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Sample records for central cell development

  1. Cell fate control in the developing central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guérout, Nicolas; Li, Xiaofei; Barnabé-Heider, Fanie, E-mail: Fanie.Barnabe-Heider@ki.se

    2014-02-01

    The principal neural cell types forming the mature central nervous system (CNS) are now understood to be diverse. This cellular subtype diversity originates to a large extent from the specification of the earlier proliferating progenitor populations during development. Here, we review the processes governing the differentiation of a common neuroepithelial cell progenitor pool into mature neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells and adult stem cells. We focus on studies performed in mice and involving two distinct CNS structures: the spinal cord and the cerebral cortex. Understanding the origin, specification and developmental regulators of neural cells will ultimately impact comprehension and treatments of neurological disorders and diseases. - Highlights: • Similar mechanisms regulate cell fate in different CNS cell types and structures. • Cell fate regulators operate in a spatial–temporal manner. • Different neural cell types rely on the generation of a diversity of progenitor cells. • Cell fate decision is dictated by the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic signals.

  2. Cell fate control in the developing central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guérout, Nicolas; Li, Xiaofei; Barnabé-Heider, Fanie

    2014-01-01

    The principal neural cell types forming the mature central nervous system (CNS) are now understood to be diverse. This cellular subtype diversity originates to a large extent from the specification of the earlier proliferating progenitor populations during development. Here, we review the processes governing the differentiation of a common neuroepithelial cell progenitor pool into mature neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells and adult stem cells. We focus on studies performed in mice and involving two distinct CNS structures: the spinal cord and the cerebral cortex. Understanding the origin, specification and developmental regulators of neural cells will ultimately impact comprehension and treatments of neurological disorders and diseases. - Highlights: • Similar mechanisms regulate cell fate in different CNS cell types and structures. • Cell fate regulators operate in a spatial–temporal manner. • Different neural cell types rely on the generation of a diversity of progenitor cells. • Cell fate decision is dictated by the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic signals

  3. RNA-Seq analysis of laser-capture microdissected cells of the developing central starchy endosperm of maize

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    Dhiraj Thakare

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Endosperm is a product of double fertilization, and provides nutrients and signals to the embryo during seed development in flowering plants. Early stages of endosperm development are critical for the development of its storage capacity through synthesis and accumulation of starch and storage proteins. Here we report on the isolation and sequencing of mRNAs from the central portion of the starchy endosperm of Zea mays (maize B73 at 6 days after pollination. We detected a high level of correlation among the four biological replicates of RNAs isolated using laser-capture microdissection of the cell type. Because the assayed developmental stage precedes the synthesis and accumulation of the major storage proteins and starch in the endosperm, our dataset likely include mRNAs for genes that are involved in control and establishment of these storage programs. The mRNA-Seq data has been deposited in Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE58504.

  4. A novel three-dimensional system to study interactions between endothelial cells and neural cells of the developing central nervous system

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    Milner Richard

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During angiogenesis in the developing central nervous system (CNS, endothelial cells (EC detach from blood vessels growing on the brain surface, and migrate into the expanding brain parenchyma. Brain angiogenesis is regulated by growth factors and extracellular matrix (ECM proteins secreted by cells of the developing CNS. In addition, recent evidence suggests that EC play an important role in establishing the neural stem cell (NSC niche. Therefore, two-way communication between EC and neural cells is of fundamental importance in the developing CNS. To study the interactions between brain EC and neural cells of the developing CNS, a novel three-dimensional (3-D murine co-culture system was developed. Fluorescent-labelled brain EC were seeded onto neurospheres; floating cellular aggregates that contain NSC/neural precursor cells (NPC and smaller numbers of differentiated cells. Using this system, brain EC attachment, survival and migration into neurospheres was evaluated and the role of integrins in mediating the early adhesive events addressed. Results Brain EC attached, survived and migrated deep into neurospheres over a 5-day period. Neurospheres express the ECM proteins fibronectin and laminin, and brain EC adhesion to neurospheres was inhibited by RGD peptides and antibodies specific for the β1, but not the α6 integrin subunit. Conclusion A novel 3-D co-culture system for analysing the interactions between EC and neural cells of the developing CNS is presented. This system could be used to investigate the reciprocal influence of EC and NSC/NPC; to examine how NSC/NPC influence cerebral angiogenesis, and conversely, to examine how EC regulate the maintenance and differentiation of NSC/NPC. Using this system it is demonstrated that EC attachment to neurospheres is mediated by the fibronectin receptor, α5β1 integrin.

  5. Central cell confinement in MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The point code TANDEM has been used to survey the range of plasma parameters which can be attained in MFTF-B. The code solves for the electron and ion densities and temperatures in the central cell, yin-yang, barrier, and A-cell regions as well as the plasma potential in each region. In these studies, the A-cell sloshing ion beams were fixed while the neutral beams in the yin-yang and central cell, the gas feed in the central cell, and the applied ECRH power β, central cell ion density and temperature, and the confining potential are discussed

  6. Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells and Central Tolerance in Autoimmune Hepatitis Development: Novel Perspective from a New Mouse Model

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    Konstantina Alexandropoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH is an immune-mediated disorder that affects the liver parenchyma. Diagnosis usually occurs at the later stages of the disease, complicating efforts towards understanding the causes of disease development. While animal models are useful for studying the etiology of autoimmune disorders, most of the existing animal models of AIH do not recapitulate the chronic course of the human condition. In addition, approaches to mimic AIH-associated liver inflammation have instead led to liver tolerance, consistent with the high tolerogenic capacity of the liver. Recently, we described a new mouse model that exhibited spontaneous and chronic liver inflammation that recapitulated the known histopathological and immunological parameters of AIH. The approach involved liver-extrinsic genetic engineering that interfered with the induction of T-cell tolerance in the thymus, the very process thought to inhibit AIH induction by liver-specific expression of exogenous antigens. The mutation led to depletion of specialized thymic epithelial cells that present self-antigens and eliminate autoreactive T-cells before they exit the thymus. Based on our findings, which are summarized below, we believe that this mouse model represents a relevant experimental tool towards elucidating the cellular and molecular aspects of AIH development and developing novel therapeutic strategies for treating this disease.

  7. Neural stem cells and neuro/gliogenesis in the central nervous system: understanding the structural and functional plasticity of the developing, mature, and diseased brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Seki, Tatsunori; Imayoshi, Itaru; Tamamaki, Nobuaki; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Hitoshi, Seiji

    2016-05-01

    Neurons and glia in the central nervous system (CNS) originate from neural stem cells (NSCs). Knowledge of the mechanisms of neuro/gliogenesis from NSCs is fundamental to our understanding of how complex brain architecture and function develop. NSCs are present not only in the developing brain but also in the mature brain in adults. Adult neurogenesis likely provides remarkable plasticity to the mature brain. In addition, recent progress in basic research in mental disorders suggests an etiological link with impaired neuro/gliogenesis in particular brain regions. Here, we review the recent progress and discuss future directions in stem cell and neuro/gliogenesis biology by introducing several topics presented at a joint meeting of the Japanese Association of Anatomists and the Physiological Society of Japan in 2015. Collectively, these topics indicated that neuro/gliogenesis from NSCs is a common event occurring in many brain regions at various ages in animals. Given that significant structural and functional changes in cells and neural networks are accompanied by neuro/gliogenesis from NSCs and the integration of newly generated cells into the network, stem cell and neuro/gliogenesis biology provides a good platform from which to develop an integrated understanding of the structural and functional plasticity that underlies the development of the CNS, its remodeling in adulthood, and the recovery from diseases that affect it.

  8. Neurofascin (NF155- and NF186-Specific T Cell Response in a Patient Developing a Central Pontocerebellar Demyelination after 10 Years of CIDP

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    Juliane Klehmet

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundInformation and pathobiological understanding about central demyelinating manifestation in patients, who primarily suffer from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP, are scarce.MethodsIFN-γ-response as well as antibodies against the (paranodal antigens neurofascin (NF155 and NF 186 had been tested by Elispot assay and ELISA before clinical manifestation and at follow-up.Case description and resultsThe patient described here developed a subacute brainstem syndrome more than 10 years after diagnosis of CIDP under low-dose maintenance treatment of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG. MRI revealed enhancing right-sided pontocerebellar lesion. CSF examination showed mild pleocytosis and elevated protein, and negative oligoclonal bands. Further diagnostics exclude differential diagnoses such as tuberculoma, sarcoidosis, or metastasis. Specific IFN-γ response against NF155 and NF186 as measured by Elispot assay was elevated before clinical manifestation. NF155 and NF186 antibodies were negative. Escalation of IVIG treatment at 2 g/kg BW followed by 1.4 g/kg BW led to clinical remission albeit to a new asymptomatic central lesion. Follow-up NF155 and NF186-Elispot turned negative.ConclusionThe case reported here with a delayed central manifestation after an initially typical CIDP and NF155 and NF186 T cell responses does not resemble described cases of combined central and peripheral demyelination but may reflect a novel subtype within the great clinical heterogeneity of CIDP.

  9. Indonesia: population central to development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The Indonesian representative to the 50th session of the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) reiterated the issue of population as being central to sustainable development. Indonesia recognizes that quality of life, which can be improved with education, health, skills, productivity, self reliance, and resiliency, has an impact on the process of development. Without quality improvements, large numbers of people become a burden. Population programs must aim to reduce population growth rates simultaneously with enhancing the quality of life. Women's improvement in education, health, and employment opportunities must be accomplished because of women's important role in national development. The goals of sustainable development are to maintain a balance between human needs and desires of the population and available resources and the environment. Sustainable development is necessary for present and future generations. The Fourth Asian and Pacific Population Conference was held in Bali in August 1992, at which time the Bali Declaration was affirmed. At the January 1994 meeting of officials regarding the implementation of the Bali Declaration held in Bangkok, Thailand, the Indonesian representative stressed the importance of the vigorous involvement of the ESCAP secretariat in planning and implementing population programs in the region. Recommendations included in the Bali Declaration are related to the issues being addressed at the International Conference on Population and Development to be held in Cairo in September 1994. The secretariat was also asked by the Indonesian representative to disseminate information on the implementation of the Bali Declaration through regular publications and other appropriate venues. Comprehensive data collection and information systems were needed on the links between population, development, and resources.

  10. SJL mice infected with Acanthamoeba castellanii develop central nervous system autoimmunity through the generation of cross-reactive T cells for myelin antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandirasegaran Massilamany

    Full Text Available We recently reported that Acanthamoeba castellanii (ACA, an opportunistic pathogen of the central nervous system (CNS possesses mimicry epitopes for proteolipid protein (PLP 139-151 and myelin basic protein 89-101, and that the epitopes induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in SJL mice reminiscent of the diseases induced with their corresponding cognate peptides. We now demonstrate that mice infected with ACA also show the generation of cross-reactive T cells, predominantly for PLP 139-151, as evaluated by T cell proliferation and IAs/dextramer staining. We verified that PLP 139-151-sensitized lymphocytes generated in infected mice contained a high proportion of T helper 1 cytokine-producing cells, and they can transfer disease to naïve animals. Likewise, the animals first primed with suboptimal dose of PLP 139-151 and later infected with ACA, developed EAE, suggesting that ACA infection can trigger CNS autoimmunity in the presence of preexisting repertoire of autoreactive T cells. Taken together, the data provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba infections, and the potential role of infectious agents with mimicry epitopes to self-antigens in the pathogenesis of CNS diseases such as multiple sclerosis.

  11. Successful treatment with cladribine of Erdheim-Chester disease with orbital and central nervous system involvement developing after treatment of langerhans cell histiocytosis

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    Perić Predrag

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD is a rare, systemic form of non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the juvenile xantho-granuloma family with characteristic bilateral symmetrical long bone osteosclerosis, associated with xanthogranulomatous extras-keletal organ involvement. In ECD, central nervous system (CNS and orbital lesions are frequent, and more than half of ECD patients carry the V600E mutation of the proto-oncogene BRAF. The synchronous or metachronous development of ECD and Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH in the same patients is rare, and the possible connection between them is still obscure. Cladribine is a purine substrate analogue that is toxic to lymphocytes and monocytes with good hematoencephalic penetration. Case report. We presented a 23-year-old man successfully treated with cladribine due to BRAF V600E-mutation-negative ECD with bilateral orbital and CNS involvement. ECD developed metachronously, 6 years after chemotherapy for multisystem LCH with complete disease remission and remaining central diabetes insipidus. During ECD treatment, the patient received 5 single-agent chemotherapy courses of cladribine (5 mg/m2 for 5 consecutive days every 4 weeks, with a reduction in dose to 4 mg/m2 in a fifth course, delayed due to severe neutropenia and thoracic dermatomal herpes zoster infection following the fourth course. Radiologic signs of systemic and CNS disease started to resolve 3 months after the end of chemotherapy, and CNS lesions completely resolved within 2 years after the treatment. After 12-year follow-up, there was no recurrence or appearance of new systemic or CNS xanthogranu-lomatous lesions or second malignancies. Conclusion. In accordance with our findings and recommendations provided by other authors, cladribine can be considered an effective alternative treatment for ECD, especially with CNS involvement and BRAF V600E-mutation-negative status, when interferon-α as the first-line therapy fails.

  12. Predictor Variables of Developing Anterior Pituitary Deficiencies in a Group of Paediatric Patients with Central Diabetes Insipidus and Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiani, Elisa; Malossetti, Carmen; Vega, Lina Margarita; Zubizarreta, Pedro; Braier, Jorge; Belgorosky, Alicia

    2017-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare histiocytic disorder of unknown etiopathogenesis. Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is the most frequent endocrine manifestation and is a known risk factor for the development of further anterior pituitary hormone deficiencies (APD). However, not all CDI patients develop APD, as observed during prolonged periods of follow-up. To find predictors of developing APD in LCH children with CDI followed in our institution. We retrospectively analysed 44 patients over a median period (quartiles) of 12.3 years (8.79-14.24). Patients were subdivided into group 1 and group 2, according to absence or presence of APD, respectively. The main variables studied were: (1) chronological age (CA) at LCH diagnosis, (2) the primary site of LCH at diagnosis: low risk (LR) and multisystemic risk organs, and (3) the presence of reactivation. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that APD was positively associated with CA at LCH diagnosis [relative risk (RR) 1.14, p < 0.01], the LR clinical form (RR 8.6, p < 0.03), and negatively associated with the presence of reactivations (RR 0.3, p < 0.01). Patients with older CA at LCH diagnosis, LR clinical forms, and fewer reactivation episodes might represent a subgroup of paediatric LCH CDI patients with a higher risk of developing APD. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. The central dogma of cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, S

    1981-06-01

    The Continuum Model proposes that preparations for DNA synthesis occur continuously during all phases of the division cycle. Various stimuli activate cell proliferation by changing the rate of initiator (protein) synthesis. Cell division does not initiate any process regulating cell proliferation. Cell division is the end of a process and the beginning of nothing. The alternative model which has cell proliferation regulated in the G1 phase of the division cycle is reexamined and the two types of evidence for this model, G1-variability and G1-arrest are shown to be compatible with the Continuum Model. Here, the Continuum Model is generalized to produce a new look at the logic of the division cycle in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. This new view, the Central Dogma of Cell Biology, is presented and two predictions are made. I propose that (i) cell division does not have any regulatory function, and (ii) that DNA synthesis may, indeed, have some affect on the synthesis of initiator.

  14. Central Asia | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Central Asia. Asie centrale. Read more about Harnessing big data to meet the Sustainable Development Goals – Building capacity in the Global South. Language English. Read more about Grants and awards: Gender equality and scaling digital innovation. Language English. Read more about Community access ...

  15. Central station market development strategies for photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Federal market development strategies designed to accelerate the market penetration of central station applications of photovoltaic energy system are analyzed. Since no specific goals were set for the commercialization of central station applications, strategic principles are explored which, when coupled with specific objectives for central stations, can produce a market development implementation plan. The study includes (1) background information on the National Photovoltaic Program, photovoltaic technology, and central stations; (2) a brief market assessment; (3) a discussion of the viewpoints of the electric utility industry with respect to solar energy; (4) a discussion of commercialization issues; and (5) strategy principles. It is recommended that a set of specific goals and objectives be defined for the photovoltaic central station program, and that these goals and objectives evolve into an implementation plan that identifies the appropriate federal role.

  16. Retail Market Structure Development in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Machek

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is analyzing the trends and development in the retailing sector in Central Europe, namely in the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia. These markets serve about 63 million inhabitants. The retail industry in Central Europe has changed dramatically in the last two decades, and has become a model for successful transformation of emerging markets. The retail market is highly concentrated and dominated by Western European retail chains. International retail chains are using all formats of modern distribution. This article is focusing on the development of hypermarkets, supermarkets and discount stores. Due to the international retail chains, Central European countries benefit from a dense network of modern shopping places; the intense competition of highly productive retailers contributes to the lower level of inflation rate because of the so-called Wal-Mart Effect. The constant pressure on prices influences the marketing strategies of both retailers and suppliers.

  17. Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood central nervous system (CNS) germ cell tumors form from germ cells (a type of cell that forms as a fetus develops and later becomes sperm in the testicles or eggs in the ovaries). Learn about the signs, tests to diagnose, and treatment of pediatric germ cell tumors in the brain in this expert-reviewed summary.

  18. Ultrasound and the developing central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziskin, M C; Barnett, S B

    2001-07-01

    The potential risk of ultrasonography resulting in adverse biologic effects is particularly important in neurosonographic applications of diagnostic ultrasound in medicine. Key issues relate to the likelihood of producing bioeffects from the level of acoustic output emitted from modern diagnostically powerful ultrasound equipment. Important elements in the assessment of risk include the sensitivity of the tissue structures under examination, the standards of practice in clinical use and the presence of biologic effects identified from laboratory experimentation or from human studies. The World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology continues to support activities related to evaluating bioeffects and safety of ultrasound. This paper includes extracts of some of the presentations given during the latest safety meeting, a mini-symposium on "ultrasound and the developing fetal central nervous system" held in conjunction with the WFUMB Congress in May 2000. The speakers covered topics ranging from physics of estimating heating from ultrasound equipment in clinical use to actual measurement of ultrasound-induced intracranial temperature increases in animal fetuses. Finally, some practical scanning strategies were proposed to minimise risk of adverse outcome in various clinical neurosonographic practices.

  19. Cell structure of developing barbs and barbules in downfeathers of the chick: Central role of barb ridge morphogenesis for the evolution of feathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, L

    2005-04-01

    The present ultrastructural study shows how cells organize to form the complex structure of downfeathers in chick embryos. The embryonic epidermis of the apical part of feather filaments folds inward forming barb ridges which extend toward the base of the feather. The stratification of epidermal cells in barb ridges is maintained but the basal layer loses most of the germinal activity. New cells for the growth of feather filaments are mainly produced in its basal part. In barb ridges only the original four epidermal layers of the embryonic epidermis remain to form feathers: 1) the external periderm, 2) three-five layers of the feather sheath and barb vane ridge cells, 3) subperiderm cells, and 4) basal or cylindrical cells. Periderm, sheath, barb vane ridge and cylindrical cells synthesize only alpha-keratin. Instead, cells of the subperiderm layer synthesize a small type of beta-keratin: feather beta-keratin. At hatching, the subperiderm layer is lost in most areas of the skin of the chick (apteric and scaled), and is replaced by cells containing alpha-keratin (interfollicular-apteric epidermis), scale beta-keratin (scales), beak beta-keratin (beak), and claw beta-keratin (claws). Only in feathers, cells of the original subperiderm layer remain and give origin to barb and barbule cells. The formation of separated chains of barb and barbule cells is allowed by the presence of barb vane ridge cells that function as spacers between merging cells of barb and barbule cells. Subperiderm cells elongate and merge into a syncitium to form barbules and barbs. While barbule and barb cells accumulate feather-keratin, barb vane and cylindrical cells accumulate lipids, vesicles and little alpha-keratin. These cells eventually degenerate by necrosis leaving empty spaces and lipids between barbules and barbs. No apoptosis is necessary to explain the process of carving out of barb and barbules in feathers after dissolution of the external sheath. In fact, the retraction of blood

  20. Collection development at the NOAA Central Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillen, Steve R.

    1994-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Central Library collection, approximately one million volumes, incorporates the holdings of its predecessor agencies. Within the library, the collections are filed separately, based on their source and/or classification schemes. The NOAA Central Library provides a variety of services to users, ranging from quick reference and interlibrary loan to in-depth research and online data bases.

  1. SJL mice infected with Acanthamoeba castellanii develop central nervous system autoimmunity through the generation of cross-reactive T cells for myelin antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Marciano-Cabral, Francine; Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno da

    2014-01-01

    ) in SJL mice reminiscent of the diseases induced with their corresponding cognate peptides. We now demonstrate that mice infected with ACA also show the generation of cross-reactive T cells, predominantly for PLP 139-151, as evaluated by T cell proliferation and IAs/dextramer staining. We verified...

  2. Central Asia | Page 105 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Asie centrale. Read more about Sécurité hydrique dans les régions périurbaines de l'Asie du Sud - adaptation aux changements climatiques et urbanisation. Language French. Read more about Innovations for Inclusive Knowledge-based Economies in Asia - Phase II. Language English. Read more about L'innovation au ...

  3. Prenatal irradiation: radioinduced apoptosis in developing central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisone, P.; Dubner, D.; Michelin, S.; Perez, M.R.; Barboza, M.

    1998-01-01

    Severe mental retardation (SMR) is the most significant effect of prenatal irradiation. The high radiosensitivity of developing brain is related with the chronology of morpho genetic phenomena regarding neuroblast proliferation, neuronal differentiation and migration, synaptogenesis and dendritic arborization. Programmed cell death (apoptosis) normally occurs during development in central nervous system (CNS). Apoptosis is a direct result of the expression of specific genes with a final common pathway leading to a characteristic DNA fragmentation pattern. A wide variety of situations and toxic agents have been reported to result in apoptotic death in developing CNS. The aim of this work was the characterization and quantification of apoptosis using an in vitro model of prenatal irradiation. Primary cell cultures from rat brain cortex of 17 days g.a. were irradiated with a gamma source, with doses between 0.2 Gy to 2 Gy. Apoptosis was evaluated 4 hours and 20 hours after irradiation by hematoxylin/eosin, fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry and DNA electrophoresis. It was also evaluated the neuro protective effect of L-NAME, SOD and glutathion. A dose-dependent increase in apoptotic cell fraction was observed. A protector effect related with the presence of glutathion was observed. (author) [es

  4. Cape Town's central city development: A strategy of partnership and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to address this urban challenge, the Cape Town Partnership developed the Central City Development Strategy (CCDS), a ten-year plan that calls for the densification of the central city to re-plan Cape Town into a more liveable, inclusive, democratic, and sustainable urban space. By critically examining the role that ...

  5. Energy sector developments in Central America and the Caribbean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, J.

    1997-01-01

    Energy sector developments in Central America and the Caribbean were discussed. Central America is composed of six small countries whose total population is 32 million. The Caribbean population is 20.5 million. Central America is generally poor in hydrocarbon reserves but the geological prospects in several of the countries are encouraging. The oil and petroleum products supply and demand picture, the main characteristics of the hydrocarbon market, structure of the oil industry, hydrocarbon market reforms, pricing issues and recent trend towards reforms in the electric power industry in Central America were discussed. An overview of the Inter-American Development Bank's (IDB) effort to provide technical assistance and loans to strengthen the energy sector development in Central America and the Caribbean was also given. 17 refs., 2 tabs., 23 figs

  6. Gene expression as a sensitive endpoint to evaluate cell differentiation and maturation of the developing central nervous system in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) exposed to pesticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogberg, Helena T.; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Hartung, Thomas; Coecke, Sandra; Bal-Price, Anna K.

    2009-01-01

    The major advantage of primary neuronal cultures for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) testing is their ability to replicate the crucial stages of neurodevelopment. In our studies using primary culture of cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) we have evaluated whether the gene expression relevant to the most critical developmental processes such as neuronal differentiation (NF-68 and NF-200) and functional maturation (NMDA and GABA A receptors), proliferation and differentiation of astrocytes (GFAP and S100β) as well as the presence of neural precursor cells (nestin and Sox10) could be used as an endpoint for in vitro DNT. The expression of these genes was assessed after exposure to various pesticides (paraquat parathion, dichlorvos, pentachlorophenol and cycloheximide) that could induce developmental neurotoxicity through different mechanisms. All studied pesticides significantly modified the expression of selected genes, related to the different stages of neuronal and/or glial cell development and maturation. The most significant changes were observed after exposure to paraquat and parathion (i.e. down-regulation of mRNA expression of NF-68 and NF-200, NMDA and GABA A receptors). Similarly, dichlorvos affected mainly neurons (decreased mRNA expression of NF-68 and GABA A receptors) whereas cycloheximide had an effect on neurons and astrocytes, as significant decreases in the mRNA expression of both neurofilaments (NF-68 and NF-200) and the astrocyte marker (S100β) were observed. Our results suggest that toxicity induced by pesticides that target multiple pathways of neurodevelopment can be identified by studying expression of genes that are involved in different stages of cell development and maturation, and that gene expression could be used as a sensitive endpoint for initial screening to identify the compounds with the potential to cause developmental neurotoxicity

  7. Bioengineered cell culture systems of central nervous system injury and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, Fábio Gabriel Rodrigues; Vasconcelos, Natália L.; Gomes, Eduardo Domingos Correia; Marques, Fernanda; Sousa, João Carlos; Sousa, Nuno; Silva, Nuno A.; Silva, Rita Catarina Assunção Ribeiro; Lima, Rui Augusto Ribeiro; Salgado, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Cell culture systems, either 2D or explant based, have been pivotal to better understand the pathophysiology of several central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Recently, bioengineered cell culture systems have been proposed as an alternative to the traditional setups. These innovative systems often combine different cell populations in 3D environments that more closely recapitulate the different niches that exist within the developing or adult CNS. Given the importance of such systems for the...

  8. Central Asia | Page 179 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    E-commerce in Asia has been receiving considerable attention as a result of the proliferation of Internet connectivity and technologies in the region. In response to this trend, Canada's International Development Research Centre ( IDRC ) commissioned four studies to investigate the various economic, social, methodological ...

  9. Central Asia | Page 104 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Read more about Mapping Civil Society Initiatives toward the Development and Empowerment of Muslims in India. Language English. Read more about Solutions de remplacement à la culture du tabac et aux activités connexes (Inde). Language French. Read more about Démarginalisation des travailleurs pauvres par le ...

  10. Central Asia | Page 112 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Language French. Read more about Women's Rights and Access to Water and Sanitation in Asian Cities. Language English. Read more about Poverty Reduction through Private Sector Development : Policy Research on Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises. Language English. Read more about Initiative de recherche ...

  11. Developing financeable projects in Central Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelberg, R.; Prerad, V. [POWER International, Josefov (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    POWER`s engineering and development experience in the Czech Republic creating financeable projects within the power generation industry will be presented. POWER has been involved in the Czech Republic`s privatization process, environmental legislation as well as formation of the regulatory environment. Strategic methods for accomplishing the development of financeable projects often include ownership and financial restructuring of the projects. This is done by utilizing internal cash flows, external debt and equity placement (provided by international financial institutions) by restructuring the facility`s contractual relationships and operations (providing as least cost solution to engineering) and possibly using existing governmental guarantees. In order to make any recommendations on how to come into compliance with the country`s environmental legislation, it is necessary to begin with an analysis of the existing facility. This involves preparation of technical and economic feasibility study, evaluation of technology and preliminary engineering solutions. It further involves restructuring of power sales agreements, heat sales agreements, and fuel supply agreements. The goal is to provide suitable security for the equity and debt financing participants by mitigating risk and creating a single purpose business unit with predictable life and economics.

  12. Development of the Central Dogma Concept Inventory (CDCI) Assessment Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Dina L.; Snyder, Christopher W.; Fisk, J. Nick; Wright, L. Kate

    2016-01-01

    Scientific teaching requires scientifically constructed, field-tested instruments to accurately evaluate student thinking and gauge teacher effectiveness. We have developed a 23-question, multiple select?format assessment of student understanding of the essential concepts of the central dogma of molecular biology that is appropriate for all levels of undergraduate biology. Questions for the Central Dogma Concept Inventory (CDCI) tool were developed and iteratively revised based on student lan...

  13. [Calcium distribution in the central cell of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) before and after pollination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yi Lan; Liu, Ru Shi; Ye, Lv; Tian, Hui

    2008-02-01

    Potassium antimonite precipitation was used to locate calcium in the central cell of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) before and after pollination. At 3d before anthesis, two polar nuclei of central cell separately located at two polarity of the cell, and few calcium precipitates (ppts) appeared in the polar nuclei and cytoplasm, but some ppts in its small vacuoles. At 2d before anthesis, two polar nuclei moved toward the middle of the cell and fused to form a secondary nucleus, and the ppts evidently increased in the nucleus and cytoplasm. At 1d before anthesis, secondary nucleus again moved toward micropylar end and located near the egg to prepare for fertilization. Calcium precipitates were mainly accumulated in the secondary nucleus. After pollination and before fertilization, the distribution of calcium ppts was similar to that before pollination. At 4h after pollination, the central cell was fertilized, and calcium ppts evidently increased in the cell and numerous were accumulated in its nucleus and cytoplasm. At 6h after pollination, the primary endosperm nucleus completed its first division and formed two dissociate endosperm nuclei, and still many calcium precipitates appeared in the nucleus and cytoplasm. With endosperm development, calcium ppts decreased in the endosperm cell. At 1d after emasculated and without pollination, the secondary nucleus of the cell still bordered on the egg and some calcium ppts appeared in the secondary nucleus. The results indicated that the temporal and spatial changes of calcium in the central cell may play an important physiological role during the development of the central cell and endosperm.

  14. [Central giant cell reparative granuloma of the jaw].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulaich, M; Benbouzid, M A; Lazrak, A; Benchaqroun, L; Jazouli, N; Mahassini, N; Saidi, A; Kzadri, M

    1995-01-01

    The authors report a series of 22 cases of central giant cells Granuloma of the jaws. There were 12 located in the maxilla, and 10 in the mandible. The majority of lesions were observed in patients under the age of 30 years, and occurs more often in females than in males, particularly in mandibular lesions. This lesion, which the pathogenesis still remains obscure, appears as radiolucency, well or ill-defined, uni or multilocular with trabeculations coursing through the lesion. Histologic study shows giant cells, fibroblastic cells, and foci of hemorrhage and osteoid tissue. The authors insist on the problem of differential diagnosis which can make a radiolucency with giant cells. It must be differentiated especially from giant cells tumor, which treatment and course are different. Finally, the authors underline a good prognosis of this lesion, which simple curettage is generally sufficient, and which recurrences remain rare.

  15. Central nervous system infection following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanajiri, Ryo; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Kosuke; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watakabe, Kyoko; Murata, Yutaka; Hagino, Takeshi; Seno, Yasushi; Najima, Yuho; Igarashi, Aiko; Doki, Noriko; Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Ohashi, Kazuteru

    2017-03-01

    Here, we described the clinical characteristics and outcomes of central nervous system (CNS) infections occurring after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in a single institution over the previous 6 years. Charts of 353 consecutive allogeneic transplant recipients were retrospectively reviewed for CNS infection. A total of 17 cases of CNS infection were identified at a median of 38 days (range, 10-1028 days) after allo-HSCT. Causative pathogens were human herpesvirus-6 (n=6), enterococcus (n=2), staphylococcus (n=2), streptococcus (n=2), varicella zoster virus (n=1), cytomegalovirus (n=1), John Cunningham virus (n=1), adenovirus (n=1), and Toxoplasma gondii (n=1). The cumulative incidence of CNS infection was 4.1% at 1 year and 5.5% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis revealed that high-risk disease status was a risk factor for developing CNS infection (p=.02), and that overall survival at 3 years after allo-HSCT was 33% in patients with CNS infection and 53% in those without CNS infection (p=.04). Copyright © 2016 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Aggressive central giant cell granuloma: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunanda Chavva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell granuloma is a benign proliferative pathological lesion of the bone accounting for less than 7% of lesions of the jaw, predominant in females and most commonly seen in anterior segment of jaws. Mandible is more commonly affected. Radiographically, the lesion may present with diffuse or irregular borders, sometimes leading to expansion of cortex, displacement of teeth, or root resorption. We present a case of aggressive central giant cell granuloma in a 45-year-old female patient in the right mandibular alveolar ridge presenting as an irregular mass causing displacement of teeth.

  17. Sickle Cell Disease in Central India: A Potentially Severe Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Dipty; Warthe, Vinit; Dayama, Paridhi; Sarate, Dilip; Colah, Roshan; Mehta, Pallavi; Serjeant, Graham

    2016-10-01

    To explore clinical, hematological and molecular features of homozygous sickle cell (SS) disease in central India. Focusing on the pediatric age group attending a clinic at the Akola Government Medical College, Akola, Maharashtra State, India, a cross-sectional assessment of 91 patients with sickle cell disease was performed during one week in March 2015. Of the 91 patients, there were 49 with SS disease, 36 with sickle cell-beta thalassemia, and 6 with sickle cell-HbD Punjab. Alpha globin gene deletions occurred in only 8/49 (16 %) SS disease but fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels were markedly elevated with mean and median of 24.4 %; all except 3 SS disease patients had the Xmn1(+/+) polymorphism consistent with the Asian haplotype. Among the 36 patients with sickle cell-beta thalassemia, 25 (69 %) had the severe beta(+) mutation, IVS1-5 G > C, and seven other molecular mutations, all beta(o) occurred in the other 11 patients. Many patients had a relatively severe clinical course. Comparison of SS disease and sickle cell-beta thalassemia showed no differences in the prevalence of dactylitis, bone pain crisis, acute chest syndrome, hemoglobin level, reticulocyte counts or hydroxyurea usage but patients with sickle cell-beta thalassemia had significantly more blood transfusions, and greater frequencies of splenomegaly and hepatomegaly. Many patients in central India have relatively severe manifestations. This may result from lower frequencies of alpha thalassemia and more frequent severe sickle cell-beta(+) thalassemia. There is a need for assessment of the indications and policies for blood transfusion and for hydroxyurea.

  18. Central Asia | Page 97 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Asie centrale. Read more about Analyzing Financial Flows from Emerging Economies to the Developing World. Language English. Read more about Studying Alcohol Pricing and Taxation Policies in India. Language English. Read more about Centre for Global Development Visiting Fellowship Program. Language English.

  19. CENTRAL GIANT CELL GRANULOMA OF THE MANDIBLE: A RARE PRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra SINGH

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG is an intra-osseous lesion consisting of cellular fibrosis tissue containing multiple foci of hemorrhage, multinucleated giant cells and trabecules of woven bone. This lesion accounts for less than 7% of all benign jaw tumours. Jaffe considered it as a locally reparative reaction of bone, which can be possibly due to either an inflammatory response, hemorrhage or local trauma. Females are affected more frequently than males. It occurs over a wide age range.It has been reported that this lesion is diagnosed during the first two decades of life in approximately 48% of cases, and 60% of cases are evident before the age of 30. It is considerably more common in the mandible than in the maxilla. Most lesions occur in the molar and premolar area, some of these extending up to the ascending ramus. The presence of giant cell granuloma in the mandibular body area, the entire ramus, condyle and coronoid represents a therapeutic challenge for the oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The aim of this report is to describe an unusual presentation of central giant cell granuloma involving the mandibular body, ramus, condylar and coronoid processes, and to discuss the differentiated diagnosis, the radiographic presentation and the management of this lesion.

  20. Granuloma central de células gigantes Giant cells central granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayelén María Portelles Massó

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available El granuloma reparativo central de células gigantes es una lesión proliferativa no neoplásica de etiología desconocida. Se presenta un paciente masculino de 40 años de edad, portador de prótesis parcial superior. Fue remitido al Servicio de Cirugía Maxilofacial del Hospital "V. I. Lenin" por presentar aumento de volumen en reborde alveolar superior, de color rojo grisáceo y que provocaba expansión de corticales óseas. Una vez analizados los exámenes clínicos, radiográficos e histopatológicos se diagnosticó un granuloma reparativo central de células gigantes Se realizó exéresis quirúrgica de la lesión y extracción de dientes adyacentes con una evolución satisfactoria sin señales de recidivas luego de tres años del tratamiento. El granuloma reparativo central de células gigantes se presentó como respuesta a un trauma. La correcta interpretación de los datos clínicos, radiográficos e histopatológicos nos permitió llegar al correcto diagnóstico y plan de tratamiento.Giant-cell central reparative granuloma is non neoplastic proliferative lesion of unknown etiology. We report a 40 years old male patient who was admitted at the Maxillofacial Service of the "V. I. Lenin" Hospital. The patient had partial upper prosthesis and was complaining of red-grey volume increase lesion in upper alveolar ridge which led to the expansion of cortical bone. Having analyzed clinical, radiographic and histopathological findings the case was concluded as a giant-cell central reparative granuloma. Surgical exeresis and adjunct tooth extraction were done. After three years of treatment, satisfactory follow up without recurrence is reported.

  1. Agroforestry for landscape restoration and livelihood development in Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    U. Djanibekov; Klara Dzhakypbekova; James Chamberlain; Horst Weyerhaeuser; Robert Zomer; G. Villamor; J. Xu

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses how the adoption of agroforestry for ecosystem and livelihood improvement in Central Asian countries can be enhanced. First, it describes how previous and current developments lead to changing environmental conditions, and how these changing conditions consequently affected the welfare of people. Environmental issues on a global level, such as...

  2. Development of the Central Dogma Concept Inventory (CDCI) Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Dina L.; Snyder, Christopher W.; Fisk, J. Nick; Wright, L. Kate

    2016-01-01

    Scientific teaching requires scientifically constructed, field-tested instruments to accurately evaluate student thinking and gauge teacher effectiveness. We have developed a 23-question, multiple select--format assessment of student understanding of the essential concepts of the central dogma of molecular biology that is appropriate for all…

  3. Delayed cell death signaling in traumatized central nervous system: hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Danielle; Qiu, JingXin; Grafe, Marjorie; Fabian, Roderick; Kent, Thomas A; Rassin, David; Nesic, Olivera; Werrbach-Perez, Karin; Perez-Polo, Regino

    2002-02-01

    There are two different ways for cells to die: necrosis and apoptosis. Cell death has traditionally been described as necrotic or apoptotic based on morphological criteria. There are controversy about the respective roles of apoptosis and necrosis in cell death resulting from trauma to the central nervous system (CNS). An evaluation of work published since 1997 in which electron microscopy was applied to ascertain the role of apoptosis and necrosis in: spinal cord injury, stroke, and hypoxia/ischemia (H/I) showed evidence for necrosis and apoptosis based on DNA degradation, presence of histones in cytoplasm, and morphological evidence in spinal cord. In the aftermath of stroke, many of the biochemical markers for apoptosis were present but the morphological determinations suggested that necrosis is the major source of post-traumatic cell death. This was not the case in H/I where both biochemical assays and the morphological studies gave more consistent results in a manner similar to the spinal cord injury studies. After H/I, major factors affecting cell death outcomes are DNA damage and repair processes, expression of bcl-like gene products and inflammation-triggered cytokine production.

  4. Hydrolytic enzymes in the central vacuole of plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boller, T; Kende, H

    1979-06-01

    The hydrolase content of vacuoles isolated from protoplasts of suspension-cultured tobacco cells, of tulip petals, and of pineapple leaves, and the sedimentation behavior of tobacco tonoplasts were studied. Three precautions were found to be important for the analysis of vacuolar hydrolases and of the tonoplast. (a) Purification of protoplasts in a Ficoll gradient was necessary to remove cell debris which contained contaminating hydrolases adsorbed from the fungal cell-wall-degrading enzyme preparation. (b) Hydrolase activities in the homogenates of the intact cells or the tissue used and of the purified protoplasts had to be compared to verify the absence of contaminating hydrolases in the protoplast preparation. (c) Vacuoles obtained from the protoplasts by an osmotic shock had to be purified from the lysate in a Ficoll gradient. Since the density of the central vacuole approximates that of the protoplasts, about a 10% contamination of the vacuolar preparation by surviving protoplasts could not be eliminated and had to be taken into account when the distribution of enzymes and of radioactivity was calculated.THE INTRACELLULAR ACTIVITIES OF THE FOLLOWING ACID HYDROLASES WERE PRIMARILY LOCALIZED IN THE VACUOLE OF TOBACCO CELLS: alpha-mannosidase, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, beta-fructosidase, nuclease, phosphatase, phosphodiesterase. A similar composition of acid hydrolases was found in vacuoles obtained from protoplasts of tulip petals. Proteinase, a hydrolase with low activity in tobacco cells and tulip petals and therefore difficult to localize unequivocally, was found to be vacuolar in pineapple leaves, a tissue containing high levels of this enzyme. Our data support the hypothesis that the central vacuole of higher plant cells has an enzyme composition analogous to that of the animal lysosome.None of the vacuolar enzymes investigated was found to be bound to the tonoplast. When vacuoles were isolated from cells labeled with radioactive choline, the vacuolar

  5. Hyperammonemia-induced toxicity for the developing central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Cagnon, L.; Braissant, O.

    2007-01-01

    In pediatric patients, hyperammonemia can be caused by various acquired or inherited disorders such as urea cycle deficiencies or organic acidemias. The brain is much more susceptible to the deleterious effects of ammonium during development than in adulthood. Hyperammonemia can provoke irreversible damages to the developing central nervous system that lead to cortical atrophy, ventricular enlargement and demyelination, responsible for cognitive impairment, seizures and cerebral palsy. Until ...

  6. Central granular cell odontogenic tumor: Report of an unusual case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani Madan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central granular cell odontogenic tumor (CGCOT is an unusual benign odontogenic neoplasm characterized by the presence of granular cells associated with apparently inactive odontogenic epithelium. These tumors tend to occur in the posterior mandible and usually present as well-defined unilocular or multilocular radiolucent lesions. So far, only <40 cases of CGCOT have been described in the literature under various terminologies. Though these tumors were not considered as distinct entity in the recent WHO classification of odontogenic tumors, long-term follow-up is recommended as malignant counterpart of CGCOT has already been reported. The main aim of this article is to report an additional case of CGCOT to the literature, occurring in a 73-year-old male.

  7. Central giant cell granuloma: A case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnaveni Buduru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG is a benign intra-osseous lesion of unknown etiology, and occurs in jaws. Clinically and radiographically difference between its nature - aggressive and non-aggressive can be made. It is characterized histologically by cellular fibrous tissue containing multiple foci of hemorrhage, aggregations of multinucleated giant cells, and occasionally, trabeculae of woven bone. Histologically, identical lesions occur in patients with known genetic defects such as cherubism, Noonan syndrome, or neurofibromatosis type I. It has an increased predilection for mandible and females in younger age group. Surgical curettage or resection is the most common therapy in aggressive lesions. The drawback is undesirable damage to the jaw or teeth, tooth germs, and frequent recurrences. Non-aggressive tumors respond well to such treatments. We are presenting a case of an aggressive type of CGCG of mandible in a young patient, who presented with massive swelling associated with loss of teeth in just 6 months duration.

  8. Hydrolytic enzymes in the central vacuole of plant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boller, T.; Kende, H.

    1979-01-01

    The hydrolase content of vacuoles isolated from protoplasts of suspension-cultured tobacco cells, of tulip petals, and pineapple leaves, and the sedimentation behavior of tobacco tonoplasts were studied. Three precautions were found to be important for the analysis of vacuolar hydrolases and of the tonoplast: (a) purification of protoplasts in a Ficoll gradient was necessary to remove cell debris which contained contaminating hydrolases adsorbed from the fungal cell-wall-degrading enzyme preparation; (b) hydrolase activities in the homogenates of the intact cells or the tissue used and of the purified protoplasts had to be compared to verify the absence of contaminating hydrolases in the protoplast preparation; and (c) vacuoles obtained from the protoplasts by an osmotic shock had to be purified from the lysate in a Ficoll gradient. Since the density of the central vacuole approximates that of the protoplasts, about a 10% contamination of the vacuolar preparation by surviving protoplasts could not be eliminated. The intracellular activities of the following acid hydrolases were primarily localized in the vacuole of tobacco cells: α-mannosidase, β-N-acetylglucosaminidase, β-fructosidase, nuclease, phosphatase, phosphodiesterase. A similar composition of acid hydrolases was found in vacuoles obtained from protoplasts of tulip petals. Proteinase, a hydrolase with low activity in tobacco cells and tulip petals was found to be vacuolar in pineapple leaves, a tissue containing high levels of this enzyme. None of the vacuolar enzymes investigated ws found to be bound to the tonoplast. When vacuoles were isolated from cells labeled with radioactive choline, the vacuolar membrane was found to contain radioactivity. On sucrose gradients, the label incorporated into tonoplasts banded around a density of 1.10 grams per cubic centimeter

  9. Environmental impacts during geothermal development: Some examples from Central America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, S.; Goff, F.

    1997-01-01

    The impacts of geothermal development projects are usually positive. However, without appropriate monitoring plans and mitigation actions firmly incorporated into the project planning process, there exists the potential for significant negative environmental impacts. The authors present five examples from Central America of environmental impacts associated with geothermal development activities. These brief case studies describe landslide hazards, waste brine disposal, hydrothermal explosions, and air quality issues. Improved Environmental Impact Assessments are needed to assist the developing nations of the region to judiciously address the environmental consequences associated with geothermal development

  10. Chronic Opioid Therapy and Central Sensitization in Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, C Patrick; Lanzkron, Sophie; Haywood, Carlton; Kiley, Kasey; Pejsa, Megan; Moscou-Jackson, Gyasi; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Campbell, Claudia M

    2016-07-01

    Chronic opioid therapy (COT) for chronic non-cancer pain is frequently debated, and its effectiveness is unproven in sickle cell disease (SCD). The authors conducted a descriptive study among 83 adult SCD patients and compared the severity of disease and pain symptoms among those who were prescribed COT (n=29) with those who were not using COT. All patients completed baseline laboratory pain assessment and questionnaires between January 2010 and June 2014. Thereafter, participants recorded daily pain, crises, function, and healthcare utilization for 90 days using electronic diaries. Analyses were conducted shortly after the final diary data collection period. Patients on COT did not differ on age, sex, or measures of disease severity. However, patients on COT exhibited greater levels of clinical pain (particularly non-crisis); central sensitization; and depression and increased diary measures of pain severity, function, and healthcare utilization on crisis and non-crisis diary days, as well as a greater proportion of days in crisis. Including depressive symptoms in multivariate models did not change the associations between COT and pain, interference, central sensitization, or utilization. Additionally, participants not on COT displayed the expected positive relationship between central sensitization and clinical pain, whereas those on COT demonstrated no such relationship, despite having both higher central sensitization and higher clinical pain. Overall, the results point out a high symptom burden in SCD patients on COT, including those on high-dose COT, and suggest that nociceptive processing in SCD patients on COT differs from those who are not. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Radiological and epidemiological aspects of central giant cell granuloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noleto, Jose Wilson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: wilsonnoleto@ig.com.br; Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Sampaio, Renato Kobler [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Irion, Klaus L. [Liverpool NHS Trust, Liverpool (United Kingdom). Cardiothoracic Centre; Collares, Felipe Birchal [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC)

    2007-05-15

    Objective: The present study was aimed at evaluating main radiological and epidemiological aspects of giant cell lesions (central giant cell granuloma and brown tumors of hyperparathyroidism). Materials and methods: The sample consisted of 26 giant cell lesions diagnosed in 22 patients divided into two groups, one of them including 17 patients who were not affected by hyperparathyroidism (group A) and another including five patients with such a disorder (group B). Results: Prevalence was higher in female patients (72.7%). Most frequently, lesions occurred more in the second decade of life (mean age, 27 years). The mandible arc was most frequently involved (61.5%). Radiographically, 57.7% of lesions were multilocular and 42.3% were unilocular with defined limits. All of the 26 lesions caused expansion of bone, 15.4% radicular resorption, 50% dental displacement, and 11.5% produced pain. In the mandible 18.7% of the lesions crossed the midline. Group A showed 66.7% of lesions in the mandible and group B showed an even distribution of lesions between arches. In group A 66.7% of lesions were multilocular, and 33.3% unilocular; in group B 62.5% were unilocular, and 37.5% multilocular. Conclusion: Giant cells lesions may present themselves with a wide spectrum, from small, slow-growing unilocular lesions to extensive multilocular lesions. They present features of benignity, though some lesions may demonstrate a locally aggressive behavior. (author)

  12. Radiation induced effects in the developing central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisone, P.; Dubner, D.; Michelin, S.C.; Perez, M.R. Del

    1997-01-01

    The embryo and the human foetus are particularly sensitive to ionizing radiation and this sensitivity presents various qualitative and quantitative functional changes during intra-uterine development. Apart from radiation induced carcinogenesis, the most serious consequence of prenatal exposure in human beings is severe mental retardation. The principal data on radiation effects on human beings in the development of the central nervous system come form epidemiological studies carried out in individuals exposed in utero during the atomic explosion at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These observations demonstrate the existence of a time of maximum radiosensitivity between the weeks 8 and 15 of the gestational period, a period in which the proliferation and neuronal migration takes place. Determination of the characteristics of dose-response relationship and the possible existence of a threshold dose of radiation effects on the development of the central nervous system is relevant to radiation protection against low dose radiation and the establishment of dose limits for occupational exposure and the public. Studies were conducted on the generation of nitrous-oxide and its relation with the production of active species of oxygen in brains of exposed rats in utero exposed to doses of up to 1 Gy during their maximum radiosensitivity. The possible role of the mechanism of radiation induced damage in the development of the central nervous system is discussed

  13. Site development in the Central Midwest Compact Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lash, T.R.

    1986-01-01

    Illinois and Kentucky, the two members of the Central Midwest Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact, are well along in fulfilling their responsibility to provide new low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal capacity, which has been delegated to states and regions by federal law. The host state for facilities under the compact will be Illinois, and thus the focus of this paper is on Illinois' siting process. Illinois has both the statutory authority for LLW management and a cabinet-level agency, the Illinois Department of Nuclear Safety (IDNS), which has the responsibility for implementing the state management act. Based on activities to date, the Central Midwest Region expects to meet the milestones established by the federal Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. Illinois, however, cannot take further progress toward managing and disposing of our LLW for granted. IDNS and the Central Midwest Compact Commission (CMCC) must continue vigorously to press ahead to assure timely development of new disposal capacity. This paper provides background information on (1) the laws under which new facilities will be established in the Central Midwest Region, (2) the activities of IDNS and CMCC, and (3) planned activities by both IDNS and the CMCC

  14. Potential Development Essential Oil Production of Central Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alighiri, D.; Eden, W. T.; Supardi, K. I.; Masturi; Purwinarko, A.

    2017-04-01

    Indonesia is the source of raw essential oil in the world. Essential oils are used in various types of industries such as food and beverage, flavour, fragrance, perfumery, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. However, the development of Indonesian essential oil industry has not been encouraging for the production of essential oils, further it is unable to meet global demand. Besides that, the quality of volatile oil resulted cannot meet the international market standards. Based on the facts, the potential of Indonesian essential oils needs to be developed to provide added value, through increased production, improved quality and product diversification. One part of Indonesia having abundant of raw essential oil source is Central Java. Central Java has the quite large potential production of essential oils. Some essential oils produced from refining industry owned by the government, private and community sectors include cananga oils (Boyolali district), clove oils (Semarang district), patchouli oils (Brebes district, Pemalang district, and Klaten district). The main problem in the development of plants industries that producing essential oil in Central Java is low crops production, farming properties, quality of essential oils are diverse, providing poor-quality products and volatile oil price fluctuations. Marketing constraints of Central Java essential oils are quite complex supply chain. In general, marketing constraints of essential oils due to three factors, namely the low quality due to type of essential oil business that generally shaped small businesses with different capital and technology, domestic marketing is still a buyer-market (price determined by the buyer) because of weak bargaining position processors businessman, and prices fluctuate (domestic and foreign) due to uncontrolled domestic production and inter-country competition among manufacturers.

  15. Alerting the immune system via stromal cells is central to the prevention of tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navikas, Shohreh

    2013-01-01

    Anticancer immunotherapies are highly desired. Conversely, unwanted inflammatory or immune responses contribute to oncogenesis, tumor progression, and cancer-related death. For non-immunogenic therapies to inhibit tumor growth, they must promote, not prevent, the activation of anticancer immune...... responses. Here, the central immunoregulatory role of brain-specific stromal cells and neurons as well as their ability to maintain an immunological balance and prevent the development of glioblastoma is discussed....

  16. Are astrocytes executive cells within the central nervous system?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto E. Sica

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Experimental evidence suggests that astrocytes play a crucial role in the physiology of the central nervous system (CNS by modulating synaptic activity and plasticity. Based on what is currently known we postulate that astrocytes are fundamental, along with neurons, for the information processing that takes place within the CNS. On the other hand, experimental findings and human observations signal that some of the primary degenerative diseases of the CNS, like frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s dementia, Huntington’s dementia, primary cerebellar ataxias and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, all of which affect the human species exclusively, may be due to astroglial dysfunction. This hypothesis is supported by observations that demonstrated that the killing of neurons by non-neural cells plays a major role in the pathogenesis of those diseases, at both their onset and their progression. Furthermore, recent findings suggest that astrocytes might be involved in the pathogenesis of some psychiatric disorders as well.

  17. Solar cell materials developing technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Conibeer, Gavin J

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a comparison of solar cell materials, including both new materials based on organics, nanostructures and novel inorganics and developments in more traditional photovoltaic materials. It surveys the materials and materials trends in the field including third generation solar cells (multiple energy level cells, thermal approaches and the modification of the solar spectrum) with an eye firmly on low costs, energy efficiency and the use of abundant non-toxic materials.

  18. Development of the Centralized Reliability Data Organization (CREDO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.M.; Bott, T.F.; Knee, H.E.; Manning, J.J.; Hudson, S.D.; Greene, N.M.; Woodside, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    CREDO has been established to meet the needs of the US Breeder Reactor Program and the advanced reactor community for a centralized source of accurate reliability/maintainability data and data-related services. The center provides for a comprehensive program of collection, evaluation, and dissemination of data and for necessary user services. A steering committee of nationally recognized experts has been formed to guide CREDO development and operation. Historic data have been collected, analyzed, and published. Routine, continuous data collection and processing has been initiated at US sites. Interfaces with existing data bases have been established. Special user services are under development

  19. Role and organization of a centralized radiopharmacy in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, R.J.; Mather, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of sharing radiopharmacy services among several users in a particular geographical region has gained widespread acceptance in many countries, particularly in the United States, as a viable way of reducing costs and increasing efficiency of resource utilization. This has been exemplified by the successful commercialization of this concept by several corporations. This concept is also viable when centralization originates from a public or government institution such as a nuclear research center or university hospital. In developing countries with limited resources, shared radiopharmacy services are especially attractive. The International Atomic Energy Agency has been playing a pivotal role in the implementation of centralized radiopharmacies in developing Member States. This document presents some goals, requirements for space, personnel and equipment for various levels of radiopharmacy service along with a general cost analysis. It is intended that this document be a guide to basic concepts and planning strategies in establishing centralized radiopharmacy services. The diversity of available resources and government regulations must be considered in establishing a specific facility. (author). 3 tabs

  20. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND INNOVATION IN EASTERN AND CENTRAL EUROPEAN COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEAGU OLIMPIA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper has the aim to highlight the impact of innovation on sustainable development in Eastern and Central European countries. In this wiew, a sinthetic measure of sustainability in these countries is calculated, taking into account ten statistical indicators (related to socio-economic development, sustainable consumption and production, social inclusion, demographic changes, public health, primary energy consumption, share of renewable energy in final consumption energy, sustainable transport, official development assistance granted to these countries from EUROSTAT database. A comparative analysis of the level of sustainability during 2005-2014 in Eastern and Central Europe is followed by an analysis of the impact of innovation (measured by eco-innovation index on sustainable development, using panel data techniques. The findings show that eco-innovation had a positive impact on sustainability in these countries in the examined period.This result could be used as a rationale for policy makers from these countries in designing measures for eco-innovation stimulation, aiming in this way to move forward for achieving the planned national targets within the European Union Sustainable Development Strategy (EU-SDS.

  1. Development of Thymic Epithelial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulyanchenko, Svetlana; Vaidya, Harsh J.; O'Neill, Kathy E.

    2016-01-01

    The thymus is the primary lymphoid organ in which the T cell repertoire is generated. The complex cellularity of this organ is uniquely designed to facilitate T cell development: defects in thymus development or function can cause immunodeficiencies ranging from the absence of T cell-mediated imm......The thymus is the primary lymphoid organ in which the T cell repertoire is generated. The complex cellularity of this organ is uniquely designed to facilitate T cell development: defects in thymus development or function can cause immunodeficiencies ranging from the absence of T cell......-mediated immunity to broad-spectrum autoimmune disease. Peak thymus size and output occurs early in life, after which the thymus undergoes a natural process of involution. This results in the progressive loss of functional thymus tissue and correspondingly in decreased production of new naïve T cells with age...... - contributing to the diminished capacity of the aged immune system to adequately respond to new antigenic challenge. Age-related thymic involutions, together with the thymic involutions associated with cytotoxic therapies (e.g., radio- or chemotherapy), have raised interest in development of clinically useful...

  2. Development Of Data Acquisition Software For Centralized Radiation Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolida Yussup; Maslina Mohd Ibrahim; Mohd Fauzi Haris; Syirrazie Che Soh; Harzawardi Hasim; Azraf Azman; Mohd Ashhar Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, with the growth of technology, many devices and equipment's can be connected to the network and internet to enable online data acquisition. Centralized radiation monitoring system utilizes a Local Area Network (LAN) as a communication media for data acquisition of the area radiation levels from radiation detectors in Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia). The development of the system involves device configuration, wiring, network and hardware installation, software and web development. This paper describes the software development on the system server that is responsible to acquire and record the area radiation readings from the detectors. Then the recorded readings are called in a web programming to be displayed on a web site. The readings with the time stamp are stored in the system database for query. Besides acquiring the area radiation levels in Nuclear Malaysia centrally, additional features such as data conversion from mR to μSv and line chart display are developed in the software for effective radiation level trend observation and studies. (author)

  3. Centrality and economic development in the Rijnland region : Social and spatial concepts of centrality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Nes, A.

    2007-01-01

    In urban research, spatial and social concepts of centrality are being distinguished. From a spatial point of view, metrical centrality implies that something is located in the middle of an area. However, metrical and topological centrality are not equivalent. In research where space syntax methods

  4. ASSOCIATION OF CENTRAL CORNEAL THICKNESS AND CENTRAL CORNEAL ENDOTHELIAL CELL COUNT WITH PROGRESSIVE STAGES OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Kumar Sasmal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetes mellitus along with its different serious pathological complications are increasing very rapidly in both developed and developing countries and manifesting as an escalating pandemic leading to morbidity and untimely death. This may lead to irreversible socioeconomic and psychosocial damage to the individuals, families and communities, either directly or indirectly. Assessment of Central Corneal Thickness (CCT and Central Corneal Endothelial Cell Count (CCEC in different stages of DR would help us to understand how rapidly the disease spreads, which could in turn be used as guidelines for disease screening in patients as risk to developing the disease. The aim of the study is to understand the association of CCT and CECC with progressive stages of Diabetic Retinopathy (DR in Diabetes Mellitus type 2 (DM-2. MATERIALS AND METHODS A case-control study was performed with a random eye from cases, No Diabetic Retinopathy (NDR, Nonproliferative Diabetic Retinopathy (NPDR and Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy (PDR to determine association of DR with CCT and CECC. Parameters were quantified by ultrasonic pachymeter and specular microscope and results statistically analysed to understand significant association. RESULTS Significant increase in CCT was observed in NPDR and PDR compared to controls or NDR. Conversely, NPDR and PDR showed significant decrease compared to controls or NDR. CCT and CECC showed significant inverse correlation in all groups. CONCLUSION CCT and CECC showed significant increase and decrease respectively with stages of DR and were inversely correlated with each other. Assessment of CCT and CECC could thus be used as effective indicators of ocular manifestations of DM for early therapeutic intervention.

  5. Concentrator-solar-cell development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenon, L.

    1982-07-01

    A program is described which is a continuation of earlier programs for the development of high-efficiency, low-cost, silicon concentrator solar cells. The base-line process steps and process sequences identified in these earlier contracts were evaluated and specific processes reviewed. In particular, emphasis on the use of Czochralski-grown silicon wafers rather than float-zone wafers were examined. Additionally, a study of the trade-offs between textured and nontextured cells was initiated, and the limits within which the low-cost plated nickel copper metallization can be used in concentrator solar cell applications was identified.

  6. Nuclear Research and Development Institutes in Central and Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-06-01

    The science and technology (S and T) sector is faced today with complex and diverse challenges. National science budgets are under pressure, and many countries are changing how research and development (R and D) is funded, reducing direct subsidies and introducing competition for both governmental and alternative sources of revenue. On the other hand, the transition toward knowledge-based economies is creating new opportunities in the S and T sector as governments look to it to foster economic growth through innovation. A number of countries in Central and Eastern Europe have recently joined the European Union (EU) which has defined the Lisbon Strategy to create a 'knowledge triangle' of research, education and innovation to underpin the European economic and social model, and economic growth. This strategy seeks to increase investment in science and technology across the EU to a target of 3% of GDP by 2010, with two-thirds of funds coming from the private sector. By comparison, funding for R and D in most Central and Eastern European countries is only around 1% GDP, of which about 90% is provided by the governments. R and D has become more international, reflecting a more interdependent and globalized world. R and D progress is not only of interest to individual countries but also tries to respond to the needs of a broader society. Governments still maintain national networks, but increasingly emphasize international cooperation, both to avoid duplication of expensive infrastructure, and because scientific excellence requires an exchange of ideas and cooperation that crosses borders. These challenges and opportunities directly impact the research and development institutes (RDIs), including the nuclear RDIs. It is important for the nuclear RDIs to take account of these trends in the broader S and T sector in their vision and strategy. Several nuclear RDIs have become very successful, but others are struggling to adapt. The challenges have been particularly severe

  7. Aire and T cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S; Su, Maureen A

    2011-04-01

    In the thymus, developing T cells that react against self-antigens with high affinity are deleted in the process of negative selection. An essential component of this process is the display of self-antigens, including those whose expression are usually restricted to specific tissues, to developing T cells within the thymus. The Autoimmune Regulator (Aire) gene plays a crucial role in the expression of tissue specific self-antigens within the thymus, and disruption of Aire function results in spontaneous autoimmunity in both humans and mice. Recent advances have been made in our understanding of how Aire influences the expression of thousands of tissue-specific antigens in the thymus. Additional roles of Aire, including roles in chemokine and cytokine expression, have also been revealed. Factors important in the differentiation of Aire-expressing medullary thymic epithelial cells have been defined. Finally, the identity of antigen presenting cells in negative selection, including the role of medullary thymic epithelial cells in displaying tissue specific antigens to T cells, has also been clarified. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hyperammonemia-induced toxicity for the developing central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnon, Laurène; Braissant, Olivier

    2007-11-01

    In pediatric patients, hyperammonemia can be caused by various acquired or inherited disorders such as urea cycle deficiencies or organic acidemias. The brain is much more susceptible to the deleterious effects of ammonium during development than in adulthood. Hyperammonemia can provoke irreversible damages to the developing central nervous system that lead to cortical atrophy, ventricular enlargement and demyelination, responsible for cognitive impairment, seizures and cerebral palsy. Until recently, the mechanisms leading to these irreversible cerebral damages were poorly understood. Using experimental models allowing the analysis of the neurotoxic effects of ammonium on the developing brain, these last years have seen the emergence of new clues showing that ammonium exposure alters several amino acid pathways and neurotransmitter systems, as well as cerebral energy metabolism, nitric oxide synthesis, oxidative stress, mitochondrial permeability transition and signal transduction pathways. Those alterations may explain neuronal loss and impairment of axonal and dendritic growth observed in the different models of congenital hyperammonemia. Some neuroprotective strategies such as the potential use of NMDA receptor antagonists, nitric oxide inhibitors, creatine and acetyl-l-carnitine have been suggested to counteract these toxic effects. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms involved in the chain of events leading to neuronal dysfunction under hyperammonemia may be useful to develop new potential strategies for neuroprotection.

  9. District Central Office Leadership as Teaching: How Central Office Administrators Support Principals' Development as Instructional Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, Meredith I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Research on educational leadership underscores the importance of principals operating as instructional leaders and intensive job-embedded supports for such work; this research also identifies central office staff as key support providers. However, it teaches little about what central office staff do when they provide such support and how…

  10. Alfven-ion-cyclotron instability in the central cell of TMX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, D.C.; Baldwin, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    The central cell of TMX may require hot-ion injection. The resulting velocity-space anisotropy together with the length of the central homogeneous region raise the possibility of convective AIC instability. In this report we demonstrate that the Rosenbluth criterion of less than a thousand-fold amplitude amplification per pass can be satisfied by ion distributions which nevertheless have sufficient anisotropy to be confined within the central cell

  11. Secondary infiltration of the central nervous system in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Maira Bueno da Silveira da Rocha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the incidence and risk factors of infiltration of the central nervous system after the initial treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in patients treated at Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo. METHODS: A total of 133 patients treated for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma from January 2001 to April 2008 were retrospectively analyzed in respect to the incidence and risk factors of secondary central nervous system involvement of lymphoma. Intrathecal prophylaxis was not a standard procedure for patients considered to be at risk. This analysis includes patients whether they received rituximab as first-line treatment or not. RESULTS: Nine of 133 (6.7% patients developed central nervous system disease after a mean observation time of 29 months. The median time to relapse or progression was 7.9 months after diagnosis and all but one patient died despite the treatment administered. Twenty-six (19.5% patients of this cohort received rituximab as first-line treatment and nine (7.1% received intrathecal chemoprophylaxis. Of the nine patients that relapsed, seven (77.7% had parenchymal central nervous system involvement; seven (77.7% had stage III or IV disease; one (11.1% had bone marrow involvement; two (22.2% had received intrathecal chemoprophylaxis; and 3 (33.3% had taken rituximab. In a multivariate analysis, the risk factors for this infiltration were being male, previous use of intrathecal chemotherapy and patients that were refractory to initial treatment. CONCLUSION: Central nervous system infiltration in this cohort is similar to that of previous reports in the literature. As this was a small cohort with a rare event, only three risk factors were important for this infiltration

  12. Expression of CD34 and CD68 in peripheral giant cell granuloma and central giant cell granuloma: An immunohistochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    VK, Varsha; Hallikeri, Kaveri; Girish, HC; Murgod, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Background: Central and Peripheral giant cell granulomas of jaws are uncommon, benign, reactive disorders that are characterized by the presence of numerous multinucleated giant cells and mononuclear cells within a stroma. The origin of the multinucleated giant cells is controversial; probably originating from fusion of histiocytes, endothelial cells and fibroblasts. Objective: To assess the expression of CD34 and CD68 in central and peripheral giant cell granulomas to understand the origin of these multinucleated giant cells. Materials and Methods: Twenty cases of Central and Peripheral giant cell granulomas were evaluated immunohistochemically for CD34 and CD68 proteins expression. Results: Immunopositivity for CD34 was seen only in cytoplasm of endothelial cells of blood vessels; whereas, consistent cytoplasmic immunopositivity for CD68 was seen in few stromal cells. Statistical significance was seen in mean number of multinucleated giant cells, mean number of nuclei in multinucleated giant cells, CD68 expression and ratio of macrophages to multinucleated giant cells among two lesions. Conclusion: Although the central giant cell granulomas share some clinical and histopathological similarities with peripheral giant cell granulomas, differences in mean number of nuclei in multinucleated giant cells and CD68 immunoreactivity may underlie the distinct clinical behavior. PMID:25948986

  13. Structural relationships among central cell and egg apparatus cells of barley as related to transmission of male gametes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David D. Cass

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Barley embryo sacs were examined using light and electron microscopy before and during fertilization. One synergid degenerates after pollination with loss of nuclear and cytoplasmic organization and cell wall material between synergid and central cell. Some wall between egg and central cell is also lost. After pollen tube discharge into the degenerate synergid, the male gametes leave the synergid entering a pocket of central cell cytoplasm separated from the synergid only by membranes. This could provide for efficient gamete transmission and possible recognition through specific membrane contacts.

  14. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassovs research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herrings group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  15. Franchise Business as a Generator of Development in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Baresa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The franchise in the global marketplace enables many globally known brands. With its business concept, it enables integration, learning and acceptance of various cultural, historical, religious and other customs and habits. Consumers prefer a proven and expected standard product quality and services, no matter where they are, they expect and want the same quality provided by franchise companies (shops, restaurants, hotels, and others of well-known brands in different places. It can be concluded that the franchise enables the transfer of business knowledge, experience and technology to an unlimited space. Franchise is largely present as a way of doing business in the world and it has an impact on national economies. Companies can use it as a strategic growth model, as a model for launching a whole new business. Since Croatia has enough potential to develop franchise business that is not sufficiently exploited, that potential could be largely exploited in addition to overcome certain problems. Conducting a systematic analysis of franchise business and development would contribute to this. This paper deals with basic concepts related to the franchise business, features and characteristics, advantages and disadvantages of franchise business, the impact it has on the national economy (US example, and a comparative analysis of the franchise business in Croatia compared to other Central European countries.

  16. Development of portable fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatou, K.; Sumi, S.; Nishizawa, N. [Sanyo Electric Co., Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Sanyo Electric has been concentrating on developing a marketable portable fuel cell using phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFC). Due to the fact that this power source uses PAFC that operate at low temperature around 100{degrees} C, they are easier to handle compared to conventional fuel cells that operate at around 200{degrees} C , they can also be expected to provide extended reliable operation because corrosion of the electrode material and deterioration of the electrode catalyst are almost completely nonexistent. This power source is meant to be used independently and stored at room temperature. When it is started up, it generates electricity itself using its internal load to raise the temperature. As a result, the phosphoric acid (the electolyte) absorbs the reaction water when the temperature starts to be raised (around room temperature). At the same time the concentration and volume of the phosphoric acid changes, which may adversely affect the life time of the cell. We have studied means for starting, operating PAFC stack using methods that can simply evaluate changes in the concentration of the electrolyte in the stack with the aim of improving and extending cell life and report on them in this paper.

  17. Ultrastructure of central cell in female gametophyte of Castilleja wightii Elmer (Scrophulariaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekici, Nuran; Dane, Feruzan; Olgun, Göksel

    2013-09-01

    Embryo sac cells are highly differentiated in plants. The central cell is one of the most important cells of the embryo sac. It forms endosperm by fusion with a sperm cell. Ultrastructure of the central cell in the mature embryo sac of Castilleja wightii was investigated in this study. Nucleolus which had a lot of vacuole in a large secondary nucleus and numerous dictyosomes, vesicles, mitochondria, amyloplasts in cytoplasm were seen in this cell. Also free ribosomes in the form of polysomes and large lipid bodies were detected in the cytoplasm. Numerous vacuoles of different size were observed and some of them had autophagic function. Both smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulums were seen. Although invaginations were seen in the plasmalemma of the central cell to the inside of the embryo sac, a thick cuticular layer was observed outer side on the cell wall. The aim of this study was to contribute studies about the ultrastructure of embryo sacs.

  18. New Insights on Schwann Cell Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Kelly R.; Feltri, M. Laura; Taveggia, Carla

    2015-01-01

    In the peripheral nervous system, Schwann cells are glial cells that are in intimate contact with axons throughout development. Schwann cells generate the insulating myelin sheath and provide vital trophic support to the neurons that they ensheathe. Schwann cell precursors arise from neural crest progenitor cells, and a highly ordered developmental sequence controls the progression of these cells to become mature myelinating or non-myelinating Schwann cells. Here, we discuss both seminal discoveries and recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that drive Schwann cell development and myelination with a focus on cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling events. PMID:25921593

  19. Development of a central auditory test battery for adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neijenhuis, C.A.M.; Stollman, M.H.P.; Snik, A.F.M.; Broek, P. van den

    2001-01-01

    There is little standardized test material in Dutch to document central auditory processing disorders (CAPDs). Therefore, a new central auditory test battery was composed and standardized for use with adult populations and older children. The test battery comprised seven tests (words in noise,

  20. Central Asia | Page 94 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Central Asia. Asie centrale. Read more about Initiative Think tank - Fondation Hewlett. Language French. Read more about Apprentissage en collaboration pour la cogestion des ressources naturelles en Mongolie. Language French. Read more about Collaborative Learning for Co-management of Natural Resources in ...

  1. Mice deficient for ERAD machinery component Sel1L develop central diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichet, Daniel G; Lussier, Yoann

    2017-10-02

    Deficiency of the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) underlies diabetes insipidus, which is characterized by the excretion of abnormally large volumes of dilute urine and persistent thirst. In this issue of the JCI, Shi et al. report that Sel1L-Hrd1 ER-associated degradation (ERAD) is responsible for the clearance of misfolded pro-arginine vasopressin (proAVP) in the ER. Additionally, mice with Sel1L deficiency, either globally or specifically within AVP-expressing neurons, developed central diabetes insipidus. The results of this study demonstrate a role for ERAD in neuroendocrine cells and serve as a clinical example of the effect of misfolded ER proteins retrotranslocated through the membrane into the cytosol, where they are polyubiquitinated, extracted from the ER membrane, and degraded by the proteasome. Moreover, proAVP misfolding in hereditary central diabetes insipidus likely shares common physiopathological mechanisms with proinsulin misfolding in hereditary diabetes mellitus of youth.

  2. Developing cloud applications using the e-Science Central platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiden, Hugo; Woodman, Simon; Watson, Paul; Cala, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the e-Science Central (e-SC) cloud data processing system and its application to a number of e-Science projects. e-SC provides both software as a service (SaaS) and platform as a service for scientific data management, analysis and collaboration. It is a portable system and can be deployed on both private (e.g. Eucalyptus) and public clouds (Amazon AWS and Microsoft Windows Azure). The SaaS application allows scientists to upload data, edit and run workflows and share results in the cloud, using only a Web browser. It is underpinned by a scalable cloud platform consisting of a set of components designed to support the needs of scientists. The platform is exposed to developers so that they can easily upload their own analysis services into the system and make these available to other users. A representational state transfer-based application programming interface (API) is also provided so that external applications can leverage the platform's functionality, making it easier to build scalable, secure cloud-based applications. This paper describes the design of e-SC, its API and its use in three different case studies: spectral data visualization, medical data capture and analysis, and chemical property prediction. PMID:23230161

  3. Developing cloud applications using the e-Science Central platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiden, Hugo; Woodman, Simon; Watson, Paul; Cala, Jacek

    2013-01-28

    This paper describes the e-Science Central (e-SC) cloud data processing system and its application to a number of e-Science projects. e-SC provides both software as a service (SaaS) and platform as a service for scientific data management, analysis and collaboration. It is a portable system and can be deployed on both private (e.g. Eucalyptus) and public clouds (Amazon AWS and Microsoft Windows Azure). The SaaS application allows scientists to upload data, edit and run workflows and share results in the cloud, using only a Web browser. It is underpinned by a scalable cloud platform consisting of a set of components designed to support the needs of scientists. The platform is exposed to developers so that they can easily upload their own analysis services into the system and make these available to other users. A representational state transfer-based application programming interface (API) is also provided so that external applications can leverage the platform's functionality, making it easier to build scalable, secure cloud-based applications. This paper describes the design of e-SC, its API and its use in three different case studies: spectral data visualization, medical data capture and analysis, and chemical property prediction.

  4. Hoxb4 overexpression in CD4 memory phenotype T cells increases the central memory population upon homeostatic proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héloïse Frison

    Full Text Available Memory T cell populations allow a rapid immune response to pathogens that have been previously encountered and thus form the basis of success in vaccinations. However, the molecular pathways underlying the development and maintenance of these cells are only starting to be unveiled. Memory T cells have the capacity to self renew as do hematopoietic stem cells, and overlapping gene expression profiles suggested that these cells might use the same self-renewal pathways. The transcription factor Hoxb4 has been shown to promote self-renewal divisions of hematopoietic stem cells resulting in an expansion of these cells. In this study we investigated whether overexpression of Hoxb4 could provide an advantage to CD4 memory phenotype T cells in engrafting the niche of T cell deficient mice following adoptive transfer. Competitive transplantation experiments demonstrated that CD4 memory phenotype T cells derived from mice transgenic for Hoxb4 contributed overall less to the repopulation of the lymphoid organs than wild type CD4 memory phenotype T cells after two months. These proportions were relatively maintained following serial transplantation in secondary and tertiary mice. Interestingly, a significantly higher percentage of the Hoxb4 CD4 memory phenotype T cell population expressed the CD62L and Ly6C surface markers, characteristic for central memory T cells, after homeostatic proliferation. Thus Hoxb4 favours the maintenance and increase of the CD4 central memory phenotype T cell population. These cells are more stem cell like and might eventually lead to an advantage of Hoxb4 T cells after subjecting the cells to additional rounds of proliferation.

  5. The Development of Central Asia Through the Middle East

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Santiago, Gerald-James

    2001-01-01

    ... powers in their internal affairs. Because of growing US interests in Central Asia and the Caspian Sea area, the US will seek to be become engaged and to expand its influence in the region through its Middle...

  6. Central nervous system involvement in mantle cell lymphoma : clinical features, prognostic factors and outcomes from the European Mantle Cell Lymphoma Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheah, C. Y.; George, A.; Gine, E.; Chiappella, A.; Kluin-Nelemans, H. C.; Jurczak, W.; Krawczyk, K.; Mocikova, H.; Klener, P.; Salek, D.; Walewski, J.; Szymczyk, M.; Smolej, L.; Auer, R. L.; Ritchie, D. S.; Arcaini, L.; Williams, M. E.; Dreyling, M.; Seymour, J. F.

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is uncommon, and the manifestations and natural history are not well described. We present the data on 57 patients with MCL who developed CNS involvement, from a database of 1396 consecutively treated patients at 14 institutions.

  7. Peripheral oxygen-sensing cells directly modulate the output of an identified respiratory central pattern generating neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Harold J; Inoue, Takuya; Shum, Kelly; Luk, Collin; Syed, Naweed I

    2007-06-01

    Breathing is an essential homeostatic behavior regulated by central neuronal networks, often called central pattern generators (CPGs). Despite ongoing advances in our understanding of the neural control of breathing, the basic mechanisms by which peripheral input modulates the activities of the central respiratory CPG remain elusive. This lack of fundamental knowledge vis-à-vis the role of peripheral influences in the control of the respiratory CPG is due in large part to the complexity of mammalian respiratory control centres. We have therefore developed a simpler invertebrate model to study the basic cellular and synaptic mechanisms by which a peripheral chemosensory input affects the central respiratory CPG. Here we report on the identification and characterization of peripheral chemoreceptor cells (PCRCs) that relay hypoxia-sensitive chemosensory information to the known respiratory CPG neuron right pedal dorsal 1 in the mollusk Lymnaea stagnalis. Selective perfusion of these PCRCs with hypoxic saline triggered bursting activity in these neurons and when isolated in cell culture these cells also demonstrated hypoxic sensitivity that resulted in membrane depolarization and spiking activity. When cocultured with right pedal dorsal 1, the PCRCs developed synapses that exhibited a form of short-term synaptic plasticity in response to hypoxia. Finally, osphradial denervation in intact animals significantly perturbed respiratory activity compared with their sham counterparts. This study provides evidence for direct synaptic connectivity between a peripheral regulatory element and a central respiratory CPG neuron, revealing a potential locus for hypoxia-induced synaptic plasticity underlying breathing behavior.

  8. HIV-1 replication in the central nervous system occurs in two distinct cell types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretja Schnell

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system (CNS can lead to the development of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD. We examined the virological characteristics of HIV-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of HAD subjects to explore the association between independent viral replication in the CNS and the development of overt dementia. We found that genetically compartmentalized CCR5-tropic (R5 T cell-tropic and macrophage-tropic HIV-1 populations were independently detected in the CSF of subjects diagnosed with HIV-1-associated dementia. Macrophage-tropic HIV-1 populations were genetically diverse, representing established CNS infections, while R5 T cell-tropic HIV-1 populations were clonally amplified and associated with pleocytosis. R5 T cell-tropic viruses required high levels of surface CD4 to enter cells, and their presence was correlated with rapid decay of virus in the CSF with therapy initiation (similar to virus in the blood that is replicating in activated T cells. Macrophage-tropic viruses could enter cells with low levels of CD4, and their presence was correlated with slow decay of virus in the CSF, demonstrating a separate long-lived cell as the source of the virus. These studies demonstrate two distinct virological states inferred from the CSF virus in subjects diagnosed with HAD. Finally, macrophage-tropic viruses were largely restricted to the CNS/CSF compartment and not the blood, and in one case we were able to identify the macrophage-tropic lineage as a minor variant nearly two years before its expansion in the CNS. These results suggest that HIV-1 variants in CSF can provide information about viral replication and evolution in the CNS, events that are likely to play an important role in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

  9. Central nervous system mast cells in peripheral inflammatory nociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellmeier Wilfried

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional aspects of mast cell-neuronal interactions remain poorly understood. Mast cell activation and degranulation can result in the release of powerful pro-inflammatory mediators such as histamine and cytokines. Cerebral dural mast cells have been proposed to modulate meningeal nociceptor activity and be involved in migraine pathophysiology. Little is known about the functional role of spinal cord dural mast cells. In this study, we examine their potential involvement in nociception and synaptic plasticity in superficial spinal dorsal horn. Changes of lower spinal cord dura mast cells and their contribution to hyperalgesia are examined in animal models of peripheral neurogenic and non-neurogenic inflammation. Results Spinal application of supernatant from activated cultured mast cells induces significant mechanical hyperalgesia and long-term potentiation (LTP at spinal synapses of C-fibers. Lumbar, thoracic and thalamic preparations are then examined for mast cell number and degranulation status after intraplantar capsaicin and carrageenan. Intradermal capsaicin induces a significant percent increase of lumbar dural mast cells at 3 hours post-administration. Peripheral carrageenan in female rats significantly increases mast cell density in the lumbar dura, but not in thoracic dura or thalamus. Intrathecal administration of the mast cell stabilizer sodium cromoglycate or the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk inhibitor BAY-613606 reduce the increased percent degranulation and degranulated cell density of lumbar dural mast cells after capsaicin and carrageenan respectively, without affecting hyperalgesia. Conclusion The results suggest that lumbar dural mast cells may be sufficient but are not necessary for capsaicin or carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia.

  10. Central nervous system lesions in adult T-cell leukaemia: MRI and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, M.; Korogi, Y.; Shigematsu, Y.; Liang, L.; Takahashi, M.; Matsuoka, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Jhono, M.; Eto, K.

    2002-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL) is a T-cell lymphoid neoplasm caused by human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I). Radiological findings in central nervous system (CNS) involvement have not been well characterised. We reviewed the MRI of 18 patients with ATL who developed new neurological symptoms or signs, and pathology specimens from a 53-year-old woman who died of ATL. MRI findings were divided into three categories: definite, probable, and other abnormal. Definite and probable findings were defined as ATL-related. The characteristic findings were multiple parenchymal masses with or without contrast enhancement adjacent to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaced and the deep grey matter of both cerebral hemispheres, plus leptomeningeal lesion. One patient had both cerebral and spinal cord lesions. Other abnormal findings in eight patients included one case of leukoencephalopathy caused by methotrexate. The histology findings consisted of clusters of tumour cells along perivascular spaces, and scattered infiltration of the parenchyma, with nests of tumour cells. Leptomeningeal infiltration by tumour spread into the parenchyma and secondary degeneration of the neuronal tracts was observed. MRI was useful for detecting CNS invasion by ATL and differentiating it from other abnormalities. The MRI findings seemed to correlate well with the histological changes. (orig.)

  11. Homeostatic proliferation fails to efficiently reactivate HIV-1 latently infected central memory CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Bosque

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic proliferation ensures the longevity of central memory T-cells by inducing cell proliferation in the absence of cellular differentiation or activation. This process is governed mainly by IL-7. Central memory T-cells can also be stimulated via engagement of the T-cell receptor, leading to cell proliferation but also activation and differentiation. Using an in vitro model of HIV-1 latency, we have examined in detail the effects of homeostatic proliferation on latently infected central memory T cells. We have also used antigenic stimulation via anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies and established a comparison with a homeostatic proliferation stimulus, to evaluate potential differences in how either treatment affects the dynamics of latent virus populations. First, we show that homeostatic proliferation, as induced by a combination of IL-2 plus IL-7, leads to partial reactivation of latent HIV-1 but is unable to reduce the size of the reservoir in vitro. Second, latently infected cells are able to homeostatically proliferate in the absence of viral reactivation or cell differentiation. These results indicate that IL-2 plus IL-7 may induce a detrimental effect by favoring the maintenance of the latent HIV-1 reservoir. On the other hand, antigenic stimulation efficiently reactivated latent HIV-1 in cultured central memory cells and led to depletion of the latently infected cells via virus-induced cell death.

  12. Fuel cell development for transportation: Catalyst development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doddapaneni, N. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Fuel cells are being considered as alternate power sources for transportation and stationary applications. With proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells the fuel crossover to cathodes causes severe thermal management and cell voltage drop due to oxidation of fuel at the platinized cathodes. The main goal of this project was to design, synthesize, and evaluate stable and inexpensive transition metal macrocyclic catalysts for the reduction of oxygen and be electrochemically inert towards anode fuels such as hydrogen and methanol.

  13. Cells of the central nervous system as targets and reservoirs of the human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer-Hämmerle, Susanne; Rothenaigner, Ina; Wolff, Horst; Bell, Jeanne E; Brack-Werner, Ruth

    2005-08-01

    The availability of highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) has not eliminated HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system (CNS) or the occurrence of HIV-associated neurological problems. Thus, the neurobiology of HIV-1 is still an important issue. Here, we review key features of HIV-1-cell interactions in the CNS and their contributions to persistence and pathogenicity of HIV-1 in the CNS. HIV-1 invades the brain very soon after systemic infection. Various mechanisms have been proposed for HIV-1 entry into the CNS. The most favored hypothesis is the migration of infected cells across the blood-brain barrier ("Trojan horse" hypothesis). Virus production in the CNS is not apparent before the onset of AIDS, indicating that HIV-1 replication in the CNS is successfully controlled in pre-AIDS. Brain macrophages and microglia cells are the chief producers of HIV-1 in brains of individuals with AIDS. HIV-1 enters these cells by the CD4 receptor and mainly the CCR5 coreceptor. Various in vivo and cell culture studies indicate that cells of neuroectodermal origin, particularly astrocytes, may also be infected by HIV-1. These cells restrict virus production and serve as reservoirs for HIV-1. A limited number of studies suggest restricted infection of oligodendrocytes and neurons, although infection of these cells is still controversial. Entry of HIV-1 into neuroectodermal cells is independent of the CD4 receptor, and a number of different cell-surface molecules have been implicated as alternate receptors of HIV-1. HIV-1-associated injury of the CNS is believed to be caused by numerous soluble factors released by glial cells as a consequence of HIV-1 infection. These include both viral and cellular factors. Some of these factors can directly induce neuronal injury and death by interacting with receptors on neuronal membranes (neurotoxic factors). Others can activate uninfected cells to produce inflammatory and neurotoxic factors and/or promote infiltration of

  14. Central Asia | Page 8 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Asie centrale. Read more about Démarche intégrée pour assurer la sécurité alimentaire et nutritionnelle aux Philippines. Language French. Read more about Strengthening the Indonesia's Health Policy Network to Promote Equity and Social Protection. Language English. Read more about Rendement des entreprises en ...

  15. Central Bank Autonomy, The Money Stock And Price Developments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This artcle uses on econometric model to analyse central bank policy on the money stock and prices by investigating the relationship among the components of the balance sheet using data from the BOT spanning from 1986 to 2001. The results indicate that the behavior of the BOTs balance sheet has strong implications of ...

  16. Recurrent case of central giant cell granuloma with multiple soft tissue involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Suresh; Singh, Anurag; Kumar, Prince; Tyagi, Shallu

    2014-01-01

    Central giant cell granuloma is a fairly common lesion in the jaws aetiology of which is still completely unknown but thought to be of a reactive process to some unknown stimuli. It usually arises either peripherally in periodontal ligament, mucoperiosteum, or centrally in the bone. The histological hallmark for both peripheral and central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) is the presence of distinctive multinucleated giant cells (MGCs) in a prominent fibrous stroma. Central giant cell granuloma is an uncommon benign proliferative lesion that almost exclusively occurs within the jaw. Eventually, it may become aggressive leading to the expansion and perforation of cortex resulting into mobility and displacement of teeth with root resorption. The present case focuses on the dilemma and perplexity in diagnosing aggressive CGCGs, due to its close proximity with respect to pathology, behavior and prognosis from giant cell tumors (GCT). Central giant cell granuloma persuaded extensive destruction to the hard and soft tissues with high rate of recurrence encourage us the need of exploring the possibilities of giant cell tumors having a definitive presence in the jaws. PMID:25298721

  17. Nestin Reporter Transgene Labels Multiple Central Nervous System Precursor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avery S. Walker

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic neuroepithelia and adult subventricular zone (SVZ stem and progenitor cells express nestin. We characterized a transgenic line that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP specified to neural tissue by the second intronic enhancer of the nestin promoter that had several novel features. During embryogenesis, the dorsal telencephalon contained many and the ventral telencephalon few eGFP+ cells. eGFP+ cells were found in postnatal and adult neurogenic regions. eGFP+ cells in the SVZ expressed multiple phenotype markers, glial fibrillary acidic protein, Dlx, and neuroblast-specific molecules suggesting the transgene is expressed through the lineage. eGFP+ cell numbers increased in the SVZ after cortical injury, suggesting this line will be useful in probing postinjury neurogenesis. In non-neurogenic regions, eGFP was strongly expressed in oligodendrocyte progenitors, but not in astrocytes, even when they were reactive. This eGFP+ mouse will facilitate studies of proliferative neuroepithelia and adult neurogenesis, as well as of parenchymal oligodendrocytes.

  18. Asymmetric cell division during T cell development controls downstream fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Kim; Shimoni, Raz; Charnley, Mirren; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J.; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Ramsbottom, Kelly; Oliaro, Jane; Izon, David; Ting, Stephen B.; Reynolds, Joseph; Lythe, Grant; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Melichar, Heather; Robey, Ellen; Humbert, Patrick O.; Gu, Min

    2015-01-01

    During mammalian T cell development, the requirement for expansion of many individual T cell clones, rather than merely expansion of the entire T cell population, suggests a possible role for asymmetric cell division (ACD). We show that ACD of developing T cells controls cell fate through differential inheritance of cell fate determinants Numb and α-Adaptin. ACD occurs specifically during the β-selection stage of T cell development, and subsequent divisions are predominantly symmetric. ACD is controlled by interaction with stromal cells and chemokine receptor signaling and uses a conserved network of polarity regulators. The disruption of polarity by deletion of the polarity regulator, Scribble, or the altered inheritance of fate determinants impacts subsequent fate decisions to influence the numbers of DN4 cells arising after the β-selection checkpoint. These findings indicate that ACD enables the thymic microenvironment to orchestrate fate decisions related to differentiation and self-renewal. PMID:26370500

  19. Risk factors for development of complication following peripherally inserted central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Aydın

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs are inserted into central veins through the upper extremity veins. In this retrospective study, we aimed to evaluate PICC procedures, related complications, their causes and factors influencing the success of the procedure during anaesthesia Methods: ‘Central Venous Catheterization Forms’ filled out for 850 patients in whom a PICC was inserted by residents during general anaesthesia between November 2009 and March 2013 in the operating room of Uludag University Medical Faculty Hospital were retrospectively analysed. Results: A total of 1174 procedures were evaluated. The most preferred vein for the first attempt was the right basilic vein (32.7%. Difficulty (more than two attempts with the PICC procedure was correlated with the patient’s age (p30 kg/m² (p<0.05, resident with less than 4 years of training (p=0.001, number of PICC attempts ≥2 (p<0.001, more than one resident involved in the catheterization procedure (p<0.001 and previous failed PICC procedures (p<0.001. Conclusion: We conclude that catheterization should be performed under the surveillance of a staff keeping in mind the risks of complications. In the case of failure following 2 attempts, the procedure should be handed over to a more experienced staff member. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (1: 29-35

  20. The insect central complex as model for heterochronic brain development-background, concepts, and tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koniszewski, Nikolaus Dieter Bernhard; Kollmann, Martin; Bigham, Mahdiyeh; Farnworth, Max; He, Bicheng; Büscher, Marita; Hütteroth, Wolf; Binzer, Marlene; Schachtner, Joachim; Bucher, Gregor

    2016-06-01

    The adult insect brain is composed of neuropils present in most taxa. However, the relative size, shape, and developmental timing differ between species. This diversity of adult insect brain morphology has been extensively described while the genetic mechanisms of brain development are studied predominantly in Drosophila melanogaster. However, it has remained enigmatic what cellular and genetic mechanisms underlie the evolution of neuropil diversity or heterochronic development. In this perspective paper, we propose a novel approach to study these questions. We suggest using genome editing to mark homologous neural cells in the fly D. melanogaster, the beetle Tribolium castaneum, and the Mediterranean field cricket Gryllus bimaculatus to investigate developmental differences leading to brain diversification. One interesting aspect is the heterochrony observed in central complex development. Ancestrally, the central complex is formed during embryogenesis (as in Gryllus) but in Drosophila, it arises during late larval and metamorphic stages. In Tribolium, it forms partially during embryogenesis. Finally, we present tools for brain research in Tribolium including 3D reconstruction and immunohistochemistry data of first instar brains and the generation of transgenic brain imaging lines. Further, we characterize reporter lines labeling the mushroom bodies and reflecting the expression of the neuroblast marker gene Tc-asense, respectively.

  1. LIQUID HYDROCARBON FUEL CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A compound anode consists of a reforming catalyst bed in direct contact with a palladium-silver fuel cell anode. The objective of this study was to...prove the feasibility of operating a compound anode fuel cell on a liquid hydrocarbon and to define the important parameters that influence cell...performance. Both reformer and fuel cell tests were conducted with various liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Included in this report is a description of the

  2. Pluripotent stem cells for the study of CNS development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Petros

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian central nervous system is a complex neuronal meshwork consisting of a diverse array of cellular subtypes generated in a precise spatial and temporal pattern throughout development. Achieving a greater understanding of the molecular and genetic mechanisms that direct a relatively uniform population of neuroepithelial progenitors into the diverse neuronal subtypes remains a significant challenge. A firmer knowledge of the fundamental aspects of developmental neuroscience will allow us to better study the vast array of neurodevelopmental diseases. The advent of stem cell technologies has expedited our ability to generate and isolate populations of distinct interneuron subtypes. To date, researchers have successfully developed protocols to derive many types of neural cells from pluripotent stem cells, with varying degrees of efficiencies and reproducibility. The stem cell field is devoted to the potential of stem cell-derived neurons for the treatment of disease, highlighted by the ability to create patient specific induced pluripotent stem cells. However, another application that is often overlooked is the use of stem cell technology for studying normal neural development. This is especially important for human neurodevelopment, since obtaining embryonic tissue presents numerous technical and ethical challenges. In this review, we will explore the use of pluripotent stem cells for the study of neural development. We will review the different classes of pluripotent stem cells and focus on the types of neurodevelopmental questions that stem cell technologies can help address. In addition to covering the different neural cells derived from stem cells to date, we will detail the derivation and characterization of three of the more thoroughly studied cell groups. We hope that this review encourages researchers to develop innovative strategies for using pluripotent stem cells for the study of mammalian, and specifically human

  3. [Ethical justification for human stem cell research. The view of the German Central Ethics Committee for Stem Cell Research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siep, L

    2008-09-01

    According to the German Stem Cell Act the Central Ethics Committee for Stem Cell Research (ZES) advices the competent authority (Robert Koch Institute) as to whether an application to import human embryonic stem-cells for research is "ethically justifiable" ("ethisch vertretbar"). The law does indeed specify some conditions of this justification, but without precisely defining them. This article clarifies the committee's understanding of ethically justifiable research. It deals with misunderstandings of the law and problems involved in its application.

  4. The development of cell lineages: a sequential model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G; Bunce, C M; Lord, J M; McConnell, F M

    1988-12-01

    The concept of cell lineage and the empirical characterization of specific lineages provide valuable insight into the problems of developmental biology. Of central interest is the decision-making process that results in the diversification of cell lines. Studies of the haemopoietic system, in which stem cells can be committed to one of at least six pathways of differentiation, have suggested that the restriction of differentiation potentials is a progressive and stochastic process. We have recently proposed an alternative model which hypothesizes that lineage potentials during haemopoiesis are expressed individually and in a predetermined sequence as progenitor cells mature. The model first arises from experimental studies which show that both normal myeloid progenitor cells and a human promyeloid cell line, which are able to differentiate towards either neutrophils or monocytes, express these potentials sequentially in culture. The close linear relationship between other haemopoietic progenitor cells is inferred from collective data from studies of bipotent progenitor cells and of haemopoietic proliferative disorders. If the development of haemopoietic cell lineages shows a tendency to follow a particular program, such a mechanism is likely to operate throughout development. In this paper we consider the evidence in favour of programmed events within progenitor cells implementing diversification, and the implications of predetermined and restricted pathways of embryonic development.

  5. Development of PEM fuel cell technology at international fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, D.J.

    1996-04-01

    The PEM technology has not developed to the level of phosphoric acid fuel cells. Several factors have held the technology development back such as high membrane cost, sensitivity of PEM fuel cells to low level of carbon monoxide impurities, the requirement to maintain full humidification of the cell, and the need to pressurize the fuel cell in order to achieve the performance targets. International Fuel Cells has identified a hydrogen fueled PEM fuel cell concept that leverages recent research advances to overcome major economic and technical obstacles.

  6. Phenotype of Antigen Unexperienced TH Cells in the Inflamed Central Nervous System in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Sophia; Paterka, Magdalena; Birkenstock, Jerome; Zipp, Frauke; Siffrin, Volker; Witsch, Esther

    2017-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, disseminated inflammation of the central nervous system which is thought to be driven by autoimmune T cells. Genetic association studies in multiple sclerosis and a large number of studies in the animal model of the disease support a role for effector/memory T helper cells. However, the mechanisms underlying relapses, remission and chronic progression in multiple sclerosis or the animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, are not clear. In particular, there is only scarce information on the role of central nervous system-invading naive T helper cells in these processes. By applying two-photon laser scanning microscopy we could show in vivo that antigen unexperienced T helper cells migrated into the deep parenchyma of the inflamed central nervous system in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, independent of their antigen specificity. Using flow cytometric analyses of central nervous system-derived lymphocytes we found that only antigen-specific, formerly naive T helper cells became activated during inflammation of the central nervous system encountering their corresponding antigen.

  7. The allometry of the central nervous system during the postembryonic development of the spider Eratigena atrica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napiórkowska, Teresa; Kobak, Jarosław

    2017-11-01

    During ontogenesis, the size of a spider body, tissues and organs increases dramatically. The aim of the study was to estimate changes in the central nervous system of postembryonic stages of Eratigena atrica and compare them with the literature data on species differing in behavioural traits. Allometric analysis involved evaluation of histological slides embedded in paraffin and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The reduced major axis regression (RMA) was applied to find allometric relationships between the volumes of the particular parts of the body. All the measured parts of the central nervous system (CNS) were negatively allometrically related to the volume of the prosoma, showing that the increment of the CNS was lower than that of the entire body. The growth of the brain was negatively allometrically related to the growth of the CNS but the increment of the subesophageal ganglion was greater than that of the CNS, exhibiting a positive allometry. Within both these structures, the increase in neuropil volume was greater than the growth of the cortex (cell body rind). Thus, in postembryonic development, the share of the subesophageal ganglion and neuropil in the total volume of the CNS increased, whereas that of the brain and cortex decreased. The mode of the CNS development in E. atrica is similar to that observed in other arthropods, including Argiope aurantia, a spider of different ecology and behaviour. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Spectral analysis of ICRF [Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies] wave field measurements in the Tara Central Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.; Golovato, S.N.; Horne, S.F.

    1987-12-01

    A simple spectral analysis technique has been developed to analyse the digital signals from an array of magnetic probes for ICRF field measurements in the Tara Tandem Mirror central cell. The wave dispersion relations of both the applied ICRF and the Alfven Ion Cyclotron Instability have been studied and the waves have been identified as slow in cyclotron waves. The radial profiles of field amplitude and wave vectors were also generated. 9 refs., 10 figs

  9. The thymic orchestration involving Aire, miRNAs and cell-cell interactions during the induction of central tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo eAleixo Passos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Developing thymocytes interact sequentially with two distinct structures within the thymus: the cortex and medulla. Surviving single-positive and double-positive thymocytes from the cortex migrate into the medulla, where they interact with medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs. These cells ectopically express a vast set of peripheral tissue antigens (PTAs, a property termed promiscuous gene expression that is associated with the presentation of PTAs by mTECs to thymocytes. Thymocyte clones that have a high affinity for PTAs are eliminated by apoptosis in a process termed negative selection, which is essential for tolerance induction. The Aire gene is an important factor that controls the expression of a large set of PTAs. In addition to PTAs, Aire also controls the expression of miRNAs in mTECs. These miRNAs are important in the organization of the thymic architecture and act as posttranscriptional controllers of PTAs. Herein, we discuss recent discoveries and highlight open questions regarding the migration and interaction of developing thymocytes with thymic stroma, the ectopic expression of PTAs by mTECs, the association between Aire and miRNAs and its effects on central tolerance.

  10. The role of central nervous system development in late-onset neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palubinsky, Amy M; Martin, Jacob A; McLaughlin, Bethann

    2012-01-01

    The human brain is dependent upon successfully maintaining ionic, energetic and redox homeostasis within exceptionally narrow margins for proper function. The ability of neurons to adapt to genetic and environmental perturbations and evoke a 'new normal' can be most fully appreciated in the context of neurological disorders in which clinical impairments do not manifest until late in life, although dysfunctional proteins are expressed early in development. We now know that proteins controlling ATP generation, mitochondrial stability, and the redox environment are associated with neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Generally, focus is placed on the role that early or long-term environmental stress has in altering the survival of cells targeted by genetic dysfunctions; however, the central nervous system undergoes several periods of intense stress during normal maturation. One of the most profound periods of stress occurs when 50% of neurons are removed via programmed cell death. Unfortunately, we have virtually no understanding of how these events proceed in individuals who harbor mutations that are lethal later in life. Moreover, there is a profound lack of information on circuit formation, cell fate during development and neurochemical compensation in either humans or the animals used to model neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we consider the current knowledge of how energetic and oxidative stress signaling differs between neurons in early versus late stages of life, the influence of a new group of proteins that can integrate cell stress signals at the mitochondrial level, and the growing body of evidence that suggests early development should be considered a critical period for the genesis of chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Shadowing on Apollo 12 Solar Cells and Possible Movement of the ALSEP Central Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Paul A.; Williams, David R.

    2014-01-01

    A fortuitous arrangement of a west-facing solar cell and a bracket on the Apollo 12 ALSEP (Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package) has allowed us to precisely determine the relative position of the Sun near sunset relative to the Apollo 12 central station over a period of nearly 8 years. The small bracket, mounted on the central station due west of the cell, casts a shadow on the cell near sunset, decreasing the output of the cell proportional to the area of shadow covering the cell. The pattern of shadowing by the bracket gives good agreement with the known change of solar azimuth on a yearly timescale, but the pattern gradually but constantly changed from year-to-year, in a manner inconsistent with the known and changing position of the Sun.

  12. Single cell transcriptome profiling of developing chick retinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboissonniere, Lauren A; Martin, Gregory M; Goetz, Jillian J; Bi, Ran; Pope, Brock; Weinand, Kallie; Ellson, Laura; Fru, Diane; Lee, Miranda; Wester, Andrea K; Liu, Peng; Trimarchi, Jeffrey M

    2017-08-15

    The vertebrate retina is a specialized photosensitive tissue comprised of six neuronal and one glial cell types, each of which develops in prescribed proportions at overlapping timepoints from a common progenitor pool. While each of these cells has a specific function contributing to proper vision in the mature animal, their differential representation in the retina as well as the presence of distinctive cellular subtypes makes identifying the transcriptomic signatures that lead to each retinal cell's fate determination and development challenging. We have analyzed transcriptomes from individual cells isolated from the chick retina throughout retinogenesis. While we focused our efforts on the retinal ganglion cells, our transcriptomes of developing chick cells also contained representation from multiple retinal cell types, including photoreceptors and interneurons at different stages of development. Most interesting was the identification of transcriptomes from individual mixed lineage progenitor cells in the chick as these cells offer a window into the cell fate decision-making process. Taken together, these data sets will enable us to uncover the most critical genes acting in the steps of cell fate determination and early differentiation of various retinal cell types. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Bilateral Maxillary Central Incisor Impaction associated with Developing Supernumerary Premolars in the Mandibular Arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitali Mishra

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of 15-year-old girl with bilaterally impacted supernumeraries in the premaxilla region associated with asymptomatic impacted developing supernumerary premolars in the mandibular arch. The supernumeraries of premaxilla region impeded the eruption of the permanent maxillary central incisors. The impacted supernumerary tooth was surgically removed and brackets bonded to the central incisors to apply orthodontic extrusive force which brought the central incisors down to their proper position in the dental arch.

  14. Central giant cell lesion of the mandible in a 2-year old girl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Takaaki; Sue, Mikiko; Okada, Yasuo; Kanri, Yoriaki; Ono, Junya; Ogura, Ichiro [The Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry at Niigata, Niigata (Japan)

    2017-09-15

    Central giant cell lesions are rare, benign, osteolytic, pseudocystic, solitary, localized lesions that are common in the skeletal structure, but less so in the maxillofacial region. Furthermore, to perform panoramic radiography and cone-beam computed tomography, it is necessary to prepare patients properly and to position their heads carefully. However, this can be difficult in pediatric patients, who may be anxious. In this report, we describe the case of a central giant cell lesion of the mandible in a 2-year-old girl that was evaluated with multidetector computed tomography.

  15. Development of Needle Insertion Manipulator for Central Venous Catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yo; Hong, Jaesung; Hamano, Ryutaro; Hashizume, Makoto; Okada, Kaoru; Fujie, Masakatsu G.

    Central venous catheterization is a procedure, which a doctor insert a catheter into the patient’s vein for transfusion. Since there are risks of bleeding from arterial puncture or pneumothorax from pleural puncture. Physicians are strictly required to make needle reach up into the vein and to stop the needle in the middle of vein. We proposed a robot system for assisting the venous puncture, which can relieve the difficulties in conventional procedure, and the risks of complication. This paper reports the design structuring and experimental results of needle insertion manipulator. First, we investigated the relationship between insertion force and angle into the vein. The results indicated that the judgment of perforation using the reaction force is possible in case where the needling angle is from 10 to 20 degree. The experiment to evaluate accuracy of the robot also revealed that it has beyond 0.5 mm accuracy. We also evaluated the positioning accuracy in the ultrasound images. The results displays that the accuracy is beyond 1.0 mm and it has enough for venous puncture. We also carried out the venous puncture experiment to the phantom and confirm our manipulator realized to make needle reach up into the vein.

  16. Central Asia | Page 21 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Language French. Read more about STI for Development in Asia : a Platform for Information Sharing and Learning. Language English. Read more about Toward an Innovation-led Development Path in the Philippines. Language English. Read more about Vers un développement axé sur l'innovation aux Philippines.

  17. Central dogma at the single-molecule level in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gene-Wei; Xie, X Sunney

    2011-07-20

    Gene expression originates from individual DNA molecules within living cells. Like many single-molecule processes, gene expression and regulation are stochastic, that is, sporadic in time. This leads to heterogeneity in the messenger-RNA and protein copy numbers in a population of cells with identical genomes. With advanced single-cell fluorescence microscopy, it is now possible to quantify transcriptomes and proteomes with single-molecule sensitivity. Dynamic processes such as transcription-factor binding, transcription and translation can be monitored in real time, providing quantitative descriptions of the central dogma of molecular biology and the demonstration that a stochastic single-molecule event can determine the phenotype of a cell.

  18. Enhanced microglial clearance of myelin debris in T cell-infiltrated central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helle Hvilsted; Ladeby, Rune; Fenger, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Acute multiple sclerosis lesions are characterized by accumulation of T cells and macrophages, destruction of myelin and oligodendrocytes, and axonal damage. There is, however, limited information on neuroimmune interactions distal to sites of axonal damage in the T cell-infiltrated central nervous...... system. We investigated T-cell infiltration, myelin clearance, microglial activation, and phagocytic activity distal to sites of axonal transection through analysis of the perforant pathway deafferented dentate gyrus in SJL mice that had received T cells specific for myelin basic protein (TMBP...

  19. Central Asia | Page 98 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Saharan Africa: Strengthening Research Capacity. Language English. Read more about Soutien au Conseil arabe des sciences sociales. Language French. Read more about Strengthening Science-based Environmental Policy Development ...

  20. Cell to cell signalling during vertebrate limb bud development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panman, Lia

    2004-01-01

    Communication between cells is essential during embryonic development. The vertebrate limb bud provides us a model to study signalling interactions between cells during patterning of embryonic tissues and organogenesis. In chapter 1 I give an introduction about limb bud development that is focussed

  1. Opportunities for development of ecotourism in central Banat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čučulović Rodoljub

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing interest in the preserved nature caused the emergence of ecotourism as epoch-making tourism activities with minimal impact on environment of tourist destinations and locality. Natural features and protected natural resources of the Middle Banat a good basis for the development of ecotourism, but it is necessary to serious and responsible approach in the planning of tourism development potentials into new usable value.

  2. Central precocious puberty and granulosa cell ovarian tumor in an 8-year old female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Calcaterra

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian tumors associated with hormonal changes of the peripheral iso-sexual precocious puberty are of common presentation. We describe here a rare case of juvenile granulosa cell tumor in a female with central precocious puberty (CPP. An 8-year old girl with CPP presented with vaginal bleeding four months after the diagnosis and before starting treatment with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-analogs. Suppression of basal follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH level, elevation of serum estradiol, progesterone and Cancer Antigen-125 were documented. Abdominal ultrasound examination (US and magnetic resonance imaging showed a pelvic mass affecting the left ovary. A left salpingo-oophorectomy was performed and the mass was totally resected. Juvenile granulosa cell ovarian tumor was diagnosed. One month post surgery, estradiol and progesterone decreased to values of the first evaluation and FSH increased; Cancer Antigen-125 resulted normal while ultrasound pelvic examination showed absence of pelvic masses. In our patient, the tumor had grown very quickly since hormonal data demonstrated a CPP without any evidence of ovarian mass on US only four months before diagnosis. The overstimulation of the FSH or aberrant activation of FSH receptors may have contributed to the development of the mass.

  3. Reactivation of latent HIV-1 in central memory CD4+ T cells through TLR-1/2 stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Novis, Camille L; Archin, Nancie M; Buzon, Maria J; Verdin, Eric; Round, June L; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Margolis, David M; Planelles, Vicente; Bosque, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are crucial for recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by cells of the innate immune system. TLRs are present and functional in CD4+ T cells. Memory CD4+ T cells, predominantly central memory cells (TCM), constitute the main reservoir of latent HIV-1. However, how TLR ligands affect the quiescence of latent HIV within central memory CD4+ T cells has not been studied. ...

  4. Does central bank independence really matter? New evidence for developing countries using a new indicator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, J; Kooi, WJ

    This paper provides a new indicator for central bank independence (CBI) based on the turnover rate of central bank governors for 82 developing countries over the period 1980-1989. Using this new indicator it is concluded that this proxy for CBI is related to inflation, only if the high inflation

  5. Diazepam treatment reduces inflammatory cells and mediators in the central nervous system of rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Hurst, Nicolás; Zanetti, Samanta R; Báez, Natalia S; Bibolini, Mario J; Bouzat, Cecilia; Roth, German A

    2017-12-15

    Benzodiazepines are psychoactive drugs and some of them also affect immune cells. We here characterized the inflammatory and infiltrating immune cells in the central nervous system (CNS) during the acute phase of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in animals treated with Diazepam. Also, we evaluated the expression of Translocator Protein (18kDa) (TSPO), which is a biomarker of neuroinflammatory diseases. The results indicate that Diazepam exerts protective effects on EAE development, decreasing the incidence of the disease and reducing the number of inflammatory cells in CNS, with a concomitant decrease of TSPO levels in brain tissue and CNS inflammatory CD11b + cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mobile fuel cell development at Siemens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, K.

    1992-01-01

    Recent mobile fuel cell developments are reported with particular attention given to fuel cell technology based on photon exchange membrane (PEM) as electrolyte. Advantages of PEM fuel cells over conventional systems include their overload capacity, low power degradation, long lifetime, and the possibility to operate the fuel cell at different temperatures. The PEM fuel cells can be operated with CO2-containing reactants and have a considerable potential for increasing power. These facts make it possible to construct energy storage systems with H2/air fuel cells for electric cars or long-term storage facilities for regenerative energy systems.

  7. Central Asia | Page 24 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Read more about Women and the Justice System in Cambodia. Language English. Read more about Traumatismes, développement et consolidation de la paix : vers une approche psychologique intégrée. Language French. Read more about Trauma, Development and Peacebuilding : Toward an Integrated Psychological ...

  8. Central Asia | Page 70 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Language English. Read more about Démocratie et le développement dans le monde arabe. Language French. Read more about Democracy and Development in the Arab World. Language English. Read more about Focus Cities : Economic Incentives for Improving Water, Sanitation and Solid Waste Services in Jakarta ...

  9. Central Asia | Page 89 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Tourism is an important driver of economic growth throughout Southeast Asia. However, a booming tourism industry has caused dramatic changes to populations and ecosystems through rapid urbanization, extensive land development, and the exploitation of natural resources. Overburdened health systems and weak ...

  10. Central Asia | Page 9 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Read more about Programme de chercheurs invités du Center for Global Development. Language French. Read more about Une nouvelle vision de la transition en Syrie. Language French. Read more about Élaboration de protocoles facilitant l'application des lois en matière de violence sexuelle et de violence conjugale.

  11. Dynamics of small ruminant development in Central Java-Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gede Suparta Budisatria, I.

    2006-01-01

    Small ruminants are an important but neglected resource in developing countries. Small ruminant production systems are complex. The multiple goals related to small ruminants, combined with the complexity of their management, and the resources and social arrangements involved, make small ruminants

  12. Central Asia | Page 88 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Tourism is an important driver of economic growth throughout Southeast Asia. However, a booming tourism industry has caused dramatic changes to populations and ecosystems through rapid urbanization, extensive land development, and the exploitation of natural resources. Overburdened health systems and weak ...

  13. Central Asia | Page 68 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Read more about ICTs and Urban Micro Enterprises : Maximizing Opportunities for Economic Development. Language English. Read more about Socioeconomic Impacts of Avian Influenza on Small and Backyard Poultry Producers in Asia. Language English. Read more about Répercussions socioéconomiques de la ...

  14. Central Asia | Page 59 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Read more about Telecentre Network Startup : Bangladesh - Mission 2011. Language English. Read more about Public Audit of Local Area Development Fund in Meghalaya. Language English. Read more about La participation des femmes et la décentralisation. Language French. Read more about Women's Participation ...

  15. Central Asia | Page 83 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Language French. Read more about Mobilizing Private Sector Investment in Adaptation to Climate Change. Language English. Read more about Global Partnership on Open Data for Development. Language English. Read more about Trade-Related Challenges to Tobacco Control in Southeast Asia. Language English.

  16. Central Asia | Page 29 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Language French. Read more about Information and Communication Technologies for Development in the Middle East : Exploration. Language English. Read more about Improving Flood Plain Management through Adaptive Learning Networks (Bangladesh). Language English. Read more about Amélioration de la ...

  17. Central Asia | Page 90 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Read more about Shifting Cultivation : Promoting Innovative Policy and Development Options in the Eastern Himalayas. Language English. Read more about Agriculture itinérante : promotion de solutions novatrices en matière de politiques et de développement dans l'est de l'Himalaya. Language French. Read more about ...

  18. Central Asia | Page 28 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Language French. Read more about Strengthening Science-based Environmental Policy Development in Burma's Democratic Transition. Language English. Read more about Élaboration d'une politique environnementale reposant sur des données scientifiques dans le cadre de la transition démocratique en Birmanie.

  19. Central Asia | Page 80 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Language French. Read more about Éviter la reprise des conflits par des règlements politiques inclusifs. Language French. Read more about Recherche sur les ressources éducatives libres au service du développement. Language French. Read more about Research into Open Educational Resources for Development.

  20. Cape Town's central city development: A strategy of partnership and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By critically examining the role that inclusionary housing policies, public transportation, and increased economic opportunities play in a more .... strengthening economic and social connections to the benefit of the wider metropolitan region. 2. ... Western Cape, local businesses and other urban development stakeholders,.

  1. Central Asia | Page 72 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Read more about Société de l'information pour le Sud. Language French. Read more about Gender and Taxation : Improving Revenue Generation and Social Protection in Developing Countries. Language English. Read more about Incidence de la taxation selon le sexe : améliorer la production de revenus et la protection ...

  2. Central Asia | Page 12 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Language French. Read more about Élaborer un modèle d'équilibre général dynamique et stochastique pour l'économie indienne. Language French. Read more about Developing a Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Model for the Indian Economy. Language English. Read more about ITT - Fonds d'activités du BRA ...

  3. Central giant cell granulomas of the jaws: phenotype and proliferation-associated markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, M; Pogrel, M A; Stewart, J C; Silva, R G; Regezi, J A

    1997-04-01

    Central giant cell granulomas (CGCGs) are jaw tumors of unknown origin that often exhibit an aggressive, though unpredictable, clinical course. The purpose of this study was to determine the immunoprofile of the mononuclear cells that seem to be responsible for the biologic behavior of these tumors. Numbers of cells in cell cycle were also determined and compared in clinically aggressive and non-aggressive CGCGs. Sixteen aggressive and 12 non-aggressive CGCGs were immunohistochemically stained with antibodies to CD34, CD68, factor XIIIa, alpha-smooth muscle actin, prolyl 4-hydroxylase, Ki-67, and p53 protein. Cell populations and numbers of cells in cell cycle were determined through microscopic quantitative assessment. CD34-positive cells were limited to support vessels. CD68-positive mononuclear cells constituted a small population of cells in all tumors. With two exceptions, factor XIIIa-positive cells were rarely seen. Alpha-smooth muscle actin staining was present in approximately half the tumors, and occasionally large numbers of positive cells were seen. Most mononuclear cells were positive for fibroblast-associated antigen. No phenotypic differences were detected between aggressive and non-aggressive tumors. P53 protein did not appear to be overexpressed in CGCGs. Ki-67 staining showed that only mononuclear cells were in cell cycle, and that there were no differences between aggressive and non-aggressive tumors. We conclude that CGCGs are primarily fibroblastic (and myofibroblastic) tumors in which macrophages appear to play a secondary role. Tumor cells show no differentiation toward endothelial cells or macrophage-related dendrocytes (factor XIIIa). Cellular phenotypes and numbers of cells in cell cycle are similar in both aggressive and non-aggressive tumors.

  4. Regression of central giant cell granuloma by a combination of imatinib and interferon: a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, Jan; van Rijn, Rick R.; van den Berg, Henk; van den Akker, Hans P.

    2009-01-01

    Central giant cell granuloma is a benign lesion of the jaws which is sometimes aggressive locally. The most common treatment is curettage which has a high recurrence rate. particularly, in more aggressive lesions. Other treatments Such as interferon (IFN) and calcitonin have been described. We

  5. Risk Factors for Subsequent Central Nervous System Tumors in Pediatric Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabriel, Melissa; Shaw, Bronwen E; Brazauskas, Ruta

    2017-01-01

    Survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) are at risk of subsequent solid tumors, including central nervous system (CNS) tumors. The risk of CNS tumors after HCT in pediatric HCT recipients is not known. We evaluated the incidence and risk factors for CNS tumors in pediatric recipients...

  6. Single cell cultures of Drosophila neuroectodermal and mesectodermal central nervous system progenitors reveal different degrees of developmental autonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Technau Gerhard M; Lüer Karin

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The Drosophila embryonic central nervous system (CNS) develops from two sets of progenitor cells, neuroblasts and ventral midline progenitors, which behave differently in many respects. Neuroblasts derive from the neurogenic region of the ectoderm and form the lateral parts of the CNS. Ventral midline precursors are formed by two rows of mesectodermal cells and build the CNS midline. There is plenty of evidence that individual identities are conferred to precursor cells by...

  7. Cytoview: Development of a cell modelling framework

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-07-06

    Jul 6, 2007 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 32; Issue 5. Cytoview: Development of a cell modelling framework ... The framework serves as a first step in integrating different levels of data available for a biological cell and has the potential to lead to development of computational models in our pursuit to ...

  8. Keeping the Rhythm : Cardiac Pacemaker Cell Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burkhard, Silja

    2017-01-01

    The heart is the first organ to form and function in the developing vertebrate embryo. Its proper morphogenesis and function is crucial for survival. Here we focus on the development and characterization of a highly specialized subset of cardiac cells, the pacemaker cells. In the mammalian heart,

  9. Development of a central nervous system axonal myelination assay for high throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lariosa-Willingham, Karen D; Rosler, Elen S; Tung, Jay S; Dugas, Jason C; Collins, Tassie L; Leonoudakis, Dmitri

    2016-04-22

    Regeneration of new myelin is impaired in persistent multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions, leaving neurons unable to function properly and subject to further degeneration. Current MS therapies attempt to ameliorate autoimmune-mediated demyelination, but none directly promote the regeneration of lost and damaged myelin of the central nervous system (CNS). Development of new drugs that stimulate remyelination has been hampered by the inability to evaluate axonal myelination in a rapid CNS culture system. We established a high throughput cell-based assay to identify compounds that promote myelination. Culture methods were developed for initiating myelination in vitro using primary embryonic rat cortical cells. We developed an immunofluorescent phenotypic image analysis method to quantify the morphological alignment of myelin characteristic of the initiation of myelination. Using γ-secretase inhibitors as promoters of myelination, the optimal growth, time course and compound treatment conditions were established in a 96 well plate format. We have characterized the cortical myelination assay by evaluating the cellular composition of the cultures and expression of markers of differentiation over the time course of the assay. We have validated the assay scalability and consistency by screening the NIH clinical collection library of 727 compounds and identified ten compounds that promote myelination. Half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values for these compounds were determined to rank them according to potency. We have designed the first high capacity in vitro assay that assesses myelination of live axons. This assay will be ideal for screening large compound libraries to identify new drugs that stimulate myelination. Identification of agents capable of promoting the myelination of axons will likely lead to the development of new therapeutics for MS patients.

  10. Central muscarinic cholinergic activation alters interaction between splenic dendritic cell and CD4+CD25- T cells in experimental colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peris Munyaka

    Full Text Available The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP is based on vagus nerve (VN activity that regulates macrophage and dendritic cell responses in the spleen through alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7nAChR signaling. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients present dysautonomia with decreased vagus nerve activity, dendritic cell and T cell over-activation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether central activation of the CAP alters the function of dendritic cells (DCs and sequential CD4+/CD25-T cell activation in the context of experimental colitis.The dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid model of experimental colitis in C57BL/6 mice was used. Central, intracerebroventricular infusion of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist McN-A-343 was used to activate CAP and vagus nerve and/or splenic nerve transection were performed. In addition, the role of α7nAChR signaling and the NF-kB pathway was studied. Serum amyloid protein (SAP-A, colonic tissue cytokines, IL-12p70 and IL-23 in isolated splenic DCs, and cytokines levels in DC-CD4+CD25-T cell co-culture were determined.McN-A-343 treatment reduced colonic inflammation associated with decreased pro-inflammatory Th1/Th17 colonic and splenic cytokine secretion. Splenic DCs cytokine release was modulated through α7nAChR and the NF-kB signaling pathways. Cholinergic activation resulted in decreased CD4+CD25-T cell priming. The anti-inflammatory efficacy of central cholinergic activation was abolished in mice with vagotomy or splenic neurectomy.Suppression of splenic immune cell activation and altered interaction between DCs and T cells are important aspects of the beneficial effect of brain activation of the CAP in experimental colitis. These findings may lead to improved therapeutic strategies in the treatment of IBD.

  11. Contrasting ERP absorption between transition and developed economies from Central and Eastern Europe (CEE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernroider, Edward W.N.; Sudzina, Frantisek; Pucihar, Andreja

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates Enterprise Resource Planning absorption in transition and developed economies in Central and Eastern Europe. Using absorptive capacity theory and data envelopment analysis, we view organizational transformation in Enterprise Resource Planning absorption as an economic...

  12. Development of the central nervous system in guinea pig (Cavia porcellus, Rodentia, Caviidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Fernanda Menezes de Oliveira e; Alcantara, Dayane; Carvalho, Rafael Cardoso; Favaron, Phelipe Oliveira; Santos, Amilton Cesar dos; Viana, Diego Carvalho; Miglino, Maria Angelica

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: This study describes the development of the central nervous system in guinea pigs from 12th day post conception (dpc) until birth. Totally, 41 embryos and fetuses were analyzed macroscopically and by means of light and electron microscopy. The neural tube closure was observed at day 14 and the development of the spinal cord and differentiation of the primitive central nervous system vesicles was on 20th dpc. Histologically, undifferentiated brain tissue was observed as a mass of mes...

  13. Development of Botanical Composition in Maribaya Pasture, Brebes, Central Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umami, N.; Ngadiyono, N.; Panjono; Agus, F. N.; Shirothul, H. M.; Budisatria, I. G. S.; Hendrawati, Y.; Subroto, I.

    2018-02-01

    The research was aimed to observe the development of botanical composition in Maribaya pastures. The sampling method was cluster random sampling. The observed variables were the type of forages and the botanical composition in the pasture. Botanical composition was measured by using Line Intercept method and the production was measured by the estimation of botany production for each square meter using its dry matter measurement. The botani sampling was performed using square with size of 1×1 m2. The observation was performed before the pasture made (at 2015) and after the pasture made (at 2017). Based on the research result, it was found that there was significant difference between the forage type in the pasture at 2015 and at 2017. It happens due to the adjustment for the Jabres cattle feed.

  14. American fuel cell market development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, E. A.

    1992-01-01

    Over the past three decades several attempts have been made to introduce fuel cells into commercial markets. The prospective users recognized the attractive features of fuel cells, however they were unwilling to pay a premium for the features other than the easily-calculated fuel cost savings. There was no accepted method for a user to calculate and the accrue the economic value of the other features. The situation is changing. The Clean Air Act signed into law by President Bush on November 15, 1990, mandates a nation wide reduction in SO 2, NO x and ozone emissions. This law affects specific utilities for SO 2 reduction, and specific regions of the country for NO x and ozone reductions — the latter affecting the utility-, industrial- and transportation-sectors in these regions. The Act does not direct how the reductions are to be achieved; but it specifically establishes a trading market for emission allowances whereby an organization that reduces emissions below its target can sell its unused allowance to another organization. In addition to the Clean Air Act, there are other environmental issues emerging such as controls on CO 2 emissions, possible expansion of the list of controlled emissions, mandated use of alternative fuels in specific transportation districts and restrictions on electrical transmission systems. All of these so-called 'environmental externalities' are now recognized as having a real cost that can be quantified, and factored in to calculations to determine the relative economic standing of various technologies. This in turn justifies a premium price for fuel cells hence the renewed interest in the technology by the utility and transportation market segments.

  15. Neural Stem Cells: Implications for the Conventional Radiotherapy of Central Nervous System Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barani, Igor J.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Lin, Peck-Sun

    2007-01-01

    Advances in basic neuroscience related to neural stem cells and their malignant counterparts are challenging traditional models of central nervous system tumorigenesis and intrinsic brain repair. Neurogenesis persists into adulthood predominantly in two neurogenic centers: subventricular zone and subgranular zone. Subventricular zone is situated adjacent to lateral ventricles and subgranular zone is confined to the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Neural stem cells not only self-renew and differentiate along multiple lineages in these regions, but also contribute to intrinsic brain plasticity and repair. Ionizing radiation can depopulate these exquisitely sensitive regions directly or impair in situ neurogenesis by indirect, dose-dependent and inflammation-mediated mechanisms, even at doses <2 Gy. This review discusses the fundamental neural stem cell concepts within the framework of cumulative clinical experience with the treatment of central nervous system malignancies using conventional radiotherapy

  16. Central sensitization associated with low fetal hemoglobin levels in adults with sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbari, Deepika S; Vaughan, Kathleen J; Roskom, Katherine; Seamon, Cassie; Diaw, Lena; Quinn, Meghan; Conrey, Anna; Schechter, Alan N; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Waclawiw, Myron A; Wallen, Gwenyth R; Belfer, Inna; Taylor, James G

    2017-10-01

    Pain is the hallmark of sickle cell anemia (SCA), presenting as recurrent acute events or chronic pain. Central sensitization, or enhanced excitability of the central nervous system, alters pain processing and contributes to the maintenance of chronic pain. Individuals with SCA demonstrate enhanced sensitivity to painful stimuli however central mechanisms of pain have not been fully explored. We hypothesized that adults with SCA would show evidence of central sensitization as observed in other diseases of chronic pain. We conducted a prospective study of static and dynamic quantitative sensory tests in 30 adults with SCA and 30 matched controls. Static thermal testing using cold stimuli showed lower pain thresholds (p=0.04) and tolerance (p=0.04) in sickle cell subjects, but not for heat. However, SCA subjects reported higher pain ratings with random heat pulses (pcentral sensitization in SCA. The association with fetal hemoglobin suggests this known SCA modifier may have a therapeutic role in modulating central sensitization. Copyright © 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain. All rights reserved.

  17. Endoderm Generates Endothelial Cells during Liver Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orit Goldman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Organogenesis requires expansion of the embryonic vascular plexus that migrates into developing organs through a process called angiogenesis. Mesodermal progenitors are thought to derive endothelial cells (ECs that contribute to both embryonic vasculogenesis and the subsequent organ angiogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that during development of the liver, which is an endoderm derivative, a subset of ECs is generated from FOXA2+ endoderm-derived fetal hepatoblast progenitor cells expressing KDR (VEGFR2/FLK-1. Using human and mouse embryonic stem cell models, we demonstrate that KDR+FOXA2+ endoderm cells developing in hepatic differentiation cultures generate functional ECs. This introduces the concept that ECs originate not exclusively from mesoderm but also from endoderm, supported in Foxa2 lineage-tracing mouse embryos by the identification of FOXA2+ cell-derived CD31+ ECs that integrate the vascular network of developing fetal livers.

  18. Programmed Cell Death During Caenorhabditis elegans Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradt, Barbara; Wu, Yi-Chun; Xue, Ding

    2016-08-01

    Programmed cell death is an integral component of Caenorhabditis elegans development. Genetic and reverse genetic studies in C. elegans have led to the identification of many genes and conserved cell death pathways that are important for the specification of which cells should live or die, the activation of the suicide program, and the dismantling and removal of dying cells. Molecular, cell biological, and biochemical studies have revealed the underlying mechanisms that control these three phases of programmed cell death. In particular, the interplay of transcriptional regulatory cascades and networks involving multiple transcriptional regulators is crucial in activating the expression of the key death-inducing gene egl-1 and, in some cases, the ced-3 gene in cells destined to die. A protein interaction cascade involving EGL-1, CED-9, CED-4, and CED-3 results in the activation of the key cell death protease CED-3, which is tightly controlled by multiple positive and negative regulators. The activation of the CED-3 caspase then initiates the cell disassembly process by cleaving and activating or inactivating crucial CED-3 substrates; leading to activation of multiple cell death execution events, including nuclear DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial elimination, phosphatidylserine externalization, inactivation of survival signals, and clearance of apoptotic cells. Further studies of programmed cell death in C. elegans will continue to advance our understanding of how programmed cell death is regulated, activated, and executed in general. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  19. Radiosensitivity of the developing central nervous system: an important question in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Maria del R.; Gisone, Pablo A.; Dubner, Diana L.; Robello, Elizabeth; Michelin, Severino C.

    2004-01-01

    The high radiosensitivity of the human developing brain has been demonstrated by epidemiological data . The maximal incidence of microcephaly and mental retardation in the Hiroshima and Nagasaki cohort was observed among survivors exposed between 8 and 15 weeks of gestation. Experimental studies indicate that this period corresponds to gestational days (g.d.) 14-18 in the rat. Apoptosis, the typical mode of radiation-induced cell death in developing Central Nervous System (CNS), is closely related with the oxidative status. Enhanced radiation-induced generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) has been observed after low-dose radiation exposure, leading to the amplification of signal transduction and further molecular and cellular radiation-responses. This study is an attempt to address the participation of ROS/RNS in the early radiation-induced apoptosis of neural cortical precursors. Cortical cells obtained from Wistar rat fetuses at 17 g.d. were irradiated with a dose of 2 Gy at a dose-rate of 0.3 Gy/minute. Nitric oxide (NO) content estimated by measuring the stable products NO 2 and NO 3 released to the culture medium, has shown a time-dependent accumulation from 30 min post-irradiation (pi). ROS/RNS content was determined by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. A significant decrease of chemiluminescence was evident 30 min pi, reaching basal levels at 120 min, followed by an important augmentation by 4 hs after irradiation. The early decrease in ROS/RNS was not observed in samples irradiated in the presence of L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. Incubations with superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) decreased significantly the chemiluminescence in irradiated samples. Apoptotic cell death, already evident from 4 hs pi., was significantly increased in irradiated cells after incubation with L-NAME. We conclude that ROS/RNS play a pivotal role in the early signaling pathway leading to a radiation-induced cell death of cortical

  20. Superficiary Right of Building: Origin and Development in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Pavel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Czech Republic has been dealing for the last four years with a legal revolution in the field of private law. A new Civil Code was adopted in 2012 and many new and forgotten legal figures were restored in the text of the code. An interesting example of forgotten legal figures is the superficiary right of building, which has again entered the legal order of the Czech Republic after a long one hundred years. Unlike the Act on the Superficiary Right of Building of 1912, the new Civil Code extends the scope of persons that may create the superficiary right of building to their land. This should eliminate the obstacle that has substantially limited its wider use. The superficiary right of building is not likely to become a legal concept very frequently seen in public registers. The aim of this paper is, therefore, a reflection on divided ownership and the purpose and genesis of the superficiary right of building in relation to its origins, as well as a prediction of future developments of this legal concept in the real estate market. To analyse the concept, the paper employs formal and legal methods (logical, grammatical and historical method. A comparative study is conducted in the spirit of the comparative method. The superficiary right of building is a suitable complement to the range of options of property rights offered by the new Civil Code. The author concludes that the use of the superficiary right of building, although not limited in comparison with the 1912 Act, will likely be less frequent and focused on longer-term projects.

  1. Development of Passive Fuel Cell Thermal Management Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian J.; Colozza, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced passive thermal management technology to reduce the mass and improve the reliability of space fuel cell systems for the NASA Exploration program. The passive thermal management system relies on heat conduction within highly thermally conductive cooling plates to move the heat from the central portion of the cell stack out to the edges of the fuel cell stack. Using the passive approach eliminates the need for a coolant pump and other cooling loop components within the fuel cell system which reduces mass and improves overall system reliability. Previous development demonstrated the performance of suitable highly thermally conductive cooling plates that could conduct the heat, provide a sufficiently uniform temperature heat sink for each cell of the fuel cell stack, and be substantially lighter than the conventional thermal management approach. Tests were run with different materials to evaluate the design approach to a heat exchanger that could interface with the edges of the passive cooling plates. Measurements were made during fuel cell operation to determine the temperature of individual cooling plates and also to determine the temperature uniformity from one cooling plate to another.

  2. Maintainability considerations for the central cell in WITAMIR-I, a conceptual design of a tandem mirror fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1980-10-01

    The concepts for maintaining the central cell reactor components for WITAMIR-I are described. WITAMIR-I is a conceptual tandem mirror fusion power reactor utilizing thermal barriers designed by the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Unique solutions to the difficult problems of routine blanket replacement and maintenance are proposed. Solutions are also proposed for maintaining the central cell coils and the shield

  3. Does the preference of peripheral versus central venous access in peripheral blood stem cell collection/yield change stem cell kinetics in autologous stem cell transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogu, Mehmet Hilmi; Kaya, Ali Hakan; Berber, Ilhami; Sari, İsmail; Tekgündüz, Emre; Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Iskender, Dicle; Kayıkçı, Ömur; Kuku, Irfan; Kaya, Emin; Keskin, Ali; Altuntaş, Fevzi

    2016-02-01

    Central venous access is often used during apheresis procedure in stem cell collection. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether central or peripheral venous access has an effect on stem cell yield and the kinetics of the procedure and the product in patients undergoing ASCT after high dose therapy. A total of 327 patients were retrospectively reviewed. The use of peripheral venous access for stem cell yield was significantly more frequent in males compared to females (p = 0.005). Total volume of the product was significantly lower in central venous access group (p = 0.046). As being a less invasive procedure, peripheral venous access can be used for stem cell yield in eligible selected patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. IMPACT OF CENTRAL SURGICAL REVIEW IN A STUDY OF MALIGNANT GERM CELL TUMORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billmire, Deborah F.; Rescorla, Frederick J.; Ross, Jonathan H.; Schlatter, Marc G.; Dicken, Bryan J.; Krailo, Mark D.; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Olson, Thomas A.; Cullen, John W.; Frazier, A. Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Verification of surgical staging has received little attention in clinical oncology trials for both children and adults. Central surgical review in a study of malignant pediatric germ cell tumors provided an opportunity to assess the impact of this process. METHODS Children’s Oncology Group study AGCT0132 data submission at study entry required operative note, surgical checklist, pathology and imaging reports. Central surgical review during the study included assessment for completeness of submitted data and confirmation of assigned stage. Review resulted in one of three conclusions: assigned status confirmed, assignment withheld pending review of additional information requested, or institutional assignment of stage disputed with reasons for recommended stage assignment explained. Changes in stage assignment based on central surgical review were left at the discretion of the enrolling institution. RESULTS 206 patients underwent central review. Failure to submit required data elements or need for clarification was noted in 40%. Disagreement with stage assignment occurred in 10%; the highest rate of discordance was in ovarian tumors submitted as stage I (34%). 17 of 21 discordant patients were reassigned to the stage recommended by central review. 4 patients with ovarian tumors not meeting central review criteria for Stage I remained in that stratum by institutional decision. Two-year event free survival (EFS) in Stage I ovarian tumor patients was 25% (1/4) for discordant patients compared to 57% (9/21) in patients who met Stage I criteria by central review. CONCLUSIONS Central review of stage assignment by a dedicated study surgeon improved collection of complete data and assignment of correct tumor stage at study entry, and allowed for prompt initiation of chemotherapy in patients determined not to have Stage I disease. PMID:25783295

  5. Logical development of the cell ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Terrence F; Masci, Anna Maria; Abdulla, Amina; Cowell, Lindsay G; Blake, Judith A; Mungall, Christopher J; Diehl, Alexander D

    2011-01-05

    The Cell Ontology (CL) is an ontology for the representation of in vivo cell types. As biological ontologies such as the CL grow in complexity, they become increasingly difficult to use and maintain. By making the information in the ontology computable, we can use automated reasoners to detect errors and assist with classification. Here we report on the generation of computable definitions for the hematopoietic cell types in the CL. Computable definitions for over 340 CL classes have been created using a genus-differentia approach. These define cell types according to multiple axes of classification such as the protein complexes found on the surface of a cell type, the biological processes participated in by a cell type, or the phenotypic characteristics associated with a cell type. We employed automated reasoners to verify the ontology and to reveal mistakes in manual curation. The implementation of this process exposed areas in the ontology where new cell type classes were needed to accommodate species-specific expression of cellular markers. Our use of reasoners also inferred new relationships within the CL, and between the CL and the contributing ontologies. This restructured ontology can be used to identify immune cells by flow cytometry, supports sophisticated biological queries involving cells, and helps generate new hypotheses about cell function based on similarities to other cell types. Use of computable definitions enhances the development of the CL and supports the interoperability of OBO ontologies.

  6. Logical Development of the Cell Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake Judith A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Cell Ontology (CL is an ontology for the representation of in vivo cell types. As biological ontologies such as the CL grow in complexity, they become increasingly difficult to use and maintain. By making the information in the ontology computable, we can use automated reasoners to detect errors and assist with classification. Here we report on the generation of computable definitions for the hematopoietic cell types in the CL. Results Computable definitions for over 340 CL classes have been created using a genus-differentia approach. These define cell types according to multiple axes of classification such as the protein complexes found on the surface of a cell type, the biological processes participated in by a cell type, or the phenotypic characteristics associated with a cell type. We employed automated reasoners to verify the ontology and to reveal mistakes in manual curation. The implementation of this process exposed areas in the ontology where new cell type classes were needed to accommodate species-specific expression of cellular markers. Our use of reasoners also inferred new relationships within the CL, and between the CL and the contributing ontologies. This restructured ontology can be used to identify immune cells by flow cytometry, supports sophisticated biological queries involving cells, and helps generate new hypotheses about cell function based on similarities to other cell types. Conclusion Use of computable definitions enhances the development of the CL and supports the interoperability of OBO ontologies.

  7. Development of induction cells at CAEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Huacen; Zhang Kaizhi; Cheng Nian'an; Zhang Wenwei; Lai Qinggui; Wen Long; Zhang Linwen; Deng Jianjun; Ding Bonan

    2002-01-01

    The effects to develop induction cells for induction linac and radiography at CAEP are introduced and reviewed in this paper. During the past two decades, several kinds of cells have been designed and tested, and some of them have been used for construction of induction linac, such as Dragon-1 and 12 MeV, and a Synthetic Test Stand (STS) for comprehensive linac technology study. The structure, test results and performance in the induction linac of these cells are given

  8. Hypertranscription in development, stem cells, and regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percharde, Michelle; Bulut-Karslioglu, Aydan; Ramalho-Santos, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Cells can globally up-regulate their transcriptome during specific transitions, a phenomenon called hypertranscription. Evidence for hypertranscription dates back over 70 years, but it has gone largely ignored in the genomics era until recently. We discuss data supporting the notion that hypertranscription is a unifying theme in embryonic development, stem cell biology, regeneration and cell competition. We review the history, methods for analysis, underlying mechanisms and biological significance of hypertranscription. PMID:27989554

  9. Space solar cell technology development - A perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Monck, J.

    1982-01-01

    The developmental history of photovoltaics is examined as a basis for predicting further advances to the year 2000. Transistor technology was the precursor of solar cell development. Terrestrial cells were modified for space through changes in geometry and size, as well as the use of Ag-Ti contacts and manufacture of a p-type base. The violet cell was produced for Comsat, and involved shallow junctions, new contacts, and an enhanced antireflection coating for better radiation tolerance. The driving force was the desire by private companies to reduce cost and weight for commercial satellite power supplies. Liquid phase epitaxial (LPE) GaAs cells are the latest advancement, having a 4 sq cm area and increased efficiency. GaAs cells are expected to be flight ready in the 1980s. Testing is still necessary to verify production techniques and the resistance to electron and photon damage. Research will continue in CVD cell technology, new panel technology, and ultrathin Si cells.

  10. Central giant cell granuloma of the jaws: clinical and radiological evaluation of 22 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Zhi-Jun; Cai, Yu; Zhao, Yi-Fang; Zwahlen, Roger A.; Zheng, Yun-Fei; Wang, Shi-Ping

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the clinical and radiological characteristics of central giant cell granulomas (CGCGs) of the jaws. A retrospective analysis of a 20-year database was performed regarding both clinical and radiological features of 22 patients affected with CGCGs of the jaws. Fourteen women and 8 men were included with the age range of 7-81 years (mean 31.7 years). Among the 22 lesions, 16 were located in the mandible and 6 in the maxilla. Painless swelling was the most common clinical feature in 18 of all cases. Limited mouth opening was noted in 2 patients where the lesions involved the condyle. Radiographically, 13 lesions were homogeneously osteolytic and 9 lesions were trabeculated. Fifteen lesions were unilocular and 14 lesions presented with well-defined but not sclerotic margins. CT images in 5 patients clearly showed the trabeculation within the lesions. The follow-up ranged from 1.5 to 11 years with a mean period of 5 years. Three out of 9 aggressive and 1 out of 13 nonaggressive lesions developed recurrence. Diagnosis of CGCGs of the jaws depends on both correct interpretation of clinical, radiographic and pathological data. Differentiation between aggressive and nonaggressive CGCGs should be considered to improve individual treatment planning. (orig.)

  11. Extracellular matrix, cell skeletons, and embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, E D

    1989-09-01

    During embryonic development, the extracellular matrix (ECM) promotes the production of differentiated products by epithelial cells and the migration of mesenchymal cells, and probably also plays a role in epithelial-mesenchymal transformation. Here we examine the role of the cell skeleton (actin, microtubules, intermediate filaments) in mediating matrix effects on mesenchymal cell morphology, migration, and formation. The interaction of both epithelial cells and mesenchymal cells with ECM seems to involve the actin cortex, which is best developed in the base of the epithelial cell, where it attaches to underlying matrix via membrane-intercalated receptors. To interact with the matrix, the fibroblast has appropriate ECM receptors and an actin cortex around the whole cell. The actin cortex is absolutely required for assumption of bipolar shape, elongation, and movement through the matrix. Since the cortex seems to be anchored to the matrix, it is unlikely that it moves during cell migration. A new hypothesis states that the microtubule- and intermediate filament-rich endoplasm, containing the nucleus, moves past the actin cortex-receptor-matrix complex into the newly synthesized front end of the mesenchymal cell to effect forward movement. When epithelial cells transform into mesenchyme in the embryo, or when they are induced to do this in vitro, they switch from the keratin intermediate filament profile to one rich in vimentin, and the effect of cell matrix interaction on cell shape is profoundly altered. Vimentin-actin interactions with ECM may be a major factor in the ability of a cell to become mesenchymal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. The fuel cell; development and possibilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rijnsoever, J.W.M.

    Activities on fuel cells and fuel cell development in the USA and Japan are surveyed. Possibilities for large scale application are mentioned. Attention is given to efficiency and environmental aspects. There are no problems about hazardous emissions. Besides electric power some heat is generated, which is not always a disadvantage. In many cases both are useful products. (A.V.)

  13. The chronically inflamed central nervous system provides niches for long-lived plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollok, Karolin; Mothes, Ronja; Ulbricht, Carolin; Liebheit, Alina; Gerken, Jan David; Uhlmann, Sylvia; Paul, Friedemann; Niesner, Raluca; Radbruch, Helena; Hauser, Anja Erika

    2017-11-25

    Although oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid have been a hallmark of multiple sclerosis diagnosis for over three decades, the role of antibody-secreting cells in multiple sclerosis remains unclear. T and B cells are critical for multiple sclerosis pathogenesis, but increasing evidence suggests that plasma cells also contribute, through secretion of autoantibodies. Long-lived plasma cells are known to drive various chronic inflammatory conditions as e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus, however, to what extent they are present in autoimmune central nervous system inflammation has not yet been investigated. In brain biopsies from multiple sclerosis patients and other neurological diseases, we could detect non-proliferating plasma cells (CD138 + Ki67 - ) in the parenchyma. Based on this finding, we hypothesized that long-lived plasma cells can persist in the central nervous system (CNS). In order to test this hypothesis, we adapted the multiple sclerosis mouse model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis to generate a B cell memory response. Plasma cells were found in the meninges and the parenchyma of the inflamed spinal cord, surrounded by tissue areas resembling survival niches for these cells, characterized by an up-regulation of chemokines (CXCL12), adhesion molecules (VCAM-1) and survival factors (APRIL and BAFF). In order to determine the lifetime of plasma cells in the chronically inflamed CNS, we labeled the DNA of proliferating cells with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). Up to five weeks later, we could detect EdU + long-lived plasma cells in the murine CNS. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing non-proliferating plasma cells directly in the target tissue of a chronic inflammation in humans, as well as the first evidence demonstrating the ability of plasma cells to persist in the CNS, and the ability of the chronically inflamed CNS tissue to promote this persistence. Hence, our results suggest that the CNS provides survival niches for

  14. Development of Cell Analysis Software for Cultivated Corneal Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Naoki; Ishida, Naoya; Kakutani, Kazuya; Hongo, Akane; Hiwa, Satoru; Hiroyasu, Tomoyuki; Koizumi, Noriko

    2017-11-01

    To develop analysis software for cultured human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs). Software was designed to recognize cell borders and to provide parameters such as cell density, coefficient of variation, and polygonality of cultured HCECs based on phase contrast images. Cultured HCECs with high or low cell density were incubated with Ca-free and Mg-free phosphate-buffered saline for 10 minutes to reveal the cell borders and were then analyzed with software (n = 50). Phase contrast images showed that cell borders were not distinctly outlined, but these borders became more distinctly outlined after phosphate-buffered saline treatment and were recognized by cell analysis software. The cell density value provided by software was similar to that obtained using manual cell counting by an experienced researcher. Morphometric parameters, such as the coefficient of variation and polygonality, were also produced by software, and these values were significantly correlated with cell density (Pearson correlation coefficients -0.62 and 0.63, respectively). The software described here provides morphometric information from phase contrast images, and it enables subjective and noninvasive quality assessment for tissue engineering therapy of the corneal endothelium.

  15. Cell death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Thompson, L.S.; James, S.

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms often develop multicellular, three-dimensional structures known as microcolonies. Complex differentiation within biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, leading to the creation of voids inside microcolonies and to the dispersal of cells from within these voids...

  16. Conservation and Development of Central Thai Folk Music for Cultural Inheritance

    OpenAIRE

    Thipsuda Imjai; Ying Keeratiburana; Marisa Koseyayothin

    2013-01-01

    Folk music of Central Thailand is an artistic performance and an important cultural heritage of Thais that is in need of conservation, revitalization and development. The performance factors of all 5 folk music bands studied in the research were similar in areas of 1) performance stages. 2) Similar traditional clothing. 3) Music instruments. 4) Light and sound. 5) The amount of performers was selected according to appropriateness. The difficulties of Central Thailand folk music are 1) Declini...

  17. Central America Field Epidemiology Training Program (CA FETP): a pathway to sustainable public health capacity development

    OpenAIRE

    L?pez, Augusto; C?ceres, Victor M

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The Central America Field Epidemiology Training Program (CA FETP) is a public health capacity-building training programme aimed at developing high-caliber field epidemiologists at various levels of the public health system. It began in 2000 as part of the effort to rebuild public health infrastructure in six Central American and Caribbean countries following the devastation of Hurricanes Mitch and Georges in late 1998. Since then, the CA FETP has evolved from one regional training pr...

  18. Organization of glial cells in the adult sea cucumber central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashanov, Vladimir S; Zueva, Olga R; Garcia-Arraras, Jose E

    2010-10-01

    The nervous system of echinoderms has long been considered too unique to be directly comparable to the nervous system of other Deuterostomia. Using two novel monoclonal antibodies in combination with epifluorescence, confocal, and electron microscopy, we demonstrate here that the central nervous system of the sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima possesses a major non-neuronal cell type, which shares striking similarities with the radial glia of chordates. The basic features in common include (a) an elongated shape, (b) long radial processes, (c) short lateral protrusions branching off the main processes and penetrating into the surrounding neuropile, (d) prominent orderly oriented bundles of intermediate filaments, and (e) ability to produce Reissner's substance. Radial glia account for the majority of glia cells in echinoderms and constitutes more than half of the total cell population in the radial nerve cord and about 45% in the circumoral nerve ring. The difference in glia cell number between those regions is significant, suggesting structural specialization within the seemingly simple echinoderm nervous system. Both cell death and proliferation are seen under normal physiological conditions. Although both glia and neurons undergo apoptosis, most of the mitotic cells are identified as radial glia, indicating a key role of this cell type in cell turnover in the nervous system. A hypothesis is proposed that the radial glia could be an ancestral feature of the deuterostome nervous system, and the origin of this cell type might have predated the diversification of the Chordata and Ambulacraria lineages. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. The Mechanosensitive Ca2+ Channel as a Central Regulator of Prostate Tumor Cell Migration and Invasiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    the same concentrations that block PC-3 cell migration, also prevented the development of [Ca2+]i gradients and transients (Fig. 3d and supplementary...L., Heisenberg , C.P., Raz, E. (2006). Migration of zebrafish primordial germ cells: a role for myosin contraction and cytoplasmic flow. Devel. Cell

  20. A Comparative Study of Cathepsin D Expression in Peripheral and Central Giant Cell Granuloma of the Jaws by Immunohistochemistry Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargaran, Massoumeh; Moghimbeigi, Abbas; Afsharmoghadam, Noushin; Nasr Isfahani, Mohsen; Hashemi, Atefeh

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral and central giant cell granuloma are two common benign lesions of the oral cavity. In spite of histopathological similarities, they have different clinical behaviors. Cathepsin D is a lysosomal enzyme which has different functions on the basis of protein and applied peptide cleavage. This research aimed to evaluate and compare the expression level of Cathepsin D in these two lesions to find the reasons for the differences in clinical and biologic characteristics. The expression of Cathepsin D was investigated by using the immunohistochemistry method in 20 samples of peripheral giant cell granuloma and 20 samples of central giant cell granuloma. The percentage of stained giant cells (labeling index), the intensity of staining of giant cells, and staining-intensity-distribution in both groups were calculated and compared. The labeling indices of Cathepsin D in peripheral giant cell granuloma and central giant cell granuloma were 95.9±4.03 and 95.6±2.34, respectively. There was no significant difference in the percentages of stained giant cells between the two groups (p= 0.586). The intensity of staining of giant cells in central giant cell granuloma was stronger than that of peripheral giant cell granuloma (p> 0.001). Staining- intensity- distribution of giant cells in central giant cell granuloma was significantly greater than that of the peripheral type of lesion (p= 0.001). The higher expression level of Cathepsin D in central giant cell granuloma compared to peripheral type of lesion can explain more aggressive behavior of central giant cell granuloma.

  1. Development and Prospect of Nanoarchitectured Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives an overview of the development and prospect of nanotechnologies utilized in the solar cell applications. Even though it is not clearly pointed out, nanostructures indeed have been used in the fabrication of conventional solar cells for a long time. However, in those circumstances, only very limited benefits of nanostructures have been used to improve cell performance. During the last decade, the development of the photovoltaic device theory and nanofabrication technology enables studies of more complex nanostructured solar cells with higher conversion efficiency and lower production cost. The fundamental principles and important features of these advanced solar cell designs are systematically reviewed and summarized in this paper, with a focus on the function and role of nanostructures and the key factors affecting device performance. Among various nanostructures, special attention is given to those relying on quantum effect.

  2. Multiple Synchronous Central Giant Cell Granulomas of the Maxillofacial Region: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Min Seok; Kim, Hak Jin [Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    Multifocal central giant cell granulomas (CGCG) in the maxillofacial region are suggestive of systemic disease such as hyperparathyroidism or an inherited syndrome such as Noonan-like multiple giant cell lesion syndrome. Only 5 cases of multifocal CGCGs in the maxillofacial region without any concomitant systemic disease have currently been reported. We report here on an unusual case of 17-year-old man who presented with multifocal CGCGs of the bilateral posterior mandible and right maxilla and he was without any concomitant systemic disease

  3. Thermal analysis of the unloading cell of the Spanish centralized interim storage facility (CISF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Dominguez, J. R.; Perez Vara, R.; Huelamo Martinez, E.

    2016-01-01

    This article deals with the thermal analysis performed for the Untoading Cell of Spain Centralized Interim Storage Facility, CISF (ATC, in Spanish). The analyses are done using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation, with the aim of obtaining the air flow required to remove the residual heat of the elements stored in the cell. Compliance with the admissible heat limits is checked with the results obtained in the various operation and accident modes. The calculation model is flexible enough to allow carrying out a number of sensitivity analyses with the different parameters involved in the process. (Author)

  4. [Neuroimaging of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in the central nervous system of children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Hoz Polo, M; Rebollo Polo, M; Fons Estupiña, C; Muchart López, J; Cruz Martinez, O

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease characterized by the accumulation within tissues of anomalous dendritic cells similar to Langerhans cells. The clinical presentation varies, ranging from the appearance of a single bone lesion to multisystemic involvement. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement, manifesting as diabetes insipidus secondary to pituitary involvement, has been known since the original description of the disease. Two types of CNS lesions are currently differentiated. The first, pseudotumoral lesions with infiltration by Langerhans cells, most commonly manifests as pituitary infiltration. The second, described more recently, consists of neurodegenerative lesions of the CNS associated with neurologic deterioration. This second type of lesion constitutes a complication of the disease; however, there is no consensus about the cause of this complication. Our objective was to describe the radiologic manifestations of LCH in the CNS in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Organization of the cytoplasmic reticulum in the central vacuole of parenchyma cells in Allium cepa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz J. Wodzicki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An elaborate and complex cytoplasmic reticulum composed of fine filaments and lamellae ranging from 0.1 to 4 microns in size is revealed by viewing the central vacuole of onion bulb parenchyma cells with the scanning election microscope. The larger cytoplasmic strands, visible with the light microscope, are composed of numerous smaller filaments (some tubular which might explain the observed bidirectional movement of particles in these larger strands. The finely divided cytoplasmic network of filaments is continuous with the parietal cytoplasm inclosing the vacuolar sap. In these highly vacuolated cells the mass of the protoplast is in the form of an intravacuolar reticulum immersed in the cell sap. The probable significance of the vacuolar sap in relation to physiological processes of the cell is discussed.

  6. SURGICAL TREATMENT AND RECONSTRUCTION FOR CENTRAL GIANT CELL GRANULOMA OF MANDIBLE - case report and literature review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elitsa G. Deliverska

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG is a benign aggressive destructive osteolytic lesion of osteoclastic origin. The central giant cell granuloma is often found in the mandible, anterior to the first molars. It most commonly occurs in patients under the age of 30, with a clear female prevalencePurpose: To present a case of CGCG of the lower jaw in Department of Oral and maxillofacial surgery, University Hospital "St. Anna". Although en bloc resection provides the lowest recurrence rate, only a few single case reports describe the use of this technique followed by reconstruction with autogenous bone grafts.Material and methods: The medical history of a 28 years patient with a large central giant cell granuloma in the mandible. Biopsy specimen taken from the lesion showed CGCG followed by curettage with peripheral ostectomy with preservation of the continuity of the mandible.Result: At the 1-year clinical and radiological follow up there was no sign of recurrence. Conclusion: After complete healing of the graft, prosthetic rehabilitation with implants will be perfomed. This allows the best functional and aesthetic results.

  7. Biomarkers in early phase development of central nervous system drugs : a conceptual framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Jeroen-Paul van der

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to provide a conceptual framework for the use of Central Nervous System (CNS) biomarkers in early phase clinical drug development. In the Introduction the current use of biomarkers in early CNS drug development is discussed. A conceptual framework for the

  8. Measuring Central and Eastern Europe’s Socio-Economic Development Using Time Lags

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paprotny, D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper applies the ‘time lag’ method to a set of social and economic indicators, examining the development of Central and Eastern Europe since the first world war. Originally used to assess technology diffusion, this method allows comparison of levels of development between states and through a

  9. Development tendencies of energy facilities in Central and Eastern European countries in transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesner, W.; Stuits, I.; Zeltins, N.

    1999-01-01

    The present work considers development problems of energy facilities in Central and Eastern European countries being in transition in the period from 1990 to 1997. It outlines the changes in economical situation during this period. The paper also shows the development dynamics for economic indicators in 11 countries and analyses them for each country taken separately. (author)

  10. Stomach development, stem cells and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Shivdasani, Ramesh A

    2016-02-15

    The stomach, an organ derived from foregut endoderm, secretes acid and enzymes and plays a key role in digestion. During development, mesenchymal-epithelial interactions drive stomach specification, patterning, differentiation and growth through selected signaling pathways and transcription factors. After birth, the gastric epithelium is maintained by the activity of stem cells. Developmental signals are aberrantly activated and stem cell functions are disrupted in gastric cancer and other disorders. Therefore, a better understanding of stomach development and stem cells can inform approaches to treating these conditions. This Review highlights the molecular mechanisms of stomach development and discusses recent findings regarding stomach stem cells and organoid cultures, and their roles in investigating disease mechanisms. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Cell fate regulation in early mammalian development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oron, Efrat; Ivanova, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Preimplantation development in mammals encompasses a period from fertilization to implantation and results in formation of a blastocyst composed of three distinct cell lineages: epiblast, trophectoderm and primitive endoderm. The epiblast gives rise to the organism, while the trophectoderm and the primitive endoderm contribute to extraembryonic tissues that support embryo development after implantation. In many vertebrates, such as frog or fish, maternally supplied lineage determinants are partitioned within the egg. Cell cleavage that follows fertilization results in polarization of these factors between the individual blastomeres, which become restricted in their developmental fate. In contrast, the mouse oocyte and zygote lack clear polarity and, until the eight-cell stage, individual blastomeres retain the potential to form all lineages. How are cell lineages specified in the absence of a maternally supplied blueprint? This is a fundamental question in the field of developmental biology. The answer to this question lies in understanding the cell–cell interactions and gene networks involved in embryonic development prior to implantation and using this knowledge to create testable models of the developmental processes that govern cell fates. We provide an overview of classic and contemporary models of early lineage development in the mouse and discuss the emerging body of work that highlights similarities and differences between blastocyst development in the mouse and other mammalian species. (paper)

  12. Targeting of prion-infected lymphoid cells to the central nervous system accelerates prion infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedman-Levi Yael

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prions, composed of a misfolded protein designated PrPSc, are infectious agents causing fatal neurodegenerative diseases. We have shown previously that, following induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, prion-infected mice succumb to disease significantly earlier than controls, concomitant with the deposition of PrPSc aggregates in inflamed white matter areas. In the present work, we asked whether prion disease acceleration by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis results from infiltration of viable prion-infected immune cells into the central nervous system. Methods C57Bl/6 J mice underwent intraperitoneal inoculation with scrapie brain homogenates and were later induced with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by inoculation of MOG35-55 in complete Freund's adjuvant supplemented with pertussis toxin. Spleen and lymph node cells from the co-induced animals were reactivated and subsequently injected into naïve mice as viable cells or as cell homogenates. Control groups were infected with viable and homogenized scrapie immune cells only with complete Freund's adjuvant. Prion disease incubation times as well as levels and sites of PrPSc deposition were next evaluated. Results We first show that acceleration of prion disease by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis requires the presence of high levels of spleen PrPSc. Next, we present evidence that mice infected with activated prion-experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis viable cells succumb to prion disease considerably faster than do mice infected with equivalent cell extracts or other controls, concomitant with the deposition of PrPSc aggregates in white matter areas in brains and spinal cords. Conclusions Our results indicate that inflammatory targeting of viable prion-infected immune cells to the central nervous system accelerates prion disease propagation. We also show that in the absence of such targeting it is the load of PrPSc in the

  13. Transcriptional and Epigenetic Regulation of Oligodendrocyte Development and Myelination in the Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Ben; Lu, Q. Richard

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) myelination by oligodendrocytes (OLs) is a highly orchestrated process involving well-defined steps from specification of neural stem cells into proliferative OL precursors followed by terminal differentiation and subsequent maturation of these precursors into myelinating OLs. These specification and differentiation processes are mediated by profound global changes in gene expression, which are in turn subject to control by both extracellular signals and regulatory networks intrinsic to the OL lineage. Recently, basic transcriptional mechanisms that control OL differentiation and myelination have begun to be elucidated at the molecular level and on a genome scale. The interplay between transcription factors activated by differentiation-promoting signals and master regulators likely exerts a crucial role in controlling stage-specific progression of the OL lineage. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge regarding the transcription factors and the epigenetic programs including histone methylation, acetylation, chromatin remodeling, micro-RNAs, and noncoding RNAs that regulate development of OLs and myelination. PMID:26134004

  14. Forced notch signaling inhibits commissural axon outgrowth in the developing chick central nerve system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A collection of in vitro evidence has demonstrated that Notch signaling plays a key role in the growth of neurites in differentiated neurons. However, the effects of Notch signaling on axon outgrowth in an in vivo condition remain largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, the neural tubes of HH10-11 chick embryos were in ovo electroporated with various Notch transgenes of activating or inhibiting Notch signaling, and then their effects on commissural axon outgrowth across the floor plate midline in the chick developing central nerve system were investigated. Our results showed that forced expression of Notch intracellular domain, constitutively active form of RBPJ, or full-length Hes1 in the rostral hindbrain, diencephalon and spinal cord at stage HH10-11 significantly inhibited commissural axon outgrowth. On the other hand, inhibition of Notch signaling by ectopically expressing a dominant-negative form of RBPJ promoted commissural axonal growth along the circumferential axis. Further results revealed that these Notch signaling-mediated axon outgrowth defects may be not due to the alteration of axon guidance since commissural axon marker TAG1 was present in the axons in floor plate midline, and also not result from the changes in cell fate determination of commissural neurons since the expression of postmitotic neuron marker Tuj1 and specific commissural markers TAG1 and Pax7 was unchanged. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We first used an in vivo system to provide evidence that forced Notch signaling negatively regulates commissural axon outgrowth.

  15. Clinically aggressive central giant cell granulomas in two patients with neurofibromatosis 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Paul C; Fantasia, John E; Saini, Tarnjit; Rosenberg, Tracey J; Sachs, Stephen A; Ruggiero, Salvatore

    2006-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder caused by a spectrum of mutations affecting the Nf1 gene. Affected patients develop benign and malignant tumors at an increased frequency. Clinical findings include multiple cutaneous café-au-lait pigmentations, neurofibromas, axillary freckling, optic gliomas, benign iris hamartomas (Lisch nodules), scoliosis, and poorly defined soft tissue lesions of the skeleton. Kerl first reported an association of NF1 with multiple central giant cell granulomas (CGCGs) of the jaws. There have since been 4 additional published cases of NF1 patients with CGCGs of the jaws. We report on 2 patients who presented with NF1 and aggressive CGCGs of the jaws. In both cases, the clinical course was characterized by numerous recurrences despite mechanical curettage and surgical resection. We review proposed mechanisms to explain the apparent association between NF1 and an increased incidence of CGCGs of the jaws. While the presence of CGCGs of the jaws in patients with NF1 could represent either a coincidental association or a true genetic linkage, we propose that this phenomenon is most likely related to NF1-mediated osseous dysplasia. Compared to normal bone, the Nf1-haploinsufficient bone in a patient with NF1 may be less able to remodel in response to as of yet unidentified stimuli (e.g. excessive mechanical stress and/or vascular fragility), and consequently may be more susceptible to developing CGCG-like lesions. Alternatively, the CGCG in NF1 patients could represent a true neoplasm, resulting from additional, as of yet unidentified, genetic alterations to Nf1-haploinsufficient bone.

  16. Single cell cultures of Drosophila neuroectodermal and mesectodermal central nervous system progenitors reveal different degrees of developmental autonomy

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    Technau Gerhard M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Drosophila embryonic central nervous system (CNS develops from two sets of progenitor cells, neuroblasts and ventral midline progenitors, which behave differently in many respects. Neuroblasts derive from the neurogenic region of the ectoderm and form the lateral parts of the CNS. Ventral midline precursors are formed by two rows of mesectodermal cells and build the CNS midline. There is plenty of evidence that individual identities are conferred to precursor cells by positional information in the ectoderm. It is unclear, however, how far the precursors can maintain their identities and developmental properties in the absence of normal external signals. Results To separate the respective contributions of autonomous properties versus extrinsic signals during their further development, we isolated individual midline precursors and neuroectodermal precursors at the pre-mitotic gastrula stage, traced their development in vitro, and analyzed the characteristics of their lineages in comparison with those described for the embryo. Although individually cultured mesectodermal cells exhibit basic characteristics of CNS midline progenitors, the clones produced by these progenitors differ from their in situ counterparts with regard to cell numbers, expression of molecular markers, and the separation of neuronal and glial fate. In contrast, clones derived from individually cultured precursors taken from specific dorsoventral zones of the neuroectoderm develop striking similarities to the lineages of neuroblasts that normally delaminate from these zones and develop in situ. Conclusion This in vitro analysis allows for the first time a comparison of the developmental capacities in situ and in vitro of individual neural precursors of defined spatial and temporal origin. The data reveal that cells isolated at the pre-mitotic and pre-delamination stage express characteristics of the progenitor type appropriate to their site of origin in

  17. Single cell cultures of Drosophila neuroectodermal and mesectodermal central nervous system progenitors reveal different degrees of developmental autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüer, Karin; Technau, Gerhard M

    2009-08-03

    The Drosophila embryonic central nervous system (CNS) develops from two sets of progenitor cells, neuroblasts and ventral midline progenitors, which behave differently in many respects. Neuroblasts derive from the neurogenic region of the ectoderm and form the lateral parts of the CNS. Ventral midline precursors are formed by two rows of mesectodermal cells and build the CNS midline. There is plenty of evidence that individual identities are conferred to precursor cells by positional information in the ectoderm. It is unclear, however, how far the precursors can maintain their identities and developmental properties in the absence of normal external signals. To separate the respective contributions of autonomous properties versus extrinsic signals during their further development, we isolated individual midline precursors and neuroectodermal precursors at the pre-mitotic gastrula stage, traced their development in vitro, and analyzed the characteristics of their lineages in comparison with those described for the embryo. Although individually cultured mesectodermal cells exhibit basic characteristics of CNS midline progenitors, the clones produced by these progenitors differ from their in situ counterparts with regard to cell numbers, expression of molecular markers, and the separation of neuronal and glial fate. In contrast, clones derived from individually cultured precursors taken from specific dorsoventral zones of the neuroectoderm develop striking similarities to the lineages of neuroblasts that normally delaminate from these zones and develop in situ. This in vitro analysis allows for the first time a comparison of the developmental capacities in situ and in vitro of individual neural precursors of defined spatial and temporal origin. The data reveal that cells isolated at the pre-mitotic and pre-delamination stage express characteristics of the progenitor type appropriate to their site of origin in the embryo. However, presumptive neuroblasts, once

  18. Development of low temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakker, W.T.; Goldstein, R. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The historical focus of the electric utility industry has been central station power plants. These plants are usually sited outside urban areas and electricity was delivered via high voltage transmission lines. Several things are beginning to change this historical precedent One is the popular concern with EMF as a health hazard. This has rendered the construction of new lines as well as upgrading old ones very difficult. Installation of power generating equipment near the customer enables the utility to better utilize existing transmission and distribution networks and defer investments. Power quality and lark of disturbances and interruptions is also becoming increasingly more important to many customers. Grid connected, but dedicated small power plants can greatly improve power quality. Finally the development of high efficiency, low emission, modular fuel cells promises near pollution free localized power generation with an efficiency equal to or exceeding that of even the most efficient central power stations.

  19. Expanding Role of T Cells in Human Autoimmune Diseases of the Central Nervous System

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    Deepti Pilli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is being increasingly recognized that a dysregulation of the immune system plays a vital role in neurological disorders and shapes the treatment of the disease. Aberrant T cell responses, in particular, are key in driving autoimmunity and have been traditionally associated with multiple sclerosis. Yet, it is evident that there are other neurological diseases in which autoreactive T cells have an active role in pathogenesis. In this review, we report on the recent progress in profiling and assessing the functionality of autoreactive T cells in central nervous system (CNS autoimmune disorders that are currently postulated to be primarily T cell driven. We also explore the autoreactive T cell response in a recently emerging group of syndromes characterized by autoantibodies against neuronal cell-surface proteins. Common methodology implemented in T cell biology is further considered as it is an important determinant in their detection and characterization. An improved understanding of the contribution of autoreactive T cells expands our knowledge of the autoimmune response in CNS disorders and can offer novel methods of therapeutic intervention.

  20. Early Divergence of Central and Peripheral Neural Retina Precursors During Vertebrate Eye Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venters, Sara J.; Mikawa, Takashi; Hyer, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    During development of the vertebrate eye, optic tissue is progressively compartmentalized into functionally distinct tissues. From the central to the peripheral optic cup, the original optic neuroepithelial tissue compartmentalizes, forming retina, ciliary body and iris. The retina can be further sub-divided into peripheral and central compartments, where the central domain is specialized for higher visual acuity, having a higher ratio and density of cone photoreceptors in most species. Classically, models depict a segregation of the early optic cup into only two domains, neural and non-neural. Recent studies, however, uncovered discrete precursors for central and peripheral retina in the optic vesicle, indicating that the neural retina cannot be considered as a single unit with homogeneous specification and development. Instead, central and peripheral retina may be subject to distinct developmental pathways that underlie their specialization. This review focuses on lineage relationships in the retina and revisits the historical context for segregation of central and peripheral retina precursors before overt eye morphogenesis. PMID:25329498

  1. Early divergence of central and peripheral neural retina precursors during vertebrate eye development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venters, Sara J; Mikawa, Takashi; Hyer, Jeanette

    2015-03-01

    During development of the vertebrate eye, optic tissue is progressively compartmentalized into functionally distinct tissues. From the central to the peripheral optic cup, the original optic neuroepithelial tissue compartmentalizes, forming retina, ciliary body, and iris. The retina can be further sub-divided into peripheral and central compartments, where the central domain is specialized for higher visual acuity, having a higher ratio and density of cone photoreceptors in most species. Classically, models depict a segregation of the early optic cup into only two domains, neural and non-neural. Recent studies, however, uncovered discrete precursors for central and peripheral retina in the optic vesicle, indicating that the neural retina cannot be considered as a single unit with homogeneous specification and development. Instead, central and peripheral retina may be subject to distinct developmental pathways that underlie their specialization. This review focuses on lineage relationships in the retina and revisits the historical context for segregation of central and peripheral retina precursors before overt eye morphogenesis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Factors blocking the development of north - central Rzeszów

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybka, Adam; Mazur, Rafał

    2017-12-01

    Rzeszów is one of the best developing cities in Poland. Once the small HQ of a principality - due to complicated historical conditioning - it has now become a place where an increasing number of people choose to live. The city with its bursting life, streets and squares starts and ends, however, in an area which only a few dozen years ago still catered for one fifth of the current population. The main reason for this phenomenon is the presence of spatial barriers, which significantly limit the development of the central urban area. This article analyzes the elements, which block the development of the north-central part of Rzeszów. An appropriate diagnosis of the problem may in the future allow the right actions in urban planning to be taken in order to cross these barriers. This may lead to the future development of areas with huge urbanization potential. Investments undertaken by city authorities to develop the northern peripheries of Rzeszów may trigger the development of the central district in this direction. This may occur as a result of concrete design interventions. The new part of the central district should have the scale and proportions of urban space that answer to the needs of a dynamically developing capital of the Podkarpacie region.

  3. Deletion of the Mineralocorticoid Receptor in Myeloid Cells Attenuates Central Nervous System Autoimmunity

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    Elena Montes-Cobos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Monocytes, macrophages, and microglia can adopt two distinct phenotypes, with M1-polarized cells being more related to inflammation and autoimmunity while M2-polarized cells contribute to tissue repair and anti-inflammatory processes. Here, we show that deletion of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR in bone marrow-derived macrophages and peritoneal macrophages caused their polarization toward the M2 phenotype with its distinct gene expression, altered phagocytic and migratory properties, and dampened NO production. After induction of EAE, mice that are selectively devoid of the MR in their myeloid cells (MRlysM mice showed diminished clinical symptoms and ameliorated histological hallmarks of neuroinflammation. T cells in peripheral lymphoid organs of these mice produced less pro-inflammatory cytokines while their proliferation and the abundance of regulatory T cells were unaltered. The numbers of inflammatory monocytes and reactive microglia in the central nervous system (CNS in MRlysM mice were significantly lower and they adopted an M2-polarized phenotype based on their gene expression profile, presumably explaining the ameliorated neuroinflammation. Our results indicate that the MR in myeloid cells plays a critical role for CNS autoimmunity, providing a rational to interfere with diseases such as MS by pharmacologically targeting this receptor.

  4. A moonlighting enzyme links Escherichia coli cell size with central metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert S Hill

    Full Text Available Growth rate and nutrient availability are the primary determinants of size in single-celled organisms: rapidly growing Escherichia coli cells are more than twice as large as their slow growing counterparts. Here we report the identification of the glucosyltransferase OpgH as a nutrient-dependent regulator of E. coli cell size. During growth under nutrient-rich conditions, OpgH localizes to the nascent septal site, where it antagonizes assembly of the tubulin-like cell division protein FtsZ, delaying division and increasing cell size. Biochemical analysis is consistent with OpgH sequestering FtsZ from growing polymers. OpgH is functionally analogous to UgtP, a Bacillus subtilis glucosyltransferase that inhibits cell division in a growth rate-dependent fashion. In a striking example of convergent evolution, OpgH and UgtP share no homology, have distinct enzymatic activities, and appear to inhibit FtsZ assembly through different mechanisms. Comparative analysis of E. coli and B. subtilis reveals conserved aspects of growth rate regulation and cell size control that are likely to be broadly applicable. These include the conservation of uridine diphosphate glucose as a proxy for nutrient status and the use of moonlighting enzymes to couple growth rate-dependent phenomena to central metabolism.

  5. FASN expression, angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in central and peripheral giant cell lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Gabriel Moreira FALCI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Central giant cell lesion (CGCL and peripheral giant cell lesion (PGCL are non-neoplastic proliferative processes of the jaws. PGCL is a reactive process induced by irritant local factors and CGCL is an intra-osseous lesion of unknown etiology. Both lesions exhibit similar histologic features showing abundant mononuclear cells, admixed with a large number of multinucleated giant cells and a rich vascularized stroma with extravasated erythrocytes, hemosiderin deposition, and blood-filled pools. Recent studies have linked fatty acid synthase (FASN with angiogenesis. Objective: To evaluate angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis and their relationship with FASN expression in CGCL and PGCL. Material and Methods: Thirteen CGCL and 14 PGCL of the jaws were selected for immunoexpression of FASN; CD34 and CD105 (to assess blood microvessel density [MVD] and microvessel area [MVA]; and D2-40 (to assess lymphatic MVD and MVA. Results: Within PGCL and CGCL, MVD-CD34 was signifcantly higher than MVD-CD10S, followed by MVD-D2-40. Moreover, a signifcantly higher number of FASN-positive multinucleated giant cells than mononuclear cells were observed. Between PGCL and CGCL, only MVD-CD34 and all MVA were signifcantly higher in PGCL. Positive correlation between MVA-CD10S with FASNpositive mononuclear cells in both lesions was observed. Conclusions: Our results show both lesions exhibiting similar levels of FASN expression and neoangiogenesis, suggesting constitutive processes that regulate tissue maintenance.

  6. Mitotic bookmarking in development and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festuccia, Nicola; Gonzalez, Inma; Owens, Nick; Navarro, Pablo

    2017-10-15

    The changes imposed on the nucleus, chromatin and its regulators during mitosis lead to the dismantlement of most gene regulatory processes. However, an increasing number of transcriptional regulators are being identified as capable of binding their genomic targets during mitosis. These so-called 'mitotic bookmarking factors' encompass transcription factors and chromatin modifiers that are believed to convey gene regulatory information from mother to daughter cells. In this Primer, we review mitotic bookmarking processes in development and stem cells and discuss the interest and potential importance of this concept with regard to epigenetic regulation and cell fate transitions involving cellular proliferation. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Recruitment and retention of B cells in the central nervous system in response to alphavirus encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Talibah U; Baxter, Victoria K; Nilaratanakul, Voraphoj; Griffin, Diane E

    2013-03-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV) infection of neurons results in nonfatal viral encephalomyelitis and provides a model system for understanding recovery from virus infection of the central nervous system (CNS). Infection is followed by clearance of infectious virus, a gradual decrease in viral RNA, and then long-term maintenance of low levels of viral RNA. Antibody to the E2 glycoprotein is important for virus clearance, and B cells enter the CNS along with CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells during the early clearance phase. Antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) are present in the CNS and become enriched for SINV-specific ASCs. We have evaluated the factors within the CNS that facilitate continued local antibody production after infection. Expression of CXCL9, CXCL10, CCL1, CCL2, and CCL5 chemokine mRNAs increased early, and infiltrating B cells expressed CXCR3, CXCR5, and CCR7. The mRNAs for IL-10 and IL-21, cytokines important for B cell proliferation and differentiation, rose rapidly and remained elevated long after clearance of infectious virus. Active proliferation of B cells, as indicated by Ki-67 expression, continued for months. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling of proliferating cells showed that ASCs produced in the draining cervical lymph nodes during the early germinal center response were preferentially retained in the CNS. Sustained increase in B-cell-activating factor (BAFF) mRNA in the CNS and BAFF receptor expression by B cells coincided with the long-term maintenance of SINV-specific ASCs in the brain. We conclude that multiple changes in the brain microenvironment facilitate B-cell entry and support proliferation and differentiation and long-term survival of antiviral ASCs during recovery from alphaviral encephalomyelitis.

  8. Primary central nervous system lymphoma in Korea: comparison of B- and T-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Sun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Ko, Young Hyeh; Seo, Jin Won; Choi, Yoon-La; Suh, Yeon Lim; Ree, Howe J

    2003-07-01

    The great majority of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is known to be of B-lineage, with T-cell PCNSL (T-PCNSL) accounting for two were negative for CD4 and CD8. Of 24 DLBCLs tested, the pattern of Bcl-6+ tumor cells was diffusely dense, similar to that of the germinal center in nine cases (37.5%), with coexpression of CD10 in three of the nine cases. T-PCNSL accounted for 16.7% of the PCNSLs; thus, in Korea it may not be as rare as previously known. The T-PCNSL presented with certain clinical and pathologic features that were distinct from B-PCNSL and displayed preponderance of CD8 expression. DLBCL of the germinal center B-cell derivation defined by bcl-6 expression comprised 37.5% of DLBCL of the brain.

  9. A central role for carbon-overflow pathways in the modulation of bacterial cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinai Chittezham Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Similar to developmental programs in eukaryotes, the death of a subpopulation of cells is thought to benefit bacterial biofilm development. However mechanisms that mediate a tight control over cell death are not clearly understood at the population level. Here we reveal that CidR dependent pyruvate oxidase (CidC and α-acetolactate synthase/decarboxylase (AlsSD overflow metabolic pathways, which are active during staphylococcal biofilm development, modulate cell death to achieve optimal biofilm biomass. Whereas acetate derived from CidC activity potentiates cell death in cells by a mechanism dependent on intracellular acidification and respiratory inhibition, AlsSD activity effectively counters CidC action by diverting carbon flux towards neutral rather than acidic byproducts and consuming intracellular protons in the process. Furthermore, the physiological features that accompany metabolic activation of cell death bears remarkable similarities to hallmarks of eukaryotic programmed cell death, including the generation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage. Finally, we demonstrate that the metabolic modulation of cell death not only affects biofilm development but also biofilm-dependent disease outcomes. Given the ubiquity of such carbon overflow pathways in diverse bacterial species, we propose that the metabolic control of cell death may be a fundamental feature of prokaryotic development.

  10. T-Bet and Eomes Regulate the Balance between the Effector/Central Memory T Cells versus Memory Stem Like T Cells.

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    Gang Li

    Full Text Available Memory T cells are composed of effector, central, and memory stem cells. Previous studies have implicated that both T-bet and Eomes are involved in the generation of effector and central memory CD8 T cells. The exact role of these transcription factors in shaping the memory T cell pool is not well understood, particularly with memory stem T cells. Here, we demonstrate that both T-bet or Eomes are required for elimination of established tumors by adoptively transferred CD8 T cells. We also examined the role of T-bet and Eomes in the generation of tumor-specific memory T cell subsets upon adoptive transfer. We showed that combined T-bet and Eomes deficiency resulted in a severe reduction in the number of effector/central memory T cells but an increase in the percentage of CD62L(highCD44(low Sca-1(+ T cells which were similar to the phenotype of memory stem T cells. Despite preserving large numbers of phenotypic memory stem T cells, the lack of both of T-bet and Eomes resulted in a profound defect in antitumor memory responses, suggesting T-bet and Eomes are crucial for the antitumor function of these memory T cells. Our study establishes that T-bet and Eomes cooperate to promote the phenotype of effector/central memory CD8 T cell versus that of memory stem like T cells.

  11. Central and peripheral fatigue development in the shoulder muscle with obesity during an isometric endurance task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajoutan, Mojdeh; Ghesmaty Sangachin, Mahboobeh; Cavuoto, Lora A

    2017-07-21

    Fatigue increases the likelihood of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders and injury. Due to the physiological and neuromuscular changes that accompany obesity, it may alter the fatigue development mechanism and exacerbate injury risk. The upper extremities have the highest incidence rates for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Therefore, the goals of this study were to investigate the effect of obesity on central vs. peripheral fatigue as well as on the physical signs of fatigue on the middle deltoid muscle. A measure of central activation ratio was used to quantify central fatigue by considering the increment in the torque output by superimposed twitch relative to its corresponding maximum voluntary contraction. For this purpose, electrical stimulation was delivered at the middle deltoid muscles of 22 non-obese (18 fatiguing task at either 30 or 60% of the muscle capacity. Differences in endurance time, torque fluctuation, torque loss, and muscle activity measured by an electromyography sensor were also investigated. A greater reduction of voluntary activation of motor units (p = 0.001) with fatigue was observed for individuals who are obese. Contrary to the effect of obesity on central fatigue, a trend toward reduced peripheral fatigue (p = 0.06) was observed for the obese group compared to the non-obese group. On average, a 14% higher rate of torque loss per second was observed among individuals with obesity in comparison to non-obese participants. The observed greater contribution of central fatigue during the sustained endurance tasks suggests that among young healthy obese individuals, the faster fatigue development with obesity, commonly reported in the literature, is most likely due to the central elements rather than the peripheral factors. This finding has implications for fatigue prevention programs during sustained exertions and can help to develop training, work, and rest schedules considering obesity.

  12. Fuel cells: a survey of current developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropper, Mark A. J.; Geiger, Stefan; Jollie, David M.

    Since the first practical uses of fuel cells were developed, it has become clear that they could find use in many products over a wide power range of milliwatts to tens of megawatts. Throughout the 1990s, and later, there has been significant work carried out on adapting the various different fuel cell technologies for use in targetted consumer and industrial applications. This paper discusses these developments and gives details on the specific market segments for providing power to vehicles, portable devices and large- and small-scale stationary power generation.

  13. Development of gallium arsenide solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The potential of ion implantation as a means to the development of high efficiency gallium arsenide solar cells is investigated. Summaries are included of the results of computer calculations of GaAs cell characteristics, based on a model which includes the effects of surface recombination, junction space-charge region recombination, and built-in fields produced by nonuniform doping in the region; of the fabrication technology developed under the program; and of the results of electrical and optical measurements on the samples produced during the program. It was determined that measured AMO efficiencies were more than a factor of two lower than the calculated values.

  14. Development of endosperm transfer cells in barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes eThiel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Endosperm transfer cells (ETCs are positioned at the intersection of maternal and filial tissues in seeds of cereals and represent a bottleneck for apoplasmic transport of assimilates into the endosperm. Endosperm cellularization starts at the maternal-filial boundary and generates the highly specialized ETCs. During differentiation barley ETCs develop characteristic flange-like wall ingrowths to facilitate effective nutrient transfer. A comprehensive morphological analysis depicted distinct developmental time points in establishment of transfer cell morphology and revealed intracellular changes possibly associated with cell wall metabolism. Embedded inside the grain, ETCs are barely accessible by manual preparation. To get tissue-specific information about ETC specification and differentiation, laser microdissection(LM-based methods were used for transcript and metabolite profiling. Transcriptome analysis of ETCs at different developmental stages by microarrays indicated activated gene expression programs related to control of cell proliferation and cell shape, cell wall and carbohydrate metabolism reflecting the morphological changes during early ETC development. Transporter genes reveal distinct expression patterns suggesting a switch from active to passive modes of nutrient uptake with the onset of grain filling. Tissue-specific RNA-seq of the differentiating ETC region from the syncytial stage until functionality in nutrient transfer identified a high number of novel transcripts putatively involved in ETC differentiation. An essential role for two-component signaling (TCS pathways in transfer cell development of barley emerged from this analysis. Correlative data provide evidence for ABA and ethylene influences on ETC differentiation and hint at a crosstalk between hormone signal transduction and TCS phosphorelays. Collectively, the data expose a comprehensive view on ETC development, associated pathways and identified candidate genes for

  15. The activation pattern of macrophages in giant cell (temporal) arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihm, Bernhard; Bergmann, Markus; Brück, Wolfgang; Probst-Cousin, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    To determine if the pattern of macrophage activation reflects differences in the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system, specimens of 10 patients with giant cell arteritis and five with primary angiitis of the central nervous system were immunohistochemically studied and the expression of the macrophage activation markers 27E10, MRP14, MRP8 and 25F9 was determined in the vasculitic infiltrates. Thus, a partly different expression pattern of macrophage activation markers in giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system was observed. The group comparison revealed that giant cell arteritis cases had significantly higher numbers of acute activated MRP14-positive macrophages, whereas primary angiitis of the central nervous system is characterized by a tendency toward more MRP8-positive intermediate/late activated macrophages. Furthermore, in giant cell arteritis comparably fewer CD8-positive lymphocytes were observed. These observations suggest, that despite their histopathological similarities, giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system appear to represent either distinct entities within the spectrum of granulomatous vasculitides or different stages of similar disease processes. Their discrete clinical presentation is reflected by different activation patterns of macrophages, which may characterize giant cell arteritis as a more acute process and primary angiitis of the central nervous system as a more advanced inflammatory process. © 2013 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  16. Development of novel microfluidic platforms for neural stem cell research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Bonggeun

    This dissertation describes the development and characterization of novel microfluidic platforms to study proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis of neural stem cells (NSCs). NSCs hold tremendous promise for fundamental biological studies and cell-based therapies in human disorders. NSCs are defined as cells that can self-renew yet maintain the ability to generate the three principal cell types of the central nervous system such as neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. NSCs therefore have therapeutic possibilities in multiple neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases. Despite their promise, cell-based therapies are limited by the inability to precisely control their behavior in culture. Compared to traditional culture tools, microfluidic platforms can provide much greater control over cell microenvironments and optimize proliferation and differentiation conditions of cells exposed to combinatorial mixtures of growth factors. Human NSCs were cultured for more than 1 week in the microfluidic device while constantly exposed to a continuous gradient of a growth factor mixture. NSCs proliferated and differentiated in a graded and proportional fashion that varied directly with growth factor concentration. In parallel to the study of growth and differentiation of NSCs, we are interested in proliferation and apoptosis of mouse NSCs exposed to morphogen gradients. Morphogen gradients are fundamental to animal brain development. Nonetheless, much controversy remains about the mechanisms by which morphogen gradients act on the developing brain. To overcome limitations of in-vitro models of gradients, we have developed a hybrid microfluidic platform that can mimic morphogen gradient profiles. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) activity in the developing cortex is graded and cortical NSC responses to BMPs are highly dependent on concentration and gradient slope of BMPs. To make novel microfluidic devices integrated with multiple functions, we have

  17. Miners, peasants and entrepreneurs : Regional development in the Central Highlands of Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, N.; Roberts, B.

    1984-01-01

    This volume traces the development of the central highlands, one of Peru's major mining regions. It draws on extensive fieldwork carried out in Peru between 1970 and 1982, spanning a reforming military government, reaction and a return to civilian politics under Belaunde. Through historical material

  18. Climate change impacts in Central Asia and their implications for development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyer, Christopher P.O.; Otto, Ilona M.; Adams, Sophie; Albrecht, Torsten; Baarsch, Florent; Cartsburg, Matti; Coumou, Dim; Eden, Alexander; Ludi, Eva; Marcus, Rachel; Mengel, Matthias; Mosello, Beatrice; Robinson, Alexander; Schleussner, Carl Friedrich; Serdeczny, Olivia; Stagl, Judith

    2017-01-01

    This paper synthesizes what is known about the physical and biophysical impacts of climate change and their consequences for societies and development under different levels of global warming in Central Asia. Projections show mean temperatures increasing by up to 6.5 °C compared to pre-industrial by

  19. Geotechnical research in the Hungarian Central Institute for the Development of Mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmieder, A.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes the geotechnical project of the Hungarian Central Institute for the Development of Mining. The activities of the Department of Geophysics and Nuclear Technology in the field of isotope and radiochemistry for geotechnical research are discussed in detail. (Sz.J.)

  20. THE DEVELOPMENT OF GIS EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES SHARING AMONG CENTRAL TAIWAN UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.-Y. Chou

    2012-09-01

    Moreover, e-learning platforms provide solutions and resources. Different levels of image scales have been integrated into the systems. Multi-scale spatial development and analyses in Central Taiwan integrate academic research resources among CTTLRC partners. Thus, establish decision-making support mechanism in teaching and learning. Accelerate communication, cooperation and sharing among academic units

  1. ANTIEPILEPTIC MEDICATION IN PREGNANCY - LATE EFFECTS ON THE CHILDRENS CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERPOL, MC; HADDERSALGRA, M; HUISJES, HJ; TOUWEN, BCL

    In a follow-up study long-term effects of antenatal exposure to two anticonvulsant drugs, phenobarbital and carbamazepine on central nervous system development were evaluated. Children aged 6 to 13 years of epileptic mothers who used phenobarbital (n = 13), carbamazepine (n = 12), phenobarbital plus

  2. Regulation of B cell development by posttranslational modification of Ebf1

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Qiongman

    2016-01-01

    Early B cell differentiation is regulated via a complex transcriptional network. Ebf1 is a central part of it, regulating around 3000 target genes associated with B cell function. Among these target genes, Ebf1 plays diverse roles to activate, repress or poise gene expression. Post-translational modification represents a potential explanation for these diverse roles. Specifically, phosphorylation of Ebf1 might contribute to the diverse functions of Ebf1 during B cell development. The hypot...

  3. Unraveling Natural Killer T-Cells Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bianca Bennstein

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T-cells are a subset of innate-like T-cells with the ability to bridge innate and adaptive immunity. There is great interest in harnessing these cells to improve tumor therapy; however, greater understanding of invariant NKT (iNKT cell biology is needed. The first step is to learn more about NKT development within the thymus. Recent studies suggest lineage separation of murine iNKT cells into iNKT1, iNKT2, and iNKT17 cells instead of shared developmental stages. This review will focus on these new studies and will discuss the evidence for lineage separation in contrast to shared developmental stages. The author will also highlight the classifications of murine iNKT cells according to identified transcription factors and cytokine production, and will discuss transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations, and the role of mammalian target of rapamycin. Finally, the importance of these findings for human cancer therapy will be briefly discussed.

  4. Advanced Cell Development and Degradation Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; R. C. O' Brien; K. G. Condie; M. Sohal; G. K. Housley; J. J. Hartvigsen; D. Larsen; G. Tao; B. Yildiz; V. Sharma; P. Singh; N. Petigny; T. L. Cable

    2010-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cells for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. From 2003 – 2009, this work was sponsored by the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). Starting in 2010, the HTE research program has been sponsored by the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program. HTSE research priorities in FY10 are centered on understanding and reducing cell and stack performance degradation to an acceptable level to advance the technology readiness level of HTSE and to justify further large-scale demonstration activities. This report provides a summary of our FY10 experimental program, which has been focused on advanced cell and stack development and degradation studies. Advanced cell and stack development activities are under way at five technology partners: MSRI, Versa Power, Ceramatec, NASA Glenn, and St. Gobain. Performance evaluation of the advanced technology cells and stacks has been performed by the technology partners, by MIT and the University of Connecticut and at the INL HTE Laboratory. Summaries of these development activities and test results are presented.

  5. High-fat diet feeding differentially affects the development of inflammation in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemot-Legris, Owein; Masquelier, Julien; Everard, Amandine; Cani, Patrice D; Alhouayek, Mireille; Muccioli, Giulio G

    2016-08-26

    Obesity and its associated disorders are becoming a major health issue in many countries. The resulting low-grade inflammation not only affects the periphery but also the central nervous system. We set out to study, in a time-dependent manner, the effects of a high-fat diet on different regions of the central nervous system with regard to the inflammatory tone. We used a diet-induced obesity model and compared at several time-points (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 16 weeks) a group of mice fed a high-fat diet with its respective control group fed a standard diet. We also performed a large-scale analysis of lipids in the central nervous system using HPLC-MS, and we then tested the lipids of interest on a primary co-culture of astrocytes and microglial cells. We measured an increase in the inflammatory tone in the cerebellum at the different time-points. However, at week 16, we evidenced that the inflammatory tone displayed significant differences in two different regions of the central nervous system, specifically an increase in the cerebellum and no modification in the cortex for high-fat diet mice when compared with chow-fed mice. Our results clearly suggest region-dependent as well as time-dependent adaptations of the central nervous system to the high-fat diet. The differences in inflammatory tone between the two regions considered seem to involve astrocytes but not microglial cells. Furthermore, a large-scale lipid screening coupled to ex vivo testing enabled us to identify three classes of lipids-phosphatidylinositols, phosphatidylethanolamines, and lysophosphatidylcholines-as well as palmitoylethanolamide, as potentially responsible for the difference in inflammatory tone. This study demonstrates that the inflammatory tone induced by a high-fat diet does not similarly affect distinct regions of the central nervous system. Moreover, the lipids identified and tested ex vivo showed interesting anti-inflammatory properties and could be further studied to better characterize

  6. Development and efficiency of banking and economic growth in Central and Eastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana ĆURAK

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In an endogenous growth framework, well developed and efficient financial system can promote economic growth. A number of empirical studies confirmed this hypothesis. Since the financial systems of transition countries are dominated by banks, in this paper we analyze the importance of banking industry for economic growth using methods of panel data analysis for 15 Central and Eastern European countries in the period from 1992 to 2006. Using variables that measure both quantitative and qualitative aspects of financial intermediation, our findings support the view that the effectiveness of banking industry is more important than its size per se for the economic growth in the Central and Eastern European countries.

  7. Monostotic Langerhans' cell histiocytosis in a child with central diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Eduardo Costa Studart; Quidute, Ana Rosa Pinto; Costa, Fábio Wildson Gurgel; Gurgel, Maria Helane Costa; Alves, Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes; Fonteles, Cristiane Sá Roriz

    2012-01-01

    Langerhans'cell histiocytosis (LCH) comprises a rare group of reticuloendothelial system disorders that can produce focal or systemic manifestations. Diabetes insipidus is considered to be an important indicator of serious underlying diseases in children, including LCH. We report the case of a young patient with monostotic LCH confined to the mandibular ramus, who was diagnosed with the disease after presenting symptoms of central diabetes insipidus and was satisfactorily treated with multi-agent chemotherapy. Additionally, we discuss the clinical, radiographic, histological and immunohistochemical findings, as well as the multidisciplinary approach of this important disease, which should receive attention by dental practitioners, especially when it occurs in children.

  8. Cell design and electrostatic optimisation for the ZEUS central tracking detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.H.C.

    1987-11-01

    The report is concerned with the cell design and electrostatic optimisation for the ZEUS Central Tracking Detector (CTD). The CTD is being designed for charged track reconstruction and particle momentum measurement in the ZEUS experiment at the HERA electron-proton collider. The contents of the report is divided into two parts. The first part describes the techniques employed in the study, and includes: design overview, voltage optimisation, strategy evolution, electrostatic screens, and optimisation over many superlayers. The second part contains a critical assessment of the results obtained, including optimised parameters, operational stability and alternative field values. (U.K.)

  9. Central Granular Cell Odontogenic Tumor: Report of a Case with CBCT Features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Anbiaee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Central granular cell odontogenic tumor CGCOT of the jaw is an exceedingly rare benign odontogenic neoplasm with 35 reported cases in the literature. Among these, very few studies have focused on the cone-beam CT features of CGCOT. Here, we report a case of an asymptomatic CGCOT in a 16-year-old girl and focus on the cone-beam CT features. Only 36 cases of this lesion, including this one, have been reported so far. The case presented is of special importance due to the young age of the patient, the posterior location of the lesion and the multilocular pattern in the cone beam CT images.

  10. Strategy of Developing Tomini Bay for Economic Growth of Coastal Community in Central Sulawesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzakir Muzakir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to analyze the potential and the strategy of developing Tomini Bay to improve the economic growth of the coastal community in Central Sulawesi. The research is located in four regencies in Central Sulawesi. The method uses the descriptive analysis using SWOT analysis. The research result shows that the potential of fisheries resources in Poso Regency, Parigi Moutong Regency, Tojo Una-Una Regency, and Banggai Regency can support the development of Tomini Bay region based on fisheries in order to accelerate the economic growth of coastal communities in Central Sulawesi. The potential fishery resources that can support the development of Tomini Bay area are the potential of fisheries, marine and coastal infrastructure, social economy and geographic conditions in four regencies. The strategies are building the marketing network for fishery products both the catching and cultivation, improving the fishery human resouce capacity, controlling the fishery product quality, and increasing the social awareness to maintain the ecosystem sustainability. To optimize the utilization of Tomini Bay, it is suggested to improve the involvement of the regional government, the central government, and also the private sector and the whole community.

  11. Analysing Scenarios of Cell Population System Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Vinogradova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers an isolated population system consisting of two types of human stem cells, namely normal cells and cells with chromosomal abnormalities (abnormal ones. The system develops in the laboratory (in vitro. The article analyses possible scenarios of the population system development, which are implemented for different values of its parameters. An investigated model of the cell population system takes into account the limited resources. It is represented as a system of two nonlinear differential equations with continuous right-hand part. The model is considered with non-negative values of the variables; the domain is divided into four sets. The model feature is that in each set the right part of the system of differential equations has a different form.The article analyses a quality of the rest points of the system in each of four sets. The analytical conditions for determination of the number of rest points and the quality of rest points, with, at least, one zero coordinate, are obtained.It is shown that the population system under study cannot have more than two points of rest, both coordinates of which are positive (non-zero. It is difficult to determine quality of such rest points depending on the model parameters due to the complexity of the expressions, which define the systems of the first approximation, recorded in a neighborhood of these points of rest. Numerical research results of the stability of these points of rest are obtained, and phase portraits with the specified specific values of the system parameters are demonstrated. The main scenarios for the cell population development are adduced. Analysis of mathematical model shows that a cell population system may remain the system consisting of populations of normal and abnormal cells; it can degenerate into a population of abnormal cells or perish. The scenario, in which there is only the population of normal cells, is not implemented. The numerical simulation

  12. Characterization of radiation-induced apoptosis in developing central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, M.R.; Gisone, P.; Dubner, D.; Michelin, S.; Sanjurjo, J.

    2000-01-01

    Prenatal exposures to ionizing radiation may cause a variety of effects on Central Nervous System (CNS) including microcephaly, severe mental retardation and lower intelligence tests score. The highest risks occur between 8 and 15 week of gestational age, simultaneously with the greatest neuroblastic proliferation and migration to cerebral cortex. It has been shown that radiation induce apoptosis in CNS, primarily in neonatal or early postnatal brain. At the same time, programmed cell death plays an important role in normal development of embrionic tissues, especially in the neuronal system. The purpose of the present study was the characterization and quantification of the apoptosis, the effectivity of different neuroprotectors, and the involvement of the caspase-3 in the programmed cellular death in our model. Evidence for apoptotic like features included: apoptotic nuclei observed by conventional and fluorescent staining, analysis of DNA fragmentation in agarosa gels and flow cytometric quantification. To gain an insight about the neuroprotective effect of different modulators of neuroprotection, it has been tested: Protein synthesis inhibitor, Compounds capable of reducing the effect of oxidative stress, Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors and glutamate receptor antagonists. Cerebrocortical micromass cultures were prepared from fetuses of Wistar rats removed between 15 and 19 embronic day (ED) and 5 postnatal day (PN). Irradiation was performed two hours after seeding, with a Co60 source and a fast beam of the research reactor RA1 with a neutron-gamma field. Conventional staining was performed with May Grunwald Giemsa. Fluorescent staining consisted in a mixture of Propidium iodide (IP), fluorescein diacetate (FDA) and Hoescht 33342. Analysis of DNA fragmentation was carried out on 1,8% agarosa gel stained with ethidium bromide, visualized and photographed by UV illumination. Caspase-3 activation was performed using ApoAlert TM Kit. The quantification of

  13. Programmed Cell Death Ligand 1 Expression in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphomas: A Clinicopathological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayano, Azusa; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Takashima, Yasuo; Takeya, Hiroto; Homma, Jumpei; Fukai, Junya; Iwadate, Yasuo; Kajiwara, Koji; Ishizawa, Shin; Hondoh, Hiroaki; Yamanaka, Ryuya

    2017-10-01

    Programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1)/programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) have been shown to predict response to PD-L1/PD-1-targeted therapy. We analyzed PD-L1 expression in primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSLs). PD-L1 protein and mRNA expression were evaluated in 64 PCNSL tissue samples. IFN-γ, IL-10, CD4, and CD8 mRNA expression was also evaluated. PD-L1 protein was detected in tumor cells in 2 (4.1%) cases and in tumor microenvironments in 25 (52%) cases. PD-L1 mRNA positively correlated with IFN-γ (p=0.0024) and CD4 (p=0.0005) mRNA expression. IFN-γ mRNA positively correlated with CD8 mRNA expression (p=0.0001). Furthermore, tumor cell PD-L1 expression correlated positively with overall survival (p=0.0177), whereas microenvironmental PD-L1 expression exhibited an insignificant negative trend with overall survival (p=0.188). PD-L1 was expressed on both tumor and/or tumor-infiltrating immune cells in PCNSL. The biological roles of this marker warrant further investigation. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  14. The effects of centrally administered fluorocitrate via inhibiting glial cells on working memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Li, Chao-Cui; Wang, Gong-Wu; Cai, Jing-Xia

    2009-08-01

    Although prefrontal and hippocampal neurons are critical for spatial working memory, the function of glial cells in spatial working memory remains uncertain. In this study we investigated the function of glial cells in rats' working memory. The glial cells of rat brain were inhibited by intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of fluorocitrate (FC). The effects of FC on the glial cells were examined by using electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings and delayed spatial alternation tasks. After icv injection of 10 microL of 0.5 nmol/L or 5 nmol/L FC, the EEG power spectrum recorded from the hippocampus increased, but the power spectrum for the prefrontal cortex did not change, and working memory was unaffected. Following an icv injection of 10 microL of 20 nmol/L FC, the EEG power spectra in both the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus increased, and working memory improved. The icv injection of 10 microL of 50 nmol/L FC, the EEG power spectra in both the prefrontal cortex and in the hippocampus decreased, and working memory was impaired. These results suggest that spatial working memory is affected by centrally administered FC, but only if there are changes in the EEG power spectrum in the prefrontal cortex. Presumably, the prefrontal glial cells relate to the working memory.

  15. Biothreat Reduction and Economic Development: The Case of Animal Husbandry in Central Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eWalker

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Improving human welfare is a global concern, but not always easy to achieve. In this regard, challenges have been faced by the states of the Former Soviet Union (FSU, where socialist institutions have disappeared, and the transition to a market economy has been slow. Economic adjustments have been difficult in the new nations of central Asia, including Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. Here, a severe climate limits agriculture, and industrialization has been inhibited by a lack of infrastructure, human capital, and financial resources. These conditions are aggravated by the fact that the central Asia is mostly landlocked, far from market centers. Despite these barriers, development potential exists, and the goal of the paper is to consider central Asia’s pastoral economy, with a focus on Kazakhstan, which stands poised to become a regional growth pole. The article pursues its goal as follows. It first addresses the biothreat situation to central Asian livestock herds, a significant impediment to realizing the market potential of the region’s animal products. It next provides an outline of interventions that can reduce risk levels for key biothreats impacting central Asia, namely foot and mouth disease (FMD and Brucellosis. Included is a success story involving FMD eradication in Brazil, which enabled an export boom in beef. After this comes a description of the epidemiological situation in Kazakhstan; here, the article considers how wildlife might act as a disease reservoir, which presents a conservation issue for the Kazakhstani case. This is followed by a discussion of the role of science in threat reduction, particularly with respect to the potential offered by geospatial technologies. The article concludes with an assessment of the research that would be necessary to identify pathways to developing the economic potential of central Asia, as changes in policy are implemented and livestock health improves.

  16. Changes in central corneal thickness and endothelial cell count pediatric cataract surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the mean changes in Central Corneal Thickness (CCT) and Endothelial Cell Count (ECC) in eyes after pediatric cataract surgery with foldable intraocular lens using scleral tunnel incision micro-surgical technique. Study Design: Qausi experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Al-Shifa Trust Eye Hospital, Rawalpindi, from May 2011 to March 2012. Methodology: Fifty-two eyes of 37 children with pediatric cataract were included in the study. Extracapsular Cataract Extraction (ECE) with foldable Intra Ocular Lens (IOL) implantation using sclera tunnel incision was performed in all children. Endothelial Cell Count (ECC) and Central Corneal Thickness (CCT) were recorded before surgery and 1 month, 3 months and 6 months after surgery and the effect of currently practiced surgical technique on ECC and CCTwas evaluated. Results: The mean age at the time of surgery was 8.8 ± 2.7 years (range: 4 to 15 years). The postoperative ECC and CCT were significantly different from the pre-operative values. Mean pre-operative ECC was 3175.3 ± 218.4 cell/mm2 and in first postoperative month the mean ECC was 3113.4 ± 210.8 cell/mm2 (p<0.0001). In the 3rd and 6th month postoperative means ECC were 3052 ± 202.5 cell/mm2 (p<0.0001) and 3015 ±190.6 cell/mm2 (p<0.0001), respectively. The mean cell loss at first postoperative month was 1.95% and at 3rd and 6th postoperative month were 3.9% and 5.05%, respectively. Mean pre-operative CCT was 514 ± 49.9 micro m and first postoperative mean CCT after 1 month was 524.1 ± 25 micro m (p = 0.084). After the 3rd and 6th months postoperative, mean CCT were 527.3 ± 24.6 micro m, and 530 ± 24.5 micro m, respectively. Third and 6th months postoperative means were significantly higher than baseline CCT, p = 0.024 and 0.007, respectively. Conclusion: Endothelial cell loss with closed chamber micro-surgical technique using scleral tunnel incision is within acceptable limits and

  17. Strategies for fuel cell product development. Developing fuel cell products in the technology supply chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellman, H.L.

    2004-01-01

    Due to the high cost of research and development and the broad spectrum of knowledge and competences required to develop fuel cell products, many product-developing firms outsource fuel cell technology, either partly or completely. This article addresses the inter-firm process of fuel cell product development from an Industrial Design Engineering perspective. The fuel cell product development can currently be characterised by a high degree of economic and technical uncertainty. Regarding the technology uncertainty: product-developing firms are more often then not unfamiliar with fuel cell technology technology. Yet there is a high interface complexity between the technology supplied and the product in which it is to be incorporated. In this paper the information exchange in three current fuel cell product development projects is analysed to determine the information required by a product designer to develop a fuel cell product. Technology transfer literature suggests that transfer effectiveness is greatest when the type of technology (technology uncertainty) and the type of relationship between the technology supplier and the recipient are carefully matched. In this line of thinking this paper proposes that the information required by a designer, determined by the design strategy and product/system volume, should be met by an appropriate level of communication interactivity with a technology specialist. (author)

  18. The Role of Duty Cycle in a Three Cell Central Pattern Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Jeremy; Clewley, Robert; Shilnikov, Andrey

    We describe a novel computational approach to reduce detailed models of central pattern generation to an equationless mapping that can be studied geometrically. Changes in model parameters, coupling properties, or external inputs produce qualitative changes in the mapping. These changes uncover possible biophysical mechanisms for control and modulation of rhythmic activity. Our analysis does not require knowledge of the equations that model the system, and so provides a powerful new approach to studying detailed models, applicable to a variety of biological phenomena beyond motor control. We demonstrate our technique on a motif of three reciprocally inhibitory cells that is able to produce multiple patterns of bursting rhythms. In particular, we examine the qualitative geometric structure of two-dimensional maps for phase lag between the cells.

  19. A Central Composite Face-Centered Design for Parameters Estimation of PEM Fuel Cell Electrochemical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled MAMMAR

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new approach based on Experimental of design methodology (DoE is used to estimate the optimal of unknown model parameters proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC. This proposed approach combines the central composite face-centered (CCF and numerical PEMFC electrochemical. Simulation results obtained using electrochemical model help to predict the cell voltage in terms of inlet partial pressures of hydrogen and oxygen, stack temperature, and operating current. The value of the previous model and (CCF design methodology is used for parametric analysis of electrochemical model. Thus it is possible to evaluate the relative importance of each parameter to the simulation accuracy. However this methodology is able to define the exact values of the parameters from the manufacture data. It was tested for the BCS 500-W stack PEM Generator, a stack rated at 500 W, manufactured by American Company BCS Technologies FC.

  20. Primary angiitis of the central nervous system with diffuse cerebral mass effect and giant cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, J A

    2012-02-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS), also called primary CNS vasculitis, is an idiopathic inflammatory condition affecting only intracranial and spinal cord vessels, particularly medium-sized and smaller arteries and arterioles. Angiography and histopathology typically do not reveal evidence of systemic vasculitis.(1,2) Histopathology usually reveals granulomatous inflammation affecting arterioles and small arteries of the parenchyma and\\/or leptomeninges, similar to that seen in Takayasu\\'s or giant cell arteritis.(1-3) We report a patient with biopsy-proven PACNS with giant cells and cerebral mass effect on MRI. Magnetic resonance angiography and cerebral angiography appeared normal and there was no evidence of extracranial vasculitis.

  1. MCPIP1 contributes to clear cell renal cell carcinomas development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligeza, Janusz; Marona, Paulina; Gach, Natalia; Lipert, Barbara; Miekus, Katarzyna; Wilk, Waclaw; Jaszczynski, Janusz; Stelmach, Andrzej; Loboda, Agnieszka; Dulak, Jozef; Branicki, Wojciech; Rys, Janusz; Jura, Jolanta

    2017-08-01

    Monocyte Chemoattractant protein-induced protein 1 (MCPIP1), also known as Regnase-1, is encoded by the ZC3H12a gene, and it mediates inflammatory processes by regulating the stability of transcripts coding for proinflammatory cytokines and controlling activity of transcription factors, such as NF-κB and AP1. We found that MCPIP1 transcript and protein levels are strongly downregulated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) samples, which were derived from patients surgically treated for renal cancer compared to surrounded normal tissues. Using Caki-1 cells as a model, we analyzed the role of MCPIP1 in cancer development. We showed that MCPIP1 expression depends on the proteasome activity; however, hypoxia and hypoxia inducible factor 2 alfa (HIF2α) are key factors lowering MCPIP1 expression. Furthermore, we found that MCPIP1 negatively regulates HIF1α and HIF2α levels and in the case of the last one, the mechanism is based on the regulation of the half time of transcript coding for HIF2α. Enhanced expression of MCPIP1 in Caki-1 cells results in a downregulation of transcripts encoding VEGFA, GLUT1, and IL-6. Furthermore, MCPIP1 decreases the activity of mTOR and protein kinase B (Akt) in normoxic conditions. Taken together, MCPIP1 contributes to the ccRCC development.

  2. Improved premises for cell factory development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Karina Marie

    by a differential expression of the lysozyme gene encoded on the same plasmid. These phenomena seem to have been largely overlooked despite the huge popularity of the T7/pet-based systems for bacterial protein production. Additionally, the paradox that standardization comes at the cost of reduced flexibility...... is at the core of biotechnology and numerous molecular tools and bacterial strains have been developed over the past four decades for this purpose. Understanding of the genetic code and our ability to manipulate genetic material, paves the way for the microbial cell factory development that enables production...... of protein in a sustainable, costefficient manner. In this thesis I report the joined efforts of my colleagues and myself, to improve the premises for cell factory development by optimizing the cloning strategies, improving the awareness of unforeseen side-effects in complex bacterial expression systems...

  3. Central role of T helper 17 cells in chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maston, Levi D; Jones, David T; Giermakowska, Wieslawa; Howard, Tamara A; Cannon, Judy L; Wang, Wei; Wei, Yongyi; Xuan, Weimin; Resta, Thomas C; Gonzalez Bosc, Laura V

    2017-05-01

    Inflammation is a prominent pathological feature in pulmonary arterial hypertension, as demonstrated by pulmonary vascular infiltration of inflammatory cells, including T and B lymphocytes. However, the contribution of the adaptive immune system is not well characterized in pulmonary hypertension caused by chronic hypoxia. CD4 + T cells are required for initiating and maintaining inflammation, suggesting that these cells could play an important role in the pathogenesis of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that CD4 + T cells, specifically the T helper 17 subset, contribute to chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. We compared indices of pulmonary hypertension resulting from chronic hypoxia (3 wk) in wild-type mice and recombination-activating gene 1 knockout mice (RAG1 -/- , lacking mature T and B cells). Separate sets of mice were adoptively transferred with CD4 + , CD8 + , or T helper 17 cells before normoxic or chronic hypoxic exposure to evaluate the involvement of specific T cell subsets. RAG1 -/- mice had diminished right ventricular systolic pressure and arterial remodeling compared with wild-type mice exposed to chronic hypoxia. Adoptive transfer of CD4 + but not CD8 + T cells restored the hypertensive phenotype in RAG1 -/- mice. Interestingly, RAG1 -/- mice receiving T helper 17 cells displayed evidence of pulmonary hypertension independent of chronic hypoxia. Supporting our hypothesis, depletion of CD4 + cells or treatment with SR1001, an inhibitor of T helper 17 cell development, prevented increased pressure and remodeling responses to chronic hypoxia. We conclude that T helper 17 cells play a key role in the development of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Measuring Central and Eastern Europe's Socio-Economic Development Using Time Lags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paprotny, Dominik

    This paper applies the 'time lag' method to a set of social and economic indicators, examining the development of Central and Eastern Europe since the first world war. Originally used to assess technology diffusion, this method allows comparison of levels of development between states and through a long period of time. It presents how many years have elapsed between achieving a certain level of development between countries. The results show that the countries of Central and Eastern Europe have only narrowly converged with a set of 23 highly-developed 'benchmark' states. Development in monetary terms (gross domestic product per capita) is the indicator where this region lags most. Employment structure, life expectancy or infant mortality show much smaller lags. Communist states were closest to the West in the 1960s-early 1970s and struggled thereafter. They are still mostly lagging more today than at their peak before transformation despite the progress achieved in absolute terms after the fall of centrally-planned economy.

  5. Recent developments in blood cell labeling research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.; Meinken, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    A number of recent developments in research on blood cell labeling techniques are presented. The discussion relates to three specific areas: (1) a new in vitro method for red blood cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc; (2) a method for labeling leukocytes and platelets with /sup 99m/Tc; and (3) the use of monoclonal antibody technique for platelet labeling. The advantages and the pitfalls of these techniques are examined in the light of available mechanistic information. Problems that remain to be resolved are reviewed. An assessment is made of the progress as well as prospects in blood cell labeling methodology including that using the monoclonal antibody approach. 37 refs., 4 figs

  6. Cells, embryos and development in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1984-01-01

    Work continues to focus on the demonstrable totipotency of cultured somatic cells of various higher plants and has examined the conditions which regulate this propensity to be controllably released. This was done with special reference to cells obtained from cultured explants of daylily and carrot. For purposes of identifying the variables in question, work was carried out almost exclusively in liquid media. The events that intervene between the aseptic isolation of tissue explants, the culture of small derived units and free cells and the propagation in large numbers of adventive or somatic embryos to plantlets were traced and certain definitive stages at which control is exercised were identified. In daylily, morphologically competent units are now propagated with a high degree of precision in rotated liquid cultures in bulk, and under the conditions of continuous neutralized gravity, the development progresses so that embryo-plantlets are obtained.

  7. Recent developments in blood cell labeling research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.; Meinken, G.E.

    1988-09-07

    A number of recent developments in research on blood cell labeling techniques are presented. The discussion relates to three specific areas: (1) a new in vitro method for red blood cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc; (2) a method for labeling leukocytes and platelets with /sup 99m/Tc; and (3) the use of monoclonal antibody technique for platelet labeling. The advantages and the pitfalls of these techniques are examined in the light of available mechanistic information. Problems that remain to be resolved are reviewed. An assessment is made of the progress as well as prospects in blood cell labeling methodology including that using the monoclonal antibody approach. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Residual spinothalamic tract pathways predict development of central pain after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasner, Gunnar; Lee, Bonsan Bonne; Engel, Stella; McLachlan, Elspeth

    2008-09-01

    Central neuropathic pain following lesions within the CNS, such as spinal cord injury, is one of the most excruciating types of chronic pain and one of the most difficult to treat. The role of spinothalamic pathways in this type of pain is not clear. Previous studies suggested that spinothalamic tract lesions are necessary but not sufficient for development of central pain, since deficits of spinothalamic function were equally severe in spinal cord injured people with and without pain. The aim of the present study was to examine spinothalamic tract function by quantitative sensory testing before and after activation and sensitization of small diameter afferents by applying menthol, histamine or capsaicin to the distal skin areas where spontaneous pain was localized. Investigations were performed in matched groups each of 12 patients with and without central pain below the level of a clinically complete spinal cord injury, and in 12 able-bodied controls. To test peripheral C fibre function, axon reflex vasodilations induced by histamine and capsaicin applications were quantified. In eight patients with pain, sensations of the same quality as one of their major individual pain sensations were rekindled by heat stimuli in combination with topical capsaicin (n = 7) or by cold stimuli (n = 1). No sensations were evoked in pain-free patients (P central pain from those without. The ability to mimic chronic pain sensations by activation of thermosensory nociceptive neurons implies that ongoing activity in these residual spinothalamic pathways plays a crucial role in maintaining central pain. We propose that processes associated with degeneration of neighbouring axons within the tract, such as inflammation, may trigger spontaneous activity in residual intact neurons that act as a 'central pain generator' after spinal cord injury.

  9. Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Magee; Richard Gehman

    2005-07-12

    This document reports on the work done by Honeywell Sensing and Control to investigate the feasibility of modifying low cost Commercial Sensors for use inside a PEM Fuel Cell environment. Both stationary and automotive systems were considered. The target environment is hotter (100 C) than the typical commercial sensor maximum of 70 C. It is also far more humid (100% RH condensing) than the more typical 95% RH non-condensing at 40 C (4% RH maximum at 100 C). The work focused on four types of sensors, Temperature, Pressure, Air Flow and Relative Humidity. Initial design goals were established using a market research technique called Market Driven Product Definition (MDPD). A series of interviews were conducted with various users and system designers in their facilities. The interviewing team was trained in data taking and analysis per the MDPD process. The final result was a prioritized and weighted list of both requirements and desires for each sensor. Work proceeded on concept development for the 4 types of sensors. At the same time, users were developing the actual fuel cell systems and gaining knowledge and experience in the use of sensors and controls systems. This resulted in changes to requirements and desires that were not anticipated during the MDPD process. The concepts developed met all the predicted requirements. At the completion of concept development for the Pressure Sensor, it was determined that the Fuel Cell developers were happy with off-the-shelf automotive pressure sensors. Thus, there was no incentive to bring a new Fuel Cell Specific Pressure Sensor into production. Work was therefore suspended. After the experience with the Pressure Sensor, the requirements for a Temperature Sensor were reviewed and a similar situation applied. Commercially available temperature sensors were adequate and cost effective and so the program was not continued from the Concept into the Design Phase.

  10. Dengue Virus Type 2: Protein Binding and Active Replication in Human Central Nervous System Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Isabel Salazar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An increased number of dengue cases with neurological complications have been reported in recent years. The lack of reliable animal models for dengue has hindered studies on dengue virus (DENV pathogenesis and cellular tropism in vivo. We further investigate the tropism of DENV for the human central nervous system (CNS, characterizing DENV interactions with cell surface proteins in human CNS cells by virus overlay protein binding assays (VOPBA and coimmunoprecipitations. In VOPBA, three membrane proteins (60, 70, and 130 kDa from the gray matter bound the entire virus particle, whereas only a 70 kDa protein bound in white matter. The coimmunoprecipitation assays revealed three proteins from gray matter consistently binding virus particles, one clearly distinguishable protein (~32 kDa and two less apparent proteins (100 and 130 kDa. Monoclonal anti-NS3 targeted the virus protein in primary cell cultures of human CNS treated with DENV-2, which also stained positive for NeuH, a neuron-specific marker. Thus, our results indicate (1 that DENV-2 exhibited a direct tropism for human neurons and (2 that human neurons sustain an active DENV replication as was demonstrated by the presence of the NS3 viral antigen in primary cultures of these cells treated with DENV-2.

  11. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Development in Columbia (SC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reifsnider, Kenneth

    2011-07-31

    This is an update to the final report filed after the extension of this program to May of 2011. The activities of the present program contributed to the goals and objectives of the Fuel Cell element of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program of the Department of Energy through five sub-projects. Three of these projects have focused on PEM cells, addressing the creation of carbon-based metal-free catalysts, the development of durable seals, and an effort to understand contaminant adsorption/reaction/transport/performance relationships at low contaminant levels in PEM cells. Two programs addressed barriers in SOFCs; an effort to create a new symmetrical and direct hydrocarbon fuel SOFC designs with greatly increased durability, efficiency, and ease of manufacturing, and an effort to create a multiphysics engineering durability model based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy interpretations that associate the micro-details of how a fuel cell is made and their history of (individual) use with specific prognosis for long term performance, resulting in attendant reductions in design, manufacturing, and maintenance costs and increases in reliability and durability.

  12. Hydrogen Fuel Cell development in Columbia (SC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reifsnider, Kenneth [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Chen, Fanglin [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Popov, Branko [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Chao, Yuh [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Xue, Xingjian [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2012-09-15

    This is an update to the final report filed after the extension of this program to May of 2011. The activities of the present program contributed to the goals and objectives of the Fuel Cell element of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program of the Department of Energy through five sub-projects. Three of these projects have focused on PEM cells, addressing the creation of carbon-based metal-free catalysts, the development of durable seals, and an effort to understand contaminant adsorption/reaction/transport/performance relationships at low contaminant levels in PEM cells. Two programs addressed barriers in SOFCs; an effort to create a new symmetrical and direct hydrocarbon fuel SOFC designs with greatly increased durability, efficiency, and ease of manufacturing, and an effort to create a multiphysics engineering durability model based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy interpretations that associate the micro-details of how a fuel cell is made and their history of (individual) use with specific prognosis for long term performance, resulting in attendant reductions in design, manufacturing, and maintenance costs and increases in reliability and durability.

  13. Programmed cell death during quinoa perisperm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, María Paula; Maldonado, Sara

    2013-08-01

    At seed maturity, quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) perisperm consists of uniform, non-living, thin-walled cells full of starch grains. The objective of the present study was to study quinoa perisperm development and describe the programme of cell death that affects the entire tissue. A number of parameters typically measured during programmed cell death (PCD), such as cellular morphological changes in nuclei and cytoplasm, endoreduplication, DNA fragmentation, and the participation of nucleases and caspase-like proteases in nucleus dismantling, were evaluated; morphological changes in cytoplasm included subcellular aspects related to starch accumulation. This study proved that, following fertilization, the perisperm of quinoa simultaneously accumulates storage reserves and degenerates, both processes mediated by a programme of developmentally controlled cell death. The novel findings regarding perisperm development provide a starting point for further research in the Amaranthaceae genera, such as comparing seeds with and without perisperm, and specifying phylogeny and evolution within this taxon. Wherever possible and appropriate, differences between quinoa perisperm and grass starchy endosperm--a morphologically and functionally similar, although genetically different tissue--were highlighted and discussed.

  14. The thymic orchestration involving Aire, miRNAs and cell-cell interactions during the induction of central tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Geraldo eAleixo Passos; DANIELLA AREAS MENDES-DA-CRUZ; Ernna Hérida Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Developing thymocytes interact sequentially with two distinct structures within the thymus: the cortex and medulla. Surviving single-positive and double-positive thymocytes from the cortex migrate into the medulla, where they interact with medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). These cells ectopically express a vast set of peripheral tissue antigens (PTAs), a property termed promiscuous gene expression that is associated with the presentation of PTAs by mTECs to thymocytes. Thymocyte clon...

  15. Stepwise development of hematopoietic stem cells from embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Matsumoto

    Full Text Available The cellular ontogeny of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs remains poorly understood because their isolation from and their identification in early developing small embryos are difficult. We attempted to dissect early developmental stages of HSCs using an in vitro mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC differentiation system combined with inducible HOXB4 expression. Here we report the identification of pre-HSCs and an embryonic type of HSCs (embryonic HSCs as intermediate cells between ESCs and HSCs. Both pre-HSCs and embryonic HSCs were isolated by their c-Kit(+CD41(+CD45(- phenotype. Pre-HSCs did not engraft in irradiated adult mice. After co-culture with OP9 stromal cells and conditional expression of HOXB4, pre-HSCs gave rise to embryonic HSCs capable of engraftment and long-term reconstitution in irradiated adult mice. Blast colony assays revealed that most hemangioblast activity was detected apart from the pre-HSC population, implying the early divergence of pre-HSCs from hemangioblasts. Gene expression profiling suggests that a particular set of transcripts closely associated with adult HSCs is involved in the transition of pre-HSC to embryonic HSCs. We propose an HSC developmental model in which pre-HSCs and embryonic HSCs sequentially give rise to adult types of HSCs in a stepwise manner.

  16. The central nervous system environment controls effector CD4+ T cell cytokine profile in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krakowski, M L; Owens, T

    1997-01-01

    In experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), CD4+ T cells infiltrate the central nervous system (CNS). We derived CD4+ T cell lines from SJL/J mice that were specific for encephalitogenic myelin basic protein (MBP) peptides and produced both Th1 and Th2 cytokines. These lines transferred EAE...

  17. Specific central nervous system recruitment of HLA-G(+) regulatory T cells in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Hwa; Zozulya, Alla L; Weidenfeller, Christian; Metz, Imke; Buck, Dorothea; Toyka, Klaus V; Brück, Wolfgang; Wiendl, Heinz

    2009-08-01

    We have recently described a novel population of natural regulatory T cells (T(reg)) that are characterized by the expression of HLA-G and may be found at sites of tissue inflammation (HLA-G(pos) T(reg)). Here we studied the role of these cells in multiple sclerosis (MS), a prototypic autoimmune inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS). Sixty-four patients with different types of MS, 9 patients with other neurological diseases, and 20 healthy donors were included in this study. Inflamed brain lesions from 5 additional untreated MS patients were examined. HLA-G(pos) T(reg) were analyzed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by flow cytometry and in inflammatory demyelinating lesions of MS brain specimens by immunohistochemistry. Functional capacity was accessed and transmigration was determined using an in vitro model of the human blood-brain barrier (BBB). HLA-G(pos) T(reg) were found enriched in the inflamed CSF of MS patients and in inflammatory demyelinating lesions of MS brain specimens. HLA-G(pos) T(reg) showed a strong propensity to transmigrate across BBB, which was vigorously driven by inflammatory chemokines, and associated with a gain of suppressive capacity upon transmigration. CSF-derived HLA-G(pos) T(reg) of MS patients represented a population of activated central memory activated T cells with an upregulated expression of inflammatory chemokine receptors and exhibiting full suppressive capacity. Unlike natural FoxP3-expressing T(reg), HLA-G(pos) T(reg) derived from peripheral blood were functionally unimpaired in MS. In MS, HLA-G(pos) T(reg) may serve to control potentially destructive immune responses directly at the sites of CNS inflammation and to counterbalance inflammation once specifically recruited to the CNS.

  18. Development in the central nervous system: studies of activity-dependent plasticity and synapse refinement

    OpenAIRE

    Gaudias, Julien

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is a highly specified structure, involved in a large range of function, from sensory processing to motor behavior to cognition. The CNS development is genetically programmed but also heavily dependent on environmental cues. The CNS is a highly plastic structure, most prominently at the synaptic level. Plasticity is a physiological process allowing a rapid change of synaptic strength depending on experience, use and surrounding neuronal activity. It...

  19. National Economic Development Status May Affect the Association between Central Adiposity and Cognition in Older Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asri Maharani

    Full Text Available Obesity is becoming a global problem, rather than one found only in developed countries. Although recent studies have suggested a detrimental effect of obesity on cognition, studies of the relationship between obesity and cognition among older adults have been limited to developed countries. We aimed to examine the associations between central obesity, as measured by waist circumference, and cognition level in adults aged 50 years and older in England and Indonesia.We used linear regression models to analyse these associations and multiple imputation to manage missing data. The 2006 English Longitudinal Study of Ageing Wave 3 is the source of data from England, while data from Indonesia is sourced from the 2007 Indonesian Family Life Survey Wave 4.Centrally obese respondents had lower cognition levels than non-centrally obese respondents in England. In contrast, central adiposity had a statistically significant positive association with cognition in Indonesia. Higher levels of education and higher economic status were associated with higher cognitive ability, while age was associated with lower cognition in both countries. Elevated C-reactive protein (CRP concentrations and smoking behaviour, both linked to higher risk of obesity, were negatively associated with cognitive ability among older adults in England, but they had no statistically significant association with cognition among Indonesians.The contradictory findings on obesity and cognition in England and Indonesia not only create a puzzle, but they may also have different policy implications in these countries. Reducing the prevalence of obesity may be the main focus in England and other developed countries to maintain older adults' cognition. However, Indonesia and other developing countries should place more emphasis on education, in addition to continued efforts to tackle the double burden of malnutrition, in order to prevent cognitive impairment among older adults.

  20. Polygenetic development and paleoenvironmental implications of a Pleistocene calcrete at Tongoy, central northern Chile.

    OpenAIRE

    M. Pfeiffer; J. Le Roux; H. Kemnitz

    2011-01-01

    The Norte Chico Region, in central northern Chile, is a particularly sensitive area to Quaternary climate changes because of its extreme climatic gradients. However, very little has been done to determine the late Pleistocene climatic conditions of the area. Calcretes are known to be important repositories of information on past ecosystems and environments. In the Tongoy paleobay, a series of four marine beach terraces have developed over a Mio-Pliocene calcareous formation since MIS 11 to th...

  1. Development of key performance indicators to evaluate centralized intake for patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Claire E; Patel, Jatin N; Woodhouse, Linda; Smith, Christopher; Weiss, Stephen; Homik, Joanne; LeClercq, Sharon; Mosher, Dianne; Christiansen, Tanya; Howden, Jane Squire; Wasylak, Tracy; Greenwood-Lee, James; Emrick, Andrea; Suter, Esther; Kathol, Barb; Khodyakov, Dmitry; Grant, Sean; Campbell-Scherer, Denise; Phillips, Leah; Hendricks, Jennifer; Marshall, Deborah A

    2015-11-14

    Centralized intake is integral to healthcare systems to support timely access to appropriate health services. The aim of this study was to develop key performance indicators (KPIs) to evaluate centralized intake systems for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Phase 1 involved stakeholder meetings including healthcare providers, managers, researchers and patients to obtain input on candidate KPIs, aligned along six quality dimensions: appropriateness, accessibility, acceptability, efficiency, effectiveness, and safety. Phase 2 involved literature reviews to ensure KPIs were based on best practices and harmonized with existing measures. Phase 3 involved a three-round, online modified Delphi panel to finalize the KPIs. The panel consisted of two rounds of rating and a round of online and in-person discussions. KPIs rated as valid and important (≥7 on a 9-point Likert scale) were included in the final set. Twenty-five KPIs identified and substantiated during Phases 1 and 2 were submitted to 27 panellists including healthcare providers, managers, researchers, and patients in Phase 3. After the in-person meeting, three KPIs were removed and six were suggested. The final set includes 9 OA KPIs, 10 RA KPIs and 9 relating to centralized intake processes for both conditions. All 28 KPIs were rated as valid and important. Arthritis stakeholders have proposed 28 KPIs that should be used in quality improvement efforts when evaluating centralized intake for OA and RA. The KPIs measure five of the six dimensions of quality and are relevant to patients, practitioners and health systems.

  2. Central Dalmatia: An Area with Differentiated Demographic Development (1961–2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roko Mišetić

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses Central Dalmatian territory in the 2nd half of the 20th century as one of demographically more progressive parts of the Republic of Croatia. Analyses of overall population trends and the dynamic components of overall trends (natural change and migration balance have been made for the 1961 to 2001 period. The space has been analysed through its three components: the hinterland, the coastal area and the islands. The results have shown that all three components of Central Dalmatia have not been equally characterized by the cited demographic progression. Namely, by the analysis (dissection of the dynamic components of the overall population trends, it was established that two out of the three spatial components of the Central Dalmatian territory were in a regressive, and only the smallest one of them in a progressive demographic phase throughout the entire analysed period. In this way, Central Dalmatia proved to be a space of differentiated demographic development with an unfavourable developmental structure, where population is concentrated in the narrow longitudinal coastal zone.

  3. [Primary central nervous system diffuse large B cell lymphoma: a clinicopathologic and molecular study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Z P; Ainiwaer, Babayi; Liu, Z Y; Shi, X L; Cui, W L; Zhang, W; Li, X X

    2016-11-08

    Objective: To investigate clinicopathologic characteristics, immunophenotype and EB virus-related molecular genetic alterations in primary central nervous system diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) along with correlation with clinical prognosis. Methods: A total of 30 cases of primary central nervous system DLBCL were retrospectively studied by retrieving clinical data, histological evaluation and immunophenotyping by EnVision two steps methods. The expression of EBER mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization and bcl-2, bcl-6 and C-MYC gene abnormalities were analyzed by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization. Results: The cases included 18 males and 12 females (sex ratio of 1.5∶1.0) with an age ranging from 24 to 78 years (average age of 52 years, the median age of 53 years). The single primary clinical presentation was focal neurologic deficits. Tumor locations were supratentorial (21 cases), subtentorial (7 cases), involving both locations in 2 cases. Diffuse growth pattern was observed with large lymphoid cells mostly resembling centroblasts with abundant basophilic cytoplasm with oval to round, vesicular nuclei containing fine chromatin. An angiocentric and angiodestructive growth pattern was also present. Other features included perivascular space invasion. Immunohistochemical staining using a panel of CD10, bcl-6 and MUM1, six cases were germinal center-like (GCB) and 24 cases were non-germinal central-like (non-GCB). The positive rates of bcl-2, bcl-6 and C-MYC were 53.3% (16/30), 80.0% (24/30) and 20.0% (6/30), respectively. Genetic alterations were detected by FISH and the gene arrangement rates of bcl-2, bcl-6 and C-MYC were 3.3% (1/30), 16.7% (5/30) and 3.3% (1/30), respectively. There were 19 cases in stage 0-1 disease and 11 cases had stage 2-3 disease. Postoperative follow-up for average 13.6 months showed the median survival of 10 months, one-year survival of 46.7% and 16 patients died within a year. Conclusions: The clinical prognosis

  4. Challenges in developing direct carbon fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Cairong; Ma, Jianjun; Corre, Gael; Jain, Sneh L; Irvine, John T S

    2017-05-22

    A direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) can produce electricity with both superior electrical efficiency and fuel utilisation compared to all other types of fuel cells. Although the first DCFC prototype was proposed in 1896, there was, until the 1970s, little sustained effort to investigate further, because of technology development issues. Interest in DCFCs has recently been reinvigorated as a possible method of replacing conventional coal-fired power plants to meet the demands for lower CO 2 emissions, and indeed for efficient utilisation of waste derived chars. In this article, recent developments in direct carbon conversion are reviewed, with the principal emphasis on the materials involved. The development of electrolytes, anodes and cathodes as well as fuel sources is examined. The activity and chemical stability of the anode materials are a critical concern addressed in the development of new materials. Redox media of molten carbonate or molten metal facilitating the transportation of ions offer promising possibilities for carbon oxidation. The suitability of different carbon fuels in various DCFC systems, in terms of crystal structure, surface properties, impurities and particle size, is also discussed. We explore the influence of a variety of parameters on the electrochemical performance of DCFCs, with regard to their open circuit voltage, power output and lifetime. The challenges faced in developing DCFCs are summarised, and potential prospects of the system are outlined.

  5. Studies on the development of male cells of third generation of the stratosphere radiative millet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Qinggang; Cao Yufang; Xin Hua; Zhang Xiufen

    1998-01-01

    The developmental process of male cells of millet (Setaria italica), the third generation of the stratosphere radiative treatment SP 3 and CK 3 , was studied. The results show that the normal process begins with archesporial cell and undergoes stages of primary and secondary sporogenous cell, microspore mother cell, dyad, tetrad, central nucleus microspore, vacuolated microspore, mature microspore, two-cell pollen and three-cell mature pollen. Among them, the formation of tetrad belongs to successive type. The situation of abnormal development of male cells is as follows: microspore mother cell can't enter into meiosis because of intense vacuolation, shrink and disintegration of its cytoplasm; although vacuolated microspore mother cell can enter into meiosis, it can't form normal dyad and degenerate in the middle process; dyad and tetrad become vacuolated and can't develop normally; cytoplasm of microspore shrinks around the nucleus at the stage of central nucleus microspore, the shape of microspore is twisted into crescent or irregular shape, at last its cytoplasm and nucleus are disintegrated and crescent vacant microspore presents; nutritive substances can't be accumulated at the stage of vacuolated microspore, cytoplasm is disintegrated, and microspore turns into a big vacant pollen. The ratio of abnormal development of male cells of SP 3 is as high as 50%. This maybe relates to the treatment of space radiation, which results in chromosomal aberration, and also to the segregation and recombinatiom of chromosome of SP 1 and SP 2

  6. Biothreat Reduction and Economic Development: The Case of Animal Husbandry in Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robert; Blackburn, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Improving human welfare is a critical global concern, but not always easy to achieve. Complications in this regard have been faced by the states of the Former Soviet Union, where socialist-style economic institutions have disappeared, and the transition to a market economy has been slow in coming. Lack of capital, ethnic conflict, and political instability have at times undermined the institutional reform that would be necessary to enable economic efficiency and development. Nowhere are such challenges more pronounced than in the new nation states of central Asia, including Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. Here, a severe climate limits agriculture, and industrialization has been inhibited by lack of infrastructure, low levels of human capital, and a scarcity of financial resources. These conditions are aggravated by the fact that the central Asian states are landlocked, far from centers of market demand and capital availability. Despite these daunting barriers, development potential does exist, and the goal of the paper is to consider central Asia's pastoral economy, with a focus on Kazakhstan, which stands poised to become a regional growth pole. The article pursues its goal as follows. It first addresses the biothreat situation to central Asian livestock herds, the most significant existing impediment to realizing the full market potential of the region's animal products. Next, it provides an outline of interventions that can reduce risk levels for key biothreats impacting central Asia, namely foot and mouth disease (FMD), which greatly impacts livestock and prohibits export, and Brucellosis, a bacterial zoonosis with high incidence in both humans and livestock in the region. Included is an important success story involving the FMD eradication programs in Brazil, which enabled an export boom in beef. After this comes a description of the epidemiological situation in Kazakhstan; here, the article considers the role of wildlife in

  7. The Development of GIS Educational Resources Sharing among Central Taiwan Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, T.-Y.; Yeh, M.-L.; Lai, Y.-C.

    2011-09-01

    Using GIS in the classroom enhance students' computer skills and explore the range of knowledge. The paper highlights GIS integration on e-learning platform and introduces a variety of abundant educational resources. This research project will demonstrate tools for e-learning environment and delivers some case studies for learning interaction from Central Taiwan Universities. Feng Chia University (FCU) obtained a remarkable academic project subsidized by Ministry of Education and developed e-learning platform for excellence in teaching/learning programs among Central Taiwan's universities. The aim of the project is to integrate the educational resources of 13 universities in central Taiwan. FCU is serving as the hub of Center University. To overcome the problem of distance, e-platforms have been established to create experiences with collaboration enhanced learning. The e-platforms provide coordination of web service access among the educational community and deliver GIS educational resources. Most of GIS related courses cover the development of GIS, principles of cartography, spatial data analysis and overlaying, terrain analysis, buffer analysis, 3D GIS application, Remote Sensing, GPS technology, and WebGIS, MobileGIS, ArcGIS manipulation. In each GIS case study, students have been taught to know geographic meaning, collect spatial data and then use ArcGIS software to analyze spatial data. On one of e-Learning platforms provide lesson plans and presentation slides. Students can learn Arc GIS online. As they analyze spatial data, they can connect to GIS hub to get data they need including satellite images, aerial photos, and vector data. Moreover, e-learning platforms provide solutions and resources. Different levels of image scales have been integrated into the systems. Multi-scale spatial development and analyses in Central Taiwan integrate academic research resources among CTTLRC partners. Thus, establish decision-making support mechanism in teaching and

  8. Development and Analysis of a Hurricane Hazard Model for Disaster Risk Assessment in Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, G. L.; Gunasekera, R.; Ishizawa, O. A.

    2014-12-01

    Hurricane and tropical storm activity in Central America has consistently caused over the past decades thousands of casualties, significant population displacement, and substantial property and infrastructure losses. As a component to estimate future potential losses, we present a new regional probabilistic hurricane hazard model for Central America. Currently, there are very few openly available hurricane hazard models for Central America. This resultant hazard model would be used in conjunction with exposure and vulnerability components as part of a World Bank project to create country disaster risk profiles that will assist to improve risk estimation and provide decision makers with better tools to quantify disaster risk. This paper describes the hazard model methodology which involves the development of a wind field model that simulates the gust speeds at terrain height at a fine resolution. The HURDAT dataset has been used in this study to create synthetic events that assess average hurricane landfall angles and their variability at each location. The hazard model also then estimates the average track angle at multiple geographical locations in order to provide a realistic range of possible hurricane paths that will be used for risk analyses in all the Central-American countries. This probabilistic hurricane hazard model is then also useful for relating synthetic wind estimates to loss and damage data to develop and calibrate existing empirical building vulnerability curves. To assess the accuracy and applicability, modeled results are evaluated against historical events, their tracks and wind fields. Deeper analyses of results are also presented with a special reference to Guatemala. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this paper are entirely those of the authors. They do not necessarily represent the views of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/World Bank and its affiliated organizations, or those of the

  9. Porcine pluripotency cell signaling develops from the inner cell mass to the epiblast during early development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane; Christensen, Josef; Gao, Yu

    2009-01-01

    (LIF, LIFR, GP130), FGF pathway (bFGF, FGFR1, FGFR2), BMP pathway (BMP4), and downstream-activated genes (STAT3, c-Myc, c-Fos, and SMAD4). We discovered two different expression profiles exist in the developing porcine embryo. The D6 porcine blastocyst (inner cell mass stage) is devoid......  The signaling mechanisms regulating pluripotency in porcine embryonic stem cells and embryos are unknown. In this study, we characterize cell signaling in the in-vivo porcine inner cell mass and later-stage epiblast. We evaluate expression of OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, genes within the JAK/STAT pathway...... pluripotency in human embryonic stem cells is detectable in the porcine epiblast, but not in the inner cell mass. Copyright (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc....

  10. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in central giant cell lesion of the jaws: an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Renato Luiz Maia; Faria, Mário Henrique Girão; Osterne, Rafael Lima Verde; Cavalcante, Roberta Barroso; Ribeiro, Ronaldo Albuquerque; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem

    2012-02-01

    Central Giant Cell Lesion (CGCL) is an uncommon benign jaw lesion, with uncertain etiology, and a variable clinical behavior. Studies of molecular markers of CGCL, may help understanding better the nature and behavior of this lesion, and eventually may represent a definitive target to pharmacological approach in the treatment of CGCL. Chronic inflammation has been found to mediate a wide variety of diseases including neoplasms. Among the gene products involved in the induction of the inflammatory process, Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) has been shown to have a close relationship with tumorigenesis, however COX-2 expression has never been evaluated in CGCL. The aim of the study was to investigate the expression of COX-2 in CGCL. Immunohistochemical assessment for COX-2 expression was performed in 18 patients previously diagnosed with CGCL. Multinucleated giant cells (MGC) and mononucleated stromal cells (MSC) were used in the slide analysis. Among the patients studied, 10 were male and 8 were female, with a median age of 15.4 years. Lesions in the mandible were observed in 11 cases and 7 were found in the maxilla. There were 9 aggressive and 9 non-aggressive CGCLs. COX-2 immunopositivity was present in only 3 cases stained in both MGC and MSC. All 3 cases presented with ulcerations in the mucosa lesion, suggesting that the COX-2 expression is due to the presence of inflammation. This study does not support the involvement of COX-2 in the etiophatogenesis of CGCL.

  11. Blast shockwaves propagate Ca2+ activity via purinergic astrocyte networks in human central nervous system cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, Rea; Blank, Paul S.; Busse, Brad; Ravin, Nitay; Vira, Shaleen; Bezrukov, Ludmila; Waters, Hang; Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Lee, Philip R.; Fields, R. Douglas; Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    In a recent study of the pathophysiology of mild, blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) the exposure of dissociated, central nervous system (CNS) cells to simulated blast resulted in propagating waves of elevated intracellular Ca2+. Here we show, in dissociated human CNS cultures, that these calcium waves primarily propagate through astrocyte-dependent, purinergic signaling pathways that are blocked by P2 antagonists. Human, compared to rat, astrocytes had an increased calcium response and prolonged calcium wave propagation kinetics, suggesting that in our model system rat CNS cells are less responsive to simulated blast. Furthermore, in response to simulated blast, human CNS cells have increased expressions of a reactive astrocyte marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and a protease, matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9). The conjoint increased expression of GFAP and MMP-9 and a purinergic ATP (P2) receptor antagonist reduction in calcium response identifies both potential mechanisms for sustained changes in brain function following primary bTBI and therapeutic strategies targeting abnormal astrocyte activity. PMID:27162174

  12. Phosphodiesterase-Ialpha/autotaxin (PD-Ialpha/ATX): a multifunctional protein involved in central nervous system development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Jameel; Nogaroli, Luciana; Fuss, Babette

    2005-12-15

    Phosphodiesterase-Ialpha/autotaxin (PD-Ialpha/ATX) was originally identified as a cell-motility-stimulating factor secreted by a variety of tumor cells. Thus, studies related to its potential functional roles have traditionally focused on tumorigenesis. PD-Ialpha/ATX's catalytic activity, initially defined as nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase, was soon recognized as being necessary for its tumor cell-motility-stimulating activity. However, only the discovery of PD-Ialpha/ATX's identity with lysophospholipase D, an extracellular enzyme that converts lysophosphatidylcholine into lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and potentially sphingosylphosphoryl choline into sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), revealed the actual effectors responsible for PD-Ialpha/ATX's ascribed motogenic functions, i.e., its catalytic products. PD-Ialpha/ATX has also been detected during normal development in a number of tissues, in particular, the central nervous system (CNS), where expression levels are high. Similar to tumor cells, PD-Ialpha/ATX-expressing CNS cells secrete catalytically active PD-Ialpha/ATX into the extracellular environment. Thus, it appears reasonable to assume that PD-Ialpha/ATX's CNS-related functions are mediated via lysophospholipid, LPA and potentially S1P, signaling. However, recent studies identified PD-Ialpha/ATX as a matricellular protein involved in the modulation of oligodendrocyte-extracellular matrix interactions and oligodendrocyte remodeling. This property of PD-Ialpha/ATX was found to be independent of its catalytic activity and to be mediated by a novel functionally active domain. These findings, therefore, uncover PD-Ialpha/ATX, at least in the CNS, as a multifunctional protein able to induce complex signaling cascades via distinct structure-function domains. This Mini-Review describes PD-Ialpha/ATX's multifunctional roles in the CNS and discusses their potential contributions to CNS development and pathology.

  13. Prospects for development of fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. М. Шабер

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the solution of a complex of problems that arise in small and medium-scale treatment complexes, gas production plants and small and medium-capacity power plants associated with the processing of crude methane and the possibility of reducing the greenhouse effect.The economic feasibility of the development of fuel cells (FC on raw biomethane was demonstrated by the authors in previous publications.The specificity of the solution of problems is focused on small and medium-scale treatment complexes, gas production plants and small and medium power plants.The aim of the study is to show the possibility of solving a multicomponent task of developing fuel cells, including the experimental determination of the actual use of sodium formate as a reducing agent for the production of electricity in a fuel cell (FC.Results are the following: the possibility of solving the issues of reducing greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere during processing of waste products of human vital activity is proved. A method for converting methane and carbon dioxide emissions into useful products is shown.

  14. Central America Field Epidemiology Training Program (CA FETP): a pathway to sustainable public health capacity development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Augusto; Cáceres, Victor M

    2008-12-16

    The Central America Field Epidemiology Training Program (CA FETP) is a public health capacity-building training programme aimed at developing high-caliber field epidemiologists at various levels of the public health system. It began in 2000 as part of the effort to rebuild public health infrastructure in six Central American and Caribbean countries following the devastation of Hurricanes Mitch and Georges in late 1998. Since then, the CA FETP has evolved from one regional training programme managed by CDC to several national FETPs with each country assuming ownership of its domestic programme. The curriculum is competency-based, and is divided into a three-tiered training pyramid that corresponds to the needs at the local, district and central levels of the health system. Trainees at each tier spend about 20% of their time in the classroom and 80% in the field implementing what they have learned while being mentored by graduates of the programme. FETP trainees have responded to multiple natural disasters and conducted hundreds of investigations including surveillance evaluations, outbreak responses and planned studies. Also graduates of the CA FETP are assuming influential positions in their respective ministries. As countries meet the challenge of institutionalizing their programmes, the CA FETP concept will increasingly be recognized as a model for sustainable public health capacity development.

  15. Central America Field Epidemiology Training Program (CA FETP: a pathway to sustainable public health capacity development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cáceres Victor M

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Central America Field Epidemiology Training Program (CA FETP is a public health capacity-building training programme aimed at developing high-caliber field epidemiologists at various levels of the public health system. It began in 2000 as part of the effort to rebuild public health infrastructure in six Central American and Caribbean countries following the devastation of Hurricanes Mitch and Georges in late 1998. Since then, the CA FETP has evolved from one regional training programme managed by CDC to several national FETPs with each country assuming ownership of its domestic programme. The curriculum is competency-based, and is divided into a three-tiered training pyramid that corresponds to the needs at the local, district and central levels of the health system. Trainees at each tier spend about 20% of their time in the classroom and 80% in the field implementing what they have learned while being mentored by graduates of the programme. FETP trainees have responded to multiple natural disasters and conducted hundreds of investigations including surveillance evaluations, outbreak responses and planned studies. Also graduates of the CA FETP are assuming influential positions in their respective ministries. As countries meet the challenge of institutionalizing their programmes, the CA FETP concept will increasingly be recognized as a model for sustainable public health capacity development.

  16. A Kinetic Modelling of Enzyme Inhibitions in the Central Metabolism of Yeast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasbawati; Kalondeng, A.; Aris, N.; Erawaty, N.; Azis, M. I.

    2018-03-01

    Metabolic regulation plays an important role in the metabolic engineering of a cellular process. It is conducted to improve the productivity of a microbial process by identifying the important regulatory nodes of a metabolic pathway such as fermentation pathway. Regulation of enzymes involved in a particular pathway can be held to improve the productivity of the system. In the central metabolism of yeast cell, some enzymes are known as regulating enzymes that can be inhibited to increase the production of ethanol. In this research we study the kinetic modelling of the enzymes in the central pathway of yeast metabolism by taking into consideration the enzyme inhibition effects to the ethanol production. The existence of positive steady state solution and the stability of the system are also analysed to study the property and dynamical behaviour of the system. One stable steady state of the system is produced if some conditions are fulfilled. The conditions concern to the restriction of the maximum reactions of the enzymes in the pyruvate and acetaldehyde branch points. There exists a certain time of fermentation reaction at which a maximum and a minimum ethanol productions are attained after regulating the system. Optimal ethanol concentration is also produced for a certain initial concentration of inhibitor.

  17. Medical management of a case of central giant cell granuloma masquerading as a periapical pathosis

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    Balaji Babu Bangi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lesions of non-endodontic origin may mimic periapical pathosis. Errors in one or more of the clinical reasoning steps of diagnosis of such lesions may ultimately lead to misdiagnosis and ensuing complications. Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG is one such lesion of non-endodontic origin which can present as periapical pathosis. Here, we present a case of CGCG in a 33-year-old female patient who visited our department with a complaint of growth from the extraction sockets of upper front teeth, which were extracted 1 month back after a misdiagnosis as periapical pathosis. Suspecting a non-endodontic lesion, radiographic examination and incisional biopsy were performed and a final diagnosis of CGCG was made. Biweekly intra-lesional steroids were given for 6 weeks and patient was followed up for 6 months.

  18. IL-7 Enhances Thymic Human T Cell Development in "Human Immune System" Rag2-/-IL-2R{gamma}c-/- Mice without Affecting Peripheral T Cell Homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lent, Anja U.; Dontje, Wendy; Nagasawa, Maho; Siamari, Rachida; Bakker, Arjen Q.; Pouw, Stephan M.; Maijoor, Kelly A.; Weijer, Kees; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Blom, Bianca; Di Santo, James P.; Spits, Hergen; Legrand, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    IL-7 is a central cytokine in the development of hematopoietic cells, although interspecies discrepancies have been reported. By coculturing human postnatal thymus hematopoietic progenitors and OP9-huDL1 stromal cells, we found that murine IL-7 is approximately 100-fold less potent than human IL-7

  19. [Integration of demographic variables in development planning: the case of Central African Republic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bm'niyat Bangamboulou-te-niya, D

    1989-06-01

    Development is a complex phenomenon that concerns all the structures and subsystems of a society, affecting its quantitative aspects through economic growth and its qualitative aspects through social and cultural change. Planning is needed, but it is effective only to the extent that it is applied to a known and controllable reality. The integration of population and development is still a poorly defined concept despite the fat the it has been a topic of interest for the past several decades. at least since the 1946 creation of the UN Population Commission. Development planning should begin with evaluation of the past and present economic, social, and demographic situation of the country and should include formulation of clear objectives. The Central African Republic is a hugh country with some significant resources but a fragile and underdeveloped economy. The population, estimated at nearly 3 million, is very unevenly distributed, with 1/2 million living in the capital of Bangui. Fertility and mortality are high. The Central African Republic has had multi year development plans since 1948, but they have largely consisted of collections of projects funded by external investment. In the absence of institutional mechanisms capable of defining priorities and strategies leading to concrete decisions, the plans remained excessively general and ambitious. Economic planning has improved somewhat over the years, but there is still a lack of basic economic and social data, a shortage of financial resources, and inadequate mechanisms for setting priorities and strategies for decision making. No mechanism has been developed for integrating population and development although some research and family planning activities have been undertaken. A 1980 national seminar on problems of development was attended by representatives of all sectors, and in 1981 a national team formulated guidelines for a new strategy of social development. Family planning services were added to the

  20. The central and northern Appalachian Basin-a frontier region for coalbed methane development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, P.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Appalachian basin is the world's second largest coalbed-methane (CBM) producing basin. It has nearly 4000 wells with 1996 annual production at 147.8 billion cubic feet (Bcf). Cumulative CBM production is close to 0.9 trillion cubic feet (Tcf). The Black Warrior Basin of Alabama in the southern Appalachian basin (including a very minor amount from the Cahaba coal field) accounts for about 75% of this annual production and about 75% of the wells, and the remainder comes from the central and northern Appalachian basin. The Southwest Virginia coal field accounts for about 95% of the production from the central and northern parts of the Appalachian basin. Production data and trends imply that several of the Appalachian basin states, except for Alabama and Virginia, are in their infancy with respect to CBM development. Total in-place CBM resources in the central and northern Appalachian basin have been variously estimated at 66 to 76 trillion cubic feet (Tcf), of which an estimated 14.55 Tcf (~ 20%) is technically recoverable according to a 1995 U.S. Geological Survey assessment. For comparison in the Black Warrior basin of the 20 Tcf in-place CBM resources, 2.30 Tcf (~ 12%) is technically recoverable. Because close to 0.9 Tcf of CBM has already been produced from the Black Warrior basin and the proved reserves are about 0.8 Tcf for 1996 [Energy Information Administration (EIA), 1997]. U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves, 1996 Annual Report. U.S. Department of Energy DOE/EIA-0216(96), 145 pp.], these data imply that the central and northern Appalachian basin could become increasingly important in the Appalachian basin CBM picture as CBM resources are depleted in the southern Appalachian basin (Black Warrior Basin and Cahaba Coal Field). CBM development in the Appalachian states could decrease the eastern U.S.A.'s dependence on coal for electricity. CBM is expected to provide over the next few decades a virtually untapped source of

  1. Folk toys in Central Thailand: Product development for a creative economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanna Pichetpruth

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Folk toys in Central Thailand are a part of local Thai local wisdom. Creative folk toys are a part of cultural heritage and Thai creative and sustainable economic development. So, this research aimed to study 1 the indigenous folk toys in central Thailand, 2 the toy production problems and solution guidelines, and 3 the toy product development for the creative economy. The study employed a qualitative research method. The target group consisted of the selected communities in Nonthaburi Province, Ayutthaya Province and Suphanburi Province and folk toy sources. The informants were: 15 folk toy enterprise presidents, government officers and local experts as the key informants, 45 folk toy enterprise members as the causal informants and 45 customers as the general informants. Data were collected by means of interview, observation, focus group discussion and workshop from field study. Qualitative data were analyzed by inductive analysis method with triangular verification and the research results were presented by a descriptive analysis method. The research results revealed that folk toys in Central Thailand were derived from local indigenous knowledge that was created and transmitted through the generations for at least 700 years. Most of the folk toys in Central Thailand were produced by natural, local and easily found materials, using natural colors. The beauty, styles and quality of natural and man-made children’s toys were based on parental competency. Moreover, creation of folk toys is a form of Thai handicraft. Thai people truly believe that toys are symbols of parental love and attention and the tools to build up children’s growth in terms of lifestyle and creative mind. The findings show that folk toys in Central Thailand are made of special soil, wood, bamboo, lan leaf, tan leaf and coconut shell. Folk toys are categorized in four groups: 1 fun toys, such as krataewien, explosive bamboo, king drum, nangkop drum, rhythm coconut shell

  2. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for Central American Begonia sect. Gireoudia (Begoniaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twyford, Alex D; Ennos, Richard A; Kidner, Catherine A

    2013-05-01

    Transcriptome sequence data were used to design microsatellite primers for two widespread Central American Begonia species, B. heracleifolia and B. nelumbiifolia, to investigate population structure and hybridization. • The transcriptome from vegetative meristem tissue from the related B. plebeja was mined for microsatellite loci, and 31 primer pairs amplified in the target species. Fifteen primer pairs were combined in two multiplex PCR reactions, which amplified an average of four alleles per locus. • The markers developed will be a valuable genetic resource for medium-throughput genotyping of Central American species of Begonia sect. Gireoudia. A subset of these markers have perfect sequence matches to Asian B. venusta, and are promising for studies in other Begonia sections.

  3. Development and Characterization of Microsatellite Markers for Central American Begonia sect. Gireoudia (Begoniaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex D. Twyford

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Transcriptome sequence data were used to design microsatellite primers for two widespread Central American Begonia species, B. heracleifolia and B. nelumbiifolia, to investigate population structure and hybridization. Methods and Results: The transcriptome from vegetative meristem tissue from the related B. plebeja was mined for microsatellite loci, and 31 primer pairs amplified in the target species. Fifteen primer pairs were combined in two multiplex PCR reactions, which amplified an average of four alleles per locus. Conclusions: The markers developed will be a valuable genetic resource for medium-throughput genotyping of Central American species of Begonia sect. Gireoudia. A subset of these markers have perfect sequence matches to Asian B. venusta, and are promising for studies in other Begonia sections.

  4. ANALYSIS OF DEVELOPING BATIK INDUSTRY CLUSTER IN BAKARAN VILLAGE CENTRAL JAVA PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermanto Hermanto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available SMEs grow in a cluster in a certain geographical area. The entrepreneurs grow and thrive through the business cluster. Central Java Province has a lot of business clusters in improving the regional economy, one of which is batik industry cluster. Pati Regency is one of regencies / city in Central Java that has the lowest turnover. Batik industy cluster in Pati develops quite well, which can be seen from the increasing number of batik industry incorporated in the cluster. This research examines the strategy of developing the batik industry cluster in Pati Regency. The purpose of this research is to determine the proper strategy for developing the batik industry clusters in Pati. The method of research is quantitative. The analysis tool of this research is the Strengths, Weakness, Opportunity, Threats (SWOT analysis. The result of SWOT analysis in this research shows that the proper strategy for developing the batik industry cluster in Pati is optimizing the management of batik business cluster in Bakaran Village; the local government provides information of the facility of business capital loans; the utilization of labors from Bakaran Village while improving the quality of labors by training, and marketing the Bakaran batik to the broader markets while maintaining the quality of batik. Advice that can be given from this research is that the parties who have a role in batik industry cluster development in Bakaran Village, Pati Regency, such as the Local Government.

  5. Gold nanoparticles administration induced prominent inflammatory, central vein intima disruption, fatty change and Kupffer cells hyperplasia

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    Abdelhalim Mohamed

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in nanotechnology have identified promising candidates for many biological, biomedical and biomedicine applications. They are being increasingly exploited for medical uses and other industrial applications. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of administration of gold nanoparticles (GNPs on inflammatory cells infiltration, central vein intima disruption, fatty change, and Kupffer cells hyperplasia in the hepatic tissue in an attempt to cover and understand the toxicity and the potential threat of their therapeutic and diagnostic use. Methods A total of 70 healthy male Wistar-Kyoto rats were exposed to GNPs received 50 or 100 μl of GNPs infusion of 10, 20 and 50 nm GNPs for 3 or 7 days. Animals were randomly divided into groups, 12 GNPs-treated rats groups and one control group (NG. Groups 1, 2 and 3 received infusion of 50 μl GNPs of size 10 nm (3 or 7 days, size 20 nm (3 or 7 days and 50 nm (3 or 7 days, respectively; while groups 4, 5 and 6 received infusion of 100 μl GNPs of size 10 nm, size 20 nm and 50 nm, respectively. Results In comparison with respective control rats, exposure to GNPs doses has produced alterations in the hepatocytes, portal triads and sinusoids. The alterations in the hepatocytes were mainly vacuolar to hydropic degeneration, cytopasmic hyaline vacuolation, polymorphism, binucleation, karyopyknosis, karyolysis, karyorrhexis and necrosis. In addition, inflammatory cell infiltration, Kupffer cells hyperplasia, central veins intima disruption, hepatic strands dilatation and occasional fatty change together with a loss of normal architechiture of hepatic strands were also seen. Conclusions The alterations induced by the administration of GNPs were size-dependent with smaller ones induced more affects and related with time exposure of GNPs. These alterations might be an indication of injured hepatocytes due to GNPs toxicity that became unable to deal with the

  6. Working Memory in Children With Neurocognitive Effects From Sickle Cell Disease: Contributions of the Central Executive and Processing Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kelsey E.; Schatz, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at risk for working memory deficits due to multiple disease processes. We assessed working memory abilities and related functions in 32 school-age children with SCD and 85 matched comparison children using Baddeley’s working memory model as a framework. Children with SCD performed worse than controls for working memory, central executive function, and processing/rehearsal speed. Central executive function was found to mediate the relationship between SCD status and working memory, but processing speed did not. Cognitive remediation strategies that focus on central executive processes may be important for remediating working memory deficits in SCD. PMID:27759435

  7. Financial development and energy consumption in Central and Eastern European frontier economies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadorsky, Perry

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the impact of financial development on energy consumption in a sample of 9 Central and Eastern European frontier economies. Several different measures of financial development are examined including bank related variables and stock market variables. The empirical results, obtained from dynamic panel demand models, show a positive and statistically significant relationship between financial development and energy consumption when financial development is measured using banking variables like deposit money bank assets to GDP, financial system deposits to GDP, or liquid liabilities to GDP. Of the three stock market variables investigated, only one, stock market turnover, has a positive and statistically significant impact on energy consumption. Both short-run and long-run elasticities are presented. The implications of these results for energy policy are discussed. (author)

  8. Clear cell hidradenocarcinoma developing in pacemaker pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Cesar V

    2008-11-01

    An octagenerian woman developed clear cell hidradenocarcinoma, a rare neoplasm of eccrine sweat gland origin, 4 years following pacemaker implantation in her right lateral chest. The tumor immunohistochemically mimicked a metastatic lobular breast carcinoma, for example, strongly positive estrogen, weakly positive progesterone, and weakly reactive mammoglobin. A complete surgical excision of the tumor was complemented with ipsilateral dissection of involved adjacent axillary lymph nodes. Recommended irradiation was refused by the patient. Retrospective 3-year mammogram review, 2-year postsurgery follow-up, and complete postmortem evaluation failed to prove a primary breast malignancy or other metastatic lesion elsewhere.

  9. Co-occurrence of Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst, Aggressive Central Giant Cell Granuloma and Central Odontogenic Fibroma: Report of a Very Rare Entity and Its Surgical Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touraj Vaezi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC, Central odontogenic fibroma (COF and aggressive central giant cell granuloma (CGCG are rare pathologic diseases affecting the jaws. While the Co-existence of two of them is reported in the literature, existence of all three conditions in one patient is an extremely rare entity. In the present report, initial biopsy revealed fibrosarcoma, therefore mandibular resection was performed for the subject. Sectional Histopathologic evaluation revealed the co-existence of three conditions through histopathologic evaluation. This report emphasizes the importance of precise microscopical evaluation of jaw lesions and thorough sectional examination of the lesions to reach the precise diagnosis. Treatment modalities and follow-up radiographs are also provided to help clinicians manage these entities.

  10. Programmed cell senescence during mammalian embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Espín, Daniel; Cañamero, Marta; Maraver, Antonio; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Contreras, Julio; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Rodríguez-Baeza, Alfonso; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Ruberte, Jesús; Collado, Manuel; Serrano, Manuel

    2013-11-21

    Cellular senescence disables proliferation in damaged cells, and it is relevant for cancer and aging. Here, we show that senescence occurs during mammalian embryonic development at multiple locations, including the mesonephros and the endolymphatic sac of the inner ear, which we have analyzed in detail. Mechanistically, senescence in both structures is strictly dependent on p21, but independent of DNA damage, p53, or other cell-cycle inhibitors, and it is regulated by the TGF-β/SMAD and PI3K/FOXO pathways. Developmentally programmed senescence is followed by macrophage infiltration, clearance of senescent cells, and tissue remodeling. Loss of senescence due to the absence of p21 is partially compensated by apoptosis but still results in detectable developmental abnormalities. Importantly, the mesonephros and endolymphatic sac of human embryos also show evidence of senescence. We conclude that the role of developmentally programmed senescence is to promote tissue remodeling and propose that this is the evolutionary origin of damage-induced senescence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Occult esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with metastases to the spine and central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lídia Viaro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal malignancy encompasses a group of diseases that are mostly represented by the squamous cell carcinoma and the adenocarcinoma. Quite frequently, these neoplasms present aggressive behavior; therefore, the diagnosis is often made when the condition is in advanced stages. Dysphagia is the typical clinical complaint, although it is present only when most of the lumen is obstructed. Therefore, quite often, the metastatic disease is first diagnosed, which contributes to the patient’s poor survival expectancy. The authors report the case of a 58-year-old man who looked for medical care complaining of a long-term history of scapular pain. The diagnostic work-up disclosed a cervical spine lytic lesion surrounded by a tumoral mass shown by computed tomography. The cervical tumor was sampled by fine needle aspiration, revealing an undifferentiated carcinoma. The outcome was unfavorable and the patient died. The autopsy findings revealed metastatic disease to the spine and central nervous system, and the primary tumor was found to be an esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, which had progressed without typical dysphagia.

  12. Treatment of initial parenchymal central nervous system involvement in systemic aggressive B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijland, Marcel; Jansen, Anne; Doorduijn, Jeanette K; Enting, Roelien H; Bromberg, Jacoline E C; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C

    2017-09-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in systemic B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) at diagnosis (sysCNS) is rare. We investigated the outcome of 21 patients with sysCNS, most commonly diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, treated with high dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) and R-CHOP. The median number of cycles of HD-MTX and R-CHOP was 4 (range 1-8) and 6 (range 0-8), respectively. Consolidative whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) was given to 33% (7/21) patients. With a median follow-up of 44 months the 3-year progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 45% (95%CI 34-56%) and 49% (95%CI 38-60%), respectively. Over 90% of patients had an unfavorable international prognostic index score, reflected by treatment-related mortality of 19% (4/21) and relapse-related mortality of 28% (6/21). The outcome of these patients was, however, unexpectedly good when compared to secondary CNS relapses. Prospective studies are needed to define the optimal treatment for patients with sysCNS, but its rarity might be challenging.

  13. Metabolic regulation and maximal reaction optimization in the central metabolism of a yeast cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasbawati, Gunawan, A. Y.; Hertadi, R.; Sidarto, K. A.

    2015-03-01

    Regulation of fluxes in a metabolic system aims to enhance the production rates of biotechnologically important compounds. Regulation is held via modification the cellular activities of a metabolic system. In this study, we present a metabolic analysis of ethanol fermentation process of a yeast cell in terms of continuous culture scheme. The metabolic regulation is based on the kinetic formulation in combination with metabolic control analysis to indicate the key enzymes which can be modified to enhance ethanol production. The model is used to calculate the intracellular fluxes in the central metabolism of the yeast cell. Optimal control is then applied to the kinetic model to find the optimal regulation for the fermentation system. The sensitivity results show that there are external and internal control parameters which are adjusted in enhancing ethanol production. As an external control parameter, glucose supply should be chosen in appropriate way such that the optimal ethanol production can be achieved. For the internal control parameter, we find three enzymes as regulation targets namely acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, and alcohol dehydrogenase which reside in the acetaldehyde branch. Among the three enzymes, however, only acetaldehyde dehydrogenase has a significant effect to obtain optimal ethanol production efficiently.

  14. Central Giant Cell Granuloma of Posterior Maxilla: First Expression of Primary Hyperparathyroidism

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    Deepanshu Gulati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of 19-year-old male patient reported with the chief complaint of slowly growing diffuse painless swelling over the right part of the face from last 6 months. Intraoral examination revealed a swelling on right side of palate in relation to molar region with buccal cortical plate expansion. Radiographic examination (orthopantograph and 3DCT showed large multilocular radiolucency in right maxilla with generalized loss of lamina dura. Incisional biopsy was done and specimen was sent for histopathological examination which showed multinucleated giant cells containing 15–30 nuclei. Based on clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings provisional diagnosis of central giant cell granuloma was made. Blood tests after histopathology demonstrated elevated serum calcium level and alkaline phosphatase level. Immunoassay of parathyroid hormone (PTH level was found to be highly elevated. Radiographic examination of long bones like humerus and femur, mandible, and skull was also done which showed osteoclastic lesions. Considering the clinical, radiographic, histopathological, and blood investigation findings, final diagnosis of brown tumour of maxilla was made. The patient underwent partial parathyroidectomy under general anaesthesia to control primary hyperparathyroidism. Surgical removal of the bony lesion was done by curettage. The patient has been followed up for 1 year with no postoperative complications and the lesion healed uneventfully.

  15. Dynamic Labeling Reveals Temporal Changes in Carbon Re-Allocation within the Central Metabolism of Developing Apple Fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasiye F. Beshir

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the application of isotopically labeled substrates has received extensive attention in plant physiology. Measuring the propagation of the label through metabolic networks may provide information on carbon allocation in sink fruit during fruit development. In this research, gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry based metabolite profiling was used to characterize the changing metabolic pool sizes in developing apple fruit at five growth stages (30, 58, 93, 121, and 149 days after full bloom using 13C-isotope feeding experiments on hypanthium tissue discs. Following the feeding of [U-13C]glucose, the 13C-label was incorporated into the various metabolites to different degrees depending on incubation time, metabolic pathway activity, and growth stage. Evidence is presented that early in fruit development the utilization of the imported sugars was faster than in later developmental stages, likely to supply the energy and carbon skeletons required for cell division and fruit growth. The declined 13C-incorporation into various metabolites during growth and maturation can be associated with the reduced metabolic activity, as mirrored by the respiratory rate. Moreover, the concentration of fructose and sucrose increased during fruit development, whereas concentrations of most amino and organic acids and polyphenols declined. In general, this study showed that the imported compounds play a central role not only in carbohydrate metabolism, but also in the biosynthesis of amino acid and related protein synthesis and secondary metabolites at the early stage of fruit development.

  16. T cell immunosurveillance controls B lymphoma development

    OpenAIRE

    Kallies, Axel

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed a critical role for T cells in the immunosurveillance of nascent B cell lymphomas arising from mutations impacting plasma cell differentiation. Our data suggest that CD8+ T cells continuously eliminate mutated B cells that fail to downregulate their co-stimulatory machinery and the Fas death receptor, thus constraining B lymphoma pathogenesis.

  17. Lunatic, Manic and Radical Fringe Each Promote T and B Cell Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yinghui; Kumar, Vivek; Wei, Hua-Xing; Qiu, Ju; Stanley, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Lunatic, Manic and Radical Fringe (LFNG, MFNG and RFNG) are N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases that modify Notch receptors and regulate Notch signaling. Loss of LFNG affects thymic T cell development and LFNG and MFNG are required for marginal zone (MZ) B cell development. However, roles for MFNG and RFNG in T cell development, RFNG in B cell development, or Fringes in T and B cell activation, are not identified. Here we show that Lfng/Mfng/Rfng triple knockout (Fng tKO) mice exhibited reduced binding of DLL4 Notch ligand to CD4/CD8 double-negative (DN) T cell progenitors, and reduced expression of NOTCH1 targets Deltex1 and CD25. Fng tKO mice had reduced frequencies of DN1/cKit+ and DN2 T cell progenitors and CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) T cell precursors, but increased frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ single positive (SP) T cells in thymus. In spleen, Fng tKO mice had reduced frequencies of CD4+, CD8+, central memory T cells and marginal zone (MZ) B cells, and an increased frequency of effector memory T cells, neutrophils, follicular (Fo) and MZ P B cells. The Fng tKO phenotype was cell-autonomous and largely rescued in mice expressing one allele of a single Fng gene. Stimulation of Fng tKO splenocytes with anti-CD3/CD28 beads or lipopolysaccharide gave reduced proliferation compared to controls, and the generation of activated T cells by concanavalin A or L-PHA was also reduced in Fng tKO mice. Therefore, each Fringe contributes to T and B cell development, and Fringe is required for optimal in vitro stimulation of T and B cells. PMID:26608918

  18. On the Ethnic Origins of African Development: Chiefs and Precolonial Political Centralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalopoulos, Stelios; Papaioannou, Elias

    2015-01-01

    We report on recent findings of a fruitful research agenda that explores the importance of ethnic-specific traits in shaping African development. First, using recent surveys from Sub-Saharan African countries, we document that individuals identify with their ethnic group as often as with the nation pointing to the salience of ethnicity. Second, we focus on the various historical and contemporary functions of tribal leaders (chiefs) and illustrate their influence on various aspects of the economy and the polity. Third, we elaborate on a prominent dimension of ethnicity, that of the degree of complexity of pre-colonial political organization. Building on insights from the African historiography, we review recent works showing a strong association between pre-colonial centralization and contemporary comparative development both across and within countries. We also document that the link between pre-colonial political centralization and regional development -as captured by satellite images of light density at night-is particularly strong in areas outside the vicinity of the capitals, where due to population mixing and the salience of national institutions ethnic traits play a lesser role. Overall, our evidence is supportive to theories and narratives on the presence of a “dual” economic and institutional environment in Africa. PMID:27011760

  19. On the Ethnic Origins of African Development: Chiefs and Precolonial Political Centralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalopoulos, Stelios; Papaioannou, Elias

    2015-02-01

    We report on recent findings of a fruitful research agenda that explores the importance of ethnic-specific traits in shaping African development. First, using recent surveys from Sub-Saharan African countries, we document that individuals identify with their ethnic group as often as with the nation pointing to the salience of ethnicity. Second, we focus on the various historical and contemporary functions of tribal leaders (chiefs) and illustrate their influence on various aspects of the economy and the polity. Third, we elaborate on a prominent dimension of ethnicity, that of the degree of complexity of pre-colonial political organization. Building on insights from the African historiography, we review recent works showing a strong association between pre-colonial centralization and contemporary comparative development both across and within countries. We also document that the link between pre-colonial political centralization and regional development -as captured by satellite images of light density at night-is particularly strong in areas outside the vicinity of the capitals, where due to population mixing and the salience of national institutions ethnic traits play a lesser role. Overall, our evidence is supportive to theories and narratives on the presence of a "dual" economic and institutional environment in Africa.

  20. Quantitative proteomics identifies central players in erlotinib resistance of the non-small cell lung cancer cell line HCC827

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirstine; Lund, Rikke Raaen; Beck, Hans Christian

    Background: Erlotinib (Tarceva®, Roche) has significantly changed the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as 70% of patients show significant tumor regression when treated. However, all patients relapse due to development of acquired resistance, which in 43-50% of cases are caused...... by a secondary mutation (T790M) in EGFR. Importantly, a majority of resistance cases are still unexplained. Our aim is to identify novel resistance mechanisms in erlotinib-resistant subclones of the NSCLC cell line HCC827. Materials & Methods: We established 3 erlotinib-resistant subclones (resistant to 10, 20...... or other EGFR or KRAS mutations, potentiating the identification of novel resistance mechanisms. We identified 2875 cytoplasmic proteins present in all 4 cell lines. Of these 87, 56 and 23 are upregulated >1.5 fold; and 117, 72 and 32 are downregulated >1.5 fold, respectively, in the 3 resistant clones...

  1. New perspectives on the development of muscle contractures following central motor lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Bartels, Else Marie; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2017-01-01

    Muscle contractures are common in patients with central motor lesions, but the mechanisms responsible for the development of contractures are still unclear. Increased or decreased neural activation, protracted placement of a joint with the muscle in a short position and muscle atrophy have been...... suggested to be involved, but none of these mechanisms are sufficient to explain the development of muscle contractures alone. Here we propose that changes in tissue homeostasis in the neuro-muscular-tendon-connective tissue complex is at the heart of the development of contractures, and that an integrated...... physiological understanding of the interaction between neural, mechanical and metabolic factors, as well as genetic and epigenetic factors, is necessary in order to unravel the mechanisms that result in muscle contractures. We hope thereby to contribute to a reconsideration of how and why muscle contractures...

  2. Microsystems technologist workforce development capacity and challenges in Central New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, Thor D.

    2008-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has made major investments in microsystems-related infrastructure and research staff development over the past two decades, culminating most recently in the MESA project. These investment decisions have been made based in part upon the necessity for highly reliable, secure, and for some purposes, radiation-hardened devices and subsystems for safety and sustainability of the United States nuclear arsenal and other national security applications. SNL's microsystems development and fabrication capabilities are located almost entirely within its New Mexico site, rendering their effectiveness somewhat dependent on the depth and breadth of the local microsystems workforce. Consequently, the status and development capacity of this workforce has been seen as a key personnel readiness issue in relation to the maintenance of SNL's microsystems capabilities. For this reason SNL has supported the instantiation and development of the Southwest Center for Microsystems Education, an Advanced Technology Education center funded primarily by the National Science Foundation, in order to foster the development of local training capacity for microsystems technologists. Although the SCME and the associated Manufacturing Technology program at Central New Mexico Community College have developed an effective curriculum and graduated several highly capable microsystems technologists, the future of both the center and the degree program remain uncertain due to insufficient student enrollment. The central region of New Mexico has become home to many microsystems-oriented commercial firms. As the demands of those firms for technologists evolve, SNL may face staffing problems in the future, especially if local training capacity is lost.

  3. Simulation of developing human neuronal cell networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenk, Kerstin; Priwitzer, Barbara; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Tietz, Lukas H B; Narkilahti, Susanna; Hyttinen, Jari A K

    2016-08-30

    Microelectrode array (MEA) is a widely used technique to study for example the functional properties of neuronal networks derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-NN). With hESC-NN, we can investigate the earliest developmental stages of neuronal network formation in the human brain. In this paper, we propose an in silico model of maturating hESC-NNs based on a phenomenological model called INEX. We focus on simulations of the development of bursts in hESC-NNs, which are the main feature of neuronal activation patterns. The model was developed with data from developing hESC-NN recordings on MEAs which showed increase in the neuronal activity during the investigated six measurement time points in the experimental and simulated data. Our simulations suggest that the maturation process of hESC-NN, resulting in the formation of bursts, can be explained by the development of synapses. Moreover, spike and burst rate both decreased at the last measurement time point suggesting a pruning of synapses as the weak ones are removed. To conclude, our model reflects the assumption that the interaction between excitatory and inhibitory neurons during the maturation of a neuronal network and the spontaneous emergence of bursts are due to increased connectivity caused by the forming of new synapses.

  4. The embryonic development of the central American wandering spider Cupiennius salei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilbrant Maarten

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spider Cupiennius salei (Keyserling 1877 has become an important study organism in evolutionary and developmental biology. However, the available staging system for its embryonic development is difficult to apply to modern studies, with strong bias towards the earliest developmental stages. Furthermore, important embryonic events are poorly understood. We address these problems, providing a new description of the embryonic development of C. salei. The paper also discusses various observations that will improve our understanding of spider development. Results Conspicuous developmental events were used to define numbered stages 1 to 21. Stages 1 to 9 follow the existing staging system for the spider Achaearanea tepidariorum, and stages 10 to 21 provide a high-resolution description of later development. Live-embryo imaging shows cell movements during the earliest formation of embryonic tissue in C. salei. The imaging procedure also elucidates the encircling border between the cell-dense embryo hemisphere and the hemisphere with much lower cell density (a structure termed 'equator' in earlier studies. This border results from subsurface migration of primordial mesendodermal cells from their invagination site at the blastopore. Furthermore, our detailed successive sequence shows: 1 early differentiation of the precheliceral neuroectoderm; 2 the morphogenetic process of inversion and 3 initial invaginations of the opisthosomal epithelium for the respiratory system. Conclusions Our improved staging system of development in C. salei development should be of considerable value to future comparative studies of animal development. A dense germ disc is not evident during development in C. salei, but we show that the gastrulation process is similar to that in spider species that do have a dense germ disc. In the opisthosoma, the order of appearance of precursor epithelial invaginations provides evidence for the non-homology of the

  5. Neonatal Screening and the Clinical Outcome in Children with Sickle Cell Disease in Central India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipti S Upadhye

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is a major health burden in India. The objective of the study was to establish a neonatal screening program and to understand the clinical course of children with SCD in central India.Pregnant mothers were screened for sickle hemoglobin using the solubility test. Babies were screened by high performance liquid chromatography if the mother was positive for sickle hemoglobin. The diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis. They received early prophylactic treatment and vaccination. Of 2134 newborns screened, 104 were sickle homozygous (SS, seven had sickle β-thalassemia (S-β thal and 978 were sickle heterozygous (AS. The other hemoglobin abnormalities detected included HbS-δβ thalassemia-1, HbSD disease-2, HbE traits-5, β-thalassemia traits-4, alpha chain variants-3 and HbH disease-1.These babies were followed up regularly for hematological and clinical evaluation. Pain, severe anemia requiring blood transfusions and acute febrile illness were the major complications with 59.7, 45.1 and 42.6 cases per 100 person years. Fetal hemoglobin (HbF levels were inversely associated with vaso-oclussive crisis (VOC and severe anemia while presence of alpha thalassemia increased the rate of painful events and sepsis. Six early deaths occurred among the SS babies.A systematic follow up of this first newborn SCD cohort in central India showed that 47% of babies presented within 1 year of age. In spite of the presence of the Arab-Indian haplotype many babies had severe manifestations.

  6. FAK phosphorylation plays a central role in thrombin-induced RPE cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Solis, E D; Lee-Rivera, I; Álvarez-Arce, A; López, E; López-Colomé, A M

    2017-08-01

    The migration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is an important step in various pathologic conditions including subretinal neovascularization (SRN), proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and, importantly, as a consequence of retinal surgery. Therefore, the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying RPE trans-differentiation and migration is essential for devising effective treatments aimed to the prevention of these disorders. A common event in these pathologies is the alteration of the blood-retina barrier (BRB), which allows the interaction of RPE cells with thrombin, a pro-inflammatory protease contained in serum. Our previous work has demonstrated that thrombin induces RPE cell cytoskeletal remodeling and migration, hallmark processes in the development of PVR; however, the molecular mechanisms involved are still unclear. Cell migration requires the disassembly of focal adhesions induced by Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) phosphorylation, together with the formation of actin stress fibers. The aim of the present work was to identify thrombin-activated signaling pathways leading to FAK phosphorylation and to determine FAK participation in thrombin-induced RPE cell migration. Results demonstrate that the activation of PAR1 by thrombin induces FAK autophosphorylation at Y397 and the subsequent phosphorylation of Y576/577 within the activation loop. FAK phosphorylation was shown to be under the control of c/nPKC and PI3K/PKC-ζ, as well as by Rho/ROCK, since the inhibition of these pathways prevented thrombin-induced FAK phosphorylation and the consequent disassembly of focal adhesions, in parallel to FAK-dependent actin stress fiber formation and RPE cell migration. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, that thrombin stimulation of RPE cell transformation and migration are regulated by FAK tyrosine phosphorylation. Thus, targeting FAK phosphorylation may provide a strategical basis for PVR treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Norwegian support in development of regulations of radioactive waste management in central Asia-threat assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhunussova, Tamara; Sneve, Malgorzata; Liland, Astrid; Strand, Per; Kim, Alexander; Mirsaidov, Ulmas; Tolongutov, Baigabyl

    2011-01-01

    In Central Asia (CA) the radioactive waste comes mainly from uranium mining and milling, nuclear weapon testing and nuclear power development and other ionizing sources. This waste was produced, to a greater extent, by the military-industrial complex and the uranium and non-uranium industry, and, to a lesser extent, by the nuclear industry and in the process of use of isotope products. Exploitation and mining of uranium and thorium deposits produce a large amount of solid and liquid radioactive waste, as well volatile contaminants which need a proper management. In Central Asia the wastes are mainly stored at the surface in large piles and represent a long-term potential health and environmental hazard. The process of remediating legacy sites of the past and reducing the threats is now getting under way, with the design and implementation of remediation activities, partly with international support. However, there is a significant lack in the regulatory basis for carrying out such remediation work, including a lack of relevant radiation and environmental safety norms and standards, licensing procedures and requirements for monitoring etc., as well as expertise to transform such a basis into practice. Accordingly, the objective of the proposed project is to assist the relevant regulatory authorities in Kazakhstan, Kirgizstan and Tajikistan to develop national robust and adequate regulations and procedures, taking into account the international guidance and Norwegian experience with regulatory support projects in Russia. Specific expected results in the project period include: a threat assessment report identifying priority areas for regulatory development, based on the status of current regulatory documents and the hazard presented by the different sites and facilities; development of national radioactive waste management strategies in each country; development of an enhanced regulatory framework for supervision of nuclear matters, and an enhanced safety culture

  8. Comparison of central and local serial CT assessments of metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients in a clinical phase IIB study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felsch, Moritz; Zaim, Souhil; Dicken, Volker; Lehmacher, Walter; Scheuring, Urban J

    2017-02-01

    Background Clinical oncological studies attempt to improve precision of data by central radiological assessments. However, it is unclear, to which extent local and central assessments diverge. Purpose To quantify inter-reader variability and the deviation of local from central radiological assessments of computed tomography (CT) scans. Material and Methods This was a sub-study of a randomized clinical phase IIb trial in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), comparing first-line sorafenib with interferon-alpha-2a (IFN-α-2a). It analyzed agreements of local with central RECIST CT assessments by Cohen's kappa (κ), symmetry tests, deviations in waterfall plots, Bland-Altman plots, and parametric survival analyses. Results The concordance between local and central radiologic review was quantified by κ = 0.53. While local assessment yielded progressive disease (PD) in 18.6%, central assessment classified 22.5% of patient time points as PD exhibiting only a partial overlap with the 18.6% The tumor shrinkage rates in waterfall plots were 68.1% in local and 55.8% in central review (57.8% and 59% by Reader 1 and Reader 2). Bland-Altman plots identified a systematic shift of tumor change rates by -7.5% in local compared to central assessments, that may reflect a systematic tendency of more favorable results in local assessments. The discordance between local and central review was reflected by a time to progression (TTP) hazard ratio (HR) of 1.73 ( P = 0.0003). Conclusion These data suggest that central radiologic review may reduce technical measurement variability in clinical trials, which should be scrutinized in future studies compared to a volumetric reference.

  9. Cell cycle entry in C. elegans development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korzelius, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Cell division is controlled by a mechanism that uses Cyclins, in association with their Cyclin-dependent kinase partners (Cdk’s), to regulate the transitions in the cell cycle.Studies in mammalian cell culture and single cell eukaryotes such as budding and fission yeast have uncovered much about how

  10. Cytoview: Development of a cell modelling framework

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    The fundamental unit of living tissue, in fact of life itself, is the biological cell. Currently there is enormous interest in in silico modelling of the cell .... classification and cell type relationships, newer vocabulary is required to describe a single cell itself with all its sub- cellular structures. Further, this vocabulary should pave way.

  11. Transient inhibition of LIMKs significantly attenuated central sensitization and delayed the development of chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiangyu; He, Guiqin; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Chen, Lu; Kong, Yue; Xie, Wei; Jia, Zhengping; Liu, Wen-Tao; Zhou, Zikai

    2017-10-01

    Central sensitization represents a key mechanism mediating chronic pain, a major clinical problem lacking effective treatment options. LIM-domain kinases (LIMKs) selectively regulate several substrates, e.g. cofilin and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), that profoundly affect neural activities, such as synaptogenesis and gene expression, thus critical in the consolidation of long-term synaptic potentiation and memory in the brain. In this study, we demonstrate that LIMK deficiency significantly impaired the development of multiple forms of chronic pain. Mechanistic studies focusing on spared nerve injury (SNI) model reveal a pivotal role of LIMKs in the up-regulation of spontaneous excitatory synaptic transmission and synaptogenesis after pain induction. Depending on the pain induction methods, LIMKs can be transiently activated with distinct time courses. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of LIMKs targeting this critical period remarkably attenuated central sensitization in the spinal cord and alleviated pain behaviors. We propose selectively targeting LIMKs during their activation phase as a potential therapeutic strategy for clinical management of chronic pain, especially for chronic pain with predictable onset and development time courses, such as chronic post-surgical pain (PSP). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Development of the central nervous system in guinea pig (Cavia porcellus, Rodentia, Caviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Menezes de Oliveira e Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study describes the development of the central nervous system in guinea pigs from 12th day post conception (dpc until birth. Totally, 41 embryos and fetuses were analyzed macroscopically and by means of light and electron microscopy. The neural tube closure was observed at day 14 and the development of the spinal cord and differentiation of the primitive central nervous system vesicles was on 20th dpc. Histologically, undifferentiated brain tissue was observed as a mass of mesenchymal tissue between 18th and 20th dpc, and at 25th dpc the tissue within the medullary canal had higher density. On day 30 the brain tissue was differentiated on day 30 and the spinal cord filling throughout the spinal canal, period from which it was possible to observe cerebral and cerebellar stratums. At day 45 intumescences were visualized and cerebral hemispheres were divided, with a clear division between white and gray matter in brain and cerebellum. Median sulcus of the dorsal spinal cord and the cauda equina were only evident on day 50. There were no significant structural differences in fetuses of 50 and 60 dpc, and animals at term were all lissencephalic. In conclusion, morphological studies of the nervous system in guinea pig can provide important information for clinical studies in humans, due to its high degree of neurological maturity in relation to its short gestation period, what can provide a good tool for neurological studies.

  13. [A case of primary central nervous system anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma manifested as a unilateral pachymeningits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Etsuco; Shibayama, Hidehiro; Mitobe, Fumi; Katada, Fumiaki; Sato, Susumu; Fukutake, Toshio

    2017-11-25

    There have been 23 reports of primary central nervous system anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma in the literature. Here we report the 24th case of a 40-year-old man who presented with occipital headache for one month. His contrast-enhanced brain MRI showed enhancement around the right temporal lobe, which suggested a diagnosis of hypertrophic pachymeningitis. He improved with steroid therapy. After discharge, however, he was readmitted with generalized convulsive seizures. Finally, he was diagnosed as primary central nervous system ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma by brain biopsy. Primary central nervous system lymphoma invading dura matter can rarely manifests as a unilateral pachymeningitis. Therefore, in case of pachymeningitis, we should pay attention to the possibility of infiltration of lymophoma with meticulous clinical follow-up.

  14. Microstructural evaluation by confocal and electron microscopy in thrombi developed in central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Thabata Coaglio; Silva, Eliata Ester da; Souza, Danilo Olzon Dionysio; Santos, Amanda Rodrigues Dos; Lara, Maristela Oliveira

    2017-08-28

    Evaluating thrombi microstructure developed in central venous catheters using confocal and electron microscopy. An experimental, descriptive study carrying out a microstructural evaluation of venous thrombi developed in central venous catheters using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy. A total of 78 venous catheters were collected over a period of three months. Different fibrin structures were distinguished: fibrin plates, fibrin network, and fibrin fibers. It was observed that the thrombus had thick fibrin plates adhered to the catheter wall openings in both a catheter with three days of permanence as well as in a catheter with 20 days of insertion in the patient. However, a greater amount of erythrocytes and fibrin fibers were found in the central region of the thrombus. This study contributes to improving health care and can have a positive impact on clinical practice, as easy adherence of platelets and fibrins to the catheter wall demonstrated in this study makes it possible to adopt thrombus prevention strategies such as therapy discontinuation for an extended period, blood reflux by a catheter, slow infusion rate and hypercoagulo pathyclinical conditions. Avaliar a microestrutura por microscopia confocal e eletrônica em trombos desenvolvidos em cateteres venosos centrais. Pesquisa experimental, descritiva, em que foi feita uma avaliação microestrutural de trombos venosos desenvolvidos em cateteres venosos centrais por Microscopia Eletrônica de Varredura e Microscopia Confocal de Varredura a Laser. Foram coletados 78 cateteres venosos centrais num período de três meses. Distinguiram-se diferentes estruturas de fibrina: a placa de fibrina, a rede de fibrina e as fibras de fibrina. Observou-se que tanto em um cateter com três dias de permanência quanto em um cateter com 20 dias inserido no paciente o trombo apresentou placas de fibrina espessas aderidas às paredes dos orifícios dos cateteres. Na região central do

  15. Role of Nuclear Receptors in Central Nervous System Development and Associated Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear hormone receptor (NHR superfamily is composed of a wide range of receptors involved in a myriad of important biological processes, including development, growth, metabolism, and maintenance. Regulation of such wide variety of functions requires a complex system of gene regulation that includes interaction with transcription factors, chromatin-modifying complex, and the proper recognition of ligands. NHRs are able to coordinate the expression of genes in numerous pathways simultaneously. This review focuses on the role of nuclear receptors in the central nervous system and, in particular, their role in regulating the proper development and function of the brain and the eye. In addition, the review highlights the impact of mutations in NHRs on a spectrum of human diseases from autism to retinal degeneration.

  16. Cortical development: the art of generating cell diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Götz, Magdalena; Sommer, Lukas

    2005-01-01

    The fascinating question of how the enormous diversity of neuronal and glial cells in the cerebral cortex is generated during development was recently discussed at a meeting on cortical development and stem cells in Greece. What emerged from this meeting is an equally fascinating answer, namely that precursor diversity at rather early stages of development anticipates later cell type diversity.

  17. Limited regression of central giant cell granuloma by interferon alpha after failed calcitonin therapy: a report of 2 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, J.; van den Akker, H.P.; van den Berg, H.; Richel, D.J.; Gortzak, R.A.T.

    2006-01-01

    Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) is a benign lesion of the jaws with a sometimes locally aggressive behaviour. The most common therapy is surgical curettage which has a high recurrence rate, especially in lesions with aggressive signs and symptoms (i.e. pain, paresthesia, root-resorption and

  18. Central giant cell granuloma of the jaw: a review of the literature with emphasis on therapy options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, Jan; van den Akker, Hans P.; van den Berg, Henk

    2007-01-01

    Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) is a benign lesion of the jaws with an unknown etiology. Clinically and radiologically, a differentiation between aggressive and non-aggressive lesions can be made. The incidence in the general population is very low and patients are generally younger than 30

  19. Case Study: Fuel Cells Provide Combined Heat and Power at Verizon's Garden City Central Office

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-12-01

    This case study describes how Verizon's Central Office in Garden City, NY, installed a 1.4-MW phosphoric acid fuel cell system as an alternative solution to bolster electric reliability, optimize the company's energy use, and reduce costs in an environmentally responsible manner.

  20. The familial dysautonomia disease gene IKBKAP is required in the developing and adult mouse central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Chaverra

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSANs are a genetically and clinically diverse group of disorders defined by peripheral nervous system (PNS dysfunction. HSAN type III, known as familial dysautonomia (FD, results from a single base mutation in the gene IKBKAP that encodes a scaffolding unit (ELP1 for a multi-subunit complex known as Elongator. Since mutations in other Elongator subunits (ELP2 to ELP4 are associated with central nervous system (CNS disorders, the goal of this study was to investigate a potential requirement for Ikbkap in the CNS of mice. The sensory and autonomic pathophysiology of FD is fatal, with the majority of patients dying by age 40. While signs and pathology of FD have been noted in the CNS, the clinical and research focus has been on the sensory and autonomic dysfunction, and no genetic model studies have investigated the requirement for Ikbkap in the CNS. Here, we report, using a novel mouse line in which Ikbkap is deleted solely in the nervous system, that not only is Ikbkap widely expressed in the embryonic and adult CNS, but its deletion perturbs both the development of cortical neurons and their survival in adulthood. Primary cilia in embryonic cortical apical progenitors and motile cilia in adult ependymal cells are reduced in number and disorganized. Furthermore, we report that, in the adult CNS, both autonomic and non-autonomic neuronal populations require Ikbkap for survival, including spinal motor and cortical neurons. In addition, the mice developed kyphoscoliosis, an FD hallmark, indicating its neuropathic etiology. Ultimately, these perturbations manifest in a developmental and progressive neurodegenerative condition that includes impairments in learning and memory. Collectively, these data reveal an essential function for Ikbkap that extends beyond the peripheral nervous system to CNS development and function. With the identification of discrete CNS cell types and structures that depend on

  1. [Development of aloin cells and accumulation of anthraquinone in aloe leaf].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tai Xia; Li, Jing Yuan; Shen, Zong Gen; Hu, Zheng Hai

    2003-10-01

    The development of aloin cells and its relationship with the accumulation of anthraquinone in aloe leaf were investigated with the methods of paraffin section, semi-thin section, histochemistry and fluorescent microscopy. The results showed: cells rounded the procambium bundle differentiated into bundle sheath at the initial stage of procambium bundle developing into vascular bundle. When the sieve tube members appeared in protophloem, there were a lay of procambium bundle cells reserved between the sieve tube members and bundle sheath. These cells began to devise, then developed into aloin cells through enlargement of volume and vacuolization with the differentiation of metaphloem and metaxylem. So the aloin cells were special phloem parenchyma cells because they shared the same origin with the other phloem cells. The investigation of histochemistry reflected that there were aloin precipitate in the central vacuole of aloin cells after the material was soaked in the liquid of 1% lead acetate [Pb (CH3COO)2]. In addition, the yellow fluorescence was observed in aloin cells when the section of fresh material was investigated under the fluorescent microscope with blue light, which suggested the aloin cells of vascular bundles were the mainly storage site of anthraquinone.

  2. Lithium-Ion Cell Charge-Control Unit Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha M.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Buton, Robert M.; Gemeiner, Russel

    2005-01-01

    A lithium-ion (Li-ion) cell charge-control unit was developed as part of a Li-ion cell verification program. This unit manages the complex charging scheme that is required when Li-ion cells are charged in series. It enables researchers to test cells together as a pack, while allowing each cell to charge individually. This allows the inherent cell-to-cell variations to be addressed on a series string of cells and reduces test costs substantially in comparison to individual cell testing.

  3. Effector memory and central memory NY-ESO-1-specific re-directed T cells for treatment of multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuberth, P C; Jakka, G; Jensen, S M; Wadle, A; Gautschi, F; Haley, D; Haile, S; Mischo, A; Held, G; Thiel, M; Tinguely, M; Bifulco, C B; Fox, B A; Renner, C; Petrausch, U

    2013-04-01

    The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 is a potential target antigen for immune therapy expressed in a subset of patients with multiple myeloma. We generated chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) recognizing the immunodominant NY-ESO-1 peptide 157-165 in the context of HLA-A*02:01 to re-direct autologous CD8(+) T cells towards NY-ESO-1(+) myeloma cells. These re-directed T cells specifically lysed NY-ESO-1(157-165)/HLA-A*02:01-positive cells and secreted IFNγ. A total of 40% of CCR7(-) re-directed T cells had an effector memory phenotype and 5% a central memory phenotype. Based on CCR7 cell sorting, effector and memory CAR-positive T cells were separated and CCR7(+) memory cells demonstrated after antigen-specific re-stimulation downregulation of CCR7 as sign of differentiation towards effector cells accompanied by an increased secretion of memory signature cytokines such as IL-2. To evaluate NY-ESO-1 as potential target antigen, we screened 78 bone marrow biopsies of multiple myeloma patients where NY-ESO-1 protein was found to be expressed by immunohistochemistry in 9.7% of samples. Adoptively transferred NY-ESO-1-specific re-directed T cells protected mice against challenge with endogenously NY-ESO-1-positive myeloma cells in a xenograft model. In conclusion, re-directed effector- and central memory T cells specifically recognized NY-ESO-1(157-165)/ HLA-A*02:01-positive cells resulting in antigen-specific functionality in vitro and in vivo.

  4. [Central nervous system relapse in diffuse large B cell lymphoma: Risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Juan-Manuel; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2016-01-15

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by lymphoma is a complication associated, almost invariably, with a poor prognosis. The knowledge of the risk factors for CNS relapse is important to determine which patients could benefit from prophylaxis. Thus, patients with very aggressive lymphomas (such as lymphoblastic lymphoma or Burkitt's lymphoma) must systematically receive CNS prophylaxis due to a high CNS relapse rate (25-30%), while in patients with indolent lymphoma (such as follicular lymphoma or marginal lymphoma) prophylaxis is unnecessary. However, the question about CNS prophylaxis in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of lymphoma, remains controversial. The information available is extensive, mainly based on retrospective and heterogeneous studies. There seems that immunochemotherapy based on rituximab reduces the CNS relapse rate. On the other hand, patients with increased serum lactate dehydrogenase plus more than one extranodal involvement seem to have a higher risk of CNS relapse, but a prophylaxis strategy based only on the presence of these 2 factors does not prevent all CNS relapses. Patients with involvement of testes or breast have high risk of CNS relapse and prophylaxis is mandatory. Finally, CNS prophylaxis could be considered in patients with DLBCL and renal or epidural space involvement, as well as in those cases with MYC rearrangements, although additional studies are necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Central nervous system prophylaxis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Mohammad Faizan; Khan, Nadia; Hashmi, Shahrukh K; Kizilbash, Sani Haider; Barta, Stefan K

    2016-08-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a relatively uncommon manifestation; with most cases of CNS involvement occuring during relapse after primary therapy. CNS dissemination typically occurs early in the disease course and is most likely present subclinically at the time of diagnosis in many patients who later relapse in the CNS. CNS relapse in these patients is associated with poor outcomes. Based on a CNS relapse rate of 5% in DLBCL and weighing the benefits against the toxicities, universal application of CNS prophylaxis is not justified. The introduction of rituximab has significantly reduced the incidence of CNS relapse in DLBCL. Different studies have employed other agents for CNS prophylaxis, such as intrathecal chemotherapy and high-dose systemic agents with sufficient CNS penetration. If CNS prophylaxis is to be given, it should be preferably administered during primary chemotherapy. However, there is no strong evidence that supports any single approach for CNS prophylaxis. In this review, we outline different strategies of administering CNS prophylaxis in DLBCL patients reported in literature and discuss their advantages and drawbacks. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. How can health remain central post-2015 in a sustainable development paradigm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In two years, the uncompleted tasks of the Millennium Development Goals will be merged with the agenda articulated in the 2012 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development. This process will seek to integrate economic development (including the elimination of extreme poverty), social inclusion, environmental sustainability, and good governance into a combined sustainable development agenda. The first phase of consultation for the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals reached completion in the May 2013 report to the Secretary-General of the High-Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda. Health did well out of the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) process, but the global context and framing of the new agenda is substantially different, and health advocates cannot automatically assume the same prominence. This paper argues that to remain central to continuing negotiations and the future implementation, four strategic shifts are urgently required. Advocates need to reframe health from the poverty reduction focus of the MDGs to embrace the social sustainability paradigm that underpins the new goals. Second, health advocates need to speak—and listen—to the whole sustainable development agenda, and assert health in every theme and every relevant policy, something that is not yet happening in current thematic debates. Third, we need to construct goals that will be truly “universal”, that will engage every nation—a significant re-orientation from the focus on low-income countries of the MDGs. And finally, health advocates need to overtly explore what global governance structures will be needed to finance and implement these universal Sustainable Development Goals. PMID:24708779

  7. Neural Stem Cell Plasticity: Advantages in Therapy for the Injured Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottoboni, Linda; Merlini, Arianna; Martino, Gianvito

    2017-01-01

    The physiological and pathological properties of the neural germinal stem cell niche have been well-studied in the past 30 years, mainly in animals and within given limits in humans, and knowledge is available for the cyto-architectonic structure, the cellular components, the timing of development and the energetic maintenance of the niche, as well as for the therapeutic potential and the cross talk between neural and immune cells. In recent years we have gained detailed understanding of the potentiality of neural stem cells (NSCs), although we are only beginning to understand their molecular, metabolic, and epigenetic profile in physiopathology and, further, more can be invested to measure quantitatively the activity of those cells, to model in vitro their therapeutic responses or to predict interactions in silico . Information in this direction has been put forward for other organs but is still limited in the complex and very less accessible context of the brain. A comprehensive understanding of the behavior of endogenous NSCs will help to tune or model them toward a desired response in order to treat complex neurodegenerative diseases. NSCs have the ability to modulate multiple cellular functions and exploiting their plasticity might make them into potent and versatile cellular drugs.

  8. Hypoxia Pathway Proteins As Central Mediators of Metabolism in the Tumor Cells and Their Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundary Sormendi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Low oxygen tension or hypoxia is a determining factor in the course of many different processes in animals, including when tissue expansion and cellular metabolism result in high oxygen demands that exceed its supply. This is mainly happening when cells actively proliferate and the proliferating mass becomes distant from the blood vessels, such as in growing tumors. Metabolic alterations in response to hypoxia can be triggered in a direct manner, such as the switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis or inhibition of fatty acid desaturation. However, as the modulated action of hypoxia-inducible factors or the oxygen sensors (prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing enzymes can also lead to changes in enzyme expression, these metabolic changes can also be indirect. With this review, we want to summarize our current knowledge of the hypoxia-induced changes in metabolism during cancer development, how they are affected in the tumor cells and in the cells of the microenvironment, most prominently in immune cells.

  9. Concise Review: Cancer Cells, Cancer Stem Cells, and Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Influence in Cancer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaccio, Federica; Paino, Francesca; Regad, Tarik; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Tirino, Virginia

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Tumors are composed of different types of cancer cells that contribute to tumor heterogeneity. Among these populations of cells, cancer stem cells (CSCs) play an important role in cancer initiation and progression. Like their stem cells counterpart, CSCs are also characterized by self‐renewal and the capacity to differentiate. A particular population of CSCs is constituted by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that differentiate into cells of mesodermal characteristics. Several studies have reported the potential pro‐or anti‐tumorigenic influence of MSCs on tumor initiation and progression. In fact, MSCs are recruited to the site of wound healing to repair damaged tissues, an event that is also associated with tumorigenesis. In other cases, resident or migrating MSCs can favor tumor angiogenesis and increase tumor aggressiveness. This interplay between MSCs and cancer cells is fundamental for cancerogenesis, progression, and metastasis. Therefore, an interesting topic is the relationship between cancer cells, CSCs, and MSCs, since contrasting reports about their respective influences have been reported. In this review, we discuss recent findings related to conflicting results on the influence of normal and CSCs in cancer development. The understanding of the role of MSCs in cancer is also important in cancer management. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:2115–2125 PMID:29072369

  10. Planning Of Beef Cattle Development in District Blora, Central Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoso, Budi; Prasetiyono, Bambang Waluyo Hadi Eko

    2018-02-01

    Continuity of meat supply availability is generally related to the number and production of livestock in a region. Therefore, a framework of sustainable livestock development is needed to increase the production and productivity of livestock. Blora Regency is one of the areas in the Province of Central Java with the largest number of large livestock, primarily beef cattle. Blora Regency has a population of 199.584 beef cattle. Agricultural waste results in Blora Regency can be used as supporting the availability of feed for livestock sector. This is supported by the availability of forage feed which is very abundant.Based on these potentials, it is necessary to assess the characteristics of natural land for the development of beef cattle farms. Therefore, the objectives of this study are (1) to assess the environmental suitability of the environment for the development of cattle ranching that is grazed and stacked; (2) to analyze the potential of forage source of fodder and bearing capacity for beef cattle farming; (3) to analyze the centers of activity of development of beef cattle; (4) to prepare direction and strategy of beef cattle development in Blora Regency.

  11. Planning Of Beef Cattle Development in District Blora, Central Java, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santoso Budi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuity of meat supply availability is generally related to the number and production of livestock in a region. Therefore, a framework of sustainable livestock development is needed to increase the production and productivity of livestock. Blora Regency is one of the areas in the Province of Central Java with the largest number of large livestock, primarily beef cattle. Blora Regency has a population of 199.584 beef cattle. Agricultural waste results in Blora Regency can be used as supporting the availability of feed for livestock sector. This is supported by the availability of forage feed which is very abundant.Based on these potentials, it is necessary to assess the characteristics of natural land for the development of beef cattle farms. Therefore, the objectives of this study are (1 to assess the environmental suitability of the environment for the development of cattle ranching that is grazed and stacked; (2 to analyze the potential of forage source of fodder and bearing capacity for beef cattle farming; (3 to analyze the centers of activity of development of beef cattle; (4 to prepare direction and strategy of beef cattle development in Blora Regency.

  12. CXCL13 promotes isotype-switched B cell accumulation to the central nervous system during viral encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phares, Timothy W; DiSano, Krista D; Stohlman, Stephen A; Segal, Benjamin M; Bergmann, Cornelia C

    2016-05-01

    Elevated CXCL13 within the central nervous system (CNS) correlates with humoral responses in several neuroinflammatory diseases, yet its role is controversial. During coronavirus encephalomyelitis CXCL13 deficiency impaired CNS accumulation of memory B cells and antibody-secreting cells (ASC) but not naïve/early-activated B cells. However, despite diminished germinal center B cells and follicular helper T cells in draining lymph nodes, ASC in bone marrow and antiviral serum antibody were intact in the absence of CXCL13. The data demonstrate that CXCL13 is not essential in mounting effective peripheral humoral responses, but specifically promotes CNS accumulation of differentiated B cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Intermontane eolian sand sheet development, Upper Tulum Valley, central-western Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Francisco Fuhr Dal' Bó

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe intermontane Upper Tulum eolian sand sheet covers an area of ca. 125 km² at north of the San Juan Province, central-western Argentina. The sand sheet is currently an aggrading system where vegetation cover, surface cementation and periodic flooding withhold the development of dunes with slipfaces. The sand sheet surface is divided into three parts according to the distribution of sedimentary features, which reflects the variation in sediment budget, water table level and periodic flooding. The central sand sheet part is the main area of eolian deposition and is largely stabilized by vegetation. The sedimentary succession is 4 m thick and records the vertical interbedding of eolian and subaqueous deposits, which have been deposited for at least 3.6 ky with sedimentation rates of 86.1 cm/ky. The construction of the sand sheet is associated with deflation of the sand-graded debris sourced by San Juan alluvial fan, which is available mainly in drier fall-winter months where water table is lower and wind speeds are periodically above the threshold velocity for sand transport. The accumulation of sedimentary bodies occurs in a stabilized eolian system where vegetation cover, thin mud veneers and surface cementation are the main agents in promoting accumulation. The preservation of the sand sheet accumulations is enabled by the progressive creation of the accommodation space in a tectonically active basin and the continuous burial of geological bodies favored by high rates of sedimentation.

  14. Postembryonic development of centrally generated flight motor patterns in the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierk, Ricardo; Duch, Carsten; Pflüger, Hans-Joachim

    2010-01-01

    This study analyses the maturation of centrally generated flight motor patterns during metamorphosis of Manduca sexta. Bath application of the octopamine agonist chlordimeform to the isolated central nervous system of adult moths reliably induces fictive flight patterns in wing depressor and elevator motoneurons. Pattern maturation is investigated by chlordimeform application at different developmental stages. Chlordimeform also induces motor patterns in larval ganglia, which differ from fictive flight, indicating that in larvae and adults, octopamine affects different networks. First changes in motoneuron activity occur at the pupal stage P10. Rhythmic motor output is induced in depressor, but not in elevator motoneurons at P12. Adult-like fictive flight activity in motoneurons is observed at P16 and increases in speed and precision until emergence 2 days later. Pharmacological block of chloride channels with picrotoxin also induces fictive flight in adults, suggesting that the pattern-generating network can be activated by the removal of inhibition, and that proper network function does not rely on GABA(A) receptors. Our results suggest that the flight pattern-generating network becomes gradually established between P12 and P16, and is further refined until adulthood. These findings are discussed in the context of known physiological and structural CNS development during Manduca metamorphosis.

  15. SALTRA: a regional program for workers' health and sustainable development in Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesseling, Catharina; Aragón, Aurora; Elgstrand, Kaj; Flores, Reinaldo; Hogstedt, Christer; Partanen, Timo

    2011-01-01

    In 2003, the university-based Program on Work and Health in Central America, SALTRA, was launched to build national and regional capacities in occupational safety and health with the goal of preventing and reducing poverty in Central America. SALTRA has implemented 20 projects including action projects in priority sectors (e.g., construction, sugarcane, hospitals, migrant coffee workers); strengthening of surveillance (occupational health profiles, carcinogenic exposures, fatal injuries and pesticides); a participatory model for training and risk monitoring by workers; building occupational health capacity for professionals, employers, and workers, with collaborating networks between the countries; strengthening of universities in work, environment, and health; studies of serious occupational and environmental situations; communication channels; and continued efforts to raise political awareness. SALTRA has placed issues of workers' health on political, business, and academic agendas throughout the region and has laid the foundations for achieving substantial future improvements in health conditions of all workers in the region. External evaluators envisioned SALTRA as an innovative development model.

  16. Budget deficits, monetization, and central-bank independence in developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikken, BJ; de Haan, J

    Using various indicators for central bank independence we examine the relationship between central bank independence and government budget deficits. Using a two-stage procedure we also analyze whether central bank independence affects the monetization of deficits. First, the monetization relation in

  17. Development of large area, high efficiency amorphous silicon solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, K.S.; Kim, S.; Kim, D.W. [Yu Kong Taedok Institute of Technology (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-02-01

    The objective of the research is to develop the mass-production technologies of high efficiency amorphous silicon solar cells in order to reduce the costs of solar cells and dissemination of solar cells. Amorphous silicon solar cell is the most promising option of thin film solar cells which are relatively easy to reduce the costs. The final goal of the research is to develop amorphous silicon solar cells having the efficiency of 10%, the ratio of light-induced degradation 15% in the area of 1200 cm{sup 2} and test the cells in the form of 2 Kw grid-connected photovoltaic system. (author) 35 refs., 8 tabs., 67 figs.

  18. Energy policy, economic cooperation, and sustainable development in Central Asia: the case of Uzbekistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djakhangir, S.

    2005-04-15

    This research deals with a number of issues on the transformation process, sustainable development and regional cooperation in Central Asia. These areas of the research are discussed within the three models of development, i.e. national, regional, and global. Within the new concept on stability and conflict prevention, the author attempted to sort out the economic fundamentals affecting contemporary development of the states in the region. The main focus is made on Uzbekistan which is the most populated country in the region and whose socio-political and economic development has substantial impact on the regional situation. The analysis of the country's progress in domestic economic reforms in the past not only defines some conflict areas of development, but also tries to shape those fields where national strategy is confronted with difficulties on the long and pain-staking way from the plan system towards liberal market economy and democratic society. At the sector-specific level, particular attention is paid to the trends in Uzbekistan's energy sector. Simultaneously the work argues that national policy decisions in the energy field go much beyond national borders, and strongly correlated to intra-regional relations, as well as to those heated by geopolitical and geoeconomic considerations of the USA, Russia, Iran, China, the EU, and Turkey. Subsequently, the research concludes that Central Asia so far remains mainly as an object of expansion of great geopolitical interests rather than being a sovereign player in international relations. In this regard, sustainable development of the states in the region is expected to depend to a large extent on how the interests of the regional states will be put in line with those of non-regionals. Finally, the research emphasizes that in terms of limited domestic resources, investment and donor activities are desperately needed, both in Uzbekistan and the whole region, to modernize production process, raise

  19. Cell wall heterogeneity in root development of Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Somssich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signalling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modelling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes.

  20. New perspectives on the development of muscle contractures following central motor lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingel, J; Bartels, E M; Nielsen, J B

    2017-02-15

    Muscle contractures are common in patients with central motor lesions, but the mechanisms responsible for the development of contractures are still unclear. Increased or decreased neural activation, protracted placement of a joint with the muscle in a short position and muscle atrophy have been suggested to be involved, but none of these mechanisms are sufficient to explain the development of muscle contractures alone. Here we propose that changes in tissue homeostasis in the neuromuscular-tendon-connective tissue complex is at the heart of the development of contractures, and that an integrated physiological understanding of the interaction between neural, mechanical and metabolic factors, as well as genetic and epigenetic factors, is necessary in order to unravel the mechanisms that result in muscle contractures. We hope thereby to contribute to a reconsideration of how and why muscle contractures develop in a way which will open a window towards new insight in this area in the future. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  1. Librarians' Role in Development and Achievement of Central Library Users' Information Literacy (a Case Study: Iran).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaminfirooz, Mousa; Siamian, Hasan; Shahrabi, Afsaneh

    2013-12-01

    Due to the development of technologies, communications, databases and information resource varieties in today's information age, our various social, economic, cultural and political needs cannot be fulfilled by relying merely on past knowledge and skills as done previously. Information literacy (IL) as a set of necessary skills for all of us is an effective way of treating new technologies and their effective application in our lives. The study aimed to survey the library users' views in the Central Library of Babol University of Medical Sciences (The Library), Iran, on the role and influences of librarians on their IL development and improvement. This analytical survey used a researcher-made questionnaire for data collection. Research population consisted of all users referring Information Unit of The Library during 22 September - 20 December 2010. Of them, 150 users participating in at least 5 workshops held by The Library were selected as the study sample. Based on the findings, 52.7 percent of the subjects rated the influence of the librarians on their IL development much and very much. 44.7 percent claimed that they more acquired IL skills from librarians rather than others. 100 (63.3%) subjects preferred workshops held by the librarian to other workshops. The users of Information Unit of The Library perceived the training IL skills by librarians as a main influencing factor in their IL development and achievement. This emphasized the necessity of teaching IL to users and training the librarians in better teaching IL skills to library user.

  2. Sonic Hedgehog Regulation of the Neural Precursor Cell Fate During Chicken Optic Tectum Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ciqing; Li, Xiaoying; Li, Qiuling; Li, Han; Qiao, Liang; Guo, Zhikun; Lin, Juntang

    2018-02-01

    During nervous system development, neurons project axons over long distances to reach the appropriate targets for correct neural circuit formation. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a secreted protein and plays a key role in regulating vertebrate embryogenesis, especially in central nervous system (CNS) patterning, including neuronal migration and axonal projection in the brain and spinal cord. In the developing ventral midbrain, Shh is sufficient to specify a striped pattern of cell fates. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the Shh regulation of the neural precursor cell fate during the optic tectum development. Here, we aimed at studying how Shh might regulate chicken optic tectum patterning. In the present study, in ovo electroporation methods were employed to achieve the overexpression of Shh in the optic tectum during chicken embryo development. Besides, the study combined in ovo electroporation and neuron isolation culturing to study the function of Shh in vivo and in vitro. The fluorescent immunohistochemistry methods were used to check the related indicators. The results showed that Shh overexpression caused 87.8% of cells to be distributed to the stratum griseum central (SGC) layer, while only 39.3% of the GFP-transfected cells resided in the SGC layer in the control group. Shh overexpression also reduced the axon length in vivo and in vitro. In conclusion, we provide evidence that Shh regulates the neural precursor cell fate during chicken optic tectum development. Shh overexpression impairs neuronal migration and may affect the fate determination of transfected neurons.

  3. Development of the Centralized Storm Information System (CSIS) for use in severe weather prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    The centralized storm information system is now capable of ingesting and remapping radar scope presentations on a satellite projection. This can be color enhanced and superposed on other data types. Presentations from more than one radar can be composited on a single image. As with most other data sources, a simple macro establishes the loops and scheduling of the radar ingestions as well as the autodialing. There are approximately 60 NWS network 10 cm radars that can be interrogated. NSSFC forecasters have found this data source to be extremely helpful in severe weather situations. The capability to access lightning frequency data stored in a National Weather Service computer was added. Plans call for an interface with the National Meteorological Center to receive and display prognostic fields from operational computer forecast models. Programs are to be developed to plot and display locations of reported severe local storm events.

  4. Developing a strategy for improving efficiency in the heating sector in central and eastern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, A.S. [World Bank, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Heating is a vital energy service in Central and Eastern Europe, but the current delivery mechanisms are riddled with problems. District heating (DH) in its present technical form and with the present management structures is an inefficient system which produces expensive heat. Customers cannot control it and react to overheating by opening windows, even in winter. DH facilities together with other forms of individual heating are responsible for air pollution, causing severe impacts on the health of urban residents. The issues relating to DH are discussed, the first World Bank activities and experiences with projects in Poland are analyzed, and the cornerstones of a strategy to support future World Bank financing and the development of sound heating policies in CEE are presented.

  5. [The Development of Information Centralization and Management Integration System for Monitors Based on Wireless Sensor Network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiu; Zhang, Honglei; Li, Yiming; Li, Bin

    2015-07-01

    Developed the information centralization and management integration system for monitors of different brands and models with wireless sensor network technologies such as wireless location and wireless communication, based on the existing wireless network. With adaptive implementation and low cost, the system which possesses the advantages of real-time, efficiency and elaboration is able to collect status and data of the monitors, locate the monitors, and provide services with web server, video server and locating server via local network. Using an intranet computer, the clinical and device management staffs can access the status and parameters of monitors. Applications of this system provide convenience and save human resource for clinical departments, as well as promote the efficiency, accuracy and elaboration for the device management. The successful achievement of this system provides solution for integrated and elaborated management of the mobile devices including ventilator and infusion pump.

  6. Development of centralized radiopharmacies in Spain: A successful experience in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyarzabal, I.; Jimenez-Shaw, R.

    2007-01-01

    Good manufacturing practice requirements applied to radiopharmaceuticals compounding and unit dose preparation were seen as an opportunity when they were made compulsory by law in Spain during the mid-1990s. An innovative company was set up to develop centralized radiopharmacies or 'nuclear pharmacies', as they are known in the United States of America, with units designed for a safe and efficient operation with respect to product and personnel and which fulfil radioactive and pharmaceutical criteria. A quality management system has been implanted and a computerized management system supports the operation of each unit, helping the operator in their work, preventing mistakes and human error, and keeping control of record and traceability. An e-business system based upon the internet allows customers to place an order for their needs and provides additional information. (author)

  7. The World Summit on Sustainable Development: reaffirming the centrality of health

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schirnding, Yasmin

    2005-01-01

    The World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD) was held in Johannesburg in 2002 to review progress since the Rio conference in 1992, and to agree a new global deal on sustainable development. Unlike its predecessor, it was primarily concerned with implementation rather than with new treaties and targets, although a number of new targets were agreed, for example one on sanitation. Failure to agree a target on renewable energy was regarded as a major disappointment of the conference. While relatively modest in its achievements, and with difficulties in achieving consensus in key areas such as energy, trade, finance and globalisation, WSSD nevertheless succeeded in placing sustainable development back on the political agenda, giving new impetus, in particular to the environment and development needs of Africa, with a strong focus on local issues like household energy, water and sanitation. Health was singled out as one of five priority areas, along with water, energy, agriculture and biodiversity, and was devoted a separate chapter in the resulting Plan of Implementation, which highlighted a range of environmental health issues as well as issues relating to health services, communicable and non-communicable diseases. A number of new partnerships were formed at WSSD, including the Healthy Environments for Children Alliance (HECA) launched by WHO, which will form an important platform for implementation. The Commission on Sustainable Development has been designated main responsibility for monitoring and follow up, with its programme of work reorganised to focus on thematic clusters of issues. From the perspective of health, WSSD must be seen as a reaffirmation of the central place of health on the sustainable development agenda, and in the broader context of a process which began in Rio and was given added impetus with the Monterrey Financing for Development conference and the World Trade Organisation meeting held in Doha. Translating policies into action at all

  8. The World Summit on Sustainable Development: reaffirming the centrality of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schirnding, Yasmin

    2005-05-10

    The World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD) was held in Johannesburg in 2002 to review progress since the Rio conference in 1992, and to agree a new global deal on sustainable development. Unlike its predecessor, it was primarily concerned with implementation rather than with new treaties and targets, although a number of new targets were agreed, for example one on sanitation. Failure to agree a target on renewable energy was regarded as a major disappointment of the conference. While relatively modest in its achievements, and with difficulties in achieving consensus in key areas such as energy, trade, finance and globalisation, WSSD nevertheless succeeded in placing sustainable development back on the political agenda, giving new impetus, in particular to the environment and development needs of Africa, with a strong focus on local issues like household energy, water and sanitation. Health was singled out as one of five priority areas, along with water, energy, agriculture and biodiversity, and was devoted a separate chapter in the resulting Plan of Implementation, which highlighted a range of environmental health issues as well as issues relating to health services, communicable and non-communicable diseases. A number of new partnerships were formed at WSSD, including the Healthy Environments for Children Alliance (HECA) launched by WHO, which will form an important platform for implementation. The Commission on Sustainable Development has been designated main responsibility for monitoring and follow up, with its programme of work reorganised to focus on thematic clusters of issues. From the perspective of health, WSSD must be seen as a reaffirmation of the central place of health on the sustainable development agenda, and in the broader context of a process which began in Rio and was given added impetus with the Monterrey Financing for Development conference and the World Trade Organisation meeting held in Doha. Translating policies into action at all

  9. The World Summit on Sustainable Development: reaffirming the centrality of health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Schirnding Yasmin

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD was held in Johannesburg in 2002 to review progress since the Rio conference in 1992, and to agree a new global deal on sustainable development. Unlike its predecessor, it was primarily concerned with implementation rather than with new treaties and targets, although a number of new targets were agreed, for example one on sanitation. Failure to agree a target on renewable energy was regarded as a major disappointment of the conference. While relatively modest in its achievements, and with difficulties in achieving consensus in key areas such as energy, trade, finance and globalisation, WSSD nevertheless succeeded in placing sustainable development back on the political agenda, giving new impetus, in particular to the environment and development needs of Africa, with a strong focus on local issues like household energy, water and sanitation. Health was singled out as one of five priority areas, along with water, energy, agriculture and biodiversity, and was devoted a separate chapter in the resulting Plan of Implementation, which highlighted a range of environmental health issues as well as issues relating to health services, communicable and non-communicable diseases. A number of new partnerships were formed at WSSD, including the Healthy Environments for Children Alliance (HECA launched by WHO, which will form an important platform for implementation. The Commission on Sustainable Development has been designated main responsibility for monitoring and follow up, with its programme of work reorganised to focus on thematic clusters of issues. From the perspective of health, WSSD must be seen as a reaffirmation of the central place of health on the sustainable development agenda, and in the broader context of a process which began in Rio and was given added impetus with the Monterrey Financing for Development conference and the World Trade Organisation meeting held in Doha. Translating

  10. Smad4 represses the generation of memory-precursor effector T cells but is required for the differentiation of central memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, J; Zhang, X; Wang, Q; Qiu, G; Hou, C; Wang, J; Cheng, Q; Lan, Y; Han, H; Shen, H; Zhang, Y; Yang, X; Shen, B; Zhang, J

    2015-11-19

    The transcriptional regulation underlying the differentiation of CD8(+) effector and memory T cells remains elusive. Here, we show that 18-month-old mice lacking the transcription factor Smad4 (homolog 4 of mothers against decapentaplegic, Drosophila), a key intracellular signaling effector for the TGF-β superfamily, in T cells exhibited lower percentages of CD44(hi)CD8(+) T cells. To explore the role of Smad4 in the activation/memory of CD8(+) T cells, 6- to 8-week-old mice with or without Smad4 in T cells were challenged with Listeria monocytogenes. Smad4 deficiency did not affect antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell expansion but led to partially impaired cytotoxic function. Less short-lived effector T cells but more memory-precursor effector T cells were generated in the absence of Smad4. Despite that, Smad4 deficiency led to reduced memory CD8(+) T-cell responses. Further exploration revealed that the generation of central memory T cells was impaired in the absence of Smad4 and the cells showed survival issue. In mechanism, Smad4 deficiency led to aberrant transcriptional programs in antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. These findings demonstrated an essential role of Smad4 in the control of effector and memory CD8(+) T-cell responses to infection.

  11. Quantitative Multilevel Analysis of Central Metabolism in Developing Oilseeds of Oilseed Rape during in Vitro Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwender, Jörg; Hebbelmann, Inga; Heinzel, Nicolas; Hildebrandt, Tatjana; Rogers, Alistair; Naik, Dhiraj; Klapperstück, Matthias; Braun, Hans-Peter; Schreiber, Falk; Denolf, Peter; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Rolletschek, Hardy

    2015-07-01

    Seeds provide the basis for many food, feed, and fuel products. Continued increases in seed yield, composition, and quality require an improved understanding of how the developing seed converts carbon and nitrogen supplies into storage. Current knowledge of this process is often based on the premise that transcriptional regulation directly translates via enzyme concentration into flux. In an attempt to highlight metabolic control, we explore genotypic differences in carbon partitioning for in vitro cultured developing embryos of oilseed rape (Brassica napus). We determined biomass composition as well as 79 net fluxes, the levels of 77 metabolites, and 26 enzyme activities with specific focus on central metabolism in nine selected germplasm accessions. Overall, we observed a tradeoff between the biomass component fractions of lipid and starch. With increasing lipid content over the spectrum of genotypes, plastidic fatty acid synthesis and glycolytic flux increased concomitantly, while glycolytic intermediates decreased. The lipid/starch tradeoff was not reflected at the proteome level, pointing to the significance of (posttranslational) metabolic control. Enzyme activity/flux and metabolite/flux correlations suggest that plastidic pyruvate kinase exerts flux control and that the lipid/starch tradeoff is most likely mediated by allosteric feedback regulation of phosphofructokinase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Quantitative data were also used to calculate in vivo mass action ratios, reaction equilibria, and metabolite turnover times. Compounds like cyclic 3',5'-AMP and sucrose-6-phosphate were identified to potentially be involved in so far unknown mechanisms of metabolic control. This study provides a rich source of quantitative data for those studying central metabolism. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Quantitative Multilevel Analysis of Central Metabolism in Developing Oilseeds of Oilseed Rape During In Vitro Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwender, Jorg [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hebbelmann, Inga [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Heinzel, Nicholas [Leibniz Inst. of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Gatersleben (Germany); Hildebrandt, Tatjana [Univ. of Hannover (Germany); Rogers, Alistair [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Naik, Dhiraj [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Indian Inst. of Advanced Research Koba, Gujarat (India); Klapperstuck, Matthias [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Braun, Hans -Peter [Univ. of Hannover (Germany); Schreiber, Falk [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Univ. Halle-Wittenberg, Melbourne (Australia); Denolf, Peter [Bayer CropScience (Belgium); Borisjuk, Ljudmilla [Leibniz Inst. of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Gatersleben (Germany); Rolletschek, Hardy [Leibniz Inst. of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Gatersleben (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Seeds provide the basis for many food, feed, and fuel products. Continued increases in seed yield, composition, and quality require an improved understanding of how the developing seed converts carbon and nitrogen supplies into storage. Current knowledge of this process is often based on the premise that transcriptional regulation directly translates via enzyme concentration into flux. In an attempt to highlight metabolic control, we explore genotypic differences in carbon partitioning for in vitro cultured developing embryos of oilseed rape (Brassica napus). We determined biomass composition as well as 79 net fluxes, the levels of 77 metabolites, and 26 enzyme activities with specific focus on central metabolism in nine selected germplasm accessions. We observed a tradeoff between the biomass component fractions of lipid and starch. With increasing lipid content over the spectrum of genotypes, plastidic fatty acid synthesis and glycolytic flux increased concomitantly, while glycolytic intermediates decreased. The lipid/starch tradeoff was not reflected at the proteome level, pointing to the significance of (posttranslational) metabolic control. Enzyme activity/flux and metabolite/flux correlations suggest that plastidic pyruvate kinase exerts flux control and that the lipid/starch tradeoff is most likely mediated by allosteric feedback regulation of phosphofructokinase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Also, quantitative data were used to calculate in vivo mass action ratios, reaction equilibria, and metabolite turnover times. Compounds like cyclic 3',5'-AMP and sucrose-6-phosphate were identified to potentially be involved in so far unknown mechanisms of metabolic control. This study provides a rich source of quantitative data for those studying central metabolism..

  13. Complications of central venous catheter in patients transplanted with hematopoietic stem cells in a specialized service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barretta, Lidiane Miotto; Beccaria, Lúcia Marinilza; Cesarino, Cláudia Bernardi; Pinto, Maria Helena

    2016-06-07

    to identify the model, average length of stay on site and complications of central venous catheter in patients undergoing transplant of hematopoietic stem cells and verify the corresponding relationship between the variables: age, gender, medical diagnosis, type of transplant, implanted catheter and insertion site. a retrospective and quantitative study with a sample of 188 patients transplanted records between 2007 and 2011. the majority of patients used Hickman catheter with an average length of stay on site of 47.6 days. The complication fever/bacteremia was significant in young males with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma undergoing autologous transplant, which remained with the device for a long period in the subclavian vein. nurses should plan with their team the minimum waiting time, recommended between the catheter insertion and start of the conditioning regimen, as well as not to extend the length of time that catheter should be on site and undertake their continuing education, focusing on the prevention of complications. identificar o modelo, tempo médio de permanência e complicações de cateter venoso central em pacientes submetidos ao transplante de células-tronco hematopoiéticas e verificar a relação de correspondência entre as variáveis: idade, sexo, diagnóstico médico, tipo de transplante, cateter implantado e local de inserção. retrospectivo, quantitativo, com amostra de prontuários de 188 pacientes transplantados, entre 2007 e 2011. a maioria dos pacientes utilizou o cateter de Hickman com permanência média de 47,6 dias. A complicação febre/bacteremia foi significante em jovens do sexo masculino, com linfoma não Hodgkin, submetidos ao transplante autólogo, que permaneceram com o dispositivo por longo período, em veia subclávia. os enfermeiros devem planejar com a equipe o aguardo do tempo mínimo preconizado entre o implante do cateter e início do regime de condicionamento, assim como não estender o período de permanência e realizar

  14. Cell cycle control factors and skeletal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Ogasawara

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the oral and maxillofacial region, conditions such as delayed bone healing after tooth extraction, bone fracture, trauma-induced bone or cartilage defects, and tumors or birth defects are common, and it is necessary to identify the molecular mechanisms that control skeletogenesis or the differentiation of cells, in order to establish new treatment strategies for these conditions. Multiple studies have been conducted to investigate the involvement of factors that may be crucial for skeletogenesis or the differentiation of cells, including transcription factors, growth factors and cell cycle factors. Several genetically engineered mouse models of cell cycle factors have been generated in research seeking to identify cell cycle factor(s involved in the differentiation of cells, carcinogenesis, etc. Many groups have also reported the importance of cell cycle factors in the differentiation of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, chondrocytes and other cell types. Herein, we review the phenotypes of the genetically engineered mouse models of cell cycle factors with a particular focus on the size, body weight and skeletal abnormalities of the mice, and we discuss the potential of cell cycle factors as targets of clinical applications.

  15. Geodynamical model of development the gold ore deposit Muruntau in Central Kyzylkums /Western Uzbekistan/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorova, I. P.

    2004-12-01

    Recent advances in geology and sciences dealing with planets resulted in ever-growing information on the internal structure and composition of upper and lower mantle and its role in the development of mineral deposits. Thus, the analysis of geologic-geophysical velocity sections on DSS-MOVZ profiles, that cross Central Kyzylkum, has revealed a number of features, which are characteristic of the upper mantle rocks, related to morphology of bodies, their physical properties, consisting mainly in their contrasting values for contiquous blocks, and general increased velocity and density of the rocks they contain. Petrologic-geophysical analysis of the same profiles proved the previous conclusions, and besides it allowed us to create the geodinamical model of development of a complicated continental lithosphere within Central Kyzylkum Ore Magmatic Concenter (CKOMC). CKOMC is a part of Western Uzbekistan's territory, that has maximum concentration of gold ore deposits of different scale, including the gigantic one- Muruntau. There are two main factors, that condition the area of the concenter: 1.Obduction of crust of the ocean to continental one during the Upper Paleozoic collision of Kyrgiz-Kazakh and Karakum-Tadjik microcontinents; 2.Geochemical gold specialization of Turkestan paleo-ocean's lithosphere. As a result of obduction of doubled, and sometimes even trebled crust of the ocean to continental, the front of rock granitization shifted to the sphere of ocean sediments development, and granite-gneiss layer of the continental crust went down to granulite zone. The latter factor provoked mass penetration of fluids from the former granite-gneiss and sedimentary-metamorphic layers, which due to their uprush to the surface, formed fluid-hydrothermal system , enriched with gold, in the new upper crust. This, in its turn, conditioned the formation of numerous gold ore deposits of different facies and formations observed in Central Kyzylkums. Abrupt increase in the crust

  16. Modelling central metabolic fluxes by constraint-based optimization reveals metabolic reprogramming of developing Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombié, Sophie; Nazaret, Christine; Bénard, Camille; Biais, Benoît; Mengin, Virginie; Solé, Marion; Fouillen, Laëtitia; Dieuaide-Noubhani, Martine; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Beauvoit, Bertrand; Gibon, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Modelling of metabolic networks is a powerful tool to analyse the behaviour of developing plant organs, including fruits. Guided by our current understanding of heterotrophic metabolism of plant cells, a medium-scale stoichiometric model, including the balance of co-factors and energy, was constructed in order to describe metabolic shifts that occur through the nine sequential stages of Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) fruit development. The measured concentrations of the main biomass components and the accumulated metabolites in the pericarp, determined at each stage, were fitted in order to calculate, by derivation, the corresponding external fluxes. They were used as constraints to solve the model by minimizing the internal fluxes. The distribution of the calculated fluxes of central metabolism were then analysed and compared with known metabolic behaviours. For instance, the partition of the main metabolic pathways (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, etc.) was relevant throughout fruit development. We also predicted a valid import of carbon and nitrogen by the fruit, as well as a consistent CO2 release. Interestingly, the energetic balance indicates that excess ATP is dissipated just before the onset of ripening, supporting the concept of the climacteric crisis. Finally, the apparent contradiction between calculated fluxes with low values compared with measured enzyme capacities suggest a complex reprogramming of the metabolic machinery during fruit development. With a powerful set of experimental data and an accurate definition of the metabolic system, this work provides important insight into the metabolic and physiological requirements of the developing tomato fruits. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The morphological characterization of orientation-biased displaced large-field ganglion cells in the central part of goldfish retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Hideo; Sato, Fumi

    2018-02-01

    The vertebrate retina has about 30 subtypes of ganglion cells. Each ganglion cell receives synaptic inputs from specific types of bipolar and amacrine cells ramifying at the same depth of the inner plexiform layer (IPL), each of which is thought to process a specific aspect of visual information. Here, we identified one type of displaced ganglion cell in the goldfish retina which had a large and elongated dendritic field. As a population, all of these ganglion cells were oriented in the horizontal axis and perpendicular to the dorsal-ventral axis of the goldfish eye in the central part of retina. This ganglion cell has previously been classified as Type 1.2. However, the circuit elements which synapse with this ganglion cell are not yet characterized. We found that this displaced ganglion cell was directly tracer-coupled only with homologous ganglion cells at sites containing Cx35/36 puncta. We further illustrated that the processes of dopaminergic neurons often terminated next to intersections between processes of ganglion cells, close to where dopamine D1 receptors were localized. Finally, we showed that Mb1 ON bipolar cells had ribbon synapses in the axonal processes passing through the IPL and made ectopic synapses with this displaced ganglion cell that stratified into stratum 1 of the IPL. These results suggest that the displaced ganglion cell may synapse with both Mb1 cells using ectopic ribbon synapses and OFF cone bipolar cells with regular ribbon synapses in the IPL to function in both scotopic and photopic light conditions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Immunohistochemical expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and glucocorticoid and calcitonin receptors in central giant-cell lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiz, Nancy Noya; de la Rosa-García, Estela; Camacho, María Esther Irigoyen

    2016-04-01

    Central giant-cell lesions (CGCLs) are reactive lesions that consist histologically of spindle-shaped stromal cells, (fibroblasts and myofibroblasts) loosely arranged in a fibrous stroma, multinucleated giant cells and mononuclear cells with haemorrhagic areas. This study identified the immunoexpression of alpha-smooth muscle actin in spindle-shaped stromal cells, and glucocorticoid and calcitonin receptors in multinucleated giant cells and mononuclear cells. Their association with the clinical and radiographic characteristics of these lesions was identified. Thirty-five cases of CGCLs were studied. Expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, glucocorticoid and calcitonin was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The labelling index was 100 times the quotient of the number of positive cells divided by the total number of cells of each type. Logistic regression analysis was applied. Alpha-smooth muscle actin was positive (54%) for spindle stromal cells (myofibroblasts). A significant association was observed with root resorption (P = 0.004) and cortical bone destruction (P = 0.024). Glucocorticoid immunoexpression was positive for 99% of the giant cells and 86.7% of the mononuclear cells. Glucocorticoid immunoexpression in the mononuclear cells was associated with root resorption (P = 0.031). A longer evolution time was associated with lower immunoexpression of glucocorticoid (OR 12.4: P = 0.047). Calcitonin immunoexpression was positive in 86% of the giant cells. Immunoexpression of calcitonin was associated with age (P = 0.040). Myofibroblasts are important components of CGCLs, stromal cells and alpha-smooth muscle. Actin immunoexpression was associated with root and cortical bone resorption. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Reef Development on Artificial Patch Reefs in Shallow Water of Panjang Island, Central Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munasik; Sugiyanto; Sugianto, Denny N.; Sabdono, Agus

    2018-02-01

    Reef restoration methods are generally developed by propagation of coral fragments, coral recruits and provide substrate for coral attachment using artificial reefs (ARs). ARs have been widely applied as a tool for reef restoration in degraded natural reefs. Successful of coral restoration is determined by reef development such as increasing coral biomass, natural of coral recruits and fauna associated. Artificial Patch Reefs (APRs) is designed by combined of artificial reefs and coral transplantation and constructed by modular circular structures in shape, were deployed from small boats by scuba divers, and are suitable near natural reefs for shallow water with low visibility of Panjang Island, Central Java. Branching corals of Acropora aspera, Montipora digitata and Porites cylindrica fragments were transplanted on to each module of two units of artificial patch reefs in different periods. Coral fragments of Acropora evolved high survival and high growth, Porites fragments have moderate survival and low growth, while fragment of Montipora show in low survival and moderate growth. Within 19 to 22 months of APRs deployment, scleractinian corals were recruited on the surface of artificial patch reef substrates. The most recruits abundant was Montastrea, followed by Poritids, Pocilloporids, and Acroporids. We conclude that artificial patch reefs with developed by coral fragments and natural coral recruitment is one of an alternative rehabilitation method in shallow reef with low visibility.

  20. E-health development policies in new member states in Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplaga, Mariusz

    2007-01-01

    The paper brings insights on the process of e-health development in countries of Central and Eastern Europe, which joined European Union in 2004 years. The main part of the activities resulting in this review were carried out within the eHealth European Research Area (eHealth ERA) project established under the EU 6. Framework Programme. The research team involved in the project activities in the Centre of Innovation, Technology Transfer and University Development, Jagiellonian University focused the inquiries on the six countries: Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Lithuania and Latvia. The tool for data collection elaborated by the STAKES, Finland was applied. The main areas covered within the analysis included: health system characteristics, e-health policies definition process and deployment, specific activities in e-health subdomain as well as research and development programmes held in European countries. It seems that general background and intensive process of system and economy transformation was key factor influencing greatly the perception and status of the e-health domain in these countries. The opportunities related to the inclusion in the European Union was another essential factor bringing additional important impact on the e-health formation. All these countries started painful reform in early 90s after the fall of the communist governments. The health care system in general was not the prime benefactors of these changes.

  1. Comparison of Housing Construction Development in Selected Regions of Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorský, Ján; Petráková, Zora; Hollý, Ján

    2017-12-01

    In fast-growing countries, the economic growth, which came after the global financial crisis, ought to be manifested in the development of housing policy. The development of the region is directly related to the increase of the quality of living of its inhabitants. Housing construction and its relation with the availability of housing is a key issue for population overall. Comparison of its development in selected regions is important for experts in the field of construction, mayors of the regions, the state, but especially for the inhabitants themselves. The aim of the article is to compare the number of new dwellings with building permits and completed dwellings with final building approval between selected regions by using a mathematical statistics method - “Analysis of variance”. The article also uses the tools of descriptive statistics such as a point graph, a graph of deviations from the average, basic statistical characteristics of mean and variability. Qualitative factors influencing the construction of flats as well as the causes of quantitative differences in the number of started apartments under construction and completed apartments in selected regions of Central Europe are the subjects of the article’s conclusions.

  2. Tumor-induced rickets in a child with a central giant cell granuloma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Cooke, Elisa; Cruz-Rojo, Jaime; Gallego, Carmen; Romance, Ana Isabel; Mosqueda-Peña, Rocio; Almaden, Yolanda; Sánchez del Pozo, Jaime

    2015-06-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia/rickets is a rare paraneoplastic disorder associated with a tumor-producing fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). We present a child with symptoms of rickets as the first clinical sign of a central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) with high serum levels of FGF23, a hormone associated with decreased phosphate resorption. A 3-year-old boy presented with a limp and 6 months later with painless growth of the jaw. On examination gingival hypertrophy and genu varum were observed. Investigations revealed hypophosphatemia, normal 1,25 and 25 (OH) vitamin D, and high alkaline phosphatase. An MRI showed an osteolytic lesion of the maxilla. Radiographs revealed typical rachitic findings. Incisional biopsy of the tumor revealed a CGCG with mesenchymal matrix. The CGCG was initially treated with calcitonin, but the lesions continued to grow, making it necessary to perform tracheostomy and gastrostomy. One year after onset the hyperphosphaturia worsened, necessitating increasing oral phosphate supplements up to 100 mg/kg per day of elemental phosphorus. FGF23 levels were extremely high. Total removal of the tumor was impossible, and partial reduction was achieved after percutaneous computed tomography-guided radiofrequency, local instillation of triamcinolone, and oral propranolol. Compassionate use of cinacalcet was unsuccessful in preventing phosphaturia. The tumor slowly regressed after the third year of disease; phosphaturia improved, allowing the tapering of phosphate supplements, and FGF23 levels normalized. Tumor-induced osteomalacia/rickets is uncommon in children and is challenging for physicians to diagnose. It should be suspected in patients with intractable osteomalacia or rickets. A tumor should be ruled out if FGF23 levels are high. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Performance and safety of femoral central venous catheters in pediatric autologous peripheral blood stem cell collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooling, Laura; Hoffmann, Sandra; Webb, Dawn; Yamada, Chisa; Davenport, Robertson; Choi, Sung Won

    2017-12-01

    Autologous peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cell collection (A-HPCC) in children typically requires placement of a central venous catheter (CVC) for venous access. There is scant published data regarding the performance and safety of femoral CVCs in pediatric A-HPCC. Seven-year, retrospective study of A-HPCC in pediatric patients collected between 2009 and January 2017. Inclusion criteria were an age ≤ 21 years and A-HPCC using a femoral CVC for venous access. Femoral CVC performance was examined by CD34 collection rate, inlet rate, collection efficiency (MNC-FE, CD34-FE), bleeding, flow-related adverse events (AE), CVC removal, and product sterility testing. Statistical analysis and graphing were performed with commercial software. A total of 75/119 (63%) pediatric patients (median age 3 years) met study criteria. Only 16% of children required a CVC for ≥ 3 days. The CD34 collect rate and CD34-FE was stable over time whereas MNC-FE decreased after day 4 in 80% of patients. CD34-FE and MNC-FE showed inter- and intra-patient variability over time and appeared sensitive to plerixafor administration. Femoral CVC showed fewer flow-related AE compared to thoracic CVC, especially in pediatric patients (6.7% vs. 37%, P = 0.0005; OR = 0.12 (95%CI: 0.03-0.45). CVC removal was uneventful in 73/75 (97%) patients with hemostasis achieved after 20-30 min of pressure. In a 10-year period, there were no instances of product contamination associated with femoral CVC colonization. Femoral CVC are safe and effective for A-HPCC in young pediatric patients. Femoral CVC performance was maintained over several days with few flow-related alarms when compared to thoracic CVCs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. An Evaluation of Central Sensitization in Patients With Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Claudia M; Moscou-Jackson, Gyasi; Carroll, C Patrick; Kiley, Kasey; Haywood, Carlton; Lanzkron, Sophie; Hand, Matthew; Edwards, Robert R; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A

    2016-05-01

    Central sensitization (CS), nociceptive hyperexcitability known to amplify and maintain clinical pain, has been identified as a leading culprit responsible for maintaining pain in several chronic pain conditions. Recent evidence suggests that it may explain differences in the symptom experience of individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD). Quantitative sensory testing (QST) can be used to examine CS and identify individuals who may have a heightened CS profile. The present study categorized patients with SCD on the basis of QST responses into a high or low CS phenotype and compared these groups according to measures of clinical pain, vaso-occlusive crises, psychosocial factors, and sleep continuity. Eighty-three adult patients with SCD completed QST, questionnaires, and daily sleep and pain diaries over a 3-month period, weekly phone calls for 3 months, and monthly phone calls for 12 months. Patients were divided into CS groups (ie, no/low CS [n = 17] vs high CS [n = 21]), on the basis of thermal and mechanical temporal summation and aftersensations, which were norm-referenced to 47 healthy control subjects. High CS subjects reported more clinical pain, vaso-occlusive crises, catastrophizing, and negative mood, and poorer sleep continuity (Ps < .05) over the 18-month follow-up period. Future analyses should investigate whether psychosocial disturbances and sleep mediate the relationship between CS and pain outcomes. In general, SCD patients with greater CS had more clinical pain, more crises, worse sleep, and more psychosocial disturbances compared with the low CS group. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of glia-glia interactions on oligodendrocyte precursor cell biology during development and in demyelinating diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Clemente, Diego; Ortega, M.C.; Melero-Jerez, Carolina; Castro Soubriet, Fernando de

    2013-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) originate in specific areas of the developing central nervous system (CNS). Once generated, they migrate towards their destinations where they differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes. In the adult, 5–8% of all cells in the CNS are OPCs, cells that retain the capacity to proliferate, migrate, and differentiate into oligodendrocytes. Indeed, these endogenous OPCs react to damage in demyelinating diseases, like multiple sclerosis (MS), representing a key...

  6. Impurity of stem cell graft by murine embryonic fibroblasts – implications for cell-based therapy of the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek eMolcanyi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have been demonstrated to possess a therapeutic potential in experimental models of various central nervous system disorders, including stroke. The types of implanted cells appear to play a crucial role. Previously, groups of the stem cell network NRW implemented a feeder-based cell line within the scope of their projects, examining the implantation of stem cells after ischemic stroke and traumatic brain injury. Retrospective evaluation indicated the presence of spindle-shaped cells in several grafts implanted in injured animals, which indicated potential contamination by co-cultured feeder cells (murine embryonic fibroblasts – MEFs. Because feeder-based cell lines have been previously exposed to a justified criticism with regard to contamination by animal glycans, we aimed to evaluate the effects of stem cell/MEF co-transplantation. MEFs accounted for 5.33% ± 2.81 of all cells in the primary FACS-evaluated co-culture. Depending on the culture conditions and subsequent purification procedure, the MEF-fraction ranged from 0.9 to 9.9% of the cell suspensions in vitro. MEF survival and related formation of extracellular substances in vivo were observed after implantation into the uninjured rat brain. Impurity of the stem cell graft by MEFs interferes with translational strategies, which represents a threat to the potential recipient and may affect the graft microenvironment. The implications of these findings are critically discussed.

  7. Chromatin Repressive Complexes in Stem Cells, Development, and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Anne; Helin, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The chromatin environment is essential for the correct specification and preservation of cell identity through modulation and maintenance of transcription patterns. Many chromatin regulators are required for development, stem cell maintenance, and differentiation. Here, we review the roles...

  8. Early development of the south Central American margin: mechanisms and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchs, D. M.; Baumgartner, P. O.; Arculus, R.; Montes, C.; Bayona, G.; Cardona, A.

    2012-04-01

    The south Central American margin forms the SW border of the Caribbean Plate on top of the subducting Cocos and Nazca Plates between Nicaragua and Colombia. New and previous tectonostratigraphic, age and geochemical results show that the forearc basement between south Costa Rica and east Panama is composed of autochthonous and accreted sequences that provide important constraints on the development of the south Central American margin, the evolution of the Caribbean Plate and the formation of an inter-American land bridge. Autochtonous sequences in the forearc include three tectonostratigraphic units that occur at a regional scale: (1) a Late Cretaceous oceanic plateau considered to represent an extension of the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP) at the base of the arc; (2) Late Campanian to Maastrichtian protoarc sequences that cover or intrude the oceanic plateau; and (3) Maastrichtian to Eocene sequences of a more mature volcanic arc that overlies or intrude preceding units. These units clearly indicate that subduction initiation along the margin and, thus, the birth of the Caribbean Plate occurred in the Campanian. Incipient subduction was possibly triggered or facilitated by contrasted lithospheric strength across the edge of the CLIP and collision between the CLIP and South America during westward migration of South America. Accreted sequences in the forearc include mostly Late Cretaceous to Eocene seamount fragments between south Costa Rica and west Panama, with additional Eocene to Miocene olistostromal and hemipelagic sediments in south Costa Rica. The age and tectonostratigraphic relationships of accreted sequences, autochtonous sequences, and overlying forearc slope sediment suggest that subduction erosion, punctuated by local seamount or sediment accretion was the dominant process controlling the evolution of the outer margin at least until the Miocene. A major tectonic event affected the margin in the Middle Eocene, which is indicated by a

  9. Effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing central nervous system: possible involvement of thyroid hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.; Li, G. H.; Ronca, A. E.; Baer, L. A.; Sulkowski, G. M.; Koibuchi, N.; Wade, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing brain and specifically explored the possibility that these effects are mediated by altered thyroid status. Thirty-four timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to continuous centrifugation at 1.5 G (HG) from gestational Day 11 until one of three key developmental points: postnatal Day (P) 6, P15, or P21 (10 pups/dam: 5 males/5 females). During the 32-day centrifugation, stationary controls (SC, n = 25 dams) were housed in the same room as HG animals. Neonatal body, forebrain, and cerebellum mass and neonatal and maternal thyroid status were assessed at each time point. The body mass of centrifuged neonates was comparatively lower at each time point. The mass of the forebrain and the mass of the cerebellum were maximally reduced in hypergravity-exposed neonates at P6 by 15.9% and 25.6%, respectively. Analysis of neonatal plasma suggested a transient hypothyroid status, as indicated by increased thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level (38.6%) at P6, while maternal plasma TSH levels were maximally elevated at P15 (38.9%). Neither neonatal nor maternal plasma TH levels were altered, suggesting a moderate hypothyroid condition. Thus, continuous exposure of the developing rats to hypergravity during the embryonic and neonatal periods has a highly significant effect on the developing forebrain and cerebellum and neonatal thyroid status (P thyroid hormone in mediating the effect of hypergravity in the developing central nervous system and begin to define the role of TH in the overall response of the developing organism to altered gravity.

  10. MAIN TRENDS OF DERIVATIVES’ MARKET DEVELOPMENT IN CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostiantyn Vozianov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to examine the factors of formation and development of the derivatives market in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE, to analyze the features of the organization and functioning of these markets, as well as to identify modern trends of development of the derivatives markets of CEE. The methodological basis of the study are historical and logical and systematic approach to the analysis of economic phenomena and processes in national and global environment. The study was conducted using the methods: qualitative and quantitative comparison, factor and structural analysis. Results. The development of the CEE derivatives market is characterized by: rapid growth of derivatives trading for the past two decades; high concentration of trading volumes on the stock market; offering a wide range of derivative products allowing investors to effectively hedge risk or get exposure; exchange consolidation; tendency to increased use of modern telecommunication technologies etc. The key problems of CEE derivatives market are low liquidity and international profile of exchanges and the lack of domestic investors for achieving the desired depth of the market. Practical implications. Research of the derivatives market makes it possible to understand more about the mechanism of functioning of the modern financial sector. In our opinion, special attention should be paid to CEE countries, where the development of the derivatives market began in the 1990s. To date, they are understudied, although they have considerable growth potential and in the future can compete on equal terms with Western European and American markets. Moreover, the starting conditions of development of the derivatives market in the CEE countries are more similar to the market of Ukraine and could be useful in terms of adapting good practices.

  11. New insights into human primordial germ cells and early embryonic development from single-cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Jörg; Wruck, Wasco; Adjaye, James

    2017-08-01

    Human preimplantation developmental studies are difficult to accomplish due to associated ethical and moral issues. Preimplantation cells are rare and exist only in transient cell states. From a single cell, it is very challenging to analyse the origination of the heterogeneity and complexity inherent to the human body. However, recent advances in single-cell technology and data analysis have provided new insights into the process of early human development and germ cell specification. In this Review, we examine the latest single-cell datasets of human preimplantation embryos and germ cell development, compare them to bulk cell analyses, and interpret their biological implications. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  12. Cytoview: Development of a cell modelling framework

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    after image processing we used virtual reality modelling language (VRML). Rendering and interactive visualization provided by VRML is compatible with CellML. VRML has been used not only to enable 3D visualization of cells, but also to represent the information with minimum amount of data still representing it to the ...

  13. Cytoview: Development of a cell modelling framework

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-07-06

    Jul 6, 2007 ... Here we report a framework to model various aspects of a cell and integrate knowledge encoded at different levels of abstraction, with cell morphologies at one end to atomic structures at the other. The different issues that have been addressed are ontologies, feature description and model building.

  14. Location and cellular stages of NK cell development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianhua; Freud, Aharon G.; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    The identification of distinct tissue-specific natural killer (NK) cell populations that apparently mature from local precursor populations has brought new insight into the diversity and developmental regulation of this important lymphoid subset. NK cells provide a necessary link between the early (innate) and late (adaptive) immune responses to infection. Gaining a better understanding of the processes that govern NK cell development should allow us to better harness NK cell functions in multiple clinical settings as well as to gain further insight into how these cells undergo malignant transformation. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding sites and cellular stages of NK cell development in humans and mice. PMID:24055329

  15. [Agrarian movements, development alternatives and food security in Central America: scenarios of transition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Rojas, R

    1991-01-01

    This article, based on personal experiences with a network of organizations of small and medium agricultural producers in Central America, aims to present the views of peasant organizations concerning agrarian problems in the region. The 3 major sections of work define the place of peasant agriculture in the traditional agrarian structure and the new problems resulting from the structural adjustment programs of the 1980s; separately describe the new peasant movements emerging in Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama, identifying common themes an efforts at international collaboration; and explore the positions of the peasant organizations on the optimal strategies for agricultural development and agrarian change. Agriculture remains the backbone of the Central American economies. But because the economic model in the region is 1 of accumulation characterized by dependency, concentration of capital, and social marginalization, the agrarian structure is at the basis of social tensions. Efforts to develop peasant agriculture and to give small producers access to marketing and credit services have been weak and sporadic. The new peasant movements are less inclined than those of the past to employ tactics of confrontation in their efforts to secure access to land and better working conditions. The new movement is the expression of small market producers sometimes grouped into associations who are oriented to production of basic foodstuffs for the internal market. A new concern with adaptation and negotiation is evident. The new organizations have in common a belief in their ability to propose new solutions to regional problems. Their views are founded on a positive assessment of the ability of peasant agriculture to produce food and add dynamism to the regional economy after barriers to credit, technological progress, and modernization in general are removed. Signs of increased cooperation are evident between peasant organizations and other groups

  16. Microfouling development on artificial substrates deployed in the central Red Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Balqadi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Microfouling is the initial step in the growth of biofouling on hard substrata submerged in marine waters. In this study, microfouling development on nylon nets submerged in the central Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia was analyzed during the winter and summer seasons for a period of 5 days each. The results showed a well-established biofilm community on nylon nets submerged for 24 h, with bacteria and diatoms being the primary colonizers. Protein was the major organic component of the biofilm that developed on the nylon nets during the winter and summer seasons. Navicula spp., Nitzschia spp., Cylindrotheca spp., and Pluerosigma spp. were the dominant diatom species settled on the nylon nets. Pseudoalteromonas shioyasakiensis, Planomicrobium sp., Vibrio harveyi and Pseudoalteromonas rubra were the dominant bacteria isolated from the nylon nets. While the abundance of bacteria showed a positive correlation with the nutrient concentration of the biofilm during both winter and summer seasons, diatom density exhibited a significant positive relationship with the biofilm nutrients during the winter season only. The results also revealed significant seasonal variations in the abundance of microfouling organisms and accumulation of nutrients on nylon nets. Keywords: Biofilm, Biofouling, Nutrient cycling, Diatom, Larval settlement, Red Sea

  17. The development of a risk score for unplanned removal of peripherally inserted central catheter in newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Costa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to develop a risk score for unplanned removal of peripherally inserted central catheter in newborns.METHOD: prospective cohort study conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit with newborn babies who underwent 524 catheter insertions. The clinical characteristics of the newborn, catheter insertion and intravenous therapy were tested as risk factors for the unplanned removal of catheters using bivariate analysis. The risk score was developed using logistic regression. Accuracy was internally validated based on the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve.RESULTS: the risk score was made up of the following risk factors: transient metabolic disorders; previous insertion of catheter; use of a polyurethane double-lumen catheter; infusion of multiple intravenous solutions through a single-lumen catheter; and tip in a noncentral position. Newborns were classified into three categories of risk of unplanned removal: low (0 to 3 points, moderate (4 to 8 points, and high (≥ 9 points. Accuracy was 0.76.CONCLUSION: the adoption of evidence-based preventative strategies based on the classification and risk factors faced by the newborn is recommended to minimize the occurrence of unplanned removals.

  18. Development of a central PC-based system for reactor signal monitoring and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, A.; Ansari, S.A.; Rauf Baig, A.

    1998-01-01

    A personal computer based system was developed for on-line monitoring, signal processing and display of important reactor parameters of the Pakistan Research Reactor-1. The system was designed for assistance to both reactor operator and users. It performs three main functions. The first is the centralized radiation monitoring in and around the reactor building. The computer acquires signals from radiation monitoring channels and continuously displays them on distributed monitors. Trend monitoring and alarm generation is also done. In case of any abnormal condition the radiation level data is automatically stored in computer memory for detailed off-line analysis. In the second part the computer does the performance testing of nuclear instrumentation channels by signal statistical analysis, and generates alarm in case the channel standard deviation error exceeds the permissible error. Mean values of important nuclear signals are also displayed on distributed monitors as a part of reactor safety parameters display system. The third function is on-line computation of reactor physics parameters of the core which are important from operational and safety points-of-view. The signals from radiation protection system and nuclear instrumentation channels in the reactor were interfaced with the computer for this purpose. The development work was done under an IAEA research contract as a part of coordinated research programme. (author)

  19. TRUST, CORRUPTION, BRIBES AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPEAN COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Iolanda Voda

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the Western world has drawn on theoretical structures of classical and neoclassical liberalism for its explanatory support and sources of inspiration for centuries. Against this ideological background, institutionalists aim at showing that growth is a process of transformation, a double change: an economic and an institutional one. In this analysis, our purpose is to highlight the importance of informal institutional arrangements and their quality in explaining the disparities of revenues and developments between countries. In our approach, we will consider several indicators meant to highlight various aspects of research. The approach proposed is a transversal-comparative one and static methods pertain to uni- and multivariate analysis. The results obtained suggest the existence of major differences within the Central and East European area as far as informal institutions are concerned; moreover, the analysis conducted confirms the existence of a significant relation between the level of development and the structure of informal arrangements such as: trust level, bribe culture and corruption control.

  20. Limited HIV infection of central memory and stem cell memory CD4+ T cells is associated with lack of progression in viremic individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichole R Klatt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A rare subset of HIV-infected individuals, designated viremic non-progressors (VNP, remain asymptomatic and maintain normal levels of CD4+ T-cells despite persistently high viremia. To identify mechanisms potentially responsible for the VNP phenotype, we compared VNPs (average >9 years of HIV infection to HIV-infected individuals who have similar CD4+ T-cell counts and viral load, but who are likely to progress if left untreated ("putative progressors", PP, thus avoiding the confounding effect of differences related to substantial CD4+ T cell depletion. We found that VNPs, compared to PPs, had preserved levels of CD4+ stem cell memory cells (TSCM (p<0.0001, which was associated with decreased HIV infection of these cells in VNPs (r = -0.649, p = 0.019. In addition, VNPs had decreased HIV infection in CD4+ central memory (TCM cells (p = 0.035, and the total number of TCM cells was associated with increased proliferation of memory CD4+ T cells (r = 0.733, p = 0.01. Our results suggest that, in HIV-infected VNPs, decreased infection of CD4+ TCM and TSCM, cells are involved in preservation of CD4+ T cell homeostasis and lack of disease progression despite high viremia.

  1. The role and development perspectives of small towns in central Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasić Nenad

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The link between urban centers and the countryside, including movement of people, goods, capital and other social exchanges, play an important role in processes of rural and urban change of a country. Major demographic and spatial changes have been typical for Serbia in the second half of the 20th century, caused by a dynamic primary urbanization process, i.e. by intense migration trends between rural areas and towns (cities. A special attention in this paper is given to the small urban centers in Serbia (small towns with population of less than 20,000 as the first magnet in proximate contact with the rural surroundings, and the one that therefore could have the greatest influence on organization structure and development prospects of the rural areas. In addition to being difficult to substantiate criteria for urban classification, small towns themselves do not represent a homogeneous group of settlements, and this makes it even harder to put up generalizations that would fit to all the settlements of this kind either within our country or cross-borders. However, here are identified certain common features for the small towns in Central Serbia and their development perspective is analyzed in relation to medium towns and cities of the same territory in consideration. Finally, this paper discusses the importance of policies for small town development in light of a real risk that the process of globalisation may lead to the justification of a new concentration of activities in the large cities, increasing the already significant regional differences in living conditions and economic development.

  2. Librarians’ Role in Development and Achievement of Central Library Users’ Information Literacy (a Case Study: Iran)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaminfirooz, Mousa; Siamian, Hasan; Shahrabi, Afsaneh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Due to the development of technologies, communications, databases and information resource varieties in today’s information age, our various social, economic, cultural and political needs cannot be fulfilled by relying merely on past knowledge and skills as done previously. Information literacy (IL) as a set of necessary skills for all of us is an effective way of treating new technologies and their effective application in our lives. The study aimed to survey the library users’ views in the Central Library of Babol University of Medical Sciences (The Library), Iran, on the role and influences of librarians on their IL development and improvement. Methods: This analytical survey used a researcher-made questionnaire for data collection. Research population consisted of all users referring Information Unit of The Library during 22 September - 20 December 2010. Of them, 150 users participating in at least 5 workshops held by The Library were selected as the study sample. Results: Based on the findings, 52.7 percent of the subjects rated the influence of the librarians on their IL development much and very much. 44.7 percent claimed that they more acquired IL skills from librarians rather than others. 100 (63.3%) subjects preferred workshops held by the librarian to other workshops. Conclusion: The users of Information Unit of The Library perceived the training IL skills by librarians as a main influencing factor in their IL development and achievement. This emphasized the necessity of teaching IL to users and training the librarians in better teaching IL skills to library user. PMID:24511265

  3. A20 Restrains Thymic Regulatory T Cell Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Julius Clemens; Otten, Vera; Kober, Maike; Drees, Christoph; Rosenbaum, Marc; Schmickl, Martina; Heidegger, Simon; Beyaert, Rudi; van Loo, Geert; Li, Xian Chang; Peschel, Christian; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Haas, Tobias; Spoerl, Silvia; Poeck, Hendrik

    2017-10-01

    Maintaining immune tolerance requires the production of Foxp3-expressing regulatory T (T reg ) cells in the thymus. Activation of NF-κB transcription factors is critically required for T reg cell development, partly via initiating Foxp3 expression. NF-κB activation is controlled by a negative feedback regulation through the ubiquitin editing enzyme A20, which reduces proinflammatory signaling in myeloid cells and B cells. In naive CD4 + T cells, A20 prevents kinase RIPK3-dependent necroptosis. Using mice deficient for A20 in T lineage cells, we show that thymic and peripheral T reg cell compartments are quantitatively enlarged because of a cell-intrinsic developmental advantage of A20-deficient thymic T reg differentiation. A20-deficient thymic T reg cells exhibit reduced dependence on IL-2 but unchanged rates of proliferation and apoptosis. Activation of the NF-κB transcription factor RelA was enhanced, whereas nuclear translocation of c-Rel was decreased in A20-deficient thymic T reg cells. Furthermore, we found that the increase in T reg cells in T cell-specific A20-deficient mice was already observed in CD4 + single-positive CD25 + GITR + Foxp3 - thymic T reg cell progenitors. T reg cell precursors expressed high levels of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily molecule GITR, whose stimulation is closely linked to thymic T reg cell development. A20-deficient T reg cells efficiently suppressed effector T cell-mediated graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, suggesting normal suppressive function. Holding thymic production of natural T reg cells in check, A20 thus integrates T reg cell activity and increased effector T cell survival into an efficient CD4 + T cell response. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. Stepwise development of MAIT cells in mouse and human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Martin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells display two evolutionarily conserved features: an invariant T cell receptor (TCRalpha (iTCRalpha chain and restriction by the nonpolymorphic class Ib major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecule, MHC-related molecule 1 (MR1. MR1 expression on thymus epithelial cells is not necessary for MAIT cell development but their accumulation in the gut requires MR1 expressing B cells and commensal flora. MAIT cell development is poorly known, as these cells have not been found in the thymus so far. Herein, complementary human and mouse experiments using an anti-humanValpha7.2 antibody and MAIT cell-specific iTCRalpha and TCRbeta transgenic mice in different genetic backgrounds show that MAIT cell development is a stepwise process, with an intra-thymic selection followed by peripheral expansion. Mouse MAIT cells are selected in an MR1-dependent manner both in fetal thymic organ culture and in double iTCRalpha and TCRbeta transgenic RAG knockout mice. In the latter mice, MAIT cells do not expand in the periphery unless B cells are added back by adoptive transfer, showing that B cells are not required for the initial thymic selection step but for the peripheral accumulation. In humans, contrary to natural killer T (NKT cells, MAIT cells display a naïve phenotype in the thymus as well as in cord blood where they are in low numbers. After birth, MAIT cells acquire a memory phenotype and expand dramatically, up to 1%-4% of blood T cells. Finally, in contrast with NKT cells, human MAIT cell development is independent of the molecular adaptor SAP. Interestingly, mouse MAIT cells display a naïve phenotype and do not express the ZBTB16 transcription factor, which, in contrast, is expressed by NKT cells and the memory human MAIT cells found in the periphery after birth. In conclusion, MAIT cells are selected by MR1 in the thymus on a non-B non-T hematopoietic cell, and acquire a memory phenotype and expand in the

  5. Development of an ultrasound microscope combined with optical microscope for multiparametric characterization of a single cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Mototaka; Shikama, Joe; Yoshida, Koki; Nagaoka, Ryo; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2015-09-01

    Biomechanics of the cell has been gathering much attention because it affects the pathological status in atherosclerosis and cancer. In the present study, an ultrasound microscope system combined with optical microscope for characterization of a single cell with multiple ultrasound parameters was developed. The central frequency of the transducer was 375 MHz and the scan area was 80 × 80 μm with up to 200 × 200 sampling points. An inverted optical microscope was incorporated in the design of the system, allowing for simultaneous optical observations of cultured cells. Two-dimensional mapping of multiple ultrasound parameters, such as sound speed, attenuation, and acoustic impedance, as well as the thickness, density, and bulk modulus of specimen/cell under investigation, etc., was realized by the system. Sound speed and thickness of a 3T3-L1 fibroblast cell were successfully obtained by the system. The ultrasound microscope system combined with optical microscope further enhances our understanding of cellular biomechanics.

  6. [DEVELOPMENT OF CELL SHEET ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY IN ENGINEERING VASCULARIZED TISSUE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Ma, Dongyang; Ren, Liling

    2015-03-01

    To review the development of cell sheet engineering technology in engineering vascularized tissue. The literature about cell sheet engineering technology and engineering vascularized tissue was reviewed, analyzed, and summarized. Although there are many methods to engineer vascularized tissue, cell sheet engineering technology provides a promising potential to develop a vascularized tissue. Recently, cell sheet engineering technology has become a hot topic in engineering vascularized tissue. Co-culturing endothelial cells on a cell sheet, endothelial cells are able to form three-dimensional prevascularized networks and microvascular cavities in the cell sheet, which facilitate the formation of functional vascular networks in the transplanted tissue. Cell sheet engineering technology is a promising strategy to engineer vascularized tissue, which is still being studied to explore more potential.

  7. Basement control in the development of the early cretaceous West and Central African rift system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurin, Jean-Christophe; Guiraud, René

    1993-12-01

    The structural framework of the Precambrian basement of the West and Central African Rift System (WCARS) is described in order to examine the role of ancient structures in the development of this Early Cretaceous rift system. Basement structures are represented in the region by large Pan-African mobile belts (built at ca. 600 Ma) surrounding the > 2 Ga West African, Congo and Sao Francisco cratons. Except for the small Gao trough (eastern Mali) located near the contact nappe of the Pan-African Iforas suture zone along the edge of the West African craton, the entire WCARS is located within the internal domains of the Pan-African mobile belts. Within these domains, two main structural features occur as the main basement control of the WCARS: (1) an extensive network of near vertical shear zones which trend north-south through the Congo, Brazil, Nigeria, Niger and Algeria, and roughly east-west through northeastern Brazil and Central Africa. The shear zones correspond to intra-continental strike-slip faults which accompanied the oblique collision between the West African, Congo, and Sao Francisco cratons during the Late Proterozoic; (2) a steep metamorphic NW-SE-trending belt which corresponds to a pre-Pan-African (ca. 730 Ma) ophiolitic suture zone along the eastern edge of the Trans-Saharian mobile belt. The post-Pan-African magmatic and tectonic evolution of the basement is also described in order to examine the state of the lithosphere prior to the break-up which occurred in the earliest Cretaceous. After the Pan-African thermo-tectonic event, the basement of the WCARS experienced a long period of intra-plate magmatic activity. This widespread magmatism in part relates to the activity of intra-plate hotspots which have controlled relative uplift, subsidence and occasionally block faulting. During the Paleozoic and the early Mesozoic, this tectonic activity was restricted to west of the Hoggar, west of Aïr and northern Cameroon. During the Late Jurassic

  8. AIRE deficiency leads to impaired iNKT cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, Emma; Rosmaraki, Eleftheria; Berg, Louise; Brauner, Hanna; Karlsson, Mikael C I; Peltonen, Leena; Höglund, Petter; Winqvist, Ola

    2010-02-01

    Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndrome type I (APS I) is caused by mutations in the Autoimmune Regulator gene (AIRE), and results in the immunological destruction of endocrine organs. Herein we have characterized the CD1d-restricted invariant NKT cells (iNKT) and NK cells in APS I patients and Aire(-/-) mice, two cell populations known to play a role in the regulation of autoimmune disease. We show that the frequency of circulating iNKT cells is reduced in APS I patients compared to healthy controls. In accordance with this, iNKT cells are significantly reduced in the thymus and peripheral organs of Aire(-/-) mice. Bone marrow transfer from wild type donors into lethally irradiated Aire(-/-) recipients led to a decreased iNKT cell population in the liver, suggesting an impaired development of iNKT cells in the absence of Aire expression in radio-resistant cells. In contrast to the iNKT cells, both conventional NK cells and thymus-derived NK cells were unaffected by Aire deficiency and differentiated normally in Aire(-/-) mice. Our results show that expression of Aire in radio-resistant cells is important for the development of iNKT cells, whereas NK cell development and function does not depend on Aire. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Central giant cell granuloma of the mandibular condyle: a case report, literature review, and discussion of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Gigliotti, DMD

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Benign and malignant neoplasms of the temporomandibular joint are uncommon. Their presence poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for clinicians. The central giant cell granuloma is a relatively common lesion of the jaws; however, it has been reported rarely to originate from the mandibular condyle. To date, only 5 such cases have been documented. We report a case of a large central giant cell granuloma of the condylar head with extension into the infratemporal fossa in a 29-year-old male. The patient was treated with resection and reconstruction using a costochondral graft. The signs, symptoms, and radiographic features are described and compared with the previous reports in the literature. The therapeutic options detailed in the literature have been focused mainly on lesions occupying the dentate regions of the maxilla and mandible. As such, we will review the surgical and pharmacologic options available to the surgeon and discuss their appropriateness with regard to this unique presentation of the central giant cell granuloma.

  10. Ranking landscape development scenarios affecting natterjack toad (Bufo calamita population dynamics in Central Poland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila W Franz

    Full Text Available When data are limited it is difficult for conservation managers to assess alternative management scenarios and make decisions. The natterjack toad (Bufo calamita is declining at the edges of its distribution range in Europe and little is known about its current distribution and abundance in Poland. Although different landscape management plans for central Poland exist, it is unclear to what extent they impact this species. Based on these plans, we investigated how four alternative landscape development scenarios would affect the total carrying capacity and population dynamics of the natterjack toad. To facilitate decision-making, we first ranked the scenarios according to their total carrying capacity. We used the software RAMAS GIS to determine the size and location of habitat patches in the landscape. The estimated carrying capacities were very similar for each scenario, and clear ranking was not possible. Only the reforestation scenario showed a marked loss in carrying capacity. We therefore simulated metapopulation dynamics with RAMAS taking into account dynamical processes such as reproduction and dispersal and ranked the scenarios according to the resulting species abundance. In this case, we could clearly rank the development scenarios. We identified road mortality of adults as a key process governing the dynamics and separating the different scenarios. The renaturalisation scenario clearly ranked highest due to its decreased road mortality. Taken together our results suggest that road infrastructure development might be much more important for natterjack toad conservation than changes in the amount of habitat in the semi-natural river valley. We gained these insights by considering both the resulting metapopulation structure and dynamics in the form of a PVA. We conclude that the consideration of dynamic processes in amphibian conservation management may be indispensable for ranking management scenarios.

  11. Comparative effects of alcohol and thiamine deficiency on the developing central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bâ, Abdoulaye

    2011-11-20

    The present study addresses the still unresolved issue of the character of alcohol-thiamine metabolic interferences in the developing central nervous system (CNS). Investigations compare developmental neurotoxicity evoked by three patterns of maternal thiamine deficiency (pre, peri and postnatal), with two patterns of maternal chronic alcohol intake (alcohol alone and alcohol+thiamine cotreatment), on seven neurodevelopmental abilities in the offspring. The three patterns of thiamine deficiency, pair-compared with controls, highlight four sequences of development: (1) embryonic-perinatal sequence; (2) perinatal-postnatal sequence; (3) "ontogeny in ontogeny out" sequence; (4) "off and on" developing sequence. The results suggest a temporally- and regionally emergence of structures and centers underlying functional maturation during CNS ontogenesis. Furthermore, both developmental thiamine deficiencies and ethanol exposure produce two waves of neurofunctional alterations, peaking at P15 (postnatal day 15) and P25, respectively. The first peak of vulnerability is a prenatal event; it may interfere with the periods of intense cellular proliferation and migration. The second peak represents both perinatal and postnatal events; it may interfere with the periods of cellular differentiation, synaptogenesis, axonogenesis and myelinogenesis. Alcohol+thiamine cotreatment fails to reduce the first peak, but neutralizes essentially the second peak. The results suggest that alcohol interferes with thiamine during cellular differentiation and membrane developmental processes mainly. Indeed, among the three conditions of thiamine-deficient diet, only perinatal thiamine deficiency exhibits a closer relationship with developmental alcohol exposure. Together, these observations suggest that the critical period for alcohol-thiamine antagonism occurs perinatally and affects primarily cellular differentiation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Development of the CMS Zero Degree Calorimeters to Derive the Centrality of AA Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Jeffrey Scott [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States)

    2012-12-07

    The centrality of РЬРЬ collisions is derived using correlations from the zero degree calorimeter (ZDC) signal and pixel multiplicity at the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment using data from the heavy ion run in 2010. The method to derive the centrality takes the two-dimensional correlation between the ZDC and pixels and linearizes it for sorting events. The initial method for deriving the centrality at CMS uses the energy deposit in the HF detector, and it is compared to the centrality derived Ьу the correlations in ZDC and pixel multiplicity. This comparison highlights the similarities between the results of both methods in central collisions, as expected, and deviations in the results in peripheral collisions. The ZDC signals in peripheral collisions are selected Ьу low pixel multiplicity to oЬtain а ZDC neutron spectrum, which is used to effectively gain match both sides of the ZDC

  13. Development of 99mTc agents for imaging central neural system receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals that bind to central neural system (CNS) receptors in vivo are potentially useful for understanding the pathophysiology of anumber of neurological and psychiatric disorders, their diagnosis and treatment. Carbon-11 labelled compounds and positron emission tomography(PET) imaging have played a vital role in establishing the usefulness of imaging the dopaminergic, cholinergic, serotonergic and benzodiazapine receptors, and relating the receptor density to disease status. Since the use of 11C agents is constrained due to their 20 min half-life, various radiohalogenated analogues based on the structure of 11C compounds have been successfully developed, providing comparable information. Iodine- 123 is the most widely employed of these radioisotopes; it has a longer, 13 h, half-life. Through the use of 123I, there has been a steady growth in CNS receptor imaging studies employing single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). SPECT, as compared with PET, has slightly inferior image resolution but has the advantage of being readily available worldwide. However, the 123I radiopharmaceutical is expensive and the distribution system outside of the major markets is not well developed for its supply on a routine basis. The ideal radioisotope for SPECT imaging is 99mTc, due to its low cost per dose, availability through commercially available generator systems and physical decay characteristics. Over 80% of all diagnostic nuclear medicine imaging studies worldwide are conducted using this radioisotope. Development of 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals for imaging CNS receptors is therefore of considerable importance. On the basis of the recommendations of a consultants meeting, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated in 1996 a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Agents for Imaging CNS Receptors based on 99mTc. At that time there were no 99mTc CNS receptor imaging radiopharmaceuticals available even though work on

  14. Towards Design of Sustainable Energy Systems in Developing Countries: Centralized and Localized Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursun, Berrin

    Energy use in developing countries is projected to equal and exceed the demand in developed countries in the next five years. Growing concern about environmental problems, depletion and price fluctuation of fossil fuels pushes the efforts for meeting energy demand in an environmentally friendly and sustainable way. Hence, it is essential to design energy systems consisting of centralized and localized options that generate the optimum energy mix to meet this increasing energy demand in a sustainable manner. In this study, we try to answer the question, "How can the energy demand in Rampura village be met sustainably?" via two centralized clean coal (CCC) technology and three localized energy technology options analyzed. We perform the analysis of these energy technologies through joint use of donor-side analysis technique emergy analysis (EA) and user-side analysis technique life cycle assessment (LCA). Sustainability of such an energy combination depends on its reliance on renewable inputs rather than nonrenewable or purchased inputs. CCC technologies are unsustainable energy systems dependent on purchased external inputs almost 100%. However, increased efficiency and significantly lower environmental impacts of CCC technologies can lead to more environmentally benign utilization of coal as an energy source. CCC technologies supply electricity at a lower price compared to the localized energy options investigated. Localized energy options analyzed include multi-crystalline solar PV, floating drum biogas digester and downdraft biomass gasifier. Solar PV has the lowest water and land use, however, solar electricity has the highest price with a high global warming potential (GWP). Contrary to general opinion, solar electricity is highly non-renewable. Although solar energy is a 100% renewable natural resource, materials utilized in the production of solar panels are mostly non-renewable purchased inputs causing the low renewability of solar electricity. Best

  15. A fuzzy logic controller based approach to model the switching mechanism of the mammalian central carbon metabolic pathway in normal and cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Abhijit; Paul, Debjyoti; De, Rajat K

    2016-07-19

    Dynamics of large nonlinear complex systems, like metabolic networks, depend on several parameters. A metabolic pathway may switch to another pathway in accordance with the current state of parameters in both normal and cancer cells. Here, most of the parameter values are unknown to us. A fuzzy logic controller (FLC) has been developed here for the purpose of modeling metabolic networks by approximating the reasons for the behaviour of a system and applying expert knowledge to track switching between metabolic pathways. The simulation results can track the switching between glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, as well as glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways (PPP) in normal cells. Unlike normal cells, pyruvate kinase (M2 isoform) (PKM2) switches alternatively between its two oligomeric forms, i.e. an active tetramer and a relatively low activity dimer, in cancer cells. Besides, there is a coordination among PKM2 switching and enzymes catalyzing PPP. These phenomena help cancer cells to maintain their high energy demand and macromolecular synthesis. However, the reduction of initial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to a very low concentration, decreasing initial glucose uptake, destroying coordination between glycolysis and PPP, and replacement of PKM2 by its relatively inactive oligomeric form (dimer) or inhibition of the translation of PKM2 may destabilize the mutated control mechanism of the mammalian central carbon metabolic (CCM) pathway in cancer cells. The performance of the model is compared appropriately with some existing ones.

  16. Welfare State Development in Central and Eastern Europe: A State of the Art Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragos Adascalitei

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The welfare states in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE have undergone massive changes since the beginning of the 1990s. This paper reviews the literature on welfare state development in CEE in light of the theories that have been used to study advanced capitalist democracies. Its purpose is to critically assess the extent to which different theories can explain changes in the welfare state during and after transition. It argues that until now two strands of literature have crystallised: institutionalism and actor-centred explanations. Institutionalists agree that welfare reforms are limited by the path dependence of the national welfare state structures though this framework is biased towards explaining stability. Recent literature seeks to overcome this bias by adding variables that traditionally belong to the actor-centred paradigm. This essay will argue that the gains from such an approach are exceeded by losses in the accuracy and parsimony of explanations. Further, in the actor-centred camp the welfare state is seen as a product of bargaining between various national and international actors. Yet the debate about who is responsible for the present welfare state arrangements is far from over. Unanswered questions revolve around the impact of political parties and ideologies on welfare reforms, the role of bureaucracies, the efficiency of international financial institutions in advocating retrenchment and the precise mechanisms through which all the above actors defend their interests.

  17. Development of pectinate-ispagula mucilage mucoadhesive beads of metformin HCl by central composite design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Amit Kumar; Pal, Dilipkumar; Santra, Kousik

    2014-05-01

    Ionotropically-gelled mucoadhesive beads of metformin HCl composed of low methoxy (LM) pectin-ispaghula husk mucilage (IHM) polymer-blend was developed and optimized using central composite design (spherical type, single center point, and α=1.414). Effects of LM pectin and IHM amounts on drug encapsulation efficiency (DEE) and cumulative drug release at 10h (R10h) were analysed using response surface methodology. The optimized beads containing metformin HCl (F-O) showed DEE of 86.98 ± 3.26% and R10h of 47.20 ± 1.28%. All these beads exhibited suitable controlled in vitro sustained drug release pattern with super case-II transport mechanism over 10h. These beads were also characterized by SEM and FTIR. The optimized beads also exhibited pH-dependent swelling, good mucoadhesivity with goat intestinal mucosa and significant hypoglycemic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats over prolonged period after oral administration, which could possibly be lucrative in terms of prolonged systemic absorption of metformin HCl maintaining tight blood glucose level and advanced patient compliance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Getting ready for REDD+: Recognition and Donor-country Project Development Dynamics in Central Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen M Walters

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available REDD+ (Reducing Emissions, Deforestation and forest Degradation+ is a United Nations Framework Convention for Climate Change (UNFCCC process through which governments reduce the impacts of climate change through forest conservation in a results-based payments scheme. Distinct from international negotiations about the REDD+ framework under the UNFCCC, there are also REDD+ projects that help governments to set up the institutional architecture, plans and strategies to implement REDD+. These capacity-building projects, in the first phase of 'REDD+ readiness', involve negotiations among national and international actors in which recognition and authority claims are used by participants to influence project-level negotiations. This study analyses the project development negotiations in a World Bank-led REDD+ capacity building regional project, involving six Central African countries between 2008 and 2011. It explores how the project created a 'negotiation table' constituted of national and regional institutions recognised by the donors and governments, and how this political space, influenced by global, regional and national political agendas led to 'instances' of recognition and misrecognition – in which some negotiating parties' claims of representation were acknowledge and affirmed, while others' claims were not. Focusing on Cameroon and Gabon, this article analyses how negotiations shaped full participation by Cameroon and only partial engagement by Gabon.

  19. Regulation of hematopoietic stem cells during mouse development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Orelio (Claudia)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe hematopoietic system is comprised of many different cell types that fulfill important physiological functions throughout embryonic and adult stages of mouse development. As the mature blood cells have a limited life-span, the pool of blood cells needs constant replenishing. At the

  20. A drug target that stimulates development of healthy stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists have overcome a major impediment to the development of effective stem cell therapies by studying mice that lack CD47, a protein found on the surface of both healthy and cancer cells. They discovered that cells obtained from the lungs of CD47-de

  1. Cellular Silica Encapsulation for Development of Robust Cell Based Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Robert; Rogelj, Snezna; Harper, Jason; Tartis, Michaelann

    2014-03-01

    In order to detect chemical and biological threats both on the battlefield and in civilian life, development of portable, robust detection systems capable of real-time identification of the chemical and biological agents are needed. Living cell-based sensors have proven effective as sensitive, specific, near real-time detectors; however, living cell-based sensors require frequent cell replenishment due to cell sensitivity to the ex-vivo environment, which limits sensor stability. Incorporation of living cells within a biocompatible matrix that provides mechanical protection and maintains access to the external environment may facilitate the development of long-term stable cell-based biosensors. We are exploring the use of a novel Chemical Vapor into Liquid (CViL) deposition process for whole cell encapsulation in silica. In CViL, the high vapor pressure of common silica alkoxides is utilized to deliver silica into an aqueous medium, creating a silica sol. Mixing of cells with the resulting silica sol facilitates encapsulation of cells in silica while minimizing cell contact with the cytotoxic products of silica generating reactions. Using fluorescence microscopy analysis with multiple silica specific markers, encapsulation of multiple eukaryotic cell types (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Jurkat, HeLa, and U87 cells) with CViL generated silica is shown, providing a foundation for development of long -term stable cell-based biosensors with diverse sensing capabilities.

  2. Impact of GDP Information Technology in Developing of Regional Central Business (Case 50 Airports IT City Development in Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyono, Joko; Sukoco, Agus; Ikhsan Setiawan, M.; Suhermin; Rahim, Robbi

    2017-12-01

    Indonesia a great number of populations and demand of air transportation services keep increasing by the year in line with the increasing of population and welfare its people. Need for telematics solutions to support goods transport and distribution in cities is mainly due to the complexity of the processes taking place in urban transport systems and the importance of the optimisation of transport operations via ensuring adequate availability of linear and point infrastructure, while reducing the adverse impacts of the transport system on the environment. Efficient infrastructure supports economic growth, improves quality of life, and it is important for national security. Impact of GDP Information Technology in developing of Regional Central Business especially SME Business, are very large correlations and very significant supported by Passenger Arrival and Departure, Baggage Loaded and Unloaded, Cargo Loaded and Unloaded, Separated regional asset, Grant, Capital Expenditure, Investment of Regional Gov., GDP Agriculture-Forestry-Fishing, GDP Manufacturing, GDP Electricity-Gas, GDP Water supply- Sewerage-Waste Management-Remediation Activities, GDP Financial-Insurance Activities, GDP Business Activities, GDP Public Administration and Defense-Compulsory Social Security, GDP Education and GDP Other Services Activities

  3. Prenatal irradiation: nitric oxide and oxidative stress roles in radiation-induced apoptosis of the developing central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjurjo, Julieta

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The effects of prenatal irradiation on developing brain should be considered at cellular, structural and functional levels, integrating the information obtained from different sources in an appropriated model to explain the mechanisms involved in neuronal damage. That would permit to make risk estimations and improve radiological protection. Human brain is especially sensitive to ionizing radiation during certain stages of prenatal development. At doses such as those received by Hiroshima and Nagasaki's atomic bomb explosions survivors that were prenatally exposed, the maximum risk was to those exposed between the 8th and 15th weeks of gestation, in coincidence with the highest rate of neuron production and its migration to the brain cortex. The major effect produced on both, brain growth and development, was the augmentation of the Severe Mental Retardation (SMR) incidence. Radiation-induced apoptosis of neuronal progenitors should be considered as one of the factors associated with this pathology, apart from those of migration and synaptogenesis. Apoptosis is an innate and evolutionally conserved process by which the cells provoke the inactivation, disorganisation and degradation of their structural and functional components in a systematic fashion, with the aim of producing its own death. It is also the main cell death mechanism induced by low linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation in developing Central Nervous System (CNS). Radioinduced apoptosis characterization during the different developmental stages, its kinetics and the possible implicated mechanisms (like oxidative injury and nitric oxide) was done using an 'in vitro' system of cortical micro masses (primary cultures of brain cortex cells) from rat embryo brains. Cell cultures were exposed to a single dose of gamma radiation, between 0,2 and 2 Gy, supplied by a Co 60 source (Picker C4M60) at a 70 cm distance with a field area size of 25 cm x 25 cm and at a 0,34 Gy/minute dose rate

  4. Overview on the IFMIF test cell development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzel, V. E-mail: heinzel@irs.fzk.de; Bem, P.; Esposito, E.; Gordeev, S.; Fischer, U.; Moeslang, A.; Simakov, S.; Shimizu, A.; Sugimoto, M.; Tiseanu, I.; Vladimirov, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Yutani, T

    2004-08-01

    The major components of the test cell are the three test modules, the shield plugs and the test cell covers. The existing drawings of the IFMIF test cell and the internals were put together to have a common basis for discussion. The high-flux-test-module was redesigned. The rigs were designed with a flat plate geometry. They are equipped with an electric heater system, with which the temperatures in the specimens stack can be kept at temperature levels between 250 and 650 deg. C within a tolerance of 30 deg. C. The temperature level of each rig can be adjusted independently. First result of the optimization of the medium-flux-test-module are also described.

  5. Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Elangovan; Scott Barnett; Sossina Haile

    2008-06-30

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency energy conversion devices. Present materials set, using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, limit the cell operating temperatures to 800 C or higher. It has become increasingly evident however that lowering the operating temperature would provide a more expeditious route to commercialization. The advantages of intermediate temperature (600 to 800 C) operation are related to both economic and materials issues. Lower operating temperature allows the use of low cost materials for the balance of plant and limits degradation arising from materials interactions. When the SOFC operating temperature is in the range of 600 to 700 C, it is also possible to partially reform hydrocarbon fuels within the stack providing additional system cost savings by reducing the air preheat heat-exchanger and blower size. The promise of Sr and Mg doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) electrolyte materials, based on their high ionic conductivity and oxygen transference number at the intermediate temperature is well recognized. The focus of the present project was two-fold: (a) Identify a cell fabrication technique to achieve the benefits of lanthanum gallate material, and (b) Investigate alternative cathode materials that demonstrate low cathode polarization losses at the intermediate temperature. A porous matrix supported, thin film cell configuration was fabricated. The electrode material precursor was infiltrated into the porous matrix and the counter electrode was screen printed. Both anode and cathode infiltration produced high performance cells. Comparison of the two approaches showed that an infiltrated cathode cells may have advantages in high fuel utilization operations. Two new cathode materials were evaluated. Northwestern University investigated LSGM-ceria composite cathode while Caltech evaluated Ba-Sr-Co-Fe (BSCF) based pervoskite cathode. Both cathode materials showed lower polarization losses at temperatures as low as 600

  6. Development and Evaluation of a Simulation-based Curriculum for Ultrasound-guided Central Venous Catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Robert; Chaplin, Tim; McKaigney, Conor; Rang, Louise; Jaeger, Melanie; Redfearn, Damian; Davison, Colleen; Ungi, Tamas; Holden, Matthew; Yeo, Caitlin; Keri, Zsuzsanna; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2016-11-01

    To develop a simulation-based curriculum for residents to learn ultrasound-guided (USG) central venous catheter (CVC) insertion, and to study the volume and type of practice that leads to technical proficiency. Ten post-graduate year two residents from the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Anesthesiology completed four training sessions of two hours each, at two week intervals, where they engaged in a structured program of deliberate practice of the fundamental skills of USG CVC insertion on a simulator. Progress during training was monitored using regular hand motion analysis (HMA) and performance benchmarks were determined by HMA of local experts. Blinded assessment of video recordings was done at the end of training to assess technical competence using a global rating scale. None of the residents met any of the expert benchmarks at baseline. Over the course of training, the HMA metrics of the residents revealed steady and significant improvement in technical proficiency. By the end of the fourth session six of 10 residents had faster procedure times than the mean expert benchmark, and nine of 10 residents had more efficient left and right hand motions than the mean expert benchmarks. Nine residents achieved mean GRS scores rating them competent to perform independently. We successfully developed a simulation-based curriculum for residents learning the skills of USG CVC insertion. Our results suggest that engaging residents in three to four distributed sessions of deliberate practice of the fundamental skills of USG CVC insertion leads to steady and marked improvement in technical proficiency with individuals approaching or exceeding expert level benchmarks.

  7. Development of a monthly to seasonal forecast framework tailored to inland waterway transport in central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Meißner

    2017-12-01

    predictive limitations on longer lead times in central Europe, this study reveals the existence of a valuable predictability of streamflow on monthly up to seasonal timescales along the Rhine, upper Danube and Elbe waterways, and the Elbe achieves the highest skill and economic value. (3 The more physically based and the statistical approach are able to improve the predictive skills and economic value compared to climatology and the ESP approach. The specific forecast skill highly depends on the forecast location, the lead time and the season. (4 Currently, the statistical approach seems to be most skilful for the three waterways investigated. The lagged relationship between the monthly and/or seasonal streamflow and the climatic and/or oceanic variables vary between 1 month (e.g. local precipitation, temperature and soil moisture up to 6 months (e.g. sea surface temperature. Besides focusing on improving the forecast methodology, especially by combining the individual approaches, the focus is on developing useful forecast products on monthly to seasonal timescales for waterway transport and to operationalize the related forecasting service.

  8. Development of a monthly to seasonal forecast framework tailored to inland waterway transport in central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meißner, Dennis; Klein, Bastian; Ionita, Monica

    2017-12-01

    limitations on longer lead times in central Europe, this study reveals the existence of a valuable predictability of streamflow on monthly up to seasonal timescales along the Rhine, upper Danube and Elbe waterways, and the Elbe achieves the highest skill and economic value. (3) The more physically based and the statistical approach are able to improve the predictive skills and economic value compared to climatology and the ESP approach. The specific forecast skill highly depends on the forecast location, the lead time and the season. (4) Currently, the statistical approach seems to be most skilful for the three waterways investigated. The lagged relationship between the monthly and/or seasonal streamflow and the climatic and/or oceanic variables vary between 1 month (e.g. local precipitation, temperature and soil moisture) up to 6 months (e.g. sea surface temperature). Besides focusing on improving the forecast methodology, especially by combining the individual approaches, the focus is on developing useful forecast products on monthly to seasonal timescales for waterway transport and to operationalize the related forecasting service.

  9. Making headway: the roles of Hox genes and neural crest cells in craniofacial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Paul A

    2003-04-14

    Craniofacial development is an extraordinarily complex process requiring the orchestrated integration of multiple specialized tissues such as the surface ectoderm, neural crest, mesoderm, and pharyngeal endoderm in order to generate the central and peripheral nervous systems, axial skeleton, musculature, and connective tissues of the head and face. How do the characteristic facial structures develop in the appropriate locations with their correct shapes and sizes, given the widely divergent patterns of cell movements that occur during head development? The patterning information could depend upon localized interactions between the epithelial and mesenchymal tissues or alternatively, the developmental program for the characteristic facial structures could be intrinsic to each individual tissue precursor. Understanding the mechanisms that control vertebrate head development is an important issue since craniofacial anomalies constitute nearly one third of all human congenital defects. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of neural crest cell patterning and the dynamic nature of the tissue interactions that are required for normal craniofacial development.

  10. Dental Stem Cell in Tooth Development and Advances of Adult Dental Stem Cell in Regenerative Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jiali; Xu, Xin; Lin, Jiong; Fan, Li; Zheng, Yuting; Kuang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are considered as a promising treatment for many clinical usage such as tooth regeneration, bone repairation, spinal cord injury, and so on. However, the ideal stem cell for stem cell-based therapy still remains to be elucidated. In the past decades, several types of stem cells have been isolated from teeth, including dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), dental follicle progenitor stem cells (DFPCs) and stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP), which may be a good source for stem cell-based therapy in certain disease, especially when they origin from neural crest is considered. In this review, the specific characteristics and advantages of the adult dental stem cell population will be summarized and the molecular mechanisms of the differentiation of dental stem cell during tooth development will be also discussed.

  11. Reactivation of latent HIV-1 in central memory CD4+ T cells through TLR-1/2 stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are crucial for recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by cells of the innate immune system. TLRs are present and functional in CD4+ T cells. Memory CD4+ T cells, predominantly central memory cells (TCM), constitute the main reservoir of latent HIV-1. However, how TLR ligands affect the quiescence of latent HIV within central memory CD4+ T cells has not been studied. Results We evaluated the ability of a broad panel of TLR agonists to reactivate latent HIV-1. The TLR-1/2 agonist Pam3CSK4 leads to viral reactivation of quiescent HIV in a model of latency based on cultured TCM and in resting CD4+ T cells isolated from aviremic patients. In addition, we investigated the signaling pathway associated with Pam3CSK4 involved in HIV-1 reactivation. We show that the transcription factors NFκB, NFAT and AP-1 cooperate to induce viral reactivation downstream of TLR-1/2 stimulation. Furthermore, increasing levels of cyclin T1 is not required for TLR-mediated viral reactivation, but induction of viral expression requires activated pTEFb. Finally, Pam3CSK4 reactivates latent HIV-1 in the absence of T cell activation or proliferation, in contrast to antigen stimulation. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the signaling through TLR-1/2 pathway via Pam3CSK4 or other reagents should be explored as an anti-latency strategy either alone or in combination with other anti-latency drugs. PMID:24156240

  12. c-Myc regulates cell proliferation during lens development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel R Cavalheiro

    Full Text Available Myc protooncogenes play important roles in the regulation of cell proliferation, growth, differentiation and survival during development. In various developing organs, c-myc has been shown to control the expression of cell cycle regulators and its misregulated expression is detected in many human tumors. Here, we show that c-myc gene (Myc is highly expressed in developing mouse lens. Targeted deletion of c-myc gene from head surface ectoderm dramatically impaired ocular organogenesis, resulting in severe microphtalmia, defective anterior segment development, formation of a lens stalk and/or aphakia. In particular, lenses lacking c-myc presented thinner epithelial cell layer and growth impairment that was detectable soon after its inactivation. Defective development of c-myc-null lens was not caused by increased cell death of lens progenitor cells. Instead, c-myc loss reduced cell proliferation, what was associated with an ectopic expression of Prox1 and p27(Kip1 proteins within epithelial cells. Interestingly, a sharp decrease in the expression of the forkhead box transcription factor Foxe3 was also observed following c-myc inactivation. These data represent the first description of the physiological roles played by a Myc family member in mouse lens development. Our findings support the conclusion that c-myc regulates the proliferation of lens epithelial cells in vivo and may, directly or indirectly, modulate the expression of classical cell cycle regulators in developing mouse lens.

  13. Immunoglobulins, antibody repertoire and B cell development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Butler, J. E.; Zhao, Y.; Šinkora, Marek; Wertz, N.; Kacskovics, I.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2009), s. 321-333 ISSN 0145-305X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/07/0088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : swine * immunoglobulin * b cell Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.290, year: 2009

  14. Innovative membrane development for fuel cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vaivars, G

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available will take time, and the first alternative commercial car will be hybrid. The critical issue is the power source for an electrical engine. The fuel cell (FC)-battery hybrid is a promising solution to replace the combustion engine. Liquid fuel (e.g. methanol...

  15. The biochemistry of hematopoietic stem cell development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Kaimakis (Polynikis); M. Crisan (Mihaela); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The cornerstone of the adult hematopoietic system and clinical treatments for blood-related disease is the cohort of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) that is harbored in the adult bone marrow microenvironment. Interestingly, this cohort of HSCs is generated only during a short

  16. Facies development in the Lower Freeport coal bed, west-central Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, B.S.; Stanton, R.W.; Eble, C.F.

    1991-01-01

    The Lower Freeport coal bed in west-central Pennsylvania is interpreted to have formed within a lacustrine-mire environment. Conditions of peat formation, caused by the changing chemical and physical environments, produced five coal facies and two mineral-rich parting facies within the coal bed. The coal bed facies are compositionally unique, having developed under varying conditions, and are manifested by megascopic, petrographic, palynologic and quality characteristics. The initial environment of the Lower Freeport peat resulted in a coal facies that is relatively high in ash yield and contains large amounts of lycopod miospores and moderate abundances of cryptotelinite, crypto-gelocollinite, inertinite and tree fern miospores. This initial Lower Freeport peat is interpreted to have been a topogenous body that was low lying, relatively nutrient rich (mesotrophic to eutrophic), and susceptible to ground water and to sediment influx from surface water. The next facies to form was a ubiquitous, clay-rich durain parting which is attributed to a general rise in the water table accompanied by widespread flooding. Following formation of the parting, peat accumulation resumed within an environment that inhibited clastic input. Development of doming in this facies restricted deposition of the upper shale parting to the margins of the mire and allowed low-ash peat to form in the interior of the mire. Because this environment was conducive to preservation of cellular tissue, this coal facies also contains large amounts of crypto-telinite. This facies development is interpreted to have been a transitional phase from topogenous, planar peat formation to slightly domed, oligotrophic (nutrient-poor) peat formation. As domed peat formation continued, fluctuations in the water table enabled oxidation of the peat surface and produced high inertinite concentrations toward the top of the coal bed. Tree ferns became an increasingly important peat contributor in the e upper facies

  17. Modelling and simulation of Holocene marine terrace development in Boso Peninsula, central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Akemi; Miyauchi, Takahiro; Sato, Toshinori; Matsu'ura, Mitsuhiro

    2018-04-01

    In the southern part of Boso Peninsula, central Japan, we can observe a series of well-developed Holocene marine terraces. We modeled the development of these marine terraces by considering sea-level fluctuation and steady land uplift. The evolution of coastal landform is generally described as follows: altitude change = - erosion + deposition - sea-level rise + land uplift. In this study, the erosion rate is supposed to be proportional to the dissipation rate of wave energy, and the deposition rate of eroded materials to decay exponentially as they are transported seaward. The rate of sea-level rise is given by the time derivative of a sea-level curve obtained from the sediment core records of oxygen isotope ratios. Steady plate subduction generally brings about steady crustal uplift/subsidence independently of earthquake occurrence, and so the land-uplift rate is regarded as time independent on a long-term average. Our simulation results show that a pair of sea cliff and abrasion platform is efficiently formed about a stationary point of the sea-level curve. The Holocene sea-level curve has four peaks and three troughs, and so basically seven terraces are formed one by one during the past 10,000 yr. However, when the land-uplift rate is low, most of the terraces formed at older times sink in the sea. When the land-uplift rate is high, the overlap and/or reverse of older and younger terraces occur frequently, and so the correspondence between the age and present altitude of terraces is not necessarily one-to-one. Taking the land-uplift rate to be 3-4 mm/yr, we can reproduce a series of well-developed Holocene marine terraces in Boso Peninsula independently of coseismic uplifts. From these simulation results, we may conclude that the Holocene marine terraces in Boso Peninsula were developed as a result of the composite process of sea-level fluctuation and steady coastal uplift.

  18. Pathologic and protective roles for microglial subsets and bone marrow- and blood-derived myeloid cells in central nervous system inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka eWlodarczyk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a series of processes designed for eventual clearance of pathogens and repair of damaged tissue. In the context of autoimmune recognition inflammatory processes are usually considered to be pathological. This is also true for inflammatory responses in the central nervous system (CNS. However, as in other tissues, neuroinflammation can have beneficial as well as pathological outcomes. The complex role of encephalitogenic T cells in multiple sclerosis and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE may derive from heterogeneity of the myeloid cells with which these T cells interact within the CNS. Myeloid cells, including resident microglia and infiltrating bone marrow-derived cells such as dendritic cells (DC and monocytes/macrophages (BMDM, are highly heterogeneous populations that may be involved in neurotoxicity but also immunoregulation and regenerative processes. Better understanding and characterization of myeloid cell heterogeneity is essential for future development of treatments controlling inflammation and inducing neuroprotection and neuroregeneration in diseased CNS. Here we describe and compare three populations of myeloid cells: CD11c+ microglia, CD11c- microglia and CD11c+ blood-derived cells in terms of their pathological versus protective functions in the CNS of mice with EAE. Our data show that CNS-resident microglia include functionally distinct subsets that can be distinguished by their expression of CD11c. These subsets differ in their expression of Arg-1, YM1, iNOS, IL-10 and IGF-1. Moreover, in contrast to BMDM/DC both subsets of microglia express protective interferon-beta (IFNβ, high levels of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor and do not express the Th1-associated transcription factor T-bet. Taken together, our data suggest that CD11c+ microglia, CD11c- microglia and infiltrating BMDM/DC represent separate and distinct populations and illustrate the heterogeneity of the CNS

  19. NY-ESO-1 TCR single edited stem and central memory T cells to treat multiple myeloma without graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastaglio, Sara; Genovese, Pietro; Magnani, Zulma; Ruggiero, Eliana; Landoni, Elisa; Camisa, Barbara; Schiroli, Giulia; Provasi, Elena; Lombardo, Angelo; Reik, Andreas; Cieri, Nicoletta; Rocchi, Martina; Oliveira, Giacomo; Escobar, Giulia; Casucci, Monica; Gentner, Bernhard; Spinelli, Antonello; Mondino, Anna; Bondanza, Attilio; Vago, Luca; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ciceri, Fabio; Holmes, Michael C; Naldini, Luigi; Bonini, Chiara

    2017-08-03

    Transfer of T-cell receptors (TCRs) specific for tumor-associated antigens is a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy. We developed the TCR gene editing technology that is based on the knockout of the endogenous TCR α and β genes, followed by the introduction of tumor-specific TCR genes, and that proved safer and more effective than conventional TCR gene transfer. Although successful, complete editing requires extensive cell manipulation and 4 transduction procedures. Here we propose a novel and clinically feasible TCR "single editing" (SE) approach, based on the disruption of the endogenous TCR α chain only, followed by the transfer of genes encoding for a tumor-specific TCR. We validated SE with the clinical grade HLA-A2 restricted NY-ESO-1 157-165 -specific TCR. SE allowed the rapid production of high numbers of tumor-specific T cells, with optimal TCR expression and preferential stem memory and central memory phenotype. Similarly to unedited T cells redirected by TCR gene transfer (TCR transferred [TR]), SE T cells efficiently killed NY-ESO-1 pos targets; however, although TR cells proved highly alloreactive, SE cells showed a favorable safety profile. Accordingly, when infused in NSG mice previously engrafted with myeloma, SE cells mediated tumor rejection without inducing xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease, thus resulting in significantly higher survival than that observed in mice treated with TR cells. Overall, single TCR gene editing represents a clinically feasible approach that is able to increase the safety and efficacy of cancer adoptive immunotherapy. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  20. Sickle cell disease in Madhya Pradesh, Central India: A comparison of clinical profile of sickle cell homozygote vs. sickle-beta thalassaemia individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rajiv; Lazarus, Monica; Ghanghoria, Pawan; Singh, Mpss; Gupta, Rasik Behari; Kumar, Surendra; Sharma, Ravendra K; Shanmugam, Rajasubramaniam

    2016-10-01

    The clinical manifestation in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients varies from one individual to another due to factors like the presence of alpha-thalassaemia mutation, foetal haemoglobin, and β-globin gene haplotype. The present study enumerates the clinical profile of sickle cell anaemia patients from Central India. Seven hundred seventy-six SCD patients from Jabalpur and surrounding districts (Madhya Pradesh) in central India were registered with the sickle cell clinic of NIRTH, Jabalpur. The present study reveals recorded signs and symptoms of genetically confirmed sickle cell anaemia (404) and sickle beta thalassaemia (92) patients. Majority of the patients were from scheduled caste communities (47.9%) and Gond tribal community (13.8%). Splenomegaly was the most common clinical manifestation observed (71.4%). Overall, 63.5% patients had a history of blood transfusion. The most frequent signs and symptoms observed were Pallor, Icterus, Joint pain, Fever, and Fatigue. Majority of the patients revealed onset of disease prior to attaining the age of 3 years (sickle cell anaemia 44.3% and sickle beta thalassaemia 35.9%). Mean haemoglobin levels among SCA individuals were marginally higher than SBT patients. On the other hand, mean foetal haemoglobin levels among SBT individuals showed the reverse trend. Notably, the present study reports the first incidence of priapism recorded in Central India. The study revealed a high prevalence of SCD among scheduled caste, backward caste, and tribal communities. Dissemination of study findings, screening, pre-marriage counselling, and pre-natal diagnosis are fundamental to preventing or lowering of birth of sickle cell anaemia children in the affected populations.

  1. Central Asia: Regional Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nichol, Jim

    2005-01-01

    After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States recognized the independence of the former Central Asian republics, supported their admission into Western organizations, and elicited...

  2. Central Asia: Regional Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nichol, Jim

    2006-01-01

    After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States recognized the independence of the former Central Asian republics, supported their admission into Western organizations, and elicited...

  3. Drug Development and Conservation of Biodiversity in West and Central Africa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bacchi, Cyrus

    2004-01-01

    ...) Program, which was headed by the Walter Reed Army Institute for Research (WRAIR). The project involves screening extracts of medicinal plants from Central and West Africa for growth-inhibitory activity vs...

  4. Economic Development Through Biomass Systems Integration in Central Florida: Final Report; May 5, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stricker, J. A.; Smith, W. H.

    2004-07-01

    Reclaimed phosphate mined land in central Florida has been identified as an area with potential for growing biomass crops. Approximately 73,000 acres of land could be available for production. Additional research is needed to define the possibilities.

  5. Central Asia's New States: Political Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nichol, Jim

    2002-01-01

    After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States recognized the independence of all the former Central Asian republics and established diplomatic relations with each by mid-March 1992...

  6. Central Asia: Regional Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nichol, Jim

    2004-01-01

    After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States recognized the independence of the former Central Asian republics, supported their admission into the Organization on Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE...

  7. Advanced fuel cell development in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Both molten carbonate and solid oxide fuel cells are being developed in the United States to complement and/or supplant phosphoric acid cells for commercial and utility use. This paper described the two technologies and the programs for their development

  8. The development and plasticity of alveolar type 1 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Hernandez, Belinda J.; Martinez Alanis, Denise; Narvaez del Pilar, Odemaris; Vila-Ellis, Lisandra; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Evans, Scott E.; Ostrin, Edwin J.; Chen, Jichao

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar type 1 (AT1) cells cover >95% of the gas exchange surface and are extremely thin to facilitate passive gas diffusion. The development of these highly specialized cells and its coordination with the formation of the honeycomb-like alveolar structure are poorly understood. Using new marker-based stereology and single-cell imaging methods, we show that AT1 cells in the mouse lung form expansive thin cellular extensions via a non-proliferative two-step process while retaining cellular plasticity. In the flattening step, AT1 cells undergo molecular specification and remodel cell junctions while remaining connected to their epithelial neighbors. In the folding step, AT1 cells increase in size by more than 10-fold and undergo cellular morphogenesis that matches capillary and secondary septa formation, resulting in a single AT1 cell spanning multiple alveoli. Furthermore, AT1 cells are an unexpected source of VEGFA and their normal development is required for alveolar angiogenesis. Notably, a majority of AT1 cells proliferate upon ectopic SOX2 expression and undergo stage-dependent cell fate reprogramming. These results provide evidence that AT1 cells have both structural and signaling roles in alveolar maturation and can exit their terminally differentiated non-proliferative state. Our findings suggest that AT1 cells might be a new target in the pathogenesis and treatment of lung diseases associated with premature birth. PMID:26586225

  9. Use of peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) in children receiving autologous or allogeneic stem-cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuti, Stefano; Ceresoli, Rosanna; Boroni, Giovanni; Parolini, Filippo; Porta, Fulvio; Alberti, Daniele

    2018-03-01

    The aim of our study was to present our experience with the use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in pediatric patients receiving autologous or allogenic blood stem-cell transplantation. The insertion of the device in older children does not require general anesthesia and does not require a surgical procedure. From January 2014 to January 2017, 13 PICCs were inserted as a central venous device in 11 pediatric patients submitted to 14 autologous or allogeneic stem-cell transplantation, at the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit of the Children's Hospital of Brescia. The mean age of patients at the time of the procedure was 11.3 years (range 3-18 years). PICCs remained in place for an overall period of 4104 days. All PICCs were positioned by the same specifically trained physician and utilized by nurses of our stem-cell transplant unit. No insertion-related complications were observed. Late complications were catheter ruptures and line occlusions (1.2 per 1000 PICC days). No rupture or occlusion required removal of the device. No catheter-related venous thrombosis, catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI), accidental removal or permanent lumen occlusion were observed. Indications for catheter removal were completion of therapy (8 patients) and death (2 patients). Three PICCs are currently being used for blood sampling in follow-up patients after transplantation. Our data suggest that PICCs are a safe and effective alternative to conventional central venous catheters even in pediatric patients with high risk of infectious and hemorrhagic complications such as patients receiving stem-cell transplantation.

  10. Plastids: dynamic components of plant cell development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guikema, J. A.; Gallegos, G. L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The gravitropic bending of maize roots, as a response to reorientation of the root within a gravitational field, was examined for sensitivity to exogenous applications of the cytoskeletal inhibitor, cytochalasin D. Agar blocks were impregnated with this inhibitor, and were applied either to the root cap or to the zone of root cell elongation. Root growth was normal with either treatment, if the roots were not repositioned with respect to the gravitational vector. When untreated roots were placed in a horizontal position with respect to gravity, a 40 degree bending response was observed within one hour. This bending also occurred when cytochalasin D was applied at high concentrations to the zone of root cell elongation. However, when cytochalasin D above 40 micrograms/ml was applied to the root cap, roots lost the ability of directional reorientation within the gravitational field, causing a random bending.

  11. Zbtb1 controls NKp46+ ROR-gamma-T+ innate lymphoid cell (ILC3) development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying; Zhang, Xianyu; Bouladoux, Nicolas; Kaul, Saransh Neel; Jin, Kangxin; Sant'Angelo, Derek; Belkaid, Yasmine; Kovalovsky, Damian

    2017-08-22

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) play a central role conferring protection at the mucosal frontier. In this study, we have identified a requirement of the transcription factor Zbtb1 for the development of RORγt + ILCs (ILC3s). Zbtb1-deficient mice lacked NKp46 + ILC3 cells in the lamina propria of the small and large intestine. This requirement of Zbtb1 was cell intrinsic, as NKp46 + ILC3s were not generated from Zbtb1-deficient progenitors in bone marrow chimeras and Zbtb1-deficient RORγt + CCR6 - NKp46 - ILC3s didn't generate NKp46 + ILC3s in co-cultures with OP9-DL1 stroma. In correlation with this impairment, Zbtb1-deficient ILC3 cells failed to upregulate T-bet expression, and to acquire IFN-γ production characteristic of NKp46 + cells. Finally, absence of NKp46 + ILC3 cells combined with the absence of T-cells in Zbtb1-deficient mice, led to a transient susceptibility to C. rodentium infections. Altogether, these results establish that Zbtb1 is essential for the development of NKp46 + ILC3 cells.

  12. Incidence and Outcomes of Central Nervous System Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Relapse after Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lounder, Dana T; Khandelwal, Pooja; Chandra, Sharat; Jordan, Michael B; Kumar, Ashish R; Grimley, Michael S; Davies, Stella M; Bleesing, Jack J; Marsh, Rebecca A

    2017-05-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is an immune regulatory disorder that commonly presents with central nervous system (CNS) involvement. The only cure for genetic HLH is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), typically treated with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens. We sought to estimate the incidence of CNS relapse after RIC HSCT, determine risk factors, and evaluate outcomes. We performed a retrospective chart review of 94 consecutive children and young adults with primary HLH who received RIC HSCT. CNS relapse within 1 year after transplantation was diagnosed by review of clinical symptoms, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), and radiologic findings. Four (4.25%) patients developed symptoms of possible CNS HLH after HSCT and 3 patients were diagnosed. Eight patients underwent screening lumbar puncture because of history of active CNS disease at the onset of the conditioning regimen and 4 had evidence of continued disease. The overall incidence of CNS relapse and continued CNS disease after RIC HSCT was 8%. All patients with CNS disease after HSCT responded to CNS-directed therapy. Whole blood donor chimerism at the time of CNS relapse was low at 1% to 34%, but it remained high at 88% to 100% for patients with continued CNS disease. Overall survival for patients with CNS relapse was 50%, compared with 75% for patients without CNS disease (P = .079). Our data suggest that a low level of donor chimerism or active CNS disease at the time of transplantation increase the risk of CNS HLH after HSCT. Surveillance CSF evaluation after allogeneic RIC HSCT should be considered in patients with risk factors and CNS-directed treatment should be initiated if appropriate. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. CAST-ChIP Maps Cell-Type-Specific Chromatin States in the Drosophila Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Schauer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin organization and gene activity are responsive to developmental and environmental cues. Although many genes are transcribed throughout development and across cell types, much of gene regulation is highly cell-type specific. To readily track chromatin features at the resolution of cell types within complex tissues, we developed and validated chromatin affinity purification from specific cell types by chromatin immunoprecipitation (CAST-ChIP, a broadly applicable biochemical procedure. RNA polymerase II (Pol II CAST-ChIP identifies ∼1,500 neuronal and glia-specific genes in differentiated cells within the adult Drosophila brain. In contrast, the histone H2A.Z is distributed similarly across cell types and throughout development, marking cell-type-invariant Pol II-bound regions. Our study identifies H2A.Z as an active chromatin signature that is refractory to changes across cell fates. Thus, CAST-ChIP powerfully identifies cell-type-specific as well as cell-type-invariant chromatin states, enabling the systematic dissection of chromatin structure and gene regulation within complex tissues such as the brain.

  14. Molecular Control of Interdigital Cell Death and Cell Differentiation by Retinoic Acid during Digit Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Elena Díaz-Hernández

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The precise coordination of cell death and cell differentiation during the formation of developing digits is essential for generating properly shaped limbs. Retinoic acid (RA has a fundamental role in digit development; it promotes or inhibits the molecular expression of several critical genes. This control of gene expression establishes molecular cascades that enable both the commencement of cell death and the inhibition of cell differentiation. In this review, we focus on the antagonistic functions between RA and fibroblast growth factor (FGF signaling in the control of cell death and between RA and transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ signaling in the control of cell differentiation.

  15. Experiences with DSM in a developing market economy in central-Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobula, A.; Krommer, B.

    1995-12-31

    Hungary is situated at the point of intersection of Europe`s North-South and East-West roads. It is a country of Central Europe where, as a result of political changes of the recent past, substancial social, economic and market changes have occured. Due to its geographical situation and its historical tradition, Hungary wishes to stay in the leading position among the transforming countries of this region. DedAsz Rt. is one of the six electricity supply companies of Hungary. Our main task is to distribute and supply electrical energy to the customers in this region, in the South-West part of the country. Our supply area is 18,414 sqkms, where electricity is supplied in 27 towns and 799 villages to 665,000 customers. The history of electricity supply in this area, and also the history of our company takes a look back into 100 years. The grater part of this 100-year-long history has been extensive development, especially during the decades of socialism. That time the quality items of service could not be properly emphasized. We are aware that this period is over and the quality items should come into the limelight in the future. Hungary is a relatively small country in Europe having a significant history and, according to our hopes, it certainly has a more important future. We are convinced that the political, economic and geographical inheritance provide us with such opportunities that to exploit them is not only in our interest, but it is our duty, too. Since 1990 the Government of Hungary has comrnitted itself to transform into a market economy. In accordance with this, such new aims and goals have been formulated which harmonize with the new European recommendations. The economic endeavours have also appeared in Hungary`s new energy-policy, for example, in our new Energy Act having just been accepted recently.

  16. Development of the Central-Afar volcanic margin, mantle upwelling and break-up processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pik, Raphaël; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Leroy, Sylvie; Stab, Martin; Ayalew, Dereje; Yirgu, Gezahegn

    2017-04-01

    Whereas the present day mantle dynamics is now well imaged by geophysical investigations, the long-term expression of mantle dynamics below rifted lithosphere is not directly recorded at the surface of the earth. Such information must therefore be extracted from non-direct manifestations of mantle upwelling, which are principally (i) the uplift of the upperlying lithosphere and (ii) the melts produced when the solidus of mantle mineral assemblages is crossed. These first order and unique evidences should therefore represent corner stones output of any geodynamic models used to deduce the interplay between mantle dynamics and surface deformations. For magmatism produced during extension of lithosphere, the dynamics of mantle upwelling can be recognized in the volumes of magmas and also in their geochremistry, which allow tracking the various types of mantle sources and the various types of mantle melting regime (P, T and intensity of partial melting). Volcanism has been closely associated with extension in the East African rift system. It is yet (and logically) heterogeneously distributed along the western, eastern and northern volcanic provinces. We have concentrated the efforts of a multidisciplinary team these last years in the northern Ethiopian volcanic province where the most important volumes of volcanism have been emplaced since 30 Ma, from Continental Flood Basalts episode to active extension along the Central Afar magmatic segment. These structural and geochemical data point out new constraints on the interplay between the upwelling of the Afar mantle plume and the style and mechanisms of extension, and imply to update and revise our understanding of the development of this volcanic margin.

  17. Functioning of photovoltaic cell battery under winter conditions in the central-eastern region of Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nalewaj, K.; Wójcicka-Migasiuk, D.; Złonkiewicz, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Paper described the laboratory photovoltaic assembly and its real operation under the least advantageous conditions of winter climate in the central-eastern region of Poland. Measurement and calculation results made possible to compare the real potential of getting energy from solar radiation with the data provided by the manufacturer of collector panels and relate these results to winter climate

  18. Hepatic stellate cells in liver development, regeneration, and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chunyue; Evason, Kimberley J.; Asahina, Kinji; Stainier, Didier Y.R.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells are liver-specific mesenchymal cells that play vital roles in liver physiology and fibrogenesis. They are located in the space of Disse and maintain close interactions with sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatic epithelial cells. It is becoming increasingly clear that hepatic stellate cells have a profound impact on the differentiation, proliferation, and morphogenesis of other hepatic cell types during liver development and regeneration. In this Review, we summarize and evaluate the recent advances in our understanding of the formation and characteristics of hepatic stellate cells, as well as their function in liver development, regeneration, and cancer. We also discuss how improved knowledge of these processes offers new perspectives for the treatment of patients with liver diseases. PMID:23635788

  19. The development of human mast cells. An historical reappraisal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribatti, Domenico, E-mail: domenico.ribatti@uniba.it

    2016-03-15

    The understanding of mast cell (MC) differentiation is derived mainly from in vitro studies of different stages of stem and progenitor cells. The hematopoietic lineage development of human MCs is unique compared to other myeloid-derived cells. Human MCs originate from CD34{sup +}/CD117{sup +}/CD13{sup +}multipotent hematopoietic progenitors, which undergo transendothelial recruitment into peripheral tissues, where they complete differentiation. Stem cell factor (SCF) is a major chemotactic factor for MCs and their progenitors. SCF also elicits cell-cell and cell-substratum adhesion, facilitates the proliferation, and sustains the survival, differentiation, and maturation, of MCs. Because MC maturation is influenced by local microenvironmental factors, different MC phenotypes can develop in different tissues and organs. - Highlights: • Human mast cells originate from CD34/CD117/CD13 positive multipotent hematopoietic progenitors. • Stem cell factor is a major chemotactic factor for mast cells and their progenitors. • Different mast cell phenotypes can develop in different tissues and organs.

  20. Central giant cell lesion of the jaws: study of CCND1 gene amplification and p16INK4a protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Renato Luiz Maia; Faria, Mário Henrique Girão; Osterne, Rafael Lima Verde; Cavalcante, Roberta Barroso; Ribeiro, Ronaldo Albuquerque; Nonaka, Cassiano Francisco Weege; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem

    2013-10-01

    Central giant cell lesions (CGCLs) are uncommon benign jaw lesions with uncertain etiology and a variable clinical behavior. In neoplasms, alterations in molecules involved in the G1/S checkpoint are frequently found. Loss of p16(INK4a) expression or overexpression of cyclin D1 may stimulate cell proliferation. The purpose of this study was to analyze CCND1 gene amplification and the expression of p16(INK4a) in CGCLs. Structural analysis of the CCND1 was performed using chromogenic in situ hybridization. Immmunohistochemistry was used to identify p16(INK4a) protein levels. Statistical analysis correlated the two biomarkers with clinical behavior and between each other. Twenty-four lesions were included, being 11 aggressive and 13 non-aggressive. Moderate/high-level CCND1 amplification was found in 12 lesions. Also, immunoreactivity for p16(INK4a) was present in 12 cases, mainly in mononuclear cells. There was a significantly higher level of p16(INK4a) expression in mononuclear cells of non-aggressive lesions and lesions with moderate/high-level CCND1 amplification in mononuclear cells. It could be speculated that some CGCLs may develop as a true benign neoplasm. The higher expression of p16(INK4a) in non-aggressive lesions and in cases with moderate/high-level CCND1 amplification may show that these molecules have a role in CGCLs.

  1. Selective chemokine receptor usage by central nervous system myeloid cells in CCR2-red fluorescent protein knock-in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Saederup

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Monocyte subpopulations distinguished by differential expression of chemokine receptors CCR2 and CX3CR1 are difficult to track in vivo, partly due to lack of CCR2 reagents.We created CCR2-red fluorescent protein (RFP knock-in mice and crossed them with CX3CR1-GFP mice to investigate monocyte subset trafficking. In mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, CCR2 was critical for efficient intrathecal accumulation and localization of Ly6C(hi/CCR2(hi monocytes. Surprisingly, neutrophils, not Ly6C(lo monocytes, largely replaced Ly6C(hi cells in the central nervous system of these mice. CCR2-RFP expression allowed the first unequivocal distinction between infiltrating monocytes/macrophages from resident microglia.These results refine the concept of monocyte subsets, provide mechanistic insight about monocyte entry into the central nervous system, and present a novel model for imaging and quantifying inflammatory myeloid populations.

  2. Influence of blood flow occlusion on the development of peripheral and central fatigue during small muscle mass handgrip exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxterman, R M; Craig, J C; Smith, J R; Wilcox, S L; Jia, C; Warren, S; Barstow, T J

    2015-09-01

    Critical power represents an important threshold for neuromuscular fatigue development and may, therefore, dictate intensities for which exercise tolerance is determined by the magnitude of fatigue accrued. Peripheral fatigue appears to be constant across O2 delivery conditions for large muscle mass exercise, but this consistency is equivocal for smaller muscle mass exercise. We sought to determine the influence of blood flow occlusion during handgrip exercise on neuromuscular fatigue development and to examine the relationship between neuromuscular fatigue development and W '. Blood flow occlusion influenced the development of both peripheral and central fatigue, thus providing further evidence that the magnitude of peripheral fatigue is not constant across O2 delivery conditions for small muscle mass exercise. W ' appears to be related to the magnitude of fatigue accrued during exercise, which may explain the reported consistency of intramuscular metabolic perturbations and work performed for severe-intensity exercise. The influence of the muscle metabolic milieu on peripheral and central fatigue is currently unclear. Moreover, the relationships between peripheral and central fatigue and the curvature constant (W ') have not been investigated. Six men (age: 25 ± 4 years, body mass: 82 ± 10 kg, height: 179 ± 4 cm) completed four constant power handgrip tests to exhaustion under conditions of control exercise (Con), blood flow occlusion exercise (Occ), Con with 5 min post-exercise blood flow occlusion (Con + Occ), and Occ with 5 min post-exercise blood flow occlusion (Occ + Occ). Neuromuscular fatigue measurements and W ' were obtained for each subject. Each trial resulted in significant peripheral and central fatigue. Significantly greater peripheral (79.7 ± 5.1% vs. 22.7 ± 6.0%) and central (42.6 ± 3.9% vs. 4.9 ± 2.0%) fatigue occurred for Occ than for Con. In addition, significantly greater peripheral (83.0 ± 4.2% vs. 69.0 ± 6.2%) and central

  3. Re-Engineering Vocational and Technical Education (VTE) for Sustainable Development in North Central Geo-Political Zone, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofoluwe, Abayomi Olumade

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to re-engineer vocational and technical education for sustainable development in the North Central Geo-Political Zone in Nigeria. The research design adopted was a survey inferential type. Stratified random was used to select 36 schools out of 98 schools while 920 students out of 3680 students were sampled. The data…

  4. Development of a cell sheet transportation technique for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oie, Yoshinori; Nozaki, Takayuki; Takayanagi, Hiroshi; Hara, Susumu; Hayashi, Ryuhei; Takeda, Shizu; Mori, Keisuke; Moriya, Noboru; Soma, Takeshi; Tsujikawa, Motokazu; Saito, Kazuo; Nishida, Kohji

    2014-05-01

    A transportation technique for cell sheets is necessary to standardize regenerative medicine. The aim of this article is to develop and evaluate a new transportation technique for cell sheets. We developed a transportation container with three basic functions: the maintenance of interior temperature, air pressure, and sterility. The interior temperature and air pressure were monitored by a recorder. Human oral mucosal epithelial cells obtained from two healthy volunteers were cultured on temperature-responsive culture dishes. The epithelial cell sheets were transported via an airplane between the Osaka University and Tohoku University using the developed cell transportation container. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses and flow cytometric analyses for cell viability and cell purity were performed for the cell sheets before and 12 h after transportation to assess the influence of transportation on the cell sheets. Sterility tests and screening for endotoxin and mycoplasma in the cell sheets were performed before and after transportation. During transportation via an airplane, the temperature inside the container was maintained above 32°C, and the changes in air pressure remained within 10 hPa. The cell sheets were well stratified and successfully harvested before and after transportation. The expression patterns of keratin 3/76, p63, and MUC16 were equivalent before and after transportation. However, the expression of ZO-1 in the cell sheet after transportation was slightly weaker than that before transportation. The cell viability was 72.0% before transportation and 77.3% after transportation. The epithelial purity was 94.6% before transportation and 87.9% after transportation. Sterility tests and screening for endotoxin and mycoplasma were negative for all cell sheets. The newly developed transportation technique for air travel is essential technology for regenerative medicine and promotes the standardization and spread of regenerative therapies.

  5. Peripheral dendritic cells are essential for both the innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses in the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel, Christina D.; Hahto, Suzanne M.; Ciavarra, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Intranasal application of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) causes acute infection of the central nervous system (CNS). However, VSV encephalitis is not invariably fatal, suggesting that the CNS may contain a professional antigen-presenting cell (APC) capable of inducing or propagating a protective antiviral immune response. To examine this possibility, we first characterized the cellular elements that infiltrate the brain as well as the activation status of resident microglia in the brains of normal and transgenic mice acutely ablated of peripheral dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo. VSV encephalitis was characterized by a pronounced infiltrate of myeloid cells (CD45 high CD11b + ) and CD8 + T cells containing a subset that was specific for the immunodominant VSV nuclear protein epitope. This T cell response correlated temporally with a rapid and sustained upregulation of MHC class I expression on microglia, whereas class II expression was markedly delayed. Ablation of peripheral DCs profoundly inhibited the inflammatory response as well as infiltration of virus-specific CD8 + T cells. Unexpectedly, the VSV-induced interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) response in the CNS remained intact in DC-deficient mice. Thus, both the inflammatory and certain components of the adaptive primary antiviral immune response in the CNS are dependent on peripheral DCs in vivo.

  6. Central canal ependymal cells proliferate extensively in response to traumatic spinal cord injury but not demyelinating lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Lacroix

    Full Text Available The adult mammalian spinal cord has limited regenerative capacity in settings such as spinal cord injury (SCI and multiple sclerosis (MS. Recent studies have revealed that ependymal cells lining the central canal possess latent neural stem cell potential, undergoing proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation following experimental SCI. To determine whether reactive ependymal cells are a realistic endogenous cell population to target in order to promote spinal cord repair, we assessed the spatiotemporal dynamics of ependymal cell proliferation for up to 35 days in three models of spinal pathologies: contusion SCI using the Infinite Horizon impactor, focal demyelination by intraspinal injection of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC, and autoimmune-mediated multi-focal demyelination using the active experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE model of MS. Contusion SCI at the T9-10 thoracic level stimulated a robust, long-lasting and long-distance wave of ependymal proliferation that peaked at 3 days in the lesion segment, 14 days in the rostral segment, and was still detectable at the cervical level, where it peaked at 21 days. This proliferative wave was suppressed distal to the contusion. Unlike SCI, neither chemical- nor autoimmune-mediated demyelination triggered ependymal cell proliferation at any time point, despite the occurrence of demyelination (LPC and EAE, remyelination (LPC and significant locomotor defects (EAE. Thus, traumatic SCI induces widespread and enduring activation of reactive ependymal cells, identifying them as a robust cell population to target for therapeutic manipulation after contusion; conversely, neither demyelination, remyelination nor autoimmunity appears sufficient to trigger proliferation of quiescent ependymal cells in models of MS-like demyelinating diseases.

  7. Membrane properties of chick semicircular canal hair cells in situ during embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masetto, S; Perin, P; Malusà, A; Zucca, G; Valli, P

    2000-05-01

    The electrophysiological properties of developing vestibular hair cells have been investigated in a chick crista slice preparation, from embryonic day 10 (E10) to E21 (when hatching would occur). Patch-clamp whole-cell experiments showed that different types of ion channels are sequentially expressed during development. An inward Ca(2+) current and a slow outward rectifying K(+) current (I(K(V))) are acquired first, at or before E10, followed by a rapid transient K(+) current (I(K(A))) at E12, and by a small Ca-dependent K(+) current (I(KCa)) at E14. Hair cell maturation then proceeds with the expression of hyperpolarization-activated currents: a slow I(h) appears first, around E16, followed by the fast inward rectifier I(K1) around E19. From the time of its first appearance, I(K(A)) is preferentially expressed in peripheral (zone 1) hair cells, whereas inward rectifying currents are preferentially expressed in intermediate (zone 2) and central (zone 3) hair cells. Each conductance conferred distinctive properties on hair cell voltage response. Starting from E15, some hair cells, preferentially located at the intermediate region, showed the amphora shape typical of type I hair cells. From E17 (a time when the afferent calyx is completed) these cells expressed I(K, L), the signature current of mature type I hair cells. Close to hatching, hair cell complements and regional organization of ion currents appeared similar to those reported for the mature avian crista. By the progressive acquisition of different types of inward and outward rectifying currents, hair cell repolarization after both positive- and negative-current injections is greatly strengthened and speeded up.

  8. Radiation-induced apoptosis in undifferentiated cells of the developing brain as a biological defense mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inouye, Minioru; Tamaru, Masao.

    1994-01-01

    Undifferentiated neural (UN) cells of the developing mammalian brain are highly sensitive to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation. Nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation, transglutaminase activation, and internucleosomal DNA cleavage reveal radiation-induced cell death in the ventricular zone of the cerebral mantle and external granular layer of the cerebellum to be due to apoptosis. A statistically significant increase of cell mortality can be induced by 0.03 Gy X-irradiation, and the mortality increases linearly with increasing doses. It is not changed by split doses, probably because of the very slow repair of cellular damage and a lack of adaptive response. Although extensive apoptosis in the UN cell population results in microcephaly and mental retardation, it possesses the ability to recover from a considerable cell loss and to form the normal structure of the central nervous system. The number of cell deaths needed to induce tissue adnormalities in the adult murine brain rises in the range of 15-25% of the germinal cell population; with the threshold doses at about 0.3 Gy for cerebral anomalies and 1 Gy for cerebellar abnormalities. Threshold level is similarly suggested in prenatally exposed A-bomb survivors. High radiosensitivity of UN cells is assumed to be a manifestation of the ability of the cell to commit suicide when injured. Repeated replication of DNA and extensive gene expression are required in future proliferation and differentiation. Once an abnormality in DNA was induced and fixed in the UN cell, it would be greatly amplified and prove a danger in producing malformations and tumors. These cells would thus commit suicide for the benefit of the individual to eliminate their acquired genetic abnormalities rather than make DNA repair. UN cells in the developing brain are highly radiosensitive and readily involved in apoptosis. Paradoxically, however, this may be to protect individuals against teratogenesis and tumorigenesis. (J.P.N.)

  9. Chemical dissection of the cell cycle: probes for cell biology and anti-cancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senese, S; Lo, Y C; Huang, D; Zangle, T A; Gholkar, A A; Robert, L; Homet, B; Ribas, A; Summers, M K; Teitell, M A; Damoiseaux, R; Torres, J Z

    2014-10-16

    Cancer cell proliferation relies on the ability of cancer cells to grow, transition through the cell cycle, and divide. To identify novel chemical probes for dissecting the mechanisms governing cell cycle progression and cell division, and for developing new anti-cancer therapeutics, we developed and performed a novel cancer cell-based high-throughput chemical screen for cell cycle modulators. This approach identified novel G1, S, G2, and M-phase specific inhibitors with drug-like properties and diverse chemotypes likely targeting a broad array of processes. We further characterized the M-phase inhibitors and highlight the most potent M-phase inhibitor MI-181, which targets tubulin, inhibits tubulin polymerization, activates the spindle assembly checkpoint, arrests cells in mitosis, and triggers a fast apoptotic cell death. Importantly, MI-181 has broad anti-cancer activity, especially against BRAF(V600E) melanomas.

  10. Regulation of Mu Opioid Receptor Expression in Developing T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lily; Belkowski, Judith Sliker; Briscoe, Tammi; Rogers, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported that functionally active μ-opioid receptors (MOR) are constitutively expressed at relatively low levels by developing T cells in the thymus. However, very little is known about the regulation of MOR expression by immature T cells. In this report, we first attempted to determine the effect of T cell receptor-induced T cell activation on the expression of MOR. We activated T cells with either the combination of anti-CD3 and CD28, or with superantigen, and observed a ...

  11. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Adult Male Presenting with Central Diabetes Insipidus and Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yeun Seoung; Lim, Jung Soo; Kwon, Woocheol; Jung, Soon-Hee; Park, Il Hwan; Lee, Myoung Kyu; Lee, Won Yeon; Yong, Suk Joong; Lee, Seok Jeong; Jung, Ye-Ryung; Choi, Jiwon; Choi, Ji Sun; Jeong, Joon Taek; Yoo, Jin Sae

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis is an uncommon diffuse cystic lung disease in adults. In rare cases, it can involve extrapulmonary organs and lead to endocrine abnormalities such as central diabetes insipidus. A 42-year-old man presented with polyphagia and polydipsia, as well as a dry cough and dyspnea on exertion. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hypothalamic-pituitary system failed to show the posterior pituitary, which is a typical finding in patients with central diabetes insipidus. This condition was confirmed by a water deprivation test, and the patient was also found to have type 2 diabetes mellitus. Computed tomographic scanning of the lungs revealed multiple, irregularly shaped cystic lesions and small nodules bilaterally, with sparing of the costophrenic angles. Lung biopsy through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery revealed pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. On a follow-up visit, only 1 year after the patient had quit smoking, clinical and radiological improvement was significant. Here, we report an uncommon case of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis that simultaneously presented with diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. PMID:26508947

  12. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Adult Male Presenting with Central Diabetes Insipidus and Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yeun Seoung; Lim, Jung Soo; Kwon, Woocheol; Jung, Soon-Hee; Park, Il Hwan; Lee, Myoung Kyu; Lee, Won Yeon; Yong, Suk Joong; Lee, Seok Jeong; Jung, Ye-Ryung; Choi, Jiwon; Choi, Ji Sun; Jeong, Joon Taek; Yoo, Jin Sae; Kim, Sang-Ha

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis is an uncommon diffuse cystic lung disease in adults. In rare cases, it can involve extrapulmonary organs and lead to endocrine abnormalities such as central diabetes insipidus. A 42-year-old man presented with polyphagia and polydipsia, as well as a dry cough and dyspnea on exertion. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hypothalamic-pituitary system failed to show the posterior pituitary, which is a typical finding in patients with central diabetes insipidus. This condition was confirmed by a water deprivation test, and the patient was also found to have type 2 diabetes mellitus. Computed tomographic scanning of the lungs revealed multiple, irregularly shaped cystic lesions and small nodules bilaterally, with sparing of the costophrenic angles. Lung biopsy through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery revealed pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. On a follow-up visit, only 1 year after the patient had quit smoking, clinical and radiological improvement was significant. Here, we report an uncommon case of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis that simultaneously presented with diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus.

  13. [Current developments on sickle cell disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girot, R

    2005-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a genetic autosomal recessive disease of hemoglobin. The disease results from a mutation of the sixth codon of the beta-globin gene, which induces the synthesis of an abnormal hemoglobin called hemoglobin S (HbS). The polymerisation of deoxy HbS molecules causes a chronic hemolytic anemia and vaso-occlusive phenomenons. The disease affects mainly people from West Indies and Sub saharian Africa. Due to recent movements of these populations over the past years, sickle cell disease has spread across all continents. Painful crises, severe infections such as septicemia, meningitis, osteomyelytis, acute anemia episodes, and severe vaso-occlusive events, mainly neurological, are the most frequent complications affecting children. Recent progresses in the care of patients have deeply modified the prognosis. The mean life expectancy of patients is now above 40 years. The conventional treatment includes antibiotics and immunizations, analgesics, and blood transfusion. The effects of chronic blood transfusion, hydroxyurea and bone marrow transplantation are the subject of current comparative evaluations.

  14. Long Life, High Energy Cell Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has a need to develop higher energy density battery systems to meet the power requirements of future energy devices. In this proposed Phase I program, PSI will...

  15. Cell cycle in egg cell and its progression during zygotic development in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukawa, Yumiko; Okamoto, Takashi

    2018-03-01

    Rice egg is arrested at G1 phase probably by OsKRP2. After fusion with sperm, karyogamy, OsWEE1-mediated parental DNA integrity in zygote nucleus, zygote progresses cell cycle to produce two-celled embryo. In angiosperms, female and male gametes exist in gametophytes after the complementation of meiosis and the progression of nuclear/cell division of the haploid cell. Within the embryo sac, the egg cell is specially differentiated for fertilization and subsequent embryogenesis, and cellular programs for embryonic development, such as restarting the cell cycle and de novo gene expression, are halted. There is only limited knowledge about how the cell cycle in egg cells restarts toward zygotic division, although the conversion of the cell cycle from a quiescent and arrested state to an active state is the most evident transition of cell status from egg cell to zygote. This is partly due to the difficulty in direct access and analysis of egg cells, zygotes and early embryos, which are deeply embedded in ovaries. In this study, precise relative DNA amounts in the nuclei of egg cells, developing zygotes and cells of early embryos were measured, and the cell cycle of a rice egg cell was estimated as the G1 phase with a 1C DNA level. In addition, increases in DNA content in zygote nuclei via karyogamy and DNA replication were also detectable according to progression of the cell cycle. In addition, expression profiles for cell cycle-related genes in egg cells and zygotes were also addressed, and it was suggested that OsKRP2 and OsWEE1 function in the inhibition of cell cycle progression in egg cells and in checkpoint of parental DNA integrity in zygote nucleus, respectively.

  16. Classification of cell signalling in tissue development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Craig Charles; Nicholls, Clare; Brookes, Chris; Wood, Ian

    2011-02-01

    The traditional classification of signalling in biological systems is insufficient and outdated and novel efforts must take into account advances in systems theory, information theory and linguistics. We present some of the classification systems currently used both within and outside of the biological field and discuss some specific aspects of the nature of signalling in tissue development. The analytical methods used in understanding non-biological networks provide a valuable vocabulary, which requires integration and a system of classification to further facilitate development.

  17. Quantitative single cell analysis of cell population dynamics during submandibular salivary gland development and differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Deirdre A.; Manhardt, Charles; Kamath, Vidya; Sui, Yunxia; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Can, Ali; Bello, Musodiq; Corwin, Alex; Dinn, Sean R.; Lazare, Michael; Gervais, Elise M.; Sequeira, Sharon J.; Peters, Sarah B.; Ginty, Fiona; Gerdes, Michael J.; Larsen, Melinda

    2013-01-01

    Summary Epithelial organ morphogenesis involves reciprocal interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal cell types to balance progenitor cell retention and expansion with cell differentiation for evolution of tissue architecture. Underlying submandibular salivary gland branching morphogenesis is the regulated proliferation and differentiation of perhaps several progenitor cell populations, which have not been characterized throughout development, and yet are critical for understanding organ development, regeneration, and disease. Here we applied a serial multiplexed fluorescent immunohistochemistry technology to map the progressive refinement of the epithelial and mesenchymal cell populations throughout development from embryonic day 14 through postnatal day 20. Using computational single cell analysis methods, we simultaneously mapped the evolving temporal and spatial location of epithelial cells expressing subsets of differentiation and progenitor markers throughout salivary gland development. We mapped epithelial cell differentiation markers, including aquaporin 5, PSP, SABPA, and mucin 10 (acinar cells); cytokeratin 7 (ductal cells); and smooth muscle α-actin (myoepithelial cells) and epithelial progenitor cell markers, cytokeratin 5 and c-kit. We used pairwise correlation and visual mapping of the cells in multiplexed images to quantify the number of single- and double-positive cells expressing these differentiation and progenitor markers at each developmental stage. We identified smooth muscle α-actin as a putative early myoepithelial progenitor marker that is expressed in cytokeratin 5-negative cells. Additionally, our results reveal dynamic expansion and redistributions of c-kit- and K5-positive progenitor cell populations throughout development and in postnatal glands. The data suggest that there are temporally and spatially discreet progenitor populations that contribute to salivary gland development and homeostasis. PMID:23789091

  18. Stem and Progenitor Cell-Based Therapy of the Central Nervous System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldman, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of neurological disorders are attractive targets for stem and progenitor cell-based therapy. Yet many conditions are not, whether by virtue of an inhospitable disease environment, poorly understood pathophysiology, or poor alignment of donor cell capabilities with patient needs. Moreove...

  19. Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    CNS germ cell tumors can be diagnosed and classified based on histology, tumor markers, or a combination of both. Get detailed information about newly diagnosed and recurrent childhood CNS germ cell tumors including molecular features and clinical features, diagnostic and staging evaluation, and treatment in this summary for clinicians.

  20. Embryonic Stem Cells in Development and Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Ayşegül

    2018-02-21

    After progressive improvement in embryonic stem (ES) cell field, several studies have been conducted to explore the usage of ES cells in regenerative medicine. Unlimited self renewal and pluripoteny properties, combined with encouraging preclinical trials, remark that ES cell technology might be promising for clinical practice. ES cells, which can form three germ layers in vitro, are potential candidates to study development at the cellular and molecular level. Understanding the cell fate decision and differentiation processes during development might enable generating functional progenitor cells for tissue restoration. Progression in gene modifications and tissue engineering technology has facilitated the derivation of desired cells for therapy. Success in differentiation protocols and identification the regulatory pathways simplify the research for clinical applications. Although there are established protocols for cell differentiation in vitro and promising preclinical studies in vivo, many challenges need to be adressed before clinical translation. In this review, ES cells are discussed as a model of development in vitro and as a potential candidate for regenerative medicine. This review also dissusses current challenges for ES cell based therapy.

  1. The history and development of off-site nuclear power plant training in the Central Electricity Generating Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, V.J.; Bindon, F.J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The paper describes the history and development of off-site nuclear power plant training in the Central Electricity Generating Board (United Kingdom). A description is given of: the training at Calder Hall, -circa 1958, early simulator training at Berkeley Power Station, Oldbury Nuclear Power Training Centre, Heysham 2, and PWR training. The paper also looks at future developments likely to occur in the next few years. (UK)

  2. Preservation of beach ridges due to pedogenic calcrete development in the Tongoy palaeobay, North-Central Chile

    OpenAIRE

    M. Pfeiffer; J. P. Le Roux; E. Solleiro-Rebolledo; Helga Kemnitz; S. Sedov; O. Seguel

    2011-01-01

    At the Tongoy palaeobay in north-central Chile, a series of beach ridges developed during seaward progradation that took place after the MIS 11 sea-level highstand (412ka). The microrelief left by this succession of beach ridges has been well preserved from erosion due to the development of a calcrete (petrocalcic horizons), which was resistant to the chemical and physical weathering that characterized the area during humid phases of the late Pleistocene and middle Holocene. Macro- and micro-...

  3. Recurrent central giant cell granuloma in the mandible : surgical treatment and dental implant restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Infante Cossío, Pedro; Martínez de Fuentes, Rafael; Carranza Carranza, Andrés; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Gutiérrez Pérez, José Luis

    2007-01-01

    El granuloma central de células gigantes es una rara lesión intraósea benigna de los maxilares. El tratamiento tradicional ha sido el curetaje local, aunque los sub-tipos agresivos tienen una alta tendencia a la recurrencia. Este caso clínico describe un granuloma central de células gigantes recurrente en el cuerpo mandibular de una mujer de 48 años. El tratamiento inicial de la lesión consistió en un curetaje con ostectomía periférica. Cuando se detectó la recurrencia un año más tarde, s...

  4. TOURISM INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT IN THE EMERGING ECONOMIES OF CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE (HUNGARY, BULGARIA, ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina-Petronela HALLER

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Emerging Economies from Central and Eastern Europe take steps to ensure growth through tourism. Although they do not have the cultural, historical and artistic potential of the most famous tourist destinations, these economies promote forms of tourism for which they have suitable conditions. For example, Hungary is famous for health tourism, Bulgaria has made progress in terms of coastal tourism and Romania tries to make known the rural area although it has all conditions for practicing a wide diversified range of tourism forms. In this paper we present statistics showing how the tourism industry looks for three Central and Eastern European countries and we do a brief comparative analysis.

  5. Development of Renewable Energies in the liberation of the energy market in Central America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebollo, Jose; Puente, Margarita; Cabezas, Jose

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the diagnostic of the current situation on renewable energy in Central America, including socio-economical situation, with economical index, supply and demand of energy and planning of wind resources. The experience of Europe in the promotion for the market of renewable energy, discussing the policies and cooperation between private sector and the government is included. A list of potential projects of renewable energy in each country of Central America based on biomass, hydro power, wind and other energy sources for power generation is presented

  6. Comparison of central corneal thickness and endothelial cell measurements by Scheimpflug camera system and two noncontact specular microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Irmak; Yilmaz, Suzan Guven; Palamar, Melis; Ates, Halil

    2017-07-03

    To investigate the correlation of Scheimpflug camera system and two noncontact specular microscopes in terms of central corneal thickness (CCT) and corneal endothelial cell morphology measurements. One hundred eyes of 50 healthy subjects were examined by Pentacam Scheimpflug Analyzer, CEM-530 (Nidek Co, Ltd, Gamagori, Japan) and CellChek XL (Konan Medical, California, USA) via fully automated image analysis with no corrections made. Measurement differences and agreement between instruments were determined by intraclass correlation analysis. The mean age of the subjects was 36.74 ± 8.59 (range 22-57). CCTs were well correlated among all devices, with having CEM-530 the thinnest and CellChek XL the thickest measurements (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.83; p < 0.001 and ICC = 0.78; p < 0.001, respectively). Mean endothelial cell density (ECD) given by CEM-530 was lower than CellChek XL (2613.17 ± 228.62 and 2862.72 ± 170.42 cells/mm 2 , respectively; ICC = 0.43; p < 0.001). Mean value for coefficient of variation (CV) was 28.57 ± 3.61 in CEM-530 and 30.30 ± 3.53 in CellChek XL. Cell hexagonality (HEX) with CEM-530 was higher than with CellChek XL (68.70 ± 4.16% and 45.19 ± 6.58%, respectively). ECDs with CellChek XL and CEM-530 have good correlation, but the values obtained by CellChek XL are higher than CEM-530. Measurements for HEX and CV differ significantly and show weak correlation. Thus, we do not recommend interchangeable use of CellChek XL and CEM-530. In terms of CCTs, Pentacam, CEM-530 and CellChek XL specular microscopy instruments are reliable devices.

  7. Restrained Th17 response and myeloid cell infiltration into the central nervous system by human decidua-derived mesenchymal stem cells during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Beatriz; Gallego, Marta I; Flores, Ana I; Bornstein, Rafael; Puente-Bedia, Alba; Hernández, Javier; de la Torre, Paz; García-Zaragoza, Elena; Perez-Tavarez, Raquel; Grande, Jesús; Ballester, Alicia; Ballester, Sara

    2016-03-17

    Multiple sclerosis is a widespread inflammatory demyelinating disease. Several immunomodulatory therapies are available, including interferon-β, glatiramer acetate, natalizumab, fingolimod, and mitoxantrone. Although useful to delay disease progression, they do not provide a definitive cure and are associated with some undesirable side-effects. Accordingly, the search for new therapeutic methods constitutes an active investigation field. The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to modify the disease course is currently the subject of intense interest. Decidua-derived MSCs (DMSCs) are a cell population obtained from human placental extraembryonic membranes able to differentiate into the three germ layers. This study explores the therapeutic potential of DMSCs. We used the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) animal model to evaluate the effect of DMSCs on clinical signs of the disease and on the presence of inflammatory infiltrates in the central nervous system. We also compared the inflammatory profile of spleen T cells from DMSC-treated mice with that of EAE control animals, and the influence of DMSCs on the in vitro definition of the Th17 phenotype. Furthermore, we analyzed the effects on the presence of some critical cell types in central nervous system infiltrates. Preventive intraperitoneal injection of DMSCs resulted in a significant delay of external signs of EAE. In addition, treatment of animals already presenting with moderate symptoms resulted in mild EAE with reduced disease scores. Besides decreased inflammatory infiltration, diminished percentages of CD4(+)IL17(+), CD11b(+)Ly6G(+) and CD11b(+)Ly6C(+) cells were found in infiltrates of treated animals. Early immune response was mitigated, with spleen cells of DMSC-treated mice displaying low proliferative response to antigen, decreased production of interleukin (IL)-17, and increased production of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10. Moreover, lower RORγT and higher GATA-3

  8. The Iron Status of Sickle Cell Anaemia Patients in Ilorin, North Central Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa A. Sani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Sickle cell anaemia (SCA is one of the commonest genetic disorders in the world. It is characterized by anaemia, periodic attacks of thrombotic pain, and chronic systemic organ damage. Recent studies have suggested that individuals with SCA especially from developing countries are more likely to be iron deficient rather than have iron overload. The study aims to determine the iron status of SCA patients in Ilorin, Nigeria. Methods. A cross-sectional study of 45 SCA patients in steady state and 45 non-SCA controls was undertaken. FBC, blood film, sFC, sTfR, and sTfR/log sFC index were done on all subjects. Results. The mean patients’ serum ferritin (589.33 ± 427.61 ng/mL was significantly higher than the mean serum ferritin of the controls (184.53 ± 119.74 ng/mL. The mean serum transferrin receptor of the patients (4.24 ± 0.17 μg/mL was higher than that of the controls (3.96 ± 0.17 μg/mL (p=0.290. The mean serum transferrin receptor (sTfR/log serum ferritin index of the patients (1.65 ± 0.27 μg/mL was significantly lower than that of the control (1.82 ± 0.18 μg/mL (p=0.031. Conclusion. Iron deficiency is uncommon in SCA patients and periodic monitoring of the haematological, biochemical, and clinical features for iron status in SCA patients is advised.

  9. Progress in developing ultrathin solar cell blanket technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, R. E.; Mesch, H. G.; Scott-Monck, J.

    1984-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop technologies for welding interconnects to three types of 50-micron-thick, 2 by 2-cm solar cells. Parallel-gap resistance welding was used for interconnect attachment. Weld schedules were independently developed for each of the three cell types and were coincidentally identical. Six 48-cell modules were assembled with 50-micron (nominal) thick cells, frosted fused-silica covers, silver-plated Invar interconnectors, and four different substrate designs. Three modules (one for each cell type) have single-layer Kapton (50-micron-thick) substrates. The other three modules each have a different substrate (Kapton-Kevlar-Kapton, Kapton-graphite-Kapton, and Kapton-graphite-aluminum honeycomb-graphite). All six modules were subjected to 4112 thermal cycles from -175 to 65 C (corresponding to over 40 years of simulated geosynchronous orbit thermal cycling) and experienced only negligible electrical degradation (1.1 percent average of six 48-cell modules).

  10. Nuclear size regulation: from single cells to development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, Lisa J; White, Karen H; Jevtic, Predrag; Li, Xiaoyang; Levy, Daniel L

    2013-04-01

    Cell size varies greatly among different cell types and organisms, especially during early development when cell division is rapid with little overall growth. A fundamental question is how organelle size is regulated relative to cell size. The nucleus exhibits exquisite size scaling during development and between species, and nuclear size is often altered in cancer cells. Recent studies have elucidated mechanisms of nuclear size regulation in a variety of experimental systems, opening the door to future research on how nuclear size impacts upon cell and nuclear function and subnuclear organization. In this review we discuss studies that have clarified nuclear size control mechanisms and how these results have or will contribute to our understanding of the functional significance of nuclear size. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development and regeneration of vestibular hair cells in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Joseph C; Stone, Jennifer S

    2017-05-01

    Vestibular sensation is essential for gaze stabilization, balance, and perception of gravity. The vestibular receptors in mammals, Type I and Type II hair cells, are located in five small organs in the inner ear. Damage to hair cells and their innervating neurons can cause crippling symptoms such as vertigo, visual field oscillation, and imbalance. In adult rodents, some Type II hair cells are regenerated and become re-innervated after damage, presenting opportunities for restoring vestibular function after hair cell damage. This article reviews features of vestibular sensory cells in mammals, including their basic properties, how they develop, and how they are replaced after damage. We discuss molecules that control vestibular hair cell regeneration and highlight areas in which our understanding of development and regeneration needs to be deepened. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. SETD2 and PBRM1 inactivation in the development of clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Kidney cancer of the clear cell type is often lethal and causes more than 100,000 deaths worldwide every year. Understanding the biology of this cancer type may help to develop better ways to diagnose and treat it. Damage in DNA (genes) is present in all cancer cells and clear cell kidney cancer is

  13. RET/GFRα signals are dispensable for thymic T cell development in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonso Rocha Martins Almeida

    Full Text Available Identification of thymocyte regulators is a central issue in T cell biology. Interestingly, growing evidence indicates that common key molecules control neuronal and immune cell functions. The neurotrophic factor receptor RET mediates critical functions in foetal hematopoietic subsets, thus raising the possibility that RET-related molecules may also control T cell development. We show that Ret, Gfra1 and Gfra2 are abundantly expressed by foetal and adult immature DN thymocytes. Despite the developmentally regulated expression of these genes, analysis of foetal thymi from Gfra1, Gfra2 or Ret deficient embryos revealed that these molecules are dispensable for foetal T cell development. Furthermore, analysis of RET gain of function and Ret conditional knockout mice showed that RET is also unnecessary for adult thymopoiesis. Finally, competitive thymic reconstitution assays indicated that Ret deficient thymocytes maintained their differentiation fitness even in stringent developmental conditions. Thus, our data demonstrate that RET/GFRα signals are dispensable for thymic T cell development in vivo, indicating that pharmacological targeting of RET signalling in tumours is not likely to result in T cell production failure.

  14. Ultra-sensitive molecular MRI of cerebrovascular cell activation enables early detection of chronic central nervous system disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montagne, Axel; Gauberti, Maxime; Jullienne, Amandine; Briens, Aurelien; Docagne, Fabian; Vivien, Denis; Maubert, Eric; Macrez, Richard; Defer, Gilles; Raynaud, Jean-Sebastien; Louin, Gaelle; Buisson, Alain; Haelewyn, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    Since endothelial cells can be targeted by large contrast-carrying particles, molecular imaging of cerebrovascular cell activation is highly promising to evaluate the underlying inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we aimed to demonstrate that molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cerebrovascular cell activation can reveal CNS disorders in the absence of visible lesions and symptoms. To this aim, we optimized contrast carrying particles targeting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and MRI protocols through both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Although, pre-contrast MRI images failed to reveal the ongoing pathology, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed hypoperfusion-triggered CNS injury in vascular dementia, unmasked amyloid-induced cerebrovascular activation in Alzheimer's disease and allowed monitoring of disease activity during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Moreover, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed the cerebrovascular cell activation associated with known risk factors of CNS disorders such as peripheral inflammation, ethanol consumption, hyperglycemia and aging. By providing a dramatically higher sensitivity than previously reported methods and molecular contrast agents, the technology described in the present study opens new avenues of investigation in the field of neuro-inflammation. (authors)

  15. Neural stem/progenitor cells as a promising candidate for regenerative therapy of the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie eBonnamain

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Neural transplantation is a promising therapeutic strategy for neurodegenerative diseases and other affections of the central nervous system (CNS like Parkinson and Huntington diseases, multiple sclerosis or stroke. If cell replacement therapy already went through clinical trials for some of these diseases using fetal human neuroblasts, several important limitations led to the search for alternative cell sources that would be more suitable for intracerebral transplantation. Taking into account logistical and ethical issues linked to the use of tissue derived from human fetuses, and the immunologically special status of the CNS allowing the occurrence of deleterious immune reactions, Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells (NSPCs appear as an interesting cell source candidate. In addition to their ability for replacing cell populations lost during the pathological events, NSPCs also display surprising therapeutic effects of neuroprotection and immunomodulation. A better knowledge of the mechanisms involved in these specific characteristics will hopefully lead in the future to a successful use of NSPCs in regenerative medicine for CNS affections.

  16. Apoptotic cell elimination during early tooth development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matalová, Eva; Míšek, Ivan; Chovancová, Eva

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 7 (2003), s. 34 ISSN 0001-7213. [Congress of the European Association of Veterinary Anatomists/24./. 21.07.2002-25.07.2002, Brno] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP204/02/P112 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : tooth development Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry

  17. SMAD7 deficiency stimulates Müller progenitor cell proliferation during the development of the mammalian retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugler, Martina; Schlecht, Anja; Fuchshofer, Rudolf; Schmitt, Sabrina I; Kleiter, Ingo; Aigner, Ludwig; Tamm, Ernst R; Braunger, Barbara M

    2017-07-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathway contributes to maintain the quiescence of adult neural stem and progenitor cells in the brain. In the retina, Müller cells are discussed to represent a glial cell population with progenitor-like characteristics. Here, we aimed to investigate if elevated TGF-β signaling modulates the proliferation of Müller cells during retinal development. We generated mutant mice with a systemic, heterozygous up-regulation of TGF-β signaling by deleting its inhibitor SMAD7. We investigated apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation of Müller cells in the developing retina. We show that a heterozygous deletion of SMAD7 results in an increased proliferation of Müller cell progenitors in the central retina at postnatal day 4, the time window when Müller cells differentiate in the mouse retina. This in turn results in a thickened retina and inner nuclear layer and a higher number of differentiated Müller cells in the more developed retina. Müller cells in mutant mice contain higher amounts of nestin than those of control animals which indicates that the increase in TGF-β signaling activity during retinal development contribute to maintain some progenitor-like characteristics in Müller cells even after their differentiation period. We conclude that TGF-β signaling influences Müller cell proliferation and differentiation during retinal development.

  18. Central Asia: Regional Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    country to host an OSCE summit. Kazakhstan’s then-Foreign Minister Marat Tazhin pledged at the Ministerial Meeting that Kazakhstan would enact human...Council Meeting, Address of Marat Tazhin, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Kazakhstan, November 29, 2007. Central Asia: Regional

  19. Security Policy and Developments in Central Asia : Security Documents Compared with Security Challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, de M.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the security policy of the Central Asian (CA) states, by comparing theory (security documents) with practice (the actual security challenges). The lack of CA regional (security) cooperation and authoritarian rule puts political and economic stability at stake. The internal and

  20. Central Auditory Development: Evidence from CAEP Measurements in Children Fit with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Michael F.; Sharma, Anu; Gilley, Phillip; Martin, Kathryn; Roland, Peter

    2007-01-01

    In normal-hearing children the latency of the P1 component of the cortical evoked response to sound varies as a function of age and, thus, can be used as a biomarker for maturation of central auditory pathways. We assessed P1 latency in 245 congenitally deaf children fit with cochlear implants following various periods of auditory deprivation. If…

  1. Mechanisms Of Formation And Development Of Mahalla Centers In Central Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sereeva Guljazira

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available this article is devoted to the architecture of mahalla where mechanism of its historical formation and evolution planning solutions structural composition are analyzed. In addition an attempt has been made to cover the activity of mahalla neighborhood team in family lifestyle of Central Asias nations from historical and ethnographic viewpoint. Recommendations on increasing the opportunities for efficient use of populated areas.

  2. Competing for Coffee Space: Development-Induced Displacement in the Central Highlands of Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doutriaux, Sylvie; Geisler, Charles; Shively, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Vietnam has emerged as the world's second largest producer of coffee. The benefits of this expanding coffee economy are substantial but not universal; their distribution follows ethnic lines despite government commitment to equalize welfare. Focusing on Dak Lak Province in Vietnam's Central Highlands, we investigate this commercial transformation…

  3. Development of a central hardwood stand following whole-tree clearcutting in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Wayne Martin

    1995-01-01

    Little information is available concerning the initial stages of forest regeneration following intensive harvesting of central hardwood stands in the northeastern part of the range. Establishment of commercial species, density, and rate of biomass accumulation of the regeneration are of major concern to both foresters and landowners contemplating a harvest. To help...

  4. The Development of Higher Education in Eastern and Central Europe in the Aftermath of Recent Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadlak, Jan

    1991-01-01

    Describes the impact of Marxism-Leninism on higher education in central and eastern Europe after World War II. Contends that the dramatic political changes in recent years call for a profound transformation in higher education. Asserts that, despite numerous difficulties, higher education in these nations has embarked on dramatic improvements.…

  5. Hardware, firmware and software developments for the upgrade of the ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger Processor

    CERN Document Server

    Ghibaudi, M; The ATLAS collaboration; Spiwoks, R; Anders, G; Bertelsen, H; Boisen, A; Childers, T; Dam, M; Ellis, N; Farthouat, P; Gabaldon Ruiz, C; Gorini, B; Kaneda, M; Ohm, C; Silva Oliveira, M; Pauly, T; Pottgen, R; Schmieden, K; Xella, S

    2013-01-01

    The Central Trigger Processor (CTP) is the final stage of the ATLAS first level trigger system which reduces the collision rate of 40 MHz to a Level-1 event rate of 100 kHz. An upgrade of the CTP is currently underway to significantly increase the number of trigger inputs and trigger combinations, allowing additional flexibility for the trigger menu.\

  6. Process development for high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gee, J.M.; Basore, P.A.; Buck, M.E.; Ruby, D.S.; Schubert, W.K.; Silva, B.L.; Tingley, J.W.

    1991-12-31

    Fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells in an industrial environment requires a different optimization than in a laboratory environment. Strategies are presented for process development of high-efficiency silicon solar cells, with a goal of simplifying technology transfer into an industrial setting. The strategies emphasize the use of statistical experimental design for process optimization, and the use of baseline processes and cells for process monitoring and quality control. 8 refs.

  7. Supporting R&D of industrial fuel cell developers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumpelt, M.

    1998-09-11

    Argonne National Laboratory is supporting the industrial developers of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) and tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The results suggest that a lithium concentration level of 65-75 mol% in the LiNa electrolyte will improve cell performance. They have made inroads in understanding the interfacial resistance of bipolar plate materials, and they have reduced the air electrode overpotential in OSFCs by adding dopants.

  8. Development of rat embryonic spinal ganglion cells in damaged nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, E S; Isaeva, E N; Korzhevskii, D E

    2014-09-01

    The development of dissociated cells from rat embryonic spinal ganglion after transplantation to damaged nerve of adult animals was studied using immunohistochemical differentiation markers of neural and glial cells. The cell suspension obtained after dissociation of rat embryonic spinal ganglia (embryonic day 15) was injected into the proximal segment of crushed sciatic nerve. The nerve was damaged by ligation for 40 sec. Progenitor cells were labeled with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) before transplantation. BrdU-immunopositive cells were detected in the nerve trunks of recipients on days 1, 21, and 28 after transplantation. Dissociated cells of rat embryonic spinal ganglion (embryonic day 15) survived for at least 4 weeks after transplantation to the nerve and differentiate into NeuN-immunopositive neurons with morphological properties of sensory neurons and satellite cells containing S100 protein.

  9. Immunologic glycosphingolipidomics and NKT cell development in mouse thymus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yunsen; Thapa, Prakash; Hawke, David

    2009-01-01

    Invariant NKT cells are a hybrid cell type of Natural Killer cells and T cells, whose development is dependent on thymic positive selection mediated by double positive thymocytes through their recognition of natural ligands presented by CD1d, a nonpolymorphic, non-MHC, MHC-like antigen presenting...... molecule. Genetic evidence suggested that beta-glucosylceramide derived glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are natural ligands for NKT cells. N-butyldeoxygalactonojirimycin (NB-DGJ), a drug that specifically inhibits the glucosylceramide synthase, inhibits the endogenous ligands for NKT cells. Furthermore, we...... in mouse thymus, which are specifically regulated by rate-limiting glycosidases. Among the identified thymic glycosphingolipids, only iGb3 is a stimulatory ligand for NKT cells, suggesting that large-scale fractionation, enrichment and characterization of minor species of glycosphingolipids are necessary...

  10. Mammary Development and Breast Cancer: The Role of Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, C.; van Diest, P.J.; Vooijs, M.

    2014-01-01

    The mammary gland is a highly regenerative organ that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation and involution, a process controlled by stem cells. The last decade much progress has been made in the identification of signaling pathways that function in these stem cells to control self-renewal, lineage commitment and epithelial differentiation in the normal mammary gland. The same signaling pathways that control physiological mammary development and homeostasis are also often found deregulated in breast cancer. Here we provide an overview on the functional and molecular identification of mammary stem cells in the context of both normal breast development and breast cancer. We discuss the contribution of some key signaling pathways with an emphasis on Notch receptor signaling, a cell fate determination pathway often deregulated in breast cancer. A further understanding of the biological roles of the Notch pathway in mammary stem cell behavior and carcinogenesis might be relevant for the development of future therapies. PMID:21506923

  11. Microgrid Central Controller Development and Hierarchical Control Implementation in the Intelligent MicroGrid Lab of Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Lexuan; Savaghebi, Mehdi; Andrade, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a microgrid central controller in an inverter-based intelligent microgrid (iMG) lab in Aalborg University, Denmark. The iMG lab aims to provide a flexible experimental platform for comprehensive studies of microgrids. The complete control system applied...... in this lab is based on the hierarchical control scheme for microgrids and includes primary, secondary and tertiary control. The structure of the lab, including the lab facilities, configurations and communication network, is first introduced. Primary control loops are developed in MATLAB....../Simulink and compiled to dSPACEs for local control purposes. In order to realize system supervision and proper secondary and tertiary management, a LabVIEW-based microgrid central controller is also developed. The software and hardware schemes are described. An example case is introduced and tested in the iMG lab...

  12. Aspectos radiológicos e epidemiológicos do granuloma central de células gigantes Radiological and epidemiological aspects of central giant cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Wilson Noleto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar os principais aspectos radiográficos e epidemiológicos das lesões de células gigantes (granulomas centrais de células gigantes e tumores marrons do hiperparatireoidismo. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: A amostra consistiu de 26 lesões de células gigantes diagnosticadas em 22 pacientes divididos em dois grupos, um deles composto por 17 pacientes que não tinham hiperparatireoidismo (grupo A e o outro formado por cinco pacientes portadores de tal distúrbio (grupo B. RESULTADOS: O sexo feminino (72,7% foi o mais acometido. As lesões ocorreram mais freqüentemente na segunda década de vida, com média de idade de 27 anos. A mandíbula (61,5% foi o arco mais envolvido. Radiograficamente, 57,7% das lesões eram multiloculares e 42,3% eram uniloculares com limites definidos. Todas as 26 lesões provocaram expansão óssea, 15,4% produziram reabsorção radicular, 50% causaram deslocamento dentário e 11,5% produziram dor. Na mandíbula, 18,7% das lesões cruzavam a linha média. O grupo A apresentou 66,7% das lesões na mandíbula e o grupo B mostrou igualdade na distribuição das lesões entre os arcos. O grupo A apresentou 66,7% das lesões multiloculares e 33,3%, uniloculares. O grupo B apresentou 62,5% das lesões uniloculares e 37,5%, multiloculares. CONCLUSÃO: As lesões de células gigantes podem manifestar-se, radiograficamente, com um amplo espectro, desde pequenas lesões uniloculares de crescimento lento até extensas lesões multiloculares. Elas apresentam características de benignidade, embora algumas lesões possam demonstrar um comportamento localmente agressivo.OBJECTIVE: The present study was aimed at evaluating main radiological and epidemiological aspects of giant cell lesions (central giant cell granuloma and brown tumors of hyperparathyroidism. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The sample consisted of 26 giant cell lesions diagnosed in 22 patients divided into two groups, one of them

  13. Analysis of Papaya Cell Wall-Related Genes during Fruit Ripening Indicates a Central Role of Polygalacturonases during Pulp Softening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabi, João Paulo; Broetto, Sabrina Garcia; da Silva, Sarah Lígia Garcia Leme; Zhong, Silin; Lajolo, Franco Maria; do Nascimento, João Roberto Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Papaya (Carica papaya L.) is a climacteric fleshy fruit that undergoes dramatic changes during ripening, most noticeably a severe pulp softening. However, little is known regarding the genetics of the cell wall metabolism in papayas. The present work describes the identification and characterization of genes related to pulp softening. We used gene expression profiling to analyze the correlations and co-expression networks of cell wall-related genes, and the results suggest that papaya pulp softening is accomplished by the interactions of multiple glycoside hydrolases. The polygalacturonase cpPG1 appeared to play a central role in the network and was further studied. The transient expression of cpPG1 in papaya results in pulp softening and leaf necrosis in the absence of ethylene action and confirms its role in papaya fruit ripening. PMID:25162506

  14. Purkinje cell activity during classical conditioning with different conditional stimuli explains central tenet of Rescorla–Wagner model [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Anders; Zucca, Riccardo; Johansson, Fredrik; Jirenhed, Dan-Anders; Hesslow, Germund

    2015-11-10

    A central tenet of Rescorla and Wagner's model of associative learning is that the reinforcement value of a paired trial diminishes as the associative strength between the presented stimuli increases. Despite its fundamental importance to behavioral sciences, the neural mechanisms underlying the model have not been fully explored. Here, we present findings that, taken together, can explain why a stronger association leads to a reduced reinforcement value, within the context of eyeblink conditioning. Specifically, we show that learned pause responses in Purkinje cells, which trigger adaptively timed conditioned eyeblinks, suppress the unconditional stimulus (US) signal in a graded manner. Furthermore, by examining how Purkinje cells respond to two distinct conditional stimuli and to a compound stimulus, we provide evidence that could potentially help explain the somewhat counterintuitive overexpectation phenomenon, which was derived from the Rescorla-Wagner model.

  15. Long Noncoding RNA Expression during Human B-Cell Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Petri

    Full Text Available Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs have emerged as important regulators of diverse cellular processes, but their roles in the developing immune system are poorly understood. In this study, we analysed lncRNA expression during human B-cell development by array-based expression profiling of eleven distinct flow-sorted B-cell subsets, comprising pre-B1, pre-B2, immature, naive, memory, and plasma cells from bone marrow biopsies (n = 7, and naive, centroblast, centrocyte, memory, and plasmablast cells from tonsil tissue samples (n = 6, respectively. A remapping strategy was used to assign the array probes to 37630 gene-level probe sets, reflecting recent updates in genomic and transcriptomic databases, which enabled expression profiling of 19579 long noncoding RNAs, comprising 3947 antisense RNAs, 5277 lincRNAs, 7625 pseudogenes, and 2730 additional lncRNAs. As a first step towards inferring the functions of the identified lncRNAs in developing B-cells, we analysed their co-expression with well-characterized protein-coding genes, a method known as "guilt by association". By using weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we identified 272 lincRNAs, 471 antisense RNAs, 376 pseudogene RNAs, and 64 lncRNAs within seven sub-networks associated with distinct stages of B-cell development, such as early B-cell development, B-cell proliferation, affinity maturation of antibody, and terminal differentiation. These data provide an important resource for future studies on the functions of lncRNAs in development of the adaptive immune response, and the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies that originate from distinct B-cell subpopulations.

  16. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and expression in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus in central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush; Dar, Nazir Ahmad; Mir, Mohammad Muzaffar; Zargar, Showkat Ahmad; Lone, M Muqbool; Martel-Planche, Ghyslaine; Villar, Stéphanie; Mounawar, Mounia; Saidi, Farrokh; Malekzadeh, Reza; Hainaut, Pierre

    2012-12-17

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) shows geographic variations in incidence, with high incidences (>50/105 person-years) in central Asia, including North Eastern Iran (Golestan) and Northern India (Kashmir). In contrast to Western countries, smoking does not appear to be a significant risk factor for ESCC in central Asia. In lung adenocarcinoma, activating mutations in the gene encoding epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are frequent in tumors of never smokers of Asian origin, predicting therapeutic sensitivity to Egfr-targeting drugs. In this study 152 cases of histologically confirmed ESCC from Iran (Tehran and Golestan Province) and North India (Kashmir Valley) have been analyzed for EGFR mutation by direct sequencing of exons 18-21. Egfr protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 34 samples from Tehran and HER2 mutations were analyzed in 54 cases from Kashmir. A total of 14 (9.2%) EGFR variations were detected, including seven variations in exons. Among those, four (2.6%) were already documented in lung cancers, two were reported as polymorphisms and one was a potentially new activating mutation. All but one variation in introns were previously identified as polymorphisms. Over-expression of Egfr was detected in 22/34 (65%) of tested cases whereas no HER2 mutation was found in 54 cases from Kashmir. Overall, EGFR mutations appear to be a rare event in ESCC in high incidence areas of central Asia, although a very small proportion of cases may harbor mutations predicting sensitivity to anti-Egfr drugs.

  17. Development of New Technologies for Stem Cell Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xibo Ma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1960s, the stem cells have been extensively studied including embryonic stem cells, neural stem cells, bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells. In the recent years, several stem cells have been initially used in the treatment of diseases, such as in bone marrow transplant. At the same time, isolation and culture experimental technologies for stem cell research have been widely developed in recent years. In addition, molecular imaging technologies including optical molecular imaging, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, and computed tomography have been developed rapidly in recent the 10 years and have also been used in the research on disease mechanism and evaluation of treatment of disease related with stem cells. This paper will focus on recent typical isolation, culture, and observation techniques of stem cells followed by a concise introduction. Finally, the current challenges and the future applications of the new technologies in stem cells are given according to the understanding of the authors, and the paper is then concluded.

  18. Development of new membrane materials for direct methanol fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yildirim, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Development of new membrane materials for direct methanol fuel cells Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) can convert the chemical energy of a fuel directly into electrical energy with high efficiency and low emission of pollutants. DMFCs can be used as the power sources to portable electronic devices

  19. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Development in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderoth, Søren; Larsen, Peter Halvor; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2007-01-01

    on larger anode-supported cells as well as a new generation of SOFCs based on porous metal supports and new electrode and electrolyte materials. The SOFC program comprises development of next generation of cells and multi stack modules for operation at lower temperature with increased durability...

  20. Immune regulatory neural stem/precursor cells protect from central nervous system autoimmunity by restraining dendritic cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Pluchino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The systemic injection of neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs provides remarkable amelioration of the clinico-pathological features of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. This is dependent on the capacity of transplanted NPCs to engage concurrent mechanisms of action within specific microenvironments in vivo. Among a wide range of therapeutic actions alternative to cell replacement, neuroprotective and immune modulatory capacities of transplanted NPCs have been described. However, lacking is a detailed understanding of the mechanisms by which NPCs exert their therapeutic plasticity. This study was designed to identify the first candidate that exemplifies and sustains the immune modulatory capacity of transplanted NPCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To achieve the exclusive targeting of the peripheral immune system, SJL mice with PLP-induced EAE were injected subcutaneously with NPCs and the treatment commenced prior to disease onset. NPC-injected EAE mice showed significant clinical improvement, as compared to controls. Exogenous NPCs lacking the expression of major neural antigens were reliably (and for long-term found at the level of draining lymph nodes, while establishing sophisticated anatomical interactions with lymph node cells. Importantly, injected NPCs were never found in organs other than lymph nodes, including the brain and the spinal cord. Draining lymph nodes from transplanted mice showed focal up-regulation of major developmental stem cell regulators, such as BMP-4, Noggin and Sonic hedgehog. In lymph nodes, injected NPCs hampered the activation of myeloid dendritic cells (DCs and steadily restrained the expansion of antigen-specific encephalitogenic T cells. Both ex vivo and in vitro experiments identified a novel highly NPC-specific-BMP-4-dependent-mechanism hindering the DC maturation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The study described herein, identifies the first member of the TGF beta/BMP family of stem cell