 24% in the summer period in a normal, dry and wet year respectively. The glacier contribution becomes more significant in dry years, where it is estimated to contribute 40% of the mean annual streamflow.

  7. Glacial areas, lake areas, and snowlines from 1975 to 2012: status of the Cordillera Vilcanota, including the Quelccaya Ice Cap, northern central Andes, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Hanshaw

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Glaciers in the tropical Andes of southern Peru have received limited attention compared to glaciers in other regions (both near and far, yet remain of vital importance to agriculture, fresh water, and hydropower supplies of downstream communities. Little is known about recent glacial-area changes and how the glaciers in this region respond to climate changes, and, ultimately, how these changes will affect lake and water supplies. To remedy this, we have used 144 multi-spectral satellite images spanning almost four decades, from 1975–2012, to obtain glacial and lake-area outlines for the understudied Cordillera Vilcanota region, including the Quelccaya Ice Cap. In a second step, we have estimated the snowline altitude of the Quelccaya Ice Cap using spectral unmixing methods. We have made the following four key observations: first, since 1988 glacial areas throughout the Cordillera Vilcanota have been declining at a rate of 5.46 ± 1.70 km2 yr−1 (22-yr average, 1988–2010, with 95% confidence interval. The Quelccaya Ica Cap, specifically, has been declining at a rate of 0.67 ± 0.18 km2 yr−1 since 1980 (31-yr average, 1980–2011, also with 95% confidence interval; Second, decline rates for individual glacierized regions have been accelerating during the past decade (2000–2011 as compared to the preceding decade (1990–2000; Third, the snowline of the Quelccaya Ice Cap is retreating to higher elevations as glacial areas decrease, by a total of almost 300 m between its lowest recorded elevation in 1989 and its highest in 1998; and fourth, as glacial regions have decreased, 61% of lakes connected to glacial watersheds have shown a roughly synchronous increase in lake area, while 84% of lakes not connected to glacial watersheds have remained stable or have declined in area. Our new and detailed data on glacial and lake areas over 37 yr provide an important spatiotemporal assessment of climate

  8. Glacial areas, lake areas, and snowlines from 1975 to 2012: status of the Cordillera Vilcanota, including the Quelccaya Ice Cap, northern central Andes, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanshaw, M. N.; Bookhagen, B.

    2013-02-01

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes of southern Peru have received limited attention compared to glaciers in other regions (both near and far), yet remain of vital importance to agriculture, fresh water, and hydropower supplies of downstream communities. Little is known about recent glacial-area changes and how the glaciers in this region respond to climate changes, and, ultimately, how these changes will affect lake and water supplies. To remedy this, we have used 144 multi-spectral satellite images spanning almost four decades, from 1975-2012, to obtain glacial and lake-area outlines for the understudied Cordillera Vilcanota region, including the Quelccaya Ice Cap. In a second step, we have estimated the snowline altitude of the Quelccaya Ice Cap using spectral unmixing methods. We have made the following four key observations: first, since 1988 glacial areas throughout the Cordillera Vilcanota have been declining at a rate of 5.46 ± 1.70 km2 yr-1 (22-yr average, 1988-2010, with 95% confidence interval). The Quelccaya Ica Cap, specifically, has been declining at a rate of 0.67 ± 0.18 km2 yr-1 since 1980 (31-yr average, 1980-2011, also with 95% confidence interval); Second, decline rates for individual glacierized regions have been accelerating during the past decade (2000-2011) as compared to the preceding decade (1990-2000); Third, the snowline of the Quelccaya Ice Cap is retreating to higher elevations as glacial areas decrease, by a total of almost 300 m between its lowest recorded elevation in 1989 and its highest in 1998; and fourth, as glacial regions have decreased, 61% of lakes connected to glacial watersheds have shown a roughly synchronous increase in lake area, while 84% of lakes not connected to glacial watersheds have remained stable or have declined in area. Our new and detailed data on glacial and lake areas over 37 yr provide an important spatiotemporal assessment of climate variability in this area. These data can be integrated into further studies

  9. Glacial areas, lakes areas, and snowlines from 1975-2012: Status of the Cordillera Vilcanota, including the Quelccaya Ice Cap, northern central Andes, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanshaw, Maiana Natania

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes of southern Peru have received limited attention compared to glaciers in other regions (both near and far), yet remain of vital importance to agriculture, fresh water, and hydropower supplies of downstream communities. Little is known about recent glacial-area changes and how the glaciers in this region respond to climate changes, and, ultimately, how these changes will affect lake and water supplies. To remedy this, we have used 144 multi-spectral satellite images spanning almost four decades, from 1975-2012, to obtain glacial and lake-area outlines for the understudied Cordillera Vilcanota region, including the Quelccaya Ice Cap. In a second step, we have estimated the snowline altitude of the Quelccaya Ice Cap using spectral unmixing methods. We have made the following four key observations: First, since 1988 glacial areas throughout the Cordillera Vilcanota have been declining at a rate of 5.46 +/- 1.70 km2/yr (22-year average, 1988-2010, with 95 % confidence interval). The Quelccaya Ica Cap, specifically, has been declining at a rate of 0.67 +/- 0.18 km2/yr since 1980 (31-year average, 1980-2011, also with 95 % confidence interval); Second, decline rates for individual glacierized regions have been accelerating during the past decade (2000-2011) as compared to the preceding decade (1990-2000); Third, the snowline of the Quelccaya Ice Cap is retreating to higher elevations as glacial areas decrease, by a total of almost 300 m between its lowest recorded elevation in 1989 and its highest in 1998; and fourth, as glacial regions have decreased, 61 % of lakes connected to glacial watersheds have shown a roughly synchronous increase in lake area, while 84 % of lakes not connected to glacial watersheds have remained stable or have declined in area. Our new and detailed data on glacial and lake areas over 37 years provide an important spatiotemporal assessment of climate variability in this area. These data can be integrated into further

  10. Glacial areas, lake areas, and snow lines from 1975 to 2012: status of the Cordillera Vilcanota, including the Quelccaya Ice Cap, northern central Andes, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanshaw, M. N.; Bookhagen, B.

    2014-03-01

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes of southern Peru have received limited attention compared to glaciers in other regions (both near and far), yet remain of vital importance to agriculture, fresh water, and hydropower supplies of downstream communities. Little is known about recent glacial-area changes and how the glaciers in this region respond to climate changes, and, ultimately, how these changes will affect lake and water supplies. To remedy this, we have used 158 multi-spectral satellite images spanning almost 4 decades, from 1975 to 2012, to obtain glacial- and lake-area outlines for the understudied Cordillera Vilcanota region, including the Quelccaya Ice Cap. Additionally, we have estimated the snow-line altitude of the Quelccaya Ice Cap using spectral unmixing methods. We have made the following four key observations: first, since 1988 glacial areas throughout the Cordillera Vilcanota (1988 glacial area: 361 km2) have been declining at a rate of 3.99 ± 1.15 km2 yr-1 (22 year average, 1988-2010, with 95% confidence interval (CI), n = 8 images). Since 1980, the Quelccaya Ice Cap (1980 glacial area: 63.1 km2) has been declining at a rate of 0.57 ± 0.10 km2 yr-1 (30 year average, 1980-2010, with 95% CI, n = 14). Second, decline rates for individual glacierized regions have been accelerating during the past decade (2000-2010) as compared to the preceding decade (1988-1999) with an average increase from 37.5 to 42.3 × 10-3 km2 yr-1 km-2 (13%). Third, glaciers with lower median elevations are declining at higher rates than those with higher median elevations. Specifically, glaciers with median elevations around 5200 m a.s.l. are retreating to higher elevations at a rate of ~1 m yr-1 faster than glaciers with median elevations around 5400 m a.s.l. Fourth, as glacial regions have decreased, 77% of lakes connected to glacial watersheds have either remained stable or shown a roughly synchronous increase in lake area, while 42% of lakes not connected to glacial

  11. Geometry of the inverted Cretaceous Chañarcillo Basin based on 2-D gravity and field data. An approach to the structure of the western Central Andes of northern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Martínez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses an integrated approach that provides new ideas about the structural geometry of the NNE-striking, Cretaceous Chañarcillo Basin located along the eastern Coastal Cordillera in the western Central Andes of northern Chile (27–28° S. The results obtained from the integration of two transverse (E–W gravity profiles with previous geological information, show that the architecture of this basin is defined by a large NNE–SSE-trending and east-vergent anticline ("Tierra Amarilla Anticlinorium", which is related to the positive reactivation of a former Cretaceous normal fault (Elisa de Bordos Master Fault. Moreover, intercalations of high and low gravity anomalies and steep gravity gradients reveal a set of buried, west-tilted half-grabens associated with a synthetic normal fault pattern. These results, together with the uplift and folding style of the Cretaceous syn-rift recognized within the basin, suggest that their complete structural geometry could be explained by an inverted fault system linked to the shortening of pre-existing Cretaceous normal fault systems. Ages of the synorogenic deposits exposed unconformably over the frontal limb of the Tierra Amarilla Anticlinorium confirm a Late Cretaceous age for the Andean deformation and tectonic inversion of the basin.

  12. Consecuencias de las variaciones microclimáticas sobre la visita de insectos polinizadores en dos especies de Chaetanthera (Asteraceae en los Andes de Chile central Consequences of microclimate variation on insect pollinator visitation in two species of Chaetanthera (Asteraceae in the central Chilean Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTIAN TORRES-DÍAZ

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available La actividad de polinizadores puede ser afectada por factores bióticos (e.g., densidad floral en el parche, despliegue floral o por factores abióticos (e.g., temperatura, velocidad de viento, nubosidad. A pesar de la notable variación local, estacional e interanual en temperatura en zonas alpinas, las consecuencias de la variación microclimática local sobre la actividad de los polinizadores han recibido escasa atención en ambientes de alta montaña. En este estudio comparamos las tasas de visita a flores de polinizadores realizadas sobre poblaciones de exposición norte y oeste, en Chaetanthera apiculata (3.100 m de altitud, y en poblaciones de exposición este y oeste en C. lycopodioides (3.300 m de altitud. Se estudiaron los sistemas de reproducción de ambas especies para determinar su nivel de dependencia de un agente de polinización externo. En C. apiculata, la población que crece sobre la ladera de exposición norte estuvo sujeta a mayores temperaturas diurnas (1,8 °C y mayores tasas de visita (7,8 veces que la población sobre la ladera de exposición oeste. En C. lycopodioides, a su vez, la ladera de exposición este fue más cálida (3 °C y más visitada (cuatro veces que la población de exposición oeste. Mientras en C. apiculata, solo Faunula leucoglene (Lepidóptera: Satyridae presentó mayor actividad en la población más cálida, en C. lycopodioides, solo F. leucoglene y Liphantus sp. (Himenóptera: Andrenidae tuvieron mayor actividad en la población más cálida. La tasa de visitas de Faunula leucoglene fue afectada por la temperatura en C. apiculata y C. lycopodioides. Ambas especies, C. apiculata y C. lycopodioides, son parcialmente autocompatibles, y por lo tanto requieren polen exógeno para alcanzar una producción de semillas máxima. Nuestros resultados muestran que en ambientes de alta montaña las tasas de visita de polinizadores son altamente variables y que los factores microclimáticos pueden generar más variación en las tasas de visitas a flores que la densidad de capítulos florales en los parches. Nuestros resultados aportan valiosa información sobre las potenciales consecuencias del cambio climático global en la polinizaciónInsect pollinator activity can be influenced by biotic (e.g., patch floral density and floral display or by abiotic factors (e.g., temperature, wind velocity, cloudiness. In spite of microsite, seasonal and interannual variation in temperature in the alpine zone, the consequences of local microclimatic variation on pollinator activity has been rarely studied in high mountain ecosystems. In this study we compared flower visitation rates on a north-facing slope and a west-facing slope in Chaetanthera apiculata (3,100 m of altitude and on an east-facing slope and a west-facing slope in Chaetanthera lycopodioides (3,300 m of altitude. We studied the breeding system in each species in order to determine level of dependence on external pollinators. While the north-facing slope inhabited by C. apiculata was warmer (1.8 °C and visited (7.8-fold more frequently than the west-facing slope, in C. lycopodioides the east-facing slope was warmer (3 °C and visited more frequently (4-fold than the west-facing slope. In C. apiculata only Faunula leucoglene (Lepidóptera: Satyridae showed higher activity in the warmer population. In C. lycopodioides, F. leucoglene and Liphantus sp. (Himenóptera:Andrenidae showed higher activity rates in the warmer population. Flower visitation rate in Faunula leucoglene was correlated with temperature in C. apiculata and C. lycopodioides. Both C. apiculata and C. lycopodioides are partially self-compatible, and thus require exogenous pollen for maximum seed set. Our results show that in high elevation environments flower visitation rates can be highly variable and that microclimatic conditions can be more important for pollinator variation among populations than head density. Our results offer valuable insights on the potential consequences of global warming on plant pollination at high elevation

  13. The Amazon-Laurentian connection as viewed from the Middle Proterozoic rocks in the central Andes, western Bolivia and northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosdal, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Middle Proterozoic rocks underlying the Andes in western Bolivia, western Argentina, and northern Chile and Early Proterozoic rocks of the Arequipa massif in southern Peru?? from the Arequipa-Antofalla craton. These rocks are discontinuously exposed beneath Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks, but abundant crystalline clasts in Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the western altiplano allow indirect samples of the craton. Near Berenguela, western Bolivia, the Oligocene and Miocene Mauri Formation contains boulders of granodiorite augen gneiss (1171??20 Ma and 1158??12 Ma; U-Pb zircon), quartzose gneiss and granofels that are inferred to have arkosic protoliths (1100 Ma source region; U-Pb zircon), quartzofeldspathic and mafic orthogneisses that have amphibolite- and granulite-facies metamorphic mineral assemblages (???1080 Ma metamorphism; U-Pb zircon), and undeformed granitic rocks of Phanerozoic(?) age. The Middle Proterozoic crystalline rocks from Berenguela and elsewhere in western Bolivia and from the Middle Proterozoic Bele??n Schist in northern Chile generally have present-day low 206Pb/204Pb ( 15.57), and elevated 208Pb/204Pb (37.2 to 50.7) indicative of high time-averaged Th/U values. The Middle Proterozoic rocks in general have higher presentday 206Pb/204Pb values than those of the Early Proterozoic rocks of the Arequipa massif (206Pb/204Pb between 16.1 and 17.1) but lower than rocks of the southern Arequipa-Antofalla craton (206Pb/204Pb> 18.5), a difference inferred to reflect Grenvillian granulite metamorphism. The Pb isotopic compositions for the various Proterozoic rocks lie on common Pb isotopic growth curves, implying that Pb incorporated in rocks composing the Arequipa-Antofalla craton was extracted from a similar evolving Pb isotopic reservoir. Evidently, the craton has been a coherent terrane since the Middle Proterozoic. Moreover, the Pb isotopic compositions for the Arequipa-Antofalla craton overlap those of the Amazon craton, thereby supporting a link

  14. Streamflow responses to Chilean Megathrust earthquakes during the 20th and 21st centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, C.; Manga, M.; Wang, C. Y.; Korup, O.

    2015-12-01

    Coseismic static stress and dynamic stresses generated by propagating seismic waves cause responses in hydrological systems. Such responses include changes in the water level, hydrochemistry and streamflow discharge. Earthquake effects on hydrological systems provide a means to study the interaction between stress changes and regional hydrology, which is otherwise rarely possible. Chile is a country of frequent and large earthquakes and thus provides abundant opportunities to study such interactions and processes. Here we present streamflow responses to several Chilean Megathrust earthquakes, including the 1943 Mw 8.1 Coquimbo, 1950 Mw 8.2 Antofagasta, 1960 Mw 9.5 Valdivia, 1985 Mw 8.0 Valparaiso, 1995 Mw 8.0 Antofagasta, 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, and the 2014 Mw 8.2 Iquique earthquakes. The stream gauges (n=716) are scattered across Chile, from the Altiplano in the North to Tierra del Fuego in the South. The network thus covers the Andes mountain ranges, the central valley, the Coastal Mountain ranges and (mainly in the more southern parts) the Coastal flats. We combine empirical magnitude-distance relationships, tree-based machine learning tools, and process-based modeling to characterize responses. We first assess the streamflow anomalies and relate these to environmental factors including geology, topography, altitude, soil and vegetation. We then apply 1D-groundwater flow modeling to selected catchments in order to test competing hypotheses for the origin of streamflow changes. We show that the responses of streamflow were heterogeneous, both in sign (decreases and increases in discharge) and in magnitude.

  15. Caracterización de agregaciones de merluza de cola (Macruronus magellanicus en la zona centro-sur de Chile Characterization of Chilean hoki (Macruronus magellanicus aggregations off central-southern Chile

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    Dante Queirolo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó la caracterización mensual de las agregaciones de merluza de cola usando registros acústicos obtenidos por equipos SIMRAD EK60 y ES60 a bordo de tres embarcaciones multipropósito que operaron en la Unidad de Pesquería Centro-Sur durante el año 2003, para lo cual se emplearon descriptores morfológicos y batimétricos. En cuanto a su morfología, las agregaciones mostraron una amplia variabilidad, explicada por su nivel de cohesión y tendencia a formar agregaciones de gran extensión horizontal, mientras que batimétricamente se determinó que el 90% de éstas se ubicaron preferentemente entre 300 y 450 m. Existe evidencia de asociación entre diversos descriptores y estos a su vez con otros factores como talla media, temperatura del agua, latitud y mes, lo que permite describir apropiadamente la forma de las agregaciones y su ubicación en la columna de agua. Algunas relaciones relevantes corresponden a: profundidad de las agregaciones respecto a la profundidad del fondo (r = 0,55, altitud de las agregaciones respecto a la profundidad del fondo (r = 0,72, altitud de las agregaciones respecto al índice de profundidad relativa (r = -0,98 y profundidad de las agregaciones respecto a la talla media (r = 0,66.A monthly characterization of Chilean hoki aggregations was done using acoustic records ob-tained with SIMRAD EK60 and ES60 devices aboard three multipurpose vessels that operated in the central-southern fishery unit during 2003; this considered morphological and bathymetric descriptors. The wide mor-phological variation of the aggregations was explained by their cohesión level and tendency to form large horizontal aggregations whereas, bathymetrically, 90% of the aggregations were located between 300 and 450 m. Evidence of associations between various descriptors was found, and these were, in turn, associated with other factors such as mean size, water temperature, latitude, and month, allowing an adequate description of the

  16. Importance of water quality on plant abundance and diversity in high-alpine meadows of the Yerba Loca Natural Sanctuary at the Andes of north-central Chile Importancia de la calidad del agua sobre la abundancia y diversidad vegetal en vegas altoandinas del Santuario Natural Yerba Loca en los Andes de Chile centro-norte

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    ROSANNA GINOCCHIO

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Porphyry Cu-Mo deposits have influenced surface water quality in high-Andes of north-central Chile since the Miocene. Water anomalies may reduce species abundance and diversity in alpine meadows as acidic and metal-rich waters are highly toxic to plants The study assessed the importance of surface water quality on plant abundance and diversity in high-alpine meadows at the Yerba Loca Natural Santuary (YLNS, central Chile (33°15' S, 70°18' W. Hydrochemical and plant prospecting were carried out on Piedra Carvajal, Chorrillos del Plomo and La Lata meadows the growing seasons of 2006 and 2007. Direct gradient analysis was performed through canonical correspondence analysis (CCA to look for relationships among water chemistry and plant factors. High variability in water chemistry was found inside and among meadows, particularly for pH, sulphate, electric conductivity, hardness, and total dissolved Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb and Fe. Data on species abundance and water chemical factors suggests that pH and total dissolved Cu are very important factor determining changes in plant abundance and diversity in study meadows. For instance, Festuca purpurascens, Colobanthus quitensis, and Arenaria rivularis are abundant in habitals with Cu-rich waters while Festuca magellanica, Patosia clandestina, Plantago barbata, Werneria pygmea, and Erigeron andícola are abundant in habitals with dilute waters.Los megadepósitos de pórfidos de Cu-Mo han influido sobre la calidad de las aguas superficiales en las zonas altoandinas del centro-norte de Chile desde el Mioceno. Estas alteraciones en la calidad de las aguas podrían afectar negativamente a la vegetación presente en las vegas altoandinas, ya que las aguas acidas y ricas en metales son altamente tóxicas para las plantas. En este estudio se evaluó el efecto de la calidad de las aguas en la abundancia y diversidad florística de las vegas altoandinas del Santuario de la Naturaleza Yerba Loca (SNYL, en Chile central (33

  17. Field study and three-dimensional reconstruction of thrusts and strike-slip faults in the Central Andes: implications for deep-seated geothermal circulation and ore deposits exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norini, Gianluca; Groppelli, Gianluca; Giordano, Guido; Baez, Walter; Becchio, Raul; Viramonte, Jose; Arnosio, Marcelo

    2014-05-01

    The Puna plateau (NW Argentina), located in the back-arc of the Central Andes, is a plateau characterized by both orogen-parallel and orogen-oblique deformation styles, extensive magmatic and geothermal activity, and the broad occurrence of igneous and hydrothermal ore-forming minerals. In this area, like in other convergent margins, the behaviour of the magma-tectonics interplay can affect the circulation of hydrothermal fluids, so that the full comprehension of the tectonic control on the magmas and fluids paths in the continental crust is crucial to plan the geothermal and ore exploration. In this study, we present a structural analysis of the back-arc portion of the orogen-oblique Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system and the surrounding orogen-parallel thrust faults in the central-eastern Puna Plateau, comprising the Cerro Tuzgle-Tocomar geothermal volcanic area, with high geothermal potential, and silicic calderas and domes associated with epithermal ore deposits. We also focused on the tectonic and volcanotectonic structures of the Chimpa and Tuzgle stratovolcanoes, two of the most important polygenetic volcanic centres of the plateau. Morphostructural analysis and field mapping reveal the geometry, kinematics and dynamics of the tectonic structures of the studied area. These data and the available stratigraphic and geophysical data have been integrated with the software MOVE and PETREL in a three-dimensional reconstruction of the main fault planes, showing their attitude and intersections at depth. As a result of our study, we show that despite different geometry and kinematics of the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system and the thrust faults, they formed and evolved under the same progressive evolving dynamic state, forming a single tectonic system and accommodating crustal shortening of a thickened crust. In this frame, the crust underwent simultaneous deformation along both the low-angle thrust faults and the vertical transcurrent strike-slip faults

  18. An overview of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic magmatism and tectonics in Eastern Paraguay and central Andes (Western Gondwana): Implications for the composition of mantle sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omarini, Ricardo H.; Gasparon, Massimo; De Min, Angelo; Comin-Chiaramonti, Piero

    2016-12-01

    The amalgamation of the Western Gondwana (including the Greater Gondwana supercraton) occurred at 600 Ma during the Brazilian - Pan African orogeny. A plate junction related to this event is marked by the Transbrazilian lineament which separates the South American continent into two sectors: the Eastern Paraguay-Brazilian and Central Andean domains. An overview of the geodynamic data from these two sectors indicates that the two domains were subjected to distinct evolutions from the Proterozoic to the present. The Andean domain is characterized by long-lived subduction processes linked to the convergence and consequent collision of microplates since the Middle Proterozoic (western Amazonian Craton) with a peak at about 600-580 Ma. The Paraguay-Brazilian domain remained relatively stable but was affected by extension episodes that reactivated ancient (Early and Middle Proterozoic) suture zones. These different geodynamic evolutions seem to reflect broadly distinct mantle compositions. In the subduction zones of the Andean domain the mantle was deeply modified by metasomatic processes following the subduction of oceanic plates. Consequently, the Andean type magma sources show a clear HIMU imprint inherited from the MORB, whereas the Paraguay-Brazilian sector shows a prevalent EMI and subordinate EMII character. The petrological data mainly from Mesozoic and Cenozoic magmatic events in the two sectors are reviewed to investigate the current mantle plume and mantle dome models for the uprising of the asthenospheric (or sub-lithospheric) material.

  19. Clumped Isotope Thermometry Reveals Variations in Soil Carbonate Seasonal Biases Over >4 km of Relief in the Semi-Arid Andes of Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgener, L. K.; Huntington, K. W.; Hoke, G. D.; Schauer, A. J.; Ringham, M. C.; Latorre Hidalgo, C.; Díaz, F.

    2015-12-01

    The application of carbonate clumped isotope thermometry to soil carbonates has the potential to shed new light on questions regarding terrestrial paleoclimate. In order to better utilize this paleoclimate tool, outstanding questions regarding seasonal biases in soil carbonate formation and the relationship between soil carbonate formation temperatures (T(Δ47)) and surface temperatures must be resolved. We address these questions by comparing C, O, and clumped isotope data from Holocene/modern soil carbonates to modern meteorological data. The data were collected along a 170 km transect with >4 km of relief in central Chile (~30°S). Previous studies have suggested that soil carbonates should record a warm season bias and form in isotopic equilibrium with soil water and soil CO2. We identify two discrete climate zones separated by the local winter snow line (~3200 m). Below this boundary, precipitation falls as rain and soil carbonate T(Δ47) values at depths >40 cm resemble summer soil temperatures; at higher elevations, precipitation falls as snow and T(Δ47) values resemble mean annual soil temperatures. Soil carbonates from the highest sample site (4700 m), which is devoid of vegetation and located near perennial snow fields, yield anomalous δ18O, δ13C, and T(Δ47) values, indicative of kinetic isotope effects that we attribute to cryogenic carbonate formation. Our results suggest that soil carbonates from depths <40 cm are affected by large, high frequency variations in temperature and precipitation, and should not be used as paleotemperature proxies. These findings (1) highlight the role of soil moisture in modulating soil carbonate formation and the resulting T(Δ47) values, (2) underscore the importance of understanding past soil moisture conditions when attempting to reconstruct paleotemperatures using carbonate clumped isotope thermometry, and (3) suggest that soil carbonates from high elevation or high latitude sites may form under non

  20. Contribution of ground surface altitude difference to thermal anomaly detection using satellite images: Application to volcanic/geothermal complexes in the Andes of Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Francisco J.; Lemus, Martín; Parada, Miguel A.; Benavente, Oscar M.; Aguilera, Felipe A.

    2012-09-01

    Detection of thermal anomalies in volcanic-geothermal areas using remote sensing methodologies requires the subtraction of temperatures, not provided by geothermal manifestations (e.g. hot springs, fumaroles, active craters), from satellite image kinetic temperature, which is assumed to correspond to the ground surface temperature. Temperatures that have been subtracted in current models include those derived from the atmospheric transmittance, reflectance of the Earth's surface (albedo), topography effect, thermal inertia and geographic position effect. We propose a model that includes a new parameter (K) that accounts for the variation of temperature with ground surface altitude difference in areas where steep relief exists. The proposed model was developed and applied, using ASTER satellite images, in two Andean volcanic/geothermal complexes (Descabezado Grande-Cerro Azul Volcanic Complex and Planchón-Peteroa-Azufre Volcanic Complex) where field data of atmosphere and ground surface temperature as well as radiation for albedo calibration were obtained in 10 selected sites. The study area was divided into three zones (Northern, Central and Southern zones) where the thermal anomalies were obtained independently. K value calculated for night images of the three zones are better constrained and resulted to be very similar to the Environmental Lapse Rate (ELR) determined for a stable atmosphere (ELR > 7 °C/km). Using the proposed model, numerous thermal anomalies in areas of ≥ 90 m × 90 m were identified that were successfully cross-checked in the field. Night images provide more reliable information for thermal anomaly detection than day images because they record higher temperature contrast between geothermal areas and its surroundings and correspond to more stable atmospheric condition at the time of image acquisition.

  1. PETROGENESIS OF THE METACARBONATE AND RELATED ROCKS OF THE SILGARÁ FORMATION, CENTRAL SANTANDER MASSIF, COLOMBIAN ANDES: AN OVERVIEW OF A “REACTION CALCIC EXOSCARN”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castellanos O.M

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Metacarbonate rocks (pure and impure marbles, carbonate-silicate rocks, calc-silicate rocks and carbonate-bearing silicate rocks form a very complex group within the metamorphic sequence of the Silgará Formation at the central Santander Massif (CSM. These rocks are interpreted as derived from a sedimentary sequence (including limestones and dolostones, carbonate-bearing mudstones,  sandstones, tuffaceous and evaporitic sediments and marlstones overprinted by near-isochemical regional metamorphism. They usually appear as scarce intercalations from millimeter up to meter scale, within the high-grade pelitic rocks, in the lower part of the metamorphic section, although the proportion of metacarbonate rocks can be higher and different marble layers are exploited. We report for the first time the occurrence of a "reaction calcic exoskarn", which corresponds to
    such metacarbonate rocks, taking into account that a skarn can be developed during regional metamorphism and by different metasomatic processes, adjacent to intrusive bodies, along faults and shear zones, and what defines these rocks as a skarn is its mineralogy, which includes a variety of calc-silicate and associated minerals, usually dominated by garnet and pyroxene. Therefore, this paper focus attention to the occurrence of metacarbonate and
    related rocks, which occurs as small scale reactions zones that show a gradational contact from garnet-bearing pelitic rocks to marbles or carbonate-silicate rocks, giving particular interest to the calc-silicate rocks, which are characterized by the presence of elongated grains of banded clinopyroxene (diopside and scapolite and massive
    or scattered garnet. Several reaction-zones occur in the contact between impure calcite marble and garnet-bearing metapelite and the sequence of mineral assemblages in these reaction zones is: biotite + plagioclase K-feldspar garnet (Zone I, biotite + plagioclase K-feldspar garnet staurolite epidote

  2. Evolución tectonomagmática de los Andes bolivianos Tectonomagmaticevolution of the Bolivian Andes

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    Néstor Jiménez

    2009-10-01

    ó la superficie San Juan del Oro, al mismo tiempo que se iniciaba ladeformación en la región subandina. La actividad magmática de retroarco en lafaja de Huarina fue casi continua desde el Paleozoico hasta el Cuaternario. Encambio el arco volcánico se instaló en la frontera boliviano-chilena sólo en elMioceno Inferior, hace 23-22 Ma. La actividad volcánica de retroarco llegó a suclimax en el Mioceno Superior. Las características químicas de los magmas y lasimultaneidad de las grandes erupciones a lo largo de la faja de Huarina,sugieren que es un solo proceso el que desencadenó este magmatismo de granvolumen. Se sugiere que este proceso es la delaminación litosférica del mantoque provocó el ascenso de la astenosfera hasta la base de la corteza induciendoa su fusión en varios niveles.The Bolivian Andes remained in a retroarc positionalong most of the Phanerozoic. Its evolution can be divided in two majorstages; in the first one, restricted to the early Paleozoic, a voluminoustransfer of sedimentary mass in the upper crust occurred. In the second stage,reciclyng of the crustal mass predominated. In the early Paleozoic, anepicratonic marine basin formed among the Amazonia, Arequipa-Antofalla, and Pampean cratons. This basin changed from aretroarc-type to a foreland-type before it filled in the late Paleozoic. Alongthis interval, three deformation stages came to pass: the areally restrictedOcloyic phase (Ordovician-Silurian boundary, the Eohercinian phase(Devonian-Carboniferous boundary, and the Hercinian phase (Late Carboniferouswhich was also areally restricted. In the Mesozoic, brief marine incursionsocurred before a protocordillera began to build in the Eocene. The generaluplift of the central Andes started in the Late Oligocene involving thepresent Altiplano and Eastern Cordillera. Three stages of uplift, separated byregional erosion surfaces of 18 and 10 Ma, can be recognized. The western sideof the Eastern Cordillera, named the Huarina belt, played an

  3. Remote sensing and climate data as a key for understanding fasciolosis transmission in the Andes: review and update of an ongoing interdisciplinary project

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    Màrius V. Fuentes

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Fasciolosis caused by Fasciola hepatica in various South American countries located on the slopes of the Andes has been recognized as an important public health problem. However, the importance of this zoonotic hepatic parasite was neglected until the last decade. Countries such as Peru and Bolivia are considered to be hyperendemic areas for human and animal fasciolosis, and other countries such as Chile, Ecuador, Colombia and Venezuela are also affected. At the beginning of the 1990s a multidisciplinary project was launched with the aim to shed light on the problems related to this parasitic disease in the Northern Bolivian Altiplano. A few years later, a geographic information system (GIS was incorporated into this multidisciplinary project analysing the epidemiology of human and animal fasciolosis in this South American Andean region. Various GIS projects were developed in some Andean regions using climatic data, climatic forecast indices and remote sensing data. Step by step, all these GIS projects concerning the forecast of the fasciolosis transmission risk in the Andean mountain range were revised and in some cases updated taking into account new data. The first of these projects was developed on a regional scale for the central Chilean regions and the proposed model was validated on a local scale in the Northern Bolivian Altiplano. This validated mixed model, based on both fasciolosis climatic forecast indices and normalized difference vegetation index values from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer satellite sensor, was extrapolated to other human and/or animal endemic areas of Peru and Ecuador. The resulting fasciolosis risk maps make it possible to show the known human endemic areas of, mainly, the Peruvian Altiplano, Cajamarca and Mantaro Peruvian valleys, and some valleys of the Ecuadorian Cotopaxi province. Nevertheless, more climate and remote sensing data, as well as more accurate epidemiological reports, have to be

  4. Genetic structure characterization of Chileans reflects historical immigration patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyheramendy, Susana; Martinez, Felipe I; Manevy, Federico; Vial, Cecilia; Repetto, Gabriela M

    2015-03-17

    Identifying the ancestral components of genomes of admixed individuals helps uncovering the genetic basis of diseases and understanding the demographic history of populations. We estimate local ancestry on 313 Chileans and assess the contribution from three continental populations. The distribution of ancestry block-length suggests an average admixing time around 10 generations ago. Sex-chromosome analyses confirm imbalanced contribution of European men and Native-American women. Previously known genes under selection contain SNPs showing large difference in allele frequencies. Furthermore, we show that assessing ancestry is harder at SNPs with higher recombination rates and easier at SNPs with large difference in allele frequencies at the ancestral populations. Two observations, that African ancestry proportions systematically decrease from North to South, and that European ancestry proportions are highest in central regions, show that the genetic structure of Chileans is under the influence of a diffusion process leading to an ancestry gradient related to geography.

  5. Rhizobacterial Community Structures Associated with Native Plants Grown in Chilean Extreme Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorquera, Milko A; Maruyama, Fumito; Ogram, Andrew V; Navarrete, Oscar U; Lagos, Lorena M; Inostroza, Nitza G; Acuña, Jacquelinne J; Rilling, Joaquín I; de La Luz Mora, María

    2016-10-01

    Chile is topographically and climatically diverse, with a wide array of diverse undisturbed ecosystems that include native plants that are highly adapted to local conditions. However, our understanding of the diversity, activity, and role of rhizobacteria associated with natural vegetation in undisturbed Chilean extreme ecosystems is very poor. In the present study, the combination of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 454-pyrosequencing approaches was used to describe the rhizobacterial community structures of native plants grown in three representative Chilean extreme environments: Atacama Desert (ATA), Andes Mountains (AND), and Antarctic (ANT). Both molecular approaches revealed the presence of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria as the dominant phyla in the rhizospheres of native plants. Lower numbers of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were observed in rhizosphere soils from ATA compared with AND and ANT. Both approaches also showed differences in rhizobacterial community structures between extreme environments and between plant species. The differences among plant species grown in the same environment were attributed to the higher relative abundance of classes Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria. However, further studies are needed to determine which environmental factors regulate the structures of rhizobacterial communities, and how (or if) specific bacterial groups may contribute to the growth and survival of native plants in each Chilean extreme environments.

  6. Charles Darwin in the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzo, Nelio; Bizzo, Luis Eduardo Maestrelli

    2006-01-01

    Considering geological time as an important epistemological obstacle to the construction of ideas on biological evolution, a study was carried out on the so-called "Darwin Papers". The conclusion was that Charles Darwin's excursion in the Andes during March-April 1835 was a crucial step in this regard. An expedition was carried out in…

  7. The Andes: A Geographical Portrait

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    Anthony Bebbington

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed: The Andes: A Geographical Portrait. By Axel Borsdorf and Christoph Stadel. Translated by Brigitte Scott and Christoph Stadel. Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing, 2015. xiv + 368 pp. US$ 139.00. Also available as an e-book. ISBN 978-3-319-03529-1.

  8. Lithospheric scale model of Merida Andes, Venezuela (GIAME Project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, M.; Orihuela, N. D.; Klarica, S.; Gil, E.; Levander, A.; Audemard, F. A.; Mazuera, F.; Avila, J.

    2013-05-01

    Merida Andes (MA) is one of the most important orogenic belt in Venezuela and represents the northern culmination of South America Andes. During the last 60 years, several models have been proposed to explain the shallow and deep structure, using different geological, geophysical, seismological, geochemical and petrologic concepts; nevertheless, most of them have applied local observation windows, and do not represent the major structure of MA. Therefore, a multidisciplinary research group, coordinated by FUNVISIS, in close cooperation with UCV, ULA and PDVSA, is proposed in order to get the outlined goals in the project entitled GIAME ("Geociencia Integral de los Andes de MErida") was established, which aims to generate a lithospheric scale model and the development of a temporal dynamic model for the MA. As a base for lithospheric investigations of the Merida Andes, we are proposing three wide angle seismic profiles across the orogen on three representative sites, in order to determine the inner structure and its relation with the orogen's gravimetric root. To the date, there are no seismic studies at lithospheric scale which cross MA. The wide angle seismic will be complemented with the re-processing and re-interpretation of existing reflection seismic data, which will allow to establish a relationship between MA and its associated flexural basins (Maracaibo and Barinas-Apure basins). Depending on the results of the VENCORP Project (VENezuelan COntinental Reflection Profiling), which might show some reliable results about crustal features and Moho reflectors along three long seismic profiles at Caribbean Moutain system, a reflection seismic profile across the central portion of MA is proposed. Additional tasks, consisting in MA quaternary deformation studies, using research methods like neotectonics and paleoseismology, georadar, numerical modeling, cinematic GPS, SAR interferometry, thermocronology, detailed studies on regional geology, flexural modeling

  9. Evaluation of Little Ice Age cooling in Western Central Andes, suggested by paleoELAs, in contrast with global warming since late 19th century deduced from instrumental records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, Jose; Palacios, David; Campos, Néstor; Giraldez, Claudia; García, Eduardo; Quiros, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    This paper attempts to evaluate climate cooling (°C) during the glacial expansion phases using the product GTV•ΔELA, where GTV is the vertical air temperature gradient (°C/m) and ΔELA (m) the difference in level observed between the Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) reconstructions for current and past glaciers. With this aim the Area x Altitude Balance Ratio-(AABR) method was used to produce reconstructions of present ELAs (2002-2010) and paleoELAs corresponding to the last glacier advance phase. The reconstructions were produced in three study areas located along a N-S transect of the western cordillera in the Central Andes: the south-western sector of the Nevado Hualcán (9°S, 77°W; Giráldez 2011); the southern slope of the Cordillera Pariaqaqa (12°S, 76°W; Quirós, 2013) and the NW, NE, SE and SW quadrants of the Nevado Coropuna (16°S, 72°W; García 2013; Úbeda 2011; Campos, 2012). The three mountains exceed 6000 m altitude, their summit areas are covered by glaciers, and on their slopes there are existing well-conserved moraines deposited by the last advances near the present front of the ice masses. Although there are no absolute dates to confirm this hypothesis, it has been assumed that the last glacial advances occurred during the Little Ice Age (LIA), which the oxygen isotopes of the Nevado Huascarán (9°S, 77°W) date to the period 1500-1890. For the Hualcán and Pariaqaqa the mean global value of the Earth's GTV (6.5°C/km) was used, considered valid for the Tropics. On the Coropuna a GTV=8.4°C/km was used, based on high resolution sensors installed in situ since 2007 (Úbeda 2011). This gradient is approaching the upper limit of the dry adiabatic gradient (9.8°C/km), as the Coropuna region is more arid than the other case study areas. The climate cooling estimates deduced from the product GTV•ΔELA were compared with the global warming shown by the 1880-2012 series, ΔT=0.85°C, and 1850/1900-2003/2012, ΔT=0.78°C. The differences are

  10. 78 FR 24228 - Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability... conservation plan and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) for the Lake Andes National Wildlife...

  11. Evolución tectónica, paleogeográfica y metalogénica durante el Cenozoico en los Andes de Chile norte y central e implicaciones para las regiones adyacentes de Bolivia y Argentina Tectonic, paleogeographic, and metallogenic evolution during the Cenozoic in the Andes of Central and Northern Chile and implication for the adjacent regions of Bolivia and Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Charrier

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available La orogenia incaica dio origen a un importante relieve en el Eoceno Medio, el que se concentró en el ámbito del arco magmático precedente, la Cordillera Incaica. Este relieve positivo de orientación NNE se extendió desde el sur de Perú hasta la región central de Chile y separó dos dominios paleogeográficos que tuvieron evoluciones diferentes durante el resto del Cenozoico. El dominio occidental se caracterizó por el predominio de procesos de erosión y sedimentación. En el dominio oriental también existieron importantes episodios de erosión que originaron depósitos que se encuentran en la vertiente oriental de la cadena en la actualidad y presentan una cronología comparable con la de los depósitos del dominio occidental. Sin embargo, la evolución se caracterizó por presentar, a partir del Eoceno Tardío, diferencias al norte y sur de los ~27ºS. Al norte de esa latitud, en el ámbito del Altiplano-Puna, el arco magmático se mantuvo aproximadamente en la misma posición, coincidente con la del arco actual, y estuvo bordeado por una cuenca de antepaís de retroarco; mientras que, al sur de ~27ºS, se desarrollaron sucesivos arcos magmáticos con una marcada migración hacia el este. El arco magmático del Eoceno Tardío al Oligoceno Tardío - Mioceno Temprano se caracterizó por el desarrollo de una amplia cuenca extensional de intra-arco, la cuenca de Abanico. En esta cuenca se acumularon hasta 3.000 m de rocas volcánicas, volcaniclásticas y, subordinadamente, sedimentarias. A partir del límite oligoceno-mioceno, tuvo lugar un nuevo evento compresivo a lo largo de todo el orógeno que rejuveneció el núcleo de la Cordillera Incaica e invirtió la cuenca de Abanico permitiendo la generación de abundantes depósitos sintectónicos a ambos lados de los nuevos relieves. El inicio de este evento coincide con la orogenia pehuenche, los pulsos compresivos se mantuvieron hasta el Plioceno Temprano. En el Mioceno Temprano a Medio

  12. Quaternary Glaciations in the Rio Mendoza Valley, Argentine Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espizua, Lydia E.

    1993-09-01

    In the Rio Mendoza valley, five Pleistocene drifts and one Holocene drift are distinguished by multiple relative-age criteria, including surface-rock weathering, development of rock varnish, moraine morphology, soil-profile development, and stratigraphic relationships. Several absolute ages suggest a preliminary chronology. During the oldest (Uspallata) glaciation, a system of valley glaciers flowed 110 km from the Andean drainage divide and 80 km from Cerro Aconcagua to terminate at 1850 m. Drift of this ice advance is older than a widespread tephra dated by fission-track at 360,000 ± 36,000 yr. During the Punta de Vacas advance, ice terminated at 2350 m, while during the subsequent Penitentes advance, the glacier system ended at 2500 m. A travertine layer overlying Penitentes Drift has U-series age of 24,200 ± 2000 yr B.P. The distribution of Horcones Drift, which is inferred to represent the last glacial maximum, delimits an independent ice stream that flowed 22 km down Horcones valley to 2750 m. A later readvance (Almacenes) reached 3250 m. Confluencia Drift is considered to be Neoglacial in age and extends downvalley to 3300 m. The moraine sequence is compared with those studied by Caviedes (1972) along Rio Aconcagua on the Chilean flank of the Andes.

  13. Reflections on the Chilean Transition

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    Antonia SANTOS PÉREZ

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chile has historically excelled in Latin America for its political stability and its institutional strength, which did not prevent it from living under an authoritarian regime (1973-1988. The political transition was a consequence of a fast political pact between the military and a strong political class that led to a limited democracy because of the origin and content of the Constitution, partially overcome by the constitutional reform of 2005. However, the slow development of the Chilean democratic process is due to both the institutional framework and the behavior of the political actors who have favored political stability based on consensus before the plurality of competition and the political debate for the sake of democratic quality.

  14. The ANDES Deep Underground Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Bertou, X

    2013-01-01

    ANDES (Agua Negra Deep Experiment Site) is a unique opportunity to build a deep underground laboratory in the southern hemisphere. It will be built in the Agua Negra tunnel planned between Argentina and Chile, and operated by the CLES, a Latin American consortium. With 1750m of rock overburden, and no close- by nuclear power plant, it will provide an extremely radiation quiet environment for neutrino and dark matter experiments. In particular, its location in the southern hemisphere should play a major role in understanding dark matter modulation signals.

  15. "One of the Most Uniform Races of the Entire World": Creole Eugenics and the Myth of Chilean Racial Homogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    This article illuminates why Nicolás Palacios's 1904 monograph, Raza chilena: Libro escrito por un Chileno i para los Chilenos [Chilean Race: A Book Written by a Chilean for Chileans], is central to the creation of a myth of Chilean racial homogeneity at the turn of the twentieth century. Placing Palacios in the context of Latin American eugenic discourse, it demonstrates how he selected a specific racial origin story in order to accommodate his belief in racial hierarchy while also depicting race mixing in a positive light. Specifically, the article highlights how the myth of Chilean racial homogeneity elided the difference between the term "mestizo," which was applied to people of mixed racial heritage, and "white." I contend that Palacios sought to differentiate Chileans from other Latin Americans by emphasizing their racial distinctiveness. The article therefore highlights that Latin American eugenics was concerned with the creation of national narratives that historicized particular racial mixtures in order to reify and affirm national differences. As such, it connects to literature regarding the history of eugenics, race, nation, and the creation of whiteness.

  16. State of stress and crustal fluid migration related to west-dipping structures in the slab-forearc system in the northern Chilean subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, P.; Kummerow, J.; Wigger, P.; Shapiro, S.; Asch, G.

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies in the forearc of the northern Chilean subduction zone have identified important tectonic features in the upper crust. As a result of these works, the West Fissure Fault System (WFFS) has recently been imaged using microseismic events. The WFFS is the westward-dipping, sharp lower boundary of the northern Chilean forearc and is geometrically opposed to subduction of the Nazca plate. The present article builds on this previous work and is novel in that it characterizes this structure's stress distribution using focal mechanisms and stress tensor analysis. The results of the stress tensor analysis show that the state of stress in the WFFS is related to its strike-slip tectonic context and likely represents a manifestation of local forces associated with the highest areas in the Andes. Two seismic clusters have also been identified; these clusters may be associated with a blind branch of the WFFS. We studied these clusters in order to determine their sources and possible connection with fluid migration across the upper plate. We observed that the two clusters differ from one another in some regards. The central cluster has characteristics consistent with an earthquake swarm with two clearly identifiable phases. Conversely, the SW cluster has a clear main shock associated with it, and it can be separated into two subclusters (A and A΄). In contrast, similarities among the two clusters suggest that the clusters may have a common origin. The b-values for both clusters are characteristic of tectonic plate boundaries. The spatial spreading, which is approximately confined to one plane, reflects progressive growth of the main fracture underlying the swarm and subcluster A. We also find that earthquakes themselves trigger aftershocks near the borders of their rupture areas. In addition, the spatio-temporal migration of hypocentres, as well as their spatial correlation with areas that are interpreted to be fluid migration zones, suggest that there is a close

  17. CONSTRUCCIÓN DE SUBJETIVIDADES POLÍTICAS DE NIÑAS, NIÑOS Y JÓVENES, EN EL CONTEXTO DE LA EXPERIENCIA EDUCATIVA CAE, EN LOS ANDES CENTRALES DEL PERÚ:UN REFERENTE DE CONSTITUCIÓN SOCIOCULTURAL, SOCIOAMBIENTAL

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    MARCO TULIO PEÑA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo es producto de los desarrollos investigativos y reflexivos de la experiencia educativa “Construcción de subjetividades políticas de niñas, niños y jóvenes quechuahablantes, en el contexto de la experiencia ‘Comunidades Andinas Educativas’ en los Andes centrales del Perú: un referente de educación alternativa”. Desarrollada entre los años 2008-2009 y 2012, con la participación integral de los actores que formaron parte de esta investigación en el distrito de Pucará, provincia de Huancayo, departamento de Junín, Andes centrales del Perú. El trabajo se presentó como tesis de la Maestría en Desarrollo Educativo y Social en el Centro Internacional de Educación y Desarrollo Humano (Cinde y la Universidad Pedagógica Nacional (Bogotá, Colombia, 2013. Desde el contexto de recuperación de la experiencia educativa, se buscó significar conocimientos en torno a la construcción de subjetividades políticas de niñas, niños y jóvenes andinos considerando su universo sociocultural y socioambiental, diverso y particularizado de las comunidades andinas quechuas. La investigación se enmarcó en la modalidad de la sistematización de experiencias educativas mediante el establecimiento de unidades categoriales interpretativas devenidas de los hitos o momentos centrales, referidas a los procesos de formación y constitución de Asociaciones Educativas Infantiles (AEI y de interpretación, para este caso en la formación de habilidades interculturales y de sostenibilidad medioambiental. Dicho trabajo develó aportes significativos relacionados con la educación comunitaria y alternativa en el aporte a los procesos de motivación y construcción de subjetividades Políticas de niñas, niños y jóvenes andinos, desde contexto sociocultural y socioambiental particularizado y diverso del universo y cosmovisión andina.

  18. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1995 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1995 calendar year. The report begins...

  19. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : Updated- 2003 annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2003 calendar year. The report begins...

  20. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1994 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1994 calendar year. The report begins...

  1. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1997 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1997 calendar year. The report begins...

  2. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 2002 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2002 calendar year. The report begins...

  3. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1998 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1998 calendar year. The report begins...

  4. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1999 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1999 calendar year. The report begins...

  5. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 2001 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2001 calendar year. The report begins...

  6. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1996 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1996 calendar year. The report begins...

  7. A review of the geology of the Argentinian Fuegian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivero, Eduardo B.; Martinioni, Daniel R.

    2001-06-01

    Seven stratigraphic units reflect the tectonic evolution of the Argentinian Fuegian Andes: Basement (Paleozoic-Jurassic); Lemaire Formation (Upper Jurassic); Yahgan-Beauvoir formations (Lower Cretaceous); Cerro Matrero Formation (Upper Cretaceous); Rı´o Claro Formation (Paleocene); La Despedida Group (Eocene); and Cabo Peña Formation (uppermost Eocene-Lower Oligocene). Basement rocks (garnet, quartz-sericite, and chlorite schists; and amphibolites) are unconformably covered by the Lemaire Formation (rhyolites; basalts; slates; and acidic volcaniclastic breccias, tuffs, conglomerates, and turbidites), formed during extensional tectonism. The post-rift Yahgan Formation (deep-marine black mudstones, andesitic volcaniclastic turbidites and tuffs) interfingers northward with the Beauvoir Formation (slope and platform black mudstones), and covers the Lemaire Formation unconformably. The Yahgan Formation represents an andesitic, volcaniclastic apron, coeval with a Pacific volcanic-arc, filling a marginal basin floored with oceanic crust. The Late Cretaceous compressional orogeny resulted in tectonic inversion, closure of the marginal basin, peak metamorphism and folding, and initial uplifting of the Fuegian Andes. By the latest Cretaceous-earliest Paleogene, the Andes were exposed to subaerial erosion, and the lowest Danian Rı´o Claro Formation bears clear evidence of an Andean clastic provenance. The Rı´o Claro Formation represents the first molasse deposits of the foreland stage of evolution of the Fuegian Andes. Earliest Paleogene north-verging thrust propagation deformed the Rı´o Claro Formation and older units, producing northward depocenter migration. La Despedida Group rests unconformably on the Rı´o Claro Formation and is involved in the thrust and fold belt. Important Eocene compression resulted in thrusting of central Andean basement schists and the Lemaire Formation over Lower Cretaceous and continental Paleogene rocks, respectively. In the

  8. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1979

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1979. General water uses are discussed for 1979 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  9. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1987. General water uses are discussed for 1987 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  10. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1984. General water uses are discussed for 1984 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  11. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1985. General water uses are discussed for 1985 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  12. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1983. General water uses are discussed for 1983 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  13. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1986. General water uses are discussed for 1986 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  14. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1958. The report highlights the weather, water, habitat, and wildlife conditions for the year of...

  15. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1982. General water uses are discussed for 1982 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  16. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1971. General water uses are discussed for 1971 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  17. A millennium of metallurgy recorded by lake sediments from Morococha, Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Colin A; Abbott, Mark B; Wolfe, Alexander P; Kittleson, John L

    2007-05-15

    To date, information concerning pre-Colonial metallurgy in South America has largely been limited to the archaeological record of artifacts. Here, we reconstruct a millennium of smelting activity in the Peruvian Andes using the lake-sediment stratigraphy of atmospherically derived metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Ag, Sb, Bi, and Ti) and lead isotopic ratios (206Pb/ 207Pb) associated with smelting from the Morococha mining region in the central Peruvian Andes. The earliest evidence for metallurgy occurs ca. 1000 A.D., coinciding with the fall of the Wari Empire and decentralization of local populations. Smelting during this interval appears to have been aimed at copper and copper alloys, because of large increases in Zn and Cu relative to Pb. A subsequent switch to silver metallurgy under Inca control (ca. 1450 to conquest, 1533 A.D.) is indicated by increases in Pb, Sb, and Bi, a conclusion supported by further increases of these metals during Colonial mining, which targeted silver extraction. Rapid development of the central Andes during the 20th century raised metal burdens by an order of magnitude above previous levels. Our results represent the first evidence for pre-Colonial smelting in the central Peruvian Andes, and corroborate the sensitivity of lake sediments to pre-Colonial metallurgical activity suggested by earlier findings from Bolivia.

  18. Identificación, caracterización y dinámica de las geoformas glaciales y periglaciales en la Cordillera de los Andes a través de sensores remotos

    OpenAIRE

    Falaschi, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    El presente trabajo de Tesis Doctoral tuvo el objetivo de estudiar los glaciares y glaciares de escombros en tres regiones montañosas a lo largo de la Cordillera de los Andes Argentina: Monte San Lorenzo (Provincia de Santa Cruz), Volcán Domuyo (Provincia de Neuquén), y Nevados de Cachi (Provincia de Salta). Cada uno de estos sitios presenta características climáticas propias, representativas de tres porciones particulares de los Andes: Andes Patagónicos Meridionales, Andes Centrales Meridion...

  19. Geographical classification of Chilean wines by an electronic nose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás H Beltrán

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Nicolás H Beltrán, Manuel A Duarte-Mermoud, Ricardo E MuñozDepartment of Electrical Engineering, University of Chile, Santiago, ChileAbstract: This paper discusses the classification of Chilean wines by geographical origin based only on aroma information. The varieties of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Carménère analyzed here are produced in four different valleys in the central part of Chile (Colchagua, Maipo, Maule, and Rapel. Aroma information was obtained with a zNoseTM (fast gas chromatograph and the data was analyzed by applying wavelet transform for feature extraction followed by an analysis with support vector machines for classification. Two evaluations of the classification technique were performed; the average percentage of correct classification performed on the validation set was obtained by means of cross-validation against the percentage of correct classification obtained on the test set. This developed technique obtained results on classification rates over 94% in both cases. The geographical origin of a Chilean wine can be resolved rapidly with fast gas chromatography and data processing.Keywords: geographical origin, origin denomination, wine classification, pattern recognition, support vector machines, wavelet analysis, feature extraction

  20. Kinematic history of the retroarc thrust belt in the central Andes of Argentina at 24-25°S: significant Andean shortening and sporadic foreland-ward deformation propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, D. M.; Kapp, P. A.; Decelles, P. G.; Reiners, P. W.

    2009-12-01

    The southward along-strike transition from major thin-skinned shortening of Bolivia to the significantly lower magnitude of thick-skinned shortening in northwestern Argentina has often been attributed to the presence of a thick mid to late Paleozoic section in Bolivia relative to a thin group of correlative rocks in northwestern Argentina that were affected by significant Cretaceous rifting. Despite the Andes being regarded as an archetype of ocean-continent convergence, the northwestern Argentine Andes have remained enigmatic in a structural and tectonic context. This study integrates regional geological mapping, structural analysis, and geo- and thermochronology from the Salta province of northwestern Argentina. Geological mapping in the Cachi range at ~25° S latitude revealed the presence of an ~60° west-dipping package of rocks, passing from low grade phyllites in the eastern part of the range into cordierite-bearing, anatectic and arc-related rocks in the core of the range (one anatectic pluton yielded a U/Pb zircon age of 488 ± 10 Ma). Detrital zircons record U-Pb ages demonstrating that the highest-grade, structurally highest rocks are the oldest (maximum depositional age (MDA) ~548 Ma), rocks at structurally lower levels are younger (MDA ~538 Ma), whereas the structurally lowest rocks are the youngest (MDA ~523 Ma). Double dating some of these same zircons using the low temperature U-Th/He system indicates that at least 6-8 km of Miocene (15.7 ± 0.4 Ma) exhumation occurred in the core of the range at this time, yet exhumation at the eastern range margin was insufficient to reset zircons. U/Pb zircon ages from a tuff within growth strata in the footwall of a major thrust fault ~50 km east of Cachi demonstrate that shortening was ongoing there at 9.4 ± 0.4 Ma, yielding a propagation rate of the thrust belt of ~8 km/Ma. Since ~9 Ma, deformation has jumped ~150 km eastward to the Santa Barbara ranges, yielding an average rate of >30 km/Ma. Many thrust

  1. ICT & Learning in Chilean Schools: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jaime; Salinas, Alvaro

    2008-01-01

    By the early nineties a Chilean network on computers and education for public schools had emerged. There were both high expectancies that technology could revolutionize education as well as divergent voices that doubted the real impact of technology on learning. This paper presents an evaluation of the Enlaces network, a national Information and…

  2. Formalized morphostructural zoning of the mountain zone of the Andes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabrielov, A.M.; Gvishiani, A.D.; Zhidkov, M.P.

    1982-01-01

    A plan is presented for morphostructural zoning of the Andes compiled according to formalized signs for purposes of seismic forecasting. Characteristics are presented for the basic morphostructural subdivisions of the Andes.

  3. Fish Population Investigation: Lake Andes, Charles Mix County

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Brief background on Lake Andes fishing history, and data on current fish populations. Lake Andes was a much larger body of water prior to the construction of an...

  4. Recreational Fishery Management Plan for Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Current condition of lake Andes (1996) and highlights potential problems and recommendations for improving the lake as a hatchery. Lake Andes was a much larger body...

  5. Fishery Management Plan for Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Lake Andes was a much larger body of water prior to the construction of an artificial outlet structure that lowered the water level by 13 feet. Since Lake Andes is...

  6. [The Chilean Association of Biomedical Journal Editors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, H

    2001-01-01

    On September 29th, 2000, The Chilean Association of Biomedical Journal Editors was founded, sponsored by the "Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (CONICYT)" (the Governmental Agency promoting and funding scientific research and technological development in Chile) and the "Sociedad Médica de Santiago" (Chilean Society of Internal Medicine). The Association adopted the goals of the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME) and therefore it will foster "cooperation and communication among Editors of Chilean biomedical journals; to improve editorial standards, to promote professionalism in medical editing through education, self-criticism and self-regulation; and to encourage research on the principles and practice of medical editing". Twenty nine journals covering a closely similar number of different biomedical sciences, medical specialties, veterinary, dentistry and nursing, became Founding Members of the Association. A Governing Board was elected: President: Humberto Reyes, M.D. (Editor, Revista Médica de Chile); Vice-President: Mariano del Sol, M.D. (Editor, Revista Chilena de Anatomía); Secretary: Anna María Prat (CONICYT); Councilors: Manuel Krauskopff, Ph.D. (Editor, Biological Research) and Maritza Rahal, M.D. (Editor, Revista de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello). The Association will organize a Symposium on Biomedical Journal Editing and will spread information stimulating Chilean biomedical journals to become indexed in international databases and in SciELO-Chile, the main Chilean scientific website (www.scielo.cl).

  7. Thermochronology and tectonics of the Mérida Andes and the Santander Massif, NW South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lelij, Roelant; Spikings, Richard; Mora, Andrés

    2016-04-01

    New apatite U-Pb and multiphase 40Ar/39Ar data constrain the high to medium temperature (~ 500 °C-~ 300 °C) thermal histories of igneous and metamorphic rocks exposed in the Mérida Andes of Venezuela, and new apatite and zircon fission track data constrain the ~ 500 °C-~ 60 °C thermal histories of pre-Jurassic igneous and metamorphic rocks of the adjacent Santander Massif of Colombia. Computed thermal history envelopes using apatite U-Pb dates and grain size information from an Early Palaeozoic granodiorite in the Mérida Andes suggest that it cooled from > 500 °C to histories. The generally accepted timing of amalgamation of Pangaea along the Ouachita-Marathon suture pre-dates Late Permian to Triassic cooling recorded in basement rocks of the Mérida Andes by > 30 Ma, and its effect on rocks preserved in north-western South America is unknown. We interpret late Permian to Triassic cooling in the Mérida Andes to be driven by exhumation. Previous studies have suggested that a short phase of shortening and anatexis is recorded at ~ 253 Ma in the Maya Block, which may have been adjacent to the basement rocks of the Mérida Andes in the Late Permian. The coeval onset of exhumation in the Mérida Andes may be a result of increased coupling in the magmatic arc, which was located along the western margin of Pangaea. Triassic extension is documented in the Central Cordillera of Colombia and Ecuador between ~ 240 Ma and ~ 215 Ma, although extension at this time has not been clearly identified in the Mérida Andes or the Santander Massif. Permian to Triassic cooling is not recorded in the structurally isolated Caparo Block in the southern Mérida Andes, suggesting that it may have constituted a distinct fault block in the Triassic. New fission track data from the Santander Massif suggest that it started exhuming at ~ 40 Ma during a period of accelerated convergence between the Nazca/Farallòn Plate and the western margin of South America. Exhumation in the Santander

  8. What do Great Subduction Earthquakes tell us About Continental Deformation of the Upper Plate in the Central Andes Forearc? Insights From Seismotectonics, Continental Deformation and Coulomb Modelisation Along Southern Peru Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audin, L.; Perfettini, H.; Tavera, H.

    2007-05-01

    Calientes Fault system (parallel to the trench) and a crustal depth of about 20km. Such a magnitud and crustal depth in the area correlates perfectly with the Quaternary geomorphic evidences of tectonic activity along the Sama-Calientes thrust fault in the forearc in Southern Peru. Some questions are raised by the occurrence of such continental seismicity, just after a major subduction event, as none has been registered in the area since more than 40 years. Continental fault systems constitute a key to the understanding of the forearc deformation in the Arica Elbow, where the Andes obliquity with respect to the Nazca plate convergence direction. Also these results suggest that continental deformation should give us clues to define the pattern of segmentation of the subduction zone by studying seismotectonics and its relation to the segmentation of the upper continental plate.

  9. Million-year melt-presence in monotonous intermediate magma for a volcanic-plutonic assemblage in the Central Andes: Contrasting histories of crystal-rich and crystal-poor super-sized silicic magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Jason F.; de Silva, Shanaka; Schmitt, Axel K.; Economos, Rita; Sunagua, Mayel

    2017-01-01

    The melt-present lifetime of super-sized monotonous intermediate magmas that feed supereruptions and end life as granodioritic plutons is investigated using zircon chronochemistry. These data add to the ongoing discussion on magma assembly rates and have implications for how continental batholiths are built. Herein, we estimate ∼1.1 Ma of continuous melt presence before and after the climactic caldera-forming 2.89 ± 0.01 Ma (2σ error) Pastos Grandes Ignimbrite (PGI) supereruption (∼1500 km3 of magma) in the Andes of southwest Bolivia. Zircon crystallization in PGI pumice and lava from the faulted Southern Postcaldera Dome span ∼0.7 Ma prior to the climactic eruption and formation of the eponymous caldera, whereas younger, unfaulted Postcaldera Dome lavas (termed Northern and Middle) and a granodioritic plutonic clast within the products of a Pleistocene eruption indicate a further ∼0.4 Ma of post-climactic zircon crystallization. Bulk-rock compositions as well as zircon thermometry and geochemistry indicate the presence of homogeneous dacitic magma before and after the climactic eruption, but a trend to zircon crystallization at higher temperatures and from less evolved melts is seen for post-climactic zircon. We propose a model in which a large volume of crystal-rich dacite magma was maintained above solidus temperatures by periodic andesitic recharge that is chemically invisible in the erupted components. The climactic caldera-forming eruption vented the upper portions of the magma system zircon was saturated. Zircon in postcaldera lavas indicate that residual magma from this system remained locally viable for eruption at least for some time after the caldera-forming event. Subsequently, deeper "remnant" dacite magma previously outside the zone of zircon saturation rose to shallower levels to re-establish hydraulic and isostatic equilibrium where zircon crystallization commenced anew, and drove more resurgent volcanism and uplift. The same magma

  10. Episodic subgreenschist facies metamorphism in the Andes of Chile - is it a valid model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevins, R. E.; Robinson, D.; Aguirre, L.; Vergara, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Central Andes of Chile are characterized by subgreenschist facies burial metamorphism that is reported as having developed in up to seven episodic cycles of some 40Myr duration. The main evidence in support of the model is reported as mineralogical breaks at major stratigraphic boundaries that are interpreted as documenting sharp breaks in metamorphic grade. Here we test this model by examination of the progressive secondary mineral development, reaction progress in mafic phyllosilicates, and topological variations of the low-grade assemblages in metabasites for Jurassic to Miocene sequences east of Santiago. The mafic phyllosilicates (smectite - mixed-layer chlorite/smectite - chlorite) show increasing reaction progress with stratigraphic age and there is a continuum across the main stratigraphic boundaries, such there is no offset or gap in the reaction progress at these boundaries. There are some differences in mineral assemblages between the various stratigraphic units, such as between prehnite+pumpellyite+/-laumonite or amphibole-bearing and non amphibole bearing rocks, from which contrasting subgreenschist facies can be recognised. However, consideration of the controls on mineral parageneses at subgreenschist facies conditions demonstrates that these different facies cannot be used solely as evidence of sharp breaks in metamorphic grade at unconformities, as has been reported in many previous publications for the Andes. The presently accepted model for the Central Andes, involving repeated cycles of episodic metamorphism developing in extensional basins, is, therefore, partly unfounded. Consideration of the overall tectonic evolution of this part of the Andes concurs that the burial metamorphism developed in extensional settings, but in only two events, namely in mid-late Cretaceous and Late Miocene times respectively. The results from this work suggest that the record of sharp metamorphic breaks and the episodic model of metamorphism reported for many

  11. Constructing Realities: Bullying Usages in Chilean Discourses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Bassaletti-Contreras

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The article reports an exploratory research on the uses given in Chile to the Anglicism bullying. In order to do so, its evolution is reviewed from the early studies in the Nordic countries, to the treatment of the topic in the Chilean context. The focus of this work is based on socioconstructionism and in turn promotes the consideration of the characteristics of the socio-cultural and historical context of knowledge production with a postcolonial intention. To review the constructions on the subject, we selected Chilean videos at the YouTube virtual platform, using as methodology discourse analysis and dense description. In results can be observed two meanings of bullying: (i to refer to any kind of aggression and (ii as a homologous of abuse among schoolchildren. In response, it is realized the discrepancy with the proposed definitions from general academia and those used in the local environment in investigations, interventions, public policy and mass media in Chile.

  12. An overview of Chilean Marine Sciences Journals

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The work provides a global vision of Chilean marine sciences journals, besides the problems that have existed in relation to their edition and publication. In spite of being serious publications with rich scientific content related to the study area, mainly along the coast of the eastern South Pacific, these journals have not reached the expected levels to be considered within the ISI system journals. With the purpose of obtaining an objective appreciation in regard to the presentation format...

  13. Uniparental ancestry markers in Chilean populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Dutra Vieira-Machado

    Full Text Available Abstract The presence of Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans has led to the development of a multi-ethnic, admixed population in Chile. This study aimed to contribute to the characterization of the uniparental genetic structure of three Chilean regions. Newborns from seven hospitals in Independencia, Providencia, Santiago, Curicó, Cauquenes, Valdívia, and Puerto Montt communes, belonging to the Chilean regions of Santiago, Maule, and Los Lagos, were studied. The presence of Native American mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA haplogroups and two markers present in the non-recombinant region of the Y chromosome, DYS199 and DYS287, indicative of Native American and African ancestry, respectively, was determined. A high Native American matrilineal contribution and a low Native American and African patrilineal contributions were found in all three studied regions. As previously found in Chilean admixed populations, the Native American matrilineal contribution was lower in Santiago than in the other studied regions. However, there was an unexpectedly higher contribution of Native American ancestry in one of the studied communes in Santiago, probably due to the high rate of immigration from other regions of the country. The population genetic sub-structure we detected in Santiago using few uniparental markers requires further confirmation, owing to possible stratification for autosomal and X-chromosome markers.

  14. PRESENCE OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM SUBSP. PARATUBERCULOSIS IN ALPACAS (LAMA PACOS) INHABITING THE CHILEAN ALTIPLANO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Miguel; Sevilla, Iker; Rios, Carolina; Crossley, Jorge; Tejeda, Carlos; Manning, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of paratuberculosis. The organism causes disease in both domestically managed and wild ruminant species. South American camelids have a long, shared history with indigenous people in the Andes. Over the last few decades, increasing numbers of alpacas were exported to numerous countries outside South America. No paratuberculosis surveillance has been reported for these source herds. In this study, individual fecal samples from 85 adult alpacas were collected from six separate herds in the Chilean Altiplano. A ParaTB mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) liquid culture of each individual fecal sample, followed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol was used for confirmation. DNA extracts from a subset of confirmed MAP isolates were subjected to mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. Fifteen alpaca were fecal culture test-positive. Five false-positive culture samples were negative on PCR analysis for Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA), Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), and the 16 S rDNA gene. Three MAP isolates subset-tested belonged to the same MIRU-VNTR type, showing four repeats for TR292 (locus 1) in contrast to the three repeats typical of the MAP reference strain K10. The number of repeats found in the remaining loci was identical to that of the K10 strain. It is not known how nor when MAP was introduced into the alpaca population in the Chilean Altiplano. The most plausible hypothesis to explain the presence of MAP in these indigenous populations is transmission by contact with infected domestic small ruminant species that may on occasion share pastures or range with alpacas. Isolation of this mycobacterial pathogen from such a remote region suggests that MAP has found its way beyond the confines of intensively managed domestic agriculture premises.

  15. A new species of Eretris Thieme (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae, Satyrinae) from the Elbow of the Andes region in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrcz, Tomasz W; Gareca, Yuvinka

    2009-01-01

    A new species of cloud forest butterfly, Eretris julieta n. sp. is described from a region of south-central Bolivia known as the Elbow of the Andes. It is the southernmost known representative of the genus, hitherto known only from a restricted area of interandean valleys in the department of Santa Cruz. Its affinities with other congeners are evaluated.

  16. Distribución del género gallinago brisson 1760 (aves: scolopacidae) en los andes orientales de colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Arango, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    El género Gallinago Brisson 1760 se compone de 6 especies y 9 subespecies en el Neotrópico; de ellas cinco especies y cuatro subespecies están presentes en los Andes Orientales de Colombia y áreas adyacentes (BLAKE 1977), La especie ausente corresponde a Gallinago andina Tackzonowski 1875, especie típica del altiplano de los Andes Centrales. El génera comprende las aves con mayor especialización del pico para la captura de anélidos y otros invertebrados cavadores del suelo. Ocupa todos los pi...

  17. Structure and age of the Lower Magdalena Valley basin basement, northern Colombia: New reflection-seismic and U-Pb-Hf insights into the termination of the central andes against the Caribbean basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Bohórquez, J. Alejandro; Ibánez-Mejia, Mauricio; Oncken, Onno; de Freitas, Mario; Vélez, Vickye; Mesa, Andrés; Serna, Lina

    2017-03-01

    Detailed interpretations of reflection seismic data and new U-Pb and Hf isotope geochemistry in zircon, reveal that the basement of the Lower Magdalena Valley basin is the northward continuation of the basement terranes of the northern Central Cordillera, and thus that the Lower Magdalena experienced a similar pre-Cenozoic tectonic history as the latter. New U-Pb and Hf analyses of zircon from borehole basement samples retrieved in the basin show that the southeastern region consists of Permo-Triassic (232-300Ma) metasediments, which were intruded by Late Cretaceous (75-89 Ma) granitoids. In the northern Central Cordillera, west of the Palestina Fault System, similar Permo-Triassic terranes are also intruded by Late Cretaceous felsic plutons and display ESE-WNW-trending structures. Therefore, our new data and analyses prove not only the extension of the Permo-Triassic Tahamí-Panzenú terrane into the western Lower Magdalena, but also the along-strike continuity of the Upper Cretaceous magmatic arc of the northern Central Cordillera, which includes the Antioquia Batholith and related plutons. Hf isotopic analyses from the Upper Cretaceous Bonga pluton suggest that it intruded new crust with oceanic affinity, which we interpret as the northern continuation of a Lower Cretaceous oceanic terrane (Quebradagrande?) into the westernmost Lower Magdalena. Volcanic andesitic basement predominates in the northwestern Lower Magdalena while Cretaceous low-grade metamorphic rocks that correlate with similar terranes in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta and Guajira are dominant in the northeast, suggesting that the Tahamí-Panzenú terrane does not extend into the northern Lower Magdalena. Although the northeastern region of the Lower Magdalena has a similar NE-SW fabric as the San Lucas Ridge of the northeastern Central Cordillera and the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, lithologic and geochronologic data suggest that the San Lucas terrane terminates to the north against the

  18. New evidence about the subduction of the Copiapó ridge beneath South America, and its connection with the Chilean-Pampean flat slab, tracked by satellite GOCE and EGM2008 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Orlando; Gimenez, Mario; Folguera, Andres; Spagnotto, Silvana; Bustos, Emilce; Baez, Walter; Braitenberg, Carla

    2015-11-01

    Satellite-only gravity measurements and those integrated with terrestrial observations provide global gravity field models of unprecedented precision and spatial resolution, allowing the analysis of the lithospheric structure. We used the model EGM2008 (Earth Gravitational Model) to calculate the gravity anomaly and the vertical gravity gradient in the South Central Andes region, correcting these quantities by the topographic effect. Both quantities show a spatial relationship between the projected subduction of the Copiapó aseismic ridge (located at about 27°-30° S), its potential deformational effects in the overriding plate, and the Ojos del Salado-San Buenaventura volcanic lineament. This volcanic lineament constitutes a projection of the volcanic arc toward the retroarc zone, whose origin and development were not clearly understood. The analysis of the gravity anomalies, at the extrapolated zone of the Copiapó ridge beneath the continent, shows a change in the general NNE-trend of the Andean structures to an ENE-direction coincident with the area of the Ojos del Salado-San Buenaventura volcanic lineament. This anomalous pattern over the upper plate is interpreted to be linked with the subduction of the Copiapó ridge. We explore the relation between deformational effects and volcanism at the northern Chilean-Pampean flat slab and the collision of the Copiapó ridge, on the basis of the Moho geometry and elastic thicknesses calculated from the new satellite GOCE data. Neotectonic deformations interpreted in previous works associated with volcanic eruptions along the Ojos del Salado-San Buenaventura volcanic lineament is interpreted as caused by crustal doming, imprinted by the subduction of the Copiapó ridge, evidenced by crustal thickening at the sites of ridge inception along the trench. Finally, we propose that the Copiapó ridge could have controlled the northern edge of the Chilean-Pampean flat slab, due to higher buoyancy, similarly to the control

  19. Hydrological cycles and trends in the NW Argentine Andes since 1940

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castino, Fabiana; Bookhagen, Bodo; Strecker, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    Strong spatiotemporal variability characterizes the hydrometeorological pattern in the NW Argentine Andes, draining parts of the most populated and economically important areas of South America. During the summer monsoon season (DJF), the eastern flanks of the central Andes are characterized by deep convection, exposing them to extreme hydrometeorological events. These often result in floods and landslides with disastrous effects on the local populations. Here, we analyze river discharge to explore long-term hydrological variability in NW Argentine Andes and the linked climate controlling processes. We rely on 13 daily river discharge time series relevant to drainage basins spanning several size orders (102-104 km2) starting in 1914 and define different hydro-climate indices both for the mean and the extreme hydrological events. We apply quantile regression to investigate long-term trends and spectral analysis associated with cross-correlation with SST-based climate indices to identify links to large-scale climate variability modes. River discharge presents a pronounced and coherent variability signal in South America, particularly for wide drainage basins, such as the Amazon and Paraná/La Plata rivers, strongly associated to Pacific and Atlantic Oceans Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies (i.e. ENSO, PDO, AMO). Our analysis evidences that in the NW Argentine Andes, mean discharge values are characterized by statistically significant, mostly positive, long-term trends since 1940, whereas the extreme events present a more non-unidirectional trend pattern. Also, coherent multi-annual to multi-decadal cycles characterizing the discharge pattern have been identified, suggesting that processes linked to SST anomaly-modes strongly control the hydrometeorology variability in the NW Argentina Andes.

  20. Chilean model for long-term follow-up of phenylketonuria (PKU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Cornejo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chilean newborn screening program began in 1984 through of a covenant between the National Ministry of Health and the Chilean University through its Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA with the aim of implementing a pilot study for neonatal detection of phenylketonuria (PKU in Santiago’s central area. In 1989 a program for neonatal diagnosis of PKU and congenital hypothyroidism (HC was initiated by INTA along with Santiago´s occidental health ministry rural area, which covered 20% of newborn population. PKU and HC had an incidence of 1:14,640 and 1:2000 living newborns respectively. These findings allowed the establishment of a favorable cost/benefit ratio which validated the implementation of a program with National character. In 1992 the Chilean Ministry of Health ruled the initiation of PKU and HC newborn screening program and by 1998 the coverage across the country was achieved. INTA is the National Reference Center for confirmation and long term treatment for PKU and HC patients. A follow-up program consists of medical, nutritional, neurological and psychological outcome evaluations as well as periodic biochemical testing in order to guarantee normal patient growth and development. To date 184 children have been diagnosed with classic or moderate PKU, all of them follow a strict monitoring program.

  1. Crustal structure of the high Andes in the North Pampean flat slab segment from magnetic and gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Marcos A.; Winocur, Diego; Álvarez, Orlando; Folguera, Andrés; Martinez, Myriam P.

    2017-01-01

    The Main Andes at the northern Chilean-Pampean flat slab segment were formed by the inversion of late Oligocene to early Miocene extensional depocenters in Neogene times. Their structure, size and depth are loosely constrained by field data since these sequences have amalgamated forming an almost continuous blanket with scarce basement outcrops. Satellite and aerial gravity and magnetic data are used in this work to define a 3D model that shows the basement structure at depth and adjust 2D structural sections previously based on field data. The results indicate complex basin geometry with depocenters of variable size and depth buried beneath Mesozoic (?)-Paleogene and Neogene sections. Additionally, previously proposed crustal heterogeneities across this orogenic segment are geophysically constrained with a new crustal heterogeneity identified on the basis of a modeled 2D crustal section. We propose hypothetically, that this crustal discontinuity could have played a role in controlling Paleogene extension at the hanging wall of an asymmetric rift basin, explaining the locus and development of the Doña Ana Basin. Finally, this work provides new information about Cenozoic structure and Paleozoic basement architecture, presumably derived from amalgamation history of one of the highest and more inaccessible regions of the Andes.

  2. The CHilean Automatic Supernova sEarch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamuy, M.; Pignata, G.; Maza, J.

    2012-01-01

    The CHilean Automatic Supernova sEarch (CHASE) project began in 2007 with the goal to discover young, nearby southern supernovae in order to (1) better understand the physics of exploding stars and their progenitors, and (2) refine the methods to derive extragalactic distances. During the first...... four years of operation, CHASE has produced more than 130 supernovae, being the most successful project of its type in the southern hemisphere. Here we describe the project and present illustrative examples of CHASE discoveries of particular relevance....

  3. [Ethics code of the Chilean Biological Society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Etica, C; Valenzuela, C; Cruz-Coke, R; Ureta, T; Bull, R

    1997-01-01

    The Chilean Biological Society has approved an ethics code for researchers, elaborated by its Ethic Committee. The text, with 16 articles, undertakes the main ethical problems that researchers must solve, such as institutional, professional or societal ethics, scientific fraud, breaches in collaborative work, relationships between researchers, participation in juries and committees, ethical breaches in scientific publications, scientific responsibility and punishments. This code declares its respect and valorization of all life forms and adheres to international biomedical ethical codes. It declares that all knowledge, created or obtained by researchers is mankind's heritage.

  4. Did growth of high Andes slow down Nazca plate subduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteros, J.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2010-12-01

    The convergence velocity rate of the Nazca and South-American plate and its variations during the last 100 My are quite well-known from the global plate reconstructions. The key observation is that the rate of Nazca plate subduction has decreased by about 2 times during last 20 Myr and particularly since 10 Ma. During the same time the Central Andes have grown to its present 3-4 km height. Based on the thin-shell model, coupled with mantle convection, it was suggested that slowing down of Nazca plate resulted from the additional load exerted by the Andes. However, the thin-shell model, that integrates stresses and velocities vertically and therefore has no vertical resolution, is not an optimal tool to model a subduction zone. More appropriate would be modeling it with full thermomechanical formulation and self-consistent subduction. We performed a set of experiments to estimate the influence that an orogen like the Andes could have on an ongoing subduction. We used an enhanced 2D version of the SLIM-3D code suitable to simulate the evolution of a subducting slab in a self-consistent manner (gravity driven) at vertical crossections through upper mantle, transition zone and shallower lower mantle. The model utilizes non-linear temperature- and stress-dependant visco-elasto-plastic rheology and phase transitions at 410 and 660 km depth. We started from a reference case with a similar configuration as both Nazca and South-America plates. After some Mys of slow kinematicaly imposed subduction, to develop a coherent thermo-mechanical state, subduction was totally dynamic. On the other cases, the crust was slowly thickened artificially during 10 My to generate the Andean topography. Although our first results show no substantial changes on the velocity pattern of the subduction, we, however, consider this result as preliminary. At the meeting we plan to report completed and verified modeling results and discuss other possible cases of the late Cenozoic slowing down of

  5. Evolución tectónica, paleogeográfica y metalogénica durante el Cenozoico en los Andes de Chile norte y central e implicaciones para las regiones adyacentes de Bolivia y Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Charrier

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available La orogenia incaica dio origen a un importante relieve en el Eoceno Medio, el que se concentró en el ámbito del arco magmático precedente, la Cordillera Incaica. Este relieve positivo de orientación NNE se extendió desde el sur de Perú hasta la región central de Chile y separó dos dominios paleogeográficos que tuvieron evoluciones diferentes durante el resto del Cenozoico. El dominio occidental se caracterizó por el predominio de procesos de erosión y sedimentación. En el dominio oriental también existieron importantes episodios de erosión que originaron depósitos que se encuentran en la vertiente oriental de la cadena en la actualidad y presentan una cronología comparable con la de los depósitos del dominio occidental. Sin embargo, la evolución se caracterizó por presentar, a partir del Eoceno Tardío, diferencias al norte y sur de los ~27ºS. Al norte de esa latitud, en el ámbito del Altiplano-Puna, el arco magmático se mantuvo aproximadamente en la misma posición, coincidente con la del arco actual, y estuvo bordeado por una cuenca de antepaís de retroarco; mientras que, al sur de ~27ºS, se desarrollaron sucesivos arcos magmáticos con una marcada migración hacia el este. El arco magmático del Eoceno Tardío al Oligoceno Tardío - Mioceno Temprano se caracterizó por el desarrollo de una amplia cuenca extensional de intra-arco, la cuenca de Abanico. En esta cuenca se acumularon hasta 3.000 m de rocas volcánicas, volcaniclásticas y, subordinadamente, sedimentarias. A partir del límite oligoceno-mioceno, tuvo lugar un nuevo evento compresivo a lo largo de todo el orógeno que rejuveneció el núcleo de la Cordillera Incaica e invirtió la cuenca de Abanico permitiendo la generación de abundantes depósitos sintectónicos a ambos lados de los nuevos relieves. El inicio de este evento coincide con la orogenia pehuenche, los pulsos compresivos se mantuvieron hasta el Plioceno Temprano. En el Mioceno Temprano a Medio

  6. Andes Altiplano, Northwest Argentina, South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This view of the Andes Altiplano in northwest Argentina (25.5S, 68.0W) is dominated by heavily eroded older and inactive volcano peaks. The altiplano is a high altitude cold desert like the Tibetan Plateau but smaller in area. It is an inland extension of the hyperarid Atacama Desert of the west coast of South America and includes hundreds of volcanic edifices (peaks, cinder cones, lava flows, debris fields, lakes and dry lake beds (salars).

  7. Interseismic Rates From the CTO cGPS Andes and Nepal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genrich, J. F.; Galetzka, J.; Chowdhury, F.; Avouac, J.; Simons, M.; Barrientos, S. E.; Comte, D.; Norabuena, E. O.; Sapkota, S. N.

    2009-12-01

    To study crustal deformation at converging plate margins the Caltech Tectonics Observatory (CTO), together with partner institutions in the host countries, operates continuously observing GPS stations in the central Andes (northern Chile and southern Peru) and in Nepal. The currently 20-site Andes network was established in 2005 with 7 stations. Efforts are underway to provide data streaming links at near real time for the majority of sites. The Nepal network started with 10 sites in 2004 and has been expanded to 23 sites in the last couple of years. Dual frequency code and phase data from all sites are processed with the GAMIT/GLOBK processing package. Reliable interseismic velocities are now available for the majority of sites. Network metadata, rinex data files, processed time series and velocity estimates can be found online thru links at the CTO website: tectonics.caltech.edu.

  8. Illicit crops and armed conflict as constraints on biodiversity conservation in the Andes region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjeldså, Jon; Alvarez, María D; Lazcano, Juan Mario; León, Blanca

    2005-05-01

    Coca, once grown for local consumption in the Andes, is now produced for external markets, often in areas with armed conflict. Internationally financed eradication campaigns force traffickers and growers to constantly relocate, making drug-related activities a principal cause of forest loss. The impact on biodiversity is known only in general terms, and this article presents the first regional analysis to identify areas of special concern, using bird data as proxy. The aim of conserving all species may be significantly constrained in the Santa Marta and Perijá mountains, Darién, some parts of the Central Andes in Colombia, and between the middle Marañón and middle Huallaga valleys in Peru. Solutions to the problem must address the root causes: international drug markets, long-lasting armed conflict, and lack of alternative income for the rural poor.

  9. Mercury content in Chilean fish and estimated intake levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Sandra; Fortt, Antonia

    2007-09-01

    The intake of fish products is a major public health concern due to possible methyl mercury exposure, which is especially toxic to the human nervous system. This pilot study (n = 46) was designed to determine mercury concentrations in fish products for national consumption (Chilean jack mackerel, hake, Chilean mussel, tuna) and for export (salmon, Patagonian toothfish, swordfish, southern hake), and to estimate the exposure of the general population. The fish products were collected from markets in Talcahuano, Puerto Montt and Santiago. Samples were analyzed at the National Environmental Center by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Mercury levels in swordfish and one canned tuna sample exceeded levels prescribed by national and international standards. The remaining two export products (Patagonian toothfish, also known as Chilean sea bass, and salmon) complied with international limits, which are more demanding than Chilean regulations. Theoretical estimates of mercury intake varied from 0.08 to 3.8 microg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for high fish consumers, exceeding the provisional tolerable intake for tuna, Chilean seabass, Chilean jack mackerel and swordfish. This group appears to be at the greatest risk from mercury contamination among the Chilean population.

  10. Report on the 2010 Chilean earthquake and tsunami response

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2011-01-01

    disaster response strategies and operations of Chilean agencies, including perceived or actual failures in disaster preparation that impacted the medical disaster response; post-disaster health and medical interventions to save lives and limit suffering; and the lessons learned by public health and medical personnel as a result of their experiences. Despite devastating damage to the health care and civic infrastructure, the health care response to the Chilean earthquake appeared highly successful due to several factors. Like other first responders, the medical community had the ability and resourcefulness to respond without centralized control in the early response phase. The health care community maintained patient care under austere conditions, despite many obstacles that could have prevented such care. National and international resources were rapidly mobilized to support the medical response. The Emergency Services Team sought to collect information on all phases of emergency management (preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery) and determine what worked well and what could be improved upon. The Chileans reported being surprised that they were not as ready for this event as they thought they were. The use of mass care sheltering was limited, given the scope of the disaster, because of the resiliency of the population. The impacts of the earthquake and the tsunami were quite different, as were the needs of urban and rural dwellers, necessitating different response activities. The Volunteer Services Team examined the challenges faced in mobilizing a large number of volunteers to assist in the aftermath of a disaster of this scale. One of the greatest challenges expressed was difficulty in communication; the need for redundancy in communication mechanisms was cited. The flexibility and ability to work autonomously by the frontline volunteers was a significant factor in effective response. It was also important for volunteer leadership to know the emergency plans

  11. Plant community variation across a puna landscape in the Chilean Andes Variación en la comunidad vegetal de un paisaje de puna en los Andes chilenos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOHN G LAMBRINOS

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe patterns of plant species and growth form abundance in the puna vegetation of Parque Nacional Lauca, Chile. At more than 4,300 m, the extreme habitat of the study site supported relatively few species. These few species, however, represented a diverse array of growth forms that were organized with respect to distinct environmental gradients. Both species richness and growth form diversity increased with the degree of habitat rockiness and on more xeric north and east facing slopes. These xeric, rocky sites supported the greatest overall abundance of cushion forms. Less rocky sites with more soil development supported a greater abundance of tussock grass and shrub forms. Congeneric species occupied distinct microhabitats and were often markedly divergent in growth form. These patterns suggest that water and thermal stress are critical forces shaping functional form as well as community organization in the high Andean punaDescribimos los patrones de abundancia de las especies vegetales y las formas de vida en la vegetación de puna en el Parque Nacional Lauca, Chile. A una altitud que excede los 4.300 m de altitud, el hábitat extremo de nuestro sitio de estudio presenta relativamente pocas especies. Dichas especies, sin embargo, representan un arreglo diverso de formas de vida organizadas con respecto a distintos gradientes ambientales. Tanto la riqueza de especies como el hábito de crecimiento aumentaron en los suelos más rocosos y en las pendientes expuestas al norte y al este, cuya vegetación es más xerófila. Dichos sitios presentaron la mayor abundancia en formas de cojines. Los sitios menos rocosos con un suelo más desarrollado presentaron una mayor abundancia de pastos y arbustos. Distintos microhábitats fueron ocupados por especies congénericas que con frecuencia divergieron en su hábito de crecimiento. Los patrones observados sugieren que el agua y el estrés térmico son fuerzas críticas que moldean la forma funcional de las especies vegetales así como la organización de las comunidades de plantas en la puna altoandina

  12. Border dimension of Chilean foreign policies: Immobility and urgency of new dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Ovando Santana

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The following article draws the priorities of border public policy that define the Chilean foreign policy. Through a theoretical framework from the rational–reflective approach of International Relations, we argue that despite of the increasing openness, internationalization of the country, and the emergence of new actors and subnational initiatives; the views and options between the actors of this new area and the definitions of foreign policy not always match. We propose the need to establish mechanisms that settle the positions among regional social–political actors, intermediate agencies and the central level.

  13. Changing Student Attitudes using Andes, An Intelligent Homework System

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sande, Brett; Vanlehn, Kurt; Treacy, Don; Shelby, Bob; Wintersgill, Mary

    2007-03-01

    The size of introductory physics lectures often inhibits personal homework assistance and timely corrective feedback. Andes, an intelligent homework help system designed for two semesters of introductory physics, can fill this need by encouraging students to use sound problem solving techniques and providing immediate feedback on each step of a solution. On request, Andes provides principles-based hints based on previous student actions. A multi-year study at the U.S. Naval Academy demonstrates that students using Andes perform better than students working the same problems as graded pencil and paper homeworks. In addition, student attitude surveys show that Andes is preferred over other homework systems. These findings have implications for student attitudes toward, and mastery of, physics. See http://www.andes.pitt.edu for more information.

  14. Atmospheric transmissivity: Distribution and empirical estimation around the central andes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baigorria, G.A.; Villegas, E.B.; Trebejo, I.; Carlos, J.F.; Quiroz, R.

    2004-01-01

    This study of the distribution in space and time of atmospheric transmissivity takes into account the fact that, in complex terrain, many factors affect this variable; thus, it is not possible to use the generalizations that can be applied under more homogeneous conditions. Climatic controls, topogr

  15. Synthetic Seismogram Study of the Eastern Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-30

    TASK NUMBER SM 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER A1 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Observatorio San...LAzaro, Percy Aliaga, Magaly Gonzalez, and Wilfredo Cano Observatorio San Calixto Sponsored by the Air Force Research Laboratory Contract No. FA8718-07-C

  16. Association between eating behavior scores and obesity in Chilean children

    OpenAIRE

    Amador Paola; Obregón Ana M; Cataldo Rodrigo; Domínguez-Vásquez Patricia; Smalley Susan V; González Andrea; Ho-Urriola Judith A; Santos José L; Weisstaub Gerardo; Hodgson M Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Inadequate eating behavior and physical inactivity contribute to the current epidemic of childhood obesity. The aim of this study was to assess the association between eating behavior scores and childhood obesity in Chilean children. Design and methods We recruited 126 obese, 44 overweight and 124 normal-weight Chilean children (6-12 years-old; both genders) according to the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) criteria. Eating behavior scores were calculated using the ...

  17. Wine tourism : a review of the Chilean case

    OpenAIRE

    Kunc, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Wine tourism has become a thriving niche in global tourism industry with successful cases like Napa Valley in the USA with 19 million visitors per year. However, there are important disparities among wine regions. The paper analyses the case of the Chilean wine tourism, which is one of the regions with less wine tourists although it is very important in global wine industry, and its reasons for its low level of development. Chilean wine industry has been developing its infrastructure in wine ...

  18. Nutrition education in Chilean primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Sonia; Zacarías, Isabel; Andrade, Margarita; Kain, Juliana; Lera, Lydia; Vio, Fernando; Morón, Cecilio

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to incorporate nutrition education in Chilean primary schools. The baseline information included nutritional status, food consumption and physical activity of 1701 children from 3rd to 7th grade in ten urban and rural schools. Main results showed a high prevalence of obesity (15.4%) and overweight (19.6%), low consumption of vegetables, fruits, and dairy products, high intake of snacks and a low level of physical activity, especially in girls. Because the Ministry of Education does not allow the incorporation of new programs into the curriculum, the educational strategy was based on the development of a text book, a teacher's guide, five practical guides for students from third to eighth grade and a CD-Rom. These materials were validated by 36 teachers in six schools through an educational intervention. Teachers and students considered the educational materials useful, motivational and easy to understand. This program is being implemented in 57 schools.

  19. Linchamientos y conflicto político en Los Andes Lynchings and Political conflict in The Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M. Vilas

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available En 2004, los alcaldes de dos municipalidades de la región aimara de los Andes fueron linchados en la aparente culminación de agudos conflictos políticos internos y entre las respectivas comunidades y el Estado central. En este artículo se discuten ambos casos con el fin de ilustrar las transformaciones experimentadas en años recientes en la organización y la dinámica interna de las comunidades andinas, y de la articulación conflictiva de la política local en los procesos e instituciones de más amplio alcance. Precariedad social e incapacidad o renuencia del Estado para responder con eficacia a demandas básicas de determinados grupos de población configuran enmarcamientos socioeconómicos e institucionales de los linchamientos. En contraste con enfoques que enfatizan en factores culturales tradicionales o en un supuesto nacionalismo indígena, en el artículo se destaca la gravitación de fenómenos y procesos político- institucionales recientes en la transformación cultural y política de las comunidades, en el modo en que éstas procesan sus conflictos internos y con el Estado central.In 2004, two municipalitys mayors form the aimara Andes of Peru and Bolivia were subjected to mass lynchings as a result of the apparent culmination of violent political confrontations. This paper deals with these events as dramatic illustrations of the transformations the Andean communities experienced during recent decades in their internal dynamics, as well as in the articulation of local politics to processes and institutions beyond the communal limits. Structural precariousness combined with the state's inability or reluctance to come to terms with social or political demands from relevant segments of the people in the communities set the socioeconomic and institutional stage for lynchings. In contrast with approaches relating these events to an alleged indigenous cultural identity, the analysis points to the impact of the communities' political

  20. The impact of Chilean migration on employment in Patagonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariola Sanz, L

    1989-06-01

    This paper discusses the employment situation of Chilean migrant workers, their impact on labor markets in Patagonia, Argentina, and the government's past and projected responses to this phenomenon. In 1980, Chilean inhabitants of patagonia comprised 11% of the area's population. Chilean migration to patagonia was closely linked to economic activities that began to flourish in the 20th century, such as livestock raising, fruit and vegetable cultivation, and mining for coal and petroleum. No Chilean migrants work in a wide range of sectors. In Patagonia's southern provinces availability and ability to withstand rigorous climate conditions are the main factors which account for the prevalence of Chilean manpower. Chilean migrants do not in general displace local manpower. Legislation and the permeability of the border ensure that most workers enter the country as tourists. Clandestine migration is not an issue. Illegal migrants have provoked negative reactions for several reasons: 1) they comprise a marginal population without formal citizenship; 2) being employed as clandestine workers, they pay no social security, nor do their employers; 3) being illegal, they are obliged to accept lower wages and inferior working conditions which creates unfair competition within labor markets; and 4) as a result of these conditions, xenophobic and endophobic attitudes in relations with Argentine nationalists are reinforced. The government has attempted to solve these problems through various measures. Beginning in 1934, most foreigners entered Argentina with a tourist visa, becoming illegal when they stayed beyond authorized limits. Several measures over the years provided amnesty to illegal migrants. Currently, the law promotes immigration, monitors the admission of foreigners to the country and stipulates their rights and obligations. The law lists 115 articles on immigration promotion and on regulation of the movements of foreigners. Because of the present economic crisis in

  1. Annual narrative report: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, and Lake Andes Wetland Management District: Calendar year 1975

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This collection of monthly activity reports summarizes activities on Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR during the 1975 calendar year. Resource...

  2. Minimun Pension Insurance in the Chilean Pension System Minimun Pension Insurance in the Chilean Pension System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Zurita

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the "social" features of the Chilean individual capitalization pension system is the minimum pension scheme. which guarantees its members a minimum pension irrespective of the funds they accumulate, with the only requirement of twenty years of social security tax payments. The purpose of this paper is to estimate the implicit fiscal subsidy, using an option-based approach. We capture the risk associated to the returns on the pension fund account of a worker by modeling its value as a diffusion process and show the correspondence between the minimum pension insurance and a financial put option. Our results are the present value of the minimum pension benefit, equivalent to 3 percent of Chilean GDP for current active and non-active affiliated workers. These estimates are notoriously higher than previous results based on deterministic models, and strongly suggest the importance of explicitly considering the risk associated to pension assets when estimating the cost to the government of the insurance implied by the minimum pension benefit. One of the "social" features of the Chilean individual capitalization pension system is the minimum pension scheme. which guarantees its members a minimum pension irrespective of the funds they accumulate, with the only requirement of twenty years of social security tax payments. The purpose of this paper is to estimate the implicit fiscal subsidy, using an option-based approach. We capture the risk associated to the returns on the pension fund account of a worker by modeling its value as a diffusion process and show the correspondence between the minimum pension insurance and a financial put option. Our results are the present value of the minimum pension benefit, equivalent to 3 percent of Chilean GDP for current active and non-active affiliated workers. These estimates are notoriously higher than previous results based on deterministic models, and strongly suggest the importance of explicitly considering

  3. Large slope failures in the La Paz basin, Bolivian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, N. J.; Hermanns, R. L.; Rabus, B.; Guzmán, M. A.; Minaya, E.; Clague, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    the La Paz basin provides insights into evolution of the Central Andes and the geologic contribution to the exceptionally high landslide risk in the modern city of La Paz.

  4. Sr and Nd isotopic and trace element compositions of Quaternary volcanic centers of the Southern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futa, K.; Stern, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of samples from six Quaternary volcanoes located in the northern and southern extremities of the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ, 33-46??S) of the Andes and from four centers in the Austral Volcanic Zone (AVZ, 49-54??S) range for 87Sr 86Sr from 0.70280 to 0.70591 and for 143Nd 144Nd from 0.51314 to 0.51255. The ranges are significantly greater than previously reported from the southern Andes but are different from the isotopic compositions of volcanoes in the central and northern Andes. Basalts and basaltic andesites from three centers just north of the Chile Rise-Trench triple junction have 87Sr 86Sr, 143Nd 144Nd, La Yb, Ba La, and Hf Lu that lie within the relatively restricted ranges of the basic magmas erupted from the volcanic centers as far north as 35??S in the SVZ of the Andes. The trace element and Sr and Nd isotopic characteristics of these magmas may be explained by source region contamination of subarc asthenosphere, with contaminants derived from subducted pelagic sediments and seawater-altered basalts by dehydration of subducted oceanic lithosphere. In the northern extremity of the SVZ between 33?? and 34??S, basaltic andesites and andesites have higher 87Sr 86Sr, Rb Cs, and Hf Lu, and lower 143Nd 144Nd than basalts and basaltic andesites erupted farther south in the SVZ, which suggests involvement of components derived from the continental crust. In the AVZ, the most primitive sample, high-Mg andesite from the southernmost volcanic center in the Andes (54??S) has Sr and Nd isotopic compositions and K Rb and Ba La similar to MORB. The high La Yb of this sample suggests formation by small degrees of partial melting of subducted MORB with garnet as a residue. Samples from centers farther north in the AVZ show a regionally regular northward increase in SiO2, K2O, Rb, Ba, Ba La, and 87Sr 86Sr and decrease in MgO, Sr, K Rb, Rb Cs, and 143Nd 144Nd, suggesting increasingly greater degrees of fractional crystallization and associated intra

  5. The genus Callophyllis (Kallymeniaceae, Rhodophyta from the central-south Chilean coast (33° to 41° S, with the description of two new species El género Callophyllis (Kallymeniaceae, Rhodophyta de la costa central y sur de Chile (33° a 41° S, con la descripción de dos nuevas especies

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    NATALIA ARAKAKI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomic status of the species in the genus Callophyllis Kützing (Kallymeniaceae, Rhodophyta from central-south Chile (33° to 41° S is examined on the basis of morphological and molecular evidence. Of the four species originally cited for central Chile, C. variegata, C. pinnata, C. atrosanguinea and C. laciniata, only the presence of C. variegata has been confirmed in this study. C. pinnata reported from Chile is found to be different from C. pinnata described from California, and it is here newly described as C. concepcionensis sp. nov. C. atrosanguinea from southern Chile (including C. linguata from the Antarctic Peninsula is distinct from the species called C. atrosanguinea from central-south Chile, the latter which is here described as C. macrostiolata sp. nov. C. variegata, C. concepcionensis and C. macrostiolata are distinguished from one another by their external habit, the nature and distribution of their cystocarps, and the female reproductive morphology. Comparative rbcL sequence analysis corroborates the distinction of these taxa from central-south Chile and their relationships to other species worldwide.Se examina el estatus taxonómico de las especies del género Callophyllis Kützing (Kallymeniaceae, Rhodophyta de la costa centro-sur de Chile (33° a 41° S en base a caracteres morfológicos y moleculares. De las cuatro especies citadas para Chile central, C. variegata, C. pinnata, C. atrosanguinea y C. laciniata, solo la presencia de C. variegata ha sido confirmada en este estudio. C. pinnata de Chile muestra diferencias con C. pinnata descrita para California y con el resto de las especies de Callophyllis hasta ahora conocidas, constituyendo así una nueva especie, C. concepcionensis sp. nov. C. atrosanguinea del sur de Chile (incluyendo C. linguata de la Península Antártica muestra diferencias con la especie llamada C. atrosanguinea de la costa centro-sur de Chile, esta última especie es descrita como C. macrostiolata

  6. Results of Chilean water markets: Empirical research since 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Carl J.

    2004-09-01

    Chile's free-market Water Code turned 20 years old in October 2001. This anniversary was an important milestone for both Chilean and international debates about water policy because Chile has become the world's leading example of the free-market approach to water law and water resources management, the textbook case of treating water rights not merely as private property but also as a fully marketable commodity. The predominant view outside of Chile is that Chilean water markets and the Chilean model of water management have been a success, and this perception has encouraged other countries to follow Chile's lead in water law reform. Much of the debate about Chilean water markets, however, has been based more on theoretical or political beliefs than on empirical study. This paper reverses that emphasis by reviewing the evolution of empirical research about these markets since 1990, when Chile returned to democratic government after 16 years of military rule. During the period since 1990, understanding of how Chilean water markets have worked in practice has gradually improved. There have been two major trends in this research: first, a gradual shift from exaggerated claims of the markets' success toward more balanced assessments of mixed results and, second, a heavy emphasis on the economics of water rights trading with very little attention given to the Water Code's impacts on social equity, river basin management, environmental protection, or resolution of water conflicts. The analysis in this study is qualitative and interdisciplinary, combining law, economics, and institutions.

  7. Crustal Thickness in Northern Andes Using pP and sS Precursors at Teleseismic Distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda Camacho, N. M.; Assumpcao, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Andean belt is a result of the subduction of the Nazca plate beneath the South American continental plate. It has an extension of 8000 km from Venezuela to Tierra del Fuego. While the crustal-thickness is a well-known property in Southern and Central Andes, it is still poorly known in the Northern Andes (between 10°N and 4° S). The crustal thickness is a very important property to understand the crustal evolution such as in geodynamic models and in modeling wave-propagation in global and regional seismic studies. Due to the high seismic activity at intermediate depths in the Northern Andes, it is possible to use the teleseismic P-wave and S-wave trains to find the crustal-thickness. In this study, we analyze the reflections from the underside of the Moho for intermediate and deep earthquakes in the northern Andes recorded at teleseismic distances (between 40°- 85°), and estimate the crustal-thickness at the bounce points of the pP and sS wave by converting the delay time between the phases pP and pmP and also between sS and smS into crustal thickness. This method can be applied in zones with earthquakes having magnitude larger than 6 for that reason the Northern Andes is a favorable area to develop it. We analyzed five events from the Northern Andes with magnitude larger than 6 and deeper than 100 km. The crustal thickness was calculated using the P wave with the vertical component and the S wave using both transverse SH and radial SV components. We find that the crustal-thickness in this area varied from 27.9 × 2.4 km at (76.48 W, 4.82 N) to 55.7 × 5.2 km at (77.92 W, 2 S). Our results show a crustal-thickness consistent with a compilation made for a larger region that includes our research area, showing residuals between -4 km and 4 km in most of the bounce points . We are getting results in areas that have not been studied previously so it will help to increase the database of crustal-thicknesses for the Northern Andes.

  8. Comprehensive Conservation Plan: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Lake Andes NWR Complex for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and...

  9. Anthropometric profile of elite Chilean Paralympic athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Durán-Agüero

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sport is one of the most popular social events worldwide. It becomes interesting to characterize its practitioners, even more in some poorly studied groups such as Paralympic athletes. The main objective of this study is to determine the anthropometric profile of Chilean Elite Paralympic Athletes (CEPA through body composition and somatotype. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted with 41 subjects (93% of the classified to the Para-Panamerican Games Toronto 2015, who practiced table tennis (n=6, football 5 (n=11, swimming (n=8, rugby (n=7, powerlifting (n=6 and wheelchair tennis (n=3. The body composition and somatotype were assessed through the protocol described by the International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry (ISAK. Results: The CEPA reach an average for that classifies somatotype mostly as meso-endomorphic (5.3 - 7.8 - 0.5, a BMI of 27.4 kg/m2, and body composition for fat mass reaches 29.8% in women and 25.7% in men, while muscle mass gain 42.6% (women and 44.5% (men. Conclusions: The CEPA have a somatotype profile that classifies mostly as meso-endomorphic, body composition has a predominance muscle mass and high fat mass, although is similar to other Paralympics athletes.

  10. The Glaciation of the Ecuadorian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Carlos

    This pleasing book fills the gap in the knowledge about Pleistocene and recent glaciation between Colombia and Peru. A significant amount of data exists already for Colombia and Venezuela and for Peru, Bolivia, and, particularly, Chile. Hastenrath has now given us a description of glaciers and glaciation underneath the equator in the Andes.The book begins with brief summaries of the physiography and the atmospheric circulation, which give the general setting of Ecuador. Then follow detailed descriptions of the glaciers and glacial morphology of all the important mountains of the Western and Eastern Cordilleras. These are well illustrated, and a particularly useful feature is the comparison of old photographs and paintings of glaciers with modern photographs, many taken by the author. All illustrate the spectacular retreat of the glaciers in the Ecuadorian Andes during the last century and correlate quite well with observations elsewhere. This retreat is snown quantitatively in Table 4, in terms of decrease in glacier-covered area since the glacial advance of moraine stage III. The area of present-day glaciers is about 10% of the area during that stage (compared with about 1.5% in the Sierra Nevada de Mérida, Venezuela). A series of maps show the glacial morphology of the mountains (unfortunately, some of the maps have been included within the binding, thus losing some information; they could have been reduced somewhat to fit a single page or, if too large, could have been included in the pocket, together with the map of Chimborazo-Carihuairazo).

  11. The origin of oriented lakes in the Andean foreland, Parque Nacional Torres del Paine (Chilean Patagonia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Joseph; Aydin, Atilla

    2008-05-01

    The Parque Nacional Torres Del Paine and surrounding area in the Magallanes foreland basin in Chilean Patagonia is the site for numerous lakes fed by glaciers and rivers in the Andean highlands to the west. The lakes are elongate and have conspicuously systematic orientations. We hypothesize that the origin of the oriented lakes lies in the fault system, composed of a right-lateral strike-slip fault set oriented 58° from north, a left-lateral strike-slip set oriented 87°, and a thrust fault set oriented 167°, that exists within the underlying rocks. To test this hypothesis quantitatively, we determined the shape and orientation of the lakes by fitting each lake with an ellipse of appropriate aspect ratio, and later with multiple ellipses consistent with the composite geometry of some lakes. We then examined the faults in the area in terms of their kinematics, orientation and distribution. The distribution of lake orientations showed three distinct groups which appear to correspond to the three main fault groups. For lakes fitted with multiple ellipses, the difference in means between the right-lateral, left-lateral, and thrust faults and their corresponding groups of lakes are 3.05°, 1.57°, and 5.17°. Using a Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) statistical test to compare the orientations of faults with respect to the lakes suggests that there is not a strongly significant difference between the fault orientations and the corresponding lake groups. These results indicate that the faults have a profound control on the orientation, shape, and distribution of the lakes. We attribute this to faults and their damage zones being weaker and therefore prone to a faster rate of erosion, and to stress perturbations associated with discontinuous faults resulting in localized high density fracturing and surface subsidence. These results have implications for lake and drainage system morphologies in other foreland basins along the Andes and other similar settings.

  12. Spatial distribution of rock glaciers in the semi-arid Andes of Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöthe, Jan Henrik; Halla, Christian; Schrott, Lothar; Götz, Joachim; Trombotto, Dario

    2016-04-01

    Active rock glaciers are indicators for permafrost in periglacial environments of high mountain areas. Within the permafrost body and the seasonally frozen active layer, these rock glaciers potentially store large amounts of water. Especially in semiarid mountain belts, such as the central Andes of Argentina, rock glaciers attain several kilometres in length, covering surface areas of >106 m2. Here, rock glaciers even outrange ice glaciers in cumulative area and absolute number, indicating they might constitute a large water reservoir in this semiarid part of the Andes. Despite their potential hydrological importance, our knowledge about the rock glaciers' spatial distribution, subsurface composition and absolute ice content is still very limited. Our study addresses this shortcoming and aims at assessing the hydrological significance of rock glacier permafrost in the semi-arid Andes of Argentina by combining local geophysical investigations with regional remote sensing analysis. Our research focuses on the central Andes between 30°S and 33°S, where we have compiled an inventory that comprises more than 1200 rock glaciers, as well as 154 clear-ice and debris-covered glaciers. Two field sites that bracket this regional study area towards their northern and southern edge have been selected for local geophysical investigations. At these locations, earlier studies detected the presence of rock glacier permafrost by thermal monitoring and geophysical prospection. Preliminary results of the regional spatial distribution indicate that the spatial density of rock glaciers increases towards the south, concomitant with a twofold increase in mean annual precipitation. Rock glacier density peaks in the area of the Aconcagua massif, while precipitation is further increasing towards the south. Simultaneously, the lower altitudinal limit of intact rock glaciers slightly decreases, with the lowest rock glacier toe positions in the northern study area located at ~3800 m a. s. l

  13. Extreme high field strength element (HFSE) depletion and near-chondritic Nb/Ta ratios in Central Andean adakite-like lavas (~ 28°S, ~ 68°W)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, A. R.; Kay, S. M.

    2009-03-01

    The eruption of andesites with steep REE patterns and high Sr concentrations (adakite-like) in the northernmost Chilean flatslab region of the Central Andes spatially and temporally corresponds with the appearance of a marked HFSE (high field strength element) depletion in these lavas (La/Ta up to 95). Known as the Dos Hermanos and Pircas Negras andesites, these lavas erupted at the beginning (˜ 8 Ma), during (7-3 Ma), and immediately following (3-2 Ma) a period of tectonic instability characterized by eastward migration of the frontal volcanic arc. ICP-MS analyses of the HFSE reveal a range of chondritic (20-18) to subchondritic (18-11) Nb/Ta ratios in these lavas. Evident temporal trace element trends support a change from a rutile-bearing to an amphibole-bearing eclogitic residual assemblage in equilibrium with the mafic precursor magmas of these andesites. This change in residual mineralogy is contemporaneous with the onset of frontal arc migration in the region. Potential eclogitic sources for the Dos Hermanos and Pircas Negras adakitic andesites include mafic Andean lower crust and an additional flux of forearc crust transported to the sub-arc mantle via subduction erosion during the height of arc migration and Pircas Negras magmatism. Batch melting models of rutile- or amphibole-bearing eclogitic arc basalt in tandem with magma mixing calculations generate the observed adakitic signatures and near-chondritic Nb/Ta ratios of these Central Andean andesites.

  14. Spatial modeling of permafrost distribution using rock glacier inventories, topographic attributes and temperature data in the semiarid Andes, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azocar Sandoval, G.; Brenning, A.; Bodin, X.

    2012-12-01

    Statistical-empirical models have been widely used to estimate the spatial distribution of permafrost in the European Alps and North America using topographic, climatic data and geomorphic indicators of permafrost (i.e. rock glaciers). At present, little knowledge about mountain permafrost distribution is available for the Andes. As a first approximation of permafrost distribution, a logistic regression model was fitted to predict rock glacier activity status. The model is based on explanatory variables elevation and potential incoming solar radiation (PISR) derived from an ASTER G-DEM v. 2 digital elevations model and air temperature data in the Chilean Andes between 29 and 34°S. Rock glacier activity status (intact versus fossil) was obtained from several recent rock glacier inventories and is based on the interpretation of aerial photographs or satellite imagery with a resolution higher than 5 m. Constant lapse rates of temperature are obtained for several weather stations in the study region. These are used to estimate the change in temperature with elevation based on the digital elevation model. The model's predictive performance was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve. As a preliminary result using a probability threshold of 0.5, mountain permafrost may be present in up to 21% (1510 km2) of the Huasco watershed (29°S) located in the northern part of the study area. Considering a threshold > 0.75, about 12% (709 km2) of this watershed may be underlain by mountain permafrost. As next steps toward a permafrost distribution model, sources of bias related to the thermal offset and displacement of rock glaciers will be eliminated, and downscaling as well as spatial interpolation approaches will be evaluated in order to replace elevation as a proxy variable with estimates of mean annual air temperature.

  15. HIV prevention and low-income Chilean women

    Science.gov (United States)

    CIANELLI, ROSINA; FERRER, LILIAN; MCELMURRY, BEVERLY J.

    2008-01-01

    Socio-cultural factors and HIV-related misinformation contribute to the increasing number of Chilean women living with HIV. In spite of this, and to date, few culturally specific prevention activities have been developed for this population. The goal of the present study was to elicit the perspectives of low-income Chilean women regarding HIV and relevant socio-cultural factors, as a forerunner to the development of a culturally appropriate intervention. As part of a mixed-methods study, fifty low-income Chilean women participated in a survey and twenty were selected to participate in prevention, in-depth interviews. Results show evidence of widespread misinformation and misconceptions related to HIV/AIDS. Machismo and marianismo offer major barriers to prevention programme development. Future HIV prevention should stress partner communication, empowerment and improving the education of women vulnerable to HIV. PMID:18432428

  16. Patrones temporales de recuento de células somáticas, grasa, proteína y nitrógeno ureico en leche de estanque y su asociación con fertilidad en ganado lechero en la zona centro-sur de Chile Temporal patterns of bulk tank somatic cell count, fat, protein, and urea nitrogen and their association with fertility in Central-Southern Chilean dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PJ Pinedo

    2010-01-01

    , considering monthly LE samples from 187 farms (~12,000 dairy cows at any time in Central-Southern Chilean dairy cattle from 1997 to 2007. Reproductive indexes included in the study were calving to first service interval (IPPS, d, calving to conception interval (IPP, d and services per conception (SC. Bulk tank LNRCS was positively associated with herd size, milk yield (305 mature equivalent, milk solids and NUL. Bulk tank NUL was positively associated with milk yield and LE RCS. Average calving to first service interval was 92.5 d and showed a positive association with LE protein percentage and NUL. Average calving to conception interval was 138.9 d and was positively associated with LE NUL. It is concluded that the most significant changes in LE components during the last 10 years, in Central-Southern Chilean Holstein cattle, corresponded to a decrease in RCS and an increase in NUL. Changes in RCS reflect an improvement in mammary health, milk quality and milk yield. Bulk tank NUL concentrations were high during the last 5 years in study and depended on factors such as milk production, protein percentage, month and year. Bulk tank NUL was the milk component with the most notorious association with reproductive parameters. More data about protein nutrition should be evaluated in this Chilean cattle population.

  17. The high Andes, gene flow and a stable hybrid zone shape the genetic structure of a wide-ranging South American parrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaefer H Martin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the gene flow in some organisms is strongly affected by physical barriers and geographical distance, other highly mobile species are able to overcome such constraints. In southern South America, the Andes (here up to 6,900 m may constitute a formidable barrier to dispersal. In addition, this region was affected by cycles of intercalating arid/moist periods during the Upper/Late Pleistocene and Holocene. These factors may have been crucial in driving the phylogeographic structure of the vertebrate fauna of the region. Here we test these hypotheses in the burrowing parrot Cyanoliseus patagonus (Aves, Psittaciformes across its wide distributional range in Chile and Argentina. Results Our data show a Chilean origin for this species, with a single migration event across the Andes during the Upper/Late Pleistocene, which gave rise to all extant Argentinean mitochondrial lineages. Analyses suggest a complex population structure for burrowing parrots in Argentina, which includes a hybrid zone that has remained stable for several thousand years. Within this zone, introgression by expanding haplotypes has resulted in the evolution of an intermediate phenotype. Multivariate regressions show that present day climatic variables have a strong influence on the distribution of genetic heterogeneity, accounting for almost half of the variation in the data. Conclusions Here we show how huge barriers like the Andes and the regional environmental conditions imposed constraints on the ability of a parrot species to colonise new habitats, affecting the way in which populations diverged and thus, genetic structure. When contact between divergent populations was re-established, a stable hybrid zone was formed, functioning as a channel for genetic exchange between populations.

  18. Moderate, strong and strongest earthquake-prone areas in the Caucasus, California and the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzeboev, Boris; Gvishiani, Alexei

    2016-04-01

    We present this study on recognition of areas of possible occurrence of strong earthquakes. The study deals with the earthquake-prone areas in three regions with different geological and tectonic structures located in different parts of the world. The authors created a new method (FCAZ - Fuzzy Clustering and Zoning) for recognition of highly seismic areas, where epicenters of earthquakes with magnitude M≥M0 can occur. The magnitude threshold M0 depends on the seismic activity of the region. The objects of clustering are earthquake epicenters. The new method allows us to implement uniformly necessary clustering of the recognition objects respectively for moderate, strong and strongest events. Suggested approach consists of two steps: clustering of known earthquake epicenters by the original DPS (Discrete Perfect Sets) algorithm and delineating highly seismic zones around the recognized clusters by another original E2XT algorithm. By means of this method we detected the areas of possible occurrence of the epicenters of strong earthquakes in the Caucasus (M≥5), in California (M≥6.5) and in the mountain belt of the Andes (M≥7.75). The latter case relates to the possible areas of natural disaster occurence. Reliability of the results is confirmed by numerous control experiments, including individual and complete seismic history. Two strongest recent Chilean earthquakes occurred in 2014 and 2015 after the moment the results were published. Their epicenters belong to the zone recognized as high seismically hazardous. It is a strong independent argument which confirms the reliability of the results. The presented results integrate most recent outcomes of more than 40 years of research in pattern recognition and systems analysis for seismic zoning implemented in Russian Academy of Science. This research is supported by the Russian Science Foundation (project № 15-17-30020).

  19. Seismological Parameters in the Northern Andes, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobiesiak, M.; Palme de Osechas, C.; Choy, J. E.; Morandi S., M. T.; Campo, M.; Granado Ruiz, C.

    2001-12-01

    Venezuelas tectonic setting as part of the plate boundary between the Caribbean and the South American plate causes two major seismologically active fault systems: the roughly west - east trending strike slip fault system along the coast with numerous sub-parallel faults and the Bocono fault system, which dominates the Venezuelan southwest - northeast striking Andes. The main Bocono fault reaches a total length of about 500 km and has a width of approximately 100 km between the southern and northern baseline of the mountain slopes which are marked by inverse faults. This is believed to be due to strain partitioning, a concept which seems to apply as well to the Bocono fault system. The whole fault system is characterized by a high seismicity rate of small scale and intermediate event magnitudes ranging from 1.5 to 6.3 in the last fifty years. In this study we would like to present an investigation on 39 focal mechanism solutions and a b-value mapping of the Andean region with the main goal to throw light on the stess and strain situation. For recompiling the focal memchanisms calculated from first motion polarities, various sources had to been used: seismograms from stations of the local and regional networks of the Seismological Center of ULA, the national seismic network operated by FUNVISIS, the seismic network Lago Maracaibo of PDVSA and the local seismic network of DESURCA. For the b-value mapping we used the two catalogues of ULA and DESURCA of which the last one registered more than 6500 events from 1994 to 1999. The set of focal mechanism solutions studied showed normal, strike slip, and reverse faulting mechanisms concentrated in distinct areas of the Bocono fault system and thus resulting in a zonation also supported by the determinations of the azimuths of the maximum horizontal stress SHmax. This hypothesis of the zonation of the Andes region is strongly supported by the results of the b-value mapping. The zonation as seen in the varying major stress

  20. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1986 calendar year. The report...

  1. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1985 calendar year. The report...

  2. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1991 calendar year. The report begins...

  3. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1992 calendar year. The report begins...

  4. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1993 calendar year. The report begins...

  5. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1987 calendar year. The report...

  6. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1981 calendar year. The report...

  7. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1982 calendar year. The report...

  8. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1990 calendar year. The report...

  9. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1983 calendar year. The report...

  10. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1989 calendar year. The report...

  11. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1984 calendar year. The report...

  12. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1988 calendar year. The report...

  13. Supply Management Analysis of the Chilean Navy Acquisition System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    1. Generic supply chain diagram (from Sanders, 2012) ......................................11 Figure 2. Chilean Navy Logistics Organization...Sanders, 2012). Supply chain management involves the following activities (Monczka et al., 2009, pp. 17–19). • Purchasing or procurement • Inbound ...it will be measured, and how the data obtained will be used (Monczka et al., 2009). Some examples of indicators used inside the military logistics

  14. The 2011 Chilean Student Movement against Neoliberal Educational Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellei, Cristián; Cabalin, Cristian; Orellana, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the 2011 Chilean student movement, the most relevant social mobilisation in Chile since the restoration of democracy in 1990. Based on available material and secondary sources, it describes the main features of this student movement, analyses the key components of the students' discourse and its relationship with the Chilean…

  15. Association between eating behavior scores and obesity in Chilean children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amador Paola

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inadequate eating behavior and physical inactivity contribute to the current epidemic of childhood obesity. The aim of this study was to assess the association between eating behavior scores and childhood obesity in Chilean children. Design and methods We recruited 126 obese, 44 overweight and 124 normal-weight Chilean children (6-12 years-old; both genders according to the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF criteria. Eating behavior scores were calculated using the Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire (CEBQ. Factorial analysis in the culturally-adapted questionnaire for Chilean population was used to confirm the original eight-factor structure of CEBQ. The Cronbach's alpha statistic (>0.7 in most subscales was used to assess internal consistency. Non-parametric methods were used to assess case-control associations. Results Eating behavior scores were strongly associated with childhood obesity in Chilean children. Childhood obesity was directly associated with high scores in the subscales "enjoyment of food" (P Conclusion Our study shows a strong and graded association between specific eating behavior scores and childhood obesity in Chile.

  16. Quality of Chilean Early Childhood Education from an International Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalon, Malva; Suzuki, Emy; Herrera, Maria Olivia; Mathiesen, Maria Elena

    2002-01-01

    Assessed the quality of different types of early childhood care and education programs in Chile according to international standards. Recorded structural and process characteristics observed in the classrooms. Found that Chilean preschool programs showed a minimum level of quality, with a high proportion of centers in the inadequate range.…

  17. Prevalence and risk factors for bruises in Chilean bovine carcasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strappini, A.C.; Frankena, K.; Metz, J.H.M.; Kemp, B.

    2010-01-01

    Records of cattle slaughtered at two Chilean slaughterhouses (SLH1 and SLH2) were used to determine prevalence and risk factors for carcasses with bruises. Bruise prevalence amounted to 12.3% but differed between slaughterhouses (20.8% for SLH1 and 8.6% for SLH2 respectively). Bruise severity grade

  18. Chilean Adolescents' and Parents' Views on Autonomy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, M. Loreto; Pérez, J. Carola; Cumsille, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to understand Chilean parents' and adolescents' conceptions of autonomy and whether they hold different expectations for autonomous behaviors by generation and socioeconomic level. A qualitative approach to data collection was used through separate focus groups of parents and adolescents from different socioeconomic condition.…

  19. The first ANDES elements: 9-DOF plate bending triangles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militello, Carmelo; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1991-01-01

    New elements are derived to validate and assess the assumed natural deviatoric strain (ANDES) formulation. This is a brand new variant of the assumed natural strain (ANS) formulation of finite elements, which has recently attracted attention as an effective method for constructing high-performance elements for linear and nonlinear analysis. The ANDES formulation is based on an extended parametrized variational principle developed in recent publications. The key concept is that only the deviatoric part of the strains is assumed over the element whereas the mean strain part is discarded in favor of a constant stress assumption. Unlike conventional ANS elements, ANDES elements satisfy the individual element test (a stringent form of the patch test) a priori while retaining the favorable distortion-insensitivity properties of ANS elements. The first application of this formulation is the development of several Kirchhoff plate bending triangular elements with the standard nine degrees of freedom. Linear curvature variations are sampled along the three sides with the corners as gage reading points. These sample values are interpolated over the triangle using three schemes. Two schemes merge back to conventional ANS elements, one being identical to the Discrete Kirchhoff Triangle (DKT), whereas the third one produces two new ANDES elements. Numerical experiments indicate that one of the ANDES element is relatively insensitive to distortion compared to previously derived high-performance plate-bending elements, while retaining accuracy for nondistorted elements.

  20. Horizontal subduction zones, convergence velocity and the building of the Andes

    CERN Document Server

    Martinod, Joseph; Roperch, Pierrick; Guillaume, Benjamin; Espurt, Nicolas; 10.1016/j.epsl.2010.09.010

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the relationships between Andean shortening, plate velocities at the trench, and slab geometry beneath South America. Although some correlation exists between the convergence velocity and the westward motion of South America on the one hand, and the shortening of the continental plate on the other hand, plate kinematics neither gives a satisfactory explanation to the Andean segmentation in general, nor explains the development of the Bolivian orocline in Paleogene times. We discuss the Cenozoic history of horizontal slab segments below South America, arguing that they result from the subduction of oceanic plateaus whose effect is to switch the buoyancy of the young subducting plate to positive. We argue that the existence of horizontal slab segments, below the Central Andes during Eocene-Oligocene times, and below Peru and North-Central Chile since Pliocene, resulted (1) in the shortening of the continental plate interiors at a large distance from the trench, (2) in stronger interplate coupling and...

  1. Chilean jagged lobster, Projasus bahamondei, in the southeastern Pacific Ocean: current state of knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio M Arana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Chilean jagged lobster (Projasus bahamondei is a deep-water crustacean (175-550 m occurring in certain areas of the southeastern Pacific Ocean, including the Nazca Ridge, Desventuradas Islands, the Juan Fernandez archipelago and ridge, and the continental slope off the central coast of Chile. This review describes the taxonomic status, geographical and bathymetric distribution, some biological aspects and habitat characteristics of this species. Additionally, both artisanal and industrial exploitation attempts made within the region are detailed, as well as fishing operation results, chemical composition, different elaboration procedures and the destination of the catch. The main objectives of this review are to contribute to the knowledge of P. bahamondei as a component of the deep-sea ecosystem and to highlight its importance as a potential fishery resource.

  2. Last millenium environmental changes in Lake Bertrand sediments, Chilean Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacré, V.; Fagel, N.; Schmidt, S.; Alvarez, D.; Araneda, A.; Urrutia, R.

    2012-04-01

    Our study focuses on a multiproxy analysis of sedimentary records from Lago Bertrand (area 50 km2; 227 masl; 46°55'S 72°50'W). Three cores were retrieved during fieldtrips in 2009 and 2011 with an Uwitec gravity corer. One core was collected in the main lake (LBt09, 102 cm) and two others in a lateral extension (LBb11-A, 162 cm and LBb11-B, 156 cm). Data 210Pb and 137Cs give average sedimentation rates of 2 mm/yr for the upper core section from the main lake, allowing a decennial resolution. Our aim is to document the climatic variability during the last millennium in Northern Patagonia and its impact on the environment. Lago Bertrand is separated from a pro-glacial lake (Lago Plomo) by a morainic barrier. The sediments of this lake are mainly composed of clayed silts and very few sandy silts. In the cores from the Eastern branch of Lago Bertrand, X-ray radiographies and magnetic susceptibility profiles evidence well-defined pluri-millimetric laminations with organic-rich layers, especially in the central core section. In the main lake, X-ray radiographies show diffuse pluri-millimetric laminations while magnetic susceptibility profiles do not confirm it. The sediments of the main lake appear more homogeneous with less organic-rich layers. They are characterized by low C/N ratio (10), supporting an important aquatic productivity; high inorganic content (90-95% of the bulk sediment); two peaks in the biological silica profile; and abundant diatoms (50-100 µm). According to the age model, the changes in aquatic productivity occurred between 1700 and 1850 AD. The cores from the Eastern branch of Lago Bertrand are under investigation to confirm the extension of the sedimentological changes observed in the main lake. The main sedimentological change observed in Lago Bertrand occurs during an interval equivalent to a part of the Little Ice Age. A similar biogenic silica-rich layer was also recorded in another relatively distant lake (Lago Thompson at 45°30'S, 72°47

  3. Description and phylogeny of three new species of Synophis (Colubridae, Dipsadinae) from the tropical Andes in Ecuador and Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Carvajal, Omar; Echevarría, Lourdes Y; Venegas, Pablo J; Germán Chávez; Camper, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of three new species of Synophis snakes from the eastern slopes of the tropical Andes in Ecuador and Peru is reported. All previous records of Synophis bicolor from eastern Ecuador correspond to Synophis bogerti sp. n., which occurs between 1000-1750 m along a large part of the Amazonian slopes of the Ecuadorian Andes. In contrast, Synophis zamora sp. n. is restricted to southeastern Ecuador, including Cordillera del Cóndor, between 1543-1843 m. Synophis insulomontanus sp. n. is from the eastern slopes of the Andes in central and northern Peru, between 1122-1798 m, and represents the first record of Synophis from this country. All three new species share in common a large lateral spine at the base of the hemipenial body. A molecular phylogenetic tree based on three mitochondrial genes is presented, including samples of Diaphorolepis wagneri. Our tree strongly supports Synophis and Diaphorolepis as sister taxa, as well as monophyly of the three new species described here and Synophis calamitus. Inclusion of Synophis and Diaphorolepis within Dipsadinae as sister to a clade containing Imantodes, Dipsas, Ninia, Hypsiglena and Pseudoleptodeira is also supported.

  4. Modeling potential distribution of Oligoryzomys longicaudatus, the Andes virus (Genus: Hantavirus) reservoir, in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreo, Verónica; Glass, Gregory; Shields, Timothy; Provensal, Cecilia; Polop, Jaime

    2011-09-01

    We constructed a model to predict the potential distribution of Oligoryzomys longicaudatus, the reservoir of Andes virus (Genus: Hantavirus), in Argentina. We developed an extensive database of occurrence records from published studies and our own surveys and compared two methods to model the probability of O. longicaudatus presence; logistic regression and MaxEnt algorithm. The environmental variables used were tree, grass and bare soil cover from MODIS imagery and, altitude and 19 bioclimatic variables from WorldClim database. The models performances were evaluated and compared both by threshold dependent and independent measures. The best models included tree and grass cover, mean diurnal temperature range, and precipitation of the warmest and coldest seasons. The potential distribution maps for O. longicaudatus predicted the highest occurrence probabilities along the Andes range, from 32°S and narrowing southwards. They also predicted high probabilities for the south-central area of Argentina, reaching the Atlantic coast. The Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome cases coincided with mean occurrence probabilities of 95 and 77% for logistic and MaxEnt models, respectively. HPS transmission zones in Argentine Patagonia matched the areas with the highest probability of presence. Therefore, colilargos presence probability may provide an approximate risk of transmission and act as an early tool to guide control and prevention plans.

  5. Elevation and vegetation influences on soil properties in Chilean Nothofagus forests Influencia de la elevación y la vegetación sobre las propiedades del suelo de los bosques chilenos de Nothofagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KELLY L.M DECKER

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available We measured net nitrogen mineralization, net nitrification, proportional nitrification, and total inorganic nitrogen, available phosphorus, and soil organic carbon in five Andean forested stands in an attempt to resolve the relative influence of elevation and forest canopy composition on soil organic matter and nutrient dynamics in this ecosystem type. Our five forested study sites were within a contiguous Nothofagus forest that ranged from 1,280 to 1,700 m elevation in the central Chilean Andes. The five sites consisted of three single species stands, one each of the low elevation deciduous N. obliqua, the evergreen N. dombeyi, or the high elevation deciduous N. pumilio, as well as two mixed evergreen-deciduous stands. There was no statistically significant relationship of nitrogen mineralization or phosphorus with elevation. In contrast, there were statistically significant, though weak, negative relationships between elevation and net nitrification, proportional nitrification, soil pH and organic carbon. In general, soils from the N. obliqua stand had higher levels/rates of nitrification, soil organic carbon content, soil pH, and plant available phosphorus than soils form the other single species stands. In contrast, the N. dombeyi and N. pumilio stands had lower rates of nitrification and soil pH than did the N. obliqua stand. The evergreen-deciduous mixed stands tended to be intermediate in soil properties. These results demonstrate that vegetation, particularly the balance of evergreen and deciduous species, exerts stronger control over soil chemical and biochemical properties than the climate variations induced by 350 m in elevation, even where the evergreen and deciduous species are closely-related angiosperms.Medimos la mineralización neta de nitrógeno, la nitrificación, el total de nitrógeno disponible, el fósforo disponible y el carbono orgánico del suelo en cinco rodales forestales andinos con el propósito de separar la

  6. Prevalence and risk factors for bruises in Chilean bovine carcasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strappini, A C; Frankena, K; Metz, J H M; Gallo, B; Kemp, B

    2010-11-01

    Records of cattle slaughtered at two Chilean slaughterhouses (SLH1 and SLH2) were used to determine prevalence and risk factors for carcasses with bruises. Bruise prevalence amounted to 12.3% but differed between slaughterhouses (20.8% for SLH1 and 8.6% for SLH2 respectively). Bruise severity grade 1 (mild) was most frequently recorded. The type of the animal, source of animal, the level of fat cover and lairage time were associated with the presence of bruises. Older categories of animals and animals that pass through a market before being moved to the slaughterhouse are more prone to show bruises. The results also indicate that under the reported Chilean circumstances animals that have longer lairage times (over 12 h) have a significantly reduced risk for bruises, except for oxen. Presence of bruises is also significantly associated with increased carcass pH values.

  7. The Chilean Health System: 20 Years of Reforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Annick

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chilean health care system has been intensively reformed in the past 20 years. Reforms under the Pinochet government (1973-1990 aimed mainly at the decentralization of the system and the development of a private sector. Decentralization involved both a deconcentration process and the devolution of primary health care to municipalities. The democratic governments after 1990 chose to preserve the core organization but introduced reforms intended to correct the system's failures and to increase both efficiency and equity. The present article briefly explains the current organization of the Chilean health care system. It also reviews the different reforms introduced in the past 20 years, from the Pinochet regime to the democratic governments. Finally, a brief discussion describes the strengths and weaknesses of the system, as well as the challenges it currently faces.

  8. Out of the Andes: patterns of diversification in clearwing butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, M; Joron, M; Willmott, K; Silva-Brandão, K L; Kaiser, V; Arias, C F; Gomez Piñerez, L M; Uribe, S; Brower, A V Z; Freitas, A V L; Jiggins, C D

    2009-04-01

    Global biodiversity peaks in the tropical forests of the Andes, a striking geological feature that has likely been instrumental in generating biodiversity by providing opportunities for both vicariant and ecological speciation. However, the role of these mountains in the diversification of insects, which dominate biodiversity, has been poorly explored using phylogenetic methods. Here we study the role of the Andes in the evolution of a diverse Neotropical insect group, the clearwing butterflies. We used dated species-level phylogenies to investigate the time course of speciation and to infer ancestral elevation ranges for two diverse genera. We show that both genera likely originated at middle elevations in the Andes in the Middle Miocene, contrasting with most published results in vertebrates that point to a lowland origin. Although we detected a signature of vicariance caused by the uplift of the Andes at the Miocene-Pliocene boundary, most sister species were parapatric without any obvious vicariant barrier. Combined with an overall decelerating speciation rate, these results suggest an important role for ecological speciation and adaptive radiation, rather than simple vicariance.

  9. Andes hantavirus variant in rodents, southern Amazon Basin, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razuri, Hugo; Tokarz, Rafal; Ghersi, Bruno M; Salmon-Mulanovich, Gabriela; Guezala, M Claudia; Albujar, Christian; Mendoza, A Patricia; Tinoco, Yeny O; Cruz, Christopher; Silva, Maria; Vasquez, Alicia; Pacheco, Víctor; Ströher, Ute; Guerrero, Lisa Wiggleton; Cannon, Deborah; Nichol, Stuart T; Hirschberg, David L; Lipkin, W Ian; Bausch, Daniel G; Montgomery, Joel M

    2014-02-01

    We investigated hantaviruses in rodents in the southern Amazon Basin of Peru and identified an Andes virus variant from Neacomys spinosus mice. This finding extends the known range of this virus in South America and the range of recognized hantaviruses in Peru. Further studies of the epizoology of hantaviruses in this region are warranted.

  10. Women and changes in the Chilean economy: some questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiaroski, M S

    1996-10-01

    The author argues that a new development model that encourages greater participation of women in the work force in domestic piecework, temporary work, and subcontracting may further lead to the exploitation of women in Chile. The importance of women in economic development in Chile should be based on building skills, providing support child care services, reorienting women's education, and tax incentives. Chile over the past decade has achieved relatively stable economic growth and increased employment of women. During 1990-93 the growth of women in the work force increased at a rate of 16.8%, while men's presence increased by only 9.8%. The Chilean economy is based on a sophisticated modern sector and a labor-intensive informal sector. The Chilean model of development relies on cheap, flexible labor and a government approval of this model. Increased participation of women in the labor force is usually perceived as increased economic empowerment. A 1994 Oxfam study found that women were being forced into the labor market due to declines in family income and low wages. 46% of men and women received wages that did not cover basic necessities. The Chilean labor market is gender-stratified. Men are paid better than women for the same work. Men are in more permanent positions. Labor laws are either inadequate or violated, particularly for hours of work and overtime pay and conditions of employment and benefits. Traditional female jobs are those that rely on women's natural attributes. These unskilled attributes are rewarded with low wages. Little opportunity is provided for upgrading skills or acquiring new skills. Some women turn down advancement because of a lack of role models. Women have little opportunity to develop their self-image as workers. Poor self-images affect women's work attitudes and motivation. Some firms use competition between women to boost production. Chilean women remain in subordinate roles.

  11. Educational Opportunity and Contentious Politics: The 2011 Chilean Student Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Salinas, Daniel; Fraser, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 Chilean student movement was one of the most massive and original processes of social mobilization in Latin America in the last decade. Led by university students, the movement challenged the longstanding free-market orientation of educational policies in Chile, demanding a more active role for the State in the regulation and supply of education. In this article, we study the main educational and social factors that explain the emergence of the movement. We draw upon social movement ...

  12. A New Liquidity Risk Measure for the Chilean Banking Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastián Becerra; Gregory Claeys; Juan Francisco Martínez

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work is to construct an appropriate measure of liquidity risk for Chilean banks. There are already several measures of liquidity risk in the literature. Most of these metrics are based on specific assumptions and expert opinion. In order to overcome the potential problems associated with discretionary assumptions, and to exploit the information available, similar to the work of Drehman and Nikolaou (2012), we propose a metric based on the behavior of banks in the procure...

  13. [ANTHROPOMETRIC CHILEAN TABLE TENNIS PLAYERS OF COMPETITIVE FEATURES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez Sepúlveda, Rodrigo; Barraza, Fernando; Rosales Soto, Giovanni; Báez, Eduardo; Tuesta, Marcelo

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the anthropometric profile and somatotype of a sample of 50 players table tennis competitive with an average age 21.6 (± 3.1) years belonging to the Chilean team and institutions of higher education in the region of Valparaiso. The evaluation was conducted under the protocol marking the International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry (ISAK) for the measurement procedure 25 restricted profile variables described by Drinkwater, Norton and Olds. Order to determine the body composition, fat, muscle, bone, skin and tissue residual was considered, using the equations proposed by Kerr. The body shape is characterized through somatotype method proposed by Carter. The sample was divided into 4 groups; Chilean Selection, Traditional Private Universities, State Universities and Private Universities Traditional Nontraditional. Regarding body composition; the Chilean team has the highest values of muscle tissue (45.6 ± 1.7%) and the lowest values of adipose tissue (25.2 ± 1.8%), also presenting lesser value in the Σ 6 skinfolds (mm) . The results showed no significant differences between groups in the aforementioned variables. In general somatotype compared by analyzing SANOVA no significant differences between groups (p = 0.409) was observed. The results show a biotype with such a characterization of endo-mesomorph with average values (4,1-4,9-1,8). This study provides updated data biotypological reference for this sport that can be used for decision-making.

  14. [Evaluation of antimicrobial consumption en 15 Chilean hospitals: Results of a collaborative work, 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Isabel; Rosales, Ruth; Cabello, Ángela; Bavestrello, Luis; Labarca, Jaime

    2016-06-01

    Surveillance of antimicrobial consumption is a central part in programs of antibiotic stewardship. However, in Chile there are no national data on antibiotic consumption representing a significant number of hospitals by clinical services. In 2013 a survey was sent to multiple Chilean hospitals to evaluate antimicrobial consumption in medical services (MS), surgery services (SS) and critical care units (ICU). We used the standardized methodology recommended by the WHO, using the number of DDD/100 days beds. In the MS and SS beta-lactam and no beta-lactam antibiotics commonly used were evaluated. In the ICU consumption vancomycin, linezolid, imipenem, merope-nem, colistin and tigecycline was evaluated. Fifteen hospitals reported the density of antimicrobial consumption. Ceftriaxone and cloxacillin were the most commonly used antibiotics in general services (average cloxacillin 4,9 DDD/100 bed days in MS and 8,0 DDD/100 in SS; ceftriaxone 13,5 DDD/100 in MS and 16,7 DDD/100 in SS). In the SS there was also a significant consumption of metronidazole (average 14,5 DDD/100 bed days). In the ICU there was an important variability of consumption of selected antibiotics. This study reports the average and range of antibiotic consumption in MS, SS, and ICU from a significant number of hospitals in the country, during 2013. This information allows hospitals to compare their consumption of antibiotics with a significant sample of Chilean hospitals. Analysis of this information should consider a careful interpretation according to the sample shown here and the reality of each hospital.

  15. Geochemistry of surface sediments from the fjords of Northern Chilean Patagonia (44-47°S): Spatial variability and implications for paleoclimate reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Sébastien; Hughen, Konrad A.; Sepúlveda, Julio; Pantoja, Silvio

    2012-01-01

    The Patagonian fjords have a clear potential to provide high-resolution sedimentary and geochemical records of past climate and environmental change in the Southern Andes. To improve our ability to interpret these proxy records, we investigated the processes that control fjord sediment inorganic geochemistry through a geochemical, mineralogical and sedimentological analysis of surface sediment samples from the fjords of Northern Chilean Patagonia. A simple Terrestrial Index based on measurements of salinity and Fraction of Terrestrial Carbon was used to estimate the terrestrial input/river discharge at each site. Our results demonstrate that, under the cold climate conditions of Patagonia, chemical weathering is weak and the inorganic geochemical composition of the fjord sediments is primarily controlled by hydrodynamic mineralogical sorting, i.e., the intensity of river discharge. Our results suggest that the distribution of Fe, Ti and Zr in surface sediments is controlled by their association with heavy and/or coarse minerals, whereas Al is independent of hydrodynamic processes. The elemental ratios Fe/Al, Ti/Al and Zr/Al are therefore well suited for estimating changes in the energy of terrestrial sediment supply into the fjords through time. Zr/Al is particularly sensitive in proximal environments, while Fe/Al is most useful in the outer fjords and on the continental margin. In the most proximal environments, however, Fe/Al is inversely related to hydrodynamic conditions. Caution should therefore be exercised when interpreting Fe/Al ratios in terms of past river discharge. The application of these proxies to long sediment cores from Quitralco fjord and Golfo Elefantes validates our interpretations. Our results also emphasize the need to measure Al-based elemental ratios at high precision, which can be achieved using simultaneous acquisition ICP-AES technology. This study therefore constitutes a strong basis for the interpretation of sedimentary records from the

  16. Measures of Cost Economies in Chilean Banking: 1984-1991 Measures of Cost Economies in Chilean Banking: 1984-1991

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat B. Nauriyal

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents measures of cost economies in Chilean banking following the many regulatory and structural changes implemented by Chilean authorities in the aftermath of the 1981-83 financial system crisis. Utilizing panel, and annual cross section monthly data on 37 individual banking institutions in operation over 1984-91, a translogarithmic cost specification is adopted to estimate economies of scale and scope. My findings suggest the presence of persistent and significant economies of scale. Weaker evidence on the presence of economies of scope is also detected. These findings are of additional importance as the estimation methodology adopted overcomes an inherent flaw in most other similar studies that lump together different sizes of financial institutions for a cross sectional analysis over a one or two year period. This paper presents measures of cost economies in Chilean banking following the many regulatory and structural changes implemented by Chilean authorities in the aftermath of the 1981-83 financial system crisis. Utilizing panel, and annual cross section monthly data on 37 individual banking institutions in operation over 1984-91, a translogarithmic cost specification is adopted to estimate economies of scale and scope. My findings suggest the presence of persistent and significant economies of scale. Weaker evidence on the presence of economies of scope is also detected. These findings are of additional importance as the estimation methodology adopted overcomes an inherent flaw in most other similar studies that lump together different sizes of financial institutions for a cross sectional analysis over a one or two year period.

  17. Monitoring rock glacier dynamics and ground temperatures in the semiarid Andes (Chile, 30°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenning, Alexander; Azócar, Guillermo F.; Bodin, Xavier

    2013-04-01

    Rock glaciers and mountain permafrost are widespread in the high semiarid Andes of Chile, where they concentrate greater amounts of ice than glaciers. Rock glaciers are of particular interest because in some cases the permafrost they contain might be in a degrading in response to climatic warming. This could result in increased dynamics and even to destabilization, which has been observed on some rock glaciers in the studied area. Displacement rates and active-layer temperatures of two rock glaciers as well as ground surface temperatures of the periglacial environment in the upper Elqui valley have been monitored since summer 2009/10 with funding from the Chilean Dirección General de Aguas. Differential GPS measurements of 115 points on the surface of two rock glaciers since April 2010 showed horizontal displacements of up to 1.3 m/a on the Llano de las Liebres rock glacier and up to 1.2 m/a on the Tapado rock glacier. General velocity patterns are consistent with the morphological evidence of activity (e.g., front slopes, looseness of debris) and for the Tapado complex, a clearly distinct activity from the debris-covered glacier was observed. Temperature measurements in four boreholes indicate active-layer depths of about 2.5 m at the highest locations on the Tapado rock glacier (~4400 m a.s.l.) and about 8 m near the front of the Llano rock glacier (3786 m a.s.l.). Spatial patterns of mean ground surface temperature (MGST) were analyzed with regards to influences of elevation, potential incoming solar radiation, location on ice-debris landforms (rock and debris-covered glaciers), and snow cover duration using linear mixed-effects models. While accounting for the other variables, sites with long-lasting snow patches had ~0.4°C lower MGST, and ice-debris landforms had ~0.4-0.6°C lower MGST than general debris surfaces, highlighting important local modifications to the general topographic variation of ground thermal conditions.

  18. Eclogite-, amphibolite- and blueschist-facies rocks from Diego de Almagro Island (Patagonia): Episodic accretion and thermal evolution of the Chilean subduction interface during the Cretaceous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyppolito, Thais; Angiboust, Samuel; Juliani, Caetano; Glodny, Johannes; Garcia-Casco, Antonio; Calderón, Mauricio; Chopin, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Few localities in the Patagonian Andes expose remnants of the Mesozoic Chilean paleo-accretionary complex. We focus on the Diego de Almagro Island high-pressure/low-temperature (HP/LT) Complex, a pluri-kilometer thick sequence comprising metavolcanic rocks with oceanic affinities and metasedimentary rocks. In this study, the deepest segments of the Chilean subduction interface in Patagonia are characterized for the first time. Despite its apparent homogeneity, the complex is actually composed of two tectonic units with distinct ages of metamorphism and thermal evolution: the garnet amphibolite (GA) and the underlying blueschist (BS) units. The GA unit mafic rocks exhibit epidote, phengite, titanite, rutile, chloritoid and paragonite inclusions in prograde garnet I, diopside + albite intergrows replacing omphacite inclusions in garnet II, and relict omphacite (XJd45) included in edenitic-pargasitic amphiboles. Thermobarometric results show that these rocks were buried along a relatively cold prograde path (c. 11 °C/km) and reached eclogite-facies near peak pressure conditions (c. 550-600 °C, 1.6 GPa). The GA unit underwent a pervasive stage of amphibolitization during decompression at c. 1.3 GPa. Field and petrological observations, together with multi-mineral Rb-Sr dating, indicate that amphibolitization of the GA unit took place along the subduction interface at c. 120 Ma in a slightly warmer subduction regime (c. 13-14 °C/km), in agreeement with the formation of coetanoeus amphibolites at c. 35 km. The underlying BS unit (i) yields four consistent Rb-Sr deformation ages of c. 80 Ma, i.e. 40 Ma younger than the overlying rocks from the GA unit; (ii) exhibits slightly cooler peak metamorphic conditions (c. 520-550 °C, 1.6 GPa) indicating burial along a prograde path of c. 10 °C/km (iii) does not show amphibolite-facies overprint as seen in the GA unit. After a long residence time under amphibolite-facies conditions, the amphibolitized rocks of the GA unit

  19. Glacier shrinkage and water resources in the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francou, Bernard; Coudrain, Anne

    For more than a century glaciers around the world have been melting as air temperatures rise due to a combination of natural processes and human activity. The disappearance of these glaciers can have wide-ranging effects, such as the creation of new natural hazards or changes in stream flow that could threaten water suppliesSome of the most dramatic melting has occurred in the Andes mountain range in South America. To highlight the climatic and glacial change in the Andes and to encourage the scientific community to strengthen the glacier observation network that stretches from Colombia to the Patagonian ice fields, the Instituto Nacional de Recursos Naturales (INRENA), Perú, and the Institute of Research and Development (IRD), France, recently organized the second Symposium on Mass Balance of Andean Glaciers in Huaráz,Perú.

  20. Zeolitización de rocas andesíticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plana, F.

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of some andesites from King George Island (South Shetland Islands, Anctartica has pointed out the existence of a hydrothermal alteration process going rise to a zeolitic secondary minerals of low-temperature assemblages. Two paragenesis have been identified (Smectite-Bytownite-Mordenite, Smectite-Albite-Laumontite which reflecting different conditions durign the hydrothermal alteration of these andesitic rocksEl estudio de rocas andesíticas de la Isla King George (Archipiélago de las Shetland del Sur, Antártida pone de manifiesto la existencia de procesos de alteración hidrotermal con la formación de minerales zeolíticos secundarios pertenecientes a asociaciones de baja temperatura. Se han identificado dos paragénesis (Esmectitas-Bytownita-Mordenita, Esmectitas-AlbitaLaumontita que reflejan distintas condiciones durante la alteración hidrotermal de dichas rocas andesíticas.

  1. Sex determination using the mesio-distal dimension of permanent maxillary incisors and canines in a modern Chilean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckmann, Tanya R; Logar, Ciara; Garrido-Varas, Claudia E; Meek, Susan; Pinto, Ximena Toledo

    2016-03-01

    The pelvis and skull have been shown to be the most accurate skeletal elements for the determination of sex. Incomplete or fragmentary bones are frequently found at forensic sites however teeth are often recovered in forensic cases due to their postmortem longevity. The goal of the present research was to investigate sexual dimorphism between the mesio-distal dimension of the permanent maxillary incisors and canines for the determination of sex in a contemporary Chilean population. Three hundred and three dental models (126 males and 177 females) from individuals ranging in age from 13 years to 37 years old were used from the School of Dentistry, University of Chile. The statistical analyses showed that only the central incisors and canines were sexually dimorphic. Discriminant function score equations were generated for use in sex determination. The average accuracy of sex classification ranged from 59.7% to 65.0% for the univariate analysis and 60.1% to 66.7% for the multivariate analysis. Comparisons to other populations were made. Overall, the accuracies ranged from 54.4% to 63.3% with males most often identified correctly and females most often misidentified. The determination of sex from the mesio-distal width of incisors and canines in Chilean populations does not adhere to the Mohan and Daubert criteria and therefore would not be presented as evidence in court.

  2. Twelve new Demospongiae (Porifera) from Chilean fjords, with remarks upon sponge-derived biogeographic compartments in the SE Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdu, Eduardo; Desqueyroux-Faúndez, Ruth; Carvalho, Mariana De Souza; Lôbo-Hajdu, Gisele; Willenz, Philippe

    2013-12-02

    This article reports on 12 new species originating from the Chilean fjords region, namely Clathria (Microciona) mytilifila sp. nov., Haliclona (Reniera) caduca sp. nov., Latrunculia (L.) ciruela sp. nov., Latrunculia (L.) copihuensis sp. nov., Latrunculia (L.) verenae sp. nov., Latrunculia (L.) yepayek sp. nov., Myxilla (Burtonanchora) araucana sp. nov., Neopodospongia tupecomareni sp. nov., Oceanapia guaiteca sp. nov., Oceanapia spinisphaera sp. nov., Suberites cranium sp. nov. and Tethya melinka sp. nov. The material studied was collected between 5 and 30 m depth at latitudes comprised between 42º and 50ºS, and is part of a large collection of Chilean sponges gathered by an international team in a series of expeditions. Identification keys are provided for SE Pacific Suberites and Latrunculia, and the known species of Myxilla (Burtonanchora) and Neopodospongia. A trans-Pacific link to the New Zealand fauna was retrieved for the latter genus. Distribution ranges apparent from the materials studied here are judged too preliminary to allow any inference on biotic boundaries in the SE Pacific. A revision of earlier assertions about these biogeographic units and their boundaries concluded that very little support remains other than for existence of a Magellanic fauna. This is in part a consequence of revising the taxonomy of sponge species originally deemed to underpin these areas. Specifically, the former proposal of a Central to Southern Chile biogeographic unit (33-56ºS) has been markedly undone. 

  3. Diversification of clearwing butterflies with the rise of the Andes

    OpenAIRE

    De‐Silva, Donna Lisa; Elias, Marianne; Willmott, Keith; Mallet, James; Day, Julia J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aim Despite the greatest butterfly diversity on Earth occurring in the Neotropical Andes and Amazonia, there is still keen debate about the origins of this exceptional biota. A densely sampled calibrated phylogeny for a widespread butterfly subtribe, Oleriina (Nymphalidae: Ithomiini) was used to estimate the origin, colonization history and diversification of this species‐rich group. Location Neotropics. Methods Ancestral elevation and biogeographical ranges were reconstructed using ...

  4. Diversification of clearwing butterflies with the rise of the Andes

    OpenAIRE

    De‐Silva, Donna Lisa; Elias, Marianne; Willmott, Keith; Mallet, James; Day, Julia J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aim Despite the greatest butterfly diversity on Earth occurring in the Neotropical Andes and Amazonia, there is still keen debate about the origins of this exceptional biota. A densely sampled calibrated phylogeny for a widespread butterfly subtribe, Oleriina (Nymphalidae: Ithomiini) was used to estimate the origin, colonization history and diversification of this species‐rich group. Location Neotropics. Methods: Ancestral elevation and biogeographical ranges were reconstructed using...

  5. Preliminary measurements of gamma radiation in Chilean Antarctic Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuardo B, E. (Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago. Dept. de Aplicaciones Nucleares)

    1983-11-01

    Natural and artificial gamma radiation, 1 m above the soil, is being investigated in 4 Chilean Antartic Stations. The measurements are performed with different types of TLD detectors. Preliminary results in the Tte. Marsh Station are reported and discussed. An average exposition of 3,5 ..mu..R/h was found during a 108 days period. This exposition corresponds to an annual dose of about 40 mrad, 8% of the annual dose limit for individual of the public. The presence of low energy artificial radioisotopes was not found.

  6. Chilean Euphorbiaceae species as sources of fuels and raw chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnecco, S.; Bartulin, J.; Marticorena, C.; Ramirez, A.

    1988-01-01

    The potential of some species of Chilean Euphorbiaceae as sources of hydrocarbon-like materials was evaluated. Samples of plants excluding roots, were analyzed for CH/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ extractives, resins and hydrocarbons. The presence of waxes and natural rubber (cis-1,4-polyisoprene) was confirmed using spectroscopic and chromatographic methods. C/H values for representative fractions were calculated and extracted samples from selected species analyzed for apparent protein contents. Results suggested that at least two species, Euphorbia lactiflua and Euphorbia copiapina might have an industrial potential.

  7. Misconception p value among Chilean and Italian academic psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Badenes-Ribera

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The p value misconceptions are based on certain beliefs and attributions about the significance of the results. Thus, they affect the professionals’ decisions and jeopardize the quality of interventions and the accumulation of valid scientific knowledge. We conducted a survey on 164 academic psychologists (134 Italians, 30 Chileans, questioned on this topic. Our findings are consistent with original research and suggest that some participants do not know how to correctly interpret p values. The inverse probability fallacy presents the greatest comprehension problems, followed by the replication fallacy. These results highlight the importance of the statistical re-education of researchers. Recommendations for improving statistical cognition are proposed.

  8. Demographic and labor market in the Chilean countryside Transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos René Rodríguez Garcés

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the information provided by the National Socioeconomic Survey of 1990 and 2013, the Chilean countryside reconfigurations are analyzed in terms of their demographic trends and labor market restructuring. A continuous process of depopulation and aging of the rural population is demographically notes. The agricultural activities of the rural labor market charge less important in terms of jobs and income, showing a strong process and favoring deagrarianisation positioning services area. Finally, a growing number of households that hold informal consensual unions and a greater presence of single-parent households, mainly consisting of female-headed households is observed.

  9. Reconstruction of Late Cretaceous Magmatic Arcs in the Northern Andes: Single Versus Multiple Arc Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, A.; Jaramillo, J. S.; Leon, S.; Hincapie, S.; Mejia, D.; Patino, A. M.; Vanegas, J.; Zapata, S.; Valencia, V.; Jimenez, G.; Monsalve, G.

    2014-12-01

    Although magmatic rocks are major tracers of the geological evolution of convergent margins, pre-collisional events such as subduction erosion, collisional thrusting or late collisional strike slip segmentation may difficult the recognizing of multiple arc systems and therefore the existence of paleogeographic scenarios with multiple subduction systems. New field, U-Pb geochronology and whole rock geochemistry constraints from the northwestern segment of the Central Cordillera in the states of Antioquia and Caldas (Colombia) are used to understand the nature of the Late Cretaceous arc magmatism and evaluate the existence of single or multiple Pacific and Caribbean arc systems in the growth of the Northwestern Andes. The new results integrated with additional field and published information is used to suggest the existence of at least three different magmatic arcs. (1) An Eastern Continental arc built within a well defined Permian to Triassic continental crust that record a protracted 90-70 Ma magmatic evolution, (2) a 90-80 arc formed within attenuated continental crust and associated oceanic crust, (3) 90-88 Ma arc formed over a Late Cretaceous plateau crust. The eastern arcs were formed as part of double eastern vergent subduction system, where the most outboard arc represent a fringing arc formed over detached fragments of continental crust, whereas the easternmost continental arc growth by the closure an subduction of and older and broad Triassic to Early Jurassic back-arc ocean. Its closure also end up in ophiolite emplacement. The third allochtonous oceanic arc was formed over the Caribbean plateau crust and was accreted to the continental margin in the Late Cretaceous. Ongoing paleomagnetic, deformational, gravimetric and basin analysis will be integrate to test this model and understand the complex Late Cretaceous tectonic evolution of the Northern Andes.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of submerged cultures of Chilean basidiomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqueveque, Pedro; Anke, Timm; Saéz, Katia; Silva, Mario; Becerra, José

    2010-10-01

    This study is part of a screening program aimed at searching for bioactive metabolites from Chilean basidiomycetes. Submerged cultivation of fungal mycelia in liquid media was evaluated for antimicrobial activity. A total of 148 strains were obtained in vitro. The extracts produced from submerged cultures were evaluated against bacteria and fungi. In the primary antimicrobial assay, approximately 60% of the extracts presented positive biological activity. The highest frequencies of active strains were from the orders Agaricales (31.0%), Polyporales (20.6%), Sterales (18.3%), Boletales (11.4%), and Cortinariales (9.1%). Antifungal activity was more pronounced than antibacterial activity. Twelve extracts that exhibited strong antimicrobial activity showed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 50 µL/mL against Bacillus brevis and 25∼50 µL/mL against Penicillium notatum and Paecilomyces variotii. The biological activity of some strains did not vary considerably, regardless of the substrate or collection site whereas, for others, it showed marked variations. Differences in antimicrobial activities observed in the different fungal genera suggested that the ability to produce bioactive compounds is not homogenously distributed among basidiomycetes. The information obtained from this study reveals that Chilean basidiomycetes are able to generate small and/or large variations in the normal pathway of compounds production. Thus, it is necessary to evaluate this biological and chemical wealth, which could be an unsuspected reservoir of new and potentially useful molecules.

  11. Chilean management education: rhetoric of pragmatism, consumerism, individualism and elitism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Mandiola Cotroneo

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to understand the character and the role of higher education in business in relation to the wider institutional and structural contexts within which they function. Being loyal to that widespread background, business schools in Chile have become efficient providers of appropriate goods and services for their respective clients and consumers, behaving more like corporations and businesses rather than educational institutions. From this perspective, business education's alignment with the wider political and socio-economic shifts associated with the developments of market economies and economic globalization is a necessary reflection. In this paper we will provide an account of our problematization of management education practices in Chile. This practice was pictured as one of the main characters at the forefront of the Chilean neo-liberal revolution during the final years of the last century. In particular, we will unravel more closely the chain of signifiers articulating the meaning of Chilean higher business education. This articulation is recuperated mainly around how those involved in the management education practice talk about (ourthemselves. As well as specialised press writings, some academic accounts and fragments from our own 'ethnographic' involvement are used for this purpose. Particular attention is paid to the social, political and fantasmatic logics (GLYNOS; HOWARTH, 2007 as key elements of our own explanation of this practice, which in turn informs our critical standpoint.

  12. Participación chilena en reuniones IADR mundiales, 2001-2012 Chilean participation in IADR general sessions, 2001-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Cartes-Velásquez

    2013-04-01

    dental researchers affiliated to Chilean institutions in IADR general sessions over 2001-2012 period. Methodology: Bibliometric study. Search was performed in the web platform Conference Exchange™ for IADR, for general sessions from 2001 to 2012, for the term "Chile", including all presentations with at least one author with an affiliation to some Chilean institutions. The following variables were evaluated: Session, author, institution, international cooperation and topic area. Results: 158 presentations were found, annual average of 13.2 (15.3, in 87.3% there were 1 to 6 authors per presentation. Major participant institution was Universidad de Chile (43%, followed by Universities of Talca (15.8%, Finis Terrae (11.4% and los Andes (10.8%; topics with more participations were Periodontology (13.9%, Cariology (12.7% and Epidemiology (12.7%; 26% of the presentations had participation of foreign institutions. Discussion: These results reinforce previous bibliometrics reports, but highlight two private universities in the top positions. The assessment of participation in IADR General Sessions is an important index of scientific production of Chilean dentistry, complementing the bibliometric assessments focused on ISI publications, allowing a better understanding of knowledge generation in this field.

  13. Report on the 2010 Chilean earthquake and tsunami response

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2011-01-01

    In July 2010, in an effort to reduce future catastrophic natural disaster losses for California, the American Red Cross coordinated and sent a delegation of 20 multidisciplinary experts on earthquake response and recovery to Chile. The primary goal was to understand how the Chilean society and relevant organizations responded to the magnitude 8.8 Maule earthquake that struck the region on February 27, 2010, as well as how an application of these lessons could better prepare California communities, response partners and state emergency partners for a comparable situation. Similarities in building codes, socioeconomic conditions, and broad extent of the strong shaking make the Chilean earthquake a very close analog to the impact of future great earthquakes on California. To withstand and recover from natural and human-caused disasters, it is essential for citizens and communities to work together to anticipate threats, limit effects, and rapidly restore functionality after a crisis. The delegation was hosted by the Chilean Red Cross and received extensive briefings from both national and local Red Cross officials. During nine days in Chile, the delegation also met with officials at the national, regional, and local government levels. Technical briefings were received from the President’s Emergency Committee, emergency managers from ONEMI (comparable to FEMA), structural engineers, a seismologist, hospital administrators, firefighters, and the United Nations team in Chile. Cities visited include Santiago, Talca, Constitución, Concepción, Talcahuano, Tumbes, and Cauquenes. The American Red Cross Multidisciplinary Team consisted of subject matter experts, who carried out special investigations in five Teams on the (1) science and engineering findings, (2) medical services, (3) emergency services, (4) volunteer management, and (5) executive and management issues (see appendix A for a full list of participants and their titles and teams). While developing this

  14. Geochemical composition of river loads in the Tropical Andes: first insights from the Ecuadorian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio Poma, Gustavo; Govers, Gerard; Vanacker, Veerle; Bouillon, Steven; Álvarez, Lenín; Zhiminaicela, Santiago

    2015-04-01

    Processes governing the transport of total suspended material (TSM), total dissolved solids (TDS) and particulate organic carbon (POC) are currently not well known for Tropical Andean river systems. We analyzed the geochemical behavior and the budgets of the particulate and dissolved loads for several sub-catchments in the Paute River basin in the southern Ecuadorian Andes, and examined how anthropogenic activities influenced the dynamics of riverine suspended and dissolved loads. We gathered a large dataset by regularly sampling 8 rivers for their TSM, POC, and TDS. Furthermore, we determined the major elements in the dissolved load and stable isotope composition (δ13C) of both the POC, and the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The rivers that were sampled flow through a wide range of land uses including: 3 nature conservation areas (100 - 300 Km²), an intensive grassland and arable zone (142 Km²); downstream of two cities (1611 and 443 Km²), and 2 degraded basins (286 and 2492 Km²). We described the geochemical characteristics of the river loads both qualitatively and quantitatively. Important differences in TSM, POC and TDS yields were found between rivers: the concentration of these loads increases according with human activities within the basins. For all rivers, TSM, TDS and POC concentrations were dependent on discharge. Overall, a clear relation between TSM and POC (r²=0.62) was observed in all tributaries. The C:N ratios and δ13CPOC suggest that the POC in most rivers is mainly derived from soil organic matter eroded from soils dominated by C3 vegetation (δ13CPOC < -22‰). Low Ca:Si ratios (<1)and high δ13CDIC (-9 to -4) in the Yanuncay, Tomebamba1 and Machángara, rivers suggest that weathering of silica rocks is dominant in these catchments, and that the DIC is mainly derived from the soil or atmospheric CO2. In contrast, the Ca:Si ratio was high for the Burgay and Jadán rivers (1-13), and the low δ13CDIC values (-9 to -15) suggest that

  15. Is tourism damaging ecosystems in the Andes? Current knowledge and an agenda for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Agustina; Monz, Christopher; Pickering, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    Despite the popularity of tourism and recreation in the Andes in South America and the regions conservation value, there is limited research on the ecological impacts of these types of anthropogenic use. Using a systematic quantitative literature review method, we found 47 recreation ecology studies from the Andes, 25 of which used an experimental design. Most of these were from the Southern Andes in Argentina (13 studies) or Chile (eight studies) with only four studies from the Northern Andes. These studies documented a range of impacts on vegetation, birds and mammals; including changes in plant species richness, composition and vegetation cover and the tolerance of wildlife of visitor use. There was little research on the impacts of visitors on soils and aquatic systems and for some ecoregions in the Andes. We identify research priorities across the region that will enhance management strategies to minimise visitor impacts in Andean ecosystems.

  16. Ice-sheet control of continental erosion in central and southern Chile (36°-41°S) over the last 30,000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratli, Jesse M.; Chase, Zanna; McManus, James; Mix, Alan

    2010-11-01

    Bulk sediment chemistry from three Chilean continental margin Ocean Drilling Program sites constrains regional continental erosion over the past 30,000 years. Sediments from thirteen rivers that drain the (mostly igneous) Andes and the (mostly metamorphic) Coast Range, along with existing rock chemistry datasets, define terrestrial provenance for the continental margin sediments. Andean river sediments have high Mg/Al relative to Coast-Range river sediments. Near 36°S, marine sediments have high-Mg/Al (i.e. more Andean) sources during the last glacial period, and lower-Mg/Al (less Andean) sources during the Holocene. Near 41°S a Ti-rich source, likely from coast-range igneous intrusions, is prevalent during Holocene time, whereas high-Mg/Al Andean sources are more prevalent during the last glacial period. We infer that there is a dominant ice-sheet control of sediment sources. At 36°S, Andean-sourced sediment decreased as Andean mountain glaciers retreated after ˜17.6 ka, coincident with local oceanic warming and southward retreat of the Patagonian Forest and, by inference, westerly winds. At 41°S Andean sediment dominance peaks and then rapidly declines at ˜19 ka, coincident with local oceanic warming and the earliest deglacial sea-level rise. We hypothesize that this decreased flux of Andean material in the south is related to rapid retreat of the marine-based portion of the Patagonian Ice Sheet in response to global sea-level rise, as the resulting flooding of the southern portion of the Central Valley created a sink for Andean sediments in this region. Reversal of the decreasing deglacial Mg/Al trend at 41°S from 14.5 to 13.0 ka is consistent with a brief re-advance of the Patagonian ice sheet coincident with the Antarctic Cold Reversal.

  17. Stratigraphic and Petrological Constraints of Cretaceous Subduction Initiation and Arc-Continent Collision in the Northern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, S.; Cardona, A.; Mejia, D.; Parra, M.

    2014-12-01

    Middle to Late-Cretaceous orogenic events in the northern Andes have been commonly reconstructed from the analysis of inland basins or the integration of regional scale thermochronological, geochronological and geochemical datasets from the accreted blocks. In contrast, limited studies have been developed on the stratigraphic and deformational record of magmatic and sedimentary sequences exposed near the suture zones. New field and petrologic data are used to characterize an ophiolite type sequence that outcrops in the western flank from the northwestern segment of the Central Cordillera of Colombia. Stratigraphic analysis indicate the existence of Albian-Aptian deep marine pelitic sequence interbedded with minor chert and thin quartz sandstone beds that apparently change to a volcanic dominate stratigraphy. Deformed ophiolite-like mafic and ultramafic plutonic rocks and isolated pillow lavas are also exposed to the east in fault contact with the pelitic sequence. The pelitic and interlayered volcanic rocks represent the growth of an extensional Early-Cretaceous basin that followed a Late-Jurassic magmatic quiescence in the Northern Andes. The volcano-sedimentary record is probably related to the growth of a fore-arc basin in a new subduction zone that extends until the Late Cretaceous. The deformation and obduction of the ophiolitic association and the fore-arc basin were probably triggered by the Late Cretaceous collision with an allocthonous plateau-arc associated to the migration of the Caribbean plate.

  18. Status and evolution of the cryosphere in the Andes of Santiago (Chile, 33.5°S.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, X.; Rojas, F.; Brenning, A.

    2010-06-01

    In the context of a general retreat of glaciers in the dry Andes, this study focuses on the state and recent evolution of debris-covered glaciers and permafrost-related landforms, especially rock glaciers, in the semiarid to semihumid Laguna Negra catchment, a part of the Andes of central Chile at 33.5°S, that is a key contributor of drinking water for the city of Santiago. We conducted catchment-scale geomorphological mapping, diachronic analysis of 1955 and 1996 orthophotographs and digital elevation models (DEMs), and the analysis of ground temperatures and their sensitivity to climate variation. Rock glaciers dominate spatially and in terms of water storage over glaciers (area ratio: 1.7:1; ratio of water equivalents: 1.5:1). An intense downwasting has affected both debris-covered and exposed glacier components in the Punta Negra subcatchment, a process that is associated with the growth of numerous thermokarst depressions. The altitudinal transect of ground temperature suggest that permafrost is widespread above ˜ 4000 m asl, although it can also occur at lower elevations on sheltered footslopes and within rock glaciers. The sensitivity analysis indicates that the near-surface ground thermal regime at high altitudes is strongly influenced by the snow cover disappearance date, which may therefore constitute an important control on the effect of climatic warming.

  19. Level of evidence and geographic origin of articles published in Chilean dental journals.

    OpenAIRE

    Javier Moraga

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the geographic origin and level of evidence (LE) of articles published in Chilean dental journals during 2012. The target population for the bibliometric study was articles published in exclusively-scientific Chilean dental journals. These variables were analyzed: journal, area, language, country, region, design, scenario, and LE. A total of 120 articles were published in four journals: International Journal of Odontostomatology (IJOS=59), Revista Clínic...

  20. Amino acid biogeo- and stereochemistry in coastal Chilean sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomstein, Bente Aagaard; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Schubert, Carsten J.;

    2006-01-01

    The spatial distribution of total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA) and amino acid enantiomers (D- and L-forms) was investigated in sediments underlying two contrasting Chilean upwelling regions,: at ~23°S off Antofagasta and at ~36°S off Concepcion. The contribution of amino acids to total organic...... carbon (%TAAC: 7-14%) and total nitrogen (%TAAN: 23-38%) in surface sediments decreased with increasing water depth (from 126 to 1350 m) indicating that organic matter becomes increasingly decomposed in surface sediments at greater water depth. Changes in the ratio between the protein amino acid...... aspartate and its non-protein degradation product β-alanine confirmed this observation. Furthermore, estimates of THAA mineralization showed that sedimentary amino acid reactivity decreased with both increasing water depth as well as progressive degradation status of the organic matter that was incorporated...

  1. Justified Ilegality?: Controlled clientelism by the Chilean administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Moriconi Bezerra

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Chilean civil service is considered one of the most efficient in Latin America. However, different studies describe the informal institutions that operate between the Legislative Power and the bureaucracy to fill positions in the public administration. Although some of these clientelistic practices are against the law, they have been accepted and defended in both the political and scientific spheres. Legality is not considered an important value if certain indexes have a positive development. In this context, it is important to study how corruption and clientelism have been ignored, or hidden, through political discourses and technical reports about the situation of bureaucracy. All of this allows a better understanding of why after 20 years of administrative reforms there are damaging practices which negatively affect democracy that have not been eradicated.

  2. Simple Tool to Evaluate Airtightness in Chilean Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex González Cáceres

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Given the high impact that air leaks have on buildings’ energy expenses, most developed countries have set out norms which regulate their presence in homes. Chile will soon begin this process; however, the airtightness revision strategy in envelopes has not been resolved as of yet. This article presents a tool to Assess Airtightness in Design, EHeD. The software will allow predicting the performance of homes under the regulations which will be set out, aiding designers, builders or owners to make decisions when making changes to improve airtightness. EHeD has been validated through pressurization tests in diverse homes across the country, with results that are in line with expectations, thus validating its calculation model. The methodology considers three stages: determining the main factors that have an impact on the airtightness in Chilean homes, preparing an airtightness database for each component (wall, windows and doors and preparing a calculation model that is integrated in an IT interface.

  3. Chilean prosopis mesocarp flour: phenolic profiling and antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo; Quispe, Cristina; Soriano, Maria Del Pilar C; Theoduloz, Cristina; Jiménez-Aspée, Felipe; Pérez, Maria Jorgelina; Cuello, Ana Soledad; Isla, Maria Inés

    2015-04-17

    In South America, the mesocarp flour of Prosopis species plays a prominent role as a food resource in arid areas. The aim of this work was the characterization of the phenolic antioxidants occurring in the pod mesocarp flour of Chilean Prosopis. Samples were collected in the Copiapo, Huasco and Elqui valleys from the north of Chile. The samples of P. chilensis flour exhibited a total phenolic content ranging between 0.82-2.57 g gallic acid equivalents/100 g fresh flour weight. The highest antioxidant activity, measured by the DPPH assay, was observed for samples from the Huasco valley. HPLC-MS/MS analysis allowed the tentative identification of eight anthocyanins and 13 phenolic compounds including flavonol glycosides, C-glycosyl flavones and ellagic acid derivatives. The antioxidant activity and the phenolic composition in the flour suggest that this ancient South American resource may have potential as a functional food.

  4. Chilean Prosopis Mesocarp Flour: Phenolic Profiling and Antioxidant Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Schmeda-Hirschmann

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In South America, the mesocarp flour of Prosopis species plays a prominent role as a food resource in arid areas. The aim of this work was the characterization of the phenolic antioxidants occurring in the pod mesocarp flour of Chilean Prosopis. Samples were collected in the Copiapo, Huasco and Elqui valleys from the north of Chile. The samples of P. chilensis flour exhibited a total phenolic content ranging between 0.82–2.57 g gallic acid equivalents/100 g fresh flour weight. The highest antioxidant activity, measured by the DPPH assay, was observed for samples from the Huasco valley. HPLC-MS/MS analysis allowed the tentative identification of eight anthocyanins and 13 phenolic compounds including flavonol glycosides, C-glycosyl flavones and ellagic acid derivatives. The antioxidant activity and the phenolic composition in the flour suggest that this ancient South American resource may have potential as a functional food.

  5. VOCALS-CUpEx: the Chilean Upwelling Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garreaud, R. D.; Rutllant, J. A.; Muñoz, R. C.; Rahn, D. A.; Ramos, M.; Figueroa, D.

    2011-03-01

    The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) was a major field experiment conducted in spring of 2008 off southern Peru and northern Chile, aimed at better understanding the coupled climate systems of the southeast Pacific. Because of logistical constrains, the coastal area around 30° S was not sampled during VOCALS-REx. This area not only marks the poleward edge of the subtropical stratocumulus cloud regime (thus acting as a source of transient disturbances) but is also one of the most active upwelling centers and source of surface ocean kinetic energy along the Chilean coast. To fill such an observational gap, a small, brief, but highly focused field experiment was conducted in late spring 2009 in the near-shore region around 30° S. The Chilean Upwelling Experiment (CUpEx) was endorsed by VOCALS as a regional component. CUpEx included long-term monitoring, an intensive two-week field campaign and off-shore research flights. Our goal was to obtain an atmospheric/oceanic dataset with enough temporal and spatial coverage to be able to document (a) the mean diurnal cycles of the lower-troposphere and upper-ocean in a region of complex topography and coastline geometry, and (b) the ocean-atmosphere response to the rapid changes in coastal winds from strong, upwelling-favorable equatorward flow (southerly winds) to downwelling-favorable poleward flow (northerly winds). In this paper we describe the measurement platforms and sampling strategy, and provide an observational overview, highlighting some key mean-state and transient features.

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastrointestinal symptoms on Chilean pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Ferrer Poveda

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the aim of this research was to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection on Chilean pregnant women and its relationship with the appearance and severity of hyperemesis and dyspepsia. Methods: quantitative study of prevalence in a transversal cut with variable analysis. The sample was taken from 274 Chilean pregnant women from the Bío Bío province through vein puncture between June and December, 2005. Pregnant women were informed of this study, interviewed and signed an informed consent. The samples were processed using ImmunoComb II Helicobacter pylori IgG kit. Statistical analysis was performed by means of the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Program. Results: out of the total number of pregnant women, 68.6% showed infection by Helicobacter pylori. 79.6% of the total sample had symptoms of dyspepsia, and 72.5% of this group presented Helicobacter pylori infection. 12.4% showed pregnancy hyperemesis; among them, 79.4% were infected with Helicobacter pylori. 73.4% of the pregnant women that showed gastric discomfort during the first three months had Helicobacter pylori infection. 53.7% of them continued with gastric discomfort after the first three months; of those, 95.8% were infected. Helicobacter pylori infection was present only in 1.5% of pregnant women without gastric discomfort. Conclusion: both, gastric discomfort of pregnant women and the continuity of severe symptoms of dyspepsia and hyperemesis after the first three months of gestation are significantly correlated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  7. Indo-European and Asian origins for Chilean and Pacific chickens revealed by mtDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongora, Jaime; Rawlence, Nicolas J; Mobegi, Victor A; Jianlin, Han; Alcalde, Jose A; Matus, Jose T; Hanotte, Olivier; Moran, Chris; Austin, Jeremy J; Ulm, Sean; Anderson, Atholl J; Larson, Greger; Cooper, Alan

    2008-07-29

    European chickens were introduced into the American continents by the Spanish after their arrival in the 15th century. However, there is ongoing debate as to the presence of pre-Columbian chickens among Amerindians in South America, particularly in relation to Chilean breeds such as the Araucana and Passion Fowl. To understand the origin of these populations, we have generated partial mitochondrial DNA control region sequences from 41 native Chilean specimens and compared them with a previously generated database of approximately 1,000 domestic chicken sequences from across the world as well as published Chilean and Polynesian ancient DNA sequences. The modern Chilean sequences cluster closely with haplotypes predominantly distributed among European, Indian subcontinental, and Southeast Asian chickens, consistent with a European genetic origin. A published, apparently pre-Columbian, Chilean specimen and six pre-European Polynesian specimens also cluster with the same European/Indian subcontinental/Southeast Asian sequences, providing no support for a Polynesian introduction of chickens to South America. In contrast, sequences from two archaeological sites on Easter Island group with an uncommon haplogroup from Indonesia, Japan, and the Philippines [corrected] and may represent a genetic signature of an early Polynesian dispersal. Modeling of the potential marine carbon contribution to the Chilean archaeological specimen casts further doubt on claims for pre-Columbian chickens, and definitive proof will require further analyses of ancient DNA sequences and radiocarbon and stable isotope data from archaeological excavations within both Chile and Polynesia.

  8. Direction and timing of uplift propagation in the Peruvian Andes deduced from molecular phylogenetics of highland biotaxa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Damien; Sempere, Thierry; Plantard, Olivier

    2008-07-01

    Physical paleoaltimetric methods are increasingly used to estimate the amount and timing of surface uplift in orogens. Because the rise of mountains creates new ecosystems and triggers evolutionary changes, biological data may also be used to assess the development and timing of regional surface uplift. Here we apply this idea to the Peruvian Andes through a molecular phylogeographic and phylochronologic analysis of Globodera pallida, a potato parasite nematode that requires cool temperatures and thus thrives above 2.0-2.5 km in these tropical highlands. The Peruvian populations of this species exhibit a clear evolutionary pattern with deeper, more ancient lineages occurring in Andean southern Peru and shallower, younger lineages occurring progressively northwards. Genetically diverging G. pallida populations thus progressively colonized highland areas as these were expanding northwards, demonstrating that altitude in the Peruvian Andes was acquired longitudinally from south to north, i.e. in the direction of decreasing orogenic volume. This phylogeographic structure is recognized in other, independent highland biotaxa, and point to the Central Andean Orocline (CAO) as the region where high altitudes first emerged. Moreover, molecular clocks relative to Andean taxa, including the potato-tomato group, consistently estimate that altitudes high enough to induce biotic radiation were first acquired in the Early Miocene. After calibration by geological and biological tie-points and intervals, the phylogeny of G. pallida is used as a molecular clock, which estimates that the 2.0-2.5 km threshold elevation range was reached in the Early Miocene in southernmost Peru, in the Middle and Late Miocene in the Abancay segment (NW southern Peru), and from the latest Miocene in central and northern Peru. Although uncertainties attached to phylochronologic ages are significantly larger than those derived from geochronological methods, these results are fairly consistent with coeval

  9. Protoplanetary Disk Structure With Grain Evolution: the ANDES Model

    CERN Document Server

    Akimkin, V; Wiebe, D; Semenov, D; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya; Vasyunin, A; Birnstiel, T; Henning, Th

    2013-01-01

    We present a self-consistent model of a protoplanetary disk: 'ANDES' ('AccretioN disk with Dust Evolution and Sedimentation'). ANDES is based on a flexible and extendable modular structure that includes 1) a 1+1D frequency-dependent continuum radiative transfer module, 2) a module to calculate the chemical evolution using an extended gas-grain network with UV/X-ray-driven processes surface reactions, 3) a module to calculate the gas thermal energy balance, and 4) a 1+1D module that simulates dust grain evolution. For the first time, grain evolution and time-dependent molecular chemistry are included in a protoplanetary disk model. We find that grain growth and sedimentation of large grains to the disk midplane lead to a dust-depleted atmosphere. Consequently, dust and gas temperatures become higher in the inner disk (R 50 AU), in comparison with the disk model with pristine dust. The response of disk chemical structure to the dust growth and sedimentation is twofold. First, due to higher transparency a partl...

  10. Groundwater flow in a closed basin with a saline shallow lake in a volcanic area: Laguna Tuyajto, northern Chilean Altiplano of the Andes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Christian, E-mail: cherrera@ucn.cl [Departamento de Ciencias Geológicas, Universidad Católica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Centro de Investigación Tecnológica del Agua en el Desierto (CEITSAZA), Universidad Católica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Custodio, Emilio [Department of Geo-Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia/Barcelona Tech (UPC), Barcelona (Spain); Chong, Guillermo [Departamento de Ciencias Geológicas, Universidad Católica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Lambán, Luis Javier [Geological Institute of Spain (IGME), Zaragoza (Spain); Riquelme, Rodrigo; Wilke, Hans [Departamento de Ciencias Geológicas, Universidad Católica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Jódar, Jorge [Department of Geo-Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia/Barcelona Tech (UPC), Barcelona (Spain); Urrutia, Javier; Urqueta, Harry [Departamento de Ciencias Geológicas, Universidad Católica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Centro de Investigación Tecnológica del Agua en el Desierto (CEITSAZA), Universidad Católica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Sarmiento, Alvaro [Departamento de Ciencias Geológicas, Universidad Católica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); and others

    2016-01-15

    Laguna Tuyajto is a small, shallow saline water lake in the Andean Altiplano of northern Chile. In the eastern side it is fed by springs that discharge groundwater of the nearby volcanic aquifers. The area is arid: rainfall does not exceed 200 mm/year in the rainiest parts. The stable isotopic content of spring water shows that the recharge is originated mainly from winter rain, snow melt, and to a lesser extent from some short and intense sporadic rainfall events. Most of the spring water outflowing in the northern side of Laguna Tuyajto is recharged in the Tuyajto volcano. Most of the spring water in the eastern side and groundwater are recharged at higher elevations, in the rims of the nearby endorheic basins of Pampa Colorada and Pampa Las Tecas to the East. The presence of tritium in some deep wells in Pampa Colorada and Pampa Las Tecas indicates recent recharge. Gas emission in recent volcanoes increase the sulfate content of atmospheric deposition and this is reflected in local groundwater. The chemical composition and concentration of spring waters are the result of meteoric water evapo-concentration, water–rock interaction, and mainly the dissolution of old and buried evaporitic deposits. Groundwater flow is mostly shallow due to a low permeability ignimbrite layer of regional extent, which also hinders brine spreading below and around the lake. High deep temperatures near the recent Tuyajto volcano explain the high dissolved silica contents and the δ{sup 18}O shift to heavier values found in some of the spring waters. Laguna Tuyajto is a terminal lake where salts cumulate, mostly halite, but some brine transfer to the Salar de Aguas Calientes-3 cannot be excluded. The hydrogeological behavior of Laguna Tuyajto constitutes a model to understand the functioning of many other similar basins in other areas in the Andean Altiplano. - Highlights: • Recent volcanism formations play a key role in producing recharge. • Groundwater can flow across local interbasin boundaries. • The origin and concentration of ions dissolved in spring waters are mostly the dissolution of buried evaporitic deposits. • The stable isotopic content of water from the springs shows that recharge originates mainly from snow.

  11. Mineralogical and numerical approaches to establish the pre-eruptive conditions of the mafic Licán Ignimbrite, Villarrica Volcano (Chilean Southern Andes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmar, Silke; Parada, Miguel; Gutiérrez, Francisco; Robin, Claude; Gerbe, Marie Christine

    2012-08-01

    The Licán Ignimbrite represents a large explosive basaltic andesite event in the eruptive history of the Villarrica Volcano, an active stratovolcano of the Southern Andean Volcanic Zone. A mineralogical study of this ignimbrite indicates important disequilibrium features. Resoption textures were observed around Ca-rich (An74-92; Group 1) and more sodic (An35-44; Group 2) plagioclase phenocryst cores. Rims on these phenocrysts as well as microlites grew with an intermediate composition (An47-63; Group 3). Low- and high-Mg clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene phenocrysts were also identified; most of them showing reverse Mg zoning. Based on these mineralogical data and thermodynamic modeling, an increase of about 200 °C in temperature (from ~ 900-1000° to ~ 1100-1150 °C), a decompression of ~ 400 bar (equivalent to ~ 1.5 km) and a decrease in H2O content in the melt of ~ 1.6 wt.% are identified during crystallization. Addition of hot magma from below would have caused heating of the reservoir with the consecutive ascent of magma pulses, H2O exsolution and convective mixing (compositional and/or thermal mixing). A numerical model using the Finite Element Method was developed to assess the response of the Licán Ignimbrite reservoir upon conductive heating by 200 °C by mafic underplating; this model indicates a rapid (tens of years) temperature homogenization of this system, with ascending magma plumes with velocities as high as 6 m/h. Because the Licán Ignimbrite erupted at the end of the Pleistocene glaciation, glacial unloading could have also contributed to depressurization of the reservoir.

  12. Groundwater flow in a closed basin with a saline shallow lake in a volcanic area: Laguna Tuyajto, northern Chilean Altiplano of the Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Christian; Custodio, Emilio; Chong, Guillermo; Lambán, Luis Javier; Riquelme, Rodrigo; Wilke, Hans; Jódar, Jorge; Urrutia, Javier; Urqueta, Harry; Sarmiento, Alvaro; Gamboa, Carolina; Lictevout, Elisabeth

    2016-01-15

    Laguna Tuyajto is a small, shallow saline water lake in the Andean Altiplano of northern Chile. In the eastern side it is fed by springs that discharge groundwater of the nearby volcanic aquifers. The area is arid: rainfall does not exceed 200mm/year in the rainiest parts. The stable isotopic content of spring water shows that the recharge is originated mainly from winter rain, snow melt, and to a lesser extent from some short and intense sporadic rainfall events. Most of the spring water outflowing in the northern side of Laguna Tuyajto is recharged in the Tuyajto volcano. Most of the spring water in the eastern side and groundwater are recharged at higher elevations, in the rims of the nearby endorheic basins of Pampa Colorada and Pampa Las Tecas to the East. The presence of tritium in some deep wells in Pampa Colorada and Pampa Las Tecas indicates recent recharge. Gas emission in recent volcanoes increase the sulfate content of atmospheric deposition and this is reflected in local groundwater. The chemical composition and concentration of spring waters are the result of meteoric water evapo-concentration, water-rock interaction, and mainly the dissolution of old and buried evaporitic deposits. Groundwater flow is mostly shallow due to a low permeability ignimbrite layer of regional extent, which also hinders brine spreading below and around the lake. High deep temperatures near the recent Tuyajto volcano explain the high dissolved silica contents and the δ(18)O shift to heavier values found in some of the spring waters. Laguna Tuyajto is a terminal lake where salts cumulate, mostly halite, but some brine transfer to the Salar de Aguas Calientes-3 cannot be excluded. The hydrogeological behavior of Laguna Tuyajto constitutes a model to understand the functioning of many other similar basins in other areas in the Andean Altiplano.

  13. New location of Alsodes tumultuosus Veloso, Iturra & Galleguillos, 1979 (Amphibia, Alsodidae in the Andes Mountains of the O’Higgins Region, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Ramírez Álvarez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Alsodes tumultuosus Veloso, Iturra & Galleguillos, 1979 is an amphibian species endemic to Chile, described and known just from its type locality: the mountain streams in La Parva zone, Metropolitan region, central Chile. In this manuscript I report a new location for this species (the Andes Mountains of the O’Higgins Region, Chile, thus extending its current geographical range in about 100 kilometers southward. This finding suggests that we need to invest more efforts to clearly establish its conservation status in Chile.

  14. Una nueva especie de Pristimantis (Anura: Craugastoridae del corredor ecológico Llangantes-Sangay, Andes de Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Reyes-Puig

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Describimos una nueva especie de Pristimantis conocida del bosque nublado de las estribaciones orientales de los Andes centrales de Ecuador. La nueva especie se caracteriza por tener un distintivo patrón de manchas irregulares blancas sobre el vientre negro, dorso verde, tubérculos cónicos en el párpado, tubérculo interorbital, e hilera de tubérculos ulnares y tarsales. Esfuerzos por conservar esta especie se han cristalizado en dos áreas protegidas dentro del corredor Llanganates Sangay, un punto caliente de diversidad que resguarda poblaciones de ranas endémicas y todavía desconocidas.

  15. Dynamics and Upper Mantle Structure Beneath the Northwestern Andes: Subduction Segments, Moho Depth, and Possible Relationships to Mantle Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalve, G.; Yarce, J.; Becker, T. W.; Porritt, R. W.; Cardona, A.; Poveda, E.; Posada, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    The northwestern South American plate shows a complex tectonic setting whose causes and relationship to mantle structure are still debated. We combine different techniques to elucidate some of the links between slabs and surface deformation in Colombia. Crustal structure beneath the Northern Andes was inferred from receiver functions where we find thicknesses of nearly 60 km beneath the plateau of the Eastern Cordillera and underneath the southern volcanic area of the Central Cordillera. We infer that such crustal thickening resulted from shortening, magmatic addition, and accretion-subduction. Analyses of relative teleseismic travel time delays and estimates of residual surface topography based on our new crustal model suggest that there are at least two subduction segments underneath the area. The Caribbean slab lies at a low angle beneath northernmost Colombia and steepens beneath the Eastern Cordillera. Such steepening is indicated by negative travel time relative residuals in the area of the Bucaramanga Nest, implying a cold anomaly in the upper mantle, and by positive residual topography just off the east of this area, perhaps generated by slab-associated return flow. Results for the western Andes and the Pacific coastal plains are consistent with "normal" subduction of the Nazca plate: travel time relative residuals there are predominantly positive, and the residual topography shows an W-E gradient, going from positive at the Pacific coastline to negative at the Magdalena Valley, which separates the eastern cordillera from the rest of the Colombian Andean system. Azimuthal analysis of relative travel time residuals further suggests the presence of seismically slow materials beneath the central part of the Eastern Cordillera. Azimuthal anisotropy from SKS splitting in that region indicates that seismically fast orientations do not follow plate convergence, different from what we find for the western Colombian Andes and the Caribbean and Pacific coastal plains

  16. Ice-core evidence of earliest extensive copper metallurgy in the Andes 2700 years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, A.; Gramlich, G.; Kellerhals, T.; Tobler, L.; Rehren, Th.; Schwikowski, M.

    2017-01-01

    The importance of metallurgy for social and economic development is indisputable. Although copper (Cu) was essential for the wealth of pre- and post-colonial societies in the Andes, the onset of extensive Cu metallurgy in South America is still debated. Comprehensive archaeological findings point to first sophisticated Cu metallurgy during the Moche culture ~200–800 AD, whereas peat-bog records from southern South America suggest earliest pollution potentially from Cu smelting as far back as ~2000 BC. Here we present a 6500-years Cu emission history for the Andean Altiplano, based on ice-core records from Illimani glacier in Bolivia, providing the first complete history of large-scale Cu smelting activities in South America. We find earliest anthropogenic Cu pollution during the Early Horizon period ~700–50 BC, and attribute the onset of intensified Cu smelting in South America to the activities of the central Andean Chiripa and Chavin cultures ~2700 years ago. This study provides for the first time substantial evidence for extensive Cu metallurgy already during these early cultures. PMID:28139760

  17. Ice-core evidence of earliest extensive copper metallurgy in the Andes 2700 years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, A.; Gramlich, G.; Kellerhals, T.; Tobler, L.; Rehren, Th.; Schwikowski, M.

    2017-01-01

    The importance of metallurgy for social and economic development is indisputable. Although copper (Cu) was essential for the wealth of pre- and post-colonial societies in the Andes, the onset of extensive Cu metallurgy in South America is still debated. Comprehensive archaeological findings point to first sophisticated Cu metallurgy during the Moche culture ~200–800 AD, whereas peat-bog records from southern South America suggest earliest pollution potentially from Cu smelting as far back as ~2000 BC. Here we present a 6500-years Cu emission history for the Andean Altiplano, based on ice-core records from Illimani glacier in Bolivia, providing the first complete history of large-scale Cu smelting activities in South America. We find earliest anthropogenic Cu pollution during the Early Horizon period ~700–50 BC, and attribute the onset of intensified Cu smelting in South America to the activities of the central Andean Chiripa and Chavin cultures ~2700 years ago. This study provides for the first time substantial evidence for extensive Cu metallurgy already during these early cultures.

  18. Warm Storms Associated with Avalanches Hazard and Floods in the Andes Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, J.

    2003-04-01

    Rain-on-snow events produce avalanches of different magnitude depending on the snowpack properties, air temperatures and rain intensities. Winter storms in this mountain range typically have rain/snow levels between 1000 and 2200 m. above sea level, but warm storms with higher rain/snow of to 3000 m. above sea level. occur in extreme winters and have the potential to generate rain on snow floods and wet-snow avalanches. For example, the flood of June 29 of 2000 occurred after one of extremely wet June of the last 40 years were snowfall was 991cm in the Aconcagua Valley. Infrequently storms activity generated a huge snowfall and rainfall over the Andes mountains on June of 2000 (1525mm in El Maule Valley) and the end of the unusually period, the flood was triggered by rising temperatures on the mountains and heavy rain (199mm in 24 hours) fall over the fresh snow on the morning of June 29 and floods wave developed and moved down along of the all river located on Central part of Chile, the foods peak was 2970.5m3/s on the El Maule basin in the morning of June 29. This paper studies the characteristics of warm storms the had the potential to generate wet-snow avalanches and floods.

  19. Agriculture at the Edge: Landscape Variability of Soil C Stocks and Fluxes in the Tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Peña, C.

    2015-12-01

    Paramos, or tropical alpine grasslands occurring right above the forest tree-line (2,800 - 4,700 m), are among the most transformed landscapes in the humid tropics. In the Tropical Andes, Paramos form an archipelago-like pattern from Northern Colombia to Central Peru that effectively captures atmospheric moisture originated in the Amazon-Orinoco basins, while marking the highest altitude capable of sustaining vegetation growth (i.e., 'the edge'). This study investigates the role of land management on mediating soil carbon stocks and fluxes in Paramo ecosystems of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia. Observations were collected at a Paramo site strongly modified by land use change, including active potato plantations, pasture, tillage, and land abandonment. Results show that undisturbed Paramos soils have high total organic carbon (TOC), high soil water content (SWC), and low soil CO2 efflux (RS) rates. However, Paramo soils that experience human intervention show lower TOC, higher and more variable RS rates, and lower SWC. This study demonstrates that changes in land use in Paramos affect differentially the accumulation and exchange of soil carbon with the atmosphere and offers implications for management and protection strategies of what has been deemed the fastest evolving biodiversity ecosystem in the world.

  20. Nazca - South America Convergence and Motion of the North Andes Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Femina, P. C.; Mora-paez, H.; Mothes, P. A.; Ruiz, G.

    2012-12-01

    The North Andes block (NAB) is a hypothesized tectonic block that moves (escapes) north-northeast relative to a stable South American reference frame. The motion of this block is thought to be derived by the collision of the Carnegie Ridge in southern Ecuador and/or by oblique convergence and high degrees of interplate coupling north of the ridge (i.e., strain partitioning). We investigate the kinematics of NAB motion utilizing a velocity field based on new continuous GPS networks and existing episodic GPS data in Ecuador and Colombia. The new velocity field and published earthquake slip vectors are inverted to solve for the Euler vector of the NAB and interseismic elastic strain accumulation on block-bounding faults using a block modeling approach. At the latitude of Ecuador, the NAB is rigid with transpressional deformation accommodating northeastward motion along its boundary with South America. In central to northern Colombia, the NAB is dissected by several prominent shear zones. We test a suite of block models to investigate the tectonic nature of the NAB and the style of faulting in the upper plate accommodating block motion. Through the estimation of elastic strain accumulation on all block-bounding faults, we improve the understanding of interseismic coupling along a convergent margin capable of producing M>8 earthquakes and upper plate faults capable of generating M>6 earthquakes.

  1. Chilean Teachers Begin Exchange Program Visit in Magdalena

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    . Kelly. The Chilean teachers are visiting Magdalena while they are on their Southern Hemisphere summer vacation, and Magdalena's schools are in session. Two Magdalena teachers, Joleen Welborn and Sandra Montoya, will visit San Pedro in June, while they are on summer vacation and the Chilean schools will be in session. Dr. Eduardo Hardy, the AUI/NRAO representative in Chile, will accompany the Chilean teachers on their visit, which has been coordinated by Harrison. "ALMA is a groundbreaking example of the type of international cooperation that marks the future of astronomy. We are especially pleased to sponsor a program that brings together two communities that both enjoy proximity to world-class astronomical research facilities," said Dr. Fred K.Y. Lo, NRAO Director. "While separated by many miles, San Pedro de Atacama and Magdalena have much in common. Both are small communities in high desert environments, and both are next to telescopes where the world's astronomers will be making many exciting discoveries in the coming decades. Bringing these two communities together will advance education and international understanding," Harrison said. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  2. The Basement of the Andes: the Gondwana-Laurentia Connections Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, V. A.

    2009-05-01

    The research performed in the last decade in the basement of the Andes have shown that the Precambrian and Paleozoic rocks have recorded a series of igneous and metamorphic events through time. These episodes can be grouped in discrete orogenic events, which have different paleogeographic distribution and intensity. The first and most important orogenic event is widely distributed along the margin and correspond to the Sunsas-Grenville orogen. Evidence of metamorphism and associated magmatic rocks are found from Colombia to the southernmost Patagonia. This episode produced the amalgamation of Amazonia, Pampia and Patagonia, among other cratonic blocks, to form Rodinia. The Rodinia break-up leaved several cratonic blocks accreted in the Gondwana side, such as Marañón, Arequipa, and Antofalla, although the generalized extension of this period produced crustal attenuation, rifted basins, and limited oceanic realms during late Proterozoic times. The Brasiliano-Pampean orogeny reamalgamated these blocks against the Gondwana margin. A new episode of break-up produced the dispersal of several Gondwanian blocks, separation along some previous sutures, crustal attenuation and magmatism in Late Cambrian times, until the new amalgamation occurred in Middle Late Ordovician times. These processes led to the Famatinian orogeny when metamorphism and arc magmatism was widely spread along the continental margin, as seen in Chibcha, Marañón, Arequipa and Sierras Pampeanas. Besides the re-accretion of some parautochthonous terranes, new exotic blocks were derived from Laurentia, such as the Cuyania terrane, which finally collided against the Andean proto-margin at ~ 460 Ma to form the Argentine Precordillera and surrounding regions. Late accretion in Early to Middle Devonian times of Chilenia and related terranes formed most of the basement of Central Andes. Final collision between Laurentia and Gondwana in the Late Carboniferous - Early Permian times to form the Alleghanides

  3. Cosmogenic Dating of Moraines of the Local Last Glacial Maximum in the Tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.; Seltzer, G. O.; Rodbell, D. T.; Finkel, R. C.; Farber, D. L.

    2003-12-01

    We have used cosmogenic dating (10Be) to identify moraines of the local last glacial maximum along two east-west transects in the tropical Andes: the Junin region of central Peru ( ˜11° S 76° W) and the Cordillera Real of western Bolivia ( ˜16.3° S 68.2° W). The 10Be ages from boulders on moraines in our study areas suggest that the local last glacial maximum occurred ca. 30,000 10Be yr BP (before the inferred peak of Northern Hemisphere glaciation at ca. 21,000 calendar yr BP) and that deglaciation was well underway by 20,000 10Be yr BP. Recessional moraines were deposited between about 20,000 and 15,000 10Be yr BP. Published 14C dates from the Cordillera Real indicate that glaciers were within their present limits by about 11,000 calendar yr BP. Asymmetry in the east-west glacial extent and amount of snowline depression was relatively minor in the Junin region, but was more pronounced in the Cordillera Real. In the Junin region, terminal moraines of the local last glacial maximum lie at ˜4150-4200 m on the east side of the cordillera and at ˜4250-4400 m on the west side. In the Cordillera Real, lateral moraines of the local last glacial maximum lie at ˜4600 m on the southwest side of the cordillera (Milluni Valley), while a late-glacial (ca. 12,000 10Be yr BP) terminal moraine lies at ˜3800 m on the northeast side of the cordillera (Zongo Valley). Snowline depression during the local last glacial maximum in the Andes was ˜200-600 m on both sides of the eastern cordillera in the Junin region and on the southwest (Altiplano) side of the Cordillera Real, but closer to ˜900-1000 m on the northeast side of the Cordillera Real. The asymmetry likely arose from differences in precipitation (which comes mainly from the east) and from variations in shading, amount of supraglacial material, and topography between the deeply incised eastern valleys and the relatively broad, shallow valleys descending to high-altitude plateau surfaces on the west sides.

  4. CENOZOIC EXHUMATION OF THE ANTIOQUEÑO PLATEAU, NORTHERN ANDES, COLOMBIA, FROM APATITE LOW-TEMPERATURE THERMOCHRONOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo-Moreno, S. A.; Foster, D. A.; O'Sullivan, P. B.; Donelick, R.; Stockli, D. F.

    2009-12-01

    The Antioqueño plateau (AP), in the northernmost Cordillera Central, Colombia, is the most extensive and best preserved relict surface in the Northern Andes. Apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) and fission track (AFT) results from twenty two samples, collected from paleocrustal depths along two vertical profiles in canyons dissecting the AP, constrain Cenozoic erosional exhumation of this segment of the Andean range. The two profiles exhibit excellent reproducibility of AHe and AFT data. Helium ages increase with elevation from ~22-49 Ma. A marked inflection point in the AHe age-elevation plots at 25 Ma defines the bottom of the post-Oligocene He partial retention zone (PRZ). Virtually invariant ages at ~25 Ma record onset of rapid exhumation in the AP. A more subtle slope change in the PRZ at ~43 Ma is interpreted as a minor exhumation pulse. AFT better defines timing and intensity of Eocene exhumation. AFT ages for both profiles vary from ~30-49 Ma and are consistently older than AHe ages. AFT data display invariant ages (±2σ) between 1500-2400 m elevations while confined track length data exhibit uni-modal distributions with a mean track length of ~14.2 μm. Both facts indicate rapid cooling. This is further supported by virtually concordant AFT and AHe ages for both profiles between 1500 to 2200 m implying that rocks were exhumed from temperatures >120°C to below AHe closure temperature 60°C. Assuming a geothermal gradient of ~25°C/km this corresponds to exhumation rates in the order of 0.5 mm/y, comparable in intensity to the Miocene pulse defined by AHe. Integrated thermal modeling show an episode of rapid cooling at ~43-49 Ma. AFT profiles show an apparent inflection point at ~1400 m, which defines the upper boundary of an apatite partial annealing zone (PAZ) exhumed during the 43-49 Ma cooling event. The position of the PAZ and PRZ relative to the present erosional surface point to average erosion rates of ~0.03 mm/yr, which constitute very low denudation rates

  5. Gastrointestinal parasites of Lamas in the Bolivian Andes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Anne Malene; Nees, Ellinor Spörndly; Monrad, Jesper

    A cross sectional study was conducted to determine prevalences and intensities of gastrointestinal (GIT) parasites in lamas in the Bolivian Andes. A quantitative and qualitative necro-copro-parasitlogical study was performed on 33 lamas between October and December 2007. At the time of necropsy the......  lamas were aged 1½  to >4 years. They originated from 14 different farms in the most lama dense areas of Bolivia: Oruro, Potosi, La Paz and the highlands above Cochabamba. In total 16 different species of nematodes, one cestode species, one trematode species, and one coccidian genus were detected...... %); in the liver: Fasciola hepatica (12 %); in faeces Eimeria spp. (82 %). Pathological changes in the liver were ascribed to be most probably caused by L. chavezi larva migration. The latter species, considered to be the very most pathogenic of all lama GIT nematode species, was also the species detected...

  6. Record Solar UV Irradiance in the Tropical Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie A. Cabrol

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available High elevation, thin ozone layer, and clear sky produce intense ultraviolet (UV radiation in the tropical Andes. Recent models suggest that tropical stratospheric ozone will slightly decrease in the coming decades, potentially resulting in more UV anomalies. Data collected between 4,300-5,916 m above sea level (asl in Bolivia show how this trend could dramatically impact surface solar irradiance. During 61 days, two Eldonet dosimeters recorded extreme UV-B irradiance equivalent to a UV index (UVI of 43.3, which is the highest ground value ever reported. If they become more common, events of this magnitude may have societal and ecological implications, which make understanding the process leading to their generation critical. Our data show that this event and other major UV spikes were consistent with rising UV-B/UV-A ratios in the days to hours preceding the spikes, trajectories of negative ozone anomalies (NOAs, and radiative transfer modeling.

  7. Agricultura y ganaderia en Taya, pueblo de los Andes Peruanos

    OpenAIRE

    Pouget, Cécile

    1988-01-01

    Mémoire de fin d'études présentant les activités agricoles des paysans de Taya, village des Andes péruviennes situé sur des pentes très fortes entre 3000 et 3500 mètres d'altitude. Les paysans y cultivent le maïs et les pommes de terre pour leur propre consommation, mais aussi la luzerne destinée aux vaches laitières. Avec le lait, ils font des fromages qu'ils vendent. L'organisation de l'occupation du sol montre que malgré l'érosion, le manque d'eau et d'argent, les paysans continuent ce typ...

  8. A new species of Trechisibus from Peruvian Andes (Coleoptera: Carabidae, Trechinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Delgado

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work the new species Trechisibus (s. str. delestali sp. n., is described from the southern Peruvian Andes. The morphological differences with the geographically closest species of the subgenus are also presented and discussed.

  9. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR and WPA outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1965 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  10. Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1964: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  11. Narrative report: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: January 1 through April 30, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  12. [Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: January to April, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  13. Lake Andes Wetland Management District Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes Wetland Management District outlines District accomplishments during the 1987 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  14. Narrative report: January, February, March, and April, 1962: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  15. Narrative report: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: May 1 through August 31, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  16. [Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: January to April, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  17. Lake Andes Wetland Management District: Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes Wetland Management District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1978 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  18. Lake Andes Waterfowl Production Area: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR- Waterfowl Production Area outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1967 calendar year. The report begins by...

  19. Lake Andes Wetlands District: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes Wetlands District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1971 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  20. Lake Andes [Wetland Management District]: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1972

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes Wetlands District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1972 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  1. [Lake Andes Wetland Management District: Narrative report : July 1, 1975 through December 31, 1976

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes Wetland Management District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1976 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  2. Lake Andes Wetland District: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes Wetlands District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1970 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  3. Lake Andes Wetlands District: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes Wetlands District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1969 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  4. Planning and accomplishment narrative: Lake Andes Wetlands District: July 1, 1972 through June 30, 1973

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes Wetlands District describes Refuge activities during the 1973 fiscal year. Highlights and accomplishments are described.

  5. Lake Andes Wetlands District: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes Wetlands District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  6. Lake Andes Wetland Management District: Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1977

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes Wetland Management District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1977 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  7. Lake Andes Wetland Management District: Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1979

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes Wetland Management District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1979 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  8. Phase 1 Watershed Assessment Final Report: Lake Andes Watershed, Charles Mix County, South Dakota.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Lake Andes was included in the 1998 South Dakota 303(d) list as an impairment-related Total Maximum Daily Load waterbody. In 1922 Congress passed a bill that...

  9. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1967 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  10. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1969 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  11. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: January 1 through December 31, 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  12. Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1962: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  13. Lake Andes Wetland Management District : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1980 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the Refuge and...

  14. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1980 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the Refuge and...

  15. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1979

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1979 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the Refuge and...

  16. Narrative report: January, February, March, and April, 1963: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  17. Lake Assessment Project Report, Lake Andes: Charles Mix County, South Dakota

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Lake Andes was included in the 1998 South Dakota 303(d) list as an impairment-related Total Maximum Daily Load waterbody. In 1922 Congress passed a bill that...

  18. [Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September to December, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  19. Annual narrative report: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge and Management District: Calendar year 1974

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes activities on Lake Andes NWR during the 1974 calendar year. Monthly activities reports are provided. Resource management- including...

  20. Lake Andes Wetland Management District Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes Wetland Management District outlines District accomplishments during the 1988 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  1. Geochemical and thermochronological signals in Tertiary to Recent sediments from the Western Andes (15-19°S): proxies for sediment provenance and Andean uplift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decou, A.; Mamani, M.; von Eynatten, H.; Wörner, G.

    2009-04-01

    During the Cenozoic the landscape at the western margin of South America changed dramatically due to the tectonic evolution of the Andes (Isacks 1988, J Geophysical Res 93) and significant variations in climate (Gregory-Wodzicki 2000, GSA Bulletin 112). At present day the climate in the western Central Andes (N-Chile, S-Peru) is arid (rainfall average is less than 100-200 mm/y) Climate has changed significantly through time, for example, sediments on the Altiplano and the eastern Central Andes indicate a period of increased precipitation at around 7-8 Ma (Gaupp et al. 1999, PPP 151; Uba et al. 2007, Geology 35). The uplift of the Andes started some 30-25 My ago (Isacks, 1988,). Siliciclastic sedimentation along the western flank of the Central Andes started at 55 Ma and lasted until recent time (Moquegua Group, Roperch et al. 2006, Tectonics 25). This implies that a river system with sediment deposition was already developed before the Andean uplift which occurred during deposition of the Moquegua Group. The Moquegua group is composed of four units: Moquegua A (55-45Ma), Moquegua B (45-30Ma), Moquegua C (30-15?Ma) and Moquegua D (15?-0Ma) (Roperch et al. 2006). The sedimentary basin of Moquegua has a complex internal structure and is composed of different subbasins. We focus in this study respectively, from north to south, on the Cuno Cuno section (cut by the Rio Ocoña), the Majes section (cut by the Rio Majes) and the Moquegua section (cut by the Rio Moquegua). Several facies and compositional changes of Moquegua Group sediments, both along orogenic strike and through time, are already described; however, it lacks a detailed provenance study to constrain the tectonic and climatic controls on sediment generation, dispersal, and accumulation. To do so sandstones from all Moquegua units from the three different sections have been sampled. Because it is crucial to know all the potential source rocks in some detail, the Proterozoic-Paleozoic basement, the Jurassic

  2. Complex brittle deformation pattern along the Southern Patagonian Andes (Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberón, Vanesa; Sue, Christian; Ronda, Gonzalo; Ghiglione, Matías

    2016-04-01

    The Southern Patagonian Andes is located in the southern extreme of the Pacific subduction zone, where the Antartic oceanic plate sinks underneath South America. The history of the area begins with compression during Paleozoic, Jurassic extension associated to the rift and opening of the South Atlantic Ocean, then a sag stage in the Lower Cretaceous followed by a foreland phase as a result of plate tectonics (Ghiglione et al., 2016). The kinematic study is concentrated in the Argentinean foothills, between 46°40' and 48° SL. We measured around 800 fault planes and their striaes with the sense of movement in order to characterize the stress field. The software used to make the stress inversion were Tensor (Delvaux, 2011) and Multiple Inverse Method MIM (Yamaji et al., 2011). The stress field map was built with the results of the MIM. We present new data from 48 sites located in the northern sector of the Southern Patagonian Andes. The measurements were made in several rocks from Paleozoic to Lower Cretaceous, even though most were taken in pyroclastic jurassic rocks from El Quemado Complex. Paleostress tensors obtained are mostly strike-slip, although a 25% is normal and there are a few compresional. The pattern of faults found is complex. In some sites the tensor can be locally linked to satellite images and observations from the field or be related to a major thrust front. There is no clear correlation between the age and/or lithology with the tensor since the youngest rocks measured are Lower Cretaceous. Probably there are several generations of family faults connected to different and recent tectonic phases then the paleostress tensors might correspond to the latest tectonic events.

  3. PROTOPLANETARY DISK STRUCTURE WITH GRAIN EVOLUTION: THE ANDES MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akimkin, V.; Wiebe, D.; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya. [Institute of Astronomy of the RAS, Pyatnitskaya str. 48, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhukovska, S.; Semenov, D.; Henning, Th. [Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Vasyunin, A. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Virginia, VA (United States); Birnstiel, T., E-mail: akimkin@inasan.ru, E-mail: dwiebe@inasan.ru, E-mail: pavyar@inasan.ru, E-mail: zhukovska@mpia.de, E-mail: semenov@mpia.de, E-mail: henning@mpia.de, E-mail: anton.vasyunin@gmail.com, E-mail: tbirnstiel@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-03-20

    We present a self-consistent model of a protoplanetary disk: 'ANDES' ('AccretioN disk with Dust Evolution and Sedimentation'). ANDES is based on a flexible and extendable modular structure that includes (1) a 1+1D frequency-dependent continuum radiative transfer module, (2) a module to calculate the chemical evolution using an extended gas-grain network with UV/X-ray-driven processes and surface reactions, (3) a module to calculate the gas thermal energy balance, and (4) a 1+1D module that simulates dust grain evolution. For the first time, grain evolution and time-dependent molecular chemistry are included in a protoplanetary disk model. We find that grain growth and sedimentation of large grains onto the disk midplane lead to a dust-depleted atmosphere. Consequently, dust and gas temperatures become higher in the inner disk (R {approx}< 50 AU) and lower in the outer disk (R {approx}> 50 AU), in comparison with the disk model with pristine dust. The response of disk chemical structure to the dust growth and sedimentation is twofold. First, due to higher transparency a partly UV-shielded molecular layer is shifted closer to the dense midplane. Second, the presence of big grains in the disk midplane delays the freeze-out of volatile gas-phase species such as CO there, while in adjacent upper layers the depletion is still effective. Molecular concentrations and thus column densities of many species are enhanced in the disk model with dust evolution, e.g., CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}CN, HNO, H{sub 2}O, HCOOH, HCN, and CO. We also show that time-dependent chemistry is important for a proper description of gas thermal balance.

  4. Síndrome pulmonar por hantavirus Andes en Chile CARDIOPULMONARY SYNDROME DUE TO ANDES VIRUS IN CHILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CONSTANZA CASTILLO H.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Desde 1993 han ocurrido 204 casos de Síndrome Cardiopulmonar por Hantavirus (SCPH en Chile. Los brotes epidémicos comenzaron en el sur y avanzan hacia el norte del país. Los más afectados son varones jóvenes, obreros agrícolas o forestales. En Chile, el SCPH es causado por el virus Andes, cuyo reservorio es el Oligorizomys longicaudatus (ratón de cola larga, que se distribuye desde la III Región al sur. El cuadro clínico es similar al descrito en EE.UU., caracterizado por una fase prodrómica que simula un estado gripal o cuadro gastrointestinal febril y que agrava por la aparición de edema pulmonar agudo e inestabilidad hemodinámica (fase cardiopulmonar. Sin embargo, cursa con mayores alteraciones hemorragí-paras y compromiso renal. La mortalidad inicial fue sobre 50% y actualmente es de alrededor del 33,3%. La presente revisión incluye: historia de la enfermedad, reservorio, modos de transmisión, patogenia, cuadro clínico, diagnóstico, tratamiento y medidas de prevenciónSince 1993, 204 cases of Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS occurred in Chile. Epidemic began in the south and moved thereafter to the northern regions. The disease affected predominantly young males, who worked in agricultural labours or as timber workers. The HCPS in Chile is caused by the Andes virus. The reservoir is the wild rat Oligoryzomis longicaudatus distributed from the III to the XII Region. The clinical features are similar to those described for Sin Nombre Virus. The disease has a prodromal stage characterised by fever, muscular pain, with or without gastrointestinal manifestations, followed by the rapid onset of respiratory insufficiency and haemodynamic unstability. Andes virus courses more often with haemorrhagic disorders and overt renal failure, than Sin Nombre Virus. The initial mortality was over 50% and declined to 33,3% in the last year. History of hantavirus-diseases, reservoir, and mode of contagion, pathogenesis, clinical

  5. Waist Circumferences of Chilean Students: Comparison of the CDC-2012 Standard and Proposed Percentile Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Campos, Rossana; Lee Andruske, Cinthya; Hespanhol, Jefferson; Sulla Torres, Jose; Arruda, Miguel; Luarte-Rocha, Cristian; Cossio-Bolaños, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of waist circumference (WC) is considered to be an important means to control overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. The objectives of the study were to (a) compare the WC measurements of Chilean students with the international CDC-2012 standard and other international standards, and (b) propose a specific measurement value for the WC of Chilean students based on age and sex. A total of 3892 students (6 to 18 years old) were assessed. Weight, height, body mass index (BMI), and WC were measured. WC was compared with the CDC-2012 international standard. Percentiles were constructed based on the LMS method. Chilean males had a greater WC during infancy. Subsequently, in late adolescence, males showed values lower than those of the international standards. Chilean females demonstrated values similar to the standards until the age of 12. Subsequently, females showed lower values. The 85th and 95th percentiles were adopted as cutoff points for evaluating overweight and obesity based on age and sex. The WC of Chilean students differs from the CDC-2012 curves. The regional norms proposed are a means to identify children and adolescents with a high risk of suffering from overweight and obesity disorders. PMID:26184250

  6. Waist Circumferences of Chilean Students: Comparison of the CDC-2012 Standard and Proposed Percentile Curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Gómez-Campos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of waist circumference (WC is considered to be an important means to control overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. The objectives of the study were to (a compare the WC measurements of Chilean students with the international CDC-2012 standard and other international standards, and (b propose a specific measurement value for the WC of Chilean students based on age and sex. A total of 3892 students (6 to 18 years old were assessed. Weight, height, body mass index (BMI, and WC were measured. WC was compared with the CDC-2012 international standard. Percentiles were constructed based on the LMS method. Chilean males had a greater WC during infancy. Subsequently, in late adolescence, males showed values lower than those of the international standards. Chilean females demonstrated values similar to the standards until the age of 12. Subsequently, females showed lower values. The 85th and 95th percentiles were adopted as cutoff points for evaluating overweight and obesity based on age and sex. The WC of Chilean students differs from the CDC-2012 curves. The regional norms proposed are a means to identify children and adolescents with a high risk of suffering from overweight and obesity disorders.

  7. An elusive new species of Marsupial Frog (Anura: Hemiphractidae: Gastrotheca from the Andes of northern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Duellman

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A new species of marsupial frog, genus Gastrotheca, is described from high-elevation grasslands in the Andes in Región Amazonas in northernPeru, where even calling males are well hidden in deep moss. The new species is distinguished from all congeners by its unique color pattern that includes a narrow, blackbordered, yellow middorsal stripe. The species apparently belongs to the Gastrotheca plumbea Group, which ranges in the Andes from northern Colombia to northern Peru.

  8. Peer victimization: Intimidation and victmization in Chilean students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica López

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study about peer intimidation and victimization with 1167 school students from 6th, 7th, and 8th grade from the Valparaiso Region of Valparaíso, Chile. The instrument used was the Insebull Battery (Avilés & Elices, 2007. Results show that approximately 9% of students have been victim of peer victimization many times or almost every day during the school year. Psychological victimization was more frequent thanphysical aggression, particularly through virtual communication such as cell-phone messages and e-mails. Participants tend to be groups of male students. Although male students participate more in physical aggression, they also receive more physical and psychological aggression. The most frequent places were inside the classroom and the school yard, when the teacher is not present. Most students inform not knowing, or vaguely knowing, thereasons underlying these aggressions, and do not do anything to deal with them. These results coincide with international studies and allow a better understanding of the characteristics of peer victimization in specific educational contexts within the Chilean school system.

  9. The Role of Crustal Tectonics in Volcano Dynamics (ROCTEVODY) along the Southern Andes: seismological study with emphasis on Villarrica Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Stock, Cindy; Tassara, Andrés

    2016-04-01

    The Southern Andean margin is intrinsically related to the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ), a 1000 km-long dextral strike-slip arc-parallel fault on which most of the volcanic centers of the Southern Volcanic Zone (SCVZ) of the Andes are emplaced. At large spatial (102 - 103 km) and temporal (105 - 107 yr) scales, regional tectonics linked to partitioning of the oblique convergence controls the distribution of magma reservoirs, eruption rates and style, as well as the magma evolution. At small scales in space (transiently change the regional stress field, thus leading to eruptions and fault (re)activation. However, the mechanisms by which the interaction between (megathrust and crustal) earthquakes and volcanic eruptions actually occur, in terms of generating the relationships and characteristics verified at the long term, are still poorly understood. Since 2007, the Southern Andean margin has presented an increase of its tectonic and eruptive activity with several volcanic crisis and eruptions taking place in association with significant seismicity clusters and earthquakes both in the megathrust and the LOFZ. This increased activity offers a unique opportunity to improve our understanding of the physical relation between contemporary tectono-volcanic processes and the long-term construction of the LOFZ-SVZ system. Taking advantage of this opportunity by means of an integrated analysis of geodetic and seismological data through finite element numerical modeling at the scale of the entire margin and for selected cases is the main goal of project Active Tectonics and Volcanism at the Southern Andes (ACT&VO-SA, see Tassara et al. this meeting). Into the framework of the ACT&VO-SA project, the complementary ROCTEVODY-Villarrica project concentrates on the role that inherited crustal structures have in the volcano dynamics. The focus is on Villarrica volcano, which is emplaced at the intersection of the main NNE-branch of the LOFZ and the NW-SE inherited Mocha

  10. Estimates of Abundance and Trend of Chilean Blue Whales off Isla de Chiloé, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Elsa; Carlson, Carole A.; Brownell, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    Since 1970, blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) have been seen feeding in the waters off southern Chile during the summer and autumn (December to May). Investigation of the genetic, acoustic and morphological characteristics of these blue whales shows that they are a distinct but unnamed subspecies, called the Chilean blue whales. Photo-identification surveys have been conducted in the waters off northwestern Isla Grande de Chiloé, southern Chile from 2004–2012 and Isla Chañaral, central Chile in 2012. Over this time, 1,070 blue whales were encountered yielding, after photo-quality control, 318 and 267 unique photographs of the left and right side of the flank respectively. Using mark-recapture analysis of left and right side photographs collected from Isla Grande de Chiloé (2004–2012), open population models estimate that ~570–760 whales are feeding seasonally in this region. POPAN superpopulation abundance estimates for the same feeding ground in 2012 are 762 (95% confidence intervals, CI = 638–933) and 570 (95% CI 475–705) for left and right side datasets respectively, very similar to results from closed population models. Estimates of trend revealed strong variation in abundance, peaking in 2009 and [suggesting] fluctuating use in the survey area over time, likely related to the density of their prey. High inter-annual return rates suggest a degree of site-fidelity of individuals to Isla Grande de Chiloé and that the number of whales using this feeding ground is relatively small. PMID:28081160

  11. Spatial and temporal variability in denudation across the Bolivian Andes from multiple geochronometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insel, Nadja; Ehlers, Todd A.; Schaller, Mirjam; Barnes, Jason B.; Tawackoli, Sohrab; Poulsen, Christopher J.

    2010-10-01

    We quantify spatial and temporal variations in denudation rates across the central Andean fold-thrust belt in Bolivia with particular focus on the Holocene. Measured and predicted 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) concentrations in river sediments are used to (1) calculate catchment-averaged denudation rates from 17 basins across two transects at different latitudes, and (2) evaluate the sensitivity of Holocene climate change on the denudation history recorded by the CRN data. Estimated denudation rates vary by two orders of magnitude from 0.04 to 1.93 mm yr - 1 with mean values of 0.40 ± 0.29 mm yr - 1 in northern Bolivia and 0.51 ± 0.50 mm yr - 1 in the south. Results demonstrate no statistically significant correlation between denudation rates and morphological parameters such as relief, slope or drainage basin size. In addition, the CRN-derived denudation rates do not reflect present-day latitudinal variations in precipitation. Comparison to ˜ 130 previously published denudation rates calculated over long (thermochronology-derived; > 10 6 yrs), medium (CRN-derived; 10 2-10 4 yrs), and short timescales (sediment flux-derived; 10 1 yrs) indicate temporal variations in denudation rates that increase between 0 and 200% over the last ˜ 5 ka. CRN modeling results suggest that the CRN-derived denudation rates may not be fully adjusted to wetter climate conditions recorded in the central Andes since the mid-Holocene. We conclude that large spatial variability in CRN denudation may be due to local variations in tectonics (e.g. faulting), while large temporal variability in denudation may be due to temporal variations in climate.

  12. TRADE POLICY AND MAJOR TRENDS IN CHILEAN EXPORTS UNDER DEMOCRACY, 1990-2012

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    Manuel Llorca-Jaña

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with trade policy and the principal trends in Chilean exports after the return to democracy in 1990. During this period, both exports and imports expanded significantly in Chile. As far as exports are concerned, this boom is mainly due to an effective trade policy of additive regionalism, booming copper prices, export diversification and the economic dynamism of China, the principal beneficiary of Chilean exports. On the negative side, the country is still too dependant on copper and a few other primary products. In addition, nowadays, in relative terms Chile is exporting more copper minerals and less refined copper than it used to do in the 1990s, while Chilean exports remained highly concentrated in a few companies only, many of which belong to foreign nationals.

  13. Reporting quality of papers published in Chilean dental journals. Evaluation period: 2002-2012.

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    Sergio E Uribe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the reporting quality of papers published between 2002-2012 in Chilean dental journals. Methods: Bibliometric analysis of research papers published in indexed Chilean dental journals between 2002-2012. Three calibrated examinators (interoperator- Kappa=.83 assessed 205 papers: 150 case-reports, 37 observational studies and 18 clinical trials. Reporting quality was evaluated using CARE for case reports, STROBE for observational studies and CONSORT for clinical trials. Descriptive statistics were conducted. Results: Case-reports reported 35% of the required methodological items; epidemiological research reported 16% of required items for Materials and Methods and 10% for Results. Clinical research reported 29% of required Materials and Methods items and 20% of Results items. Conclusion: Case-report, epidemiological and clinician research papers in Chilean dental journals published during the 2002-2012 period are lacking explicit key methodological items, preventing a proper research replication or clinical application of the results.

  14. HIV prevention and low-income Chilean women: machismo, marianismo and HIV misconceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianelli, Rosina; Ferrer, Lilian; McElmurry, Beverly J

    2008-04-01

    Socio-cultural factors and HIV-related misinformation contribute to the increasing number of Chilean women living with HIV. In spite of this, and to date, few culturally specific prevention activities have been developed for this population. The goal of the present study was to elicit the perspectives of low-income Chilean women regarding HIV and relevant socio-cultural factors, as a forerunner to the development of a culturally appropriate intervention. As part of a mixed-methods study, fifty low-income Chilean women participated in a survey and twenty were selected to participate in prevention, in-depth interviews. Results show evidence of widespread misinformation and misconceptions related to HIV/AIDS. Machismo and marianismo offer major barriers to prevention programme development. Future HIV prevention should stress partner communication, empowerment and improving the education of women vulnerable to HIV.

  15. Potential heterogeneity in crustacean zooplankton assemblages in southern chilean saline lakes

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    P De los Rios-Escalante

    Full Text Available The Chilean saline lakes are distributed mainly in the Atacama desert in northern Chile and the southern Patagonian plains. The scarce studies are restricted mainly to northern Chilean saline lakes, and these revealed that the main component in these ecosystems are the halophylic copepod Boeckella poopoensis Marsh 1906, or the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana (Kellog, 1906, and both species do not coexist. The present study consisted of field observations in zooplankton assemblages in southern Chilean saline lakes (51-53 ºS. These first observations revealed three different patterns, one saline lake only with A. persimilis (Piccinelli and Prosdocimi, 1968, a second lake only with B. poopensis, and a third lake with A. persimilis, B. poopoensis and unidentified harpacticoid copepod. These results are different in comparison with the observations in the literature that described the non-coexistence between B. poopoensis with brine shrimps. Ecological and biogeographical topics were discussed.

  16. The High Andean Cordillera of central Argentina and Chile along the Piuquenes Pass-Cordon del Portillo transect: Darwin's pioneering observations compared with modern geology La Alta Cordillera de los Andes del centro de Argentina y Chile a lo largo de la transecta del Paso Piuquenes-Cordón del Portillo: Las observaciones pioneras de Darwin comparadas con la geología moderna

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    Laura Giambiagi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The geological observations made by Darwin in 1835 during his crossing of the Andes from Santiago to Mendoza via the Piuquenes Pass and Cordón del Portillo are compared with the present geological knowledge of the Cordillera Principal and Cordillera Frontal at 33°-34°S. The analysis of the complex stratigraphy of the Cordillera Principal, the imbricated structure of the Aconcagua fold and thrust belt, as well as the stratigraphy and structure of the inter mountain foreland Tunuyán Basin, allows to assess the pioneer observations of Darwin. He recognized the old metamorphic basement and the granitoids and volcanic sequences of late Paleozoic to Triassic age of the Cordillera Frontal, established the Cretaceous age of the marine successions cropping out along the eastern Cordillera Principal and studied the conglomeratic deposits associated with the uplift of the Cordillera in the Alto Tunuyán Basin. Based on the study of clast provenance of the synorogenic deposits of the Alto Tunuyán Basin, Darwin recognized that the Cordillera Frontal was uplifted later than the Cordillera Principal. The present knowledge of this sector of the Andean Cordillera confirms his pioneer observations and show that Darwin was one of the first scientists ever in realizing that in an orogenic system the sequence of uplift and deformation proceeds from hinterland towards foreland, according to a process that is exceptionally well-illustrated along the Piuquenes-Cordón del Portillo transect.Las observaciones geológicas efectuadas por Darwin en 1935 durante su cruce de la Cordillera de Los Andes entre Santiago y Mendoza realizado en 1835 a través de los pasos del Portillo y Piuquenes son examinadas y comparadas con el conocimiento actual existente de las Cordilleras Principal y Frontal entre los 33°-34°S. El análisis de la compleja estratigrafía de la Cordillera Principal, la estructura de las diferentes láminas imbricadas de la faja plegada y corrida del

  17. Cooling and Exhumation of the Coastal Batholith in the Peruvian Andes (5-12°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, M.; Hall, S. R.; Farber, D.; Hourigan, J. K.; Audin, L.

    2014-12-01

    The South American Andes exhibit strong morphological differences along strike, shaped by a combination of tectonic forces and surface processes. In the central Peruvian Andes (~12°S) a major morphological transition occurs; to the north, the spines of the Western and Eastern Cordilleras come together into a relatively narrow configuration of high topography. In Southern Peru, the region of high topography widens, where the Western and Eastern Cordilleras flank the broad, Altiplano plateau. Despite this morphological change, the Mesozoic-early Cenozoic Coastal Batholith outcrops continuously from 0°-18°S along the western margin of the Peruvian Andes, emplaced along a trench-parallel marginal basin in the Mesozoic. The Coastal Batholith is an ideal geologic setting to investigate potential differences in rock exhumation and cooling histories along the western margin of Peru. While the cooling history of the southern Coastal Batholith has been previously used to estimate timing and magnitude of rock exhumation in Southern Peru, north of 12°S it is poorly constrained. We present 16 zircon and 7 apatite (U-Th)/He mean-ages from three sites, across seven degrees of latitude (5°S to 12°S). In general, ZHe and AHe ages capture two stages of cooling, Oligocene-to-mid-Miocene and mid-to-late Miocene, respectively. We model time-temperature histories of samples with paired AHe and ZHe ages using a Monte-Carlo inversion of HeFTy® (Ketcham, 2005); best fit time-temperature pathways show cooling rates ranging from ~2-24°C/my, where fastest cooling rates are generally observed in the mid-Miocene. To estimate exhumation rates, we apply a simple thermal model to account for nonuniform geothermal gradients expected in a trench-arc setting. Exhumation rates range from ~0.2mm/yr in the north, to 0.4-0.7mm/yr in the south, and rates increase orogenward, where mean elevation is highest. These results, particularly the predominance of Miocene ZHe and AHe data, and the younging

  18. Glacial recession in the Tropical Andes from the Little Ice Age: the case of Ampato Volcanic Complex (Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá, J.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.

    2010-03-01

    Data published over the last decade reveal substantial glacial recession in the tropical Andes since the Little Ice Age (LIA), (Ramirez, et al., 2001; Rabatel, et al., 2005; Rabatel, et al., 2008; Vuille, et al., 2008; Hastenrath, 2009; Jomelli, et al., 2009), and a growing rate of recession since the 1980’s caused by global warming (Ramirez, et al., 2001; Vuille, et al., 2008). Today there is great interest in the evolution of these ice masses due to heightened awareness of climate change and of the strategic importance that glaciers have as a hydrologic resource for communities in arid climate zones in the tropical Andes (Mark, 2008; Vuille et al., 2008). Cordillera Blanca forms part of the Andes Mountains of northern Peru, and is a chosen site for many studies on glacier evolution. Vuille et al. 2008 determined that a considerable area of ice mass was lost at Huascarán-Chopicalqui glacier (18% from 1920-1970) and Astesonraju glacier (20% from 1962-2003). Studies at Coropuna volcano, which has the most extensive glacier field in the western range of southern Peru, also report a strong melting trend that began with only minimal recession from 1955-1986 (4%), but increased to 14% from 1986-2007 (Úbeda et al., 2009). Only a few of the Andes glaciers are consistently monitored, and the most comprehensive data are for Chacaltaya and Zongo glaciers (16º S) in Bolivia. Since the maximum LIA, Chacaltaya has lost 89% of its surface area, particularly in recent years. By 1983, the totaled loss was five times the shrinkage for the period 1940-1963 (Ramirez, et al., 2001). Zongo glacier maintained equilibrium from 1956-1975, but later experienced a period dominated by continuous recession (Soruco, et al., 2009). This study expands current knowledge of glacier evolution since the LIA in the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ; 14º - 27º S) (Stern, 2004) of the Andes. The study site was chosen in an area that had never been used for preliminary research of this type, concretely

  19. Environmental and climatic history in the NW Argentine Andes (24° S over the last 2100 years inferred from a high-altitude peatland record

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    K. Schittek

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available High-altitude cushion peatlands are versatile archives for high-resolution palaeoenvironmental studies, due to their high accumulation rates, range of proxies and sensitivity to climatic and/or human-induced changes. Especially within the central Andes, the knowledge about climate conditions during the Holocene is limited. In this study, we present the environmental and climatic history for the last 2100 years of Cerro Tuzgle peatland (CTP, which is located in the dry Puna of NW Argentina, based on a multi-proxy approach. X-ray fluorescence (XRF, stable isotope and element content analyses (δ13C, δ15N, TN and TOC were conducted to analyse the inorganic geochemistry throughout the sequence, revealing changes in the peatland's past redox conditions. Pollen assemblages give an insight into substantial environmental changes on a regional scale. The palaeoclimate varied significantly during the last 2100 years. The results reflect prominent late Holocene climate anomalies and provide evidence that Northern Hemisphere temperature oscillations were extensive and affected the southward migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ, and hence, the intensity of moisture flux within the South American Summer Monsoon (SASM belt. Volcanic forcing at the beginning of the 19th century (1815 Tambora eruption seems to have had an impact on climatic settings in the central Andes. In the past, the peatland recovered from climatic perturbations. Nowadays, CTP is heavily degraded by human interventions, and the peat deposit becomes increasingly susceptible to erosion and incision.

  20. Organic carbon in glacial fjords of Chilean Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja, Silvio; Gutiérrez, Marcelo; Tapia, Fabián; Abarzúa, Leslie; Daneri, Giovanni; Reid, Brian; Díez, Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    The Southern Ice Field in Chilean Patagonia is the largest (13,000 km2) temperate ice mass in the Southern hemisphere, yearly transporting ca. 40 km3 of freshwater to fjords. This volume of fresh and cold water likely affects adjacent marine ecosystems by changing circulation, productivity, food web dynamics, and the abundance and distribution of planktonic and benthic organisms. We hypothesize that freshwater-driven availability of inorganic nutrient and transport of organic and inorganic suspended matter, as well as microbes, become a controlling factor for productivity in the fjord associated with the Baker river and Jorge Montt glacier. Both appear to be sources of silicic acid, but not of nitrate and particulate organic carbon, especially during summer, when surface PAR and glacier thawing are maximal. In contrast to Baker River, the Jorge Montt glacier is also a source of dissolved organic carbon towards a proglacial fjord and the Baker Channel, indicating that a thorough chemical description of sources (tidewater glacier and glacial river) is needed. Nitrate in fiord waters reaches ca. 15 μM at 25 m depth with no evidence of mixing up during summer. Stable isotope composition of particulate organic nitrogen reaches values as low as 3 per mil in low-salinity waters near both glacier and river. Nitrogen fixation could be depleting δ15N in organic matter, as suggested by the detection at surface waters of nif H genes belonging to diazotrophs near the Montt glacier. As diazotrophs have also been detected in other cold marine waters (e.g. Baltic Sea, Arctic Ocean) as well as glaciers and polar terrestrial waters, there is certainly a potential for both marine and freshwater microbes to contribute and have a significant impact on the Patagonian N and C budgets. Assessing the impact of freshwater on C and N fluxes and the microbial community structure in Patagonian waters will allow understanding future scenarios of rapid glacier melting. This research was funded

  1. Mismatch between classroom furniture and anthropometric measures in Chilean schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellucci, H I; Arezes, P M; Viviani, C A

    2010-07-01

    Children spend about five hours per day sitting down while doing their school work. Considering this as well as the potential inadequate use of school furniture, it is likely that some anatomical-functional changes and problems in the learning process may occur. The aim of this study was to compare furniture sizes within three different schools with the anthropometric characteristics of Chilean students in the Valparaíso region, in order to evaluate the potential mismatch between them. The sample consisted of 195 volunteer students (94 male, 101 female) of the 8th grade, ranging from 12.5 to 14.5 years of age from 3 different schools. Regarding the methodology, 6 anthropometric measures (Stature, Popliteal height, Buttock-popliteal length, Elbow height while sitting, Hip width, Thigh thickness and Subscapular height) were gathered, as well as 8 dimensions from the school furniture. For the evaluation of classroom furniture a match criterion equation was defined. After considering the existing classroom furniture dimensions in each match criterion equation, the anthropometric characteristics of the considered population were compared in order to determine the mismatch between them. Results indicated that seat height, which should be considered as the starting point for the design of classroom furniture, was appropriate for students' popliteal height in only 14% of the 2 out of the 3 schools, and 28% in the third. Seat to desk height was too high and mismatched 99% of the students in one school and 100% in the others. Therefore, it was possible to conclude that the classroom's furniture was inadequate in almost all the analyzed cases and subjects. It is possible that the high mismatch percentage found between furniture and students' anthropometry can be associated to the fact that the acquisition and selection of the furniture was made without any ergonomic concern or criteria.

  2. Observational evidences on the modulation of the South American Low Level Jet east of the Andes according the ENSO variability

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    G. A. M. Silva

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The differences on the phase and wavelength of the quasi-stationary waves over the South America generated by El Niño (EN and La Niña (LN events seem to affect the daily evolution of the South American Low Level Jet east of the Andes (SALLJ. For the austral summer period of 1977–2004 the SALLJ episodes detected according to Bonner criterion 1 show normal to above-normal frequency in EN years, and in LN years the episodes show normal to below-normal frequency.

    During EN and LN years the SALLJ episodes were associated with positive rainfall anomalies over the La Plata Basin, but more intense during LN years. During EN years the increase in the SALLJ cases were associated to intensification of the Subtropical Jet (SJ around 30° S and positive Sea Level Pressure (SLP anomalies over the western equatorial Atlantic and tropical South America, particularly over central Brazil. This favored the intensification of the northeasterly trade winds over the northern continent and it channeled by the Andes mountain to the La Plata Basin region where negative SLP are found. The SALLJ cases identified during the LN events were weaker and less frequent when compared to those for EN years. In this case the SJ was weaker than in EN years and the negative SLP anomalies over the tropical continent contributed to the inversion of the northeasterly trade winds. Also a southerly flow anomaly was generated by the geostrophic balance due to the anomalous blocking over southeast Pacific and the intense cyclonic transient over the southern tip of South America. As result the warm tropical air brought by the SALLJ encounters the cold extratropical air from the southerly winds over the La Plata basin. This configuration can increase the conditional instability over the La Plata basin and may explain the more intense positive rainfall anomalies in SALLJ cases during LN years than in EN years.

  3. Into the Andes: multiple independent colonizations drive montane diversity in the Neotropical clearwing butterflies Godyridina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazot, Nicolas; Willmott, Keith R; Condamine, Fabien L; De-Silva, Donna Lisa; Freitas, André V L; Lamas, Gerardo; Morlon, Hélène; Giraldo, Carlos E; Jiggins, Chris D; Joron, Mathieu; Mallet, James; Uribe, Sandra; Elias, Marianne

    2016-11-01

    Understanding why species richness peaks along the Andes is a fundamental question in the study of Neotropical biodiversity. Several biogeographic and diversification scenarios have been proposed in the literature, but there is confusion about the processes underlying each scenario, and assessing their relative contribution is not straightforward. Here, we propose to refine these scenarios into a framework which evaluates four evolutionary mechanisms: higher speciation rate in the Andes, lower extinction rates in the Andes, older colonization times and higher colonization rates of the Andes from adjacent areas. We apply this framework to a species-rich subtribe of Neotropical butterflies whose diversity peaks in the Andes, the Godyridina (Nymphalidae: Ithomiini). We generated a time-calibrated phylogeny of the Godyridina and fitted time-dependent diversification models. Using trait-dependent diversification models and ancestral state reconstruction methods we then compared different biogeographic scenarios. We found strong evidence that the rates of colonization into the Andes were higher than the other way round. Those colonizations and the subsequent local diversification at equal rates in the Andes and in non-Andean regions mechanically increased the species richness of Andean regions compared to that of non-Andean regions ('species-attractor' hypothesis). We also found support for increasing speciation rates associated with Andean lineages. Our work highlights the importance of the Andean slopes in repeatedly attracting non-Andean lineages, most likely as a result of the diversity of habitats and/or host plants. Applying this analytical framework to other clades will bring important insights into the evolutionary mechanisms underlying the most species-rich biodiversity hotspot on the planet.

  4. You will never again be a Chilean like the others : From diaspora to diasporic practices among Chilean refugees returning from exile

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    Gurid Aga Askeland

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we focus on repatriation of refugees who came to Norway after the coup d'état in Chile in 1973. The Chilean refugees formed part of a diaspora during exile. The authors’ concern is the returnees' relationship with the diaspora upon return. The purpose of the article is to discuss whether the notion of diaspora may contribute to an understanding of the situation of the returnees. Diaspora is widely used in migration studies, although the concept is not particularly related to studies on refugees and their return. The article is based on interviews with Chilean returnees from Norwegian exile. The authors argue that their situation may be best understood as one of continued diasporic identity and diasporic consciousness.

  5. The Grenville-age basement of the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Victor A.

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of the basement of the Andes shows the strong Grenville affinities of most of the inliers exposed in the different terranes from Colombia to Patagonia. The terranes have different histories, but most of them participated in the Rodinia supercontinent amalgamation during the Mesoproterozoic between 1200 and 1000 Ma. After Rodinia break-up some terranes were left in the Laurentian side such as Cuyania and Chilenia, while others stayed in the Gondwanan side. Some of the terranes once collided with the Amazon craton remained attached, experiencing diverse rifting episodes all along the Phanerozoic, as the Arequipa and Pampia terranes. Some other basement inliers were detached in the Neoproterozoic and amalgamated again to Gondwana in the Early Cambrian, Middle Ordovician or Permian times. A few basement inliers with Permian metamorphic ages were transferred to Gondwana after Pangea break-up from the Laurentian side. Some of them were part of the present Middle America terrane. An exceptional case is the Oaxaquia terrane that was detached from the Gondwana margin after the Early Ordovician and is now one of the main Mexican terranes that collided with Laurentia. These displacements, detachments, and amalgamations indicate a complex terrane transfer between Laurentia and Gondwana during Paleozoic times, following plate reorganizations and changes in the absolute motion of Gondwana.

  6. [Medical education at Universidad de los Andes, Santiago, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrego Vicuña, F

    1997-07-01

    Universidad de los Andes School of Medicine started in 1991 with a new medical curriculum aimed at providing a medical education for its students, that is, it attempts to give, together with technical proficiency in medical matters, formation of character and a strong ethical attitude. The curriculum lasts for seven years: five of basic, pre-clinical and clinical theoretical and practical courses, followed by two years of internships in Internal Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics and Pediatrics, plus a four month period of an elective internship. The courses have an integrated design, in which each matter is presented from multiple perspectives, e.g. in Internal Medicine together with the clinical aspects of disease, the pathophysiology and the pharmacology of the drugs used are presented. Also the Pathology of each disease is given in coordination in the Pathology course. General educational matters such as Anthropology, Psychology, Origin of Living Beings, Theology and Medical Ethics are interspersed in the curriculum. An important feature is the personal counselling system, in which each student may choose an academic counsellor and discuss with him (her) the subjects of his choosing. Clinical practice is given in a system that includes five hospitals and five private clinics that range from general medical practice to Psychiatry or Ophthalmology.

  7. La familia Hemiaulaceae (Bacillariophyceae de las aguas marinas chilenas The family Hemiaulaceae (Bacillariophyceae from marine Chilean waters

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    PATRICIO RIVERA

    2003-12-01

    with light and electron microscopy of marine samples from along the Chilean coast and the Antarctic Peninsula (including those used in earlier publications revealed that (1 the genus Cerataulina is represented by C. pelagica, and is distributed along the Chilean coast between Arica in the north and the Magellan Strait in the south, (2 the genus Eucampia comprises four taxa: E. zodiacus f. cylindrocornis Syvertsen (previously reported for Chile as E. zodiacus f. zodiacus, E. zodiacus f. recta Rivera, Avaria & Cruces (described here, E. cornuta and E. antarctica. The former three taxa occur in the central and northern coast of Chile, while E. antarctica lives in Antarctic waters south of the Magellan Strait, (3 earlier records of Hemialus membranaceus, H. sinensis and Climacodium biconcavum in Chilean waters are misidentifications of Eucampia zodiacus f. recta Rivera & Avaria f. nov. A short description is included for each taxon, and photographs provide information about the main morphological characteristics

  8. External Technical Support for School Improvement: Critical Issues from the Chilean Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osses, Alejandra; Bellei, Cristián; Valenzuela, Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    To what extent school improvement processes can be initiated and sustained from the outside has been a relevant question for policy-makers seeking to increase quality in education. Since 2008, the Chilean Government is strongly promoting the use of external technical support (ETS) services to support school improvement processes, as part of the…

  9. Chilean Adolescents' and Parents' Views on Autonomy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, M. Loreto; Pérez, J. Carola; Cumsille, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to understand Chilean parents' and adolescents' conceptions of autonomy and whether they hold different expectations for autonomous behaviors by generation and socioeconomic level. A qualitative approach to data collection was used through separate focus groups of parents and adolescents from different socioeconomic…

  10. HLA-B*5701 frequency in Chilean HIV-infected patients and in general population

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    Helena Poggi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that HLA-B*5701 screening reduces the risk for hypersensitivity reaction to abacavir in HIV-infected patients. Since B*5701 prevalence varies among different populations, it is important to determine the carrier frequency prior to its use for the screening of HIV-infected patients.The aim of this study was to determine HLA-B*5701 carrier frequency in Chilean general population and HIV-infected patients referred for B*5701 typing. For that purpose 300 blood bank donors and 492 abacavir-naïve HIV-infected patients from Chile were screened for B*5701 by a sequence specific primer PCR.We detected 14/300 (4.7% B*57-positive individuals in the Chilean general population, 11 (3.7% were B*5701 positive, and 3 (1% had another subtype.All were heterozygous,thus a B*5701 allele frequency of 2% was determined.Eleven of 492 (2.2 % HIV-patients carried a B*5701 allele. The difference between these frequencies is probably due to slow progression of HIV infection in HLA-B*5701 carriers, thus less patients would require antiretroviral therapy and B*5701 typing. Considering the usefulness of B*5701 screening, its prevalence in the Chilean general population,and the availability of a validated method,we conclude that HLA-B*5701 typing in Chilean HIV-infected patients about to initiate abacavir treatment is strongly recommended

  11. Bruises in Chilean cattle: their characterization, occurrence and relation with pre-slaughter conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strappini, A.C.

    2012-01-01

    Bruises on cattle carcass affect the quality of the meat and are indicators of poor welfare conditions. According to the literature the occurrence of bruises is related to pre- slaughter conditions, however their contribution is not clear for Chilean cattle. The aim of this thesis was to provide a b

  12. The Class and Culture-Based Exclusion of the Chilean Neoliberal Educational Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavieres, Eduardo A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I analyze the class- and cultural-based exclusion produced by the Chilean neoliberal educational reform, carried out during the period from 1990 to 2010. This educational reform follows the same neoliberal model applied to the economy of the country. Although some indicators improved in relation to coverage and public spending in…

  13. The Long Journey: Perspectives on the Coordination of Chilean Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, José M.; Leihy, Peodair S.

    2017-01-01

    It is fairly established that Chilean higher education presents a high level of Habermasian "privatism," as long labeled by José Joaquin Brunner, being among the world's most privatized systems in terms of who pays, who is held to benefit directly from its action and who controls it. Less clear, however, is the contribution of public…

  14. Level of evidence and geographic origin of articles published in Chilean dental journals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Moraga

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the geographic origin and level of evidence (LE of articles published in Chilean dental journals during 2012. The target population for the bibliometric study was articles published in exclusively-scientific Chilean dental journals. These variables were analyzed: journal, area, language, country, region, design, scenario, and LE. A total of 120 articles were published in four journals: International Journal of Odontostomatology (IJOS=59, Revista Clínica de Periodoncia, Implantología y Rehabilitación Oral (PIRO=28, Journal of Oral Research (JOR=18, and Revista Dental de Chile (RDC=15. From the total, 80.83% were published in Spanish and 70% had a Chilean affiliation. Most publications corresponded to areas of pathology (21 others (20 and prosthodontics (20. None of the articles was Level 1 Evidence, 6.49% was 2b, 14.29% was 2c, 63.64% was 4, and 15.58% was 5. Chilean dental journals mainly publish articles of domestic origin and low LE.

  15. Morphology, anatomy and histology of Doto uva Marcus, 1955 (Opisthobranchia: Nudibranchia) from the Chilean coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, M.A.; Velde, van der G.; Roubos, E.W.

    2006-01-01

    Doto uva Marcus, 1955 is a nudibranch species recorded from the Brazilian and Chilean coast. In spite of its wide distribution, D. uva has been described only superficially, mainly as to the pattern of its coloration, external morphology, radular teeth and reproductive system. Here we substantially

  16. Remaking Education from Below: The Chilean Student Movement as Public Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jo

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the Chilean student movement and its ten-year struggle for public education as an example of public pedagogy. Secondary and university students, along with the parents, teachers, workers and community members who have supported them, have engaged in the most sustained political activism seen in Chile since the democratic…

  17. The Impact of Powerful Oral Language Lab on Chilean EFL Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Hsuying Chiou; Andruske, Cynthia Lee

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative case study reports the impact of using a public-speaking structure (Powerful Oral Language Lab [POLL]) in teaching preservice Chilean English pedagogy students. It describes how this task-based method of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teacher training is related to language strategic competence. Twenty students…

  18. Educational Effectiveness in Chilean Secondary Education: Comparing Different "Value Added" Approaches to Evaluate Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Chereau, B.; Thomas, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports an original investigation into school performance measures and the multilevel nature of pupil achievement data in the Chilean school system using a sample of 177,461 students, nested within 7146 classrooms, 2283 secondary schools and 313 municipalities. The data-set comprised Year 10 students' 2006 SIMCE test's results in two…

  19. Eating Disorders among a Community-Based Sample of Chilean Female Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granillo, M. Teresa; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Delva, Jorge; Castillo, Marcela

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence and correlates of eating disorders among a community-based sample of female Chilean adolescents. Data were collected through structured interviews with 420 female adolescents residing in Santiago, Chile. Approximately 4% of the sample reported ever being diagnosed with an eating disorder.…

  20. [Recommendations for Chilean travelers to the FIFA World Cup 2014 in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perret, Cecilia; Weitzel, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    This article provides a checklist of precautions and vaccines for Chilean travelers attending the FIFA World Cup 2014 in Brazil. It aims to help physicians to prepare visitors of this mass gathering and summarizes useful hints to avoid infectious diseases considering the circumstances and availabilities in Chile.

  1. The Chilean miracle : patrimonialism in a modern free-market democracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peppelenbos, L.P.C.

    2005-01-01

    International policy institutions claim that Chile's remarkable economic performance testifies to the merits of a neo-liberal development model. This book argues, however, that 'the Chilean miracle' did not result from the adoption ofneoliberalismitself, but from the persis

  2. The Dad in the Che Guevara T-Shirt: Narratives of Chilean English Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard-Warwick, Julia

    2008-01-01

    Building on previous critical research regarding student resistance to English Language Teaching (ELT), this paper illustrates Chilean high-school English teachers' use of narrative to make sense of ideological challenges from students. While the government of Chile is promoting English in connection with the nation's export-oriented economic…

  3. Bringing the Schools Back in: The Stratification of Educational Achievement in the Chilean Voucher System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizala, Alejandra; Torche, Florencia

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the socioeconomic stratification of achievement in the Chilean voucher system using a census of 4th and 8th graders, a multilevel methodology, and accounting for unobserved selectivity into school sector. Findings indicate that the association between the school's aggregate family socioeconomic status (SES) and test scores is…

  4. Draft Genome of Chilean Honeybee (Apis mellifera) Gut Strain Lactobacillus kunkeei MP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos, Alejandro; Henríquez-Piskulich, Patricia; Sanchez, Carolina; Rojas-Herrera, Marcelo; Moreno-Pino, Mario; Gómez, Marcela; Rodríguez Da Silva, Rafael; Maracaja-Coutinho, Vinicius; Aldea, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus kunkeei strain MP2, isolated from a Chilean honeybee gut. The sequenced genome has a total size of 1.58 Mb distributed into 44 contigs and 1,356 protein-coding sequences. PMID:25301653

  5. Lead isotopic evidence for evolutionary changes in magma-crust interaction, Central Andes, southern Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreiro, B.A. (California Univ., Santa Barbara (USA). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Clark, A.H. (Queen' s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1984-07-01

    Lead isotopic measurements were made on Andean igneous rocks of Jurassic to Recent age in Moquegua and Tacna Departments, southernmost Peru, to clarify the petrogenesis of the rocks and, in particular, to investigate the effect of crustal thickness on rock composition. This location in the Cordillera Occidental is ideal for such a study because the ca. 2 Ga Precambrian basement rocks (Arequipa massif) have a distinct Pb isotopic signature which is an excellent tracer of crustal interaction, and because geomorphological research has shown that the continental crust was here thickened drastically in the later Tertiary.

  6. Inventario de mamíferos en un bosque de los andes centrales de colombia

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Se usaron técnicas de captura, observación directa y registro indirecto para obtenerun inventario de mamíferos en un bosque andino de Colombia. Se realizaronmuestreos entre octubre de 1998 y abril de 1999 en la Reserva Río Blanco (Manizales,Departamento de Caldas), entre 2200 - 3750 m de altitud. Para capturar pequeñosmamíferos no voladores se usaron trampas Sherman. Para capturar murciélagos seusaron mallas de niebla y colectas manuales. Para registrar medianos y grandesmamíferos se usaron t...

  7. The nature of intermediate-depth seismicity in the Central Andes

    OpenAIRE

    P. Giese; G. Asch

    1996-01-01

    La structure thermique d'une plaque en subduction révèle deux zones de gradient de température. Tandis que la transformation basalte-éclogite se déroule dans la zone supérieure, la transformation de l'enstatite a lieu dans la zone inférieure. Ces deux processus sont associés à l'émission d'énergie sismique à une profondeur de 70 à 200 kilomètres. (Résumé d'auteur)

  8. Dry and wet rainy seasons in the Mantaro river basin (Central Peruvian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Silva

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Monthly precipitation data from the period of 1970 to 2004 from 38 meteorological stations in the Mantaro river basin were used to classify the rainy seasons (September–April of each year into anomalously dry or wet, and to determine the basin-wide extent of the anomalies based on the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI. The wet periods mostly occurred in the early 1970's and during the first half of the 1980's, except for the event that occurred in the 1993/94 period which was the strongest and most generalized in the analyzed period. The dry periods occurred mostly during the second half of the 1980's and the 1990's. Consistent with this, a negative trend in precipitation of 2% per decade was found for the rainy season, due mainly to a stronger trend (−4%/decade during the peak phase (January–March.

    Despite previously reported significant negative correlations between El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO and rainfall during the peak of the rainfall season, the similar amplitude variability of precipitation during the onset phase of the rainfall season (September–December, which is uncorrelated with ENSO, participate to the reduction of the absolute correlation for the full rainfall season. Correlations between rainfall in the Mantaro basin and sea surface temperature (SST in the tropical Atlantic are significant only near the end of the rainy season, with more rain associated with a weaker north-south difference in SST in the tropical Atlantic.

  9. Lead isotopic evidence for evolutionary changes in magma-crust interaction, Central Andes, southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro, Barbara A.; Clark, Alan H.

    1984-07-01

    Lead isotopic measurements were made on Andean igneous rocks of Jurassic to Recent age in Moquegua and Tacna Departments, southernmost Peru, to clarify the petrogenesis of the rocks and, in particular, to investigate the effect of crustal thickness on rock composition. This location in the Cordillera Occidental is ideal for such a study because the ca. 2 Ga Precambrian basement rocks (Arequipa massif) have a distinct Pb isotopic signature which is an excellent tracer of crustal interaction, and because geomorphological research has shown that the continental crust was here thickened drastically in the later Tertiary. Seven samples of quartz diorites and granodiorites from the Ilo and Toquepala intrusive complexes, and seven samples of Toquepala Group subaerial volcanics were analyzed for Pb isotopic compositions. The plutonic rocks range in age from Jurassic to Eocene; the volcanic rocks are all Late Cretaceous to Eocene. With one exception, the Pb isotopic ratios are in the ranges 206Pb/ 204Pb= 18.52-18.75, 207Pb/ 204Pb= 15.58-15.65, and 208Pb/ 204Pb= 38.53-38.74. The data reflect very little or no interaction with old continental material of the Arequipa massif type. Lead from four Miocene Huaylillas Formation ash-flow tuffs, two Pliocene Capillune Formation andesites and five Quaternary Barroso Group andesites has lower 206Pb/ 204Pb than that in the pre-Miocene rocks, but relatively high 207Pb/ 204Pb and 208Pb/ 204Pb ( 206Pb/ 204Pb= 18.16-18.30, 207Pb/ 204Pb= 15.55-15.63, 208Pb/ 204Pb= 38.45-38.90). Tilton and Barreiro [9] have shown that contamination by Arequipa massif granulites can explain the isotopic composition of the Barosso Group lavas, and the new data demonstrate that this effect is evident, to varying degrees, in all the analysed Neogene volcanic rocks. The initial incorporation of such basement material into the magma coincided with the Early Miocene uplift of this segment of the Cordillera Occidental [32], and thus with the creation of a thick crustal root. The data strongly imply a relationship between crustal thickness and degree of crustal contamination of magmas in this area, but a rigorous relationship is not yet established.

  10. A novel species of Euspondylus (Squamata: Gymnophthalmidae) from the Andes Mountains of central Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Tiffany M; Adams, Grant

    2015-10-21

    The South American gymnophthalmid genus Euspondylus is distributed from Venezuela through Peru, with its highest diversity occurring in Peru. Euspondylus paxcorpus sp. nov. is a new species from Junín, Peru possessing prefrontal scales and represented by 60 specimens. The new species differs from all other species by the combination of four supraoculars with supraocular/supraciliary fusion, 5-7 occipitals, a single palpebral scale, five supralabials and infralabials, quadrangular dorsal scales with low keels arranged in transverse series only, 40-45 in a longitudinal count and 22-28 in a transverse count, 12 rows of ventrals in a transverse count and 23-25 in a longitudinal count, and no sexual dimorphism in coloration. The discovery of E. paxcorpus increases the known number of Euspondylus species to 13. Because the coloration patterns of the specimens were greatly different after preservation in alcohol, caution should be used when identifying Euspondylus species from museum specimens.

  11. Climatic and geomorphological controls of rock glaciers in the Andes of Central Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Brenning, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Die Blockgletscher der trockenen Anden sind weitverbreitete Oberflächenformen sowie bedeutende Bodeneisvorkommen. In der vorliegenden Arbeit werden statistische Modellierungen und geomorphologische Kartierungen durchgeführt, um die Verbreitung dieser Formen in den Anden von Zentralchile (27-36° s.Br.) in ihrem Bezug zu Klima und Topographie zu quantifizieren und analysieren. Eine stichprobenbasierte statistische Erhebung und eine logistische Regressionsmodellierung wurden durchgefüh...

  12. The age and constitution of Cerro Campanario, a mafic stratovolcano in the Andes of central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, W.; Singer, B.; Godoy, E.; Munizaga, F.

    1998-01-01

    Cerro Campanario, a towering landmark on the continental divide near Paso Pehuenche, is a glacially eroded remnant of a mafic stratovolcano that is much younger than previously supposed. Consisting of fairly uniform basaltic andesite, rich in olivine and plagioclase, the 10-15 km3 edifice grew rapidly near the end of the middle Pleistocene, about 150-160 ka, as indicated by 40Ar/39Ar and unspiked K-Ar analyses of its lavas.

  13. Holocene compression in the Acequión valley (Andes Precordillera, San Juan province, Argentina): Geomorphic, tectonic, and paleoseismic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audemard, M.; Franck, A.; Perucca, L.; Laura, P.; Pantano, Ana; Avila, Carlos R.; Onorato, M. Romina; Vargas, Horacio N.; Alvarado, Patricia; Viete, Hewart

    2016-04-01

    The Matagusanos-Maradona-Acequión Valley sits within the Andes Precordillera fold-thrust belt of western Argentina. It is an elongated topographic depression bounded by the roughly N-S trending Precordillera Central and Oriental in the San Juan Province. Moreover, it is not a piggy-back basin as we could have expected between two ranges belonging to a fold-thrust belt, but a very active tectonic corridor coinciding with a thick-skinned triangular zone, squeezed between two different tectonic domains. The two domains converge, where the Precordillera Oriental has been incorporated to the Sierras Pampeanas province, becoming the western leading edge of the west-verging broken foreland Sierras Pampeanas domain. This latter province has been in turn incorporated into the active deformation framework of the Andes back-arc at these latitudes as a result of enhanced coupling between the converging plates due to the subduction of the Juan Fernández ridge that flattens the Nazca slab under the South American continent. This study focuses on the neotectonics of the southern tip of this N-S elongated depression, known as Acequión (from the homonym river that crosses the area), between the Del Agua and Los Pozos rivers. This depression dies out against the transversely oriented Precordillera Sur, which exhibits a similar tectonic style as Precordillera Occidental and Central (east-verging fold-thrust belt). This contribution brings supporting evidence of the ongoing deformation during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene of the triangular zone bounded between the two leading and converging edges of Precordillera Central and Oriental thrust fronts, recorded in a multi-episodic lake sequence of the Acequión and Nikes rivers. The herein gathered evidence comprise Late Pleistocene-Holocene landforms of active thrusting, fault kinematics (micro-tectonic) data and outcrop-scale (meso-tectonic) faulting and folding of recent lake and alluvial sequences. In addition, seismically

  14. Population genetics of the Chilean frog Batrachyla Leptopus (Leptodactylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Formas

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrophoretic variation of proteins encoded by 14 loci was analyzed in eight (five continental and three insular populations of the Chilean leptodactylid frog Batrachyla leptopus. The overall proportion of polymorphic loci was estimated to be 18.7% and the average number of alleles per locus, 1.2, while observed and expected heterozygosities were 1.7 and 5.1%, respectively. The estimated coefficient of genetic identity was 0.940; the corresponding figure for genetic distance was 0.063. F-statistics analysis showed a total inbreeding coefficient (Fit of 0.855 and high levels of genetic subdivision (Fst = 0.596 as well as of inbreeding within populations (Fis = 0.640. However, there was only a moderate level of genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.181 between the insular group of populations and the continental group.A variação eletroforética de proteínas codificadas por 14 loci foi analisada em oito populações (5 continentais e 3 insulares da rã leptodactilídea chilena Batrachyla leptopus. A proporção geral de loci polimórficos foi estimada como sendo de 18,7% e o número médio de alelos por loco, 1,2, enquanto que as heterozigosidades observada e esperada foram 1,7 e 5,1%, respectivamente. O coeficiente esperado de identidade genética foi 0,940; o número correspondente para a distância genética foi 0,063. A análise estatística F mostrou um coeficiente de endogamia total (Fit de 0,855 e altos níveis de subdivisão genética (Fst = 0,596, assim como de endogamia dentro das populações (Fis = 0,640. Contudo, houve apenas um nível moderado de diferenciação genética (Fst = 0,181 entre o grupo insular de populações e o grupo continental.

  15. Prevalence rates of mental disorders in Chilean prisons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian P Mundt

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: High rates of mental disorders have been reported for prison populations worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs. The present study aimed to establish prevalence rates of mental disorders in Chilean prisoners. METHOD: A nationwide random sample of 1008 prisoners was assessed in 7 penal institutions throughout Chile. Twelve-month prevalence rates were established using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI and compared to the prevalence rates previously published for the general population. RESULTS: Prevalence rates were 12.2% (95% CI, 10.2-14.1 for any substance use disorder, 8.3% (6.6-10.0 for anxiety disorders, 8.1% (6.5-9.8 for affective disorders, 5.7% (4.4-7.1 for intermittent explosive disorders, 2.2% (1.4-3.2 for ADHD of the adult, and 0.8% (0.3-1.3 for non-affective psychoses. Significantly higher prevalence rates among prisoners as compared to the general population in Chile were seen for major depression (6.1% vs. 3.7% males, Z=2.58, p<0.05 and illicit drug use (3.3% vs. 0.6% males with drug abuse, Z=2.04, p<0.05; 2.6% vs. 0.1% females with drug abuse, Z=5.36, p<0.001; 3.4% vs. 1.1% males with drug dependence, Z=3.70; p<0.001. Dysthymia (6.5% vs. 15.6%, Z=-2.39, p<0.05, simple (3.3% vs. 11.5%, Z=-3.13, p<0.001 and social phobias (3.9% vs. 9.7%, Z=2.38, p<0.05 were significantly less frequent in the female prison population than in the general population. One-year prevalence rates of alcohol abuse (2.3% vs. 3.9%; Z=-2.04; p<0.05 and dependence (2.7% vs. 8.2%; Z=-5.24; p<0.001 were less prevalent in the male prison population than in the general population. CONCLUSIONS: Service provision for prison populations in Chile should acknowledge high rates of depression and illicit drug use. Overall prevalence rates are lower than reported in other LMICs. Previous research in prison populations in LMICs might have overestimated prevalence rates of mental disorders.

  16. Structure and tectonic evolution of the Fuegian Andes (southernmost South America) in the framework of the Scotia Arc development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Carbonell, Pablo J.; Dimieri, Luis V.; Olivero, Eduardo B.; Bohoyo, Fernando; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús

    2014-12-01

    The major structural and tectonic features of the Fuegian Andes provide an outstanding onshore geological framework that aids in the understanding of the tectonic evolution of the Scotia Arc, mainly known from offshore studies. The orogenic history of the Fuegian Andes (Late Cretaceous-Miocene) is thus compared and integrated with the tectonic history of the Scotia Sea. Late Cretaceous-Paleocene structures in the Fuegian Andes suggest a N-directed contraction consistent with an oroclinal bending of the southernmost South America-Antarctic Peninsula continental bridge. This N-directed contraction in the Fuegian Andes continued during the spreading of the West Scotia Ridge, between 40-50 and 10 Ma ago. The onset of major strike-slip faulting in Tierra del Fuego is considered here to be not older than the late Miocene, consistent with the recent history of the North Scotia Ridge; thus forming part of a tectonic regime superposed to the prior contraction in the Fuegian Andes.

  17. Climate variability, precipitation trends, and impacts on surface processes in humid to arid climate transition zones of the NW Argentine Andes (24° S, 65° W)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castino, Fabiana; Bookhagen, Bodo; Strecker, Manfred

    2015-04-01

    , intensified (diminished) extreme events (percentiles > 90th) almost completely account for the increase (decrease) in seasonal totals, while median rainfall values have been sustained at a constant level. Our results suggest that climate transition zones in NW Argentine Andes have been subjected to the effects of pronounced climate variability over the last decades, primarily expressed as rainfall extreme events. In the context of regional fluvial aggradation and sediment transfer from semiarid hillslope environments to transient storage in intermontane basins we suggest that the intensity of changing rainfall extreme events may ultimately control the pronounced coupling between erosion and sedimentation in the intermontane basins of the southern central Andes.

  18. Carbon stabilization mechanisms in soils in the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Boris; Cammeraat, Erik

    2015-04-01

    The volcanic ash soils of the Andes contain very large stocks of soil organic matter (SOM) per unit area. Consequently, they constitute significant potential sources or sinks of the greenhouse gas CO2. Climate and/or land use change potentially have a strong effect on these large SOM stocks. To clarify the role of chemical and physical stabilisation mechanisms in volcanic ash soils in the montane tropics, we investigated carbon stocks and stabilization mechanisms in the top- and subsoil along an altitudinal transect in the Ecuadorian Andes. The transect encompassed a sequence of paleosols under forest and grassland (páramo), including a site where vegetation cover changed in the last century. We applied selective extraction techniques, performed X-ray diffraction analyses of the clay fraction and estimated pore size distributions at various depths in the top- and subsoil along the transect. In addition, from several soils the molecular composition of SOM was further characterized with depth in the current soil as well as the entire first and the top of the second paleosol using GC/MS analyses of extractable lipids and Pyrolysis-GC/MS analyses of bulk organic matter. Our results show that organic carbon stocks in the mineral soil under forest a páramo vegetation were roughly twice as large as global averages for volcanic ash soils, regardless of whether the first 30cm, 100cm or 200cm were considered. We found the carbon stabilization mechanisms involved to be: i) direct stabilization of SOM in organo-metallic (Al-OM) complexes; ii) indirect protection of SOM through low soil pH and toxic levels of Al; and iii) physical protection of SOM due to a very high microporosity of the soil (Tonneijck et al., 2010; Jansen et al. 2011). When examining the organic carbon at a molecular level, interestingly we found extensive degradation of lignin in the topsoil while extractable lipids were preferentially preserved in the subsoil (Nierop and Jansen, 2009). Both vegetation

  19. Possible future lakes in the Andes of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonia, Daniel; Haeberli, Wilfried; Torres, Judith; Giraldez, Claudia; Schauwecker, Simone; Santiago, Alexzander; Cochachin, Alejo; Huggel, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Climate change has caused large losses of glacier mass in the Andes of Peru. Also, given the projected changes in climate, based on different IPCC scenarios for 2050 and 2080, simulations with a tropical glacier-climate model indicate that glaciers will continue to retreat. According to the national Peruvian glacier inventories 43% of glacier area has disappeared between 1970 and 2003-2010 in the 19 snowy mountain ranges and a total of 8 355 new lakes have formed in deglaciating terrain. With glacier retreat new lakes form in parts of the glacier tongue where there is an overdeepening, and these lakes can be a source of natural hazards to downstrean populations. Therefore, the identification of possible future lakes is important to plan for preventive measures concerning possible lake outbursts as well as to understand changes in freshwater storage in the corresponding source areas. Modeling of glacier-bed overdeepenings and possible future lakes forming in such topographic depressions when becoming ice-free was done using the SRTM DEM from the year 2000 with a 90 m resolution and the 2003-2010 glacier outlines from the recently published national glacier inventory of Perú. The GIS-based analysis followed three main steps: (1) identification of flat glacier areas with less than 10° surface slope as a first-order spatial approximation to possible occurrences of glacier-bed overdeepenings; (2) application, using Google Earth, of three morphological indications of glacier-bed overdeepenings following Frey et al. (2010): steepening surface slope, onset of crevasse formation, lateral flow-narrowing; and (3) verification of the results from steps (1) and (2) by comparison with GlabTop modeling of bed topographies following Linsbauer et al. (2012) using the SRTM DEM, contour lines and constructed branch lines for all glaciers. A pilot study has already been carried out for the Cordillera Blanca. The results show that 31 major new lakes may form in the future. The total

  20. Late Miocene increase in precipitation in the Western Cordillera of the Andes between 18-19°S latitudes inferred from shifts in sedimentation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlunegger, Fritz; Norton, Kevin P.; Delunel, Romain; Ehlers, Todd A.; Madella, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    Modern climate in the Andes is characterized by strong N-S decreasing trends in precipitation rates. Here we use stratigraphic records to show that this pattern has been established since as early as 12-11 Ma, at least on the western Andean margin of Northern Chile. The stratigraphic architecture on the western Andean margin documents a transition between 19°-20°S latitude where matrix-supported debris flow deposits shift to fluvial conglomerates between 12-11 Ma. The deposition of fluvial sediments has been maintained to the present north of 19°-20°S, while the occurrence of post 11 Ma aeolian sand, matrix-supported breccias with conglomerate interbeds south of these latitudes implies ongoing sedimentation with less water and thus under drier conditions. We relate these changes to the tectonic development of the Andes. Existing palaeoclimate models suggest that an elevated plateau deflects the Andean jet towards the south, thereby focusing moisture from the equatorial Atlantic to the northeastern flanks of the Altiplano. In addition, the formation of the eastern Andean foothills most likely intercepted moisture transport, and shifted it farther to the east, thereby keeping the western Andean margin dry south of 19°-20°S latitudes. The sedimentological data support a strong linkage between orographic precipitation and stratigraphy whereby central Andean deformation controls the distribution of available moisture on the western flank through a combination of orographic precipitation and deflection of air masses.

  1. High resolution precipitation climatology for the Andes of South Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachte, Katja; Bendix, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    The climate of Ecuador is strongly dominated by the complex structure of the Andes Mountains. Due to their heights and north-south orientation they act like a barrier, which cause delineation between the western and eastern flanks, as well as the inner-Andean areas. Commonly the Ecuadorian climate is classified in three zones, Costa, Interandina and Oriente. Existing precipitation products such as the GPCC or TRMM data are enabled to represent these climate zones, but because of their spatial resolution, they pass to capture the different regimes within a zone. Especially the inner-Andean region (Interandina) with its characteristic complex terrain shows spatially high climate variability. Local circulation systems, e.g. mountain-valley breezes as well as effects of windward and lee-side, drive the climate conditions allowing for the differentiation of air temperature and rainfall distribution on relative small scales. These highly variable patterns are also reflected by the diversity of ecosystems, e.g. rainforest, dry forest and Paramo, in a relative small area. In order to represent the local systems a dynamical downscaling approach for the Ecuadorian region is applied. In doing so the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used. A suitable model setup was evaluated within a sensitivity study, where various parametrization schemes were tested. The most suitable physics combination was used for a 30 year hint cast simulation. The poster presents first results of the high resolution climate simulations. On the basis of the spatial distribution of rainfall patterns distinct precipitation regimes within the Interandina will be shown. The aim is to highlight and discuss the importance of the adequately representation of the terrain in mountainous regions like the Andean Mountains.

  2. The Little Ice Age in the tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomelli, V.; Cooley, D.; Naveau, P.; Rabatel, A.

    2003-12-01

    The period known as the Little Ice Age, from the 17th to the 19th century, brought a cooling of around 0.5 degrees Celsius as well as varyingly humid episodes Eurasia and North America. Because of a lack of long paleoclimatic time series in the tropical Andes, it is still unclear if similar cooling occurred over these tropical and Southern Hemisphere regions. Furthermore, if changes did take place, it is currently not well established if they were temporally synchronous or shifted with respect of the variations in the Northern Hemisphere or the globe. To look into this important climatic question and for advancing our understanding of the past climate links between the tropics and higher latitudes, 25 glaciers located in Bolivia and in Peru were carefully selected. Glacial activity and environmental changes were analyzed using lichenometry. Largest lichen diameters were measured in the different glacial basins. To better analyze these maximum diameters and to more appropriately represent uncertainty and the character of this collected data, age estimates of the different moraine systems were derived using extreme value theory rather than the traditional averaging. The results reveal two particular phases of glacier growth, 1550-1600 and 1800-1850. These two phases have also been identified in other proxy records, such as ice-cores and documentary data (particularly from church chronicles). In order to understand the climatic changes that could have contributed to the glacial variations, a simple model based on both precipitations and temperatures is applied to estimate mass balance questions in the basins. A cooling of the order of 0.5 C seems to be the most consistent with the data. Finally, these findings are compared with the better-known histories of Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude glaciers.

  3. Glacier loss and emerging hydrologic vulnerabilities in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, B. G.; McKenzie, J. M.; Baraer, M.; Lagos, P.; Lautz, L.; Carey, M.; Bury, J.; Crumley, R.; Wigmore, O.; Somers, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Accelerating glacier recession in the tropical Andes is transforming downstream hydrology, while increasing demands for water by end-users (even beyond the watershed limits) is complicating the assessment of vulnerability. Future scenarios of hydro-climatic vulnerability require a better understanding of coupled hydrologic and human systems, involving both multiscale process studies and more robust models of glacier-climate interactions. We synthesize research in two proglacial valleys of glacierized mountain ranges in different regions of Peru that are both in proximity to growing water usage from urban sectors, agriculture, hydroelectric generation, and mining. In both the Santa River watershed draining the Cordillera Blanca and the Shullcas River watershed below Hyuatapallana Mountain in Junin, glaciers have receded over 25% since the 1980s. Historical runoff and glacier data, combined with glacier-climate modeling, show a long-term decrease in discharge resulting from a net loss of stored water. We find evidence that this altered hydrology is transforming proglacial wetland ecology and water quality, even while water resource use has intensified. Beyond glaciers, our results show that over 60% of the dry season base flow in each watershed is groundwater sourced from heterogeneous aquifers. Municipal water supply in Huancayo already relies on 18 groundwater wells. Perceptions of water availability and actual water use practices remain relatively divorced from the actual water resources provided from each mountain range. Critical changes in glacier volume and water supply are not perceived or acknowledged consistently amongst different water users, nor reflected in water management decisions. In order to identify, understand, model, and adapt to climate-glacier-water changes, it is vital to integrate the analysis of water availability and groundwater processes (the domain of hydrologists) with that of water use (the focus for social scientists). Attention must be

  4. Two New Species of Black Flies (Diptera: Simuliidae) from the High Andes of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Juan S; Moncada, Ligia I; Matta, Nubia E; Adler, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    The females, males, pupae, and larvae of two new species of Simulium are described and illustrated from a small stream 3950 m above sea level in the Lake Otún area of the Colombian Andes Mountains. Simulium (Pternaspatha) quimbayium n. sp. represents a 630-km northeastern extension of the distributional range of previously known members of the subgenus Pternaspatha, and Simulium (Psilopelmia) machetorum n. sp. represents the highest altitude recorded for a species of the subgenus Psilopelmia. These species illustrate the unique simuliid biodiversity in the páramo ecosystem of the high northern Andes.

  5. High altitude C4 grasslands in the northern Andes: relicts from glacial conditions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, A.; Mora, G.; Cleef, A.M.; Hooghiemstra, H.

    2001-01-01

    The altitudinal vegetation distribution in the northern Andes during glacial time differed from the present-day conditions as a result of temperature and precipitation change. New evidence indicate that as a response to a reduced atmospheric partial CO2 pressure (pCO2), the competitive balance betwe

  6. Psychometric properties of the "Spanish Burnout Inventory" in Chilean professionals working to physical disabled people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Monte, Pedro R; Olivares Faúndez, Víctor E

    2011-05-01

    While the most commonly employed burnout measure has been the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), researchers have been troubled by some of the psychometric limitations of this instrument. The aim of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the "Spanish Burnout Inventory" (SBI). The psychometric properties were analysed with data from a sample of 277 Chilean professionals working to physical disabled people. The psychometric properties of the SBI were examined through the following analyses: confirmatory factor analysis, reliability Cronbach's alpha, and concurrent validity with the MBI. The hypothesized four factor model obtained an adequate data fit for the sample (chi2(164) = 285.32, p burnout in the Chilean cultural context.

  7. Socioeconomic Status and Internalizing Symptoms in Chilean Children: Does Reserve Capacity Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Suzanna M; Castillo, Marcela; Lozoff, Betsy; Gahagan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Informed by the reserve capacity model, we examined pathways between socioeconomic status (SES) and internalizing symptoms (IS) in 1119 Chilean 10-year-olds. Mediators included parental disciplinary style and reserve capacity resources (RCR), namely home environment, parent-child engagement, and self-esteem, and conduct problems. Using structural equation modeling, the model was stratified by gender. For boys, the SES-IS relationship was mediated by the home environment and parental disciplinary style. For girls, the SES-IS relationship was mediated by the home environment, parent-child engagement, self-esteem, and conduct problems. Findings suggest different RCR may protect against IS in a sample of Chilean children. PMID:27123471

  8. Responses to electricity liberalization: the regional strategy of a Chilean generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sol, P. del [Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Dpto. Ingenieria Industrial y de Sistemas

    2002-04-01

    Chilean reformers joined the new trend toward liberalization of the electricity markets around 1980, 12 years before any other Latin American country. This paper summarizes the main characteristics of the electricity reforms in Chile and other Latin American countries. It then analyzes the strategic response by the electricity generating company Endesa de Chile to these reforms. Endesa completely reformulated its competitive strategy. Its most significant commitments were its investments across Latin America in privatized power plants in Argentina, Peru, Colombia and Brazil. Endesa based its internationalization on its Chilean experience in transferring an inefficient state-owned firm and operating it in the new electrical regulatory framework favorable to market competition. The company's competitive advantage originated to a great extent in that Chile was the first country in Latin America to reform its electrical sector. (author)

  9. Beliefs about children's adjustment in same-sex families: Spanish and Chilean university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias-Navarro, Dolores; Monterde-i-Bort, Hector; Barrientos-Delgado, Jaime; Badenes-Ribera, Laura; Cardenas-Castro, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of our study is to compare the beliefs of Spanish and Chilean university students about the effects that same-sex parents might have on their children. A total of 491 participants completed the study (208 Spaniards and 283 Chileans). The results indicate a kind of modern and subtle rejection based on hetero-normativity. Furthermore, the results indicated the effects of sex (men have a greater degree of rejection), traditional and sexist opinions linked to a greater rejection of same-sex parents, and the contact variable which inversely correlates with this rejection. The results show that the etiology of homosexual orientation also correlates with rejection of same-sex parents when it is believed that homosexuality is learned or can be changed.

  10. Spanish and Chilean Standardizations of the Personality Assessment Inventory: the Influence of Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Tallo, Margarita; Cardenal, Violeta; Ferragut, Marta; Santamaría, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in the adaptation of psychological questionnaires in different countries, due to the need for cross-cultural research using the same tests adapted to diverse populations. This paper presents the standardization of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 1991, 2007) in Spain and Chile (both Spanish-speaking countries). The Spanish sample was made up of 940 people (461 men and 479 women), and the Chilean sample of 569 people (231 men and 338 women). Results revealed that the Chilean means were higher than those of the Spanish sample at confidence level 99.9%, although the associated effect sizes were generally small to moderate (partial eta-square between 0.008 and 0.187). Sex differences in the variables evaluated were commented on, and the importance of cross-cultural research and the influence of sex on personality and psychopathology variables were discussed.

  11. Intercultural journalism: Peruvian and Bolivian representation in the Chilean daily press news

    OpenAIRE

    Browne-Sartori, Rodrigo-Francisco; Baessolo-Stiven, Ricardo-Alberto; Silva-Echeto, Víctor-Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the processes through which the massive press generates and represents the cultural discourses of two of the most polemic migrant groups coexisting nowadays in Chile: Peruvians and Bolivians. The represe