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Sample records for central carbon metabolism

  1. Rewriting central metabolism for carbon conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Bogorad, Igor Walter

    2015-01-01

    The efficient use of carbon sources is a core objective in metabolic engineering and biorefinery. Most approaches have focused on optimizing naturally occurring pathways to improve titer, productivity, and yield. However, certain inherent limitations cannot be surpassed if natural pathways are used. Here we designed two synthetic metabolic pathways, Non-Oxidative Glycolysis (NOG) and Methanol Condensation Cycle (MCC) for the utilization of sugar and methanol, respectively. We also created a ...

  2. The Central Carbon and Energy Metabolism of Marine Diatoms

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    Adriano Nunes-Nesi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are heterokont algae derived from a secondary symbiotic event in which a eukaryotic host cell acquired an eukaryotic red alga as plastid. The multiple endosymbiosis and horizontal gene transfer processes provide diatoms unusual opportunities for gene mixing to establish distinctive biosynthetic pathways and metabolic control structures. Diatoms are also known to have significant impact on global ecosystems as one of the most dominant phytoplankton species in the contemporary ocean. As such their metabolism and growth regulating factors have been of particular interest for many years. The publication of the genomic sequences of two independent species of diatoms and the advent of an enhanced experimental toolbox for molecular biological investigations have afforded far greater opportunities than were previously apparent for these species and re-invigorated studies regarding the central carbon metabolism of diatoms. In this review we discuss distinctive features of the central carbon metabolism of diatoms and its response to forthcoming environmental changes and recent advances facilitating the possibility of industrial use of diatoms for oil production. Although the operation and importance of several key pathways of diatom metabolism have already been demonstrated and determined, we will also highlight other potentially important pathways wherein this has yet to be achieved.

  3. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Shewanella spp. Reveals Evolutionary Robustness in Central Carbon Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Martin, Hector Garcia; Dehal, Paramvir S.; Deutschbauer, Adam; Llora, Xavier; Meadows, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-08-19

    Shewanella spp. are a group of facultative anaerobic bacteria widely distributed in marine and fresh-water environments. In this study, we profiled the central metabolic fluxes of eight recently sequenced Shewanella species grown under the same condition in minimal med-ium with [3-13C] lactate. Although the tested Shewanella species had slightly different growth rates (0.23-0.29 h31) and produced different amounts of acetate and pyruvate during early exponential growth (pseudo-steady state), the relative intracellular metabolic flux distributions were remarkably similar. This result indicates that Shewanella species share similar regulation in regard to central carbon metabolic fluxes under steady growth conditions: the maintenance of metabolic robustness is not only evident in a single species under genetic perturbations (Fischer and Sauer, 2005; Nat Genet 37(6):636-640), but also observed through evolutionary related microbial species. This remarkable conservation of relative flux profiles through phylogenetic differences prompts us to introduce the concept of metabotype as an alternative scheme to classify microbial fluxomics. On the other hand, Shewanella spp. display flexibility in the relative flux profiles when switching their metabolism from consuming lactate to consuming pyruvate and acetate.

  4. Investigation into the flux distribution of central carbon metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum using principal component analysis

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    Shang Chuanyu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Central carbon metabolism is the main source of energy required by organisms and it provides precursors for other in vivo metabolic processes. The flux flowing through the pathways involved in central carbon metabolism characterizes its biological function and genetic readout between species or environments. In recent years, using a 13C tracer technique, researchers have measured the flux of central carbon metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum under a variety of nutritional and environmental changes or genetic modifications. However, there is no integrated and comparative analysis of these measured flux values. In this study, the flux values of central carbon metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum that were obtained in other recent studies were consolidated. A preliminary examination of the distribution characteristics of flux values in each metabolic pathway was conducted and the regression relationship between different fluxes was investigated. The principal components of the flux vector were further extracted and aggregated based on the components, and the general features of flux distribution of central carbon metabolism as well as the influence of environmental and genetic factors on the flux distribution were determined. This study provides a foundation for further investigation into the flux distribution and regulation characteristics of central carbon metabolism.

  5. Characterization of physiological responses to 22 gene knockouts in Escherichia coli central carbon metabolism.

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    Long, Christopher P; Gonzalez, Jacqueline E; Sandoval, Nicholas R; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the impact of gene knockouts on cellular physiology, and metabolism in particular, is centrally important to quantitative systems biology and metabolic engineering. Here, we present a comprehensive physiological characterization of wild-type Escherichia coli and 22 knockouts of enzymes in the upper part of central carbon metabolism, including the PTS system, glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway and Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Our results reveal significant metabolic changes that are affected by specific gene knockouts. Analysis of collective trends and correlations in the data using principal component analysis (PCA) provide new, and sometimes surprising, insights into E. coli physiology. Additionally, by comparing the data-to-model predictions from constraint-based approaches such as FBA, MOMA and RELATCH we demonstrate the important role of less well-understood kinetic and regulatory effects in central carbon metabolism. PMID:27212692

  6. Exhaustive Analysis of a Genotype Space Comprising 10(15 Central Carbon Metabolisms Reveals an Organization Conducive to Metabolic Innovation.

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    Sayed-Rzgar Hosseini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available All biological evolution takes place in a space of possible genotypes and their phenotypes. The structure of this space defines the evolutionary potential and limitations of an evolving system. Metabolism is one of the most ancient and fundamental evolving systems, sustaining life by extracting energy from extracellular nutrients. Here we study metabolism's potential for innovation by analyzing an exhaustive genotype-phenotype map for a space of 10(15 metabolisms that encodes all possible subsets of 51 reactions in central carbon metabolism. Using flux balance analysis, we predict the viability of these metabolisms on 10 different carbon sources which give rise to 1024 potential metabolic phenotypes. Although viable metabolisms with any one phenotype comprise a tiny fraction of genotype space, their absolute numbers exceed 10(9 for some phenotypes. Metabolisms with any one phenotype typically form a single network of genotypes that extends far or all the way through metabolic genotype space, where any two genotypes can be reached from each other through a series of single reaction changes. The minimal distance of genotype networks associated with different phenotypes is small, such that one can reach metabolisms with novel phenotypes--viable on new carbon sources--through one or few genotypic changes. Exceptions to these principles exist for those metabolisms whose complexity (number of reactions is close to the minimum needed for viability. Increasing metabolic complexity enhances the potential for both evolutionary conservation and evolutionary innovation.

  7. Enzymatic passaging of human embryonic stem cells alters central carbon metabolism and glycan abundance

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    Badur, Mehmet G.; Zhang, Hui; Metallo, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    To realize the potential of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in regenerative medicine and drug discovery applications, large numbers of cells that accurately recapitulate cell and tissue function must be robustly produced. Previous studies have suggested that genetic instability and epigenetic changes occur as a consequence of enzymatic passaging. However, the potential impacts of such passaging methods on the metabolism of hESCs have not been described. Using stable isotope tracing and mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, we have explored how different passaging reagents impact hESC metabolism. Enzymatic passaging caused significant decreases in glucose utilization throughout central carbon metabolism along with attenuated de novo lipogenesis. In addition, we developed and validated a method for rapidly quantifying glycan abundance and isotopic labeling in hydrolyzed biomass. Enzymatic passaging reagents significantly altered levels of glycans immediately after digestion but surprisingly glucose contribution to glycans was not affected. These results demonstrate that there is an immediate effect on hESC metabolism after enzymatic passaging in both central carbon metabolism and biosynthesis. HESCs subjected to enzymatic passaging are routinely placed in a state requiring re-synthesis of biomass components, subtly influencing their metabolic needs in a manner that may impact cell performance in regenerative medicine applications. PMID:26289220

  8. Modeling the Contribution of Allosteric Regulation for Flux Control in the Central Carbon Metabolism of E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Daniel; Herrgard, Markus; Rocha, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Modeling cellular metabolism is fundamental for many biotechnological applications, including drug discovery and rational cell factory design. Central carbon metabolism (CCM) is particularly important as it provides the energy and precursors for other biological processes. However, the complex...

  9. The Sinorhizobium meliloti RNA chaperone Hfq influences central carbon metabolism and the symbiotic interaction with alfalfa

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    Jiménez-Zurdo José I

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial Hfq protein is able to interact with diverse RNA molecules, including regulatory small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs, and thus it is recognized as a global post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression. Loss of Hfq has an extensive impact in bacterial physiology which in several animal pathogens influences virulence. Sinorhizobium meliloti is a model soil bacterium known for its ability to establish a beneficial nitrogen-fixing intracellular symbiosis with alfalfa. Despite the predicted general involvement of Hfq in the establishment of successful bacteria-eukaryote interactions, its function in S. meliloti has remained unexplored. Results Two independent S. meliloti mutants, 2011-3.4 and 1021Δhfq, were obtained by disruption and deletion of the hfq gene in the wild-type strains 2011 and 1021, respectively, both exhibiting similar growth defects as free-living bacteria. Transcriptomic profiling of 1021Δhfq revealed a general down-regulation of genes of sugar transporters and some enzymes of the central carbon metabolism, whereas transcripts specifying the uptake and metabolism of nitrogen sources (mainly amino acids were more abundant than in the wild-type strain. Proteomic analysis of the 2011-3.4 mutant independently confirmed these observations. Symbiotic tests showed that lack of Hfq led to a delayed nodulation, severely compromised bacterial competitiveness on alfalfa roots and impaired normal plant growth. Furthermore, a large proportion of nodules (55%-64% elicited by the 1021Δhfq mutant were non-fixing, with scarce content in bacteroids and signs of premature senescence of endosymbiotic bacteria. RT-PCR experiments on RNA from bacteria grown under aerobic and microoxic conditions revealed that Hfq contributes to regulation of nifA and fixK1/K2, the genes controlling nitrogen fixation, although the Hfq-mediated regulation of fixK is only aerobiosis dependent. Finally, we found that some of the recently

  10. Elementary Flux Mode Analysis Revealed Cyclization Pathway as a Powerful Way for NADPH Regeneration of Central Carbon Metabolism.

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    Bin Rui

    Full Text Available NADPH regeneration capacity is attracting growing research attention due to its important role in resisting oxidative stress. Besides, NADPH availability has been regarded as a limiting factor in production of industrially valuable compounds. The central carbon metabolism carries the carbon skeleton flux supporting the operation of NADPH-regenerating enzyme and offers flexibility in coping with NADPH demand for varied intracellular environment. To acquire an insightful understanding of its NADPH regeneration capacity, the elementary mode method was employed to compute all elementary flux modes (EFMs of a network representative of central carbon metabolism. Based on the metabolic flux distributions of these modes, a cluster analysis of EFMs with high NADPH regeneration rate was conducted using the self-organizing map clustering algorithm. The clustering results were used to study the relationship between the flux of total NADPH regeneration and the flux in each NADPH producing enzyme. The results identified several reaction combinations supporting high NADPH regeneration, which are proven to be feasible in cells via thermodynamic analysis and coincident with a great deal of previous experimental report. Meanwhile, the reaction combinations showed some common characteristics: there were one or two decarboxylation oxidation reactions in the combinations that produced NADPH and the combination constitution included certain gluconeogenesis pathways. These findings suggested cyclization pathways as a powerful way for NADPH regeneration capacity of bacterial central carbon metabolism.

  11. Metabolic flux determination using carbon 13 NMR. Application to normal and tumoral cells from central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon 13 NMR constitutes a potent tool to study cellular metabolism by the use of 13C enriched substrates. Analyzes of 13C NMR spectra recorded from acidic cell extracts lead to the evaluation of specific enrichment of various metabolites. On the other hand, the measure of homonuclear 13C-13C spin coupling gives information on the different isotopomers for a given molecule. Mathematical models were different isotopomers for a given molecule. Mathematical models were developed to interpret the NMR data in terms of metabolic fluxes through the metabolic network of interest. Various models established in our laboratory are presented. These models were applied to metabolic studies of cultured central nervous system cells as rat cerebellar astrocytes and granule cells, and the C6 glioma cell line. (authors). 17 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Carbon conversion efficiency and central metabolic fluxes in developing sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) embryos.

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    Alonso, Ana P; Goffman, Fernando D; Ohlrogge, John B; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2007-10-01

    The efficiency with which developing sunflower embryos convert substrates into seed storage reserves was determined by labeling embryos with [U-(14)C6]glucose or [U-(14)C5]glutamine and measuring their conversion to CO2, oil, protein and other biomass compounds. The average carbon conversion efficiency was 50%, which contrasts with a value of over 80% previously observed in Brassica napus embryos (Goffman et al., 2005), in which light and the RuBisCO bypass pathway allow more efficient conversion of hexose to oil. Labeling levels after incubating sunflower embryos with [U-(14)C4]malate indicated that some carbon from malate enters the plastidic compartment and contributes to oil synthesis. To test this and to map the underlying pattern of metabolic fluxes, separate experiments were carried out in which embryos were labeled to isotopic steady state using [1-(13)C1]glucose, [2-(13)C1]glucose, or [U-(13)C5]glutamine. The resultant labeling in sugars, starch, fatty acids and amino acids was analyzed by NMR and GC-MS. The fluxes through intermediary metabolism were then quantified by computer-aided modeling. The resulting flux map accounted well for the labeling data, was in good agreement with the observed carbon efficiency, and was further validated by testing for agreement with gas exchange measurements. The map shows that the influx of malate into oil is low and that flux through futile cycles (wasting ATP) is low, which contrasts with the high rates previously determined for growing root tips and heterotrophic cell cultures. PMID:17683473

  13. Immunosuppressive activity enhances central carbon metabolism and bioenergetics in myeloid-derived suppressor cells in vitro models

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    Hammami Ines

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tumor microenvironment contains a vast array of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines that alter myelopoiesis and lead to the maturation of immunosuppressive cells known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs. Incubating bone marrow (BM precursors with a combination of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin-6 (IL-6 generated a tumor-infiltrating MDSC-like population that impaired anti-tumor specific T-cell functions. This in vitro experimental approach was used to simulate MDSC maturation, and the cellular metabolic response was then monitored. A complementary experimental model that inhibited L-arginine (L-Arg metabolizing enzymes in MSC-1 cells, an immortalized cell line derived from primary MDSCs, was used to study the metabolic events related to immunosuppression. Results Exposure of BM cells to GM-CSF and IL-6 activated, within 24 h, L-Arg metabolizing enzymes which are responsible for the MDSCs immunosuppressive potential. This was accompanied by an increased uptake of L-glutamine (L-Gln and glucose, the latter being metabolized by anaerobic glycolysis. The up-regulation of nutrient uptake lead to the accumulation of TCA cycle intermediates and lactate as well as the endogenous synthesis of L-Arg and the production of energy-rich nucleotides. Moreover, inhibition of L-Arg metabolism in MSC-1 cells down-regulated central carbon metabolism activity, including glycolysis, glutaminolysis and TCA cycle activity, and led to a deterioration of cell bioenergetic status. The simultaneous increase of cell specific concentrations of ATP and a decrease in ATP-to-ADP ratio in BM-derived MDSCs suggested cells were metabolically active during maturation. Moreover, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK was activated during MDSC maturation in GM-CSF and IL-6–treated cultures, as revealed by the continuous increase of AMP-to-ATP ratios and the phosphorylation of AMPK. Likewise, AMPK activity was

  14. Exhaustive analysis of a genotype space comprising 1015 central carbon metabolisms reveals an organization conducive to metabolic innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseini, Sayed-Rzgar; Barve, Aditya; Wagner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    All biological evolution takes place in a space of possible genotypes and their phenotypes. The structure of this space defines the evolutionary potential and limitations of an evolving system. Metabolism is one of the most ancient and fundamental evolving systems, sustaining life by extracting energy from extracellular nutrients. Here we study metabolism's potential for innovation by analyzing an exhaustive genotype-phenotype map for a space of 10(15) metabolisms that encodes all possible su...

  15. Exhaustive Analysis of a Genotype Space Comprising 10(15 )Central Carbon Metabolisms Reveals an Organization Conducive to Metabolic Innovation.

    OpenAIRE

    Sayed-Rzgar Hosseini; Aditya Barve; Andreas Wagner

    2015-01-01

    All biological evolution takes place in a space of possible genotypes and their phenotypes. The structure of this space defines the evolutionary potential and limitations of an evolving system. Metabolism is one of the most ancient and fundamental evolving systems, sustaining life by extracting energy from extracellular nutrients. Here we study metabolism's potential for innovation by analyzing an exhaustive genotype-phenotype map for a space of 10(15) metabolisms that encodes all possible su...

  16. Genetic analysis of central carbon metabolism unveils an amino acid substitution that alters maize NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity.

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    Nengyi Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Central carbon metabolism (CCM is a fundamental component of life. The participating genes and enzymes are thought to be structurally and functionally conserved across and within species. Association mapping utilizes a rich history of mutation and recombination to achieve high resolution mapping. Therefore, applying association mapping in maize (Zea mays ssp. mays, the most diverse model crop species, to study the genetics of CCM is a particularly attractive system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a maize diversity panel to test the CCM functional conservation. We found heritable variation in enzyme activity for every enzyme tested. One of these enzymes was the NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH, E.C. 1.1.1.41, in which we identified a novel amino-acid substitution in a phylogenetically conserved site. Using candidate gene association mapping, we identified that this non-synonymous polymorphism was associated with IDH activity variation. The proposed mechanism for the IDH activity variation includes additional components regulating protein level. With the comparison of sequences from maize and teosinte (Zea mays ssp. Parviglumis, the maize wild ancestor, we found that some CCM genes had also been targeted for selection during maize domestication. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate the efficacy of association mapping for dissecting natural variation in primary metabolic pathways. The considerable genetic diversity observed in maize CCM genes underlies heritable phenotypic variation in enzyme activities and can be useful to identify putative functional sites.

  17. Control of Proteobacterial Central Carbon Metabolism by the HexR Transcriptional Regulator. A Case Study in Shewanella oneidensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyn, Semen; Li, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Qijing; Novichkov, Pavel; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Yang, Chen; Osterman, Andrei L.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2011-08-17

    Bacteria exploit multiple mechanisms for controlling central carbon metabolism (CCM). Thus, a bioinformatic analysis together with some experimental data implicated HexR transcriptional factor as a global CCM regulator in some lineages of Gammaproteobacteria operating as a functional replacement of Cra regulator characteristic of Enterobacteriales. In this study we combined a large-scale comparative genomic reconstruction of HexRcontrolled regulons in 87 species of Proteobacteria with the detailed experimental analysis of HexR regulatory network in Shewanella oneidensis model system. Although nearly all of the HexR-controlled genes are associated with CCM, remarkable variations were revealed in the scale (from 1-2 target operons in Enterobacteriales up to 20 operons in Aeromonadales) and gene content of HexR regulons between 11 compared lineages. A predicted 17-bp pseudo-palindrome with a consensus tTGTAATwwwATTACa, was confirmed as HexR-binding motif for 15 target operons (comprising 30 genes) by in vitro binding assays. The negative effect of the key CCM intermediate, 2-keto-3-deoxy-6- phosphogluconate, on the DNA-regulator complex formation was verified. A dual mode of HexR action on various target promoters, repression of genes involved in catabolic pathways and activation of gluconeogenic genes, was for the first time predicted by the bioinformatc analysis and experimentally verified by changed gene expression pattern in S. oneidensis AhexR mutant. Phenotypic profiling revealed the inability of this mutant to grow on lactate or pyruvate as a single carbon source. A comparative metabolic flux analysis of wild-type and mutant strains of S. oneidensis using 13Clactate labeling and GC-MS analysis confirmed the hypothesized HexR role as a master regulator of gluconeogenic flux from pyruvate via the transcriptional activation of phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PpsA).

  18. The carbon storage regulator (Csr system exerts a nutrient-specific control over central metabolism in Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917.

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    Olga Revelles

    Full Text Available The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the csrA51 mutant affects the growth efficiency on a broad range of physiologically relevant carbon sources, including compounds utilized by the Entner-Doudoroff (ED pathway. Detailed investigations of the metabolomes and fluxomes of mutants and wild-type cells grown on carbon sources representative of glycolysis and of the ED pathway (glucose and gluconate, respectively, revealed significant re-adjusting of central carbon metabolism for both compounds in the csrA51 mutant. However, the metabolic re-adjusting observed on gluconate was strikingly different from that observed on glucose, indicating a nutrient-specific control of metabolism by the Csr system.

  19. The carbon storage regulator (Csr) system exerts a nutrient-specific control over central metabolism in Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelles, Olga; Millard, Pierre; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Oswald, Eric; Létisse, Fabien; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr) system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations) showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the csrA51 mutant affects the growth efficiency on a broad range of physiologically relevant carbon sources, including compounds utilized by the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway. Detailed investigations of the metabolomes and fluxomes of mutants and wild-type cells grown on carbon sources representative of glycolysis and of the ED pathway (glucose and gluconate, respectively), revealed significant re-adjusting of central carbon metabolism for both compounds in the csrA51 mutant. However, the metabolic re-adjusting observed on gluconate was strikingly different from that observed on glucose, indicating a nutrient-specific control of metabolism by the Csr system. PMID:23840455

  20. The carbon storage regulator (Csr) system exerts a nutrient-specific control over central metabolism in Escherichia coli strain nissle 1917

    OpenAIRE

    Revelles, Olga; Millard, Pierre; Nougayrede, Jean-Philippe; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Oswald, Eric; Létisse, Fabien; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr) system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations) showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the c...

  1. Investigating the effects of perturbations to pgi and eno gene expression on central carbon metabolism in Escherichia coli using 13 C metabolic flux analysis

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    Usui Yuki

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has long been recognized that analyzing the behaviour of the complex intracellular biological networks is important for breeding industrially useful microorganisms. However, because of the complexity of these biological networks, it is currently not possible to obtain all the desired microorganisms. In this study, we constructed a system for analyzing the effect of gene expression perturbations on the behavior of biological networks in Escherichia coli. Specifically, we utilized 13 C metabolic flux analysis (13 C-MFA to analyze the effect of perturbations to the expression levels of pgi and eno genes encoding phosphoglucose isomerase and enolase, respectively on metabolic fluxes. Results We constructed gene expression-controllable E. coli strains using a single-copy mini F plasmid. Using the pgi expression-controllable strain, we found that the specific growth rate correlated with the pgi expression level. 13 C-MFA of this strain revealed that the fluxes for the pentose phosphate pathway and Entner-Doudoroff pathway decreased, as the pgi expression lelvel increased. In addition, the glyoxylate shunt became active when the pgi expression level was almost zero. Moreover, the flux for the glyoxylate shunt increased when the pgi expression level decreased, but was significantly reduced in the pgi-knockout cells. Comparatively, eno expression could not be decreased compared to the parent strain, but we found that increased eno expression resulted in a decreased specific growth rate. 13 C-MFA revealed that the metabolic flux distribution was not altered by an increased eno expression level, but the overall metabolic activity of the central metabolism decreased. Furthermore, to evaluate the impact of perturbed expression of pgi and eno genes on changes in metabolic fluxes in E. coli quantitatively, metabolic sensitivity analysis was performed. As a result, the perturbed expression of pgi gene had a great impact to the

  2. A fuzzy logic controller based approach to model the switching mechanism of the mammalian central carbon metabolic pathway in normal and cancer cells.

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    Dasgupta, Abhijit; Paul, Debjyoti; De, Rajat K

    2016-07-19

    Dynamics of large nonlinear complex systems, like metabolic networks, depend on several parameters. A metabolic pathway may switch to another pathway in accordance with the current state of parameters in both normal and cancer cells. Here, most of the parameter values are unknown to us. A fuzzy logic controller (FLC) has been developed here for the purpose of modeling metabolic networks by approximating the reasons for the behaviour of a system and applying expert knowledge to track switching between metabolic pathways. The simulation results can track the switching between glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, as well as glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways (PPP) in normal cells. Unlike normal cells, pyruvate kinase (M2 isoform) (PKM2) switches alternatively between its two oligomeric forms, i.e. an active tetramer and a relatively low activity dimer, in cancer cells. Besides, there is a coordination among PKM2 switching and enzymes catalyzing PPP. These phenomena help cancer cells to maintain their high energy demand and macromolecular synthesis. However, the reduction of initial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to a very low concentration, decreasing initial glucose uptake, destroying coordination between glycolysis and PPP, and replacement of PKM2 by its relatively inactive oligomeric form (dimer) or inhibition of the translation of PKM2 may destabilize the mutated control mechanism of the mammalian central carbon metabolic (CCM) pathway in cancer cells. The performance of the model is compared appropriately with some existing ones. PMID:27225801

  3. Evidence for Central Regulation of Glucose Metabolism*

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, Michelle; Kehlenbrink, Sylvia; Hawkins, Meredith

    2013-01-01

    Evidence for central regulation of glucose homeostasis is accumulating from both animal and human studies. Central nutrient and hormone sensing in the hypothalamus appears to coordinate regulation of whole body metabolism. Central signals activate ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, thereby down-regulating glucose production, likely through vagal efferent signals. Recent human studies are consistent with this hypothesis. The contributions of direct and central inputs to metabolic regulat...

  4. Depletion of the "gamma-type carbonic anhydrase-like" subunits of complex I affects central mitochondrial metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, Steffanie; Göing, Jennifer; Lorenz, Christin; Peterhänsel, Christoph; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    "Gamma-type carbonic anhydrase-like" (CAL) proteins form part of complex I in plants. Together with "gamma carbonic anhydrase" (CA) proteins they form an extra domain which is attached to the membrane arm of complex I on its matrix exposed side. In Arabidopsis two CAL and three CA proteins are present, termed CAL1, CAL2, CA1, CA2 and CA3. It has been proposed that the carbonic anhydrase domain of complex I is involved in a process mediating efficient recycling of mitochondrial CO2 for photosynthetic carbon fixation which is especially important during growth conditions causing increased photorespiration. Depletion of CAL proteins has been shown to significantly affect plant development and photomorphogenesis. To better understand CAL function in plants we here investigated effects of CAL depletion on the mitochondrial compartment. In mutant lines and cell cultures complex I amount was reduced by 90-95% but levels of complexes III and V were unchanged. At the same time, some of the CA transcripts were less abundant. Proteome analysis of CAL depleted cells revealed significant reduction of complex I subunits as well as proteins associated with photorespiration, but increased amounts of proteins participating in amino acid catabolism and stress response reactions. Developmental delay of the mutants was slightly alleviated if plants were cultivated at high CO2. Profiling of selected metabolites revealed defined changes in intermediates of the citric acid cycle and amino acid catabolism. It is concluded that CAL proteins are essential for complex I assembly and that CAL depletion specifically affects central mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:26482706

  5. Metabolic syndrome and central retinal artery occlusion

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    Kosanović-Jaković Natalija

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The accumulation of risk factors for central retinal artery occlusion can be seen in a single person and might be explained by the metabolic syndrome. Case report. We presented the case of a 52-year-old man with no light perception in his right eye. The visual loss was monocular and painless, fundoscopy showed central retinal artery occlusion and the laboratory investigation showed the raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 105 mm/h and the raised C-reactive protein of 22 mg/l. Specific laboratory investigations and fluorescein angiography excluded the presence of vasculitis, collagen vascular diseases, hypercoagulable state and antiphospholipid syndrome. Conclusion. The patient met all the five of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP criteria for the metabolic syndrome: hypertension, abnormal lipid profile, abnormal glucose metabolism, obesity and hyperuricemia. Measurement of C-reactive protein is useful for the assessment of therapeutic systemic effect on any abnormality in the metabolic syndrome. Individual therapy for all risk factors in the metabolic syndrome is necessary to prevent complications such as cardiovascular, retinal vascular diseases and stroke.

  6. Metabolic syndrome and central retinal artery occlusion

    OpenAIRE

    Kosanović-Jaković Natalija; Petrović Lidija; Risimić Dijana; Milenković Svetislav; Matić Danica

    2005-01-01

    Background. The accumulation of risk factors for central retinal artery occlusion can be seen in a single person and might be explained by the metabolic syndrome. Case report. We presented the case of a 52-year-old man with no light perception in his right eye. The visual loss was monocular and painless, fundoscopy showed central retinal artery occlusion and the laboratory investigation showed the raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 105 mm/h and the raised C-reactive protein of 22 mg/l. ...

  7. Metabolic crosstalk between choline/1-carbon metabolism and energy homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Zeisel, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    There are multiple identified mechanisms involved in energy metabolism, insulin resistance and adiposity, but there are here-to-fore unsuspected metabolic factors that also influence these processes. Studies in animal models suggest important links between choline/1-carbon metabolism and energy homeostasis. Rodents fed choline deficient diets become hypermetabolic. Mice with deletions in one of several different genes of choline metabolism have phenotypes that include increa...

  8. Effects of Conservation Tillage on Topsoil Microbial Metabolic Characteristics and Organic Carbon within Aggregates under a Rice (Oryza sativa L.-Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Cropping System in Central China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Jin Guo

    Full Text Available Investigating microbial metabolic characteristics and soil organic carbon (SOC within aggregates and their relationships under conservation tillage may be useful in revealing the mechanism of SOC sequestration in conservation tillage systems. However, limited studies have been conducted to investigate the relationship between SOC and microbial metabolic characteristics within aggregate fractions under conservation tillage. We hypothesized that close relationships can exist between SOC and microbial metabolic characteristics within aggregates under conservation tillage. In this study, a field experiment was conducted from June 2011 to June 2013 following a split-plot design of a randomized complete block with tillage practices [conventional intensive tillage (CT and no tillage (NT] as main plots and straw returning methods [preceding crop residue returning (S, 2100-2500 kg C ha-1 and removal (NS, 0 kg C ha(-1] as subplots with three replications. The objective of this study was to reveal the effects of tillage practices and residue-returning methods on topsoil microbial metabolic characteristics and organic carbon (SOC fractions within aggregates and their relationships under a rice-wheat cropping system in central China. Microbial metabolic characteristics investigated using the Biolog system was examined within two aggregate fractions (>0.25 and 0.25 aggregate, and 0.25 mm aggregate (11.3%, and 0.25 mm aggregate, and 0.25 mm aggregate, and 0.25 and 0.25 mm aggregate in the upper (0-5 cm soil layer under conservation tillage systems, as well as directly and indirectly by promoting DOC and MBC in <0.25 mm aggregate. Our results suggested that conservation tillage increased SOC in aggregates in the topsoil by improving microbial metabolic activities.

  9. Metabolic crosstalk between choline/1-carbon metabolism and energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeisel, Steven H

    2013-03-01

    There are multiple identified mechanisms involved in energy metabolism, insulin resistance and adiposity, but there are here-to-fore unsuspected metabolic factors that also influence these processes. Studies in animal models suggest important links between choline/1-carbon metabolism and energy homeostasis. Rodents fed choline deficient diets become hypermetabolic. Mice with deletions in one of several different genes of choline metabolism have phenotypes that include increased metabolic rate, decreased body fat/lean mass ratio, increased insulin sensitivity, decreased ATP production by mitochondria, or decreased weight gain on a high fat diet. In addition, farmers have recognized that the addition of a metabolite of choline (betaine) to cattle and swine feed reduces body fat/lean mass ratio. Choline dietary intake in humans varies over a > three-fold range, and genetic variation exists that modifies individual requirements for this nutrient. Although there are some epidemiologic studies in humans suggesting a link between choline/1-carbon metabolism and energy metabolism, there have been no controlled studies in humans that were specifically designed to examine this relationship. PMID:23072856

  10. Niche-specific regulation of central metabolic pathways in a fungal pathogen

    OpenAIRE

    Barelle, Caroline J; Priest, Claire L; MacCallum, Donna M.; Gow, Neil AR; Odds, Frank C; Brown, Alistair JP

    2006-01-01

    Summary To establish an infection, the pathogen Candida albicans must assimilate carbon and grow in its mammalian host. This fungus assimilates six-carbon compounds via the glycolytic pathway, and two-carbon compounds via the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis. We address a paradox regarding the roles of these central metabolic pathways in C. albicans pathogenesis: the glyoxylate cycle is apparently required for virulence although glyoxylate cycle genes are repressed by glucose at concentra...

  11. Intracellular Acetyl Unit Transport in Fungal Carbon Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Strijbis, K.; Distel, B.

    2010-01-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is a central metabolite in carbon and energy metabolism. Because of its amphiphilic nature and bulkiness, acetyl-CoA cannot readily traverse biological membranes. In fungi, two systems for acetyl unit transport have been identified: a shuttle dependent on the carrier carnitine and a (peroxisomal) citrate synthase-dependent pathway. In the carnitine-dependent pathway, carnitine acetyltransferases exchange the CoA group of acetyl-CoA for carnitine, thereby forming...

  12. Dynamics in the Central Plant Cell Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Ampofo-Asiama, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    As part of their development, plants have acquired adaptive mechanisms to cope with different stress situations they encounter in their environment. These adaptive mechanisms include the ability to alter their metabolism when faced with extreme environmental conditions such as low oxygen. In higher plants, oxygen (O2) availability is important for energy production through respiratory metabolism. Under conditions where O2 becomes limiting, respiratory metabolism can be impeded leading to impa...

  13. Carbon metabolic pathways in phototrophic bacteria and their broader evolutionary implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-HsiangTang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis is the biological process that converts solar energy to biomass, bio-products and biofuel. It is the only major natural solar energy storage mechanism on Earth. To satisfy the increased demand for sustainable energy sources and identify the mechanism of photosynthetic carbon assimilation, which is one of the bottlenecks in photosynthesis, it is essential to understand the process of solar energy storage and associated carbon metabolism in photosynthetic organisms. Researchers have employed physiological studies, microbiological chemistry, enzyme assays, genome sequencing, transcriptomics, and 13C-based metabolomics/fluxomics to investigate central carbon metabolism and enzymes that operate in phototrophs. In this report, we review diverse CO2 assimilation pathways, acetate assimilation, carbohydrate catabolism, the TCA cycle and some key and/or unconventional enzymes in central carbon metabolism of phototrophic microorganisms. We also discuss the reducing equivalent flow during photoautotrophic and photoheterotrophic growth, evolutionary links in the central carbon metabolic network, and correlations between photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic organisms. Considering the metabolic versatility in these fascinating and diverse photosynthetic bacteria, many essential questions in their central carbon metabolism still remain to be addressed.

  14. A central role of abscisic acid in stress-regulated carbohydrate metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kempa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abiotic stresses adversely affect plant growth and development. The hormone abscisic acid (ABA plays a central role in the response and adaptation to environmental constraints. However, apart from the well established role of ABA in regulating gene expression programmes, little is known about its function in plant stress metabolism. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an integrative multiparallel approach of metabolome and transcriptome analyses, we studied the dynamic response of the model glyophyte Arabidopsis thaliana to ABA and high salt conditions. Our work shows that salt stress induces complex re-adjustment of carbohydrate metabolism and that ABA triggers the initial steps of carbon mobilisation. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings open new perspectives on how high salinity and ABA impact on central carbohydrate metabolism and highlight the power of iterative combinatorial approaches of non-targeted and hypothesis-driven experiments in stress biology.

  15. Metabolic carbon fluxes and biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates in Ralstonia eutropha on short chain fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jian; Si, Yingtao

    2004-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids such as acetic, propionic, and butyric acids can be synthesized into polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) by Ralstonia eutropha. Metabolic carbon fluxes of the acids in living cells have significant effect on the yield, composition, and thermomechanical properties of PHA bioplastics. Based on the general knowledge of central metabolism pathways and the unusual metabolic pathways in R. eutropha, a metabolic network of 41 bioreactions is constructed to analyze the carbon fluxes on utilization of the short chain fatty acids. In fed-batch cultures with constant feeding of acid media, carbon metabolism and distribution in R. eutropha were measured involving CO2, PHA biopolymers, and residual cell mass. As the cells underwent unsteady state metabolism and PHA biosynthesis under nitrogen-limited conditions, accumulative carbon balance was applied for pseudo-steady-state analysis of the metabolic carbon fluxes. Cofactor NADP/NADPH balanced between PHA synthesis and the C3/C4 pathway provided an independent constraint for solution of the underdetermined metabolic network. A major portion of propionyl-CoA was directed to pyruvate via the 2-methylcitrate cycle and further decarboxylated to acetyl-CoA. Only a small amount of propionate carbon (acetic acid in the medium. Malate is the node of the C3/C4 pathway and TCA cycle and its decarboxylation to dehydrogenation ranges from 0.33 to 1.28 in response to the demands on NADPH and oxaloacetate for short chain fatty acids utilization. PMID:15296425

  16. Flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in Geobactermetallireducens during reduction of solubleFe(III)-NTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Chakraborty, Romy; Garcia-Martin, Hector; Chu,Jeannie; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the carbon fluxes in the central metabolism ofGeobacter metallireducens strain GS-15 using 13C isotopomer modeling.Acetate labeled in the 1st or 2nd position was the sole carbon source,and Fe-NTA was the sole terminal electron acceptor. The measured labeledacetate uptake rate was 21 mmol/gdw/h in the exponential growth phase.The resulting isotope labeling pattern of amino acids allowed an accuratedetermination of the in vivo global metabolic reaction rates (fluxes)through the central metabolic pathways using a computational isotopomermodel. The tracer experiments showed that G. metallireducens containedcomplete biosynthesis pathways for essential metabolism, and this strainmight also have an unusual isoleucine biosynthesis route (usingacetyl-CoA and pyruvate as the precursors). The model indicated that over90 percent of the acetate was completely oxidized to CO2 via a completetricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle while reducing iron. Pyruvate carboxylaseand phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase were present under theseconditions, but enzymes in the glyoxylate shunt and malic enzyme wereabsent. Gluconeogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway were mainlyemployed for biosynthesis and accounted for less than 3 percent of totalcarbon consumption. The model also indicated surprisingly highreversibility in the reaction between oxoglutarate and succinate. Thisstep operates close to the thermodynamic equilibrium possibly becausesuccinate is synthesized via a transferase reaction, and the conversionof oxoglutarate to succinate is a rate limiting step for carbonmetabolism. These findings enable a better understanding of therelationship between genome annotation and extant metabolic pathways inG. metallireducens.

  17. Making metabolism accessible and meaningful: is the definition of a central metabolic dogma within reach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRossa, Robert A

    2015-04-01

    Intermediary metabolism, a dominant research area before the emergence of molecular biology, is attracting renewed interest for fundamental and applied reasons as documented here. Nonetheless, the field may appear to be a thicket precluding entry to all but the most determined. Here we present a metabolic overview that makes this important and fascinating area accessible to a broad range of the molecular biological and biotechnological communities that are being attracted to biological problems crying out for metabolic solutions. This is accomplished by identifying seven key concepts, a so-called metabolic central dogma, that provide a core understanding analogous to the "Central Dogma of Molecular Biology" which focused upon maintenance and flow of genetic information. PMID:25515796

  18. Integrating Kinetic Model of E. coli with Genome Scale Metabolic Fluxes Overcomes Its Open System Problem and Reveals Bistability in Central Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad A Mannan

    Full Text Available An understanding of the dynamics of the metabolic profile of a bacterial cell is sought from a dynamical systems analysis of kinetic models. This modelling formalism relies on a deterministic mathematical description of enzyme kinetics and their metabolite regulation. However, it is severely impeded by the lack of available kinetic information, limiting the size of the system that can be modelled. Furthermore, the subsystem of the metabolic network whose dynamics can be modelled is faced with three problems: how to parameterize the model with mostly incomplete steady state data, how to close what is now an inherently open system, and how to account for the impact on growth. In this study we address these challenges of kinetic modelling by capitalizing on multi-'omics' steady state data and a genome-scale metabolic network model. We use these to generate parameters that integrate knowledge embedded in the genome-scale metabolic network model, into the most comprehensive kinetic model of the central carbon metabolism of E. coli realized to date. As an application, we performed a dynamical systems analysis of the resulting enriched model. This revealed bistability of the central carbon metabolism and thus its potential to express two distinct metabolic states. Furthermore, since our model-informing technique ensures both stable states are constrained by the same thermodynamically feasible steady state growth rate, the ensuing bistability represents a temporal coexistence of the two states, and by extension, reveals the emergence of a phenotypically heterogeneous population.

  19. Engineering Plant One-Carbon Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Rhodes

    2005-02-09

    Primary and secondary metabolism intersect in the one-carbon (C1) area. Primary metabolism supplies most of the C1 units and competes with secondary metabolism for their use. This competition is potentially severe because secondary products such as lignin, alkaloids, and glycine betaine (GlyBet) require massive amounts of C1 units. Towards the goal of understanding how C1 metabolism is regulated at the metabolic and gene levels so as to successfully engineer C1 supply to match demand, we have: (1) cloned complete suites of C1 genes from maize and tobacco, and incorporated them into DNA arrays; (2) prepared antisense constructs and mutants engineered with alterations in C1 unit supply and demand; and (3) have quantified the impacts of these alterations on gene expression (using DNA arrays), and on metabolic fluxes (by combining isotope labeling, MS, NMR and computer modeling). Metabolic flux analysis and modeling in tobacco engineered for GlyBet synthesis by expressing choline oxidizing enzymes in either the chloroplast or cytosol, has shown that the choline biosynthesis network is rigid, and tends to resist large changes in C1 demand. A major constraint on engineering enhanced flux to GlyBet in tobacco is a low capacity of choline transport across the chloroplast envelope. Maize and sorghum mutants defective in GlyBet synthesis show greatly reduced flux of C1 units into choline in comparison to GlyBet-accumulating wildtypes, but this is not associated with altered expression of any of the C1 genes. Control of C1 flux to choline in tobacco, maize and sorghum appears to reside primarily at the level of N-methylation of phosphoethanolamine. A candidate signal for the control of this flux is the pool size of phosphocholine which down-regulates and feedback inhibits phosphoethanolamine N-methyltransferase. Methionine S-methyltransferase (MMT) catalyzes the synthesis of S-methylmethionine (SMM) from methionine (Met) and S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet). SMM can be

  20. Metabolic Fluxes in Corynebacterium glutamicum during Lysine Production with Sucrose as Carbon Source

    OpenAIRE

    Wittmann, Christoph; Kiefer, Patrick; Zelder, Oskar

    2004-01-01

    Metabolic fluxes in the central metabolism were determined for lysine-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 21526 with sucrose as a carbon source, providing an insight into molasses-based industrial production processes with this organism. For this purpose, 13C metabolic flux analysis with parallel studies on [1-13CFru]sucrose, [1-13CGlc]sucrose, and [13C6Fru]sucrose was carried out. C. glutamicum directed 27.4% of sucrose toward extracellular lysine. The strain exhibited a relatively hig...

  1. Metabolic regulation and maximal reaction optimization in the central metabolism of a yeast cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasbawati, Gunawan, A. Y.; Hertadi, R.; Sidarto, K. A.

    2015-03-01

    Regulation of fluxes in a metabolic system aims to enhance the production rates of biotechnologically important compounds. Regulation is held via modification the cellular activities of a metabolic system. In this study, we present a metabolic analysis of ethanol fermentation process of a yeast cell in terms of continuous culture scheme. The metabolic regulation is based on the kinetic formulation in combination with metabolic control analysis to indicate the key enzymes which can be modified to enhance ethanol production. The model is used to calculate the intracellular fluxes in the central metabolism of the yeast cell. Optimal control is then applied to the kinetic model to find the optimal regulation for the fermentation system. The sensitivity results show that there are external and internal control parameters which are adjusted in enhancing ethanol production. As an external control parameter, glucose supply should be chosen in appropriate way such that the optimal ethanol production can be achieved. For the internal control parameter, we find three enzymes as regulation targets namely acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, and alcohol dehydrogenase which reside in the acetaldehyde branch. Among the three enzymes, however, only acetaldehyde dehydrogenase has a significant effect to obtain optimal ethanol production efficiently.

  2. Transcript abundance on its own cannot be used to infer fluxes in central metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Jörg eSchwender; Christina eKönig; Matthias eKlapperstück; Nicolas eHeinzel; Eberhard eMunz; Inga eHebbelmann; Jordan O. Hay; Peter eDenolf; Stefanie De Bodt; Henning eRedestig; Evelyne eCaestecker; Peter M. Jakob; Ljudmilla eBorisjuk; Hardy eRolletschek

    2014-01-01

    An attempt has been made to define the extent to which metabolic flux in central plant metabolism is reflected by changes in the transcriptome and metabolome, based on an analysis of in vitro cultured immature embryos of two oilseed rape (Brassica napus) accessions which contrast for seed lipid accumulation. Metabolic flux analysis was used to constrain a flux balance metabolic model which included 671 biochemical and transport reactions within the central metabolism. This highly confident fl...

  3. Transcript abundance on its own cannot be used to infer fluxes in central metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Schwender, Jörg; König, Christina; Klapperstück, Matthias; Heinzel, Nicolas; Munz, Eberhard; Hebbelmann, Inga; Jordan O. Hay; Denolf, Peter; De Bodt, Stefanie; Redestig, Henning; Caestecker, Evelyne; Peter M. Jakob; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Rolletschek, Hardy

    2014-01-01

    An attempt has been made to define the extent to which metabolic flux in central plant metabolism is reflected by changes in the transcriptome and metabolome, based on an analysis of in vitro cultured immature embryos of two oilseed rape (Brassica napus) accessions which contrast for seed lipid accumulation. Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) was used to constrain a flux balance metabolic model which included 671 biochemical and transport reactions within the central metabolism. This highly confid...

  4. Quantitative Multilevel Analysis of Central Metabolism in Developing Oilseeds of Oilseed Rape During In Vitro Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwender, Jorg [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hebbelmann, Inga [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Heinzel, Nicholas [Leibniz Inst. of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Gatersleben (Germany); Hildebrandt, Tatjana [Univ. of Hannover (Germany); Rogers, Alistair [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Naik, Dhiraj [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Indian Inst. of Advanced Research Koba, Gujarat (India); Klapperstuck, Matthias [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Braun, Hans -Peter [Univ. of Hannover (Germany); Schreiber, Falk [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Univ. Halle-Wittenberg, Melbourne (Australia); Denolf, Peter [Bayer CropScience (Belgium); Borisjuk, Ljudmilla [Leibniz Inst. of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Gatersleben (Germany); Rolletschek, Hardy [Leibniz Inst. of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Gatersleben (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Seeds provide the basis for many food, feed, and fuel products. Continued increases in seed yield, composition, and quality require an improved understanding of how the developing seed converts carbon and nitrogen supplies into storage. Current knowledge of this process is often based on the premise that transcriptional regulation directly translates via enzyme concentration into flux. In an attempt to highlight metabolic control, we explore genotypic differences in carbon partitioning for in vitro cultured developing embryos of oilseed rape (Brassica napus). We determined biomass composition as well as 79 net fluxes, the levels of 77 metabolites, and 26 enzyme activities with specific focus on central metabolism in nine selected germplasm accessions. We observed a tradeoff between the biomass component fractions of lipid and starch. With increasing lipid content over the spectrum of genotypes, plastidic fatty acid synthesis and glycolytic flux increased concomitantly, while glycolytic intermediates decreased. The lipid/starch tradeoff was not reflected at the proteome level, pointing to the significance of (posttranslational) metabolic control. Enzyme activity/flux and metabolite/flux correlations suggest that plastidic pyruvate kinase exerts flux control and that the lipid/starch tradeoff is most likely mediated by allosteric feedback regulation of phosphofructokinase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Also, quantitative data were used to calculate in vivo mass action ratios, reaction equilibria, and metabolite turnover times. Compounds like cyclic 3',5'-AMP and sucrose-6-phosphate were identified to potentially be involved in so far unknown mechanisms of metabolic control. This study provides a rich source of quantitative data for those studying central metabolism..

  5. Quantitative Multilevel Analysis of Central Metabolism in Developing Oilseeds of Oilseed Rape during in Vitro Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwender, Jörg; Hebbelmann, Inga; Heinzel, Nicolas; Hildebrandt, Tatjana; Rogers, Alistair; Naik, Dhiraj; Klapperstück, Matthias; Braun, Hans-Peter; Schreiber, Falk; Denolf, Peter; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Rolletschek, Hardy

    2015-07-01

    Seeds provide the basis for many food, feed, and fuel products. Continued increases in seed yield, composition, and quality require an improved understanding of how the developing seed converts carbon and nitrogen supplies into storage. Current knowledge of this process is often based on the premise that transcriptional regulation directly translates via enzyme concentration into flux. In an attempt to highlight metabolic control, we explore genotypic differences in carbon partitioning for in vitro cultured developing embryos of oilseed rape (Brassica napus). We determined biomass composition as well as 79 net fluxes, the levels of 77 metabolites, and 26 enzyme activities with specific focus on central metabolism in nine selected germplasm accessions. Overall, we observed a tradeoff between the biomass component fractions of lipid and starch. With increasing lipid content over the spectrum of genotypes, plastidic fatty acid synthesis and glycolytic flux increased concomitantly, while glycolytic intermediates decreased. The lipid/starch tradeoff was not reflected at the proteome level, pointing to the significance of (posttranslational) metabolic control. Enzyme activity/flux and metabolite/flux correlations suggest that plastidic pyruvate kinase exerts flux control and that the lipid/starch tradeoff is most likely mediated by allosteric feedback regulation of phosphofructokinase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Quantitative data were also used to calculate in vivo mass action ratios, reaction equilibria, and metabolite turnover times. Compounds like cyclic 3',5'-AMP and sucrose-6-phosphate were identified to potentially be involved in so far unknown mechanisms of metabolic control. This study provides a rich source of quantitative data for those studying central metabolism. PMID:25944824

  6. Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-07-12

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism was held at Connecticut College, New London, Connecticut. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  7. An Integrative Approach to Energy, Carbon, and Redox Metabolism in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Special Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbeek, R.

    2003-06-30

    The main objectives for the first year were to produce a detailed metabolic reconstruction of synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 especially in interrelated areas of photosynthesis, respiration, and central carbon metabolism to support a more complete understanding and modeling of this organism. Additionally, Integrated Genomics, Inc., provided detailed bioinformatic analysis of selected functional systems related to carbon and energy generation and utilization, and of the corresponding pathways, functional roles and individual genes to support wet lab experiments by collaborators.

  8. One Carbon Metabolism, Fetal Growth and Long Term Consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Kalhan, Satish C.

    2013-01-01

    One carbon metabolism, or methyl transfer, is critical for metabolism in all cells, is involved in the synthesis of purines, pyrimidines, in the methylation of numerous substrates, proteins, DNA and RNA, and in the expression of a number of genes. Serine is the primary endogenous methyl donor to the one carbon pool. Perturbations in methyl transfer due to nutrient and hormonal changes can have profound effect on cell function, growth and proliferation. It is postulated that at critical stages...

  9. Central metabolic pathways of Aureobasidium pullulans CGMCC1234 for pullulan production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Long; Liu, Chang; Tong, Qunyi; Ma, Meihu

    2015-12-10

    With the purpose of understanding the metabolic network of Aureobasidium pullulans, the central metabolic pathways were confirmed by the activities of the key enzymes involved in different pathways. The effect of different iodoacetic acid concentrations on pullulan fermentation was also investigated in this paper. The activities of phosphofructokinases and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase existed in A. pullulans CGMCC1234, whereas 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate aldolase activity was not detected. We proposed that the central metabolic pathways of A. pullulans CGMCC1234 included EMP and PPP, but no ED. Pullulan production declined fast as the iodoacetic acid increased, while cell growth offered upgrade firstly than descending latter tendency. Compared to the control group, the ratio of ATP/ADP of 0.60 mM iodoacetic acid group was lower at different stages of pullulan fermentation. The findings revealed that low concentration of iodoacetic acid might impel carbon flux flow toward the PPP, but reduce the flux of the EMP. PMID:26428132

  10. Biochemical Hypermedia: Glucose as a Central Molecule in Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Sugai

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The technologies of information, together with education resources, have been pointed out as a solution to the improvement of teaching approach, but they still claim for programs to fulfill the demands of didactic materials. So, a biochemical software was developed aiming to contribute for the better understanding of the glycolysis. It was prepared with the help of concept maps, ISIS Draw, ADOBE Photoshop and FLASH MX Program. The introduction screen shows a teacher in a theater presenting glucose as a central molecule in the metabolism of animals, plants and many microorganisms. She invites for a better knowledge of glucose through a view of its discovery and its metabolism. A step by step animation process shows the interaction of glucose in aerobic conditions with the enzymes of the glycolytic pathways and its products. An explanation text of each enzyme catalytic process is provided by links. A static pathway is always available through a link. The fates of pyruvate yielding lactic acid and ethanol under anaerobic conditions are shown as well. The overall reactions of gluconeogenesis and the functional significance of this pathway are presented. The experimental treatment involved the presentation of this hypermedia for Nutrition undergraduate students (UFSC as a tool for better comprehension of the theme. The students revealed that it was extremely effective in promoting the understanding of the enzymatic mechanisms involved in glycolysis. This suggests that there is a significant added value in employing the software as an instructional effort to enhance student’s abilities to understand biochemical pathways.

  11. Neural-metabolic coupling in the central visual pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ralph D; Li, Baowang

    2016-10-01

    Studies are described which are intended to improve our understanding of the primary measurements made in non-invasive neural imaging. The blood oxygenation level-dependent signal used in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) reflects changes in deoxygenated haemoglobin. Tissue oxygen concentration, along with blood flow, changes during neural activation. Therefore, measurements of tissue oxygen together with the use of a neural sensor can provide direct estimates of neural-metabolic interactions. We have used this relationship in a series of studies in which a neural microelectrode is combined with an oxygen micro-sensor to make simultaneous co-localized measurements in the central visual pathway. Oxygen responses are typically biphasic with small initial dips followed by large secondary peaks during neural activation. By the use of established visual response characteristics, we have determined that the oxygen initial dip provides a better estimate of local neural function than the positive peak. This contrasts sharply with fMRI for which the initial dip is unreliable. To extend these studies, we have examined the relationship between the primary metabolic agents, glucose and lactate, and associated neural activity. For this work, we also use a Doppler technique to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) together with neural activity. Results show consistent synchronously timed changes such that increases in neural activity are accompanied by decreases in glucose and simultaneous increases in lactate. Measurements of CBF show clear delays with respect to neural response. This is consistent with a slight delay in blood flow with respect to oxygen delivery during neural activation.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574310

  12. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle.

  13. Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism 2008 Gordon Research Conference (July 20-25, 2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen W. Ragsdale

    2009-08-12

    One-carbon (C-1) compounds play a central role in microbial metabolism. C-1 compounds include methane, carbon monoxide, CO2, and methanol as well as coenzyme-bound one-carbon compounds (methyl-B12, CH3-H4folate, etc). Such compounds are of broad global importance because several C-1 compounds (e.g., CH4) are important energy sources, some (e.g., CO2 and CH4) are potent greenhouse gases, and others (e.g., CH2Cl2) are xenobiotics. They are central in pathways of energy metabolism and carbon fixation by microbes and many are of industrial interest. Research on the pathways of one-carbon metabolism has added greatly to our understanding of evolution, structural biology, enzyme mechanisms, gene regulation, ecology, and applied biology. The 2008 meeting will include recent important findings in the following areas: (a) genomics, metagenomics, and proteomic studies that have expanded our understanding of autotrophy and C-1 metabolism and the evolution of these pathways; (b) redox regulation of carbon cycles and the interrelationship between the carbon cycle and other biogeochemical cycles (sulfur, nitrogen, oxygen); (c) novel pathways for carbon assimilation; (d) biotechnology related to C-1 metabolism; (e) novel enzyme mechanisms including channeling of C-1 intermediates during metabolism; and (f) the relationship between metal homeostasis and the global carbon cycle. The conference has a diverse and gender-balanced slate of speakers and session leaders. The wide variety of disciplines brought to the study of C-1 metabolism make the field an excellent one in which to train young researchers.

  14. Central versus peripheral cardiovascular risk in metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.KevinShoemaker

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS; i.e. 3 of 5 of the following risk factors (RFs: elevated blood pressure, waist circumference, triglycerides, blood glucose or reduced HDL are thought to be prone to serious cardiovascular disease and there is debate as to whether the disease begins in the peripheral vasculature or centrally. This study investigates hemodynamics, cardiac function/morphology, as well as mechanical properties of the central (heart, carotid artery and peripheral (total peripheral resistance, forearm vascular bed vasculature in individuals without (1-2 RFs; n=28, or with (≥3 RFs; n=46 MetS. After adjustments for statin and blood pressure medication use, those with MetS had lower mitral valve E/A ratios (<3 RFs: 1.24±0.07; ≥3 RFs: 1.01±0.04; P=0.025, and higher total peripheral resistance index (<3 RFs: 48±2 mmHg/L/min/m2; ≥3 RFs: 53±2 mmHg/L/min/m2; P=0.04. There were no differences in heart size, carotid artery measurements, cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity, pulse wave velocity, stroke volume index, or cardiac output index due to MetS after adjustments for statin and blood pressure medication use. In a separate analysis, the use of statins was associated with increased inertia in the brachial vascular bed, increased HbA1c and decreased LDL cholesterol. The independent use of anti-hypertensive medication was associated with decreased predicted VO2max, triglycerides, diastolic blood pressure, interventricular septum thickness, calculated left ventricle mass, left ventricle posterior wall thickness, and left ventricle pre-ejection period, but increased carotid stiffness, HDL cholesterol, and heart rate. These data imply that both a central cardiac effect and a peripheral effect of vascular resistance are expressed in MetS. These data also indicate that variance in between-group responses due to pharmacological treatments are important factors to consider in studying cardiovascular changes in these individuals.

  15. Preferential use of central metabolism in vivo reveals a nutritional basis for polymicrobial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Alteri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The human genitourinary tract is a common anatomical niche for polymicrobial infection and a leading site for the development of bacteremia and sepsis. Most uncomplicated, community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI are caused by Escherichia coli, while another bacterium, Proteus mirabilis, is more often associated with complicated UTI. Here, we report that uropathogenic E. coli and P. mirabilis have divergent requirements for specific central pathways in vivo despite colonizing and occupying the same host environment. Using mutants of specific central metabolism enzymes, we determined glycolysis mutants lacking pgi, tpiA, pfkA, or pykA all have fitness defects in vivo for P. mirabilis but do not affect colonization of E. coli during UTI. Similarly, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway is required only for P. mirabilis in vivo. In contrast, gluconeogenesis is required only for E. coli fitness in vivo. The remarkable difference in central pathway utilization between E. coli and P. mirabilis during experimental UTI was also observed for TCA cycle mutants in sdhB, fumC, and frdA. The distinct in vivo requirements between these pathogens suggest E. coli and P. mirabilis are not direct competitors within host urinary tract nutritional niche. In support of this, we found that co-infection with E. coli and P. mirabilis wild-type strains enhanced bacterial colonization and persistence of both pathogens during UTI. Our results reveal that complementary utilization of central carbon metabolism facilitates polymicrobial disease and suggests microbial activity in vivo alters the host urinary tract nutritional niche.

  16. Carbon and energy metabolism of atp mutants of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Michelsen, Ole

    1992-01-01

    The membrane-bound H+-ATPase plays a key role in free-energy transduction of biological systems. We report how the carbon and energy metabolism of Escherichia coli changes in response to deletion of the atp operon that encodes this enzyme. Compared with the isogenic wild-type strain, the growth...

  17. Carbon conversion and metabolic rate in two marine sponges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, M.; Van Rijswijk, P.; Martens, D.; Egorova-Zachernyuk, T.A.; Middelburg, J.J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2011-01-01

    The carbon metabolism of two marine sponges, Haliclona oculata and Dysidea avara, has been studied using a 13C isotope pulse-chase approach. The sponges were fed 13C-labeled diatoms (Skeletonema costatum) for 8 h and they took up between 75 and 85%. At different times, sponges were sampled for total

  18. Computer Modeling of Carbon Metabolism Enables Biofuel Engineering (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-09-01

    In an effort to reduce the cost of biofuels, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has merged biochemistry with modern computing and mathematics. The result is a model of carbon metabolism that will help researchers understand and engineer the process of photosynthesis for optimal biofuel production.

  19. Photosynthetic carbon metabolism in Enteromorpha compressa (Chlorophyta)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, S.; Shragge, B.

    1987-12-01

    The intertidal macroalga Enteromorpha compressa showed the ability to use HCO/sub 3//sup -/, as an exogenous inorganic carbon (Ci) source for photosynthesis. However, although the natural sea water concentration of this carbon form was saturating, additional CO/sub 2/ above ambient Ci levels doubled net photosynthetic rates. Therefore, the productivity of this alga, when submerged, is likely to be limited by Ci. When plants were exposed to air, photosynthetic rates saturated at air-levels of CO/sub 2/ during mild desiccation. Based on carbon fixing enzyme activities and Ci pulse-chase incorporation patterns, it was found that Enteromorpha is a C/sub 3/ plant. However, this alga did not show O/sub 2/ inhibited photosynthetic rates at natural sea water Ci conditions. It is suggested that such a C/sub 4/-like gas exchange response is due to the HCO/sub 3//sup -/ utilization system concentrating CO/sub 2/ intracellularly, thus alleviating apparent photorespiration.

  20. Transcript abundance on its own cannot be used to infer fluxes in central metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg eSchwender

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made to define the extent to which metabolic flux in central plant metabolism is reflected by changes in the transcriptome and metabolome, based on an analysis of in vitro cultured immature embryos of two oilseed rape (Brassica napus accessions which contrast for seed lipid accumulation. Metabolic flux analysis was used to constrain a flux balance metabolic model which included 671 biochemical and transport reactions within the central metabolism. This highly confident flux information was eventually used for comparative analysis of flux versus transcript (metabolite. Metabolite profiling succeeded in identifying 79 intermediates within the central metabolism, some of which differed quantitatively between the two accessions and displayed a significant shift corresponding to flux. An RNA-Seq based transcriptome analysis revealed a large number of genes which were differentially transcribed in the two accessions, including some enzymes/proteins active in major metabolic pathways. With a few exceptions, differential activity in the major pathways (glycolysis, TCA cycle, amino acid and fatty acid synthesis was not reflected in contrasting abundances of the relevant transcripts. The conclusion was that transcript abundance on its own cannot be used to infer metabolic activity/fluxes in central plant metabolism. This limitation needs to be borne in mind in evaluating transcriptome data and designing metabolic engineering experiments.

  1. Flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in the Fe(III)-reducing organism Geobacter metallireducens via 13C isotopiclabeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Chakraborty, Romy; Martin, Hector Garcia; Chu,Jeannie; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-08-13

    We analyzed the carbon fluxes in the central metabolism ofGeobacter metallireducens strain GS-15 using 13C isotopomer modeling.Acetate labeled in the 1st or 2nd position was the sole carbon source,and Fe-NTA was the sole terminal electron acceptor. The measured labeledacetate uptake rate was 21 mmol/gdw/h in the exponential growth phase.The resulting isotope labeling pattern of amino acids allowed an accuratedetermination of the in vivo global metabolic reaction rates (fluxes)through the central metabolic pathways using a computational isotopomermodel. The model indicated that over 90 percent of the acetate wascompletely oxidized to CO2 via a complete tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cyclewhile reducing iron. Pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxykinase were present under these conditions, but enzymes in theglyoxylate shunt and malic enzyme were absent. Gluconeogenesis and thepentose phosphate pathway were mainly employed for biosynthesis andaccounted for less than 3 percent of total carbon consumption. The modelalso indicated surprisingly high reversibility in the reaction betweenoxoglutarate and succinate. This step operates close to the thermodynamicequilibrium possibly because succinate is synthesized via a transferasereaction, and its product, acetyl-CoA, inhibits the conversion ofoxoglutarate to succinate. These findings enable a better understandingof the relationship between genome annotation and extant metabolicpathways in G. metallireducens.

  2. Carbonate platform growth and demise offshore Central Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fyhn, Michael B.W.; Boldreel, Lars Ole; Nielsen, Lars H.;

    2013-01-01

    . East of the fault zone, the Triton Carbonate Platform was also initiated during the Early Miocene. Carbonate growth thrived during Early and part of Middle Miocene time and a thick, clean Lower and Middle Miocene carbonate succession cover the Triton Horst and the Qui Nhon Ridge. During the Middle......Miocene carbonate platforms cover a large part of the Central Vietnamese South China Sea margin. Early carbonate deposition took place on two regional platforms separated by a narrow depression developed along the trace of the East Vietnam Boundary Fault Zone. West of the East Vietnam Boundary...... Fault Zone, the Tuy Hoa Carbonate Platform fringes the continental margin between Da Nang and Nha Trang. Here, platform growth initiated during the Early Miocene and continued until Middle Miocene time when regional uplift led to subaerial exposure, termination of platform growth and karstification...

  3. Carbon conversion and metabolic rate in two marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmans, M; van Rijswijk, P; Martens, D; Egorova-Zachernyuk, T A; Middelburg, J J; Wijffels, R H

    2011-01-01

    The carbon metabolism of two marine sponges, Haliclona oculata and Dysidea avara, has been studied using a (13)C isotope pulse-chase approach. The sponges were fed (13)C-labeled diatoms (Skeletonema costatum) for 8 h and they took up between 75 and 85%. At different times, sponges were sampled for total (13)C enrichment, and fatty acid (FA) composition and (13)C enrichment. Algal biomarkers present in the sponges were highly labeled after feeding but their labeling levels decreased until none was left 10 days after enrichment. The sponge-specific FAs incorporated (13)C label already during the first day and the amount of (13)C label inside these FAs kept increasing until 3 weeks after labeling. The algal-derived carbon captured by the sponges during the 8-h feeding period was thus partly respired and partly metabolized during the weeks following. Apparently, sponges are able to capture enough food during short periods to sustain longer-term metabolism. The change of carbon metabolic rate of fatty acid synthesis due to mechanical damage of sponge tissue was studied by feeding sponges with (13)C isotope-labeled diatom (Pheaodactylum tricornutum) either after or before damaging and tracing back the (13)C content in the damaged and healthy tissue. The filtration and respiration in both sponges responded quickly to damage. The rate of respiration in H. oculata reduced immediately after damage, but returned to its initial level after 6 h. The (13)C data revealed that H. oculata has a higher metabolic rate in the tips where growth occurs compared to the rest of the tissue and that the metabolic rate is increased after damage of the tissue. For D. avara, no differences were found between damaged and non-damaged tissue. However, the filtration rate decreased directly after damage. PMID:24489407

  4. Carbon metabolism of the cryptoendolithic microbiota from the Antarctic desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestal, J. R.; Friedmann, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1988-01-01

    The carbon metabolism of the cryptoendolithic microbiota of sandstones from the Ross Desert of Antarctica was studied in situ and in vitro. Organic and inorganic carbon compounds were metabolized by the microbiota, with bicarbonate incorporation into community lipids occurring primarily in the light. Light intensity affected the photometabolism of carbon with a photosynthesis-intensity response optimum at about 200 to 300 micromoles of photons per m2 per s. Photosynthesis was also affected by temperature, with a minimum activity at -5 degrees C, an optimum activity at 15 degrees C, and complete inhibition at 35 degrees C, indicating that the cryptoendolithic community was psychrophilic. The primary source of CO2 for photosynthesis in situ was the atmosphere. CO2 may also be photometabolized by using the carbon produced from respiration within the endolithic community. Photosynthesis occurred maximally when the microbiota was wet with liquid water and to a lesser extent in a humid atmosphere. This simple microbial community, therefore, exists under extremes of water, light, and temperature stress which affect and control its metabolism.

  5. Anaerobic central metabolic pathways active during polyhydroxyalkanoate production in uncultured cluster 1 Defluviicoccus enriched in activated sludge communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burow, Luke C; Mabbett, Amanda N; Borrás, Luis; Blackall, Linda L

    2009-09-01

    A glycogen nonpolyphosphate-accumulating organism (GAO) enrichment culture dominated by the Alphaproteobacteria cluster 1 Defluviicoccus was investigated to determine the metabolic pathways involved in the anaerobic formation of polyhydroxyalkanoates, carbon storage polymers important for the proliferation of microorganisms in enhanced biological phosphorus removal processes. FISH-microautoradiography and post-FISH fluorescent chemical staining confirmed acetate assimilation as polyhydroxyalkanoates in cluster 1 Defluviicoccus under anaerobic conditions. Chemical inhibition of glycolysis using iodoacetate, and of isocitrate lyase by 3-nitropropionate and itaconate, indicated that carbon is likely to be channelled through both glycolysis and the glyoxylate cycle in cluster 1 Defluviicoccus. The effect of metabolic inhibitors of aconitase (monofluoroacetate) and succinate dehydrogenase (malonate) suggested that aconitase, but not succinate dehydrogenase, was active, providing further support for the role of the glyoxylate cycle in these GAOs. Metabolic inhibition of fumarate reductase using oxantel decreased polyhydroxyalkanoate production. This indicated reduction of fumarate to succinate and the operation of the reductive branch of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which is possibly important in the production of the polyhydroxyvalerate component of polyhydroxyalkanoates observed in cluster 1 Defluviicoccus enrichment cultures. These findings were integrated with previous metabolic models for GAOs and enabled an anaerobic central metabolic pathway model for polyhydroxyalkanoate formation in cluster 1 Defluviicoccus to be proposed. PMID:19622073

  6. Metabolism of various carbon sources by Azospirillum brasilense.

    OpenAIRE

    Westby, C A; Cutshall, D S; Vigil, G V

    1983-01-01

    Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 and two mutants were examined for 19 carbon metabolism enzymes. The results indicate that this nitrogen fixer uses the Entner-Doudoroff pathway for gluconate dissimilation, lacks a catabolic but has an anabolic Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas hexosephosphate pathway, has amphibolic triosephosphate enzymes, lacks a hexose monophosphate shunt, and has lactate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, and glycerokinase. The mutants are severely deficient in phosphoglycerate and pyr...

  7. Mitochondrial dysfunction remodels one-carbon metabolism in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoyan Robert; Ong, Shao-En; Goldberger, Olga; Peng, Jun; Sharma, Rohit; Thompson, Dawn A; Vafai, Scott B; Cox, Andrew G; Marutani, Eizo; Ichinose, Fumito; Goessling, Wolfram; Regev, Aviv; Carr, Steven A; Clish, Clary B; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with a spectrum of human disorders, ranging from rare, inborn errors of metabolism to common, age-associated diseases such as neurodegeneration. How these lesions give rise to diverse pathology is not well understood, partly because their proximal consequences have not been well-studied in mammalian cells. Here we provide two lines of evidence that mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction leads to alterations in one-carbon metabolism pathways. First, using hypothesis-generating metabolic, proteomic, and transcriptional profiling, followed by confirmatory experiments, we report that mitochondrial DNA depletion leads to an ATF4-mediated increase in serine biosynthesis and transsulfuration. Second, we show that lesioning the respiratory chain impairs mitochondrial production of formate from serine, and that in some cells, respiratory chain inhibition leads to growth defects upon serine withdrawal that are rescuable with purine or formate supplementation. Our work underscores the connection between the respiratory chain and one-carbon metabolism with implications for understanding mitochondrial pathogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10575.001 PMID:27307216

  8. Fatty Acids in Energy Metabolism of the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Panov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we analyze the current hypotheses regarding energy metabolism in the neurons and astroglia. Recently, it was shown that up to 20% of the total brain’s energy is provided by mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids. However, the existing hypotheses consider glucose, or its derivative lactate, as the only main energy substrate for the brain. Astroglia metabolically supports the neurons by providing lactate as a substrate for neuronal mitochondria. In addition, a significant amount of neuromediators, glutamate and GABA, is transported into neurons and also serves as substrates for mitochondria. Thus, neuronal mitochondria may simultaneously oxidize several substrates. Astrocytes have to replenish the pool of neuromediators by synthesis de novo, which requires large amounts of energy. In this review, we made an attempt to reconcile β-oxidation of fatty acids by astrocytic mitochondria with the existing hypothesis on regulation of aerobic glycolysis. We suggest that, under condition of neuronal excitation, both metabolic pathways may exist simultaneously. We provide experimental evidence that isolated neuronal mitochondria may oxidize palmitoyl carnitine in the presence of other mitochondrial substrates. We also suggest that variations in the brain mitochondrial metabolic phenotype may be associated with different mtDNA haplogroups.

  9. Invariability of Central Metabolic Flux Distribution in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Under Environmental or Genetic Perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie; Martin, Hector Garcia; Deutschbauer, Adam; Feng, Xueyang; Huang, Rick; Llora, Xavier; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-04-21

    An environmentally important bacterium with versatile respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, displayed significantly different growth rates under three culture conditions: minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 3 hrs), salt stressed minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 6 hrs), and minimal medium with amino acid supplementation (doubling time {approx}1.5 hrs). {sup 13}C-based metabolic flux analysis indicated that fluxes of central metabolic reactions remained relatively constant under the three growth conditions, which is in stark contrast to the reported significant changes in the transcript and metabolite profiles under various growth conditions. Furthermore, ten transposon mutants of S. oneidensis MR-1 were randomly chosen from a transposon library and their flux distributions through central metabolic pathways were revealed to be identical, even though such mutational processes altered the secondary metabolism, for example, glycine and C1 (5,10-Me-THF) metabolism.

  10. An integrative approach to energy, carbon, and redox metabolism in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbeek, Ross; Fonstein, Veronika; Osterman, Andrei; Gerdes, Svetlana; Vassieva, Olga; Zagnitko, Olga; Rodionov, Dmitry

    2005-02-15

    covering energy, carbon, and redox metabolism in the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and other cyanobacteria has been performed (Specific Aim 4). The main objectives for this year (adjusted to reflect a new, public domain, setting of the Project research team) were: Aim 1. To develop, test, and deploy a new open source system, the SEED, for integrating community-based annotation, and comparative analysis of all publicly available microbial genomes. Develop a comprehensive genomic database by integrating within SEED all publicly available complete and nearly complete genome sequences with special emphasis on genomes of cyanobacteria, phototrophic eukaryotes, and anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria--invaluable for comparative genomic studies of energy and carbon metabolism in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Aim 2. To develop the SEED's biological content in the form of a collection of encoded Subsystems largely covering the conserved cellular machinery in prokaryotes (and central metabolic machinery in eukaryotes). Aim 3. To develop, utilizing core SEED technology, the CyanoSEED--a specialized WEB portal for community-based annotation, and comparative analysis of all publicly available cyanobacterial genomes. Encode the set of additional subsystems representing key metabolic transformations in cyanobacteria and other photoautotrophs. We envisioned this resource as complementary to other public access databases for comparative genomic analysis currently available to the cyanobacterial research community. Aim 4. Perform in-depth analysis of several subsystems covering energy, carbon, and redox metabolism in the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and all other cyanobacteria with available genome sequences. Reveal inconsistencies and gaps in the current knowledge of these subsystems. Use functional and genome context analysis tools in CyanoSEED to predict, whenever possible, candidate genes for inferred functional roles. To disseminate freely these conjectures and predictions by publishing

  11. Carbon and energy metabolism of atp mutants of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Michelsen, Ole

    1992-01-01

    The membrane-bound H+-ATPase plays a key role in free-energy transduction of biological systems. We report how the carbon and energy metabolism of Escherichia coli changes in response to deletion of the atp operon that encodes this enzyme. Compared with the isogenic wild-type strain, the growth...... rate and growth yield were decreased less than expected for a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis alone as a source of ATP. Moreover, the respiration rate of a atp deletion strain was increased by 40% compared with the wild-type strain. This result is surprising, since the atp deletion...

  12. Integrated in silico Analyses of Regulatory and Metabolic Networks of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 Reveal Relationships between Gene Centrality and Essentiality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Seob Song

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria dynamically relay environmental inputs to intracellular adaptations through a coordinated adjustment of photosynthetic efficiency and carbon processing rates. The output of such adaptations is reflected through changes in transcriptional patterns and metabolic flux distributions that ultimately define growth strategy. To address interrelationships between metabolism and regulation, we performed integrative analyses of metabolic and gene co-expression networks in a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Centrality analyses using the gene co-expression network identified a set of key genes, which were defined here as “topologically important.” Parallel in silico gene knock-out simulations, using the genome-scale metabolic network, classified what we termed as “functionally important” genes, deletion of which affected growth or metabolism. A strong positive correlation was observed between topologically and functionally important genes. Functionally important genes exhibited variable levels of topological centrality; however, the majority of topologically central genes were found to be functionally essential for growth. Subsequent functional enrichment analysis revealed that both functionally and topologically important genes in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 are predominantly associated with translation and energy metabolism, two cellular processes critical for growth. This research demonstrates how synergistic network-level analyses can be used for reconciliation of metabolic and gene expression data to uncover fundamental biological principles.

  13. Windthrows increase soil carbon stocks in a central Amazon forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Leandro T.; Magnabosco Marra, Daniel; Trumbore, Susan; de Camargo, Plínio B.; Negrón-Juárez, Robinson I.; Lima, Adriano J. N.; Ribeiro, Gabriel H. P. M.; dos Santos, Joaquim; Higuchi, Niro

    2016-03-01

    Windthrows change forest structure and species composition in central Amazon forests. However, the effects of widespread tree mortality associated with wind disturbances on soil properties have not yet been described in this vast region. We investigated short-term effects (7 years after disturbance) of widespread tree mortality caused by a squall line event from mid-January of 2005 on soil carbon stocks and concentrations in a central Amazon terra firme forest. The soil carbon stock (averaged over a 0-30 cm depth profile) in disturbed plots (61.4 ± 8.2 Mg ha-1, mean ±95 % confidence interval) was marginally higher (p = 0.09) than that from undisturbed plots (47.7 ± 13.6 Mg ha-1). The soil organic carbon concentration in disturbed plots (2.0 ± 0.17 %) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than that from undisturbed plots (1.36 ± 0.24 %). Moreover, soil carbon stocks were positively correlated with soil clay content (r2 = 0.332, r = 0.575 and p = 0.019) and with tree mortality intensity (r2 = 0.257, r = 0.506 and p = 0.045). Our results indicate that large inputs of plant litter associated with large windthrow events cause a short-term increase in soil carbon content, and the degree of increase is related to soil clay content and tree mortality intensity. The higher carbon content and potentially higher nutrient availability in soils from areas recovering from windthrows may favor forest regrowth and increase vegetation resilience.

  14. Carbon Metabolism Enzymes of Rhizobium tropici Cultures and Bacteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, V I; Hernández-Lucas, I; Martínez-Romero, E

    1994-07-01

    We determined the activities of selected enzymes involved in carbon metabolism in free-living cells of Rhizobium tropici CFN299 grown in minimal medium with different carbon sources and in bacteroids of the same strain. The set of enzymatic activities in sucrose-grown cells suggests that the pentose phosphate pathway, with the participation of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway, is probably the primary route for sugar catabolism. In glutamate- and malate-grown cells, high activities of the gluconeogenic enzymes (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose-6-phosphate aldolase, and fructose bisphosphatase) were detected. In bacteroids, isolated in Percoll gradients, the levels of activity for many of the enzymes measured were similar to those of malate-grown cells, except that higher activities of glucokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and NAD-dependent phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were detected. Phosphoglucomutase and UDP glucose pyrophosphorylase showed high and constant levels under all growth conditions and in bacteroids. PMID:16349319

  15. Ecophysiology of terminal carbon metabolizing bacteria in anoxic sedimentary environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical, radiotracer, and microbiological experiments were used to understand the transformation of simple carbon compounds by anaerobic bacteria in diverse aquatic sediments and laboratory cultures. The mildly acidic sediments of Knack Lake (pH 6.2), displayed low rates of organic decomposition, and methane formation occurred almost exclusively from acetate. Low pH inhibited methanogenesis and organic decomposition. Fall turnover in Lake Mendota sediments was associated with dramatic changes in environmental parameters including: elevated concentrations of sulfate and carbon metabolites, increased rates of sulfate reduction, decreased levels of methanogenesis, increased ratio (by viable counts) of sulfate reducing to methanogenic bacteria, and higher 14CO2/14C4 + 14CO2 gas ratios produced during the biodegradation of 14C-carbon substrates (e.g., acetate and methanol). Hydrogen consumption by sulfate reducers in Lake Mendota sediments and in co-cultures of Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Methanosarcina barkeri led to an alteration in the carbon and electron flow pathway resulting in increased CO2, sulfide production, and decreased methanogenesis. These data agreed with the environmental observations in Lake Mendota that high sulfate concentrations resulted in higher ratios of CO2/CH4 produced from the degradation of organic matter. A new glycine-metabolizing acetogenic species was isolated and characterized from Knaack Lake which further extended the known diversity of anaerobic bacteria in nature

  16. The brain at work: a cerebral metabolic manifestation of central fatigue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Secher, Niels H

    2007-11-15

    Central fatigue refers to circumstances in which strength appears to be limited by the ability of the central nervous system to recruit motoneurons. Central fatigue manifests when the effort to contract skeletal muscles is intense and, thus, is aggravated when exercise is performed under stress, whereas it becomes attenuated following training. Central fatigue has not been explained, but the cerebral metabolic response to intense exercise, as to other modalities of cerebral activation, is a reduction in its "metabolic ratio" (MR), i.e., the brain's uptake of oxygen relative to that of carbohydrate. At rest the MR is close to 6 but during intense whole-body exercise it decreases to less than 3, with the uptake of lactate becoming as important as that of glucose. It remains debated what underlies this apparent inability of the brain to oxidize the carbohydrate taken up, but it may approach approximately 10 mmol glucose equivalents. In the case of exercise, a concomitant uptake of ammonium for formation of amino acids may account for only approximately 10% of this "extra" carbohydrate taken up. Also, accumulation of intermediates in metabolic pathways and compartmentalization of metabolism between astrocytes and neurons are avenues that have to be explored. Depletion of glycogen stores and subsequent supercompensation during periods of low neuronal activity may not only play a role but also link brain metabolism to its function. PMID:17394258

  17. Robust Metabolic Responses to Varied Carbon Sources in Natural and Laboratory Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Van Voorhies, Wayne A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding factors that regulate the metabolism and growth of an organism is of fundamental biologic interest. This study compared the influence of two different carbon substrates, dextrose and galactose, on the metabolic and growth rates of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast metabolic and growth rates varied widely depending on the metabolic substrate supplied. The metabolic and growth rates of a yeast strain maintained under long-term laboratory conditions was compared to strain i...

  18. Central Pathways Integrating Metabolism and Reproduction in Teleosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md eShahjahan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Energy balance plays an important role in the control of reproduction. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms connecting the two systems are not well understood especially in teleosts. The hypothalamus plays a crucial role in the regulation of both energy balance and reproduction, and contains a number of neuropeptides, including gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH, orexin, neuropeptide-Y (NPY, ghrelin, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP, α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH, cholecystokinin (CCK, 26RFa, nesfatin, kisspeptin, and gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH. These neuropeptides are involved in the control of energy balance and reproduction either directly or indirectly. On the other hand, synthesis and release of these hypothalamic neuropeptides are regulated by metabolic signals from the gut and the adipose tissue. Furthermore, neurons producing these neuropeptides interact with each other, providing neuronal basis of the link between energy balance and reproduction. This review summarizes the advances made in our understanding of the physiological roles of the hypothalamic neuropeptides in energy balance and reproduction in teleosts, and discusses how they interact with GnRH, kisspeptin, and pituitary gonadotropins to control reproduction in teleosts.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus redirects central metabolism to increase iron availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Friedman

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis is significantly influenced by the iron status of the host. However, the regulatory impact of host iron sources on S. aureus gene expression remains unknown. In this study, we combine multivariable difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry with multivariate statistical analyses to systematically cluster cellular protein response across distinct iron-exposure conditions. Quadruplicate samples were simultaneously analyzed for alterations in protein abundance and/or post-translational modification state in response to environmental (iron chelation, hemin treatment or genetic (Deltafur alterations in bacterial iron exposure. We identified 120 proteins representing several coordinated biochemical pathways that are affected by changes in iron-exposure status. Highlighted in these experiments is the identification of the heme-regulated transport system (HrtAB, a novel transport system which plays a critical role in staphylococcal heme metabolism. Further, we show that regulated overproduction of acidic end-products brought on by iron starvation decreases local pH resulting in the release of iron from the host iron-sequestering protein transferrin. These findings reveal novel strategies used by S. aureus to acquire scarce nutrients in the hostile host environment and begin to define the iron and heme-dependent regulons of S. aureus.

  20. Framing REDD+ in India: Carbonizing and centralizing Indian forest governance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We analyze whether India's REDD+ strategy induces carbonization and centralization. • REDD+ in India is framed as an opportunity for synergistic, decentralized governance. • Yet national safeguards are not as strong as asserted. • Controversial issues have so far been side-lined in India's REDD+ strategy. • Without investments, synergistic and decentralized REDD+ governance remains unlikely. - Abstract: This article analyzes the interaction of newly articulated climate governance goals with long-standing forest policies and practices in India. We focus on India's REDD+ (reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation and related forest activities) strategy, with a particular focus on the Green India Mission (GIM). The GIM calls for a doubling of the area for afforestation and reforestation in India in the next decade as a dominant climate mitigation strategy. We analyze how the GIM policy document frames carbon versus non-carbon benefits to be derived from forest-related activities; and how the GIM envisages division of authority (between national, regional and local levels) in its implementation. We are interested in assessing (a) whether the GIM promotes a “carbonization” of Indian forest governance, i.e. an increased focus on forest carbon at the expense of other ecosystem services; and (b) whether it promotes an increased centralization of forest governance in India through retaining or transferring authority and control over forest resources to national and state-level authorities, at the expense of local communities. We argue that the GIM frames the climate-forest interaction as an opportunity to synergistically enhance both carbon and non-carbon benefits to be derived from forests; while simultaneously promoting further decentralization of Indian forest governance. However, based on past experiences and developments to date, we conclude that without significant investments in community-based carbon and biodiversity

  1. One-Carbon Metabolism in Prostate Cancer: The Role of Androgen Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Joshua M.; Ruiz-Echevarría, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell metabolism differs significantly from the metabolism of non-transformed cells. This altered metabolic reprogramming mediates changes in the uptake and use of nutrients that permit high rates of proliferation, growth, and survival. The androgen receptor (AR) plays an essential role in the establishment and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and in the metabolic adaptation that takes place during this progression. In its role as a transcription factor, the AR directly affects the expression of several effectors and regulators of essential catabolic and biosynthetic pathways. Indirectly, as a modulator of the one-carbon metabolism, the AR can affect epigenetic processes, DNA metabolism, and redox balance, all of which are important factors in tumorigenesis. In this review, we focus on the role of AR-signaling on one-carbon metabolism in tumorigenesis. Clinical implications of one-carbon metabolism and AR-targeted therapies for PCa are discussed in this context. PMID:27472325

  2. One-carbon metabolism in acetogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Visser, M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT One-carbon metabolism in acetogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria Life on earth is sustained by the constant cycling of six essential elements: oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorous, and carbon. The continuous cycling of these elements is due to geo-chemical processes and the combined metabolism of all life on earth. Microorganisms like bacteria and archaea play a major role in this. This is also true for the carbon cycle. In this cycle carbon dioxide and methane are two im...

  3. Central obesity measurements predict metabolic syndrome in a retrospective cohort study of postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Rosety-Rodríguez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The various diagnostic classifications in the literature concur as regards the important role of abdominal obesity in the onset and progression of metabolic syndrome. Accordingly, this study was aimed at clarifying whether central obesity measurements assessed by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA may predict metabolic syndrome in Spanish postmenopausal women. Material and methods: This historical cohort study included a total of 1326 postmenopausal women aged > 45 years old who had routinely undergone DXA to measure their bone mineral density between january 2006 and january 2011. The regions of interest (ROI envisaged in our study by using DXA were the lumbar regions L1-L4 and L4-L5. At the same time, they underwent a complete medical examination including personal medical history assessment, biochemical blood analysis, blood pressure measurement and anthropometrical evaluation. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed attending to the criteria established by National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NECP-ATP-III. Results: During the observation period, 537 women, representing 40.5% of the total studied, met the diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome. L1-L4 and L4-L5 abdominal fat mass determinations were associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in all regression models tested, showing an increasing gradient from the lowest to highest quintile. Conclusion: Central adiposity measurements assessed by DXA, especially L1-L4 region of interest, could be considered a powerful predictor of metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women.

  4. Nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur metabolism in natural Thioploca samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otte, S.; Kuenen, JG; Nielsen, LP;

    1999-01-01

    Filamentous sulfur bacteria of the genus Thioploca occur as dense mats on the continental shelf off the coast of Chile and Peru. Since little is known about their nitrogen, sulfur, and carbon metabolism, this study was undertaken to investigate their (eco)physiology. Thioploca is able to store...... internally high concentrations of sulfur globules and nitrate. It has been previously hypothesized that these large vacuolated bacteria can oxidize sulfide by reducing their internally stored nitrate. We examined this nitrate reduction by incubation experiments of washed Thioploca sheaths,vith trichomes in......) mg of protein(-1). The ammonium and sulfate production rates were not influenced by the addition of sulfide, suggesting that sulfide is first oxidized to elemental sulfur, and in a second independent step elemental sulfur is oxidized to sulfate. The average sulfide oxidation rate measured was 5 nmol...

  5. Influence of Cd, Co, and Zn on inorganic carbon acquisition and carbon metabolism in Emiliania huxleyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, J. N.; Boye, M.; De La Broise, D.; Probert, I.

    2014-12-01

    Trace elements are essential micronutrients for primary producers; hence they influence the global carbon cycle and contribute to the regulation of Earth's climate. Over the past 25 years, the influence of Fe concentration on phytoplankton production has been well studied and this research has been instrumental in our understanding of the influence that biology has on the sequestration of atmospheric CO2. However, other trace elements that are directly involved in carbon metabolism by primary producers, such as Zn, Cd, and Co, have received less attention. We examined the physiological response of two strains of Emiliania huxleyi to a range of realistic trace element concentrations (Zn, Cd, Co) in the marine environment under batch, semi-continuous, and continuous culture conditions. In addition, the continuous culture system was maintained at a pH of 8.15 ±0.02 by a sensor and regulator-controlled CO2­ injection system. The results from this study will highlight the influence that trace element composition of seawater has on the growth rate, elemental quota, inorganic carbon uptake, and carbon metabolism of Emiliania huxleyi. Potential limitations for the interpretation of paleo-productivity records will be discussed.

  6. From the selfish gene to selfish metabolism: revisiting the central dogma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2014-03-01

    The standard representation of the Central Dogma (CD) of Molecular Biology conspicuously ignores metabolism. However, both the metabolites and the biochemical fluxes behind any biological phenomenon are encrypted in the DNA sequence. Metabolism constrains and even changes the information flow when the DNA-encoded instructions conflict with the homeostasis of the biochemical network. Inspection of adaptive virulence programs and emergence of xenobiotic-biodegradation pathways in environmental bacteria suggest that their main evolutionary drive is the expansion of their metabolic networks towards new chemical landscapes rather than perpetuation and spreading of their DNA sequences. Faulty enzymatic reactions on suboptimal substrates often produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), a process that fosters DNA diversification and ultimately couples catabolism of the new chemicals to growth. All this calls for a revision of the CD in which metabolism (rather than DNA) has the leading role. PMID:24419968

  7. No Association of SNPs in One-Carbon Metabolism Genes with Prostate Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Victoria L; Rodriguez, Carmen; Sun, Juzhong; Talbot, Jeffrey T.; Michael J Thun; Eugenia E Calle

    2008-01-01

    One-carbon metabolism mediates the inter-conversion of folates for the synthesis of precursors used in DNA synthesis, repair and methylation. Inadequate folate nutrition or compromised metabolism can disrupt these processes and facilitate carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated associations of 39 candidate SNPs in nine one-carbon metabolism genes with risk of prostate cancer using 1,144 cases and 1,144 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort. None of these SNPs we...

  8. Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of the carbonate facies in the Vindhyan Supergroup, central India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Banerjee; S K Bhattacharya; S Sarkar

    2006-02-01

    The Vindhyan sedimentary succession in central India spans a wide time bracket from the Paleopro- terozoic to the Neoproterozoic period.Chronostratigraphic significance of stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of the carbonate phase in Vindhyan sediments has been discussed in some recent studies.However,the subtle controls of facies variation,depositional setting and post-depositional diagenesis on stable isotope compositions are not yet clearly understood.The Vindhyan Super- group hosts four carbonate units,exhibiting a wide variability in depositional processes and paleogeography.A detailed facies-specific carbon and oxygen isotope study of the carbonate units was undertaken by us to investigate the effect of these processes and to identify the least altered isotope values.It is seen that both carbon and oxygen isotope compositions have been affected by early meteoric water diagenesis.The effect of diagenetic alteration is,however,more pronounced in case of oxygen isotopes than carbon isotopes.Stable isotope compositions remained insensitive to facies only when sediments accumulated in a shallow shelf setting without being exposed.Major alteration of original isotope ratios was observed in case of shallow marine carbonates,which became exposed to meteoric fluids during early diagenetic stage.Duration of exposure possibly determined the magnitude of alteration and shift from the original values.Moreover,dolomitization is found to be accompanied by appreciable alteration of isotope compositions in some of the carbonates.The present study suggests that variations in sediment depositional settings,in particular the possibility of subaerial exposure,need to be considered while extracting chronostratigraphic signi ficance from 13C data.

  9. Soil metabolic transformations of carbon-14-myo-inositol, carbon-14-phytic acid and carbon-14-iron(III) phytate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uniformly labelled 14C-phytic acid and 14C-iron(III) phytate were synthesized from uniformly labelled 14C-myo-inositol. The three compounds were incubated in an Andosol sandy loam at 70% field capacity and 36.50C for a 12-day period. Myo-inositol, phytic acid and iron(III) phytate underwent a 61.0, 1.9 and 0% microbial oxidation respectively to CO2 during the incubation period. The rate of fixation of 14C-phytic acid was illustrated by its rapid decline in metabolism in the 12-day period. The metabolism rate of phytic was considerably reduced by the presumed formation of iron(III) and aluminium phytate. The metabolism rate of myo-inositol was reduced nine-fold after an initial rapid metabolism during the first day of incubation. The following mechanisms were observed in the soil metabolism of myo-inositol: (1) soil mineral-inositol carbon adsorption, (2) humic acid-inositol carbon adsorption, (3) the phosphorylation of myo-inositol, and (4) the epimerization of myo-inositol to chiro-inositol. The formation of (1) and (2) was found to be highly dependent upon microbial activity. Interactions (1), (2) and (3)are considered as possible mechanisms for the inhibition of the microbial oxidation of myo-inositol. The inhibition of myo-inositol oxidation via adsorption or phosphorylation is considered to be due to the chemical blockage of the stereo-specific microbial oxidative attack on the axial hydroxyl group. (author)

  10. Proteomic Analysis of One-carbon Metabolism-related Marker in Liver of Rat Offspring*

    OpenAIRE

    You, Young-Ah; Lee, Ji Hye; Kwon, Eun Jin; Yoo, Jae Young; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Pang, Myung-Geol; Kim, Young Ju

    2015-01-01

    Maternal food intake has a significant effect on the fetal environment, and an inadequate maternal diet may result in intrauterine growth restriction. Intrauterine growth restriction newborn rat pups nursed by normal diet-fed dams exhibited rapid catch-up growth, which plays a critical role in the risk for metabolic and cardiovascular disease in later life. Specifically, one-carbon metabolism in the liver plays a critical role in placental and fetal growth. Impaired functioning of one-carbon ...

  11. Targeting one carbon metabolism with an antimetabolite disrupts pyrimidine homeostasis and induces nucleotide overflow

    OpenAIRE

    Ser, Zheng; GAO, XIA; Johnson, Christelle; Mehrmohamadi, Mahya; Liu, Xiaojing; Li, SiQi; Locasale, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-metabolite agents that affect nucleotide metabolism are frontline chemotherapy agents in several cancers and often successfully target one carbon metabolism. However, the precise mechanisms and resulting determinants of their therapeutic value are unknown. We show that 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), a commonly used anti-metabolite therapeutic with varying efficacy, induces specific alterations to nucleotide metabolism by disrupting pyrimidine homeostasis. An integrative metabolomics analysis of ...

  12. Carbon dioxide and methane emission dynamics in central London (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfter, Carole; Nemitz, Eiko; Barlow, Janet F.; Wood, Curtis R.

    2013-04-01

    London, with a population of 8.2 million, is the largest city in Europe. It is heavily built-up (typically 8% vegetation cover within the central boroughs) and boasts some of the busiest arteries in Europe despite efforts to reduce traffic in the city centre with the introduction of a congestion charging scheme in 2007. We report on two substantial pollution monitoring efforts in the heart of London between October 2006 and present. Fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) were measured continuously by eddy-covariance in central London from October 2006 until May 2008 from a 190 m telecommunication tower (BT tower; 51° 31' 17.4'' N 0° 8' 20.04'' W). The eddy-covariance system consisted of a Gill R3-50 ultrasonic anemometer operated at 20 Hz and a LI-COR 6262 infrared gas analyser. Air was sampled 0.3 m below the sensor head of the ultrasonic anemometer - which was itself mounted on a 3 m mast to the top of a 15 m lattice tower situated on the roof of the tower (instrument head at 190 m above street level) - and pulled down 45 m of 12.7 mm OD Teflon tubing. In addition, meteorological variables (temperature, relative humidity, pressure, precipitation, wind speed and direction) were also measured with a multi-sensor (Weather Transmitter WXT510, Vaisala). Eddy-covariance measurements at the BT tower location were reinstated in July 2011 and include methane (CH4), CO2 and H2O concentrations measured by a Picarro fast methane analyser (G2301-f). CO2 emissions were found to be mainly controlled by fossil fuel combustion (e.g. traffic, commercial and domestic heating). Diurnal averages of CO2 fluxes were found to be highly correlated to traffic. However changes in heating-related natural gas consumption and, to a lesser extent, photosynthetic activity in two large city centre green spaces (Hyde Park and Regent's Park) explained the seasonal variability. Annual estimates of net exchange of CO2 obtained by eddy-covariance agreed well with up-scaled data from the UK

  13. Sucrose metabolism: gateway to diverse carbon use and sugar signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Yong-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Sucrose metabolism plays pivotal roles in development, stress response, and yield formation, mainly by generating a range of sugars as metabolites to fuel growth and synthesize essential compounds (including protein, cellulose, and starch) and as signals to regulate expression of microRNAs, transcription factors, and other genes and for crosstalk with hormonal, oxidative, and defense signaling. This review aims to capture the most exciting developments in this area by evaluating (a) the roles of key sucrose metabolic enzymes in development, abiotic stress responses, and plant-microbe interactions; (b) the coupling between sucrose metabolism and sugar signaling from extra- to intracellular spaces; (c) the different mechanisms by which sucrose metabolic enzymes could perform their signaling roles; and (d) progress on engineering sugar metabolism and transport for high yield and disease resistance. Finally, the review outlines future directions for research on sugar metabolism and signaling to better understand and improve plant performance. PMID:24579990

  14. Effects of adenosine metabolism in astrocytes on central nervous system oxygen toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-liang; Zhang, Ya-nan; Wang, Zhong-zhuang; Xu, Wei-gang; Li, Run-ping; Zhang, Jun-dong

    2016-03-15

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is widely used in military operations, especially underwater missions. However, prolonged and continuous inhalation of HBO can cause central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT), which greatly limits HBO's application. The regulation of astrocytes to the metabolism of adenosine is involved in epilepsy. In our study, we aimed to observe the effects of HBO exposure on the metabolism of adenosine in the brain. Furthermore, we aimed to confirm the possible mechanism underlying adenosine's mediation of the CNS-OT. Firstly, anesthetized rats exposed to 5 atm absolute HBO for 80 min. The concentrations of extracellular adenosine, ATP, ADP, and AMP were detected. Secondly, free-moving rats were exposed to HBO at the same pressure for 20 min, and the activities of 5'-nucleotidase and ADK in brain tissues were measured. For the mechanism studies, we observed the effects of a series of different doses of drugs related to adenosine metabolism on the latency of CNS-OT. Results showed HBO exposure could increase adenosine content by inhibiting ADK activity and improving 5'-nucleotidase activity. And adenosine metabolism during HBO exposure may be a protective response against HBO-induced CNS-OT. Moreover, the improvement of adenosine concentration, activation of adenosine A1R, or suppression of ADK and adenosine A2AR, which are involved in the prevention of HBO-induced CNS-OT. This is the first study to demonstrate HBO exposure regulated adenosine metabolism in the brain. Adenosine metabolism and adenosine receptors are related to HBO-induced CNS-OT development. These results will provide new potential targets for the termination or the attenuation of CNS-OT. PMID:26806404

  15. Role of phosphate in the central metabolism of two lactic acid bacteria-a comparative systems biology approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levering, J.; Musters, M.W.J.M.; Bekker, M.; Bellomo, D.; Fiedler, T.; Vos, de W.M.; Hugenholtz, F.; Kreikemeyer, B.; Kummer, U.; Teusink, B.

    2012-01-01

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria survive in distinct environments, but show common metabolic characteristics. Here we studied the dynamic interactions of the central metabolism in Lactococcus lactis, extensively used as a starter culture in the dairy industry, and Streptococcus pyogenes, a human patho

  16. Role of phosphate in the central metabolism of two lactic acid bacteria - a comparative systems biology approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Levering; M.W. Musters; M. Bekker; D. Bellomo; T. Fiedler; W.M. de Vos; J. Hugenholtz; B. Kreikemeyer; U. Kummer; B. Teusink

    2012-01-01

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria survive in distinct environments, but show common metabolic characteristics. Here we studied the dynamic interactions of the central metabolism in Lactococcus lactis, extensively used as a starter culture in the dairy industry, and Streptococcus pyogenes, a human patho

  17. Central and Metabolic Effects of High Fructose Consumption: Evidence from Animal and Human Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Stoianov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fructose consumption has increased dramatically in the last 40 years, and its role in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome has been implicated by many studies. It is most often encountered in the diet as sucrose (glucose and fructose or high-fructose corn syrup (55% fructose. At high levels, dietary exposure to fructose triggers a series of metabolic changes originating in the liver, leading to hepatic steatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance, and decreased leptin sensitivity. Fructose has been identified to alter biological pathways in other tissues including the central nervous system (CNS, adipose tissue, and the gastrointestinal system. Unlike glucose, consumption of fructose produces smaller increases in the circulating satiety hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1, and does not attenuate levels of the appetite suppressing hormone ghrelin. In the brain, fructose contributes to increased food consumption by activating appetite and reward pathways, and stimulating hypothalamic AMPK activity, a nutrient-sensitive regulator of food intake. Recent studies investigating the neurophysiological factors linking fructose consumption and weight gain in humans have demonstrated differential activation of brain regions that govern appetite, motivation and reward processing. Compared to fructose, glucose ingestion produces a greater reduction of hypothalamic neuronal activity, and increases functional connectivity between the hypothalamus and other reward regions of the brain, indicating that these two sugars regulate feeding behavior through distinct neural circuits. This review article outlines the current findings in fructose-feeding studies in both human and animal models, and discusses the central effects on the CNS that may lead to increased appetite and food intake. Keywords: Fructose, Metabolic syndrome, Appetite, Central nervous system

  18. A novel role for central ACBP/DBI as a regulator of long-chain fatty acid metabolism in astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouyakdan, Khalil; Taïb, Bouchra; Budry, Lionel;

    2015-01-01

    Diazepam-Binding Inhibitor, a secreted peptide acting as an allosteric modulator of the GABAA receptor. However, its role in central LCFA metabolism remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated ACBP cellular expression, ACBP regulation of LCFA intracellular metabolism, FA profile, and FA......Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that binds intracellular acyl-CoA esters. Several studies have suggested that ACBP acts as an acyl-CoA pool former and regulates long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) metabolism in peripheral tissues. In the brain, ACBP is known as...... response to palmitate in hypothalamic astrocytes. Collectively, these findings reveal for the first time that central ACBP acts as a regulator of LCFA intracellular metabolism in astrocytes. Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) or diazepam-binding inhibitor is a secreted peptide acting centrally as a GABAA...

  19. Kinetic and Stoichiometric Relationships of the Energy and Carbon Metabolism in the Culture of Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Chojnacka

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Some microalgae can grow metabolizing inorganic and organic carbon sources, which might occur simultaneously and independently, while energy is supplied by light and/or an organic carbon source. In this context, the contribution of each metabolism to total growth can be determined by quantitative analysis. The illumination of microalgal cells growing in the presence of organic substances, might cause an effect which can drive the carbon metabolism in different ways. When analyzing the growth of different strains of microalgae, some differences could be distinguished, between additive or inhibitory effect of light on heterotrophic metabolism in mixotrophic or photoheterotrophic growth. This manuscript proposes, the integration of a kinetic and stoichiometric metabolic model which explains the differences of carbon and energy utilization modes between mixotrophic and photoheterotrophic growth in microalgae. This model presumably discloses relevant independent facts between the mechanisms of photosynthesis and the oxidative metabolism of organic compounds, such as glucose and the importance of these differences on the production of biomass and secondary metabolites.

  20. Monte-Carlo Modeling of the Central Carbon Metabolism of Lactococcus lactis: Insights into Metabolic Regulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Murabito, E.; Verma, M.; Bekker, M.; Bellomo, D.; Westerhoff, H. V.; Teusink, B.; Steuer, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 9 (2014), e106453. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0256 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : systems biology * aced bacteria * Escherichia-coli * framework development * rate laws * dehydrogenase Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  1. Evidence for a link between tail biting and central monoamine metabolism in pigs (Sus scrofa domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valros, Anna; Palander, Pälvi; Heinonen, Mari; Munsterhjelm, Camilla; Brunberg, Emma; Keeling, Linda; Piepponen, Petteri

    2015-05-01

    Tail biting in pigs is a major welfare problem within the swine industry. Even though there is plenty of information on housing and management-related risk factors, the biological bases of this behavioral problem are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible link between tail biting, based on behavioral recordings of pigs during an ongoing outbreak, and certain neurotransmitters in different brain regions of these pigs. We used a total of 33 pigs at a farm with a long-standing problem of tail biting. Three equally big behavioral phenotypic groups, balanced for gender and age were selected, the data thus consisting of 11 trios of pigs. Two of the pigs in each trio originated from the same pen: one tail biter (TB) and one tail biting victim (V). A control (C) pig was selected from a pen without significant tail biting in the same farm room. We found an effect of tail biting behavioral phenotype on the metabolism of serotonin and dopamine, with a tendency for a higher 5-HIAA level in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of TB compared to the other groups, while V pigs showed changes in both serotonin and dopamine metabolism in the striatum (ST) and limbic cortex (LC). Trp:BCAA and Trp:LNAA correlated positively with serotonin and 5-HIAA in the PFC, but only in TB pigs. Furthermore, in both ST and LC, several of the neurotransmitters and their metabolites correlated positively with the frequency of bites received by the pig. This is the first study indicating a link between brain neurotransmission and tail biting behavior in pigs with TB pigs showing a tendency for increased PFC serotonin metabolism and V pigs showing several changes in central dopamine and serotonin metabolism in their ST and LC, possibly due to the acute stress caused by being bitten. PMID:25728243

  2. Integration of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxygen Metabolism in Escherichia coli--Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Wingreen, Ned s; Rabitz, Herschel A; Xu, Yifan

    2012-10-22

    A key challenge for living systems is balancing utilization of multiple elemental nutrients, such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, whose availability is subject to environmental fluctuations. As growth can be limited by the scarcity of any one nutrient, the rate at which each nutrient is assimilated must be sensitive not only to its own availability, but also to that of other nutrients. Remarkably, across diverse nutrient conditions, E. coli grows nearly optimally, balancing effectively the conversion of carbon into energy versus biomass. To investigate the link between the metabolism of different nutrients, we quantified metabolic responses to nutrient perturbations using LC-MS based metabolomics and built differential equation models that bridge multiple nutrient systems. We discovered that the carbonaceous substrate of nitrogen assimilation, -ketoglutarate, directly inhibits glucose uptake and that the upstream glycolytic metabolite, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, ultrasensitively regulates anaplerosis to allow rapid adaptation to changing carbon availability. We also showed that NADH controls the metabolic response to changing oxygen levels. Our findings support a general mechanism for nutrient integration: limitation for a nutrient other than carbon leads to build-up of the most closely related product of carbon metabolism, which in turn feedback inhibits further carbon uptake.

  3. Carbon catabolite repression and global control of the carbohydrate metabolism in Lactococcus lactis.

    OpenAIRE

    Luesink, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    In view of the economic importance of fermented dairy products considerable scientific attention has been given to various steps of fermentation processes, including the L-lactate formation of lactic acid bacteria (de Vos, 1996). In particular, the carbohydrate metabolism of L. lactis has been the subject of extensive research and several genes encoding proteins involved in the central carbohydrate metabolism have been described (Llanos et al., 1992; Llanos et al., 1993; Cancilla et al., 1995...

  4. Polymorphisms in 1-Carbon Metabolism, Epigenetics and Folate-Related Pathologies

    OpenAIRE

    Stover, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    Folate-mediated 1-carbon metabolism is a network of interconnected metabolic pathways necessary for the synthesis of purine nucleotides, thymidylate and the remethylation of homocysteine to methionine. Disruptions in this pathway influence both DNA synthesis and stability and chromatin methylation, and result from nutritional deficiencies and common gene variants. The mechanisms underlying folate-associated pathologies and developmental anomalies have yet to be established. This review focuse...

  5. Carbon and oxygen isotope geochemistry of Ediacaran outer platform carbonates, Paraguay Belt, central Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Riccomini

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available After the late Cryogenian glaciation the central region of Brazil was the site of extensive deposition of platformal carbonates of the Araras Group. This group includes a basal cap carbonate sequence succeeded by transgressive, deep platform deposits of bituminous lime mudstone and shale. Facies and stratigraphic data combined with carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses of the most complete section of the transgressive deposits, exposed in the Guia syncline, were used to evaluate the depositional paleoenvironment and to test the correlation of these deposits along the belt and with other units worldwide. The studied succession consists of 150 m thick tabular beds of black to grey lime mudstone and shale with predominantly negative delta13C PDB values around -2.5 to -1‰ . The delta13C PDB profile of Guia syncline shows a clear correlation with the upper portion of Guia Formation in the Cáceres region, about 200 km to the southwest. The delta13C PDB profile of the Araras Group is comparable with delta13C PDB profiles of Ediacaran units of the southern Paraguay Belt, western Canada, and the Congo and Kalahari cratons. Moreover, facies distribution, stratigraphy and the carbon isotopic profile of the Araras Group match the middle Tsumeb Subgroup in Namibia, which reinforces the Ediacaran age assigned to the Araras Group.Após a glaciação do final do Criogeniano, a região central do Brasil foi palco de extensa deposição de carbonatos plataformais do Grupo Araras. Este grupo inclui na sua base uma seqüência de capa carbonática sucedida por depósitos transgressivos de calcilutitos betuminosos e folhelhos de plataforma profunda. Dados de fácies e estratigráficos combinados com análises isotópicas de carbono e oxigênio da seção mais completa desses depósitos transgressivos, expostos no sinclinal da Guia, foram empregados para avaliar o paleambiente deposicional e para testar a correlação desses depósitos ao longo da faixa e tamb

  6. Maintenance metabolism and carbon fluxes in Bacillus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decasper Seraina

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selection of an appropriate host organism is crucial for the economic success of biotechnological processes. A generally important selection criterion is a low maintenance energy metabolism to reduce non-productive consumption of substrate. We here investigated, whether various bacilli that are closely related to Bacillus subtilis are potential riboflavin production hosts with low maintenance metabolism. Results While B. subtilis exhibited indeed the highest maintenance energy coefficient, B. licheniformis and B. amyloliquefaciens exhibited only statistically insignificantly reduced maintenance metabolism. Both B. pumilus and B. subtilis (natto exhibited irregular growth patterns under glucose limitation such that the maintenance metabolism could not be determined. The sole exception with significantly reduced maintenance energy requirements was the B. licheniformis strain T380B. The frequently used spo0A mutation significantly increased the maintenance metabolism of B. subtilis. At the level of 13C-detected intracellular fluxes, all investigated bacilli exhibited a significant flux through the pentose phosphate pathway, a prerequisite for efficient riboflavin production. Different from all other species, B. subtilis featured high respiratory tricarboxylic acid cycle fluxes in batch and chemostat cultures. In particular under glucose-limited conditions, this led to significant excess formation of NADPH of B. subtilis, while anabolic consumption was rather balanced with catabolic NADPH formation in the other bacilli. Conclusion Despite its successful commercial production of riboflavin, B. subtilis does not seem to be the optimal cell factory from a bioenergetic point of view. The best choice of the investigated strains is the sporulation-deficient B. licheniformis T380B strain. Beside a low maintenance energy coefficient, this strain grows robustly under different conditions and exhibits only moderate acetate overflow, hence

  7. Seasonal variations in inorganic carbon components in the central and eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.S.S.; DileepKumar, M.; George, M.D.; Rajendran, A.

    of carbon dioxide to atmosphere reached a maximum of approx 40 m mole m sup(-2) d sup(-1) around 16 degrees N in the central Arabian SEa during monsoon season. The carbon dioxide regenerated from soft tissue was higher during winter and is the least...

  8. Central leptin insufficiency syndrome: an interactive etiology for obesity, metabolic and neural diseases and for designing new therapeutic interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Kalra, Satya P.

    2007-01-01

    This review critically reappraises recent scientific evidence concerning central leptin insufficiency versus leptin resistance formulations to explain metabolic and neural disorders resulting from subnormal or defective leptin signaling in various sites in the brain. Research at various fronts to unravel the complexities of the neurobiology of leptin is surveyed to provide a comprehensive account of the neural and metabolic effects of environmentally-imposed fluctuations in leptin availabilit...

  9. Network environ perspective for urban metabolism and carbon emissions: a case study of Vienna, Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoqing; Chen, Bin

    2012-04-17

    Cities are considered major contributors to global warming, where carbon emissions are highly embedded in the overall urban metabolism. To examine urban metabolic processes and emission trajectories we developed a carbon flux model based on Network Environ Analysis (NEA). The mutual interactions and control situation within the urban ecosystem of Vienna were examined, and the system-level properties of the city's carbon metabolism were assessed. Regulatory strategies to minimize carbon emissions were identified through the tracking of the possible pathways that affect these emission trajectories. Our findings suggest that indirect flows have a strong bearing on the mutual and control relationships between urban sectors. The metabolism of a city is considered self-mutualistic and sustainable only when the local and distal environments are embraced. Energy production and construction were found to be two factors with a major impact on carbon emissions, and whose regulation is only effective via ad-hoc pathways. In comparison with the original life-cycle tracking, the application of NEA was better at revealing details from a mechanistic aspect, which is crucial for informed sustainable urban management. PMID:22424579

  10. Role of Nitrogen and Carbon Transport, Regulation, and Metabolism Genes for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Survival In Vivo†

    OpenAIRE

    Joanne M Kingsbury; Goldstein, Alan L.; McCusker, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is both an emerging opportunistic pathogen and a close relative of pathogenic Candida species. To better understand the ecology of fungal infection, we investigated the importance of pathways involved in uptake, metabolism, and biosynthesis of nitrogen and carbon compounds for survival of a clinical S. cerevisiae strain in a murine host. Potential nitrogen sources in vivo include ammonium, urea, and amino acids, while potential carbon sources include glucose, lactate,...

  11. Soil microbial community and its interaction with soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics following afforestation in central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qi; Cheng, Xiaoli; Hui, Dafeng; Zhang, Qian; Li, Ming; Zhang, Quanfa

    2016-01-15

    Afforestation may alter soil microbial community structure and function, and further affect soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics. Here we investigated soil microbial carbon and nitrogen (MBC and MBN) and microbial community [e.g. bacteria (B), fungi (F)] derived from phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) analysis in afforested (implementing woodland and shrubland plantations) and adjacent croplands in central China. Relationships of microbial properties with biotic factors [litter, fine root, soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN) and inorganic N], abiotic factors (soil temperature, moisture and pH), and major biological processes [basal microbial respiration, microbial metabolic quotient (qCO2), net N mineralization and nitrification] were developed. Afforested soils had higher mean MBC, MBN and MBN:TN ratios than the croplands due to an increase in litter input, but had lower MBC:SOC ratio resulting from low-quality (higher C:N ratio) litter. Afforested soils also had higher F:B ratio, which was probably attributed to higher C:N ratios in litter and soil, and shifts of soil inorganic N forms, water, pH and disturbance. Alterations in soil microbial biomass and community structure following afforestation were associated with declines in basal microbial respiration, qCO2, net N mineralization and nitrification, which likely maintained higher soil carbon and nitrogen storage and stability. PMID:26410698

  12. Lack of differential pattern in central adiposity and metabolic syndrome in Barrett's esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Healy, L A

    2012-02-01

    Obesity is an established risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma, although the mechanism is unclear. A pathway from reflux to inflammation through metaplasia is the dominant hypothesis, and an added role relating to visceral adiposity and the metabolic syndrome has been mooted in Barrett\\'s esophagus (BE) patients. Whether BE differs from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in obesity and metabolic syndrome profiles is unclear, and this was the focus of this study. Patients with proven BE or GERD were randomly selected from the unit data registry and invited to attend for metabolic syndrome screening, anthropometry studies including segmental body composition analysis, and laboratory tests including fasting lipids, insulin, and C-reactive protein. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. One hundred and eighteen BE patients and 113 age- and sex-matched GERD controls were studied. The incidence of obesity (body mass index >30 kg\\/m(2)) was 36% and 38%, respectively, with the pattern of fat deposition predominantly central and an estimated trunk fat mass of 13 and 14 kg, respectively. Using the NCEP criteria, metabolic syndrome was significantly more common in the BE cohort (30% vs 20%, P < 0.05), but there was no significant difference using IDF criteria (42% vs 37%, P= 0.340). Central obesity and the metabolic syndrome are common in both Barrett\\'s and GERD cohorts, but not significantly different, suggesting that central obesity and the metabolic syndrome does not per se impact on the development of BE in a reflux population. In BE, the importance of obesity and the metabolic syndrome in disease progression merits further study.

  13. The influence of soil drought on the photosynthetic carbon metabolism in different cotton sorts and lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article the results about influence of a drought on assimilation of ability CO2 during photosynthesis at different cotton sorts and lines are submitted. It was established that in these conditions speed of a turnover Pentose phosphate reduction of cycle decreases. However thus amplification inclusion 14C in products P E P-carboxylation and glycolate metabolism of carbon is observed

  14. Metabolic carbon labelling systems. Modelling, simulation, analysis, data evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work in hand presents a modelling tool of universal applicability, for description, analysis, simulation and evaluation of labelling experiments. The term 'universal' should not be understood as providing a model applicable to all biological systems, but rather as a fundamental and universal framework, made up of the various analytic tools developed, which considerably reduces the technical expenditure required for the development of metabolic flow models reflecting the various metabolic networks. Creating simulation and data analysis tools for scientific research always implies a substantial programming effort. Scientists tend to regard such programming work not so much as a scientific but rather as a technical task. This attitude has fatal consequences with respect to software development in the academic domain, as true quality will only be achieved if the required work is appropriately rewarded. Thus the situation is characterised by dispersed activities and programming work leading to a great number of more or less specialised, individual programs that require constant adaptation or new development of tools in order to take into account scientific progress. Object-oriented technology has brought about some progress in this respect, so that today at least various working groups can profit from enhanced and long-term cooperation and flow of information. (orig./AJ)

  15. Molecular and Metabolic Mechanisms of Carbon Sequestration in Marine Thrombolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobberley, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of my dissertation project has been to examine the molecular processes underlying carbon sequestration in lithifying microbial ecosystems, known as thrombolitic mats, and assess their feasibility for use in bioregenerative life support systems. The results of my research and education efforts funded by the Graduate Student Researchers Program can be summarized in four peer-reviewed research publication, one educational publication, two papers in preparation, and six research presentations at local and national science meetings (see below for specific details).

  16. Hydrogen isotopic compositions of organic compounds in plants reflect the plant's carbon metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, M. A.; Kahmen, A.; Werner, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The main factors controlling δ2H of plant organic compounds are generally assumed to be the plant's source water and the evaporative deuterium enrichment of leaf water. Hydrogen isotope analyses of plant compounds from sediments or tree rings are therefore mainly applied to assess hydrological conditions at different spatial and temporal scales. However, the biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation occurring during biosynthesis of plant organic compounds (ɛbio) also accounts for a large part of the variability observed in the δ2H values. Nevertheless, only few studies have directly addressed the physiological basis of this variability and even fewer studies have thus explored possible applications of hydrogen isotope variability in plant organic compounds for plant physiological research. Here we show two datasets indicating that the plant's carbon metabolism can have a substantial influence on δ2H values of n-alkanes and cellulose. First, we performed a controlled experiment where we forced plants into heterotrophic and autotrophic C-metabolism by growing them under four different light treatments. Second, we assessed the δ2H values of different parasitic heterotrophic plants and their autotrophic host plants. Our two datasets show a systematic shift in ɛbio of up to 80 ‰ depending on the plant's carbon metabolism (heterotrophic or autotrophic). Differences in n-alkane and cellulose δ2H values in plants with autotrophic vs. heterotrophic metabolisms can be explained by different NADPH pools that are used by the plants to build their compounds either with assimilates that originate directly from photosynthesis or from stored carbohydrates. Our results have significant implications for the calibration and interpretation of geological records. More importantly, as the δ2H values reflect the plant's carbon metabolism involved during the tissue formation, our findings highlight the potential of δ2H values as new tool for studying plant and ecosystem carbon

  17. Samuel Ruben's Contributions to Research on Photosynthesis and Bacterial Metabolism with Radioactive Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gest, Howard

    2004-01-01

    The earliest experiments on the pathways of carbon in photosynthetic and heterotrophic metabolism using radioactive carbon, (11)C, as a tracer were performed by Samuel (Sam) Ruben, Martin Kamen, and their colleagues. The short half-life of (11)C (20 min), however, posed severe limitations on identification of metabolic intermediates, and this was a major stimulus to search for a radioactive carbon isotope of longer half-life. (14)C was discovered by Ruben and Kamen in 1940, but circumstances prevented continuation of their research using the long-lived isotope. Because of the untimely accidental death of Ruben in 1943, there are very few published accounts on the life and work of this extraordinary scientist. This paper summarizes highlights of Ruben's outstanding accomplishments. PMID:16328812

  18. The Association of Glucose Metabolism and Eigenvector Centrality in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaanse, Sofie M; Wink, Alle Meije; Tijms, Betty M; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Verfaillie, Sander C J; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Boellaard, Ronald; Scheltens, Philip; van Berckel, Bart N M; Barkhof, Frederik

    2016-02-01

    Both fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG) positron emission tomography, examining glucose metabolism, and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI), using covarying blood oxygen levels, can be used to explore neuronal dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Both measures are reported to identify similar brain regions affected in AD patients. The spatial overlap and association of [(18)F]FDG with rs-fMRI in AD patients and controls were examined to investigate whether these two measures are associated, and if so, to what extent. For 24 AD patients and 18 controls, [(18)F]FDG and rs-fMRI data were available. [(18)F]FDG standardized uptake value ratios (SUVr), with cerebellar gray matter (GM) as reference tissue, were calculated. Eigenvector centrality (EC) mapping was used to spatially analyze the functional brain network. Group differences were calculated for [(18)F]FDG and eigenvector centrality mapping (ECM) values in four cortical regions (occipital, parietal, frontal, and temporal) and across voxels, with age, gender, and GM as covariates. Correlation of [(18)F]FDG with ECM was calculated within groups. Both lowered [(18)F]FDG SUVr and EC values were seen in the parietal and occipital cortex of AD patients. However, [(18)F]FDG yielded more robust and widespread brain areas affected in AD patients; hypometabolism was also observed in the temporal cortex and regions within frontal brain areas. Poor spatial overlap of both measures was observed. No associations were found between local [(18)F]FDG SUVr and ECM. In conclusion, agreement of [(18)F]FDG and ECM in AD patients seems moderate at best. [(18)F]FDG was most accurate in distinguishing AD patients from controls. PMID:26414628

  19. Phenotypic constraints promote latent versatility and carbon efficiency in metabolic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardoscia, Marco; Marsili, Matteo; Samal, Areejit

    2015-07-01

    System-level properties of metabolic networks may be the direct product of natural selection or arise as a by-product of selection on other properties. Here we study the effect of direct selective pressure for growth or viability in particular environments on two properties of metabolic networks: latent versatility to function in additional environments and carbon usage efficiency. Using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling based on flux balance analysis (FBA), we sample from a known biochemical universe random viable metabolic networks that differ in the number of directly constrained environments. We find that the latent versatility of sampled metabolic networks increases with the number of directly constrained environments and with the size of the networks. We then show that the average carbon wastage of sampled metabolic networks across the constrained environments decreases with the number of directly constrained environments and with the size of the networks. Our work expands the growing body of evidence about nonadaptive origins of key functional properties of biological networks.

  20. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also influenced by body composition — people with more muscle and less fat generally have higher BMRs. previous continue Things That Can Go Wrong With Metabolism Most of the time your metabolism works effectively ...

  1. A metagenomic window into carbon metabolism at 3 km depth in Precambrian continental crust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnabosco, Cara; Ryan, Kathleen; Lau, Maggie C Y; Kuloyo, Olukayode; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara; Kieft, Thomas L; van Heerden, Esta; Onstott, Tullis C

    2016-03-01

    Subsurface microbial communities comprise a significant fraction of the global prokaryotic biomass; however, the carbon metabolisms that support the deep biosphere have been relatively unexplored. In order to determine the predominant carbon metabolisms within a 3-km deep fracture fluid system accessed via the Tau Tona gold mine (Witwatersrand Basin, South Africa), metagenomic and thermodynamic analyses were combined. Within our system of study, the energy-conserving reductive acetyl-CoA (Wood-Ljungdahl) pathway was found to be the most abundant carbon fixation pathway identified in the metagenome. Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase genes that have the potential to participate in (1) both autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolisms through the reversible oxidization of CO and subsequent transfer of electrons for sulfate reduction, (2) direct utilization of H2 and (3) methanogenesis were identified. The most abundant members of the metagenome belonged to Euryarchaeota (22%) and Firmicutes (57%)-by far, the highest relative abundance of Euryarchaeota yet reported from deep fracture fluids in South Africa and one of only five Firmicutes-dominated deep fracture fluids identified in the region. Importantly, by combining the metagenomics data and thermodynamic modeling of this study with previously published isotopic and community composition data from the South African subsurface, we are able to demonstrate that Firmicutes-dominated communities are associated with a particular hydrogeologic environment, specifically the older, more saline and more reducing waters. PMID:26325359

  2. Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008255 Serum adiponectin level declines in the elderly with metabolic syndrome.WU Xiaoyan(吴晓琰),et al.Dept Geriatr,Huashan Hosp,Fudan UnivShanghai200040.Chin J Geriatr2008;27(3):164-167.Objective To investigate the correlation between ser-um adiponectin level and metabolic syndrome in the elderly·Methods Sixty-one subjects with metabolic syndrome and140age matched subjects without metabolic

  3. Prevalence of Central Obesity among Adults with Normal BMI and Its Association with Metabolic Diseases in Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Rui; Gao, Chunshi; Jiang, Lingling; Lv, Xin; Song, Yuanyuan; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of central obesity among adults with normal BMI and its association with metabolic diseases in Jilin Province, China. Methods A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 in Jilin Province of China. Information was collected by face to face interview. Descriptive data analysis and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of prevalence/frequency were conducted. Log-binomial regression analyses were used to find the independent factors associated with central obesity and to explore the adjusted association between central obesity and metabolic diseases among adults with normal BMI. Results Among the adult residents with normal BMI in Jilin Province, 55.6% of participants with central obesity self-assessed as normal weight and 27.0% thought their body weight were above normal. 12.7% of central obesity people took methods to lose weight, while 85.3% didn’t. Female, older people and non-manual worker had higher risk to be central obesity among adults with normal BMI. Hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia were significantly associated with central obesity among adults with normal BMI, the PRs were 1.337 (1.224–1.461), 1.323 (1.193–1.456) and 1.261 (1.152–1.381) separately when adjusted for gender, age and BMI. Conclusions Hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia were significantly associated with central obesity among adults with normal BMI in Jilin Province, China. The low rates of awareness and control of central obesity among adults with normal BMI should be improved by government and health department. PMID:27467819

  4. Carbon Deflagration in Type Ia Supernova: I. Centrally Ignited Models

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, H; Malone, C M; Almgren, A; Bell, J B

    2013-01-01

    A leading model for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) begins with a white dwarf near the Chandrasekhar mass that ignites a degenerate thermonuclear runaway close to its center and explodes. In a series of papers, we shall explore the consequences of ignition at several locations within such dwarfs. Here we assume central ignition, which has been explored before, however, the problem is worth revisiting, if only to validate those previous studies and to further elucidate the relevant physics for future work. A perturbed sphere of hot iron ash with a radius of ~100 km is initialized at the middle of the star. The subsequent explosion is followed in several simulations using a thickened flame model in which the flame speed is either fixed --- within the range expected from turbulent combustion --- or based on the local turbulent intensity. Global results, including the explosion energy and bulk nucleosynthesis (e.g. 56Ni of 0.48--0.56 $\\Msun$) turn out to be insensitive to this speed. In all completed runs, the energy...

  5. Sulfite Oxidase Activity Is Essential for Normal Sulfur, Nitrogen and Carbon Metabolism in Tomato Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Brychkova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant sulfite oxidase [SO; E.C.1.8.3.1] has been shown to be a key player in protecting plants against exogenous toxic sulfite. Recently we showed that SO activity is essential to cope with rising dark-induced endogenous sulfite levels in tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum/Solanum lycopersicum Mill. cv. Rheinlands Ruhm. Here we uncover the ramifications of SO impairment on carbon, nitrogen and sulfur (S metabolites. Current analysis of the wild-type and SO-impaired plants revealed that under controlled conditions, the imbalanced sulfite level resulting from SO impairment conferred a metabolic shift towards elevated reduced S-compounds, namely sulfide, S-amino acids (S-AA, Co-A and acetyl-CoA, followed by non-S-AA, nitrogen and carbon metabolite enhancement, including polar lipids. Exposing plants to dark-induced carbon starvation resulted in a higher degradation of S-compounds, total AA, carbohydrates, polar lipids and total RNA in the mutant plants. Significantly, a failure to balance the carbon backbones was evident in the mutants, indicated by an increase in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle intermediates, whereas a decrease was shown in stressed wild-type plants. These results indicate that the role of SO is not limited to a rescue reaction under elevated sulfite, but SO is a key player in maintaining optimal carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism in tomato plants.

  6. Sugar-starvation-induced changes of carbon metabolism in excised maize root tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excised maize (Zea mays L.) root tips were used to study the early metabolic effects of glucose (Glc) starvation. Root tips were prelabeled with [1-13C]Glc so that carbohydrates and metabolic intermediates were close to steady-state labeling, but lipids and proteins were scarcely labeled. They were then incubated in a sugar-deprived medium for carbon starvation. Changes in the level of soluble sugars, the respiratory quotient, and the 13C enrichment of intermediates, as measured by 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance, were studied to detect changes in carbon fluxes through glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Labeling of glutamate carbons revealed two major changes in carbon input into the tricarboxylic acid cycle: (a) the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase flux stopped early after the start of Glc starvation, and (b) the contribution of glycolysis as the source of acetyl-coenzyme A for respiration decreased progressively, indicating an increasing contribution of the catabolism of protein amino acids, fatty acids, or both. The enrichment of glutamate carbons gave no evidence for proteolysis in the early steps of starvation, indicating that the catabolism of proteins was delayed compared with that of fatty acids. Labeling of carbohydrates showed that sucrose turnover continues during sugar starvation, but gave no indication for any significant flux through gluconeogenesis

  7. Atmospheric black carbon and warming effects influenced by the source and absorption enhancement in central Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nordmann, S.; Cheng, Y.F.; Carmichael, G.R.; Yu, M.; Denier Van Der Gon, H.A.C.; Zhang, Q.; Saide, P.E.; Pöschl, U.; Su, H.; Birmili, W.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2014-01-01

    Particles containing black carbon (BC), a strong absorbing substance, exert a rather uncertain direct and indirect radiative forcing in the atmosphere. To investigate the mass concentration and absorption properties of BC particles over central Europe, the model WRF-Chem was used at a resolution of

  8. Selective extraction of ballast carbonates from phosphorites of central Kyzyl-Kum with chemical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfikaxor Dehkanov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The enrichment of phosphorites of Central Kyzilkum containing large amount of carbonates with nitric acid allows obtaining phosphorite concentrates applicable for sulfuric acid extraction. The paper offers the optimum parameters of this process applied to phosphorite flour, mineralised mass and washed and dried phosphorite concentrates of Cental Kyzilkum`s phosphorites.

  9. Nutritional Manipulation of One-Carbon Metabolism: Effects on Arsenic Methylation and Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan N. Hall

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to arsenic (As through drinking water is a substantial problem worldwide. The methylation of As, a reactive metalloid, generates monomethyl- (MMA and dimethyl-arsenical (DMA species. The biochemical pathway that catalyzes these reactions, one-carbon metabolism, is regulated by folate and other micronutrients. Arsenic methylation exerts a critical influence on both its urinary elimination and chemical reactivity. Mice having the As methyltransferase null genotype show reduced urinary As excretion, increased As retention, and severe systemic toxicity. The most toxic As metabolite in vitro is MMAIII, an intermediate in the generation of DMAV, a much less toxic metabolite. These findings have raised the question of whether As methylation is a detoxification or bioactivation pathway. Results of population-based studies suggest that complete methylation of inorganic As to DMA is associated with reduced risk for As-induced health outcomes, and that nutrients involved in one-carbon metabolism, such as folate, can facilitate As methylation and elimination.

  10. Abscisic acid as a factor in regulation of photosynthetic carbon metabolism of pea seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Faltynowicz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of abscisic acid (ABA on carbon metabolism and the activity of ribulosebisphosphate (RuBP and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP carboxylases in 8-day-old pea seedlings was investigated. It was endeavoured to correlate the changes observed in metabolic processes with the endogenous ABA level. In plants treated with ABA incorporation of labeled carbon into sucrose, glucose, fructose and sugar phosphates was depressed, while 14C incorporation into starch, ribulose and malic acid was enhanced. The activity of RuBP carboxylase was considerably lowered, whereas that of PEP carboxylase was slightly increased. It is considered that inhibition of photosynthesis due to the action of ABA is caused to a great extent by the obstruction of the C-3 pathway and reduced activity of RuBP carboxylase, whereas (β-carboxylation was not blocked.

  11. Oral facial clefts and gene polymorphisms in metabolism of folate/one-carbon and vitamin A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyles, Abee L; Wilcox, Allen J; Taylor, Jack A;

    2009-01-01

    child had either cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) or cleft palate only (CPO), and no other major defects. We analyzed 108 SNPs and one insertion in 29 genes involved in folate/one-carbon metabolism and 68 SNPs from 16 genes involved in vitamin A metabolism. Using the Triad Multi......An increased risk of facial clefts has been observed among mothers with lower intake of folic acid or vitamin A around conception. We hypothesized that the risk of clefts may be further moderated by genes involved in metabolizing folate or vitamin A. We included 425 case-parent triads in which the......-Marker (TRIMM) approach we performed SNP, gene, chromosomal region, and pathway-wide association tests of child or maternal genetic effects for both CL/P and CPO. We stratified these analyses on maternal intake of folic acid or vitamin A during the periconceptional period. As expected with this high number of...

  12. Carbon and nitrogen metabolism in arbuscular mycorrhizal maize plants under low-temperature stress

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xian-Can; Song, Feng-Bin; Liu, Fulai; Liu, Sheng-Qun; Tian, Chen-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus tortuosum on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism of Zea mays L. grown under low-temperature stress was investigated. Maize plants inoculated or not inoculated with AM fungus were grown in a growth chamber at 258C for 4 weeks and subsequently subjected to two temperature treatments (158C, low temperature; 258C, ambient control) for 2 weeks. Low-temperature stress significantlydecreasedAMcolonisation, plant height and biomass. TotalNco...

  13. Metabolic and transcriptional response of central metabolism affected by root endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica under salinity in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Mohammad Reza; Ghabooli, Mehdi; Khatabi, Behnam; Hajirezaei, Mohammad Reza; Schweizer, Patrick; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2016-04-01

    The root endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica enhances plant adaptation to environmental stress based on general and non-specific plant species mechanisms. In the present study, we integrated the ionomics, metabolomics, and transcriptomics data to identify the genes and metabolic regulatory networks conferring salt tolerance in P. indica-colonized barley plants. To this end, leaf samples were harvested at control (0 mM NaCl) and severe salt stress (300 mM NaCl) in P. indica-colonized and non-inoculated barley plants 4 weeks after fungal inoculation. The metabolome analysis resulted in an identification of a signature containing 14 metabolites and ions conferring tolerance to salt stress. Gene expression analysis has led to the identification of 254 differentially expressed genes at 0 mM NaCl and 391 genes at 300 mM NaCl in P. indica-colonized compared to non-inoculated samples. The integration of metabolome and transcriptome analysis indicated that the major and minor carbohydrate metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, and ethylene biosynthesis pathway might play a role in systemic salt-tolerance in leaf tissue induced by the root-colonized fungus. PMID:26951140

  14. Trehalose 6-phosphate coordinates organic and amino acid metabolism with carbon availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Carlos M; Feil, Regina; Ishihara, Hirofumi; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Kölling, Katharina; Krause, Ursula; Höhne, Melanie; Encke, Beatrice; Plaxton, William C; Zeeman, Samuel C; Li, Zhi; Schulze, Waltraud X; Hoefgen, Rainer; Stitt, Mark; Lunn, John E

    2016-02-01

    Trehalose 6-phosphate (Tre6P) is an essential signal metabolite in plants, linking growth and development to carbon metabolism. The sucrose-Tre6P nexus model postulates that Tre6P acts as both a signal and negative feedback regulator of sucrose levels. To test this model, short-term metabolic responses to induced increases in Tre6P levels were investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing the Escherichia coli Tre6P synthase gene (otsA) under the control of an ethanol-inducible promoter. Increased Tre6P levels led to a transient decrease in sucrose content, post-translational activation of nitrate reductase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, and increased levels of organic and amino acids. Radio-isotope ((14)CO2) and stable isotope ((13)CO2) labelling experiments showed no change in the rates of photoassimilate export in plants with elevated Tre6P, but increased labelling of organic acids. We conclude that high Tre6P levels decrease sucrose levels by stimulating nitrate assimilation and anaplerotic synthesis of organic acids, thereby diverting photoassimilates away from sucrose to generate carbon skeletons and fixed nitrogen for amino acid synthesis. These results are consistent with the sucrose-Tre6P nexus model, and implicate Tre6P in coordinating carbon and nitrogen metabolism in plants. PMID:26714615

  15. Growth-related Metabolism of the Carbon Storage Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate in Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmaier, Nadine; Schunder, Eva; Kutzner, Erika; Tlapák, Hana; Rydzewski, Kerstin; Herrmann, Vroni; Stämmler, Maren; Lasch, Peter; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Heuner, Klaus

    2016-03-18

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires disease, has a biphasic life cycle with a switch from a replicative to a transmissive phenotype. During the replicative phase, the bacteria grow within host cells in Legionella-containing vacuoles. During the transmissive phenotype and the postexponential (PE) growth phase, the pathogens express virulence factors, become flagellated, and leave the Legionella-containing vacuoles. Using (13)C labeling experiments, we now show that, under in vitro conditions, serine is mainly metabolized during the replicative phase for the biosynthesis of some amino acids and for energy generation. During the PE phase, these carbon fluxes are reduced, and glucose also serves as an additional carbon substrate to feed the biosynthesis of poly-3-hydroxybuyrate (PHB), an essential carbon source for transmissive L. pneumophila. Whole-cell FTIR analysis and comparative isotopologue profiling further reveal that a putative 3-ketothiolase (Lpp1788) and a PHB polymerase (Lpp0650), but not enzymes of the crotonyl-CoA pathway (Lpp0931-0933) are involved in PHB metabolism during the PE phase. However, the data also reflect that additional bypassing reactions for PHB synthesis exist in agreement with in vivo competition assays using Acanthamoeba castellannii or human macrophage-like U937 cells as host cells. The data suggest that substrate usage and PHB metabolism are coordinated during the life cycle of the pathogen. PMID:26792862

  16. A large metabolic carbon contribution to the δ 13C record in marine aragonitic bivalve shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillikin, David P.; Lorrain, Anne; Meng, Li; Dehairs, Frank

    2007-06-01

    It is well known that the incorporation of isotopically light metabolic carbon (C M) significantly affects the stable carbon isotope (δ 13C) signal recorded in biogenic carbonates. This can obscure the record of δ 13C of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon (δ 13C DIC) potentially archived in the shell carbonate. To assess the C M contribution to Mercenaria mercenaria shells collected in North Carolina, USA, we sampled seawater δ 13C DIC, tissue, hemolymph and shell δ 13C. All shells showed an ontogenic decrease in shell δ 13C, with as much as a 4‰ decrease over the lifespan of the clam. There was no apparent ontogenic change in food source indicated by soft tissue δ 13C values, therefore a change in the respired δ 13C value cannot be the cause of this decrease. Hemolymph δ 13C, on the other hand, did exhibit a negative relationship with shell height indicating that respired CO 2 does influence the δ 13C value of internal fluids and that the amount of respired CO 2 is related to the size or age of the bivalve. The percent metabolic C incorporated into the shell (%C M) was significantly higher (up to 37%, with a range from 5% to 37%) than has been found in other bivalve shells, which usually contain less than 10%C M. Interestingly, the hemolymph did contain less than 10%C M, suggesting that complex fractionation might occur between hemolymph and calcifying fluids. Simple shell biometrics explained nearly 60% of the observed variability in %C M, however, this is not robust enough to predict %C M for fossil shells. Thus, the metabolic effect on shell δ 13C cannot easily be accounted for to allow reliable δ 13C DIC reconstructions. However, there does seem to be a common effect of size, as all sites had indistinguishable slopes between the %C M and shell height (+0.19% per mm of shell height).

  17. Interaction Between the Central and Peripheral Effects of Insulin in Controlling Hepatic Glucose Metabolism in the Conscious Dog

    OpenAIRE

    Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Kraft, Guillaume; Smith, Marta S.; Farmer, Ben; Neal, Doss; Williams, Phillip E.; Lautz, Margaret; Farmer, Tiffany; Donahue, E. Patrick; Cherrington, Alan D.; Edgerton, Dale S.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of hypothalamic insulin action to the regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism in the presence of a normal liver/brain insulin ratio (3:1) is unknown. Thus, we assessed the role of central insulin action in the response of the liver to normal physiologic hyperinsulinemia over 4 h. Using a pancreatic clamp, hepatic portal vein insulin delivery was increased three- or eightfold in the conscious dog. Insulin action was studied in the presence or absence of intracerebroventricularl...

  18. PI3K: An Attractive Candidate for the Central Integration of Metabolism and Reproduction

    OpenAIRE

    Maricedes eAcosta-Martinez

    2012-01-01

    In neurons, as in a variety of other cell types, the enzyme phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) is a key intermediate that is common to the signaling pathways of a number of peripheral metabolic cues, including insulin and leptin, which are well known to regulate both metabolic and reproductive functions. In this article, I explore the possibility that PI3K is a key integrator of metabolic and neural signals regulating gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)/luteinizing hormone (LH) release a...

  19. The PGC-1α/ERRα Axis Represses One-Carbon Metabolism and Promotes Sensitivity to Anti-folate Therapy in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Étienne Audet-Walsh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Reprogramming of cellular metabolism plays a central role in fueling malignant transformation, and AMPK and the PGC-1α/ERRα axis are key regulators of this process. The intersection of gene-expression and binding-event datasets for breast cancer cells shows that activation of AMPK significantly increases the expression of PGC-1α/ERRα and promotes the binding of ERRα to its cognate sites. Unexpectedly, the data also reveal that ERRα, in concert with PGC-1α, negatively regulates the expression of several one-carbon metabolism genes, resulting in substantial perturbations in purine biosynthesis. This PGC-1α/ERRα-mediated repression of one-carbon metabolism promotes the sensitivity of breast cancer cells and tumors to the anti-folate drug methotrexate. These data implicate the PGC-1α/ERRα axis as a core regulatory node of folate cycle metabolism and further suggest that activators of AMPK could be used to modulate this pathway in cancer.

  20. Epiphyte dynamics and carbon metabolism in a nutrient enriched Mediterranean seagrass ( Posidonia oceanica ) ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolaki, Eugenia T.; Holmer, Marianne; Marbà, Núria; Karakassis, Ioannis

    2011-08-01

    The study aimed at examining the relationship between epiphyte dynamics and carbon metabolism in seagrass ecosystems under nutrient enrichment. Temporal variability of epiphytes and factors controlling their dynamics (i.e. environmental conditions, substratum availability, substratum stability and herbivore pressure) were assessed in a fish farm impacted and an unaffected Mediterranean seagrass ( Posidonia oceanica) meadow in the Aegean Sea (Greece). The factors controlling epiphyte dynamics responded differently to nutrient enrichment and partly interacted, rendering their cumulative effect on epiphyte load difficult to elucidate. Yet epiphytes accumulated on seagrass leaves near to the fish farm throughout the year, contributing 2 times more in above-ground biomass at cages than the control station. Reduction in substratum availability (i.e. decrease in leaf biomass) and increase in herbivore pressure affected epiphyte load, albeit their effects were not strong enough to counterbalance the effect of nutrient input from fish farm effluents. Moderate yet continuous nutrient input possibly stimulated epiphyte growth in excess of herbivory, shifting the control of epiphytes from top-down to bottom-up. Epiphyte accumulation affected carbon metabolism in the seagrass ecosystem by contributing to enhanced dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release, but seagrass loss was so acute that increased epiphyte cover could not counterbalance the decrease in community carbon production which was mainly driven by seagrass decline.

  1. Central Role of Glutamate Metabolism in the Maintenance of Nitrogen Homeostasis in Normal and Hyperammonemic Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur J. L. Cooper

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is present in the brain at an average concentration—typically 10–12 mM—far in excess of those of other amino acids. In glutamate-containing vesicles in the brain, the concentration of glutamate may even exceed 100 mM. Yet because glutamate is a major excitatory neurotransmitter, the concentration of this amino acid in the cerebral extracellular fluid must be kept low—typically µM. The remarkable gradient of glutamate in the different cerebral compartments: vesicles > cytosol/mitochondria > extracellular fluid attests to the extraordinary effectiveness of glutamate transporters and the strict control of enzymes of glutamate catabolism and synthesis in well-defined cellular and subcellular compartments in the brain. A major route for glutamate and ammonia removal is via the glutamine synthetase (glutamate ammonia ligase reaction. Glutamate is also removed by conversion to the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyrate (GABA via the action of glutamate decarboxylase. On the other hand, cerebral glutamate levels are maintained by the action of glutaminase and by various α-ketoglutarate-linked aminotransferases (especially aspartate aminotransferase and the mitochondrial and cytosolic forms of the branched-chain aminotransferases. Although the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction is freely reversible, owing to rapid removal of ammonia as glutamine amide, the direction of the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction in the brain in vivo is mainly toward glutamate catabolism rather than toward the net synthesis of glutamate, even under hyperammonemia conditions. During hyperammonemia, there is a large increase in cerebral glutamine content, but only small changes in the levels of glutamate and α-ketoglutarate. Thus, the channeling of glutamate toward glutamine during hyperammonemia results in the net synthesis of 5-carbon units. This increase in 5-carbon units is accomplished in part by the ammonia-induced stimulation of the anaplerotic

  2. Central Role of Glutamate Metabolism in the Maintenance of Nitrogen Homeostasis in Normal and Hyperammonemic Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Arthur J L; Jeitner, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is present in the brain at an average concentration-typically 10-12 mM-far in excess of those of other amino acids. In glutamate-containing vesicles in the brain, the concentration of glutamate may even exceed 100 mM. Yet because glutamate is a major excitatory neurotransmitter, the concentration of this amino acid in the cerebral extracellular fluid must be kept low-typically µM. The remarkable gradient of glutamate in the different cerebral compartments: vesicles > cytosol/mitochondria > extracellular fluid attests to the extraordinary effectiveness of glutamate transporters and the strict control of enzymes of glutamate catabolism and synthesis in well-defined cellular and subcellular compartments in the brain. A major route for glutamate and ammonia removal is via the glutamine synthetase (glutamate ammonia ligase) reaction. Glutamate is also removed by conversion to the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) via the action of glutamate decarboxylase. On the other hand, cerebral glutamate levels are maintained by the action of glutaminase and by various α-ketoglutarate-linked aminotransferases (especially aspartate aminotransferase and the mitochondrial and cytosolic forms of the branched-chain aminotransferases). Although the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction is freely reversible, owing to rapid removal of ammonia as glutamine amide, the direction of the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction in the brain in vivo is mainly toward glutamate catabolism rather than toward the net synthesis of glutamate, even under hyperammonemia conditions. During hyperammonemia, there is a large increase in cerebral glutamine content, but only small changes in the levels of glutamate and α-ketoglutarate. Thus, the channeling of glutamate toward glutamine during hyperammonemia results in the net synthesis of 5-carbon units. This increase in 5-carbon units is accomplished in part by the ammonia-induced stimulation of the anaplerotic enzyme pyruvate carboxylase

  3. Impact of xylose and mannose on central metabolism of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, J.P.

    2005-07-01

    In this study, understanding of the central metabolism was improved by quantification of metabolite concentrations, enzyme activities, protein abundances, and gene transcript concentrations. Intracellular fluxes were estimated by applying stoichiometric models of metabolism. The methods were applied in the study of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in two separate projects. A xylose project aimed at improved utilization of D- xylose as a substrate for, e.g., producing biomaterial- based fuel ethanol. A mannose project studied the production of GDP-mannose from D-mannose in a strain lacking the gene for phosphomannose isomerase (PMI40 deletion). Hexose, D-glucose is the only sugar more abundant than pentose D-xylose. D-xylose is common in hardwoods (e.g. birch) and crop residues (ca. 25% of dry weight). However, S. cerevisiae is unable to utilize D- xylose without a recombinant pathway where D-xylose is converted to Dxylulose. In this study D-xylose was converted in two steps via xylitol: by D-xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase encoded by XYL1 and XYL2 from Pichia stipitis, respectively. Additionally, endogenous xylulokinase (XKS1) was overexpressed in order to increase the consumption of D-xylose by enhancing the phosphorylation of D-xylulose. Despite of the functional recombinant pathway the utilization rates of D xylose still remained low. This study proposes a set of limitations that are responsible for the low utilization rates of D-xylose under microaerobic conditions. Cells compensated for the cofactor imbalance, caused by the conversion of D-xylose to D- xylulose, by increasing the flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and by shuttling NADH redox potential to mitochondrion to be oxidized in oxidative phosphorylation. However, mitochondrial NADH inhibits citrate synthase in citric acid cycle, and consequently lower flux through citric acid cycle limits oxidative phosphorylation. Further, limitations in the uptake of D- xylose, in the

  4. PI3K: An attractive candidate for the central integration of metabolism and reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricedes eAcosta-Martinez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In neurons, as in a variety of other cell types, the enzyme phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K is a key intermediate that is common to the signaling pathways of a number of peripheral metabolic cues, including insulin and leptin, which are well known to regulate both metabolic and reproductive functions. In this article, I explore the possibility that PI3K is a key integrator of metabolic and neural signals regulating gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH/luteinizing hormone (LH release and explore the hypothesis that this enzyme is pivotal in many disorders where gonadotropin release is at risk. Although the mechanisms mediating the influence of metabolism and nutrition on fertility are currently unclear, the strong association between metabolic disorders and infertility is undeniable. For example, women suffering from anorectic disorders experience amenorrhea as a consequence of malnutrition-induced impairment of LH release, and at the other extreme, obesity is also commonly co-morbid with menstrual dysfunction and infertility. Impaired hypothalamic insulin and leptin receptor signaling is thought to be at the core of reproductive disorders associated with metabolic dysfunction. While low levels of leptin and insulin characterize states of negative energy balance, prolonged nutrient excess is associated with insulin and leptin resistance. Metabolic models known to alter GnRH/LH release such as diabetes, diet-induced obesity, and caloric restriction are also accompanied by impairment of PI3K signaling in insulin and leptin sensitive tissues including the hypothalamus. However, a clear link between this signaling pathway and the control of GnRH release by peripheral metabolic cues has not been established. Investigating the role of the signaling pathways shared by metabolic cues that are critical for a normal reproductive state can help identify possible targets in the treatment of metabolic and reproductive disorders such as Polycystic Ovarian

  5. Carbon Stock Potential of Oak and Pine Forests in Garhwal Region in Indian Central Himalayas

    OpenAIRE

    Nanda Nautiyal; Vir Singh

    2013-01-01

    Oak (Quercus leucotichophora) and pine (Pinus roxburghii) are the two most dominant forest types occurring in Indian Central Himalayas. CO2 mitigation potential of these two forest types was observed in the present study. Carbon stock densities for AGTB, BB, LHG, DWS, AGSB and SOC were estimated and higher values were recorded in oak forest stands. Total carbon density estimated was 2420.54 Mg/ha for oak forest of Gopeshwar and 986.93 Mg/ha for pine forest of Nandprayag. CO2 mitigation potent...

  6. Vitamin B12: one carbon metabolism, fetal growth and programming for chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, E C; Katre, P; Yajnik, C S

    2014-01-01

    This review brings together human and animal studies and reviews that examine the possible role of maternal vitamin B12 (B12) on fetal growth and its programming for susceptibility to chronic disease. A selective literature review was undertaken to identify studies and reviews that investigate these issues, particularly in the context of a vegetarian diet that may be low in B12 and protein and high in carbohydrate. Evidence is accumulating that maternal B12 status influences fetal growth and development. Low maternal vitamin B12 status and protein intake are associated with increased risk of neural tube defect, low lean mass and excess adiposity, increased insulin resistance, impaired neurodevelopment and altered risk of cancer in the offspring. Vitamin B12 is a key nutrient associated with one carbon metabolic pathways related to substrate metabolism, synthesis and stability of nucleic acids and methylation of DNA which regulates gene expression. Understanding of factors regulating maternal-fetal one carbon metabolism and its role in fetal programming of non communicable diseases could help design effective interventions, starting with maternal nutrition before conception. PMID:24219896

  7. Carbon and nitrogen metabolism in arbuscular mycorrhizal maize plants under low-temperature stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xian-Can; Song, Feng-Bin; Liu, Fulai;

    2015-01-01

    Effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus tortuosum on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism of Zea mays L. grown under low-temperature stress was investigated. Maize plants inoculated or not inoculated with AM fungus were grown in a growth chamber at 258C for 4 weeks and subseque......Effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus tortuosum on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism of Zea mays L. grown under low-temperature stress was investigated. Maize plants inoculated or not inoculated with AM fungus were grown in a growth chamber at 258C for 4 weeks...... and subsequently subjected to two temperature treatments (158C, low temperature; 258C, ambient control) for 2 weeks. Low-temperature stress significantly decreasedAMcolonisation, plant height and biomass. TotalNcontent and activities of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase and glutamate pyruvate transaminase of AM...... phosphate synthase and amylase activities at low temperature. Moreover, low-temperature stress increased theC :Nratio in the leaves of maize plants, and AM colonisation decreased the root C :N ratio. These results suggested a difference in the C and N metabolism of maize plants at ambient and low...

  8. Sc3CH@C80: selective (13)C enrichment of the central carbon atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghans, Katrin; Rosenkranz, Marco; Popov, Alexey A

    2016-05-01

    Sc3CH@C80 is synthesized and characterized by (1)H, (13)C, and (45)Sc NMR. A large negative chemical shift of the proton, -11.73 ppm in the Ih and -8.79 ppm in the D5h C80 cage isomers, is found. (13)C satellites in the (1)H NMR spectrum enabled indirect determination of the (13)C chemical shift for the central carbon at 173 ± 1 ppm. Intensity of the satellites allowed determination of the (13)C content for the central carbon atom. This unique possibility is applied to analyze the cluster/cage (13)C distribution in mechanistic studies employing either (13)CH4 or (13)C powder to enrich Sc3CH@C80 with (13)C. PMID:27109443

  9. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a particular food provides to the body. A chocolate bar has more calories than an apple, so ... More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Endocrine System Blood ...

  10. Mitochondrial DNA Replication Defects Disturb Cellular dNTP Pools and Remodel One-Carbon Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkanen, Joni; Forsström, Saara; Euro, Liliya; Paetau, Ilse; Kohnz, Rebecca A; Wang, Liya; Chilov, Dmitri; Viinamäki, Jenni; Roivainen, Anne; Marjamäki, Päivi; Liljenbäck, Heidi; Ahola, Sofia; Buzkova, Jana; Terzioglu, Mügen; Khan, Nahid A; Pirnes-Karhu, Sini; Paetau, Anders; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Sajantila, Antti; Isohanni, Pirjo; Tyynismaa, Henna; Nomura, Daniel K; Battersby, Brendan J; Velagapudi, Vidya; Carroll, Christopher J; Suomalainen, Anu

    2016-04-12

    Mitochondrial dysfunction affects cellular energy metabolism, but less is known about the consequences for cytoplasmic biosynthetic reactions. We report that mtDNA replication disorders caused by TWINKLE mutations-mitochondrial myopathy (MM) and infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA)-remodel cellular dNTP pools in mice. MM muscle shows tissue-specific induction of the mitochondrial folate cycle, purine metabolism, and imbalanced and increased dNTP pools, consistent with progressive mtDNA mutagenesis. IOSCA-TWINKLE is predicted to hydrolyze dNTPs, consistent with low dNTP pools and mtDNA depletion in the disease. MM muscle also modifies the cytoplasmic one-carbon cycle, transsulfuration, and methylation, as well as increases glucose uptake and its utilization for de novo serine and glutathione biosynthesis. Our evidence indicates that the mitochondrial replication machinery communicates with cytoplasmic dNTP pools and that upregulation of glutathione synthesis through glucose-driven de novo serine biosynthesis contributes to the metabolic stress response. These results are important for disorders with primary or secondary mtDNA instability and offer targets for metabolic therapy. PMID:26924217

  11. Competing Ecosystem Services: an Assessment of Carbon and Timber in the Tropical Forests of Central America

    OpenAIRE

    Khatun, Kaysara

    2010-01-01

    The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MEA 2005) has classified a number of ecosystems good and services (EGS) provided by tropical forests, namely cultural, provisioning, regulatory and support services. The primary focus of this paper is to carry out an economic assessment by comparing the financial costs and returns of selected EGS, namely carbon and timber in the tropical forests of Central America. Timber is unlike the other EGS provided by forests in that it competes with the other servic...

  12. Central and Metabolic Effects of High Fructose Consumption: Evidence from Animal and Human Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra Stoianov; Khosrow Adeli

    2014-01-01

    Fructose consumption has increased dramatically in the last 40 years, and its role in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome has been implicated by many studies. It is most often encountered in the diet as sucrose (glucose and fructose) or high-fructose corn syrup (55% fructose). At high levels, dietary exposure to fructose triggers a series of metabolic changes originating in the liver, leading to hepatic steatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance, and decreased leptin sensitivi...

  13. Central nervous system: a conductor orchestrating metabolic regulations harmed by both hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Scheen, André

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the brain has a key role in the control of energy metabolism, body fat content and glucose metabolism. Neuronal systems, which regulate energy intake, energy expenditure, and endogenous glucose production, sense and respond to input from hormonal and nutrient-related signals that convey information regarding both body energy stores and current energy availability. In response to this input, adaptive changes occur that promote energy homeostasis and the maintenanc...

  14. Cerebral blood flow, oxidative metabolism and cerebrovascular carbon dioxide reactivity in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Strauss, Gitte Irene; Thomsen, Gerda;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal arterial carbon dioxide tension (P(a)CO(2)) in patients with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is unknown and controversial. The objective of this study was to measure global cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebrovascular CO(2) reactivity (CO(2)R), and cerebral metabolic rates...... to baseline ventilation, whereas CMR(glu) increased. CONCLUSION: In patients with acute bacterial meningitis, we found variable levels of CBF and cerebrovascular CO(2) reactivity, a low a-v DO(2), low cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen and glucose, and a cerebral lactate efflux. In these patients, a...... ventilation strategy guided by jugular bulb oximetry and/or repeated CBF measurements may be more optimal in terms of cerebral oxygenation than a strategy aiming at identical levels of P(a)CO(2) for all patients....

  15. Carbon Cycling Studies in Forest and Rangeland Ecosystems of Northern and Central Coastal California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, C.; Klooster, S.; Gross, P.; Hiatt, S.; Genovese, V.

    2008-12-01

    The varied topography and micro-climates of northern and central coastal California result in high biodiversity and many different levels of primary production driving regional carbon cycles. Coastal mountains trap moisture from low clouds and fog in summer to supplement rainfall in winter. This creates a favorable micro-environment for coniferous forests, including the southernmost habitat of the coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), which grows mainly on lower north-facing slopes in Big Sur. In rain shadows, forests transition to open oak woodland, and then into the more fire-tolerant chaparral and coast scrub. Field sites for our on-going climate change studies on the California northern and central coasts currently include the University of California Santa Cruz Campus Natural Reserve, the US Forest Service Brazil Ranch, and the University of California Big Creek Reserve. We are conducting research at each of these sites to better understand possible impacts of climate change, including: (1) biological and physical capacity of soils to capture carbon and retain plant-essential nutrients; (2) rates of plant-soil water and carbon cycling and energy flow; and (3) recovery mechanisms for disturbances such as invasive weed species, grazing, and wildfire. The NASA-CASA simulation model based on satellite observations of monthly vegetation cover from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was used to estimate carbon cycling for much of the central coast as far north as Mendocino County. Net primary production (NPP) of all vegetation cover was mapped at 30-meter resolution for selected years by combining MODIS and Landsat images across the region. Results show annual NPP predictions of between 200-400 grams C per square meter for coastal scrub and 800-1200 grams C per square meter for coastal evergreen forests, Net ecosystem fluxes of carbon will be presented for the region based on NASA-CASA modeling and field measurements of soil respiration fluxes.

  16. Initial water deficit effects on Lupinus albus photosynthetic performance, carbon metabolism, and hormonal balance: metabolic reorganization prior to early stress responses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pinheiro, C.; António, C.; Dobrev, Petre; Vaňková, Radomíra; Wilson, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 14 (2011), s. 4965-4974. ISSN 0022-0957 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Carbon metabolism * hormone balance * LC-MS Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 5.364, year: 2011

  17. Comparative study on CO2 sources in soil developed on carbonate rock and non-carbonate rock in Central Guizhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎廷宇; 王世杰; 郑乐平

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, by using concentration and carbon stable isotope the.CO2 sources of soil profiles developed on limestone, dolostone and claystone basements in Central Guizhou, China are comparatively studied. The results show that CO2 concentration of soil profiles developed on different basements is different, having the following sequence: limestone>dolostone>claystone. Below the soil depth of 20 cm from the surface the δ13C value of CO2 in soil profile developed on limestone ranges from -12.811‰ - -13.492‰(PDB), that in soil profile developed on dolostone varys from -13.212‰--14.271‰(PDB) and that in soil profile developed on claystone is about -20.234‰- -21.485‰(PDB). Taking the carbon isotope of soil organic matter and carbonate rock as two isotopic endmembers, the proportion of soil C02 generated by dissolution of carbonate rock is calculated, about 21%-25% for soil profile developed on limestone basement, 19%-21% for soil profile developed on dolostone basement. There is almost no influx of

  18. Distinct patterns of microbial metabolism associated to riverine dissolved organic carbon of different source and quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Martin; Giorgio, Paul A.

    2015-06-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in rivers contains a wide range of molecules that can be assimilated by microbes. However, there is today no integrated understanding of how the source and composition of this DOC regulate the extent to which the DOC can support microbial growth and respiration. We analyzed patterns in microbial metabolism of DOC from different streams and rivers in Québec, by combining short-term bacterial production and respiration measurements with long-term DOC loss and analyses of bacterial use of different single substrates. We show that distinct metabolic patterns indeed exist across catchments, reflecting the varying nature and sources of the DOC. For example, DOC from forest headwaters systematically supported the highest bacterial growth efficiency (BGE) that was recorded, while in contrast DOC in peat bog drainage was used with significantly lower BGE. The carbon consumption in clear mountain rivers, possibly represented by autochthonous algal DOC, supported the highest bacterial respiration rates and the highest long-term DOC losses. By using principle component analysis, we demonstrate how the major axes of variation in all of the measured metabolic responses are tightly connected to spectrofluorometrical DOC composition indicators and to isotopic indicators of DOC source. If causality is assumed, our results imply that changes in DOC supply from different sources, for example, caused by land use or climate change, should result in dramatic changes in the patterns of aquatic microbial metabolism and thus in altered aquatic ecosystem functioning, with likely consequences for food-web structures and greenhouse gas balances.

  19. Pheophytinase Knockdown Impacts Carbon Metabolism and Nutraceutical Content Under Normal Growth Conditions in Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Bruno Silvestre; Rosado, Daniele; Almeida, Juliana; de Souza, Amanda Pereira; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Purgatto, Eduardo; Guyer, Luzia; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; Freschi, Luciano; Rossi, Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    Although chlorophyll (Chl) degradation is an essential biochemical pathway for plant physiology, our knowledge regarding this process still has unfilled gaps. Pheophytinase (PPH) was shown to be essential for Chl breakdown in dark-induced senescent leaves. However, the catalyzing enzymes involved in pigment turnover and fruit ripening-associated degreening are still controversial. Chl metabolism is closely linked to the biosynthesis of other isoprenoid-derived compounds, such as carotenoids and tocopherols, which are also components of the photosynthetic machinery. Chls, carotenoids and tocopherols share a common precursor, geranylgeranyl diphosphate, produced by the plastidial methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Additionally, the Chl degradation-derived phytol can be incorporated into tocopherol biosynthesis. In this context, tomato turns out to be an interesting model to address isoprenoid-metabolic cross-talk since fruit ripening combines degreening and an intensely active MEP leading to carotenoid accumulation. Here, we investigate the impact of PPH deficiency beyond senescence by the comprehensive phenotyping of SlPPH-knockdown tomato plants. In leaves, photosynthetic parameters indicate altered energy usage of excited Chl. As a mitigatory effect, photosynthesis-associated carotenoids increased while tocopherol content remained constant. Additionally, starch and soluble sugar profiles revealed a distinct pattern of carbon allocation in leaves that suggests enhanced sucrose exportation. The higher levels of carbohydrates in sink organs down-regulated carotenoid biosynthesis. Additionally, the reduction in Chl-derived phytol recycling resulted in decreased tocopherol content in transgenic ripe fruits. Summing up, tocopherol and carotenoid metabolism, together with the antioxidant capacity of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic fractions, were differentially affected in leaves and fruits of the transgenic plants. Thus, in tomato, PPH plays a role beyond

  20. Unusual carbonate-rich dikes and lamprophyres in Porcupine Dome, east-central Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doden, A.G.; Gold, D.P. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Geosciences)

    1992-01-01

    Isolated carbonate dikes and lamprophyric plugs are exposed in Porcupine dome, a Laramide structure in east-central Montana. En echelon sets of carbonate dikes strike N70E, consistent with regional lineaments and local normal faults. Individual dikes are steeply dipping, only 30--70 cm in width, and up to 1 km in length. These dikes exhibit unequivocal magmatic characteristics, including chilled margins, flow-aligned micas, multiple intrusive stages, country rock xenoliths, and local small blows'' containing well-rounded carbonate autoliths. Spatially associated with the dikes are small plugs of olivine-phlogopite-garnet-carbonate-bearing silicate rocks and a diatreme of bedded tuffs with xenoliths of country rocks. The dikes consistent primarily of calcite and dolomite, phlogopite, and opaque oxides. Although the dikes are relatively homogeneous mineralogically along strike, some chemical variations are apparent in the vicinity of the plugs/diatreme. Phlogopites and carbonates, common to both dikes and plugs, may provide a genetic link between these spatially associated intrusions. These unusual associations of dikes, plugs and diatremes are not restricted to Porcupine dome, but extend at least as far as the Grassrange - Winnett area, 100 km to the NW. The regional distribution of these small carbonatite bodies suggests a different magmatic process from typical carbonatites and alkaline complexes. The closest analogy is the carbonate dikes in the Premier Diamond Mine, South Africa.

  1. Annual benthic metabolism and organic carbon fluxes in a semi-enclosed Mediterranean bay dominated by the macroalgae Caulerpa prolifera

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz-Halpern, Sergio; Vaquer-Sunyer, Raquel; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Coastal areas play an important role on carbon cycling. Elucidating the dynamics on the production, transport, and fate of organic carbon (OC) is relevant to gain a better understanding on the role coastal areas play in the global carbon budget. Here, we assess the metabolic status and associated OC fluxes of a semi-enclosed Mediterranean bay supporting a meadow of Caulerpa prolifera. We test whether the EDOC pool is a significant component of the OC pool and associated fluxes in this ecosyst...

  2. Glutamate metabolism of astrocytes during hyperbaric oxygen exposure and its effects on central nervous system oxygen toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Liang; Li, Dan; Wang, Zhong-Zhuang; Xu, Wei-Gang; Li, Run-Ping; Zhang, Jun-Dong

    2016-01-20

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) has been used widely in many underwater missions and clinical work. However, exposure to extremely high oxygen pressure may cause central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT). The regulation of astrocyte glutamate metabolism is closely related to epilepsy. This study aimed to observe the effects of HBO exposure on glutamate metabolism in astrocytes and confirm the role of glutamate metabolism in CNS-OT. Anesthetized rats were exposed to 5 atmosphere absolute HBO for 80 min and microdialysis samples of brain interstitial fluid were continuously collected. Extracellular glutamate and glutamine concentrations were also detected. Freely moving rats were exposed to HBO of the same pressure for 20 min and glutamine synthetase (GS) activity in brain tissues was measured. Finally, we observed the effects of different doses of drugs related to glutamate metabolism on the latency of CNS-OT. Results showed that HBO exposure significantly increased glutamate content, whereas glutamine content was significantly reduced. Moreover, HBO exposure significantly reduced GS activity. Glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) selective antagonist ceftriaxone prolonged CNS-OT latency, whereas GLT-1 selective inhibitor dihydrokainate shortened CNS-OT latency. In summary, HBO exposure improved glutamate concentration and reduced glutamine concentration by inhibition of GS activity. GLT-1 activation also participated in the prevention of HBO-induced CNS-OT. Our research will provide a potential new target to terminate or attenuate CNS-OT. PMID:26619231

  3. Suppression of the External MitochondrialNADPH Dehydrogenase, NDB1, in Arabidopsisthaliana Affects Central Metabolism andVegetative Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent oxidation of cytosolic NADPH is mediated by NDB1, which is an external type II NADPHdehydrogenase in the plant mitochondrial electron transport chain. Using RNA interference, the NDB1 transcript wassuppressed by 80% in Arabidopsis thaliana plants, and external Ca2+-dependent NADPH dehydrogenase activity becameundetectable in isolated mitochondria. This was linked to a decreased level of NADP+ in rosettes of the transgenic lines.Sterile-grown transgenic seedlings displayed decreased growth specifically on glucose, and respiratory metabolism of 14C-glucose was increased. On soil, NDBl-suppressing plants had a decreased vegetative biomass, but leaf maximumquantum efficiency of photosystem Ⅱ and CO2 assimilation rates, as well as total respiration, were similar to the wild-type. The in vivo alternative oxidase activity and capacity were also similar in all genotypes. Metabolic profiling revealeddecreased levels of sugars, citric acid cycle intermediates, and amino acids in the transgenic lines. The NDBl-suppressioninduced transcriptomic changes associated with protein synthesis and glucosinolate and jasmonate metabolism. Thetranscriptomic changes also overlapped with changes observed in a mutant lacking ABAINSENSITIVE4 and in A. thalianaoverexpressing stress tolerance genes from rice. The results thus indicate that A. thaliana NDB1 modulates NADP(H)reduction levels, which in turn affect central metabolism and growth, and interact with defense signaling.

  4. Carbon dioxide emissions embodied in international trade in Central Europe between 1995 and 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlčková Jana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate change and environmental policies are widely discussed, but much less is known about emissions embodied in goods traded internationally, and the distinction between emission producers and consumers. The carbon dioxide emissions embodied in international trade in Central European countries are subject to examination in this paper. As a result of industrial restructuring and environmental legislation, air pollution has improved significantly in Central European countries since the 1989 transition. On the other hand, economic growth has been accompanied by a rise in consumerism. Despite the increasing role of exports, the Visegrad group countries have become net importers of carbon dioxide emissions between 1995 and 2008. This seems to be the ‘standard trajectory’ of a country’s transition toward a more developed and consumption-oriented economy. The global patterns of carbon dioxide emissions embodied in manufacturing exports are also mapped, using network analysis and constructing ‘product space’. The analysis confirms that industrial re-structuring played an important role in lowering the production of carbon dioxide emissions in the Visegrad countries.

  5. A Large Metabolic Carbon Ccontribution to the δ13C Record in Marine Aragonitic Bivalve Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillikin, D. P.; Lorrain, A.; Dehairs, F.

    2006-12-01

    The stable carbon isotopic signature archived in bivalve shells was originally thought to record the δ13C of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13C-DIC). However, more recent studies have shown that the incorporation of isotopically light metabolic carbon (M) significantly affects the δ13C signal recorded in biogenic carbonates. To assess the M contribution to Mercenaria mercenaria shells collected in North Carolina, USA, we sampled seawater δ13C-DIC, tissue, hemolymph and shell δ13C. We found up to a 4‰ decrease through ontogeny in shell δ13C in a 23 year old individual. There was no correlation between shell height or age and tissue δ13C. Thus, the ontogenic decrease observed in the shell δ13C could not be attributed to changes in food sources as the animal ages leading to more negative metabolic CO2, since this would require a negative relationship between tissue δ13C and shell height. Hemolymph δ13C, on the other hand, did exhibit a negative relationship with height, but the δ13C values were more positive than expected, indicating that hemolymph may not be a good proxy of extrapallial fluid δ13C. Nevertheless, the hemolymph data indicate that respired CO2 does influence the δ13C of internal fluids and that the amount of respired CO2 is related to the age of the bivalve. The percent metabolic C incorporated into the shell (%M) was significantly higher (up to 37%) than has been found in other bivalve shells, which usually contain less than 10 %M. Attempts to use shell biometrics to predict %M could not explain more than ~60% of the observed variability. Moreover, there were large differences in the %M between different sites. Thus, the metabolic effect on shell δ13C cannot easily be accounted for to allow reliable δ13C-DIC reconstructions. However, there does seem to be a common effect of size, as all sites had indistinguishable slopes between the %M and shell height (+0.19% per mm of shell height).

  6. Possible role for abscisic acid in regulation of photosynthetic and photorespiratory carbon metabolism in barley leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of abscisic acid (ABA) on carbon metabolism, rate of photorespiration, and the activity of the photorespiratory enzymes ribulose bisphosphate oxygenase and glycolate oxidase in 7-day-old barley seedlings (Hordeum vulgare L. var. Alfa) was investigated. Plants treated with ABA had enhanced incorporation of labeled carbon from 14CO2 into glycolic acid, glycine, and serine, while 14C incorporation into 3-phosphoglyceric acid and sugarphosphate esters was depressed. Parallel with this effect, treated plants showed a rise in activity of RuBP oxygenase and glycolic acid oxidase. The rate of photorespiration was increased twofold by ABA treatment at IO-6 molar while the CO2-compensation point increased 46% and stomatal resistance increased more than twofold over control plants

  7. Inorganic Carbon Turnover caused by Digestion of Carbonate Sands and Metabolic Activity of Holothurians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Kenneth; Silverman, Jacob; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider-Mor, Aya; Barbosa, Sergio; Byrne, Maria; Caldeira, Ken

    2013-11-20

    Recent measurements have shown that holothurians (sea cucumbers) play an important role in the cycling of CaCO3 in tropical coral reef systems through ingestion and processing of carbonate sediment. In this study inorganic additional aspects of carbon turnover were determined in laboratory incubations of Holothuria atra, H. leucospilota and Stichopus herrmanni from One Tree Reef, Great Barrier Reef. The pH values of the gut lumen ranged from 6.1 to 6.7 in animals with empty digestive tracts as opposed to 7.0 to 7.6 when digestive tracts were filled with sediment. Empty gut volume estimates for H. atra and S. herrmanni were 36 ± 4 mL and 151 ± 14 mL, respectively. Based on these measurements it is estimated that these species process 19 ± 2kg and 80 ± 7kg CaCO3 sand yr-1 per individual, respectively. The annual dissolution rates of H. atra and S. herrmanni of 6.5±1.9g and 9.6±1.4g, respectively, suggest that 0.05±0.02% and 0.1±0.02% of the CaCO3 processed through their gut annually is dissolved. During the incubations the CaCO3 dissolution was 0.07±0.01%, 0.04±0.01% and 0.21±0.05% of the fecal casts for H. atra, H. leucospilota and S. herrmanni, respectively. The CaCO3 saturation state for both aragonite and calcite minerals during laboratory incubations decreased markedly due to a greater increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) relative to total alkalinity (AT) as a result of respiration by the animals. Our results support the hypothesis that deposit feeders such as sea cucumbers play an important ecological role in the coral reef CaCO3 cycle.

  8. Snow Impurities on Central Asian Glaciers: Mineral Dust, Organic & Elemental Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, J.; Kang, S.; Peltier, R.; Sprenger, M.; Guo, J.; Li, Y.; Zhang, Q.

    2014-12-01

    In Central Asia, 90 % of the population depend on water stored in glaciers and mountain snow cover. Accelerated melting can be induced by the deposition of e.g., mineral dust and black carbon that reduce the surface albedo. Data on source regions and chemical characteristics of snow impurities are however scarce in Central Asia. We studied aerosol deposited between summers of 2012 and 2013on three different glaciers in the Kyrgyz Republic. Samples were taken from two snow pits on the glacier Abramov in the northern Pamir and from one snow pit on Ak-Shiirak and Suek in the central Tien Shan. The snow was analyzed for elemental and total organic carbon, major ions and mineral dust. In addition, dissolved organic carbon was speciated by using the Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol spectrometer. Elevated mineral dust concentrations were found on all glaciers during summer and winter with lower annual average concentrations (20 mg l-1)in the northern Pamir (factor 5 to 6). Correlations between dust tracers varied, indicating different source regions. Average EC concentrations showed seasonal variation in the northern Pamir (> 100 μg l-1 in summer, 12) than in summer (glaciers ranged between 0.65 and 1.09, indicating a high degree of oxygenation which suggests long-range transport of the organic snow impurities. Marker substances such as potassium and mercury and their correlations suggest contribution from biomass burning emissions. Atmospheric measurements in August 2013 were conducted to obtain information on background aerosol characteristics in the remote high mountain areas. The average black carbon concentration was 0.26 μg/m³ (± 0.24 μg/m³).

  9. One carbon metabolism and bone homeostasis and remodeling: A review of experimental research and population studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigerlova, Eva; Demarquet, Lea; Guéant, Jean-Louis

    2016-07-01

    Homocysteine (HCY) is a degradation product of the methionine pathway. The B vitamins, in particular vitamin B12 and folate, are the primary nutritional determinant of HCY levels and therefore their deficiencies result in hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHCY). Prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHCY) and related dietary deficiencies in B vitamins and folate increase with age and have been related to osteoporosis and abnormal development of epiphyseal cartilage and bone in rodents. Here we provide a review of experimental and population studies. The negative effects of HHCY and/or B vitamins and folate deficiencies on bone formation and remodeling are documented by cell models, including primary osteoblasts, osteoclast and bone progenitor cells as well as by animal and human studies. However, underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are complex and remain poorly understood. Whether these associations are the direct consequences of impaired one carbon metabolism is not clarified and more studies are still needed to translate these findings to human population. To date, the evidence is limited and somewhat conflicting, however further trials in groups most vulnerable to impaired one carbon metabolism are required. PMID:27086080

  10. Expression of human dopamine receptor in potato (Solanum tuberosum results in altered tuber carbon metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Świędrych Anna

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Even though the catecholamines (dopamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine have been detected in plants their role is poorly documented. Correlations between norepinephrine, soluble sugars and starch concentration have been recently reported for potato plants over-expressing tyrosine decarboxylase, the enzyme mediating the first step of catecholamine synthesis. More recently norepinephrine level was shown to significantly increase after osmotic stress, abscisic acid treatment and wounding. Therefore, it is possible that catecholamines might play a role in plant stress responses by modulating primary carbon metabolism, possibly by a mechanism similar to that in animal cells. Since to date no catecholamine receptor has been identified in plants we transformed potato plants with a cDNA encoding human dopamine receptor (HD1. Results Tuber analysis of transgenic plants revealed changes in the activities of key enzymes mediating sucrose to starch conversion (ADP-glucose phosphorylase and sucrose synthase and sucrose synthesis (sucrose phosphate synthase leading to altered content of both soluble sugars and starch. Surprisingly the catecholamine level measured in transgenic plants was significantly increased; the reason for this is as yet unknown. However the presence of the receptor affected a broader range of enzyme activities than those affected by the massive accumulation of norepinephrine reported for plants over-expressing tyrosine decarboxylase. Therefore, it is suggested that the presence of the exogenous receptor activates catecholamine cAMP signalling in plants. Conclusions Our data support the possible involvement of catecholamines in regulating plant carbon metabolism via cAMP signalling pathway.

  11. Early pregnancy B vitamin status, one carbon metabolism, pregnancy outcome and child development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé-Navais, Pol; Cavallé-Busquets, Pere; Fernandez-Ballart, Joan D; Murphy, Michelle M

    2016-07-01

    Periconception supplementation with folic acid is recommended until 12 gestational weeks to prevent neural tube defects. Doses of folic acid contained in supplements and timing and length of use during pregnancy vary. The effects of status in periconception and pregnancy folate, cobalamin, betaine and their interactions on one carbon metabolism (1C), as well as the global effect of 1C on foetal growth and pregnancy outcome, are reviewed. Results from prospective studies are reviewed. Cessation of folic acid supplement use after the first trimester is associated with a sharp drop in plasma folate status and enhanced conversion of betaine to dimethylglycine. Dimethylglycine production is also higher in mothers with low folate status than in those with normal-high folate status. The effects of high doses of folic acid on one carbon metabolism in mothers with low early pregnancy cobalamin status and on foetal growth are also reviewed. Several studies report that moderately elevated early pregnancy fasting plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) is inversely associated with birth weight and a predictor of intrauterine growth retardation. There is also evidence for increased risk of preterm birth when maternal folate status is low. PMID:26700149

  12. Effect of carbon on whole-biofilm metabolic response to high doses of streptomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Lindsay M D; Kroukamp, Otini; Wolfaardt, Gideon M

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms typically exist as complex communities comprising multiple species with the ability to adapt to a variety of harsh conditions. In clinical settings, antibiotic treatments based on planktonic susceptibility tests are often ineffective against biofilm infections. Using a CO2 evolution measurement system we delineated the real-time metabolic response in continuous flow biofilms to streptomycin doses much greater than their planktonic susceptibilities. Stable biofilms from a multispecies culture (containing mainly Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia), Gram-negative environmental isolates, and biofilms formed by pure culture P. aeruginosa strains PAO1 and PAO1 ΔMexXY (minimum planktonic inhibitory concentrations between 1.5 and 3.5 mg/l), were exposed in separate experiments to 4000 mg/l streptomycin for 4 h after which growth medium resumed. In complex medium, early steady state multispecies biofilms were susceptible to streptomycin exposure, inferred by a cessation of CO2 production. However, multispecies biofilms survived high dose exposures when there was extra carbon in the antibiotic medium, or when they were grown in defined citrate medium. The environmental isolates and PAO1 biofilms showed similar metabolic profiles in response to streptomycin; ceasing CO2 production after initial exposure, with CO2 levels dropping toward baseline levels prior to recovery back to steady state levels, while subsequent antibiotic exposure elicited increased CO2 output. Monitoring biofilm metabolic response in real-time allowed exploration of conditions resulting in vulnerability after antibiotic exposure compared to the resistance displayed following subsequent exposures. PMID:26441887

  13. Differential metabolic rates among the school going boys of a Central Indian Town (Sagar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Thakur

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The prime objective of the present study was to estimate the basal metabolic rate (BMR and resting metabolic rate (RMR among school going boys of 5-18 year of age. The subjects were recruited from government schools of Sagar town of Madhya Pradesh state of Indian Union. Height and weight of the boys were measured using standard anthropometric techniques. Body mass index (BMI and metabolic rates (BMR/RMR were computed for each individual. It was found that mean of BMI varies from 13.8±1.6 Kg m- 2 among boys of 8 year of age to 19.0±1.9 Kg m- 2 among boys of 17 year of age. Similarly, mean of Basal metabolic rate (BMR varies from 1219.0±106.9 K cal/day among boys aged 5 year of age to 2296.3±255.9 K cal/day among 17 year of age. Pre pubertal and pubertal boys have significant difference in their basal metabolic rates as well as stunted, underweight and undernourished boys have significant low BMR. The linear bivariate regression analysis shows that the BMR is dependent on BMI, weight and height. The RMR have highest regression coefficient (r2=0.935 on BMR, followed by Height (r2=0.664, weight (r2=0.631 and body mass index (r2=0.368. The similar trends can be seen for RMR also. The BMR is highly dependent on RMR followed by height, weight and BMI.

  14. Seasonal Variation of Carbon Metabolism in the Cambial Zone of Eucalyptus grandis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzinski, Ilara G F; Moon, David H; Lindén, Pernilla; Moritz, Thomas; Labate, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    Eucalyptus species are the most widely hardwood planted in the world. It is one of the successful examples of commercial forestry plantation in Brazil and other tropical and subtropical countries. The tree is valued for its rapid growth, adaptability and wood quality. Wood formation is the result of cumulative annual activity of the vascular cambium. This cambial activity is generally related to the alternation of cold and warm, and/or dry and rainy seasons. Efforts have focused on analysis of cambial zone in response to seasonal variations in trees from temperate zones. However, little is known about the molecular changes triggered by seasonal variations in trees from tropical countries. In this work we attempted to establish a global view of seasonal alterations in the cambial zone of Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex Maiden, emphasizing changes occurring in the carbon metabolism. Using transcripts, proteomics and metabolomics we analyzed the tissues harvested in summer-wet and winter-dry seasons. Based on proteomics analysis, 70 proteins that changed in abundance were successfully identified. Transcripts for some of these proteins were analyzed and similar expression patterns were observed. We identified 19 metabolites differentially abundant. Our results suggest a differential reconfiguration of carbon partioning in E. grandis cambial zone. During summer, pyruvate is primarily metabolized via ethanolic fermentation, possibly to regenerate NAD(+) for glycolytic ATP production and cellular maintenance. However, in winter there seems to be a metabolic change and we found that some sugars were highly abundant. Our results revealed a dynamic change in E. grandis cambial zone due to seasonality and highlight the importance of glycolysis and ethanolic fermentation for energy generation and maintenance in Eucalyptus, a fast growing tree. PMID:27446160

  15. Reciprocal regulation of protein synthesis and carbon metabolism for thylakoid membrane biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra-Viola Bohne

    Full Text Available Metabolic control of gene expression coordinates the levels of specific gene products to meet cellular demand for their activities. This control can be exerted by metabolites acting as regulatory signals and/or a class of metabolic enzymes with dual functions as regulators of gene expression. However, little is known about how metabolic signals affect the balance between enzymatic and regulatory roles of these dual functional proteins. We previously described the RNA binding activity of a 63 kDa chloroplast protein from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which has been implicated in expression of the psbA mRNA, encoding the D1 protein of photosystem II. Here, we identify this factor as dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (DLA2, a subunit of the chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (cpPDC, which is known to provide acetyl-CoA for fatty acid synthesis. Analyses of RNAi lines revealed that DLA2 is involved in the synthesis of both D1 and acetyl-CoA. Gel filtration analyses demonstrated an RNP complex containing DLA2 and the chloroplast psbA mRNA specifically in cells metabolizing acetate. An intrinsic RNA binding activity of DLA2 was confirmed by in vitro RNA binding assays. Results of fluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation experiments support a role of DLA2 in acetate-dependent localization of the psbA mRNA to a translation zone within the chloroplast. Reciprocally, the activity of the cpPDC was specifically affected by binding of psbA mRNA. Beyond that, in silico analysis and in vitro RNA binding studies using recombinant proteins support the possibility that RNA binding is an ancient feature of dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferases. Our results suggest a regulatory function of DLA2 in response to growth on reduced carbon energy sources. This raises the intriguing possibility that this regulation functions to coordinate the synthesis of lipids and proteins for the biogenesis of photosynthetic membranes.

  16. Photosynthetic carbon metabolism in photoautotrophic cell suspension cultures grown at low and high CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photosynthetic carbon metabolism was characterized in four photoautotrophic cell suspension cultures. There was no apparent difference between two soybeans (Glycine max) and one cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) cell line which required 5% CO2 for growth, and a unique cotton cell line that grows at ambient CO2 (660 microliters per liter). Photosynthetic characteristics in all four lines were more like C3 mesophyll leaf cells than the cell suspension cultures previously studied. The pattern of 14C-labeling reflected the high ratio of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity and showed that CO2 fixation occurred primarily by the C3 pathway. Photorespiration occurred at 330 microliters per liter CO2, 21% O2 as indicated by the synthesis of high levels of 14C-labeled glycine and serine in a pulse-chase experiment and by oxygen inhibition of CO2 fixation. Short-term CO2 fixation in the presence and absence of carbonic anhydrase showed CO2, not HCO3-, to be the main source of inorganic carbon taken up by the low CO2-requiring cotton cells. The cells did not have a CO2-concentrating mechanism as indicated by silicone oil centrifugation experiments. Carbonic anhydrase was absent in the low CO2-requiring cotton cells, present in the high CO2-requiring soybean cell lines, and absent in other high CO2 cell lines examined. Thus, the presence of carbonic anhydrase is not an essential requirement for photoautotrophy in cell suspension cultures which grow at either high or low CO2 concentrations

  17. A direct evidence for high carbon dioxide and radon-222 discharge in Central Nepal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrier, F.; Byrdina, S. [Inst Phys Globe, UMR 7154, Equipe Geomagnetisme, F-75005 Paris (France); Univ Paris Diderot, F-75005 Paris (France); Richon, P.; Bollinger, L.; Bureau, S. [CEA Bruyeres le Chatel, DIF, Dept Anal Surveillance Environm, 91 (France); Richon, P. [Inst Phys Globe, UMR 7154, Equipe Geol Syst Volcan, F-75005 Paris (France); France-Lanord, Ch. [CNRS, Ctr Rech Petrog and Geochim, F-54501 Vandoeuvre Les Nancy (France); Rajaure, S.; Koirala, Bharat Prasad; Shrestha, Prithvi Lal; Gautam, Umesh Prasad; Tiwari, Dilli Ram; Sapkota, Soma Nath [Natl Seism Ctr, Dept Mines and Geol, Kathmandu (Nepal); Revil, A. [Colorado Sch Mines, Dept Geophys, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Revil, A. [Univ Savoie, Equipe Volcans, CNRS, LGIT, UMR 5559, Chambery (France); Contraires, S. [Inst Phys Globe, Equipe Geomat and Environm, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2009-02-15

    Gas discharges have been identified at the Syabru-Bensi hot springs, located at the front of the High Himalaya in Central Nepal, in the Main Central Thrust zone. The hot spring waters are characterized by a temperature reaching 61 C, high salinity, high alkalinity and {delta}{sup 13}C varying from +0. 7 parts per thousand to +4. 8 parts per thousand. The gas is mainly dry carbon dioxide, with a {delta}{sup 13}C of -0. 8 parts per thousand. The diffuse carbon dioxide flux, mapped by the accumulation chamber method, reached a value of 19000 g m{sup -2}day{sup -1}, which is comparable with values measured on active volcanoes. Similar values have been observed over a two-year time interval and the integral around the main gas discharge amounts to 0. 25 {+-} 0. 07 mol s{sup -1}, or 350 {+-} 100 ton a{sup -1}. The mean radon-222 concentration in spring water did not exceed 2. 5 Bq L{sup -1}, exponentially decreasing with water temperature. In contrast, in gas bubbles collected in the water or in the dry gas discharges, the radon concentration varied from 16 000 to 41000 Bq m{sup -3}. In the soil, radon concentration varied from 25000 to more than 50000 Bq m{sup -3}. Radon flux, measured at more than fifty points, reached extreme values, larger than 2 Bq m{sup -2}s{sup -1}, correlated to the larger values of the carbon dioxide flux. Our direct observation confirms previous studies which indicated large degassing in the Himalaya. The proposed understanding is that carbon dioxide is released at mid-crustal depth by metamorphic reactions within the Indian basement, transported along pre-existing faults by meteoric hot water circulation, and degassed before reaching surface. This work, first, confirms that further studies should be undertaken to better constrain the carbon budget of the Himalaya, and, more generally, the contribution of mountain building to the global carbon balance. Furthermore, the evidenced gas discharges provide a unique natural laboratory for

  18. Linking carbon storage with functional diversity in tropical rainforest in the central Congo Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeeck, Hans; Kearsley, Elizabeth; Bauters, Marijn; Beeckman, Hans; Huygens, Dries; Steppe, Kathy; Boeckx, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    This presentation will show an overview of results of the COBIMFO project (Congo basin integrated monitoring for forest carbon mitigation and biodiversity). In the framework of this project we have established 21 permanent 1 ha sampling plots in different forest types in the Yangambi reserve. This UNESCO Man and Biosphere reserve has an area of more than 6000 km² and is located in the heart of the Congo Basin near the Yangambi research station (DR Congo). Analysis of the inventory data of these plots revealed that carbon stocks in mature forests in this area of the Congo Basin are significantly lower (24%) than stocks recorded in the outer regions of the basin. These lower stocks are attributed to a lower maximal tree height (Kearsley et al. 2013). In addition to the carbon inventories we collected leaf and wood samples on all species within 95% basal area of each of the Yangambi plots. A total of 995 individuals were sampled, covering 123 tree species. On the samples we measured 15 traits related to leaf and wood morphology and functioning. In the presented study, relationships between the observed functional diversity and biomass are analysed. One of the remarkable results of our analysis is that species with a high functional distinctiveness have a low contribution to the basal area and the carbon stocks. In contrast, species with a high contribution to the carbon stock have a low contribution to the functional diversity. Similar patterns have been observed elsewhere (e.g. Amazon basin), but are now for the first time confirmed for central African rainforest. Finally, we also present the first results of an analysis of carbons stocks and functional diversity in tropical plantations from a unique 70-years old tree diversity experiment that was established during the colonial period at the Yangambi research station. Kearsley, E., de Haulleville, T., Hufkens, K., Kidimbu, A., Toirambe, B., Baert, G., Huygens, D., Kebede, Y., Defourny, P., Bogaert, J., Beeckman, H

  19. A direct evidence for high carbon dioxide and radon-222 discharge in Central Nepal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas discharges have been identified at the Syabru-Bensi hot springs, located at the front of the High Himalaya in Central Nepal, in the Main Central Thrust zone. The hot spring waters are characterized by a temperature reaching 61 C, high salinity, high alkalinity and δ13C varying from +0. 7 parts per thousand to +4. 8 parts per thousand. The gas is mainly dry carbon dioxide, with a δ13C of -0. 8 parts per thousand. The diffuse carbon dioxide flux, mapped by the accumulation chamber method, reached a value of 19000 g m-2day-1, which is comparable with values measured on active volcanoes. Similar values have been observed over a two-year time interval and the integral around the main gas discharge amounts to 0. 25 ± 0. 07 mol s-1, or 350 ± 100 ton a-1. The mean radon-222 concentration in spring water did not exceed 2. 5 Bq L-1, exponentially decreasing with water temperature. In contrast, in gas bubbles collected in the water or in the dry gas discharges, the radon concentration varied from 16 000 to 41000 Bq m-3. In the soil, radon concentration varied from 25000 to more than 50000 Bq m-3. Radon flux, measured at more than fifty points, reached extreme values, larger than 2 Bq m-2s-1, correlated to the larger values of the carbon dioxide flux. Our direct observation confirms previous studies which indicated large degassing in the Himalaya. The proposed understanding is that carbon dioxide is released at mid-crustal depth by metamorphic reactions within the Indian basement, transported along pre-existing faults by meteoric hot water circulation, and degassed before reaching surface. This work, first, confirms that further studies should be undertaken to better constrain the carbon budget of the Himalaya, and, more generally, the contribution of mountain building to the global carbon balance. Furthermore, the evidenced gas discharges provide a unique natural laboratory for methodological studies, and appear particularly important to study as a function of time

  20. Metabolic Effect of Estrogen Receptor Agonists on Breast Cancer Cells in the Presence or Absence of Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anissa Belkaid

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic shift is one of the major hallmarks of cancer development. Estrogen receptor (ER activity has a profound effect on breast cancer cell growth through a number of metabolic changes driven by its effect on transcription of several enzymes, including carbonic anhydrases, Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1, and oncogenes including HER2. Thus, estrogen receptor activators can be expected to lead to the modulation of cell metabolism in estrogen receptor positive cells. In this work we have investigated the effect of 17β-estradiol, an ER activator, and ferulic acid, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, as well as ER activator, in the absence and in the presence of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide on the metabolism of MCF7 cells and MCF7 cells, stably transfected to express HER2 (MCF7HER2. Metabolic profiles were studied using 1D and 2D metabolomic Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR experiments, combined with the identification and quantification of metabolites, and the annotation of the results in the context of biochemical pathways. Overall changes in hydrophilic metabolites were largest following treatment of MCF7 and MC7HER2 cells with 17β-estradiol. However, the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide had the largest effect on the profile of lipophilic metabolites.

  1. Carbon Stock Potential of Oak and Pine Forests in Garhwal Region in Indian Central Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanda Nautiyal

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Oak (Quercus leucotichophora and pine (Pinus roxburghii are the two most dominant forest types occurring in Indian Central Himalayas. CO2 mitigation potential of these two forest types was observed in the present study. Carbon stock densities for AGTB, BB, LHG, DWS, AGSB and SOC were estimated and higher values were recorded in oak forest stands. Total carbon density estimated was 2420.54 Mg/ha for oak forest of Gopeshwar and 986.93 Mg/ha for pine forest of Nandprayag. CO2 mitigation potential of oak forest of Gopeshwar was recorded to be 8,713.94 CO2e and of pine forests 3552.95 CO2e.

  2. The activated sludge metabolic characteristics changing sole carbon source from readily biodegradable acetate to toxic phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changyong; Zhou, Yuexi; Song, Jiamei

    2016-01-01

    A sequencing batch reactor was used to investigate the effect of carbon sources on the metabolism of activated sludge. Acetate and phenol, with the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 330-350 mg L(-1), was used as the carbon source in Periods I and II, respectively. Acetate decreased in the initial 120 min with the intracellular storage materials (XSTO), extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and the soluble microbial products (SMP) accumulating to 131.0 mg L(-1), 347.5 mg L(-1), and 35.5 mg L(-1), respectively. Then, XSTO and EPS decreased to 124.5 mg L(-1) and 340.0 mg L(-1), respectively, in the following 120 min. When acetate was replaced by phenol, it could not be used at the beginning due to its toxicity. The XSTO decreased from 142 mg L(-1) to 54.6 mg L(-1) during the aeration period. The EPS had a significant increase, with the highest value of 618.1 mg L(-1), which then decreased to 245.6 mg L(-1) at 240 min. The phenol was gradually degraded with the acclimation and it can be fully degraded 18 d later. Meanwhile, the usage ratio of the internal carbon source decreased. The effluent SMP in Period II was 1.7 times that in Period I. PMID:27191552

  3. Carbon isotope ratios in crassulacean Acid metabolism plants: seasonal patterns from plants in natural stands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarek, S R

    1976-09-01

    A year round study of photosynthesis and carbon isotope fractionation was conducted with plants of Opuntia phaeacantha Engelm. and Yucca baccata Torr. occurring in natural stands at elevations of 525, 970, 1450 and 1900 m. Plant water potentials and the daytime pattern of (14)CO(2) photosynthesis were similar for all cacti along the elevational gradient, despite significant differences in temperature regime and soil water status. Carbon isotope ratios of total tissue and soluble extract fractions were relatively constant throughtout the entire year. Additionally, the sigma(13)C values were similar in all plants of the same species along the elevational gradient, i.e. -12.5 +/- 0.86 per thousand for O. phaeacantha and -15.7 +/- 0.95 per thousand for Y. baccata. The results of this study indicate Crassulacean acid metabolism predominates as the major carbon pathway of these plants, which do not facultatively utilize the reductive pentose phosphate cycle of photosynthesis as the primary carboxylation reaction. PMID:16659680

  4. Metabolic syndrome in the rural population of Wardha, Central India: An exploratory factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep R Deshmukh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Metabolic syndrome - a plausible precondition for type II diabetes and cardiovascular diseases is also on rise. To understand the mechanistic complexity of metabolic syndrome it is imperative to study the specific contribution of the determinants of metabolic syndrome. Such study can help to identify the most significant factor which may be of use in early detection as well as prevention efforts. Such information is scarcely available from India and especially from rural India. Hence, the present study was undertaken to explore for such factor which might be considered crucial for development of such pathogenesis particularly in rural population of Wardha. Methods: A cross-sectional study comprising of 300 subjects was carried out in rural area of Primary Health Center, attached to medical college with approximate 31,000 populations. The anthropometric parameters such as height, weight, waist circumference were measured. Overnight fasting samples were collected for lipid profile (total cholesterol, triglyceride, high density lipoproteins, low density lipoproteins, very low density lipoproteins and fasting blood glucose levels. The National Cholesterol Education Programme Adult Treatment Panel, ATP-III guidelines were used to categorize the study subjects. As many of the variables are highly intercorrelated, exploratory factor analysis was carried out to reduce the data to a smaller number of independent factors that accounts for the most of the variances in the data. Principal component analysis was used as a method of extraction. Results: For both sexes, three factors were extracted accounting for about 71% variance in the measured variables. An adiposity factor which accounted for highest explained variance (28%, was the initial factor extracted. It was loaded positively by waist circumference, triglyceride, and very low density lipoprotein and negatively loaded by high density lipoprotein. Second factor extracted

  5. Mapping organic carbon stocks in eucalyptus plantations of the central highlands of Madagascar : a multiple regression approach

    OpenAIRE

    Razakamanarivo, R. H.; Grinand, Clovis; Razafindrakoto, M. A.; Bernoux, Martial; Albrecht, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Recent concerns about global warming have resulted in more concerted studies on quantification and modeling of carbon (C) storage in different ecosystems. The aim of this study was to assess and map the carbon stocks in above (ABG), below-ground (BLG) biomass and soil organic carbon contained in the 30 centimeter top-layer (SOC) in coppices of eucalyptus plantations in the central highlands of Madagascar in an area of 1590 ha. Relationships between C stock and various biophysical (stool or sh...

  6. Metabolic profiling reveals coordinated switches in primary carbohydrate metabolism in grape berry (Vitis vinifera L.), a non-climacteric fleshy fruit

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Z.; Leon, C.; Feil, R.; Lunn, J.; Delrot, S.; Gomes, E.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in carbohydrate metabolism during grape berry development play a central role in shaping the final composition of the fruit. The present work aimed to identify metabolic switches during grape development and to provide insights into the timing of developmental regulation of carbohydrate metabolism. Metabolites from central carbon metabolism were measured using high-pressure anion-exchange chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry and enzymatic assays during the development of...

  7. International Workshop on Carbon Cycling and Coral Reef Metabolism; Sangosho no tanso junkan ni kansuru kokusai workshop hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-16

    The paper described the International Workshop on Carbon Cycling and Coral Reef Metabolism which was held at Miyako-jima, Okinawa Pref. on October 17-24, 1995. In the workshop, researchers got together which are involved in marine chemistry, marine biology, coral ecology, and environmental science, and discussed the carbon cycling and metabolism of coral reef. Discussions were made on what the coral reef ecosystem is, and what the definition of a sink or a source for CO2 is. Also discussed were scales of how much time and space should be considered to make these issues clear. Further, it was proposed that it was necessary to investigate carbon balance of both the whole system and the components of the system and to keep track of mass transfer among neighboring components of the system. Seventeen presentations were given. The workshop obtained a definite consensus on carbon balance of the coral reef system. 123 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. ¹³C metabolic flux analysis identifies an unusual route for pyruvate dissimilation in mycobacteria which requires isocitrate lyase and carbon dioxide fixation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dany J V Beste

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires the enzyme isocitrate lyase (ICL for growth and virulence in vivo. The demonstration that M. tuberculosis also requires ICL for survival during nutrient starvation and has a role during steady state growth in a glycerol limited chemostat indicates a function for this enzyme which extends beyond fat metabolism. As isocitrate lyase is a potential drug target elucidating the role of this enzyme is of importance; however, the role of isocitrate lyase has never been investigated at the level of in vivo fluxes. Here we show that deletion of one of the two icl genes impairs the replication of Mycobacterium bovis BCG at slow growth rate in a carbon limited chemostat. In order to further understand the role of isocitrate lyase in the central metabolism of mycobacteria the effect of growth rate on the in vivo fluxes was studied for the first time using ¹³C-metabolic flux analysis (MFA. Tracer experiments were performed with steady state chemostat cultures of BCG or M. tuberculosis supplied with ¹³C labeled glycerol or sodium bicarbonate. Through measurements of the ¹³C isotopomer labeling patterns in protein-derived amino acids and enzymatic activity assays we have identified the activity of a novel pathway for pyruvate dissimilation. We named this the GAS pathway because it utilizes the Glyoxylate shunt and Anapleurotic reactions for oxidation of pyruvate, and Succinyl CoA synthetase for the generation of succinyl CoA combined with a very low flux through the succinate--oxaloacetate segment of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. We confirm that M. tuberculosis can fix carbon from CO₂ into biomass. As the human host is abundant in CO₂ this finding requires further investigation in vivo as CO₂ fixation may provide a point of vulnerability that could be targeted with novel drugs. This study also provides a platform for further studies into the metabolism of M. tuberculosis using ¹³C-MFA.

  9. Comparative genomic reconstruction of transcriptional networks controlling central metabolism in the Shewanella genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovaleva Galina

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-scale prediction of gene regulation and reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria is one of the critical tasks of modern genomics. The Shewanella genus is comprised of metabolically versatile gamma-proteobacteria, whose lifestyles and natural environments are substantially different from Escherichia coli and other model bacterial species. The comparative genomics approaches and computational identification of regulatory sites are useful for the in silico reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria. Results To explore conservation and variations in the Shewanella transcriptional networks we analyzed the repertoire of transcription factors and performed genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors and their DNA binding sites, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Forty five regulons were newly inferred from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in the Enterobacteria and Pseudomonas spp.. Multiple variations in regulatory strategies between the Shewanella spp. and E. coli include regulon contraction and expansion (as in the case of PdhR, HexR, FadR, numerous cases of recruiting non-orthologous regulators to control equivalent pathways (e.g. PsrA for fatty acid degradation and, conversely, orthologous regulators to control distinct pathways (e.g. TyrR, ArgR, Crp. Conclusions We tentatively defined the first reference collection of ~100 transcriptional regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The resulting regulatory network contains ~600 regulated genes per genome that are mostly involved in metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, metals, and stress responses. Several reconstructed regulons including NagR for N-acetylglucosamine catabolism were experimentally validated in S

  10. Role of central nervous system in acute radiation syndrome functional metabolic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In adult rabbit, the effect on the brain of a whole-body or encephalic gamma irradiation is a function of the absorbed dose and begins after 25 rads. Three phases are described in the mechanism of radiation effect. In the initial phase, irradiation acts as a direct stimulus of cerebral structures. The second phase is a response towards aggression which includes: the effect of stimulation of various cerebral structures; their response and the induced feed-back mechanism; the release of metabolites inducing a functional metabolic encephalopathy in which occur: modification of blood pressure; modification of pulmonary ventilation; modification of acido-basic blood equilibrium. The third phase consists of functional recovery

  11. Pathway confirmation and flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flux distribution in central metabolic pathways of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was examined using 13C tracer experiments. Consistent with the current genome annotation and independent evidence from enzyme activity assays, the isotopomer results from both GC-MS and Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) indicate the lack of oxidatively functional TCA cycle and an incomplete pentose phosphate pathway. Results from this study suggest that fluxes through both pathways are limited to biosynthesis. The data also indicate that >80 percent of the lactate was converted to acetate and the reactions involved are the primary route of energy production (NAD(P)H and ATP production). Independent of the TCA cycle, direct cleavage of acetyl-CoA to CO and 5,10-methyl-THF also leads to production of NADH and ATP. Although the genome annotation implicates a ferredoxin-dependent oxoglutarate synthase, isotopic evidence does not support flux through this reaction in either the oxidative or reductive mode; therefore, the TCA cycle is incomplete. FT-ICR MS was used to locate the labeled carbon distribution in aspartate and glutamate and confirmed the presence of an atypical enzyme for citrate formation suggested in previous reports (the citrate synthesized by this enzyme is the isotopic antipode of the citrate synthesized by the (S)-citrate synthase). These findings enable a better understanding of the relation between genome annotation and actual metabolic pathways in D. vulgaris, and also demonstrate FT-ICR MS as a powerful tool for isotopomer analysis, overcoming problems in both GC-MS and NMR spectroscopy

  12. Lysine Malonylome May Affect the Central Metabolism and Erythromycin Biosynthesis Pathway in Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun-Yu; Xu, Zhen; Zhou, Ying; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2016-05-01

    Lysine acylation is a dynamic, reversible post-translational modification that can regulate cellular and organismal metabolism in bacteria. Acetylome has been studied well in bacteria. However, to our knowledge, there are no proteomic data on the lysine malonylation in prokaryotes, especially in actinomycetes, which are the major producers of therapeutic antibiotics. In our study, the first malonylome of the erythromycin-producing Saccharopolyspora erythraea was described by using a high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach and high-affinity antimalonyllysine antibodies. We identified 192 malonylated sites on 132 substrates. Malonylated proteins are enriched in many biological processes such as protein synthesis, glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, the TCA cycle, and the feeder metabolic pathways of erythromycin synthesis according to GO analysis and KEGG pathway analysis. A total of 238 S/T/Y/H-phosphorylated sites on 158 proteins were also identified in our study, which aimed to explore the potential cross-talk between acylation and phosphorylation. After that, site-specific mutations showed that malonylation is a negative regulatory modification on the enzymatic activity of the acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs) and glutamine synthetase (Gs). Furthermore, we compared the malonylation levels of the two-growth state to explore the potential effect of malonylation on the erythromycin biosynthesis. These findings expand our current knowledge of the actinomycetes malonylome and supplement the acylproteome databases of the whole bacteria. PMID:27090497

  13. The flexible feedstock concept in Industrial Biotechnology: Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Pseudomonas, Bacillus and yeast strains for access to alternative carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendisch, Volker F; Brito, Luciana Fernandes; Gil Lopez, Marina; Hennig, Guido; Pfeifenschneider, Johannes; Sgobba, Elvira; Veldmann, Kareen H

    2016-09-20

    Most biotechnological processes are based on glucose that is either present in molasses or generated from starch by enzymatic hydrolysis. At the very high, million-ton scale production volumes, for instance for fermentative production of the biofuel ethanol or of commodity chemicals such as organic acids and amino acids, competing uses of carbon sources e.g. in human and animal nutrition have to be taken into account. Thus, the biotechnological production hosts E. coli, C. glutamicum, pseudomonads, bacilli and Baker's yeast used in these large scale processes have been engineered for efficient utilization of alternative carbon sources. This flexible feedstock concept is central to the use of non-glucose second and third generation feedstocks in the emerging bioeconomy. The metabolic engineering efforts to broaden the substrate scope of E. coli, C. glutamicum, pseudomonads, B. subtilis and yeasts to include non-native carbon sources will be reviewed. Strategies to enable simultaneous consumption of mixtures of native and non-native carbon sources present in biomass hydrolysates will be summarized and a perspective on how to further increase feedstock flexibility for the realization of biorefinery processes will be given. PMID:27491712

  14. Clinical utility of polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolism for breast cancer risk prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaik Mohammad Naushad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the issues in translating the laboratory derived data obtained during discovery phase of research to a clinical setting using a breast cancer model. Laboratory-based risk assessment indi-cated that a family history of breast cancer, reduced folate carrier 1 (RFC1 G80A, thymidylate synthase (TYMS 5’-UTR 28bp tandem repeat, methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and catecholamine-O-methyl transferase (COMT genetic polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolic pathway increase the risk for breast cancer. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII C1561T and cytosolic serine hydroxymethyl transferase (cSHMT C1420T polymorphisms were found to decrease breast cancer risk. In order to test the clinical validity of this information in the risk prediction of breast cancer, data was stratified based on number of protective alleles into four categories and in each category sensitivity and 1-specificity values were obtained based on the distribution of number of risk alleles in cases and controls. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves were plotted and the area under ROC curve (C was used as a measure of discriminatory ability between cases and controls. In subjects without any protective allele, aberrations in one-carbon metabolism showed perfect prediction (C=0.93 while the predictability was lost in subjects with one protective allele (C=0.60. However, predictability increased steadily with increasing number of protective alleles (C=0.63 for 2 protective alleles and C=0.71 for 3 protective alleles. The cut-off point for discrimination was >4 alleles in all predictable combinations. Models of this kind can serve as valuable tools in translational re-search, especially in identifying high-risk individuals and reducing the disease risk either by life style modification or by medical intervention.

  15. Fine quantitative trait loci mapping of carbon and nitrogen metabolism enzyme activities and seedling biomass in the intermated maize IBM mapping population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the genetic basis of nitrogen and carbon metabolism will accelerate development of plant varieties with high yield and improved nitrogen use efficiency. In this study, we measured the activities of ten enzymes from carbon and nitrogen metabolism and seedling/juvenile biomass in the mai...

  16. High carbon monoxide concentrations during the rainy season in Campo Grande, in central Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes an event of unusually large mixing ratios of carbon monoxide, CO, observed during a typical rainy season time period in central Brazil, when concentrations are expected to be at low levels. CO measurements were performed in Campo Grande (20.02 deg. S; 54.5 deg. W), from July 2001 to October 2002, covering entire periods of the dry and wet seasons. From January to June, average CO was 131 parts per billion by volume (ppbv). During November/December, average CO is about 180 ppbv. On November 13, 521.9 and 565.6 ppbv were observed. It is shown that for this special event, in which there was practically no fire activity at or near the site, air parcels reaching the site were enriched with fire products from regions much further north, near the equatorial region, where the fire activity is delayed in time, compared to central Brazil. - Unusually high levels of CO occurred in Campo Grande, central Brazil in the rainy season

  17. Climate Change in Central and West Asia. Routes to a More Secure, Low-Carbon Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-11-15

    ADB's Central and West Asian countries are Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, Pakistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. Geoclimatic and environmental factors make this region highly vulnerable to the risks and hazards of climate change. For example, accelerated glacial melt has serious implications for agriculture, water supply, and energy generation - problems exacerbated by overexploitation of natural resources. Countries may find it difficult to shift to low-carbon growth, since many have abundant fossil fuel and tend to use energy inefficiently. ADB is responding to these climate hazards and low-carbon pathways with a comprehensive strategy that strengthens policies, governance, and capacity support; expands the use of clean and renewable energy; encourages sustainable transport and urban development; promotes development that will be more resilient to climate change, especially in water-dependent sectors; and manages land use and forests for carbon sequestration. ADB's support is helping its developing member countries face the challenges of climate change and, with partners, is providing innovative solutions, while continuing to work to reduce poverty.

  18. Carbon isotope geothermometry of graphite-bearing marbles from Central Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to estimate the peak metamorphic temperatures in high-grade regional metamorphic marbles from central Dronning Maud Land (East Antarctica), 13C/12C isotope ratios have been measured for coexisting carbonate and graphite pairs. The δ13C values of carbonates (calcite ± dolomite) and graphite vary from -0.1 to +4.6 permill (PDB) and from -3.3 to +1.7 permill, respectively. The isotopic fractionation between carbonate and graphite ranges from 2.9 to 4.0 permill and is similar to the Δ13C (carb-gr) values observed in other East Antarctic and non-Antarctic granulite-facies marbles. The metamorphic temperatures calculated using the equation of VALLEY and O'NEIL (1981) for calcite-graphite pairs are predominantly in the range 7000 - 8000C (xn=5 ± s = 7300 ± 300C) and agree well with metamorphic temperatures derived from mineral chemical studies in this East Antarctic region. (author)

  19. Effects of oxidative stress on fatty acid- and one-carbon-metabolism in psychiatric and cardiovascular disease comorbidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assies, J.; Mocking, R.J.; Lok, A.; Ruhe, H.G.; Pouwer, F.; Schene, A.H.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in severe psychiatric disorders (depression, schizophrenia). Here, we provide evidence of how the effects of oxidative stress on fatty acid (FA) and one-carbon (1-C) cycle metabolism, which may initially represent adaptive respons

  20. Effects of oxidative stress on fatty acid- and one-carbon-metabolism in psychiatric and cardiovascular disease comorbidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assies, J.; Mocking, R. J. T.; Lok, A.; Ruhe, H. G.; Pouwer, F.; Schene, A. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in severe psychiatric disorders (depression, schizophrenia). Here, we provide evidence of how the effects of oxidative stress on fatty acid (FA) and one-carbon (1-C) cycle metabolism, which may initially represent adaptive respons

  1. Carbon balance indicates a time limit for cultivation of organic soils in central Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sonja; Ammann, Christof; Alewell, Christine; Leifeld, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands serve as important carbon sinks. Globally, more than 30% of the soil organic carbon is stored in organic soils, although they cover only 3% of the land surface. The agricultural use of organic soils usually requires drainage thereby transforming these soils from a net carbon sink into a net source. Currently, about 2 to 3 Gt CO2 are emitted world-wide from degrading organic soils (Joosten 2011; Parish et al. 2008) which is ca. 5% of the total anthropogenic emissions. Besides these CO2 emissions, the resulting subsidence of drained peat soils during agricultural use requires that drainage system are periodically renewed and finally to use pumping systems after progressive subsidence. In Switzerland, the Seeland region is characterised by fens which are intensively used for agriculture since 1900. The organic layer is degrading and subsequently getting shallower and the underlying mineral soil, as lake marl or loam, is approaching the surface. The questions arises for how long and under which land use practises and costs these soils can be cultivated in the near future. The study site was under crop rotation until 2009 when it was converted to extensively used grassland with the water regime still being regulated. The soil is characterised by a degraded organic horizon of 40 to 70 cm. Since December 2014 we are measuring the carbon exchange of this grassland using the Eddy-Covariance method. For 2015, the carbon balance indicates that the degraded fen is a strong carbon source, with approximately 500 g C m‑2 a‑1. The carbon balance is dominated by CO2 emissions and harvest. Methane emissions are negligible. With the gained emission factors different future scenarios are evaluated for the current cultivation practise of organic soils in central Switzerland. Joosten, H., 2011: Neues Geld aus alten Mooren: Über die Erzeugung von Kohlenstoffzertifikaten aus Moorwiedervernässungen. Telma Beiheft 4, 183-202. Parish, F., A. Sirin, D. Charman, H. Joosten, T

  2. Primary metabolism plays a central role in moulding silicon-inducible brown spot resistance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bockhaven, Jonas; Steppe, Kathy; Bauweraerts, Ingvar; Kikuchi, Shoshi; Asano, Takayuki; Höfte, Monica; De Vleesschauwer, David

    2015-10-01

    Over recent decades, a multitude of studies have shown the ability of silicon (Si) to protect various plants against a range of microbial pathogens exhibiting different lifestyles and infection strategies. Despite this relative wealth of knowledge, an understanding of the action mechanism of Si is still in its infancy, which hinders its widespread application for agricultural purposes. In an attempt to further elucidate the molecular underpinnings of Si-induced disease resistance, we studied the transcriptome of control and Si-treated rice plants infected with the necrotrophic brown spot fungus Cochliobolus miyabeanus. Analysis of brown spot-infected control plants suggested that C. miyabeanus represses plant photosynthetic processes and nitrate reduction in order to trigger premature senescence and cause disease. In Si-treated plants, however, these pathogen-induced metabolic alterations are strongly impaired, suggesting that Si alleviates stress imposed by the pathogen. Interestingly, Si also significantly increased photorespiration rates in brown spot-infected plants. Although photorespiration is often considered as a wasteful process, recent studies have indicated that this metabolic bypass also enhances resistance during abiotic stress and pathogen attack by protecting the plant's photosynthetic machinery. In view of these findings, our results favour a scenario in which Si enhances brown spot resistance by counteracting C. miyabeanus-induced senescence and cell death via increased photorespiration. Moreover, our results shed light onto the mechanistic basis of Si-induced disease control and support the view that, in addition to activating plant immune responses, Si can also reduce disease severity by interfering with pathogen virulence strategies. PMID:25583155

  3. Pyruvate Oxidoreductases Involved in Glycolytic Anaerobic Metabolism of Polychaetes from the Continental Shelf off Central-South Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, R. R.; Quiñones, R. A.

    2000-10-01

    The presence of low oxygen conditions in extensive areas of the continental shelf off central-south Chile has important effects on the biochemical adaptations of the organisms living in this ecosystem. Polychaetes assemblages cohabit on the shelf with an extensively distributed prokaryotic community made up of giant filamentous sulfur bacteria (mainly Thioploca sp.). The aim of this research was to characterize the pyruvate oxidoreductases enzymes involved in the biochemical adaptation of these benthic polychaetes. Nine polychaete species ( Paraprionospio pinnata, Nephtys ferruginea, Glycera americana, Haploscoloplos sp., Lumbrineris composita, Sigambra bassi, Aricidea pigmentata , Cossura chilensis, and Pectinaria chilensis) were assayed for lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), octopine dehydrogenase (OPDH), strombine dehydrogenase (STRDH) and alanopine dehydrogenase (ALPDH). Each species had a characteristic number of the pyruvate oxidoreductases assayed ranging from 4 in Paraprionospio pinnata to 1 in Pectinaria chilensis . The pyruvate saturation curves obtained for the enzymes from all species analysed, except L. composita, suggest that NADH can be oxidized at different rates depending on the amino acid used in the reaction with pyruvate. Our results indicate that organisms having more that one pyruvate oxidoreductase present a greater metabolic capacity to cope with functional and environmental hypoxia because these enzymes would better regulate the pyruvate consumption rate during the transition period. Thus, the dominance of Paraprionospio pinnata in the study area and its worldwide distribution is consistent with its higher number of pyruvate oxidoreductases with different pyruvate consumption rates involved in anaerobic metabolism. Finally, a positive allometric relationship was found between body size and the specific activity of ALPDH, STRDH, and maximum pyruvate oxidoreductase specific activity. This latter result suggests a positive scaling of the specific

  4. Metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum aimed at alternative carbon sources and new products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoor, Ahmed; Lindner, Steffen N; Wendisch, Volker F

    2012-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is well known as the amino acid-producing workhorse of fermentation industry, being used for multi-million-ton scale production of glutamate and lysine for more than 60 years. However, it is only recently that extensive research has focused on engineering it beyond the scope of amino acids. Meanwhile, a variety of corynebacterial strains allows access to alternative carbon sources and/or allows production of a wide range of industrially relevant compounds. Some of these efforts set new standards in terms of titers and productivities achieved whereas others represent a proof-of-principle. These achievements manifest the position of C. glutamicum as an important industrial microorganism with capabilities far beyond the traditional amino acid production. In this review we focus on the state of the art of metabolic engineering of C. glutamicum for utilization of alternative carbon sources, (e.g. coming from wastes and unprocessed sources), and construction of C. glutamicum strains for production of new products such as diamines, organic acids and alcohols. PMID:24688664

  5. Metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum aimed at alternative carbon sources and new products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Fritz Wendisch

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium glutamicum is well known as the amino acid-producing workhorse of fermentation industry, being used for multi-million-ton scale production of glutamate and lysine for more than 60 years. However, it is only recently that extensive research has focused on engineering it beyond the scope of amino acids. Meanwhile, a variety of corynebacterial strains allows access to alternative carbon sources and/or allows production of a wide range of industrially relevant compounds. Some of these efforts set new standards in terms of titers and productivities achieved whereas others represent a proof-of-principle. These achievements manifest the position of C. glutamicum as an important industrial microorganism with capabilities far beyond the traditional amino acid production. In this review we focus on the state of the art of metabolic engineering of C. glutamicum for utilization of alternative carbon sources, (e.g. coming from wastes and unprocessed sources, and construction of C. glutamicum strains for production of new products such as diamines, organic acids and alcohols.

  6. Chemical constraints governing the origin of metabolism: the thermodynamic landscape of carbon group transformations under mild aqueous conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    2002-01-01

    The thermodynamics of organic chemistry under mild aqueous conditions was examined in order to begin to understand its influence on the structure and operation of metabolism and its antecedents. Free energies (deltaG) were estimated for four types of reactions of biochemical importance carbon-carbon bond cleavage and synthesis, hydrogen transfer between carbon groups, dehydration of alcohol groups, and aldo-keto isomerization. The energies were calculated for mainly aliphatic groups composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The energy values showed (1) that generally when carbon-carbon bond cleavage involves groups from different functional group classes (i.e., carboxylic acids, carbonyl groups, alcohols, and hydrocarbons), the transfer of the shared electron-pair to the more reduced carbon group is energetically favored over transfer to the more oxidized carbon group, and (2) that the energy of carbon-carbon bond transformation is primarily determined by the functional group class of the group that changes oxidation state in the reaction (i.e., the functional group class of the group that donates the shared electron-pair during cleavage, or that accepts the incipient shared electron-pair during synthesis). In contrast, the energy of hydrogen transfer between carbon groups is determined by the functional group class of both the hydrogen-donor group and the hydrogen-acceptor group. From these and other observations we concluded that the chemistry involved in the origin of metabolism (and to a lesser degree modern metabolism) was strongly constrained by (1) the limited redox-based transformation energy of organic substrates that is readily dissipated in a few energetically favorable irreversible reactions; (2) the energy dominance of a few transformation half-reactions that determines whether carbon-carbon bond transformation (cleavage or synthesis) is energetically favorable (deltaG +3.5 kcal/mol); and (3) the dependence of carbon group transformation energy on the

  7. Stable and radioactive carbon in forest soils of Chhattisgarh, Central India: Implications for tropical soil carbon dynamics and stable carbon isotope evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskar, A. H.; Yadava, M. G.; Ramesh, R.

    2016-06-01

    Soils from two sites viz. Kotumsar and Tirathgarh, located ∼5 km apart in a tropical reserve forest (18°52‧N, 81°56‧E) in central India, have been explored for soil organic carbon (SOC) content, its mean residence time (MRT) and the evolution of stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C). SOC stocks in the upper 30 cm of soil layers are ∼5.3 kg/m2 and ∼3.0 kg/m2; in the upper 110 m are ∼10.7 kg/m2 and ∼7.8 kg/m2 at Kotumsar and Tirathgarh, respectively. SOC decreases with increasing depth. Bomb carbon signature is observed in the upper ∼10 cm. Organic matters in the top soil layers (0-10 cm) have MRTs of the order of a century which increases gradually with depths, reaching 3500-5000 yrs at ∼100 cm. δ13C values of SOC increase with depth, the carbon isotopic fractionation is obtained to be -1.2‰ and -3‰ for soils at Kotumsar and Tirathgarh, respectively, confirmed using Rayleigh isotopic fractionation model. The evolution of δ13C in soils was also studied using a modified Rayleigh fractionation model incorporating a continuous input into the reservoir: the depth profiles of δ13C for SOC show that the input organic matter from surface into the deeper soil layers is either insignificant or highly labile and decomposes quite fast in the top layers, thus making little contribution to the residual biomasses of the deeper layers. This is an attempt to understand the distillation processes that take place in SOC, assess the extent of decomposition by microbes and effect of percolation of fresh organic matter into dipper soil layers which are important for stable isotope based paleoclimate and paleovegetation reconstruction and understanding the dynamics of organic carbon in soils.

  8. Annual benthic metabolism and organic carbon fluxes in a semi-enclosed Mediterranean bay dominated by the macroalgae Caulerpa prolifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eRuiz-Halpern

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Coastal areas play an important role on carbon cycling. Elucidating the dynamics on the production, transport and fate of organic carbon is relevant to gain a better understanding of the role coastal areas play in the global carbon budget. Here, we assess the metabolic status and associated organic carbon fluxes of a semi-enclosed Mediterranean bay supporting a meadow of Caulerpa prolifera. We test whether the EDOC pool is a significant component of the organic carbon pool and associated fluxes in this ecosystem. The Bay of Portocolom was in net metabolic balance on a yearly basis, but heterotrophic during the summer months. Community respiration (CR was positively correlated to C. prolifera biomass, while net community production (NCP had a negative correlation. The benthic compartment represented, on average, 72.6 ± 5.2 % of CR and 86.8 ± 4.5 % of gross primary production (GPP. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC production peaked in summer and was always positive, with the incubations performed in the dark almost doubling the flux of those performed in the light. Exchangeable dissolved organic carbon (EDOC, however, oscillated between production and uptake, being completely recycled within the system and representing around 14% of the DOC flux. The pools of bottom and surface DOC were high for an oligotrophic environment, and were positively correlated to the pool of EDOC. Thus, despite being in metabolic balance, this ecosystem acted as a conduit for organic carbon (OC, as it is able to export OC to adjacent areas derived from allochtonous inputs during heterotrophic conditions. These inputs likely come from groundwater discharge, human activity in the watershed, delivered to the sediments through the high capacity of C. prolifera to remove particles from the water column, and from the air-water exchange of EDOC, demonstrating that these communities are a major contributor to the cycling of OC in coastal embayments.

  9. Contribution of carbon fixed by Rubisco and PEPC to phloem export in the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Birgit; Wanek, Wolfgang; Postl, Wolfgang; Richter, Andreas

    2010-03-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants exhibit a complex interplay between CO(2) fixation by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco), and carbon demand for CAM maintenance and growth. This study investigated the flux of carbon from PEPC and direct Rubisco fixation to different leaf carbon pools and to phloem sap over the diurnal cycle. Concentrations and carbon isotope compositions of starch, soluble sugars, and organic acids were determined in leaves and phloem exudates of Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hamet et Perr., and related to CO(2) fixation by PEPC and Rubisco. Three types of leaf carbon pools could be distinguished. (i) Starch and malate pools were dominant and showed a pattern of reciprocal mobilization and accumulation (85/54 and 13/48 mg C g(-1) DW, respective, at the beginning/end of phase I). The carbon isotope composition of these pools was compatible with predominant PEPC fixation (delta(13)C values of -13 and -11 per thousand for starch and malate compared to -11 per thousand of PEPC fixed carbon). (ii) Isotopic composition (-17 per thousand and -14 per thousand) and concentration of glucose and fructose (2 and 3 mg C g(-1) DW, respectively) were not affected by diurnal metabolism, suggesting a low turnover. (iii) Sucrose (1-3 mg C g(-1) DW), in contrast, exhibited large diurnal changes in delta(13)C values (from -17 per thousand in the evening to -12 per thousand in the morning), which were not matched by net changes in sucrose concentration. This suggests a high sucrose turnover, fed by nocturnal starch degradation and direct Rubisco fixation during the day. A detailed dissection of the carbon fixation and mobilization pattern in K. daigremontiana revealed that direct fixation of Rubisco during the light accounted for 30% of phloem sucrose, but only 15% of fixed carbon, indicating that carbon from direct Rubisco fixation was preferentially used for leaf export. PMID:20159885

  10. [Carbon emissions and low-carbon regulation countermeasures of land use change in the city and town concentrated area of central Liaoning Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Feng-ming; Liang, Wen-juan; Niu, Ming-fen; Wang, Jiao-yue

    2016-02-01

    Carbon emissions due to land use change have an important impact on global climate change. Adjustment of regional land use patterns has a great scientific significance to adaptation to a changing climate. Based on carbon emission/absorption parameters suitable for Liaoning Province, this paper estimated the carbon emission of land use change in the city and town concentrated area of central Liaoning Province. The results showed that the carbon emission and absorption were separately 308.51 Tg C and 11.64 Tg C from 1997 to 2010. It meant 3.8% of carbon emission. was offset by carbon absorption. Among the 296.87 Tg C net carbon emission of land use change, carbon emission of remaining land use type was 182.24 Tg C, accounting for 61.4% of the net carbon emission, while the carbon emission of land use transformation was 114.63 Tg C, occupying the rest 38.6% of net carbon emission. Through quantifying the mapping relationship between land use change and carbon emission, it was shown that during 1997-2004 the contributions of remaining construction land (40.9%) and cropland transform ation to construction land (40.6%) to carbon emission were larger, but the greater contributions to carbon absorption came from cropland transformation to forest land (38.6%) and remaining forest land (37.5%). During 2004-2010, the land use types for carbon emission and absorption were the same to the period of 1997-2004, but the contribution of remaining construction land to carbon emission increased to 80.6%, and the contribution of remaining forest land to carbon absorption increased to 71.7%. Based on the carbon emission intensity in different land use types, we put forward the low-carbon regulation countermeasures of land use in two aspects. In carbon emission reduction, we should strict control land transformation to construction land, increase the energy efficiency of construction land, and avoid excessive development of forest land and water. In carbon sink increase, we should

  11. Formation mechanism of carbonate cemented zones adjacent to the top overpressured surface in the central Junggar Basin,NW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Carbonate cemented zones are normally adjacent to the top overpressured surface in the central Junggar Basin,NW China.Stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions and petrological investigations of carbonate cements in the carbonate cemented zones indicate that:(1) carbonate cements are composed dominantly of ferrocalcite,ferroan dolomite,and ankerite;(2) carbonate cements are formed under a high temperature circumstance in the subsurface,and organic fluid migration has an important effect on the formation of them;and(3) carbon and oxygen ions in the carbonate cements migrate from the underlying overpressured system.This suggests that the occurrence of carbonate cemented zones in this region results from multiple phases of organic fluid expulsion out of the overpressure compartment through geological time.This study provides a plausible mechanism of the formation of carbonate cemented zones adjacent to the top overpressured surface in the clastic sedimentary basins,and has an important implication for understanding the internal correlation between the formation of carbonate cemented zones adjacent to top overpressured surface and geofluids expulsion out of overpressured system.

  12. Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis of Baseline Carbon Emissions and Removal in Tropical Rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Gonzalez; Benjamin Kroll; Carlos R. Vargas

    2006-01-10

    Conversion of tropical forest to agricultural land and pasture has reduced forest extent and the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation and reforestation can restore those ecosystem services. We have assessed forest species patterns, quantified deforestation and reforestation rates, and projected future baseline carbon emissions and removal in Amazon tropical rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru. The research area is a 4800 km{sup 2} buffer zone around the Parque Nacional Yanachaga-Chemillen, Bosque de Proteccion San Matias-San Carlos, and the Reserva Comunal Yanesha. A planned project for the period 2006-2035 would conserve 4000 ha of forest in a proposed 7000 ha Area de Conservacion Municipale de Chontabamba and establish 5600 ha of natural regeneration and 1400 ha of native species plantations, laid out in fajas de enriquecimiento (contour plantings), to reforest 7000 ha of agricultural land. Forest inventories of seven sites covering 22.6 ha in primary forest and 17 sites covering 16.5 ha in secondary forest measured 17,073 trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm. The 24 sites host trees of 512 species, 267 genera, and 69 families. We could not identify the family of 7% of the trees or the scientific species of 21% of the trees. Species richness is 346 in primary forest and 257 in the secondary forest. In primary forest, 90% of aboveground biomass resides in old-growth species. Conversely, in secondary forest, 66% of aboveground biomass rests in successional species. The density of trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm is 366 trees ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 533 trees ha{sup -1} in secondary forest, although the average diameter is 24 {+-} 15 cm in primary forest and 17 {+-} 8 cm in secondary forest. Using Amazon forest biomass equations and wood densities for 117 species, aboveground biomass is 240 {+-} 30 t ha{sup -1} in the primary sites and 90 {+-} 10 t ha{sup -1} in the

  13. Effect of Mitochondrial Dysfunction on Carbon Metabolism and Gene Expression in Flower Tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria V.Busi; Maria E.Gomez-Lobato; Sebastian P.Rius; Valeria R.Turowski; Paula Casati; Eduardo J.Zabaleta; Diego F.Gomez-Casati; Alejandro Araya

    2011-01-01

    We characterized the transcriptomic response of transgenic plants carrying a mitochondrial dysfunction induced by the expression of the unedited form of the ATP synthase subunit 9.The u-ATP9 transgene driven by A9 and APETALA3 promoters induce mitochondrial dysfunction revealed by a decrease jn both oxygen uptake and adenine nucleotides(ATP,ADP)levels without changes in the ATP/ADP ratio.Furthermore,we measured an increase in ROS accumulation and a decrease in glutathione and ascorbate levels with a concomitant oxidative stress response.The transcriptome analysis of young Arabidopsis flowers,validated by Qrt-PCR and enzymatic or functional tests,showed dramatic changes in u-ATP9 plants.Both lines display a modification in the expression of various genes involved in carbon,lipid,and cell wall metabolism,suggesting that an important metabolic readjustment occurs in plants with a mitochondrial dysfunction.Interestingly,transcript levels involved in mitochondrial respiration,protein synthesis,and degradation are affected.Moreover,the Ievels of several mRNAs encoding for transcription factors and DNA binding proteins were also changed.Some of them are involved in stress and hormone responses,suggesting that several signaling pathways overlap.Indeed,the transcriptome data revealed that the mitochondrial dysfunction dramatically alters the expression of genes involved in signaling pathways,including those related to ethylene,absicic acid,and auxin signal transduction.Our data suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction model used in this report may be usefuI to uncover the retrograde signaling mechanism between the nucleus and mitochondria in plant cells.

  14. Biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation during biosynthesis in higher plants reflects carbon metabolism of the plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Marc-André; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2015-04-01

    Compound-specific isotope analyses of plant material are frequently applied to understand the response of plants to the environmental changes. As it is generally assume that the main factors controlling δ2H values in plants are the plant's source water and evaporative deuterium enrichment of leaf water, hydrogen isotope analyses of plant material are mainly applied regarding hydrological conditions at different time scales. However, only few studies have directly addressed the variability of the biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation occurring during biosynthesis of organic compounds (ɛbio), accounting also for a large part in the δ2H values of plants but generally assumed to be constant. Here we present the results from a climate-controlled growth chambers experiment where tested the sensitivity of ɛbio to different light treatments. The different light treatments were applied to induce different metabolic status (autotrophic vs. heterotrophic) in 9 different plant species that we grew from large storage organs (e.g. tubers or roots). The results show a systematic ɛbio shift (up to 80 ) between the different light treatments for different compounds (i.e. long chain n-alkanes and cellulose). We suggest that this shift is due to the different NADPH pools used by the plants to build up the compounds from stored carbohydrates in heterotrophic or autotrophic conditions. Our results have important implications for the calibration and interpretation of sedimentary and tree rings records in geological studies. In addition, as the δ2H values reflect also strongly the carbon metabolism of the plant, our findings support the idea of δ2H values as an interesting proxy for plant physiological studies.

  15. Oxygen-18 incorporation into malic acid during nocturnal carbon dioxide fixation in crassulacean acid metabolism plants: a new approach to estimating in vivo carbonic anhydrase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtum, J.A.M.; Summons, R.; Roeske, C.A.; Comins, H.N.; O' Leary, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants fix carbon dioxide at night by the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate. If CO2 fixation is conducted with TC YO2, then in the absence of carbonic anhydrase, the malate formed by dark CO2 fixation should also contain high levels of carbon-13 and oxygen-18. Conversely, if carbonic anhydrase is present and highly active, oxygen exchange between CO2 and cellular H2O will occur more rapidly than carboxylation, and the ( TC) malate formed will contain little or no oxygen-18 above the natural abundance level. The presence of oxygen-18 in these molecules can be detected either by nuclear magnetic resonance or by mass spectrometry. Studies of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the presence and absence of carbonic anhydrase in vitro confirm the validity of the method. When CAM plants are studied by this method, we find that most species show incorporation of a significant amount of oxygen-18. Comparison of these results with results of isotope fractionation and gas exchange studies permits calculation of the in vivo activity of carbonic anhydrase toward HCO3 compared with that of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. The ratio (carbonic anhydrase activity/phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity) is species dependent and varies from a low of about 7 for Ananas comosus to values near 20 for Hoya carnosa and Bryophyllum pinnatum, 40 for Kalanchoee daigremontiana, and 100 or greater for Bryophyllum tubiflorum, Kalanchoee serrata, and Kalanchoae tomentosa. Carbonic anhydrase activity increases relative to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity at higher temperature. 37 references, 2 figures, 8 tables.

  16. Effects of wildfire on soil organic carbon export by runoff in Central Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, M. E.; Faria, S. R.; Campos, I.; Caria, M. M. P. F.; Ferreira, R. S. V.; Machado, A. I.; Martins, M. A. S.; Pinto, R.; Prats, S. A.; Esteves, V. I.; Keizer, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    Forest fires, a frequent and recurrent phenomenon in Mediterranean ecosystems, have several ecological and environmental impacts caused in part by short- and medium-term effects on soil physical and chemical characteristics as well as on organic matter (OM) composition, properties and dynamics and hence upon microbial populations. This negatively affects soil health and quality, and enhances the occurrence of erosive processes and the loss of a non-renewable natural resource such is the soil. Due to the large C pool present in soils, even small changes in soil OM may have a significant effect on biogeochemical cycles and on global climate. Even though some authors consider that organic C mobilized by erosion processes may be protected from mineralization, the general tendency is to consider that soil erosion exposes OM to mineralization processes and represents the main factor of C losses from the planet's surface. Whilst it is well documented that wildfires can have major impacts on hydrological and erosion processes, the associated transport of organic matter has received considerably less research attention. The FIRECNUTS project (PTDC/AGR-CFL/104559/2008) addresses this research gap by studying, among others, the export of organic carbon in a recently burnt forest area of 250 ha in north-central Portugal (Sever do Vouga). To this end, five slopes with contrasting forest types (eucalypt vs. Maritime Pine plantations) and geologies (schist vs. granite) are being monitored for sediment losses since a wildfire that occurred in July 2010. For reference, also a neighboring, long-unburnt eucalypt plantation is being monitored. The sediments collected by sediment fences were measured and collected at monthly intervals during the first 6 or 12 months after fire. The total carbon content of the sediment samples was measured using a Shimazdu TOC analyzer. Preliminary results revealed marked differences in organic carbon concentrations between the two burnt eucalypt stands

  17. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope record of central Lake Erie sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevesz, M.J.S.; Spongberg, A.L.; Fuller, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotope data from mollusc aragonite extracted from sediment cores provide new information on the origin and history of sedimentation in the southwestern area of the central basin of Lake Erie. Sediments infilling the Sandusky subbasin consist of three lithologic units overlying glacial deposits. The lowest of these is a soft gray mud overlain by a shell hash layer containing Sphaerium striatinum fragments. A fluid mud unit caps the shell hash layer and extends upwards to the sediment-water interface. New stable isotope data suggest that the soft gray mud unit is of postglacial, rather than proglacial, origin. These data also suggest that the shell hash layer was derived from erosional winnowing of the underlying soft gray mud layer. This winnowing event may have occurred as a result of the Nipissing flood. The Pelee-Lorain moraine, which forms the eastern boundary of the Sandusky subbasin, is an elevated area of till capped by a sand deposit that originated as a beach. The presence of both the shell hash layer and relict beach deposit strengthens the interpretation that the Nipissing flood was a critical event in the development of the southwestern area of the central basin of Lake Erie. This event, which returned drainage from the upper lakes to the Lake Erie basin, was a dominant influence on regional stratigraphy, bathymetry, and depositional setting.

  18. Estimating Carbon Stocks and Atmospheric Exchange of Depressional Marshes on the Central Florida Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benscoter, B.; McClellan, M. D.; Benavides, V.; Harshbarger, D.; Comas, X.

    2014-12-01

    Depressional marshes are ubiquitous throughout central and south Florida. Often distributed within a matrix of sandy pine flatwoods and hammocks, these wetlands have a seasonally variable water table, alternating between inundation and complete drydown. Though these landforms are typically small individually, they comprise a substantial component of the landscape and provide vital habitat for an array of flora and fauna. Given their fluctuating hydrology, conditions for soil and plant carbon (C) exchange mechanisms can vary greatly both spatially and temporally. In this study, we are developing a C budget for depressional marsh landforms by assessing ecosystem carbon exchange along an ecotone gradient and quantifying belowground C stocks using non-invasive geophysical methods (ground penetrating radar, GPR) at the Disney Wilderness Preserve (DWP) in Kissimmee, FL, USA. Using a series of closed chambers transecting the marsh from the center outward into the surrounding flatwoods, we are quantifying the effects of seasonal water table change on the magnitude of C exchange. Three dimensional GPR surveys were used to quantify peat layer thickness, and were constrained with direct core sampling to verify subsurface lithology and to assess peat C content. Using the relationship between landform surface area and belowground C volume, we assessed the cumulative C storage in depressional marshes across the DWP landscape. In conjunction with a nearby eddy covariance tower and seasonal hydrologic data, these response functions will help to evaluate the contribution of these small but widespread landscape features on regional C cycling.

  19. Implications of central obesity-related variants in LYPLAL1, NRXN3, MSRA, and TFAP2B on quantitative metabolic traits in adult Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Dorthe Sadowa; Banasik, Karina; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Sandholt, Camilla H; Sandbæk, Annelli; Lauritzen, Torsten; Jørgensen, Torben; Witte, Daniel Rinse; Holm, Jens-Christian; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf

    2011-01-01

    -binding protein 2 beta (TFAP2B) associate with measures of central obesity. To elucidate potential underlying phenotypes we aimed to investigate whether these variants associated with: 1) quantitative metabolic traits, 2) anthropometric measures (waist circumference (WC), waist-hip ratio, and BMI), or 3) type 2...

  20. Microbial contribution to carbon biogeochemistry in the Central Mediterranean Sea: Variability of activities and biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Ferla, Rosabruna; Azzaro, Filippo; Azzaro, Maurizio; Caruso, Gabriella; Decembrini, Franco; Leonardi, Marcella; Maimone, Giovanna; Monticelli, Luis S.; Raffa, Francesco; Santinelli, Chiara; Zaccone, Renata; Ribera d'Alcalà, Maurizio

    2005-08-01

    This paper concerns the current debate as to whether oceans are heterotrophic or autotrophic environments. Microbes are responsible for the assimilation and remineralization of CO 2 in the sea and microbial processes are involved in the Earth climatic change. The variability of microbial biomass and activities were studied in the Mediterranean Sea which represents a suitable basin for mapping the trophic regimes by the study of biogeochemical processes. The surveys were carried out in the epi-, meso- and bathy-pelagic zones of the Central Mediterranean Sea from 1996 to 2002. Bacterial abundance, leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and β-glucosidase (β-GLU) activities, bacterial carbon production (BCP), community respiration (R) and primary production (PP) were the main parameters investigated. Biomass and activities seasonally varied in epipelagic and, to some extent, in meso- and bathy-pelagic layers too and several trophic ratios were determined, showing different scenarios in the different areas and seasons. In the euphotic layer, bacterial growth efficiency (BGE) widely ranged between 4% and 50% showing a decreasing trend from estuaries towards pelagic areas in alignment with the trophic gradient from the Northern Adriatic to the Ionian Sea. However, BGE did not correlate to PP and temperature. The Central Mediterranean Sea showed different trophic regimes in the examined areas and seasons. In the Northern Adriatic Sea in winter, the trophic balance appeared to move towards autotrophy and a positive C budget resulted. An opposite scenario happened in summer when the trophic balance moved to heterotrophy and a negative C budget occurred. In the Ionian Sea, the overall balance turned always towards remineralization. However, on annual time scale, the Central Mediterranean Sea seems to show a tendency towards a heterotrophic system.

  1. Planktic foraminifer and coccolith contribution to carbonate export fluxes over the central Kerguelen Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembauville, M.; Meilland, J.; Ziveri, P.; Schiebel, R.; Blain, S.; Salter, I.

    2016-05-01

    We report the contribution of planktic foraminifers and coccoliths to the particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) export fluxes collected over an annual cycle (October 2011/September 2012) on the central Kerguelen Plateau in the Antarctic Zone (AAZ) south of the Polar Front (PF). The seasonality of PIC flux was decoupled from surface chlorophyll a concentration and particulate organic carbon (POC) fluxes and was characterized by a late summer (February) maximum. This peak was concomitant with the highest satellite-derived sea surface PIC and corresponded to a Emiliania huxleyi coccoliths export event that accounted for 85% of the annual PIC export. The foraminifer contribution to the annual PIC flux was much lower (15%) and dominated by Turborotalita quinqueloba and Neogloboquadrina pachyderma. Foraminifer export fluxes were closely related to the surface chlorophyll a concentration, suggesting food availability as an important factor regulating the foraminifer's biomass. We compared size-normalized test weight (SNW) of the foraminifers with previously published SNW from the Crozet Islands using the same methodology and found no significant difference in SNW between sites for a given species. However, the SNW was significantly species-specific with a threefold increase from T. quinqueloba to Globigerina bulloides. The annual PIC:POC molar ratio of 0.07 was close to the mean ratio for the global ocean and lead to a low carbonate counter pump effect (~5%) compared to a previous study north of the PF (6-32%). We suggest that lowers counter pump effect south of the PF despite similar productivity levels is due to a dominance of coccoliths in the PIC fluxes and a difference in the foraminifers species assemblage with a predominance of polar species with lower SNW.

  2. Issues in the in vivo measurement of glucose metabolism of human central nervous system tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Chiro, G; Brooks, R A; Patronas, N J; Bairamian, D; Kornblith, P L; Smith, B H; Mansi, L; Barker, J

    1984-01-01

    Over 150 cases of central nervous system tumors have been studied with positron emission tomography using fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG) as a tracer. From this material 100 consecutive cases of cerebral glioma have been reviewed and analyzed. The results show a strong correlation of tumor grade with glycolytic rate, with visual "hot spots" present in all high-grade neoplasms and in only four low-grade tumors. The quantitative accuracy is limited by three basic factors. First, the measurement of tissue uptake, as compared with the parent technique, autoradiography, is more difficult because detection must be done outside the body. Effects such as scattered radiation and self-attenuation introduce errors unless properly corrected. A more serious problem when measuring small structures, such as a rim-shaped high-grade glioma, is the limited spatial resolution. The most advanced scanner, the Neuro-PET, has a resolution of 6 to 7 mm. Second, corrections are needed for backflow, including free tracer at the time of the scan that will return to the blood and "trapped" tracer that will backflow because of the presence of phosphatase. These corrections are calculated from the blood activity using nominal rate constants for 18FDG. Our study found no significant alteration in rate constants between normal and tumoral tissue. Finally, a lumped constant is needed to correct for kinetic differences between 18FDG and glucose. If there is a change in the mechanism of either membrane transport or the hexokinase reaction, the lumped constant may change. However, measurements of actual glucose utilization in tissue culture lines from six patients support the 18FDG results. PMID:6331282

  3. New concepts of the central control of reproduction, integrating influence of stress, metabolic state, and season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, I J; Arbabi, L

    2016-07-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone is the primary driver of reproductive function and pulsatile GnRH secretion from the brain causes the synthesis and secretion of LH and FSH from the pituitary gland. Recent work has revealed that the secretion of GnRH is controlled at the level of the GnRH secretory terminals in the median eminence. At this level, projections of kisspeptin cells from the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus are seen to be closely associated with fibers and terminals of GnRH cells. Direct application of kisspeptin into the median eminence causes release of GnRH. The kisspeptin cells are activated at the time of a natural "pulse" secretion of GnRH, as reflected in the secretion of LH. This appears to be due to input to the kisspeptin cells from glutamatergic cells in the basal hypothalamus, indicating that more than 1 neural element is involved in the secretion of GnRH. Because the GnRH secretory terminals are outside the blood-brain barrier, factors such as kisspeptin may be administered systemically to cause GnRH secretion; this offers opportunities for manipulation of the reproductive axis using factors that do not cross the blood-brain barrier. In particular, kisspeptin or analogs of the same may be used to activate reproduction in the nonbreeding season of domestic animals. Another brain peptide that influences reproductive function is gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH). Work in sheep shows that this peptide acts on GnRH neuronal perikarya, but projections to the median eminence also allow secretion into the hypophysial portal blood and action of GnIH on pituitary gonadotropes. GnIH cells are upregulated in anestrus, and infusion of GnIH can block the ovulatory surge in GnRH and/or LH secretion. Metabolic status may also affect the secretion of reproduction, and this could involve action of gut peptides and leptin. Neuropeptide Y and Y-receptor ligands have a negative impact on reproduction, and Neuropeptide Y production is markedly increased in

  4. The effects of lead on the gaseous exchange and photosynthetic carbon metabolism of pea seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy W. Poskuta

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Roots of whole 3 week-old pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L. var. "Bordi" were immersed for 24 h in solutions of lead chloride at Pb copcentrations of 200, 400, 800,12000 mg dm3. Accumulation of lead in roots was independent of the Pb concentration, whereas the accumulation of Pb in shoots was an almost linear function of the concentration of this element in the root medium. This treatment caused Pb concentration-dependent inhibition of apparent photosynthesis (APS, photorespiration (PR, 14CO2 uptake, stomatal opening and transpiration of shoots and also germination of seeds. The most sensitive to Pb contamination was CO2 exchange, then transpiration and to a lesser degree germination of seeds. Lead caused a considerable alteration of photosynthetic and photorespiratory carbon metabolism, restricted the 14C-labeling of: phosphoglycerate, ribose+ribulose, sucrose, glycolate and glycine+serine. Under conditions of C02 uptake limited by lead, an enhancement of the 14C-labeling of malate+citrate, alanine and glucose was observed.

  5. 2004 Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism Gordon Conference - August 1-6, 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph A. Krzycki

    2005-09-15

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2004 Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism Gordon Conference - August 1-6, 2004 was held at Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA from August 1-6, 2004. The Conference was well-attended with 117 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, 'free time' was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field.

  6. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production: Progress report, February 1, 1987-February 1, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These studies concern the fundamental biochemical mechanisms that control carbon and electron flow in anaerobic bacteria that conserve energy when coupling hydrogen consumption to the production of acetic, propionic, or butyric acids. Two acidogens, Propionispira arboris and Butyribacterium methylotrophicum were chosen as model systems to understand the function of oxidoreductases and electron carriers in the regulation of hydrogen metabolism and single carbon metabolism. In P. arboris, H2 consumption was linked to the inhibition of CO2 production and an increase in the propionate/acetate rate; whereas, H2 consumption was linked to a stimulation of CO2 consumption and an increase in the butyrate/acetate ratio in B. methylotrophicum. We report studies on the enzymes involved in the regulation of singe carbon metabolism, the enzyme activities and pathways responsible for conversion of multicarbon components to acetate and propionate or butyrate, and how low pH inhibits H2 and acetic acid production in Sarcina ventriculi as a consequence of hydrogenase regulation. 9 refs

  7. Seasonal and spatial contrasts of sedimentary organic carbon in floodplain lakes of the central Amazon basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrinho, Rodrigo; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Abril, Gwenaël; Zell, Claudia; Moreira-Turcq, Patricia; Mortillaro, Jean-Michel; Meziane, Tarik; Damsté, Jaap; Bernardes, Marcelo

    2014-05-01

    Three-quarters of the area of flooded land in the world are temporary wetlands (Downing, 2009), which play a significant role in the global carbon cycle(Einsele et al., 2001; Cole et al., 2007; Battin et al., 2009; Abril et al., 2013). Previous studies of the Amazonian floodplain lakes (várzeas), one important compartment of wetlands, showed that the sedimentation of organic carbon (OC) in the floodplain lakes is strongly linked to the periodical floods and to the biogeography from upstream to downstream(Victoria et al., 1992; Martinelli et al., 2003). However, the main sources of sedimentary OC remain uncertain. Hence, the study of the sources of OC buried in floodplain lake sediments can enhance our understanding of the carbon balance of the Amazon ecosystems. In this study, we investigated the seasonal and spatial pattern of sedimentary organic matter in five floodplain lakes of the central Amazon basin (Cabaliana, Janauaca, Canaçari, Miratuba, and Curuai) which have different morphologies, hydrodynamics and vegetation coverage. Surface sediments were collected in four hydrological seasons: low water (LW), rising water (RW), high water (HW) and falling water (FW) in 2009 and 2010. We investigated commonly used bulk geochemical tracers such as C:N ratio and stable isotopic composition of organic carbon (δ13COC). These results were compared with lignin-phenol parameters as an indicator of vascular plant detritus (Hedges and Ertel, 1982) and branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) to trace the soil OC from land to the aquatic settings (Hopmans et al., 2004). Our data showed that during the RW and FW seasons, the concentration of lignin and brGDGTs were higher in comparison to other seasons. Our study also indicated that floodplain lake sediments primarily consisted of a mixture of C3 plant detritus and soil OC. However, a downstream increase in C4 plant-derived OC contribution was observed along the gradient of increasingly open waters, i

  8. Application of artificial neural networks to investigate one-carbon metabolism in Alzheimer's disease and healthy matched individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Coppedè

    Full Text Available Folate metabolism, also known as one-carbon metabolism, is required for several cellular processes including DNA synthesis, repair and methylation. Impairments of this pathway have been often linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD. In addition, increasing evidence from large scale case-control studies, genome-wide association studies, and meta-analyses of the literature suggest that polymorphisms of genes involved in one-carbon metabolism influence the levels of folate, homocysteine and vitamin B12, and might be among AD risk factors. We analyzed a dataset of 30 genetic and biochemical variables (folate, homocysteine, vitamin B12, and 27 genotypes generated by nine common biallelic polymorphisms of genes involved in folate metabolism obtained from 40 late-onset AD patients and 40 matched controls to assess the predictive capacity of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs in distinguish consistently these two different conditions and to identify the variables expressing the maximal amount of relevant information to the condition of being affected by dementia of Alzheimer's type. Moreover, we constructed a semantic connectivity map to offer some insight regarding the complex biological connections among the studied variables and the two conditions (being AD or control. TWIST system, an evolutionary algorithm able to remove redundant and noisy information from complex data sets, selected 16 variables that allowed specialized ANNs to discriminate between AD and control subjects with over 90% accuracy. The semantic connectivity map provided important information on the complex biological connections among one-carbon metabolic variables highlighting those most closely linked to the AD condition.

  9. Central obesity and atherogenic dyslipidemia in metabolic syndrome are associated with increased risk for colorectal adenoma in a Chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Tsann

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS is composed of cardiovascular risk factors including insulin resistance, obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Most of the components of MetS have been linked to the development of neoplasm. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between individual components of MetS and colorectal adenoma. Methods The study subjects were recruited from a pool of 4872 individuals who underwent a health check-up examination during the period January 2006 to May 2008. Each participant fulfilled a structured questionnaire. MetS was defined based on the America Heart Association and National Heart Lung Blood Institute criteria. Subjects with history of colon cancer, colon polyps, colitis, or prior colonic surgery were excluded. Results A total of 4122 subjects were included for final analysis (2367 men and 1755 women; mean age, 49.6 ± 11.7 years. Of them, MetS was diagnosed in 708 men (29.9% and in 367 women (20.9%. Among the patients with MetS, 34.6% had adenoma, 31.7% had hyperplastic polyps and 23.3% were polyp-free (p Conclusions Of the components of MetS analyzed in this study, central obesity and dyslipidemia are independent risk factors for colorectal adenoma. With regard to the prevention of colorectal neoplasm, life-style modification such as weight reduction is worthwhile.

  10. Redox driven metabolic tuning: Carbon source and aeration affect synthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Nikel, Pablo I.; de Almeida, Alejandra; Giordano, Andrea M.; Pettinari, M. Julia

    2010-01-01

    Growth and polymer synthesis were studied in a recombinant E. coli strain carrying phaBAC and phaP of Azotobacter sp. strain FA8 using different carbon sources and oxygen availability conditions. The results obtained with glucose or glycerol were completely different, demonstrating that the metabolic routes leading to the synthesis of the polymer when using glycerol do not respond to environmental conditions such as oxygen availability in the same way as they do when other substrates, such as...

  11. Effects of oxidative stress on fatty acid- and one-carbon-metabolism in psychiatric and cardiovascular disease comorbidity

    OpenAIRE

    Assies, J.; Mocking, R J T; Lok, A; Ruhé, H.G.; Pouwer, F.; Schene, A. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in severe psychiatric disorders (depression, schizophrenia). Here, we provide evidence of how the effects of oxidative stress on fatty acid (FA) and one-carbon (1-C) cycle metabolism, which may initially represent adaptive responses, might underlie comorbidity between CVD and psychiatric disorders. Method We conducted a literature search and integrated data in a narrative review. Results Oxidative stress, mainly generated in...

  12. Contribution of carbon fixed by Rubisco and PEPC to phloem export in the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana

    OpenAIRE

    Wild, Birgit; Wanek, Wolfgang; Postl, Wolfgang; Richter, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants exhibit a complex interplay between CO2 fixation by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco), and carbon demand for CAM maintenance and growth. This study investigated the flux of carbon from PEPC and direct Rubisco fixation to different leaf carbon pools and to phloem sap over the diurnal cycle. Concentrations and carbon isotope compositions of starch, soluble sugars, and organic acids were ...

  13. [Carbon source metabolic diversity of soil microbial community under different climate types in the area affected by Wenchuan earthquake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-Shuai; Lin, Yong-Ming; Ma, Rui-Feng; Deng, Hao-Jun; Du, Kun; Wu, Cheng-Zhen; Hong, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The MS8.0 Wenchuan earthquake in 2008 led to huge damage to land covers in northwest Sichuan, one of the critical fragile eco-regions in China which can be divided into Semi-arid dry hot climate zone (SDHC) and Subtropical humid monsoon climate zone (SHMC). Using the method of Bilog-ECO-microplate technique, this paper aimed to determine the functional diversity of soil microbial community in the earthquake-affected areas which can be divided into undamaged area (U), recover area (R) and damaged area without recovery (D) under different climate types, in order to provide scientific basis for ecological recovery. The results indicated that the average-well-color-development (AWCD) in undamaged area and recovery area showed SDHC > SHMC, which was contrary to the AWCD in the damaged area without recovery. The AWCD of damaged area without recovery was the lowest in both climate zones. The number of carbon source utilization types of soil microbial in SHMC zone was significantly higher than that in SDHC zone. The carbon source utilization types in both climate zones presented a trend of recover area > undamaged area > damaged area without recovery. The carbon source metabolic diversity characteristic of soil microbial community was significantly different in different climate zones. The diversity index and evenness index both showed a ranking of undamaged area > recover area > damaged area without recovery. In addition, the recovery area had the highest richness index. The soil microbial carbon sources metabolism characteristic was affected by soil nutrient, aboveground vegetation biomass and vegetation coverage to some extent. In conclusion, earthquake and its secondary disasters influenced the carbon source metabolic diversity characteristic of soil microbial community mainly through the change of aboveground vegetation and soil environmental factors. PMID:26031097

  14. Central metabolism in Mycobacterium smegmatis during the transition from O2-rich to O2-poor conditions as studied by isotopomer-assisted metabolite analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yinjie J; Shui, Wenqing; Myers, Samuel; Feng, Xueyang; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Keasling, Jay D

    2009-08-01

    Isotopomer-assisted metabolite analysis was used to investigate the central metabolism of Mycobacterium smegmatis and its transition from normal growth to a non-replicating state under a hypoxic environment. Tween 80 significantly promoted aerobic growth by improving O(2) transfer, while only small amount was degraded and metabolized via the TCA cycle for biomass synthesis. As the bacillus encountered hypoxic stress, isotopomer analysis suggested: (1) isocitrate lyase activity increased, which further induced glyoxylate pathway and glycine dehydrogenase for replenishing NAD(+); (2) the relative amount of acetyl-CoA entering the TCA cycle was doubled, whereas little entered the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways. PMID:19357814

  15. Geomorphic controls on the export of dissolved organic carbon from forested catchments in central Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, I. F.; Creed, I. F.; Lynch, M. D.; Sanford, S. E.; Beall, F. D.; Jeffries, D. S.

    2001-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a complex mixture of hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds that has significant implications for the quality of surface water. In forests, wetlands have been shown to be a significant source of the natural variation in DOC export to streams; however, ephemeral wetlands (or surface saturated areas, SSAs) have not yet been considered as a potential source. For catchments in the Turkey Lakes Watershed (TLW) in central Ontario, Canada, the natural variation in DOC export was established and a statistical model to predict this natural variation was developed. For 12 catchments in the TLW, the natural variation in DOC export was significant, with annual averages ranging from 13.8 to 23.2 kg Chayr and catchment averages ranging from 11.9 to 31.5 kg Chayr. It was hypothesised that geomorphic controls on the distribution and organisation of SSAs within catchments influence DOC export. Three SSA indices were derived: (1) SSA size; (2) SSA connectivity to streams (reflecting the hydrologic efficiency of DOC transport); and (3) SSA curvature (reflecting the potential for hydrologic flushing into areas of replenished DOC sources). A multiple linear model indicated that the majority of the natural variation in DOC export was explained by a combination of the hydrologic efficiency and flushing potentials of the SSAs (R-sqr.=0.717, Adjusted R-sqr.4=0.654, pephemeral wetlands must be considered.

  16. Carbon Flux of Down Woody Materials in Forests of the North Central United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Across large scales, the carbon (C) flux of down woody material (DWM) detrital pools has largely been simulated based on forest stand attributes (e.g., stand age and forest type). The annual change in forest DWM C stocks and other attributes (e.g., size and decay class changes) was assessed using a forest inventory in the north central United States to provide an empirical assessment of strategic-scale DWM C flux. Using DWM inventory data from the USDA Forest Service's Forest Inventory and Analysis program, DWM C stocks were found to be relatively static across the study region with an annual flux rate not statistically different from zero. Mean C flux rates across the study area were -0.25, -0.12, -0.01, and -0.04 (Mg/ha/yr) for standing live trees, standing dead trees, coarse woody debris, and fine woody debris, respectively. Flux rates varied in their both magnitude and status (emission/sequestration) by forest types, latitude, and DWM component size. Given the complex dynamics of DWM C flux, early implementation of inventory re measurement, and relatively low sample size, numerous future research directions are suggested.

  17. Modeling the diversion of primary carbon flux into secondary metabolism under variable nitrate and light/dark conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbat, Romain; Robin, Christophe; Lillo, Cathrine; Drengstig, Tormod; Ruoff, Peter

    2016-08-01

    In plants, the partitioning of carbon resources between growth and defense is detrimental for their development. From a metabolic viewpoint, growth is mainly related to primary metabolism including protein, amino acid and lipid synthesis, whereas defense is based notably on the biosynthesis of a myriad of secondary metabolites. Environmental factors, such as nitrate fertilization, impact the partitioning of carbon resources between growth and defense. Indeed, experimental data showed that a shortage in the nitrate fertilization resulted in a reduction of the plant growth, whereas some secondary metabolites involved in plant defense, such as phenolic compounds, accumulated. Interestingly, sucrose, a key molecule involved in the transport and partitioning of carbon resources, appeared to be under homeostatic control. Based on the inflow/outflow properties of sucrose homeostatic regulation we propose a global model on how the diversion of the primary carbon flux into the secondary phenolic pathways occurs at low nitrate concentrations. The model can account for the accumulation of starch during the light phase and the sucrose remobilization by starch degradation during the night. Day-length sensing mechanisms for variable light-dark regimes are discussed, showing that growth is proportional to the length of the light phase. The model can describe the complete starch consumption during the night for plants adapted to a certain light/dark regime when grown on sufficient nitrate and can account for an increased accumulation of starch observed under nitrate limitation. PMID:27164436

  18. Phenotyping hepatocellular metabolism using uniformly labeled carbon-13 molecular probes and LC-HRMS stable isotope tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissen, John K; Pirman, David A; Wan, Min; Miller, Emily; Jatkar, Aditi; Miller, Russell; Steenwyk, Rick C; Blatnik, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Metabolite stable isotope tracing is a powerful bioanalytical strategy that has the potential to unravel phenotypic markers of early pharmaceutical efficacy by monitoring enzymatic incorporation of carbon-13 atoms into targeted pathways over time. The practice of probing biological systems with carbon-13 labeled molecules using broad MS-based screens has been utilized for many years in academic laboratories but has had limited application in the pharmaceutical R&D environment. The goal of this work was to establish a LCMS analytical workflow that was capable of monitoring carbon-13 isotope changes in glycolysis, the TCA and urea cycles, and non-essential amino acid metabolism. This work applies a standardized protein precipitation with 80% cold methanol and two distinct reverse-phase ion-pair liquid chromatography methods coupled to either a positive- or negative-ion mode high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry screening method. The data herein combines thousands of single-point peak integrations into a novel metabolite network map as a visualization aid to probe and monitor stable isotope incorporation in murine hepatocytes using uniformly labeled (13)C6 glucose, (13)C3 lactate, and (13)C5 glutamine. This work also demonstrates that nitrogen metabolism may have a large influence on the TCA cycle and gluconeogenic carbon fluxes in hepatocyte cell culture. PMID:27343766

  19. Associations of Exhaled Carbon Monoxide and Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide with Metabolic Syndrome: A Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanjun; Ma, Jixuan; Lu, Wei; He, Jintong; Zhang, Runbo; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Exhaled carbon monoxide (eCO) and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) could reflect underlying inflammatory and oxidative stresses, which play important roles in pathogenetic pathways of metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, epidemiologic evidence was limited. We conducted a study in Wuhan-Zhuhai (WHZH) cohort of 3649 community participants to investigate the association between eCO, FeNO and MetS in both cross-sectional and prospective ways. The results showed that higher eCO and FeNO were associated cross-sectionally with a higher prevalence of MetS. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratios for MetS at baseline were 1.22 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11 to 1.35) associated with per log eCO and 1.14 (95% CI: 1.00 to 1.30) associated with per log FeNO. During a follow-up of 3 years, 358/2181 new developed MetS cases were identified. Compared with lowest quartile of eCO and FeNO, the multivariable-adjusted risk ratios (95% CI) for MetS were 1.48 (1.06 to 2.06) related to the highest quartile of eCO. These findings remained consistent across sex but not smoking status, eCO was only associated with MetS in non-smokers when stratified by smoking status. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that eCO and FeNO were independently and positively associated with the prevalence of MetS cross-sectionally, while only eCO was positively related with the incidence of MetS prospectively. PMID:27076211

  20. 13C-metabolic flux ratio and novel carbon path analyses confirmed that Trichoderma reesei uses primarily the respirative pathway also on the preferred carbon source glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saloheimo Markku

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei is an important host organism for industrial enzyme production. It is adapted to nutrient poor environments where it is capable of producing large amounts of hydrolytic enzymes. In its natural environment T. reesei is expected to benefit from high energy yield from utilization of respirative metabolic pathway. However, T. reesei lacks metabolic pathway reconstructions and the utilization of the respirative pathway has not been investigated on the level of in vivo fluxes. Results The biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in T. reesei supported by genome-level evidence were reconstructed with computational carbon path analysis. The pathway reconstructions were a prerequisite for analysis of in vivo fluxes. The distribution of in vivo fluxes in both wild type strain and cre1, a key regulator of carbon catabolite repression, deletion strain were quantitatively studied by performing 13C-labeling on both repressive carbon source glucose and non-repressive carbon source sorbitol. In addition, the 13C-labeling on sorbitol was performed both in the presence and absence of sophorose that induces the expression of cellulase genes. Carbon path analyses and the 13C-labeling patterns of proteinogenic amino acids indicated high similarity between biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in T. reesei and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, however, mitochondrial rather than cytosolic biosynthesis of Asp was observed under all studied conditions. The relative anaplerotic flux to the TCA cycle was low and thus characteristic to respiratory metabolism in both strains and independent of the carbon source. Only minor differences were observed in the flux distributions of the wild type and cre1 deletion strain. Furthermore, the induction of the hydrolytic gene expression did not show altered flux distributions and did not affect the relative amino acid requirements or relative anabolic

  1. Hepatic Methionine Homeostasis Is Conserved in C57BL/6N Mice on High-Fat Diet Despite Major Changes in Hepatic One-Carbon Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlhoff, Christoph; Desmarchelier, Charles; Sailer, Manuela; Fürst, Rainer W.; Haag, Alexander; Ulbrich, Susanne E.; Hummel, Björn; Obeid, Rima; Geisel, Jürgen; Bader, Bernhard L.; Daniel, Hannelore

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is an underlying risk factor in the development of cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Increased hepatic lipid accumulation is a hallmark in the progression of NAFLD and impairments in liver phosphatidylcholine (PC) metabolism may be central to the pathogenesis. Hepatic PC biosynthesis, which is linked to the one-carbon (C1) metabolism by phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase, is known to be important for hepatic lipid export by VLDL particles. Here, we assessed the influence of a high-fat (HF) diet and NAFLD status in mice on hepatic methyl-group expenditure and C1-metabolism by analyzing changes in gene expression, protein levels, metabolite concentrations, and nuclear epigenetic processes. In livers from HF diet induced obese mice a significant downregulation of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and an increased betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT) expression were observed. Experiments in vitro, using hepatoma cells stimulated with peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα) agonist WY14,643, revealed a significantly reduced Cbs mRNA expression. Moreover, metabolite measurements identified decreased hepatic cystathionine and L-α-amino-n-butyrate concentrations as part of the transsulfuration pathway and reduced hepatic betaine concentrations, but no metabolite changes in the methionine cycle in HF diet fed mice compared to controls. Furthermore, we detected diminished hepatic gene expression of de novo DNA methyltransferase 3b but no effects on hepatic global genomic DNA methylation or hepatic DNA methylation in the Cbs promoter region upon HF diet. Our data suggest that HF diet induces a PPARα-mediated downregulation of key enzymes in the hepatic transsulfuration pathway and upregulates BHMT expression in mice to accommodate to enhanced dietary fat processing while preserving the essential amino acid methionine. PMID:23472083

  2. Climate determined differences in carbon dioxide fluxes dynamics between two comparable agroecosystems of Central Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroslavtsev, Alexis; Meshalkina, Joulia; Mazirov, Ilya; Valentini, Riccardo; Vasenev, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    Creation of Russian part of Fluxnet - Rusfluxnet, aims to fill the carbon dioxide fluxes data shortage. Because the Central Russia is still one of the less GHG-investigated European areas especially in case of agroecosystem-level carbon dioxide fluxes monitoring by eddy covariance method. For the first time eddy covariance (EC) GHG study has been conducted at two representative agroecosystems of Central Russia belonging to different climate zones (climate and soils), but both with the same land use: the both fields were under barley. The study was carried out in 2013 and supported by RF Government grant No. 11.G34.31.0079. The first agricultural field located at Precision Farming Experimental Field of the Timiryazev Agricultural University situated in Moscow. It's arable Albeluvisols Umbric have around 1% of SOC, 5.4 pH(KCl) and NPK medium-enhanced contents in sandy loam topsoil. The field was used for barley planting (Hordeum vulgare L., breeding line Mihailovsky). Sowing was in early May 2013 and harvest was in August, 14. The second agricultural field near the Pristen placed at Kursk region of Russia. It's arable Chernozems have around 4% of SOC, 6.5 pH(KCl) and NPK high-enhanced contents in sandy loam topsoil. The field was used for barley planting (Hordeum vulgare L., breeding line Xanadu). Sowing was 25-27 of April and harvest was 14-19 of August. Instrumental equipments (mainly LI-COR) were the same for both stations. Both towers height was 1.4m. Footprints were considered by fields edges, and were about 55m for Moscow and about 150m for Pristen. Canopy growth and snow melting were taking into account in the model. Surface roughness was neglected. Calculations were done using EddyPro software. Since Pristen field is 600 km to the South than the Moscow one, higher PAR values were observed for Pristen field. Modal PAR values were 600 and 400 umol m-2 s-1 for Pristen and Moscow fields respectively. Nevertheless temporal pattern of PAR was similar for both

  3. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes and amino acids in Holocene sediments of Lake Lonar, central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Philip; Gaye, Birgit; Wiesner, Martin; Basavaiah, Nathani; Prasad, Sushma; Stebich, Martina; Anoop, Ambili; Riedel, Nils

    2013-04-01

    Investigations on surface sediments and a sediment core from Lake Lonar in central India were carried out within the framework of the HIMPAC (Himalaya: Modern and Past Climate) programme. The aim was to understand recent productivity, sedimentation, and degradation processes and to reconstruct variations in Holocene lake conditions on the basis of biogeochemical analysis on a 10 m long sediment core retrieved from the centre of Lake Lonar. Located in India's core monsoon zone, Lake Lonar offers valuable information about the climate development of the whole region. The lake is situated at the floor of a meteorite impact structure on the Deccan plateau basalt. The modern lake is characterised by brackish water, high alkalinity, severe eutrophication, and bottom water anoxia. The lake is about 6 m deep and fed by rainfall during the SW monsoon season and three perennial streams. Since no out-flowing stream is present and no seepage loss occurs, the lake level is highly sensitive to the balance of precipitation and evaporation. Here we present C/N, carbon and nitrogen isotope, and amino acid data of bulk organic matter from modern lake and Holocene core sediments. Modern conditions are mainly related to human activity which started to have persistent influence on the biological and chemical lake properties at ~1200 cal a BP. The distribution of δ13C in the modern sediments is driven by the ratio between terrestrial and aquatic organic matter, while δ15N seems to be influenced by redox conditions at the sediment-water-interface with elevated values at shallow oxic stations. Differences in the amino acid assemblages of oxic and anoxic surface sediment samples were used to calculate an Ox/Anox ratio indicating the redox conditions during organic matter degradation. The onset of the monsoon reconstructed from the sediment core occurred at ca. 11450 cal a BP. The early Holocene core sediments are characterised by low sedimentation rate, low aquatic productivity, and

  4. Carbon exchange of an old-growth eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) forest in central New England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Julian L; Schedlbauer, Jessica L

    2002-11-01

    Carbon (C) exchange of an approximately 200-year-old eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis L.) forest in central Massachusetts, USA, was estimated from mid-October 2000 through October 2001 based on eddy covariance measurements and statistical modeling from microclimatic data. Measurements were made in 68% of the hours during the year of study, with > 50% coverage in all months except December and August. Data were filtered by wind direction and atmospheric turbulence to remove invalid measurements. Analysis of filtered data showed that photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was significant in predicting C exchange, except during the winter. Daily minimum air temperature affected C exchange in autumn and winter, whereas time of day, water vapor pressure deficit and air temperature had significant effects on C storage in spring, summer and fall. Most C storage in the stand occurred in April through July and in October 2001, with maximum rates in April and May. Persistent cold weather prevented C storage in December through March. In early spring 2001, C uptake was sensitive to nocturnal frost: daily minimum air temperatures below 0 degrees C reduced C fixation, and minima below -5 degrees C caused its virtual cessation. Soil temperature was a poor predictor of C balance during this period. In August, high soil and air temperatures (averaging 16.7 and 21.1 degrees C, respectively) drove high ecosystem respiration, which approximately balanced C uptake. These patterns show potential for stimulated C storage in hemlock forests in a warmer climate with fewer spring and autumn frosts, but reduced C storage during warmer summers. Estimated annual C storage was 3.0 Mg ha(-1), which is higher than for younger coniferous and deciduous forests during earlier years in the northeastern USA. Long-term data are needed to determine if the estimated high C storage in this hemlock forest is a result of interannual climate variation or an effect of forest composition. PMID:12414368

  5. On the peritidal cycles and their diagenetic evolution in the Lower Jurassic carbonates of the Calcare Massiccio Formation (Central Apennines)

    OpenAIRE

    Brandano Marco; Corda Laura; Tomassetti Laura; Testa Davide

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows the environmental changes and high-frequency cyclicity recorded by Lower Jurassic shallow-water carbonates known as the Calcare Massiccio Formation which crop out in the central Apennines of Italy. Three types of sedimentary cycle bounded by subaerial erosion have been recognized: Type I consists of a shallowing upward cycle with oncoidal floatstones to rudstones passing gradationally up into peloidal packstone alternating with cryptoalgal laminites and often bounded by desic...

  6. Sources of greenhouse gases and carbon monoxide in central London (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfter, Carole; Tremper, Anja; Zazzeri, Giulia; Barlow, Janet F.; Nemitz, Eiko

    2015-04-01

    Biosphere-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) has been on the scientific agenda for several decades and new technology now also allows for high-precision, continuous monitoring of fluxes of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Compared to the natural environment, flux measurements in the urban environment, which is home to over 50% of the population globally, are still rare despite high densities of anthropogenic sources of pollutants. We report on over three years of measurements atop a 192 m tower in central London (UK), Europe's largest city, which started in October 2011. Fluxes of methane, carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide are measured by eddy-covariance (EC) at the British Telecom tower (51° 31' 17.4' N 0° 8' 20.04' W). In addition to the long-term measurements, EC fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O) were measured in February 2014. All four trace gases exhibit diurnal trends consistent with anthropogenic activities with minimum emissions at night and early afternoon maxima. Segregating emissions by wind direction reveals heterogeneous source distributions with temporal patterns and source strengths that differ between compounds. The lowest emissions for CO, CO2 and CH4 were recorded for NW winds. The highest emissions of methane were in the SE sector, in the NE for CO2 and in the W for CO. Fluxes of all 3 gases exhibited marked seasonal trends characterised by a decrease in emissions in summer (63% reduction for CO, 36% for CO2 and 22% for CH4). Monthly fluxes of CO and CO2 were linearly correlated to air temperature (R2 = 0.7 and 0.59 respectively); a weaker dependence upon temperature was also observed for CH4 (R2 = 0.31). Diurnal and seasonal emissions of CO and CO2 are mainly controlled by local fossil fuel combustion and vehicle cold starts are thought to account for 20-30% of additional emissions of CO during the winter. Fugitive emissions of CH4 from the natural gas distribution network are thought to be substantial, which is consistent

  7. Endothelial dysfunction in normal and prediabetic rats with metabolic syndrome exposed by oral gavage to carbon black nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Janne Kjærsgaard; Vesterdal, Lise Kristine; Sheykhzade, Majid;

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to nanosized particles may increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases by endothelial dysfunction, particularly in susceptible subjects with metabolic syndrome. We investigated vasomotor dysfunction in aorta from obese and lean Zucker rats after oral exposure to nanosized carbon black (CB......-induced vasorelaxation and phenylephrine-induced vasocontraction was not affected in rats exposed to CB. The endothelial dysfunction was not observed in rats sacrificed 13 weeks after the last CB exposure. There was unaltered expression of Chrm3, Nos3, Nos2, Ccl2, and Hmox1 in aorta tissue of CB-exposed rats. In...... conclusion, repeated oral exposure to CB was associated with endothelial dysfunction in rats, further aggravating the effect of metabolic syndrome....

  8. The olenekian carbonates of the Bucovinian nappe (the central sector of the Haghimas syncline, Eastern Carpathians. Lithology and microfacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Popescu

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Early Triassic carbonate outcrops were studied in the central sector of the Hăghimaş Syncline with regard to stratigraphy, microfacies and facies interpretation.This is the first microfacies study of these deposits. Early Triassic carbonates in the Hăghimaş Syncline are represented by two stratified successions: limestones and dolomites. The limestones overlie very rarely the detritic basal deposits (Induan which marks the beginning of the alpine transgression. The stratified dolomites underlie frequently the Early Anisian massive dolomites. The contact between the stratified limestones and stratified dolomites is only exposed on Calu brook outcrop (the western flank of the Hăghimaş Syncline. The age of the investigated carbonates is Olenekian, based on the occurrence of Meandrospira pusilla biozone (in limestones. The foraminifera are very scarce in dolomites, represented mostly by Earlandia taxa. Microfacies data indicate the existence of a carbonate platform. The Olenekian carbonates yield a broad spectrum of microfacies types, predominantly micrites and biomicrites with foraminifera associated with echinoderms, ostracods, radiolarians, calcitized gastropods etc. These facies types are also known from the carbonate platforms in other parts of the Tethys.

  9. Impact of CO2 concentration on autotrophic metabolisms and carbon fate in saline aquifers - A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupraz, Sebastien; Fabbri, Antonin; Joulian, Catherine; Dictor, Marie-Christine; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne; Ménez, Bénédicte; Crouzet, Catherine; Henry, Benoît; Garrido, Francis

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and quantify the fate and speciation of carbon that can occur in mixtures of geological media (crushed rock) and autotrophic microbial communities. A sulfate reducing bacterium (Desulfotomaculum geothermicum) and a methanogenic archaeon (Methanothermococcus thermolithotrophicus) were both tested separately and together, with and without crushed sedimentary rock (carbonaceous sandstone) for different CO2 partial pressures (0.22, 0.88, 3.52, and 8 bar) at 54 °C in saline artificial groundwater. In order to quantify the respective metabolic activities, the inorganic gases of interest (H2, CH4, H2S and CO2) were measured and the speciation of carbon was assessed by measuring volatile, non-purgeable, total and dissolved organic carbon as well as total and dissolved inorganic carbon. Despite a protective effect of the mineral matrix, the results showed a high sensitivity of autotrophic microorganisms to the stress induced by pressures of CO2 superior to one bar and revealed that a part of this stress was due to direct toxic effects. M. thermolithotrophicus demonstrated a better tolerance to CO2 and was dominating the consortia. This ascendancy was interpreted as resulting from equilibrium displacement due to transport effects of methane between the liquid and gas phases. Abiotic dissolution was observed but some biomineralization processes of carbonates were also identified for D. geothermicum. Both strains displayed very different patterns in their conversion of inorganic carbon: while M. thermolithotrophicus was mainly producing methane, D. geothermicum induced the formation of biomass. The availability of crushed rock increased the proportion of sessile biofilms. All these results were analyzed in correlation with a successful PHREEQC simulation and demonstrate the strong influence of the microbial activities and diversity on the carbon fate in the immediate surroundings of geological CCS storage zones.

  10. Metabolic responses to the acute ingestion of two commercially available carbonated beverages: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Mendel Ron W; Hofheins Jennifer E

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of this placebo-controlled, double-blind cross-over study was to compare the effects of two commercially available soft drinks on metabolic rate. Methods After giving informed consent, twenty healthy men and women were randomly assigned to ingest 12 ounces of Celsius™ and, on a separate day, 12 ounces of Diet Coke®. All subjects completed both trials using a randomized, counterbalanced design. Metabolic rate (via indirect calorimetry) and substrate oxidation (v...

  11. Microbial community structure and functional metabolic diversity are associated with organic carbon availability in an agricultural soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Juan; LI Yan-ting; YANG Xiang-dong; ZHANG Jian-jun; LIN Zhi-an; ZHAO Bing-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Exploration of soil environmental characteristics governing soil microbial community structure and activity may improve our understanding of biogeochemical processes and soil quality. The impact of soil environmental characteristics especialy organic carbon availability after 15-yr different organic and inorganic fertilizer inputs on soil bacterial community structure and functional metabolic diversity of soil microbial communities were evaluated in a 15-yr fertilizer experiment in Chang-ping County, Beijing, China. The experiment was a wheat-maize rotation system which was established in 1991 including four different fertilizer treatments. These treatments included: a non-amended control (CK), a commonly used application rate of inorganic fertilizer treatment (NPK); a commonly used application rate of inorganic fertilizer with swine manure in-corporated treatment (NPKM), and a commonly used application rate of inorganic fertilizer with maize straw incorporated treatment (NPKS). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the 16S rRNA gene was used to determine the bacterial community structure and single carbon source utilization proifles were determined to characterize the microbial community functional metabolic diversity of different fertilizer treatments using Biolog Eco plates. The results indicated that long-term fertilized treatments signiifcantly increased soil bacterial community structure compared to CK. The use of inorganic fertilizer with organic amendments incorporated for long term (NPKM, NPKS) signiifcantly promoted soil bacterial structure than the application of inorganic fertilizer only (NPK), and NPKM treatment was the most important driver for in-creases in the soil microbial community richness (S) and structural diversity (H). Overal utilization of carbon sources by soil microbial communities (average wel color development, AWCD) and microbial substrate utilization diversity and evenness indices (H’ and E) indicated that long

  12. Spatial variability of soil carbon stock in the Urucu river basin, Central Amazon-Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Amazon Forest plays a major role in C sequestration and release. However, few regional estimates of soil organic carbon (SOC) stock in this ecoregion exist. One of the barriers to improve SOC estimates is the lack of recent soil data at high spatial resolution, which hampers the application of new methods for mapping SOC stock. The aims of this work were: (i) to quantify SOC stock under undisturbed vegetation for the 0–30 and the 0–100 cm under Amazon Forest; (ii) to correlate the SOC stock with soil mapping units and relief attributes and (iii) to evaluate three geostatistical techniques to generate maps of SOC stock (ordinary, isotopic and heterotopic cokriging). The study site is located in the Central region of Amazon State, Brazil. The soil survey covered the study site that has an area of 80 km2 and resulted in a 1:10,000 soil map. It consisted of 315 field observations (96 complete soil profiles and 219 boreholes). SOC stock was calculated by summing C stocks by horizon, determined as a product of BD, SOC and the horizon thickness. For each one of the 315 soil observations, relief attributes were derived from a topographic map to understand SOC dynamics. The SOC stocks across 30 and 100 cm soil depth were 3.28 and 7.32 kg C m−2, respectively, which is, 34 and 16%, lower than other studies. The SOC stock is higher in soils developed in relief forms exhibiting well-drained soils, which are covered by Upland Dense Tropical Rainforest. Only SOC stock in the upper 100 cm exhibited spatial dependence allowing the generation of spatial variability maps based on spatial (co)-regionalization. The CTI was inversely correlated with SOC stock and was the only auxiliary variable feasible to be used in cokriging interpolation. The heterotopic cokriging presented the best performance for mapping SOC stock. - Highlights: • The SOC stocks across 30 and 100 cm depth were 3.28 and 7.32 kg C m−2, respectively. • SOC stocks were 34 and 16%, respectively, lower

  13. Spatial variability of soil carbon stock in the Urucu river basin, Central Amazon-Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceddia, Marcos Bacis, E-mail: marcosceddia@gmail.com [Department of Soil, Institute of Agronomy, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropédica, RJ 23890-000 (Brazil); Villela, André Luis Oliveira [Colégio Técnico da UFRRJ, RJ, Seropédica 23890-000 (Brazil); Pinheiro, Érika Flávia Machado [Department of Soil, Institute of Agronomy, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropédica, RJ 23890-000 (Brazil); Wendroth, Ole [Department of Plant & Soil Sciences, University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Amazon Forest plays a major role in C sequestration and release. However, few regional estimates of soil organic carbon (SOC) stock in this ecoregion exist. One of the barriers to improve SOC estimates is the lack of recent soil data at high spatial resolution, which hampers the application of new methods for mapping SOC stock. The aims of this work were: (i) to quantify SOC stock under undisturbed vegetation for the 0–30 and the 0–100 cm under Amazon Forest; (ii) to correlate the SOC stock with soil mapping units and relief attributes and (iii) to evaluate three geostatistical techniques to generate maps of SOC stock (ordinary, isotopic and heterotopic cokriging). The study site is located in the Central region of Amazon State, Brazil. The soil survey covered the study site that has an area of 80 km{sup 2} and resulted in a 1:10,000 soil map. It consisted of 315 field observations (96 complete soil profiles and 219 boreholes). SOC stock was calculated by summing C stocks by horizon, determined as a product of BD, SOC and the horizon thickness. For each one of the 315 soil observations, relief attributes were derived from a topographic map to understand SOC dynamics. The SOC stocks across 30 and 100 cm soil depth were 3.28 and 7.32 kg C m{sup −2}, respectively, which is, 34 and 16%, lower than other studies. The SOC stock is higher in soils developed in relief forms exhibiting well-drained soils, which are covered by Upland Dense Tropical Rainforest. Only SOC stock in the upper 100 cm exhibited spatial dependence allowing the generation of spatial variability maps based on spatial (co)-regionalization. The CTI was inversely correlated with SOC stock and was the only auxiliary variable feasible to be used in cokriging interpolation. The heterotopic cokriging presented the best performance for mapping SOC stock. - Highlights: • The SOC stocks across 30 and 100 cm depth were 3.28 and 7.32 kg C m{sup −2}, respectively. • SOC stocks were 34 and 16

  14. Shigella reroutes host cell central metabolism to obtain high-flux nutrient supply for vigorous intracellular growth

    OpenAIRE

    Kentner, David; Martano, Giuseppe; Callon, Morgane; Chiquet, Petra; Brodmann, Maj; Burton, Olga; Wahlander, Asa; Nanni, Paolo; Delmotte, Nathanaël; Grossmann, Jonas; Limenitakis, Julien; Schlapbach, Ralph; Kiefer, Patrick; Vorholt, Julia A.; Hiller, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Shigella flexneri proliferate in infected human epithelial cells at exceptionally high rates. This vigorous growth has important consequences for rapid progression to life-threatening bloody diarrhea, but the underlying metabolic mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we used metabolomics, proteomics, and genetic experiments to determine host and Shigella metabolism during infection in a cell culture model. The data suggest that infected host cells maintain largely normal fluxes through g...

  15. Effect of carbon monoxide on xenobiotic metabolism in the isolated perfused rabbit lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trela, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to determine the level and duration of CO exposure necessary to alter mixed function oxidase-mediated activity in the intact lung and to determine the magnitude of this effect. The effect of CO on the mixed function oxidase-mediated activities of aminopyrine, aniline, 4-ipomeanol and p-nitroanisole in isolated perfused rabbit lungs (IPRL) was investigated. Several concentrations of CO were evaluated for their effect on cytochrome P-450-mediated activity in the lung. Both artificial medium and whole blood were utilized as recirculating perfusates. Monomethyl-4-aminoantipyrine was the major metabolite of aminopyrine produced by in vitro hepatic and pulmonary preparations and by the intact lung. Ventilation of isolated rabbit lungs with 7.5% CO for 2.5 hours caused a 40% decrease in the rates of metabolism of both aminopyrine and p-nitroanisole. This level of CO exposure did not alter the cytochrome P-450-mediated metabolism of aniline nor 4-ipomeanol in the intact lung. Aminopyrine metabolism in isolated rabbit lungs perfused with whole blood was also decreased following the administration of 7.5% CO suggesting that the hemoglobin in whole blood affords no protection against CO-induced inhibition of mixed function oxidase activity in the intact lung. The isozyme of cytochrome P-450 which preferentially metabolizes aminopyrine and p-nitroanisole may be more sensitive to CO-induced inhibition than the form(s) which metabolize aniline and 4-ipomeanol.

  16. Metabolic Syndrome in Italian Obese Children and Adolescents: Stronger Association with Central Fat Depot than with Insulin Sensitivity and Birth Weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Brufani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate whether body fat distribution, birth weight, and family history for diabetes (FHD were associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS in children and adolescents. Methods. A total of 439 Italian obese children and adolescents (5–18 years were enrolled. Subjects were divided into 2 groups: prepubertal and pubertal. MetS was diagnosed according to the adapted National Cholesterol Education Program criteria. Birth weight percentile, central obesity index (measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, insulin sensitivity (ISI, and disposition index were evaluated. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine variables associated with MetS. Results. The prevalence of MetS was 17%, with higher percentage in adolescents than in children (21 versus 12%. In the overall population, central obesity index was a stronger predictor of MetS than insulin sensitivity and low birth weight. When the two groups were considered, central fat depot remained the strongest predictor of MetS, with ISI similarly influencing the probability of MetS in the two groups and birth weight being negatively associated to MetS only in pubertal individuals. Neither FHD nor degree of fatness was a significant predictor of MetS. Conclusion. Simple clinical parameters like increased abdominal adiposity and low birth weight could be useful tools to identify European obese adolescents at risk for metabolic complications.

  17. Stable carbon isotope fractionation of trans-1,2-dichloroethylene during co-metabolic degradation by methanotrophic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brungard, K.L.; Munakata-Marr, J.; Johnson, C.A.; Mandernack, K.W.

    2003-01-01

    Changes in the carbon isotope ratio (??13C) of trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (t-DCE) were measured during its co-metabolic degradation by Methylomonas methanica, a type I methanotroph, and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, a type II methanotroph. In closed-vessel incubation experiments with each bacterium, the residual t-DCE became progressively enriched in 13C, indicating isotopic fractionation. From these experiments, the biological fractionation during t-DCE co-metabolism, expressed as ??, was measured to be -3.5??? for the type I culture and -6.7??? for the type II culture. This fractionation effect and subsequent enrichment in the ??13C of the residual t-DCE can thus be applied to determine the extent of biodegradation of DCE by these organisms. Based on these results, isotopic fractionation clearly warrants further study, as measured changes in the ??13C values of chlorinated solvents could ultimately be used to monitor the extent of biodegradation in laboratory or field settings where co-metabolism by methanotrophs occurs. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of glycine hydroxamate, carbon dioxide, and oxygen on photorespiratory carbon and nitrogen metabolism in spinach mesophyll cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of added glycine hydroxamate on the photosynthetic incorporation of 14CO2 into metabolites by isolated mesophyll cells of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) was investigated under conditions favorable to photorespiratory (PR) metabolism (0.04% CO2 and 20% O2) and under conditions leading to nonphotorespiratory (NPR) metabolism (0.2% CO2 and 2.7% O2). Glycine hydroxamate (GH) is a competitive inhibitor of the photorespiratory conversion of glycine to serine, CO2 and NH4+. During PR fixation, addition of the inhibitor increased glycine and decreased glutamine labeling. In contrast, labeling of glycine decreased under NPR conditions. This suggests that when the rate of glycolate synthesis is slow, the primary route of glycine synthesis is through serine rather than from glycolate. GH addition increased serine labeling under PR conditions but not under NPR conditions. This increase in serine labeling under PR conditions but not under NPR conditions. This increase in serine labeling at a time when glycine to serine conversion is partially blocked by the inhibitor may be due to serine accumulation via the ''reverse'' flow of photorespiraton from 3-P-glycerate to hydroxypyruvate when glycine levels are high. GH increased glyoxylate and decreased glycolate labeling. These observations are discussed with respect to possible glyoxylate feedback inhibition of photorespiration

  19. Seagrass community metabolism: assessing the carbon sink capacity of seagrass meadows

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, Carlos M.; Marbà, Núria; Gacia, Esperança; Fourqurean, James W.; Beggins, Jeff; Barrón, Cristina; Apostolaki, Eugenia T.

    2010-01-01

    The metabolic rates of seagrass communities were synthesized on the basis of a data set on seagrass community metabolism containing 403 individual estimates derived from a total of 155 different sites. Gross primary production (GPP) rates (mean ± SE = 224.9 ± 11.1 mmol O2 m−2 d−1) tended to be significantly higher than the corresponding respiration (R) rates (mean ± SE = 187.6 ± 10.1 mmol O2 m−2 d−1), indicating that seagrass meadows tend to be autotrophic ecosystems, reflected in a positive ...

  20. Plastidial metabolite transporters integrate photorespiration with carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhut, Marion; Hocken, Nadine; Weber, Andreas P M

    2015-07-01

    Plant photorespiration is an essential prerequisite for oxygenic photosynthesis. This metabolic repair pathway bestrides four compartments, which poses the requirement for several metabolites transporters for pathway function. However, in contrast to the well-studied enzymatic steps of the core photorespiratory cycle, only few photorespiratory translocators have been identified to date. In this review, we give an overview of established and unknown plastidic transport proteins involved in photorespiration and intertwined nitrogen and sulfur metabolism, respectively. Furthermore, we discuss the evolutionary origin of the dicarboxylate translocators and the recently identified glycolate glycerate translocator. PMID:25465893

  1. Preliminary Insights Into the Interplay Among Oxygen, Organic Carbon, and Microbial Metabolism in North Atlantic Subseafloor Sediment Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenabar, M. J.; Dore, J. E.; Spivack, A. J.; Murray, R. W.; D'Hondt, S.; Boyd, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    Deep marine sediments harbor abundant microbial cells that, if active, are likely to exert a strong influence on element biogeochemical cycling. However, our understanding of the fraction of cells that are active in situ and the metabolic processes that sustain them remain underexplored. Here we describe recent results of our studies aimed at unraveling the links between geochemical heterogeneity, cellular viability and synthesis, and metabolism along a vertical depth profile in sediment from four deep sites (>5 km beneath ocean surface) cored by R/V KNORR Expedition KN-223 in the North Atlantic (2014). These sediment columns exhibit varying levels of organic carbon and different vertical extents of oxygen (O2) penetration, which we hypothesize is due to variation in the extent of heterotrophic metabolism. We prepared most probable number (MPN) assays with acetate or peptone as electron donor and carbon source, and five different terminal electron acceptors (O2, NO3, SO4, MnO2, and ferrihydrite) with sediments from 4 to 5 depths in each of the four cores MPNs were similar for acetate- and peptone-amended cultures, regardless of electron acceptor, and generally decreased with depth in the sediment column. MPNs amended with O2 as electron acceptor were greater than MPNs amended with NO3, SO4, MnO2, and ferrihydrite in samples from all depths. Moreover, MPNs were higher for assays amended with O2 from cores where the depth of O2 penetration was shallow when compared to cores where O2 is predicted to penetrate to basement rock. These results are consistent with aerobic heterotrophs limiting the penetration of O2 in deep marine sediments, and thereby provide a mechanism to explain the relationship between low O2 penetrations in sediment cores with elevated organic carbon contents. We will also present results of our ongoing isotopic labeling experiments aimed at determining rates of DNA and protein synthesis as proxies for cell replication and productivity, respectively

  2. Changes in the Phosphoproteome and Metabolome Link Early Signaling Events to Rearrangement of Photosynthesis and Central Metabolism in Salinity and Oxidative Stress Response in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanmei; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    Salinity and oxidative stress are major factors affecting and limiting the productivity of agricultural crops. The molecular and biochemical processes governing the plant response to abiotic stress have often been researched in a reductionist manner. Here, we report a systemic approach combining metabolic labeling and phosphoproteomics to capture early signaling events with quantitative metabolome analysis and enzyme activity assays to determine the effects of salt and oxidative stress on plant physiology. K(+) and Na(+) transporters showed coordinated changes in their phosphorylation pattern, indicating the importance of dynamic ion homeostasis for adaptation to salt stress. Unique phosphorylation sites were found for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SNF1 kinase homolog10 and 11, indicating their central roles in the stress-regulated responses. Seven Sucrose Non-fermenting1-Related Protein Kinase2 kinases showed varying levels of phosphorylation at multiple serine/threonine residues in their kinase domain upon stress, showing temporally distinct modulation of the various isoforms. Salinity and oxidative stress also lead to changes in protein phosphorylation of proteins central to photosynthesis, in particular the kinase State Transition Protein7 required for state transition and light-harvesting II complex proteins. Furthermore, stress-induced changes of the phosphorylation of enzymes of central metabolism were observed. The phosphorylation patterns of these proteins were concurrent with changes in enzyme activity. This was reflected by altered levels of metabolites, such as the sugars sucrose and fructose, glycolysis intermediates, and amino acids. Together, our study provides evidence for a link between early signaling in the salt and oxidative stress response that regulates the state transition of photosynthesis and the rearrangement of primary metabolism. PMID:26471895

  3. Talc-carbonate alteration of ultramafic rocks within the Leka Ophiolite Complex, Central Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerga, A.; Konopásek, J.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2015-06-01

    Petrographic and geochemical analyses of partly and completely serpentinized and carbonated peridotites within the ultramafic section of the Leka Ophiolite Complex have been used to elucidate the evolution of alterations and identify possible fluid sources. The alterations show no evidence for any major deformation and are located along low-angle structures that were formed in a late stage of the structural evolution of the ophiolite complex. Modeling of mineral equilibria in the SiO2-MgO-FeO-Fe2O3-CaO-H2O ± CO2 system has been utilized to constrain the conditions during serpentinization and carbonation. The partly altered peridotites consist of the mineral assemblage olivine-clinopyroxene-serpentine-magnetite-brucite and formed at temperatures Talc-carbonate rocks formed by the breakdown of the serpentine in the previously formed serpentinite rock at temperatures talc-magnesite-magnetite-dolomite. Carbon isotope values determined for dolomite from crosscutting carbonate lenses within the talc-carbonate rock yield δ13C values of ~- 5 indicative of a mantle source for the carbon required for the carbonation. Oxygen isotope values δSMOW18O of ~ 10.8-11.3‰ together with initial 87Sr/86Sri = 400Ma values of 0.7029 and 0.7063, suggest dehydration of rocks with mantle affinity as a source for the fluids. Based on analytical results and field observations we propose that the formation of the talc- and carbonate-bearing alteration zones is caused by the focused infiltration of fluids that originated at the bottom of already partly serpentinized ophiolite complex during extension-driven burial at the late stage of the Caledonian orogeny.

  4. Effect of carbon/nitrogen ratio on carbohydrate metabolism and light energy dissipation mechanisms in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huarancca Reyes, Thais; Scartazza, Andrea; Lu, Yu; Yamaguchi, Junji; Guglielminetti, Lorenzo

    2016-08-01

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) nutrient sources are essential elements for metabolism, and their availability must be tightly coordinated for the optimal growth and development in plants. Plants are able to sense and respond to different C/N conditions via specific partitioning of C and N sources and the regulation of a complex cellular metabolic activity. We studied how the interaction between C and N signaling could affect carbohydrate metabolism, soluble sugar levels, photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) and the ability to drive the excess energy in Arabidopsis seedlings under moderated and disrupted C/N-nutrient conditions. Invertase and sucrose synthase activities were markedly affected by C/N-nutrient status depending on the phosphorylation status, suggesting that these enzymes may necessarily be modulated by their direct phosphorylation or phosphorylation of proteins that form complex with them in response to C/N stress. In addition, the enzymatic activity of these enzymes was also correlated with the amount of sugars, which not only act as substrate but also as signaling compounds. Analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence in plants under disrupted C/N condition suggested a reduction of electron transport rate at PSII level associated with a higher capacity for non-radiative energy dissipation in comparison with plants under moderated C/N condition. In conclusion, the tight coordination between C and N not only affects the carbohydrates metabolism and their concentration within plant tissues, but also the partitioning of the excitation energy at PSII level between radiative (electron transport) and non-radiative (heat) dissipation pathways. PMID:27108206

  5. Dissolved organic carbon in the INDEX area of the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.; DeSousa, S.N.

    milli-Q water. The acidified samples were homogenised and inorganic carbon was removed by purging a stream of carbon-dioxide free air through the samples just before the analyses. The particulate organic carbon was analysed at same depths as DOC... to the lability of a large DOC fraction in sea water. The physical characteristics of the intermediate and deep waters (500–2000m) indicate an intermediate salinity minimum zone of Antarctic Intermediate Water mass (500–1300m) and a weak salinity maximum around...

  6. One-carbon metabolism nutrient status and plasma S-adenosylmethionine concentrations in middle-aged and older Chinese in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue-Choi, Maki; Nelson, Heather H.; Robien, Kim; Arning, Erland; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2012-01-01

    S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is a primary methyl donor for the methylation of many molecules including DNA. DNA methylation is believed to play an important role in functions of cells and genes. Dietary, genetic and metabolic factors that influence systematic SAM levels are not fully understood. We conducted cross-sectional analysis to evaluate associations between plasma concentrations of one-carbon metabolism nutrients and metabolites and plasma SAM concentrations using healthy individuals wi...

  7. Carbon catabolite repression and global control of the carbohydrate metabolism in Lactococcus lactis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luesink, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    In view of the economic importance of fermented dairy products considerable scientific attention has been given to various steps of fermentation processes, including the L-lactate formation of lactic acid bacteria (de Vos, 1996). In particular, the carbohydrate metabolism of L. lactis has been the s

  8. Shigella reroutes host cell central metabolism to obtain high-flux nutrient supply for vigorous intracellular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentner, David; Martano, Giuseppe; Callon, Morgane; Chiquet, Petra; Brodmann, Maj; Burton, Olga; Wahlander, Asa; Nanni, Paolo; Delmotte, Nathanaël; Grossmann, Jonas; Limenitakis, Julien; Schlapbach, Ralph; Kiefer, Patrick; Vorholt, Julia A; Hiller, Sebastian; Bumann, Dirk

    2014-07-01

    Shigella flexneri proliferate in infected human epithelial cells at exceptionally high rates. This vigorous growth has important consequences for rapid progression to life-threatening bloody diarrhea, but the underlying metabolic mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we used metabolomics, proteomics, and genetic experiments to determine host and Shigella metabolism during infection in a cell culture model. The data suggest that infected host cells maintain largely normal fluxes through glycolytic pathways, but the entire output of these pathways is captured by Shigella, most likely in the form of pyruvate. This striking strategy provides Shigella with an abundant favorable energy source, while preserving host cell ATP generation, energy charge maintenance, and survival, despite ongoing vigorous exploitation. Shigella uses a simple three-step pathway to metabolize pyruvate at high rates with acetate as an excreted waste product. The crucial role of this pathway for Shigella intracellular growth suggests targets for antimicrobial chemotherapy of this devastating disease. PMID:24958876

  9. Context-dependent metabolic networks

    CERN Document Server

    Beguerisse-Díaz, Mariano; Oyarzún, Diego; Picó, Jesús; Barahona, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Cells adapt their metabolism to survive changes in their environment. We present a framework for the construction and analysis of metabolic reaction networks that can be tailored to reflect different environmental conditions. Using context-dependent flux distributions from Flux Balance Analysis (FBA), we produce directed networks with weighted links representing the amount of metabolite flowing from a source reaction to a target reaction per unit time. Such networks are analyzed with tools from network theory to reveal salient features of metabolite flows in each biological context. We illustrate our approach with the directed network of the central carbon metabolism of Escherichia coli, and study its properties in four relevant biological scenarios. Our results show that both flow and network structure depend drastically on the environment: networks produced from the same metabolic model in different contexts have different edges, components, and flow communities, capturing the biological re-routing of metab...

  10. Carbon dioxide metabolism by Actinomyces viscosus: pathways for succinate and aspartate production.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, A T; Breeding, L C

    1980-01-01

    14C-labeled bicarbonate was incorporated into trichloroacetic acid-insoluble material by cell suspensions of A. viscosus strain M100 and also into the four-carbon fermentation product, succinate, but not into the three-carbon fermentation product, lactate. The initial step in the conversion of 14C-labeled bicarbonate into both trichloroacetic acid-insoluble material and succinate was catalyzed by the enzyme phosphoenolypyruvate carboxylase, which served to convert the glycolytic intermediate,...

  11. Genome-wide meta-analysis of homocysteine and methionine metabolism identifies five one carbon metabolism loci and a novel association of ALDH1L1 with ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circulating homocysteine levels (tHcy), a product of the folate one carbon metabolism pathway (FOCM) through the demethylation of methionine, are heritable and are associated with an increased risk of common diseases such as stroke, cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer and dementia. The FOCM is the ...

  12. Carbon isotopes in tree rings of Norway spruce (Bohemian Forest, Central Europe) exposed to atmospheric pollution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šantrůčková, H.; Šantrůček, Jiří; Svoboda, M.

    Brno : ISBE CAS, 2006. s. 22. [15 Years of EU Supported Ecophysiological Research in the Czech Republic. 18.09.2006-21.09.2006, Olomouc] Keywords : Carbon isotopes * Norway spruce Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  13. The central and eastern Arabian Sea as a perennial source of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.S.S.; DileepKumar, M.; George, M.D.

    Seasonal (winter monsoon, intermonsoon and southwest monsoon) and interannual (between southwest monsoon seasons of 1995 and 1996) variations in total carbon dioxide (TCO sub(2)) and partial pressure of CO sub(2) (pCO sub(2)) were studied...

  14. The Myriophyllum spicatum L. -epiphyte complex: A study of the community carbon metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godmaire, H.

    1988-01-01

    The kinetics of extracellular organic carbon (EOC) released by Myriophyllum spicatum L. were investigated and the importance of EOC release to epiphytic heterotrophs was determined. EOC released by colonized Myriophyllum leaves was positively related to the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration of the external medium and to photosynthetic activity. Maximum rate of release occurred during the exponential phase of growth. In short-term incubation (1-6 h), {sup 14}C-EOC accounted for 0.2-0.4% of carbon photoassimilation. {sup 14}C-EOC consisted primarily of low molecular weight products. The {sup 14}C-technique seriously underestimated the release rate compared to direct measurement of EOC which gave values of approximately 2.2% of carbon photoassimilation. During a diurnal cycle, the EOC release rate increased in the afternoon as photosynthesis decreased, and reached 2.8% of the carbon photoassimilation at the end of the light period. Axenic plants were characterized by lower growth rates and lower EOC release rates than colonized plants. The amount of EOC released during the day by colonized plants was 2.0 to 4.5 fold greater than the utilized by epiphytic heterotrophs. Therefore, EOC released by Myriophyllum may constitute a significant source of carbon for attached and surrounding heterotrophic organisms.

  15. Transcription Factor Arabidopsis Activating Factor1 Integrates Carbon Starvation Responses with Trehalose Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garapati, Prashanth; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John Edward; Van Dijck, Patrick; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    Plants respond to low carbon supply by massive reprogramming of the transcriptome and metabolome. We show here that the carbon starvation-induced NAC (for NO APICAL MERISTEM/ARABIDOPSIS TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATION FACTOR/CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON) transcription factor Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Transcription Activation Factor1 (ATAF1) plays an important role in this physiological process. We identified TREHALASE1, the only trehalase-encoding gene in Arabidopsis, as a direct downstream target of ATAF1. Overexpression of ATAF1 activates TREHALASE1 expression and leads to reduced trehalose-6-phosphate levels and a sugar starvation metabolome. In accordance with changes in expression of starch biosynthesis- and breakdown-related genes, starch levels are generally reduced in ATAF1 overexpressors but elevated in ataf1 knockout plants. At the global transcriptome level, genes affected by ATAF1 are broadly associated with energy and carbon starvation responses. Furthermore, transcriptional responses triggered by ATAF1 largely overlap with expression patterns observed in plants starved for carbon or energy supply. Collectively, our data highlight the existence of a positively acting feedforward loop between ATAF1 expression, which is induced by carbon starvation, and the depletion of cellular carbon/energy pools that is triggered by the transcriptional regulation of downstream gene regulatory networks by ATAF1. PMID:26149570

  16. Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Richard Pancake; JyunSyung Tsau; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2010-03-07

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide was injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide was injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By March 7,2010, 8,736 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver A7, Colliver A3, Colliver A14 and Graham A4 located on adjacent leases. About 19,166 bbl of incremental oil were estimated to have been produced from these wells as of March 7, 2010. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Estimated oil recovery attributed to the CO2 flood is 27,902 bbl which is equivalent to a gross CO2 utilization of 4.8 MCF/bbl. The pilot project is not economic.

  17. Land use change and carbon cycle in arid and semi-arid lands of East and Central Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Togtohyn; Chuluun; Dennis; Ojima

    2002-01-01

    Dramatic changes in land use have occurred in arid and semi-arid landsof Asia during the 20th century. Grassland conversion into croplands and ecosystem degradation is widespread due to the high growth rate of human population and political reforms of pastoral systems. Rangeland degradation made many parts of this region vulnerable to environmental and political changes. The collapse of the livestock sector in some states of central Asia, expansion of livestock inChina and intensive degradation of grasslands in China are examples of the responses of pastoral systems to these changes over the past decades. Carbon dynamics in this region is highly variable in space and time. Land use/cover changes with widespread reduction of forest and grasslands increased carbon emission from the region.

  18. δ13C chemostratigraphy in the upper Tremadocian through lower Katian (Ordovician carbonate succession of the Siljan district, central Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Lehnert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on δ13C data from two drillcores recovered from the Siljan district, we present a first continuous carbon isotope record of the upper Tremadocian–lower Katian limestone succession of central Sweden. New names for some isotopic carbon excursions from the Cambrian–Ordovician boundary through the basal Darriwilian are introduced. The Mora 001 core from the western part of the Siljan impact structure ranges through the Lower–Middle Ordovician, whereas the Solberga 1 core from its eastern part ranges through the Middle–lower Upper Ordovician. Upper Tremadocian and Floian units are extremely condensed and include extensive stratigraphic gaps. Multiple hardgrounds, sometimes with minor karstic overprint, imply recurrent periods of erosion and/or non-deposition. Like in other parts of Sweden, the Dapingian and Darriwilian succession is characterized by a relatively complete sedimentary record and low sedimentation rates.

  19. Short Term vs Long Term Environmental Reconstruction from Carbonated Deposits of the Limagne Area (Massif Central, France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 80 cm sequence has been cored from carbonated travertine in the limagne area (French Massif Central, France) in order to document recent environmental fluctuations (0-100 a) of gaseous springs, in relation to the environmental and geochemical parameters that control the isotopic signatures of modern carbonate deposits. The chronology of these finely laminated deposits that are ideal for reconstructing hydrological conditions at very narrow time steps is determined through AMS-14C and 210Pb/226Ra radiometric methods. Preliminary results highlight a high enrichment in stable isotopes (eg up to +8 per mille vs VPDB for δ13C), likely linked to both recharge temperature and degassing processes. Moreover, two general trends are superimposed: the first one, cyclic, may be correlated to the hydrologic annual/biannual budget while the second one, linear, implies a long term environmental trend. (author)

  20. Photoperiod length paces the temporal orchestration of cell cycle and carbon-nitrogen metabolism in Crocosphaera watsonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dron, Anthony; Rabouille, Sophie; Claquin, Pascal; Talec, Amélie; Raimbault, Virginie; Sciandra, Antoine

    2013-12-01

    We analysed the effect of photoperiod length (PPL) (16:8 and 8:16 h of light-dark regime, named long and short PPL, respectively) on the temporal orchestration of the two antagonistic, carbon and nitrogen acquisitions in the unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium Crocosphaera watsonii strain WH8501 growing diazotrophically. Carbon and nitrogen metabolism were monitored at high frequency, and their patterns were compared with the cell cycle progression. The oxygen-sensitive N2 fixation process occurred mainly during the dark period, where photosynthesis cannot take place, inducing a light-dark cycle of cellular C : N ratio. Examination of circadian patterns in the cell cycle revealed that cell division occurred during the midlight period, (8 h and 4 h into the light in the long and short PPL conditions, respectively), thus timely separated from the energy-intensive diazotrophic process. Results consistently show a nearly 5 h time lag between the end of cell division and the onset of N2 fixation. Shorter PPLs affected DNA compaction of C. watsonii cells and also led to a decrease in the cell division rate. Therefore, PPL paces the growth of C. watsonii: a long PPL enhances cell division while a short PPL favours somatic growth (biomass production) with higher carbon and nitrogen cell contents. PMID:23841885

  1. Application of central composite design to optimize the amount of carbon source and prebiotics for Bifidobacterium bifidum BB01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Guowei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to obtain the optimum proportion of the carbon source and prebiotics for Bifidobacterium bifidum BB01 by the central composite design (CCD. The effect of carbon source (lactose and two prebiotics (inulin and fructooligosaccharides on the BB01 were observed by measuring the OD600 value, pH value and the viable counts at 18h. The final optimized concentrations of carbon source and prebiotics were: lactose 1.6%, inulin 0.26%, and fructooligosaccharides 0.22%. The result indicates that the growth of B. bifidum BB01 shows an significant increase in the optimized culture medium (p < 0.05, the OD600 value reached 1.434 at 18h, which increased 6.58% compared to the control. And the viable counts of B. bifidum BB01 increased 24.36% and reached (2.17±0.06 ×109cfu/mL. The results show that the optimization of the carbon source and prebiotics using CCD in this study is workable and necessary.

  2. Carbon Emission from Forest Fires on Scots Pine Logging Sites in the Angara Region of Central Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, G. A.; Conard, S. G.; McRae, D. J.; Kukavskaya, E. A.; Bogorodskaya, A. V.; Kovaleva, N. M.

    2010-12-01

    Wildfire and large-scale forest harvesting are the two major disturbances in the Russian boreal forests. Non-recovered logged sites total about a million hectares in Siberia. Logged sites are characterized by higher fire hazard than forest sites due to the presence of generally untreated logging slash (i.e., available fuel) which dries out much more rapidly compared to understory fuels. Moreover, most logging sites can be easily accessed by local population; this increases the risk for fire ignition. Fire impacts on the overstory trees, subcanopy woody layer, and ground vegetation biomass were estimated on 14 logged and unlogged comparison sites in the Lower Angara Region in 2009-2010 as part of the NASA-funded NEESPI project, The Influence of Changing Forestry Practices on the Effects of Wildfire and on Interactions Between Fire and Changing Climate in Central Siberia. Based on calculated fuel consumption, we estimated carbon emission from fires on both logged and unlogged burned sites. Carbon emission from fires on logged sites appeared to be twice that on unlogged sites. Soil respiration decreased on both site types after fires. This reduction may partially offset fire-produced carbon emissions. Carbon emissions from fire and post-fire ecosystem damage on logged sites are expected to increase under changing climate conditions and as a result of anticipated increases in future forest harvesting in Siberia.

  3. Dissolved Pesticide and Organic Carbon Concentrations Detected in Surface Waters, Northern Central Valley, California, 2001-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, James L.; Jacobson, Lisa A.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    2004-01-01

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted to determine the effects of pesticide mixtures on Chinook salmon under various environmental conditions in surface waters of the northern Central Valley of California. This project was a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the University of California. The project focused on understanding the environmental factors that influence the toxicity of pesticides to juvenile salmon and their prey. During the periods January through March 2001 and January through May 2002, water samples were collected at eight surface water sites in the northern Central Valley of California and analyzed by the USGS for dissolved pesticide and dissolved organic carbon concentrations. Water samples were also collected by the USGS at the same sites for aquatic toxicity testing by the Aquatic Toxicity Laboratory at the University of California Davis; however, presentation of the results of these toxicity tests is beyond the scope of this report. Samples were collected to characterize dissolved pesticide and dissolved organic carbon concentrations, and aquatic toxicity, associated with winter storm runoff concurrent with winter run Chinook salmon out-migration. Sites were selected that represented the primary habitat of juvenile Chinook salmon and included major tributaries within the Sacramento and San Joaquin River Basins and the Sacramento?San Joaquin Delta. Water samples were collected daily for a period of seven days during two winter storm events in each year. Additional samples were collected weekly during January through April or May in both years. Concentrations of 31 currently used pesticides were measured in filtered water samples using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry at the U.S. Geological Survey's organic chemistry laboratory in Sacramento, California. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations were analyzed in filtered water samples using a Shimadzu TOC-5000A total organic carbon

  4. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis to elucidate the cross-talk between one-carbon and xenobiotic metabolic pathways in multi-disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Vijayalakshmi, Sana Venkata; Rupasree, Yedluri; Kumudini, Nadella; Sowganthika, Sampathkumar; Naidu, Janardhanan Venketlakshmi; Ramaiah, M Janaki; Rao, Dunna Nageswara; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Putatively functional polymorphisms of one-carbon and xenobiotic metabolic pathways influence susceptibility for wide spectrum of diseases. The current study was aimed to explore gene-gene interactions among these two metabolic pathways in four diseases i.e. breast cancer, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), coronary artery disease (CAD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis was carried out on four case-control datasets. Cross-talk was observed between one-carbon and xenobiotic pathways in breast cancer (RFC 80 G>A, COMT H108L and TYMS 5'-UTR 28 bp tandem repeat) and SLE (CYP1A1 m1, MTRR 66 A>G and GSTT1). Gene-gene interactions within one-carbon metabolic pathway were observed in CAD (GCPII 1561 C>T, SHMT 1420 C>T and MTHFR 677 C>T) and PD (cSHMT 1420 C>T, MTRR 66 A>G and RFC1 80 G>A). These interaction models showed good predictability of risk for PD (The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (C) = 0.83) and SLE (C = 0.73); and moderate predictability of risk for breast cancer (C = 0.64) and CAD (C = 0.63). Cross-talk between one-carbon and xenobiotic pathways was observed in diseases with female preponderance. Gene-gene interactions within one-carbon metabolic pathway were observed in diseases with male preponderance. PMID:25648260

  5. Ecological network analysis for carbon metabolism of eco-industrial parks: a case study of a typical eco-industrial park in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Chen, Bin; Feng, Kuishuang; Hubacek, Klaus

    2015-06-16

    Energy production and industrial processes are crucial economic sectors accounting for about 62% of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions globally in 2012. Eco-industrial parks are practical attempts to mitigate GHG emissions through cooperation among businesses and the local community in order to reduce waste and pollution, efficiently share resources, and help with the pursuit of sustainable development. This work developed a framework based on ecological network analysis to trace carbon metabolic processes in eco-industrial parks and applied it to a typical eco-industrial park in Beijing. Our findings show that the entire metabolic system is dominated by supply of primary goods from the external environment and final demand. The more carbon flows through a sector, the more influence it would exert upon the whole system. External environment and energy providers are the most active and dominating part of the carbon metabolic system, which should be the first target to mitigate emissions by increasing efficiencies. The carbon metabolism of the eco-industrial park can be seen as an evolutionary system with high levels of efficiency, but this may come at the expense of larger levels of resilience. This work may provide a useful modeling framework for low-carbon design and management of industrial parks. PMID:25983044

  6. Long-range transported dissolved organic matter, ions and black carbon deposited on Central Asian snow covered glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, Julia; Kang, Shichang; Peltier, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Ninety percent of the Central Asian population depend on water precipitated in the mountains stored in glaciers and snow cover. Accelerated melting of the snow and ice can be induced by the deposition of airborne impurities such as mineral dust, black carbon and co-emitted species leading to significant reductions of the surface albedo. However, Central Asia is a relatively understudied region and data on the source regions, chemical and microphysical characteristics as well as modelling studies of long-range transported air pollution and dust to the Tien Shan mountains is very scarce. We studied the atmospheric aerosol deposited most likely between summer 2012 and summer 2013on three different glaciers in the Kyrgyz Republic. Samples were taken from four snow pits on the glaciers Abramov (2 pits, 39.59 °N, 71.56 °E, 4390 m elevation, 240 cm deep, and 39.62°N, 71.52 °E, 4275 m elevation, 125 cm deep), Ak-Shiirak (41.80 °N, 78.18 °E, 4325 m elevation, 75 cm deep) and Suek (41.78 °N, 77.75 °E, 4341 m elevation, 200 cm deep). The latter two glaciers are located roughly within 6 and 38 km of an operating gold mine. The snow was analyzed for black carbon, ions, metals and organic carbon. We here focus on the results of inorganic ion measurements and organic carbon speciation based on analysis with an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and potential pollution sources that can be deduced from the chemical information as well as back trajectories. Average contributions of snow impurities measured by the HR-ToF-AMS were dominated by organic carbon. Relative concentrations of organic carbon, sulfate, nitrate and ammonium in snow were 86 %, 3 %, 9 % and 2 % respectively for Abramov, 92 %, 1 %, 5 % and 1 % for Suek, and 95 %, 1 %, 3 % and 1 % for Ak-Shiirak. Generally, impurities on Suek and Ak-Shiirak were three and five times higher than on Abramov. Mass concentrations of organic carbon were on average 6 times higher in samples

  7. Coral-algae metabolism and diurnal changes in the CO2-carbonate system of bulk sea water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul L. Jokiel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Precise measurements were conducted in continuous flow seawater mesocosms located in full sunlight that compared metabolic response of coral, coral-macroalgae and macroalgae systems over a diurnal cycle. Irradiance controlled net photosynthesis (Pnet, which in turn drove net calcification (Gnet, and altered pH. Pnet exerted the dominant control on [CO32−] and aragonite saturation state (Ωarag over the diel cycle. Dark calcification rate decreased after sunset, reaching zero near midnight followed by an increasing rate that peaked at 03:00 h. Changes in Ωarag and pH lagged behind Gnet throughout the daily cycle by two or more hours. The flux rate Pnet was the primary driver of calcification. Daytime coral metabolism rapidly removes dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC from the bulk seawater and photosynthesis provides the energy that drives Gnet while increasing the bulk water pH. These relationships result in a correlation between Gnet and Ωarag, with Ωarag as the dependent variable. High rates of H+ efflux continued for several hours following mid-day peak Gnet suggesting that corals have difficulty in shedding waste protons as described by the Proton Flux Hypothesis. DIC flux (uptake followed Pnet and Gnet and dropped off rapidly following peak Pnet and peak Gnet indicating that corals can cope more effectively with the problem of limited DIC supply compared to the problem of eliminating H+. Over a 24 h period the plot of total alkalinity (AT versus DIC as well as the plot of Gnet versus Ωarag revealed a circular hysteresis pattern over the diel cycle in the coral and coral-algae mesocosms, but not the macroalgae mesocosm. Presence of macroalgae did not change Gnet of the corals, but altered the relationship between Ωarag and Gnet. Predictive models of how future global changes will effect coral growth that are based on oceanic Ωarag must include the influence of future localized Pnet on Gnet and changes in rate of reef carbonate

  8. Carbon cycling and carbon metabolism by soil fungi in a boreal forest: impacts of wildfire and permafrost on functional genes, isotope signatures, and ectomycorrhizae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, M. P.; Harden, J. W.

    2006-12-01

    carbon for microbial metabolism. Ectomycorrhizal mats occurred only in control soils and increased fungal biomass, functional gene abundance, enzyme activities and process rates compared to non-mat soils. Taken together these results indicate that linkages can be made between the distribution of soil microbial communities, molecular scale information, and soil carbon dynamics.

  9. Metabolic responses to the acute ingestion of two commercially available carbonated beverages: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendel Ron W

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this placebo-controlled, double-blind cross-over study was to compare the effects of two commercially available soft drinks on metabolic rate. Methods After giving informed consent, twenty healthy men and women were randomly assigned to ingest 12 ounces of Celsius™ and, on a separate day, 12 ounces of Diet Coke®. All subjects completed both trials using a randomized, counterbalanced design. Metabolic rate (via indirect calorimetry and substrate oxidation (via respiratory exchange ratio were measured at baseline (pre-ingestion and at the end of each hour for 3 hours post-ingestion. Results Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant interaction (p ® ingestion. No differences in respiratory exchange ratio were noted between trials. Conclusion These preliminary findings indicate Celsius™ has thermogenic properties when ingested acutely. The effects of repeated, chronic ingestion of Celsius™ on body composition are unknown at this time.

  10. Monitoring primary carbon metabolism in plants using heavy isotope labelling and mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Lindén, Pernilla

    2015-01-01

    This thesis covers the possibilities and limitations of studying primary metabolism in intact plants, with special focus on heavy isotope labelling and mass spectrometry methodology. In paper I, a series of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants lacking one or both genes of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH characterised) were characterised. We found that mMDH has a complex respiration-controlling role. In paper II, we continued to study one of the single mutants, mmdh1. We developed a method us...

  11. Comparing CLM and CLM-ED as a basis for representing carbon cycling dynamics in a Central Amazonian forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, R. G.; Holm, J. A.; Koven, C. D.; Riley, W. J.; Chambers, J. Q.; Fisher, R.; Muszala, S.; Higuchi, N.

    2014-12-01

    Old-growth tropical forests are responsible for a potentially large portion of the terrestrial carbon sink, although the underlying control mechanisms of that sink, has large uncertainties. The quantification of the tropical forest carbon sink is a grand challenge of measurement scale. Therefore, there is a strong emphasis on incorporating improved vegetation structure and compositional representativeness in land-surface modeling. Vegetation demography, plant competition, mechanistic mortality, disturbance cycling, and plant functional traits strongly control carbon dynamics and energy budgets of the Earth's surface. Size and age structured scaling processes have not been represented in the widely used Community Land Model (CLM) until the recent inclusion of the Ecosystem Demography (ED) model into CLM 4.5, i.e., CLM-ED. The goal of this study was to compare how CLM-ED captured tropical carbon cycling dynamics compared to CLM and 16 years of field measurements from a central Amazonian forest. We evaluated critical carbon flux processes (Mg C ha-1 yr-1) such as net ecosystem exchange (NEE), net primary production (NPP), and autotrophic respiration (AR), and additional representations of growth and maintenance in CLM and CLM-ED. For a central Amazonian forest CLM estimated GPP from 2000-2012, with transient CO2 concentrations, to be 31.5 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 and was similar to field measurements, while initial evaluation of the newly developed CLM-ED estimated GPP to be substantially higher. The introduction of the size and age structure of ED to the CLM framework enables a finer granularity of state information in the canopy and new ways to represent canopy physics. Therefore alternative physics processes were compared, including those that are highly resolved at the cohort scale (i.e. plant groups) to those at the highly parameterized community scale (i.e. the plant canopy as a whole). CLM serves as the land-model component for nearly 40% of the Earth System Models

  12. Rodingitization and carbonization processes in Triassic ultramafic cumulates and lavas, Othris Mt, Central Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsovitis, Petros; Magganas, Andreas; Economou, Georgios

    2016-04-01

    A Triassic magmatic sequence from the south Othris region is comprised of early stage basaltic pillow lavas, as well as late stage ultramafic rocks, lava flows, high-Mg doleritic dykes and pyroclastic tuffs. The ultramafic rocks include slightly serpentinized wehrlites and lavas consisting of cumulate olivine, variably textured clinopyroxene (cumulate, quench, hollow, skeletal or blade shaped), magnesiohornblende, tremolite, phlogopite, spinel, chlorite, garnet, serpentine, calcite and devitrified glass[1]. Part of their secondary mineralogy developed due to percolation of metasomatic fluids during rodingitization and carbonization processes. In ultramafic rocks from Agia Marina and Mili, rodingitization was rather penetratively and expressed with crystallization of hydrogarnets, accompanied by secondary diopside and chlorite. Hydrogarnets are characterized by their low Ti-contents (recycling thermal carbonated seawater, leached from the rifted Triassic platform carbonates. References. [1] Koutsovitis, Magganas, Ntaflos 2012: Lithos 144-145, 177-193; [2] Koutsovitis, Magganas, Pomonis, Ntaflos 2013: Lithos 172-173, 139-157.

  13. Characterizing the metabolic trade-off in Nitrosomonas europaea in response to changes in inorganic carbon supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, D; Khunjar, W O; Wett, B; Murthy, S N; Chandran, K

    2015-02-17

    The link between the nitrogen and one-carbon cycles forms the metabolic basis for energy and biomass synthesis in autotrophic nitrifying organisms, which in turn are crucial players in engineered nitrogen removal processes. To understand how autotrophic nitrifying organisms respond to inorganic carbon (IC) conditions that could be encountered in engineered partially nitrifying systems, we investigated the response of one of the most extensively studied model ammonia oxidizing bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea (ATCC19718), to three IC availability conditions: excess gaseous and excess ionic IC supply (40× stoichiometric requirement), excess gaseous IC supply (4× stoichiometric requirement in gaseous form only), and limiting IC supply (0.25× stoichiometric requirement). We found that, when switching from excess gaseous and excess ionic IC supply to excess gaseous IC supply, N. europaea chemostat cultures demonstrated an acclimation period that was characterized by transient decreases in the ammonia removal efficiency and transient peaks in the specific oxygen uptake rate. Limiting IC supply led to permanent reactor failures (characterized by biomass washout and failure of ammonia removal) that were preceded by similar decreases in the ammonia removal efficiency and peaks in the specific oxygen uptake rate. Notably, both excess gaseous IC supply and limiting IC supply elicited a previously undocumented increase in nitric and nitrous oxide emissions. Further, gene expression patterns suggested that excess gaseous IC supply and limiting IC supply led to consistent up-regulation of ammonia respiration genes and carbon assimilation genes. Under these conditions, interrogation of the N. europaea proteome revealed increased levels of carbon fixation and transport proteins and decreased levels of ammonia oxidation proteins (active in energy synthesis pathways). Together, the results indicated that N. europaea mobilized enhanced IC scavenging pathways for biosynthesis and

  14. Adaptive evolution of complex innovations through stepwise metabolic niche expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szappanos, Balázs; Fritzemeier, Jonathan; Csörgő, Bálint; Lázár, Viktória; Lu, Xiaowen; Fekete, Gergely; Bálint, Balázs; Herczeg, Róbert; Nagy, István; Notebaart, Richard A; Lercher, Martin J; Pál, Csaba; Papp, Balázs

    2016-01-01

    A central challenge in evolutionary biology concerns the mechanisms by which complex metabolic innovations requiring multiple mutations arise. Here, we propose that metabolic innovations accessible through the addition of a single reaction serve as stepping stones towards the later establishment of complex metabolic features in another environment. We demonstrate the feasibility of this hypothesis through three complementary analyses. First, using genome-scale metabolic modelling, we show that complex metabolic innovations in Escherichia coli can arise via changing nutrient conditions. Second, using phylogenetic approaches, we demonstrate that the acquisition patterns of complex metabolic pathways during the evolutionary history of bacterial genomes support the hypothesis. Third, we show how adaptation of laboratory populations of E. coli to one carbon source facilitates the later adaptation to another carbon source. Our work demonstrates how complex innovations can evolve through series of adaptive steps without the need to invoke non-adaptive processes. PMID:27197754

  15. Proline induces heat tolerance in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) plants by protecting vital enzymes of carbon and antioxidative metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Kaushal, Neeru; Gupta, Kriti; Bhandhari, Kalpna; Kumar, Sanjeev; Thakur, Prince; Nayyar, Harsh

    2011-01-01

    Chickpea is a heat sensitive crop hence its potential yield is considerably reduced under high temperatures exceeding 35 °C. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of proline in countering the damage caused by heat stress to growth and to enzymes of carbon and antioxidative metabolism in chickpea. The chickpea seeds were raised without (control) and with proline (10 μM) at temperatures of 30/25 °C, 35/30 °C, 40/35 °C and 45/40 °C as day/ night (12 h/12 h) in a growth chamber. The sho...

  16. Soybeans grown in the Chernobyl area produce fertile seeds that have increased heavy metal resistance and modified carbon metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Klubicová

    Full Text Available Plants grow and reproduce in the radioactive Chernobyl area, however there has been no comprehensive characterization of these activities. Herein we report that life in this radioactive environment has led to alteration of the developing soybean seed proteome in a specific way that resulted in the production of fertile seeds with low levels of oil and β-conglycinin seed storage proteins. Soybean seeds were harvested at four, five, and six weeks after flowering, and at maturity from plants grown in either non-radioactive or radioactive plots in the Chernobyl area. The abundance of 211 proteins was determined. The results confirmed previous data indicating that alterations in the proteome include adaptation to heavy metal stress and mobilization of seed storage proteins. The results also suggest that there have been adjustments to carbon metabolism in the cytoplasm and plastids, increased activity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and decreased condensation of malonyl-acyl carrier protein during fatty acid biosynthesis.

  17. Sup(14)C activity of dissolved organic carbon fractions in the north-central Pacific and Sargasso Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocarbon measurements of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) oxidizable by ultraviolet irradiation (DOCuv) yielded apparent ages of ∼6,000 yr in the deep waters of the oligotrophic north-central Pacific gyre. Recent reports of a potentially larger pool of DOC as measured by high-temperature catalytic combustion (DOChtc) using discrete injections of sea water have led to speculation that 'younger', more recently produced DOC could contribute significantly to overall oceanic organic carbon fluxes, owing to its suspected greater biological lability. Here we present a comparison of Δ14C (the deviation in parts per thousand from the 14C activity of nineteenth-century wood) of the DOChtc, DOCuv and humic substances in profiles from the oligotrophic north-central Pacific and Sargasso Sea. For each ocean, the Δ14C values of all three fractions are remarkably similar, yielding no evidence for a component of DOC that is cycled through the system on timescales shorter than several thousands of years. We observe an age difference between the two oceans of ∼2,000 yr for the deepest DOC, which can largely be accounted for by differences in the Δ14C of the DOC sources to the deep basins, and by the different deep-water circulation patterns and transit times in the two oceans. (author)

  18. Origin of the groundwater salinity and geochemical processes in detrital and carbonate aquifers: Case of Chougafiya basin (Central Tunisia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Intissar; Zouari, Kamel; Rigane, Adel; Beji, Ridha

    2015-11-01

    Comprehensive investigations of groundwaters were performed in the detrital and carbonate aquifers of the Chougafiya basin, central Tunisia. In the present review, hydrochemistry and isotopic tools were combined to get an insight into the processes controlling mineralization, recharge conditions, flow pattern of groundwater and C chemistry in the investigated hydrological system. Analysis of the dissolved constituents revealed that several processes controlled the observed chemical composition: (i) the dissolution of evaporitic minerals, (ii) cation exchange reactions, (iii) sulfate reduction under anaerobic conditions, (iv) incongruent dissolution of carbonate minerals (calcite, dolomite) coupled with gypsum dissolution and calcite precipitation, and (v) silicates weathering. Data inferred from 18O and deuterium isotopes in groundwater samples indicated recharge with modern rainfall. Water characterized by lower δ18O and δ2H values is interpreted as recharged by non-evaporated rainfall originating from Mediterranean and Atlantic air masses. However, water with relatively enriched δ18O and δ2H contents is thought to reflect the occurrence of an evaporation process related to the long term practice of flood irrigation. The radiogenic (3H) isotope data provided insight into the presence of two recharge periods in the investigated groundwaters. Waters with 3H contents of 1 TU clearly suggested the occurrence of a contemporaneous recharge probably during the last two decades. Carbon isotopes provided some insights into the timescales of groundwater flow, but mainly revealed that main sources of C are active in the system. These are likely: dissolved biogenic CO2, carbonate dissolution and incongruent reaction of the carbonate matrix. Mean residence times were determined after correction of the initial activities for dead C from the rock matrix and suggest ages ranging from the present day to the Holocene in both Upper Cretaceous and Mio-pliocene groundwaters.

  19. Polyol synthesis in Aspergillus niger : influence of oxygen availability, carbon and nitrogen sources on the metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diano, Audrey; Bekker-Jensen, S; Dynesen, Jens Østergaard;

    2006-01-01

    , erythritol, xylitol, and arabitol were produced as carbon storage compounds when the flux through the PP pathway exceeded the need in ribulose-5-phosphate for the biomass synthesis. Glycerol, erythritol, and xylitol seem to be involved in osmoregulation. Mannitol was produced when the catabolic reduction of...

  20. Cropping Intensity Impacts on Soil Aggregation and Carbon Sequestration in the Central Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    The predominant cropping system in the Central Great Plains is conventional tillage (CT) winter wheat–summer fallow. We investigated the effect 15 yrs of variable cropping intensity, fallow frequency, and tillage (CT and no-till [NT]) had on soil organic C (SOC) sequestration, particulate organic ma...

  1. Metabolism and distribution of 14C- and 35S-labeled carbon disulfide in immature rats of different ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metabolism and distribution of 14C- and 35S-CS2 was examined in 1-, 5-, 10-, 20-, 30-, and 40-day-old rats. During a 3-hr period following an ip dose of 14C-CS2, 58-83% of the dose was expired as CS2 and 4-9% was metabolized to expired CO2 depending on age. Thirty- and forty-day-old rats metabolized significantly more CS2 to CO2 and expired significantly less CS2 than 1- through 20-day-old rats. At the end of the measured expiration period, only biotransformation products of CS2, which were in part covalently bound, remained in tissues from rats of all ages. Tissue levels of 35S-CS2-derived radioactivity exceeded levels of 14C-CS2-derived radioactivity indicating that sulfur metabolites free from the carbon atom of CS2 were formed in rats as young as 1 day of age. The 35S-CS2-derived radioactivity per g of tissue and thus 35S covalently bound to tissue protein was significantly higher in 1- through 20-day-old rats than in 30- and 40-day-old rats. Twenty-four hr after dosing, up to 13 times more 35S-labeled metabolites were covalently bound in organs from 1-day-old rats than in similar organs from 40-day-old rats. The results showed that elimination of the biotransformation products of CS2, in particular the covalently binding sulfur metabolites, was prolonged in newborn rats in comparison to 40-day-old rats

  2. Single-walled carbon nanotubes disturbed the immune and metabolic regulation function 13-weeks after a single intratracheal instillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Jung; Hong, Young-Shick; Lee, Byoung-Seok; Yoon, Cheolho; Jeong, Uiseok; Kim, Younghun

    2016-07-01

    Due to their unique physicochemical properties, the potential health effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have attracted continuous attention together with their extensive application. In this study, we aimed to identify local and systemic health effects following pulmonary persistence of SWCNTs. As expected, SWCNTs remained in the lung for 13 weeks after a single intratracheal instillation (50, 100, and 200μg/kg). In the lung, the total number of cells and the percentages of lymphocytes and neutrophils significantly increased at 200μg/kg compared to the control, and the Th1-polarized immune response was induced accompanying enhanced expression of tissue damage-related genes and increased release of chemokines. Additionally, SWCNTs enhanced the expression of antigen presentation-related proteins on the surface of antigen-presenting cells, however, maturation of dendritic cells was inhibited by their persistence. As compared to the control, a significant increase in the percentage of neutrophils and a remarkable decrease of BUN and potassium level were observed in the blood of mice treated with the highest dose. This was accompanied by the down-regulation of the expression of antigen presentation-related proteins on splenocytes. Moreover, protein and glucose metabolism were disturbed with an up-regulation of fatty acid β-oxidation. Taken together, we conclude that SWCNTs may induce adverse health effects by disturbing immune and metabolic regulation functions in the body. Therefore, careful application of SWCNTs is necessary for the enforcement of safety in nano-industries. PMID:27078092

  3. Altered white matter metabolism in delayed neurologic sequelae after carbon monoxide poisoning: A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Hiroshi; Fujihara, Kazuo; Mugikura, Shunji; Takahashi, Shoki; Kushimoto, Shigeki; Aoki, Masashi

    2016-01-15

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was recently used to examine altered metabolism in the white matter (WM) of patients experiencing carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning; however, only a small number of patients with delayed neurologic sequelae (DNS) were analyzed. We aimed to detect altered metabolism in the WM of patients with DNS using (1)H-MRS; to explore its clinical relevance in the management of patients experiencing CO poisoning. Patients experiencing acute CO poisoning underwent (1)H-MRS and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination within 1week and at 1month after acute poisoning. Metabolites including choline-containing compounds (Cho), creatine (Cr), N-acetylaspartate (NAA), and lactate were measured from the periventricular WM. Myelin basic protein (MBP) concentrations were measured in CSF. Fifty-two patients experiencing acute CO poisoning (15 with DNS, 37 without DNS; median age, 49years; 65% males) underwent (1)H-MRS. Within 1week, NAA/Cr ratios, reflecting neuroaxonal viability, were lower in patients with DNS than in those without DNS (PDNS, Cho/Cr ratios were higher, and NAA/Cr and NAA/Cho ratios lower in patients with DNS (P=0.0001, DNS development; (1)H-MRS at 1month may be useful for discriminating patients with DNS and predicting long-term outcomes. PMID:26723994

  4. Isotopic studies of beach rock carbonates from Konkan, central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumar, B.; Rajamanickam, G.V.; Gujar, A.R.

    .7% (PDB) and delta sup(18)O signatures lie in a narrow range of +27.5 to +28.6% (SMOW), respectively. Isotopic data obtained in this study show that cementation of beach rock carbonates might have taken place in a shallow vadose zone. The large variations...

  5. Effect of carbon tetrachloride on glycogen metabolism in fasted and refed mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatic glycogen was depleted rapidly in fasted mice treated with CCl4. Glycogen breakdown was slow when CCl4 was administered after 1 hr of refeeding. There was an initial increase and then a reduction in liver glycogen of mice refed for 2 hr prior to CCl4 injection. The incorporation of glucose-U-14C into glycogen was higher in mice which were refed before CCl4 administration than in fasted mice treated with the hepatotoxin. The specific activity of lactate was higher in CCl4 treated mice. The data suggested differences in glycogen metabolism of fasted and refed mice in response to CCl4 treatment. (author)

  6. The use of carbon isotopes in the study of groundwater of the Bambui calcareous-central region of Bahia (Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater of 34 wells and of a spring of the Bambui limestone aquifer, in central Bahia, Brazil, were analized for the 14C and 13C content. One sample of soil CO2 and four of soil organic matter were analized for 13C. From these data were calculated the 14C ages of these waters. A major difficulty in the use of radiocarbon in groundwater hydrology is the estimation of the initial 14C concentration. In many cases, this can be simply determined by the fraction of carbon derived from soil gas, relative to the total carbon dissolved, by the use of Δ13C of the soil organic matter, limestone and dissolved carbon in water. This approach does not seem to be completely valid in arid ou semi-arid regions, specially where the pH of the soil is relatively high. In this case, the isotopic composition of the soil water can be determined if the pCO2 and pH of the soil can be estimated and if the isotopic composition of the soil CO2 can be known. The final isotopic composition of the groundwater is a combination of the isotopic composition of the soil water and any limestone thereafter dissolved. The 14C ages of the water samples analized ranged from modern to about 13000 years. The recharge areas of the aquifer are clearly indicated, as the probable underground flow directions. The interpretation of the radiocarbon data is in accord with the hydrologic data. (Author)

  7. Moderate voluntary exercise attenuates the metabolic syndrome in melanocortin-4 receptor-deficient rats showing central dopaminergic dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Obici

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Central dopamine dysregulation during VWR reinforces the link between MC4R function and molecular and behavioral responding to rewards. The data also suggest that exercise can be a successful lifestyle intervention in MC4R-haploinsufficient individuals despite reduced positive reinforcement during exercise training.

  8. Carbon budget of Nyungwe Tropical Montane Rain Forest in Central Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyirambangutse, B.; Zibera, E.; Uwizeye, F. K.; Hansson, L.; Nsabimana, D.; Pleijel, H.; Uddling, J.; Wallin, G.

    2015-12-01

    African tropical rainforests host rich biodiversity and play many roles at different scales such as local, regional and global, in the functioning of the earth system. Despite that the African tropical forests are the world's second largest, it has been neglected in terms of understanding the storage and fluxes of carbon and other nutrients. The question of whether this biome is a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 is still not answered, and little is known concerning the climate change response. Tropical montane forests are even more poorly sampled compared with their importance. Deeper understanding of these ecosystems is required to provide insights on how they might react under global change. To answer questions related to these issues for African tropical montane forests, 15 permanent 0.5 ha plots were established in 2011 in Nyungwe tropical montane rainforest gazetted as a National Park to protect its extensive floral and faunal diversity. The plots are arranged along an east-westerly transect and includes both primary and secondary forest communities. The study is connected to the global ecosystem monitoring network (GEM, http://gem.tropicalforests.ox.ac.uk/). The aim is to characterize spatial and temporal heterogeneity of carbon and nutrient dynamics processes. The role of microclimate, topography, human disturbances, and plant species to the variability of these pools and processes will be explored. We compare stocks and fluxes of carbon and nutrients of the secondary and primary forest communities. The carbon stock are determined by an inventory of height and diameter at breast height (dbh) of all trees with a dbh above 5 cm, wood density, biomass of understory vegetation, leaf area index, standing and fallen dead wood, fine root biomass and organic content of various soil layers (litter, organic and mineral soil down to 45 cm depth). The carbon fluxes are determined by measurements of photosynthesis and respiration of leaves, above and below ground

  9. Analysis of metabolic alterations in Arabidopsis following changes in the carbon dioxide and oxygen partial pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexandra Florian; Stefan Timm; Zoran Nikoloski; Takayuki Tohge; Hermann Bauwe; Wagner LArajo; Alisdair RFernie

    2014-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants are subject to a multitude of environmental variations including several which directly affect their interaction with the atmosphere. Given the indiscriminant nature of Rubisco, the relative rates of photosynthesis and photorespiration are known to be responsive to changes in gas composition. However, compre-hensive profiling methods have not yet been applied in order to characterize the wider consequences of these changes on primary metabolism in general. Moreover, although transcrip-tional profiling has revealed that a subset of photorespiratory enzymes are co-expressed, whether transcriptional responses play a role in short-term responses to atmospheric composi-tional changes remains unknown. To address these questions, plants Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) ecotype Columbia (Col-O) grown under normal air conditions were transferred to different CO2 and O2 concentrations and characterized at the physiological, molecular, and metabolic levels fol owing this transition. The results reveal alterations in the components, which are directly involved in, or supporting, photorespiration, including transcripts and metabolite levels. The results further highlight that the majority of the regulation of these pathways is not mediated at the level of transcription and that the photorespiratory pathway is essential also in conditions in which flux through the pathway is minimized, yet suggest that flux through this pathway is not mediated at the level of transcription.

  10. Proteomic Analysis of the Hydrogen and Carbon Monoxide Metabolism of Methanothermobacter marburgensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diender, Martijn; Pereira, Ricardo; Wessels, Hans J. C. T.; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Sousa, Diana Z.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenotrophic methanogenic archaea are efficient H2 utilizers, but only a few are known to be able to utilize CO. Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus is one of the hydrogenotrophic methanogens able to grow on CO, albeit about 100 times slower than on H2 + CO2. In this study, we show that the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanothermobacter marburgensis, is able to perform methanogenic growth on H2/CO2/CO and on CO as a sole substrate. To gain further insight in its carboxydotrophic metabolism, the proteome of M. marburgensis, grown on H2/CO2 and H2/CO2/CO, was analyzed. Cultures grown with H2/CO2/CO showed relative higher abundance of enzymes involved in the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway and proteins involved in redox metabolism. The data suggest that the strong reducing capacity of CO negatively affects hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, making growth on CO as a sole substrate difficult for this type of methanogens. M. marburgensis appears to partly deal with this by up-regulating co-factor regenerating reactions and activating additional pathways allowing for formation of other products, like acetate.

  11. In vivo 13 carbon metabolic imaging at 3T with hyperpolarized 13C-1-pyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, S J; Yen, Y; Wolber, J; Chen, A P; Albers, M J; Bok, R; Zhang, V; Tropp, J; Nelson, S; Vigneron, D B; Kurhanewicz, J; Hurd, R E

    2007-07-01

    We present for the first time dynamic spectra and spectroscopic images acquired in normal rats at 3T following the injection of (13)C-1-pyruvate that was hyperpolarized by the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) method. Spectroscopic sampling was optimized for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and for spectral resolution of (13)C-1-pyruvate and its metabolic products (13)C-1-alanine, (13)C-1-lactate, and (13)C-bicarbonate. Dynamic spectra in rats were collected with a temporal resolution of 3 s from a 90-mm axial slab using a dual (1)H-(13)C quadrature birdcage coil to observe the combined effects of metabolism, flow, and T(1) relaxation. In separate experiments, spectroscopic imaging data were obtained during a 17-s acquisition of a 20-mm axial slice centered on the rat kidney region to provide information on the spatial distribution of the metabolites. Conversion of pyruvate to lactate, alanine, and bicarbonate occurred within a minute of injection. Alanine was observed primarily in skeletal muscle and liver, while pyruvate, lactate, and bicarbonate concentrations were relatively high in the vasculature and kidneys. In contrast to earlier work at 1.5 T, bicarbonate was routinely observed in skeletal muscle as well as the kidney and vasculature. PMID:17659629

  12. The Yeast Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Routes Carbon Fluxes to Fuel Cell Cycle Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Jennifer C; Kuehne, Andreas; Zamboni, Nicola; Skotheim, Jan M

    2016-05-19

    Cell division entails a sequence of processes whose specific demands for biosynthetic precursors and energy place dynamic requirements on metabolism. However, little is known about how metabolic fluxes are coordinated with the cell division cycle. Here, we examine budding yeast to show that more than half of all measured metabolites change significantly through the cell division cycle. Cell cycle-dependent changes in central carbon metabolism are controlled by the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk1), a major cell cycle regulator, and the metabolic regulator protein kinase A. At the G1/S transition, Cdk1 phosphorylates and activates the enzyme Nth1, which funnels the storage carbohydrate trehalose into central carbon metabolism. Trehalose utilization fuels anabolic processes required to reliably complete cell division. Thus, the cell cycle entrains carbon metabolism to fuel biosynthesis. Because the oscillation of Cdk activity is a conserved feature of the eukaryotic cell cycle, we anticipate its frequent use in dynamically regulating metabolism for efficient proliferation. PMID:27203178

  13. Metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum aimed at alternative carbon sources and new products

    OpenAIRE

    Volker Fritz Wendisch; Steffen Nikolaus Lindner; Ahmed Zahoor

    2012-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is well known as the amino acid-producing workhorse of fermentation industry, being used for multi-million-ton scale production of glutamate and lysine for more than 60 years. However, it is only recently that extensive research has focused on engineering it beyond the scope of amino acids. Meanwhile, a variety of corynebacterial strains allows access to alternative carbon sources and/or allows production of a wide range of industrially relevant compounds. Some of t...

  14. Effects of COD to Phosphorus Ratios on the Metabolism of PAOs in Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal with Different Carbon Sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Jiang; Junguo He; Xiaonan Yang; Jianzheng Li

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the phosphorus removal and metabolism under various COD/P ratio, a sludge highly enriched in PAOs was used to investigate the impacts of COD/P in batch tests under different carbon supply conditions. Acetate, propionate and a mixture of acetate and propionate at a ratio of 3 ∶ 1 ( COD basis) was used as carbon sources with the COD/P of 20, 15,10 and 5�0 gCOD/gP, respectively. The minimum COD/P ratios for complete P removal were found to be 8�24 gCOD/gP for acetate, 11�40 gCOD/gP for propionate and 9�10 gCOD/gP for the 3 ∶ 1 mixture of acetate and propionate. Converted to a mass basis, all three cases had a very similar ratio of 7�7 gVFA/gP, which represented a useful guide for operation of EBPR plants to identify possible shortages inVFAs. The trend in PHV accumulation during the anaerobic period along with the decrease of COD/P ratios suggested that, PAOs may use the TCA pathway for anaerobic VFA uptake to maintain the required NADH production with reduced glycogen degradation. During the aerobic phase, the glycogen pool was reduced but remained enough compared to the requirement for anaerobic VFA uptake, and the synthesis and degradation of glycogen was not the inhibition factor of PAOs.

  15. Pathway analysis using (13) C-glycerol and other carbon tracers reveals a bipartite metabolism of Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häuslein, Ina; Manske, Christian; Goebel, Werner; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Hilbi, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Amino acids represent the prime carbon and energy source for Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular pathogen, which can cause a life-threatening pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. Genome, transcriptome and proteome studies indicate that L. pneumophila also utilizes carbon substrates other than amino acids. We show here that glycerol promotes intracellular replication of L. pneumophila in amoeba or macrophages (but not extracellular growth) dependent on glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, GlpD. An L. pneumophila mutant strain lacking glpD was outcompeted by wild-type bacteria upon co-infection of amoeba, indicating an important role of glycerol during infection. Isotopologue profiling studies using (13) C-labelled substrates were performed in a novel minimal defined medium, MDM, comprising essential amino acids, proline and phenylalanine. In MDM, L. pneumophila utilized (13) C-labelled glycerol or glucose predominantly for gluconeogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway, while the amino acid serine was used for energy generation via the citrate cycle. Similar results were obtained for L. pneumophila growing intracellularly in amoeba fed with (13) C-labelled glycerol, glucose or serine. Collectively, these results reveal a bipartite metabolism of L. pneumophila, where glycerol and carbohydrates like glucose are mainly fed into anabolic processes, while serine serves as major energy supply. PMID:26691313

  16. Sources and metabolism of carbon in a Canadian boreal hydroelectric reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using isotopic approaches, we try to document the sources and pathways of this CO2 with special attention to seasonal patterns and to the cycling of organic carbon in the reservoir Robert-Bourassa . It is located in the Boreal forest area, south-east of Hudson Bay and is part of a series of 8 reservoirs. It has a mean surface area of 2835 km2 and was flooded in 1979. The isotopic monitoring of the reservoir started in 1998. However, we will essentially refer here to data collected during the summers of 2001 and 2002. Three sampling strategies were retained: i) sampling in surface waters of 15 sites scattered across the reservoir, ii) sampling along three water columns (from shallow to deep sites), and iii) sampling of of inflow and outflow waters of the reservoir, once a month during 1 year. At each sampling site, in situ measurements included: water and air temperatures, pH, alkalinity and wind speed. Samples were collected at each site for the measurement of concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), C/N ratios of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and isotopic compositions of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), DOC, air CO2 and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON)

  17. Radon, carbon dioxide and fault displacements in central Europe related to the Tohoku earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tectonic instability may be measured directly using extensometers installed across active faults or it may be indicated by anomalous natural gas concentrations in the vicinity of active faults. This paper presents the results of fault displacement monitoring at two sites in the Bohemian Massif and Western Carpathians. These data have been supplemented by radon monitoring in the Mladec Caves and by carbon dioxide monitoring in the Zbrasov Aragonite Caves. A significant period of tectonic instability is indicated by changes in the fault displacement trends and by anomalous radon and carbon dioxide concentrations. This was recorded around the time of the catastrophic MW = 9.0 Tohoku Earthquake, which hit eastern Japan on 11 March 2011. It is tentatively suggested that the Tohoku Earthquake in the Pacific Ocean and the unusual geodynamic activity recorded in the Bohemian Massif and Western Carpathians both reflect contemporaneous global tectonic changes. (authors)

  18. The Oligocene-Miocene stratigraphic evolution of the Majella carbonate platform (Central Apennines, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandano, Marco; Cornacchia, Irene; Raffi, Isabella; Tomassetti, Laura

    2016-03-01

    The stratigraphic architecture of the Bolognano Formation documents the evolution of the Majella carbonate platform in response to global and local changes that affected the Mediterranean area during the Oligocene-Miocene interval. The Bolognano Formation consists of a homoclinal ramp that developed in a warm, subtropical environment. Five different lithofacies associations have been identified: Lepidocyclina calcarenites, cherty marly limestones, bryozon calcarenites, hemipelagic marls and marly limestones, and Lithothamnion limestones. Each association corresponds to a single lithostratigraphic unit except for the Lepidocyclina calcarenites that form two distinct lithostratigraphic units (Lepidocyclina calcarenites 1 and 2). These six units reflect alternation of shallow-water carbonate production and drowning. Specifically, two of the three stages of shallow-water carbonate production regard the development of wide dune fields within the middle ramp, one stage dominated by red algae and a sea-grass carbonate factory, whereas the two drowning phases are represented by marly cherty limestones and calcareous marls. A new biostratigraphic framework for Bolognano Formation is presented, based on high-resolution analysis of calcareous nannofossil assemblages, which proved to be very useful for biostratigraphic constraints also in shallow-water settings. Using this approach, we have linked the first drowning phase, late Chattian-Aquitanian p.p. in age, to western Mediterranean volcanism and the Mi-1 event, and the second drowning phase, late Burdigalian-Serravallian in age, to the closure of the Indo-Pacific passage and the occurrence of the global Monterey event. These results permit a new deciphering, in terms of sequence stratigraphy, of the Bolognano Formation that is interpreted as a 2nd-order super-sequence that can be subdivided into 3 transgressive-regressive sequences.

  19. Radon, carbon dioxide and fault displacements in Central Europe related to the Tohoku earthquake

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Briestenský, Miloš; Thinová, L.; Praksová, R.; Stemberk, Josef; Rowberry, Matthew David; Knejflová, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 160, 1-3 (2014), s. 78-82. ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010008; GA ČR GAP210/12/0573 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : carbon dioxide * radon * fault displacements * Tohoku earthquake Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 0.913, year: 2014 http://rpd.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2014/04/06/rpd.ncu090

  20. Partial Amelioration of Peripheral and Central Symptoms of Huntington’s Disease via Modulation of Lipid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jane Y.; Tran, Conny; Hwang, Lin; Deng, Gang; Jung, Michael E.; Faull, Kym F.; Levine, Michael S.; Cepeda, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background Huntington’s disease (HD) is a fatal, inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterized by uncontrollable dance-like movements, as well as cognitive deficits and mood changes. A feature of HD is a metabolic disturbance that precedes neurological symptoms. In addition, brain cholesterol synthesis is significantly reduced, which could hamper synaptic transmission. Objective Alterations in lipid metabolism as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in the R6/2 mouse model of HD were examined. Methods Electrophysiological recordings in vitro examined the acute effects of cholesterol-modifying drugs. In addition, behavioral testing, effects on synaptic activity, and measurements of circulating and brain tissue concentrations of cholesterol and the ketone β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), were examined in symptomatic R6/2 mice and littermate controls raised on normal chow or a ketogenic diet (KD). Results Whole-cell voltage clamp recordings of striatal medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs) from symptomatic R6/2 mice showed increased frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) compared with littermate controls. Incubation of slices in cholesterol reduced the frequency of large-amplitude sIPSCs. Addition of BHB or the Liver X Receptor (LXR) agonist T0901317 reduced the frequency and amplitude of sIPSCs. Surprisingly, incubation in simvastatin to reduce cholesterol levels also decreased the frequency of sIPSCs. HD mice fed the KD lost weight more gradually, performed better in an open field, had fewer stereotypies and lower brain levels of cholesterol than mice fed a regular diet. Conclusions Lipid metabolism represents a potential target for therapeutic intervention in HD. Modifying cholesterol or ketone levels acutely in the brain can partially rescue synaptic alterations, and the KD can prevent weight loss and improve some behavioral abnormalities. PMID:27031732

  1. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase is central to skeletal muscle metabolic regulation and enzymatic signaling during exercise in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Lee-Young, Robert S.; Ayala, Julio E.; Hunley, Charles F.; James, Freyja D.; Bracy, Deanna P; Kang, Li; Wasserman, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is associated with a number of physiological functions involved in the regulation of metabolism; however, the functional role of eNOS is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that eNOS is critical to muscle cell signaling and fuel usage during exercise in vivo, using 16-wk-old catheterized (carotid artery and jugular vein) C57BL/6J mice with wild-type (WT), partial (+/−), or no expression (−/−) of eNOS. Quantitative reductions in eNOS expression ...

  2. Biosynthesis of chiral 3-hydroxyvalerate from single propionate-unrelated carbon sources in metabolically engineered E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Collin H

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to synthesize chiral building block molecules with high optical purity is of considerable importance to the fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Production of one such compound, 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV, has previously been studied with respect to the in vivo or in vitro enzymatic depolymerization of biologically-derived co-polymers of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate. However, production of this biopolymeric precursor typically necessitates the supplementation of a secondary carbon source (e.g., propionate into the culture medium. In addition, previous approaches for producing 3HV have not focused on its enantiopure synthesis, and thus suffer from increased costs for product purification. Results Here, we report the selective biosynthesis of each 3HV stereoisomer from a single, renewable carbon source using synthetic metabolic pathways in recombinant strains of Escherichia coli. The product chirality was controlled by utilizing two reductases of opposing stereoselectivity. Improvement of the biosynthetic pathway activity and host background was carried out to elevate both the 3HV titers and 3HV/3HB ratios. Overall, shake-flask titers as high as 0.31 g/L and 0.50 g/L of (S-3HV and (R-3HV, respectively, were achieved in glucose-fed cultures, whereas glycerol-fed cultures yielded up to 0.19 g/L and 0.96 g/L of (S-3HV and (R-3HV, respectively. Conclusions Our work represents the first report of direct microbial production of enantiomerically pure 3HV from a single carbon source. Continued engineering of host strains and pathway enzymes will ultimately lead to more economical production of chiral 3HV.

  3. Seasonal variations of water-soluble organic carbon, dicarboxylic acids, ketoacids, and α-dicarbonyls in the central Himalayan aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kawamura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol samples were collected from a high elevation mountain site (Nainital, India; 1958 m a.s.l. in the central Himalayas, which provide an isolated platform above the planetary boundary layer to better understand the composition of the remote continental troposphere. The samples were analyzed for water-soluble dicarboxylic acids (C2–C12 and related compounds (ketocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls, as well as organic carbon, elemental carbon and water soluble organic carbon. The contributions of total dicarboxylic acids to total aerosol carbon during wintertime were 1.7 and 1.8%, for day and night, respectively whereas they significantly reduced during summer. Molecular distributions of diacids demonstrated that oxalic (C2 acid was the most abundant species followed by C4 and C3 diacids. The average concentrations of total diacids (433 ± 108 ng m−3, ketoacids (48 ± 23 ng m−3, and α-dicarbonyls (9 ± 4 ng m−3 were similar to those from Asian cities such as Tokyo, Beijing and Hong Kong. During summer season most of the organic species were several times more abundant than in winter. Phthalic acid, which originates from oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as naphthalene, was found to be 7 times higher in summer than winter. This feature has not been reported in atmospheric aerosols. Based on molecular distributions and air mass backward trajectories, we report that dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in Himalayan aerosols are influenced by the anthropogenic activities from highly populated Indo-Gangetic plain areas.

  4. Radiohistochemical investigations into the central nervous sialoglycoconjugate metabolism of dormice (Glis glis) in different stages of adaptation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty adult dormice (Glis glis, Gliridae) were used to measure seasonal and temperature-related variations of sialoglycoconjugates in the central nervous system. The study had two different aims: On the one hand, biochemical and radiochemical methods of separation were used to investigate 10 cerebral regions for any changes in their individual contents of proteins and protein-bound sialic acids and for alterations in the ganglioside pattern of neurons as well as the time curves plotted for the uptake of a specific ganglioside tracer, 14C-N-Ac-mannosamine, that may possibly arise in response to seasonal and temperature-dependent adaptations. In addition, 32 central cerebral regions were examined for dormice showing different stages of adaptation (winter versus summer) to determine in autoradiograms that percentage share of integrated optical density (IOD), which accounts for the radioactively labelled proportions of TCA/PTA-soluble compounds, sialoglycolipids and sialoglycoproteins plus asialocompounds in the total radioactivity. (orig./ECB)

  5. Hybrid dynamic modeling of Escherichia coli central metabolic network combining Michaelis–Menten and approximate kinetic equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, Rafael S.; Machado, Daniel; Rocha, Isabel;

    2010-01-01

    The construction of dynamic metabolic models at reaction network level requires the use of mechanistic enzymatic rate equations that comprise a large number of parameters. The lack of knowledge on these equations and the difficulty in the experimental identification of their associated parameters...... using the hybrid model composed of Michaelis–Menten and the approximate lin-log kinetics indicate that this is a possible suitable approach to model complex large-scale networks where the exact rate laws are unknown.......The construction of dynamic metabolic models at reaction network level requires the use of mechanistic enzymatic rate equations that comprise a large number of parameters. The lack of knowledge on these equations and the difficulty in the experimental identification of their associated parameters......, represent nowadays the limiting factor in the construction of such models. In this study, we compare four alternative modeling approaches based on Michaelis–Menten kinetics for the bi-molecular reactions and different types of simplified rate equations for the remaining reactions (generalized mass action...

  6. Intracellular concentrations and metabolism of carbon compounds in tobacco callus cultures: Effects of light and auxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawyer, A.L.; Grady, K.L.; Bassham, J.A.

    1981-10-01

    Callus cultures derived from pith tissue of Nicotiana tobacum were grown on two media either under continuous illumination or in complete darkness. The first medium limited greening ability of callus grown in the light (3 milligrams per liter naphthalene acetic acid, 0.3 milligram per liter 2-isopentenylaminopurine, Murashige and Skoog salts, and 2% sucrose). The second medium encouraged chlorophyll synthesis (greening) though not shoot formation (0.3 milligram per liter naphthalene acetic acid; 0.3 milligrams per liter 2-isopentylaminopurine). To measure intracellular concentrations, calli were grown for 15 days on these standard media containing (U-/sup 14/C)sucrose. The dry weight proportions of the calli (as a fraction of fresh weight) and many metabolite concentrations nearly doubled in light-grown cells compared to dark-grown cells and increase 30 to 40% on low-auxin media relative to high-auxin media. Glutamine concentrations (from 4 to 26 millimolar) were very high, probably due to the NH/sub 3/ content of the media. Proline concentrations were 20-fold higher in calli grown on low-auxin media in the light (green cells), possibly a stress response to high osmotic potentials in these cells. To analyze sucrose metabolism, callus cells were allowed to take up 0.2% (weight per volume) (U-/sup 14/C)sucrose for up to 90 minutes. In callus tissues and in pith sections from stems of tobacco plants, sucrose was primarily metabolized through invertase activity, producing equal amounts of labeling glucose and fructose. Respiration of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ followed the labeling patterns of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Photorespiration activity was low.

  7. Dynamics of seawater carbonate chemistry, production, and calcification of a coral reef flat, central Great Barrier Reef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Albright

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification is projected to shift coral reefs from a state of net accretion to one of net dissolution this century. Presently, our ability to predict global-scale changes to coral reef calcification is limited by insufficient data relating seawater carbonate chemistry parameters to in situ rates of reef calcification. Here, we investigate diel and seasonal trends in carbonate chemistry of the Davies Reef flat in the central Great Barrier Reef and relate these trends to benthic carbon fluxes by quantifying net ecosystem calcification (nec and net community production (ncp. Results show that seawater carbonate chemistry of the Davies Reef flat is highly variable over both diel and seasonal cycles. pH (total scale ranged from 7.92 to 8.17, pCO2 ranged from 272 to 542 μatm, and aragonite saturation state (Ωarag ranged from 2.9 to 4.1. Diel cycles in carbonate chemistry were primarily driven by ncp, and warming explained 35% and 47% of the seasonal shifts in pCO2 and pH, respectively. Daytime ncp averaged 37 ± 19 mmol C m−2 h−1 in summer and 33 ± 13 mmol C m−2 h−1 in winter; nighttime ncp averaged −30 ± 25 and −7 ± 6 mmol C m−2 h−1 in summer and winter, respectively. Daytime nec averaged 11 ± 4 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 in summer and 8 ± 3 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 in winter, whereas nighttime nec averaged 2 ± 4 mmol and −1 ± 3 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 in summer and winter, respectively. Net ecosystem calcification was highly sensitive to changes in Ωarag for both seasons, indicating that relatively small shifts in Ωarag may drive measurable shifts in calcification rates, and hence carbon budgets, of coral reefs throughout the year.

  8. Carbon nanotubes toxicology and effects on metabolism and immunological modification in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this research is focused on the biological effects of multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on three different human cell types, laboratory animals in vivo, and immunological effects. Large numbers of researchers are directly involved in the handling of nanostructured materials such as MWCNTs and nanoparticles. It is important to assess the potential health risks related to their daily exposure to carbon nanotubes. The administration of sterilized nanosamples has been performed on laboratory animals, in both acute and chronic administration, and the pathological effects on the parenchymal tissues have been investigated. We studied the serum immunological modifications after intraperitoneal administration of the MWCNTs. We did not observe any antigenic reaction; the screening of ANA, anti-ENA, anti-cardiolipin, C-ANCA and P-ANCA was negative. No quantitative modification of immunoglobulins was observed, hence no modification of humoral immunity was documented. We also studied the effects of MWCNTs on the proliferation of three different cell types. MCF-7 showed a significant inhibition of proliferation for all conditions studied, whereas hSMCs demonstrated a reduction of cell growth only for the highest MWCNTs concentrations after 72 h. Also, no growth modification was observed in the Caco-2 cell line. We observed that a low quantity of MWCNTs does not provoke any inflammatory reaction. However, for future medical applications, it is important to realize prosthesis based on MWCNTs, through studying the corresponding implantation effects. Moreover, it has to be emphasized that this investigation does not address, at the moment, the carcinogenicity of MWCNTs, which requires a detailed follow-up investigation on the specific topic. In view of the subsequent and more extensive use of MWCNTs, especially in applications where carbon nanotubes are injected into the human body for drug delivery, as a contrast agent carrying entities for MRI, or as the basic

  9. Carbon nanotubes toxicology and effects on metabolism and immunological modification in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaretti, M.; Mazzanti, G.; Bosco, S.; Bellucci, S.; Cucina, A.; LeFoche, F.; Carru, G. A.; Mastrangelo, S.; Di Sotto, A.; Masciangelo, R.; Chiaretti, A. M.; Balasubramanian, C.; DeBellis, G.; Micciulla, F.; Porta, N.; Deriu, G.; Tiberia, A.

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this research is focused on the biological effects of multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on three different human cell types, laboratory animals in vivo, and immunological effects. Large numbers of researchers are directly involved in the handling of nanostructured materials such as MWCNTs and nanoparticles. It is important to assess the potential health risks related to their daily exposure to carbon nanotubes. The administration of sterilized nanosamples has been performed on laboratory animals, in both acute and chronic administration, and the pathological effects on the parenchymal tissues have been investigated. We studied the serum immunological modifications after intraperitoneal administration of the MWCNTs. We did not observe any antigenic reaction; the screening of ANA, anti-ENA, anti-cardiolipin, C-ANCA and P-ANCA was negative. No quantitative modification of immunoglobulins was observed, hence no modification of humoral immunity was documented. We also studied the effects of MWCNTs on the proliferation of three different cell types. MCF-7 showed a significant inhibition of proliferation for all conditions studied, whereas hSMCs demonstrated a reduction of cell growth only for the highest MWCNTs concentrations after 72 h. Also, no growth modification was observed in the Caco-2 cell line. We observed that a low quantity of MWCNTs does not provoke any inflammatory reaction. However, for future medical applications, it is important to realize prosthesis based on MWCNTs, through studying the corresponding implantation effects. Moreover, it has to be emphasized that this investigation does not address, at the moment, the carcinogenicity of MWCNTs, which requires a detailed follow-up investigation on the specific topic. In view of the subsequent and more extensive use of MWCNTs, especially in applications where carbon nanotubes are injected into the human body for drug delivery, as a contrast agent carrying entities for MRI, or as the basic

  10. Algal C-14 and total carbon metabolisms 2. Experimental observations with the diatom Skeletonema costatum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, P.J.L.; Robinson, C.; Søndergaard, M.; Jespersen, A.M.; Bentley, T.L.; Lefevre, D.; Richardson, Katherine; Riemann, B.

    1996-01-01

    Three sets of comparisons of net and gross inorganic carbon assimilation and C-14 uptake were made with an axenic culture of Skeletonema costatum. The comparisons showed that in the physiological window studied (10-20% of the intrinsic generation time and gross photosynthesis/respiration ratios of......2. The conclusion drawn was that over the time scale studied, the C-14 technique was measuring net photosynthesis, consistent with essentially 100% recycling of respiratory CO2. The study has shown that we now possess the basis to make a rigorous analysis of net, gross CO2 fixation and net C-14...

  11. Changes in photosynthetic carbon metabolism in senescent leaves of chickpea, Cicer arietinum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrashekhar V. Murumkar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic processes in mature and senescent leaves of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. have been compared. With age, leaf photosynthetic pigments viz. chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoids, and rate of 14°C fixation were considerably affected. Analysis of δ13C, and short term photosynthetic products showed no major change in the path of photosynthetic carbon fixation. Study of long term photosynthetic 14C assimilation revealed that in old senescent leaves, 14C incorporation into organic acid and sugar fractions was enhanced.

  12. Simulation of Flux Distribution in Central Metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Hybridized Genetic Algorithm%杂合基因算法在酵母中间代谢途径代谢通量分析中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张慧敏; 姚善泾

    2007-01-01

    A scheme of investigating the intracellular metabolic fluxes in central metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on isotope model and tracer experiment was developed. The metabolic model applied in this study includes the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, the pentose phosphate pathway, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, CO2 anaplerotic reactions, ethanol and acetate formation, and pathways involved in amino acid synthesis. The approach of hybridized genetic algorithm combined with the sequential simplex technique was used to optimize a quadratic error function without the requirement of the information on the partial derivatives. The impact of some key parameters on the algorithm was studied. This approach was proved to be rapid and numerically stable in the analysis of the central metabolism of S.cerevisiae.

  13. photosynthetic carbon metabolism in wild, primitive and cultivated forms of wheat at three levels of ploidy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    14CO2 assimilation was studied with diploid, tetraploid, hexaploid species of the genera Triticum and their wild relatives Aegilops. Attached mature leaves of 3 - 4 week-old plants were allowed to undergo photosynthesis under air at ambient temperature. The pattern of distribution of 14C was notably similar in Triticum and Aegilops species whatever the level of ploidy. Sucrose was the sink for photosynthetic carbon. 14C for sucrose synthesis was supplied either through the glycolate pathway by glycolate, the product of the photorespiration or by the Calvin cycle intermediates exported into the cytoplasm. Depending on the species, the glycolate pathway provided 40 to 75% of the sucrose 14C. The higher labeling of sucrose was associated with the greater participation of the glycolate pathway in the wild diploid (DD) A. squarrosa and in the cultivated hexaploid (AABBDD) T. aestivum. The results suggest that the expression of the male D genome is dominant over the female AB genome in T. aestivum. In T. aestivum under ambient conditions lowering (low temperature) or hindering (1% O2) photorespiration, sucrose labeling decreased, but serine and glycine labeling was favoured. We propose that in wheat leaves, the role of photorespiration is to drain part of the carbon exported from the chloroplast as glycolate, towards sucrose synthesis. (author)

  14. Dynamics of component carbon fluxes in a semi-arid Acacia woodland, central Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleverly, James; Boulain, Nicolas; Villalobos-Vega, Randol; Grant, Nicole; Faux, Ralph; Wood, Cameron; Cook, Peter G.; Yu, Qiang; Leigh, Andrea; Eamus, Derek

    2013-07-01

    Vast areas in the interior of Australia are exposed to regular but infrequent periods of heavy rainfall, interspersed with long periods at high temperatures, but little is known of the carbon budget of these remote areas or how they respond to extreme precipitation. In this study, we applied three methods to partition net ecosystem photosynthesis into gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Re) during two years of contrasting rainfall. The first year was wet (>250 mm above average rainfall), while little precipitation fell during the second year (>100 mm below average). During the first year of study, rates of GPP were large (793 g C m-2 yr-1) in this semi-arid Mulga (Acacia aneura) and grass savanna due to complementary photosynthetic responses by the canopy and C4 understorey to cycles of heavy rainfall. Patterns in GPP during the summer and autumn matched those in leaf area index (LAI), photosynthetic activity, and autotrophic respiration. During the dry year, small but positive photosynthetic uptake by Mulga contributed to the neutral carbon budget (GPP / Re = 1.06 ± 0.03). Small rates of photosynthesis by evergreen Mulga when dry were supported by storage of soil moisture above a relatively shallow hardpan. Little soil organic matter (1.1%) was available to support heterotrophic respiration (Rh) without input of fresh substrate. The two largest sources of Re in this study were autotrophic respiration by the seasonal understorey and Rh through decomposition of fresh organic matter supplied by the senescent understorey.

  15. METABOLIC ENGINEERING TO DEVELOP A PATHWAY FOR THE SELECTIVE CLEAVAGE OF CARBON-NITROGEN BONDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Kilbane II

    2004-10-01

    The objective of the project is to develop biochemical pathways for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. The initial phase of the project was focused on the isolation or development of an enzyme capable of cleaving the C-N bond in aromatic amides, specifically 2-aminobiphenyl. The objective of the second phase of the research will be to construct a biochemical pathway for the selective removal of nitrogen from carbazole by combining the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 with the gene(s) encoding an appropriate deaminase. The objective of the final phase of the project will be to develop derivative C-N bond cleaving enzymes that have broader substrate ranges and to demonstrate the use of such strains to selectively remove nitrogen from petroleum. During the first year of the project (October, 2002-September, 2003) enrichment culture experiments resulted in the isolation of microbial cultures that utilize aromatic amides as sole nitrogen sources, several amidase genes were cloned and were included in directed evolution experiments to obtain derivatives that can cleave C-N bonds in aromatic amides, and the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11, and Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10 were cloned in vectors capable of replicating in Escherichia coli. During the second year of the project (October, 2003-September, 2004) enrichment culture experiments succeeded in isolating a mixed bacterial culture that can utilize 2-aminobiphenyl as a sole nitrogen source, directed evolution experiments were focused on the aniline dioxygenase enzyme that is capable of deaminating aniline, and expression vectors were constructed to enable the expression of genes encoding C-N bond cleaving enzymes in Rhodococcus hosts. The construction of a new metabolic pathway to selectively remove nitrogen from carbazole and other molecules typically found in petroleum should lead to the development of a process to improve oil refinery efficiency by reducing the

  16. Cut off values for abdominal obesity as a criterion of metabolic syndrome in an ethnic Kyrgyz population (Central Asian region)

    OpenAIRE

    Mirrakhimov Aibek E; Lunegova Olga S; Kerimkulova Alina S; Moldokeeva Cholpon B; Nabiev Malik P; Mirrakhimov Erkin M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background People of different racial and ethnic backgrounds have a distinct pattern of central fat deposition, thus making it necessary to devise a race based approach for the diagnosis and evaluation of abdominal obesity (AO). This is the first study to determine the optimal waist circumference (WC) cutoff values for definition of AO in an ethnic Kyrgyz population. Methods 323 persons of Kyrgyz ethnicity (183 women and 140 men), with a mean age of 51.8 ± 9.5 years old were included...

  17. Central acylated ghrelin improves memory function and hippocampal AMPK activation and partly reverses the impairment of energy and glucose metabolism in rats infused with β-amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Suna; Moon, Na Rang; Kim, Da Sol; Kim, Sung Hoon; Park, Sunmin

    2015-09-01

    Ghrelin is a gastric hormone released during the fasting state that targets the hypothalamus where it induces hunger; however, emerging evidence suggests it may also affect memory function. We examined the effect of central acylated-ghrelin and DES-acetylated ghrelin (native ghrelin) on memory function and glucose metabolism in an experimentally induced Alzheimer's disease (AD) rat model. AD rats were divided into 3 groups and Non-AD rats were used as a normal-control group. Each rat in the AD groups had intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of β-amyloid (25-35; 16.8nmol/day) into the lateral ventricle for 3 days, and then the pumps were changed to infuse either acylated-ghrelin (0.2nmol/h; AD-G), DES-acylated ghrelin (0.2nmol/h; AD-DES-G), or saline (control; AD-C) for 3 weeks. The Non-AD group had ICV infusion of β-amyloid (35-25) which does not deposit in the hippocampus. During the next 3 weeks memory function, food intake, body weight gain, body fat composition, and glucose metabolism were measured. AD-C exhibited greater β-amyloid deposition compared to Non-AD-C, and AD-G suppressed the increased β-amyloid deposition and potentiated the phosphorylation AMPK. In addition, AD-G increased the phosphorylation GSK and decreased the phosphorylation of Tau in comparison to AD-C and AD-DES-G. Cognitive function, measured by passive avoidance and water maze tests, was much lower in AD-C than Non-AD-C whereas AD-G but not AD-DES-G prevented the decrease (pintermittent fasting to facilitate sustained elevations of acyl-ghrelin should be investigated for cognitive and metabolic benefits, especially in person with early symptoms of memory impairment. PMID:26188171

  18. Effects of sublethal fenitrothion ingestion on cholinesterase inhibition, standard metabolism, thermal preference, and prey-capture ability in the Australian central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps, Agamidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, David; Buttemer, William A; Astheimer, Lee; Fildes, Karen; Hooper, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    The central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) is a medium-sized lizard that is common in semiarid habitats in Australia and that potentially is at risk of fenitrothion exposure from use of the chemical in plague locust control. We examined the effects of single sublethal doses of this organophosphate (OP; low dose = 2.0 mg/kg; high dose = 20 mg/kg; control = vehicle alone) on lizard thermal preference, standard metabolic rate, and prey-capture ability. We also measured activities of plasma total cholinesterase (ChE) and acetylcholinesterase before and at 0, 2, 8, 24, 120, and 504 h after OP dosing. Predose plasma total ChE activity differed significantly between sexes and averaged 0.66 +/- 0.06 and 0.45 +/- 0.06 micromol/min/ml for males and females, respectively. Approximately 75% of total ChE activity was attributable to butyrylcholinesterase. Peak ChE inhibition reached 19% 2 h after OP ingestion in the low-dose group, and 68% 8 h after ingestion in high-dose animals. Neither OP doses significantly affected diurnal body temperature, standard metabolic rate, or feeding rate. Plasma total ChE levels remained substantially depressed up to 21 d after dosing in the high-dose group, making this species a useful long-term biomonitor of OP exposure in its habitat. PMID:14768874

  19. Patterns of Carbon Partitioning in Leaves of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Species during Deacidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, J. T.; Holtum, JAM.

    1996-09-01

    Carbohydrates stored during deacidification in the light were examined in 11 Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species from widely separated taxa grown under uniform conditions. The hypothesis that NAD(P) malic enzyme CAM species store chloroplastic starch and glucans, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase species store extrachloroplastic sugars or polymers was disproved. Of the six malic enzyme species examined, Kalanchoe tubiflora, Kalanchoe pinnata, Kalanchoe daigremontiana, and Vanilla planifolia stored mainly starch. Sansevieria hahnii stored sucrose and Agave guadalajarana did not store starch, glucose, fructose, or sucrose. Of the five phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase species investigated, Ananus comosus stored extrachloroplastic carbohydrate, but Stapelia gigantea, Hoya carnosa, and Portea petropolitana stored starch, whereas Aloe vera stored both starch and glucose. Within families, the major decarboxylase was common for all species examined, whereas storage carbohydrate could differ both between and within genera. In the Bromeliaceae, A. comosus stored mainly fructose, but P. petropolitana stored starch. In the genus Aloe, A. vera stored starch and glucose, but A. arborescens is known to store a galactomannan polymer. We postulate that the observed variation in carbohydrate partitioning between CAM species is the result of two principal components: (a) constraints imposed by the CAM syndrome itself, and (b) diversity in biochemistry resulting from different evolutionary histories. PMID:12226397

  20. Metabolic Engineering to Develop a Pathway for the Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Nitrogen Bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Kilbane II

    2005-10-01

    The objective of the project is to develop a biochemical pathway for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. Specifically a novel biochemical pathway will be developed for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in carbazole. The cleavage of the first C-N bond in carbazole is accomplished by the enzyme carbazole dioxygenase, that catalyzes the conversion of carbazole to 2-aminobiphenyl-2,3-diol. The genes encoding carbazole dioxygenase were cloned from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 and from Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10. The selective cleavage of the second C-N bond has been challenging, and efforts to overcome that challenge have been the focus of recent research in this project. Enrichment culture experiments succeeded in isolating bacterial cultures that can metabolize 2-aminobiphenyl, but no enzyme capable of selectively cleaving the C-N bond in 2-aminobiphenyl has been identified. Aniline is very similar to the structure of 2-aminobiphenyl and aniline dioxygenase catalyzes the conversion of aniline to catechol and ammonia. For the remainder of the project the emphasis of research will be to simultaneously express the genes for carbazole dioxygenase and for aniline dioxygenase in the same bacterial host and then to select for derivative cultures capable of using carbazole as the sole source of nitrogen.

  1. Algal C-14 and total carbon metabolisms 2. Experimental observations with the diatom Skeletonema costatum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, P.J.L.; Robinson, C.; Søndergaard, M.;

    1996-01-01

    of 2-3), C-14 uptake into the particulate plus the dissolved fractions approximated to net photosynthesis. Rate constants derived from the chemically determined changes were used to parameterize models that accounted for the respiration of photosynthetic products and for the recycling of respiratory CO......2. The conclusion drawn was that over the time scale studied, the C-14 technique was measuring net photosynthesis, consistent with essentially 100% recycling of respiratory CO2. The study has shown that we now possess the basis to make a rigorous analysis of net, gross CO2 fixation and net C-14......Three sets of comparisons of net and gross inorganic carbon assimilation and C-14 uptake were made with an axenic culture of Skeletonema costatum. The comparisons showed that in the physiological window studied (10-20% of the intrinsic generation time and gross photosynthesis/respiration ratios...

  2. Using Eddy Covariance Sensors to Quantify Carbon Metabolism of Peatlands: A Case Study in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Can Ertekin; Guler Aslan; Fatih Evrendilek; Nusret Karakaya

    2011-01-01

    Net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of carbon dioxide (CO2) was measured in a cool temperate peatland in northwestern Turkey on a continuous basis using eddy covariance (EC) sensors and multiple (non-)linear regression-M(N)LR-models. Our results showed that hourly NEE varied between −1.26 and 1.06 mg CO2 m−2 s−1, with a mean value of 0.11 mg CO2 m−2 s−1. Nighttime ecosystem respiration (R E) was on average measured as 0.23 ± 0.09 mg CO2 m−2 s−1. Two best-fit M(N)LR models estimated daytime R E as 0....

  3. Dynamics of seawater carbonate chemistry, production, and calcification of a coral reef flat, Central Great Barrier Reef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Albright

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification is projected to shift coral reefs from a state of net accretion to one of net dissolution this century. Presently, our ability to predict global-scale changes to coral reef calcification is limited by insufficient data relating seawater carbonate chemistry parameters to in situ rates of reef calcification. Here, we investigate natural trends in carbonate chemistry of the Davies Reef flat in the central Great Barrier Reef on diel and seasonal timescales and relate these trends to benthic carbon fluxes by quantifying net ecosystem calcification (nec and net community production (ncp. Results show that seawater carbonate chemistry of the Davies Reef flat is highly variable over both diel and seasonal timescales. pH (total scale ranged from 7.92 to 8.17, pCO2 ranged from 272 to 542 μatm, and aragonite saturation state (Ωarag ranged from 2.9 to 4.1. Diel cycles in carbonate chemistry were primarily driven by ncp, and warming explained 35% and 47% of the seasonal shifts in pCO2 and pH, respectively. Daytime ncp averaged 36 ± 19 mmol C m−2 h−1 in summer and 33 ± 13 mmol C m−2 h−1 in winter; nighttime ncp averaged −22 ± 20 and −7 ± 6 mmol C m−2 h−1 in summer and winter, respectively. Daytime nec averaged 11 ± 4 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 in summer and 8 ± 3 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 in winter, whereas nighttime nec averaged 2 ± 4 mmol and −1 ± 3 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 in summer and winter, respectively. Net ecosystem calcification was positively correlated with Ωarag for both seasons. Linear correlations of nec and Ωarag indicate that the Davies Reef flat may transition from a state of net calcification to net dissolution at Ωarag values of 3.4 in summer and 3.2 in winter. Diel trends in Ωarag indicate that the reef flat is currently below this calcification threshold 29.6% of the time in summer and 14.1% of the time in winter.

  4. soil carbon pools within oak forest is endangered by global climate change in central mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Oliva, Felipe; Merino, Agustín; González-Rodriguez, Antonio; Chávez-Vergara, Bruno; Tapia-Torres, Yunuen; Oyama, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Forest soil represents the main C pool in terrestrial ecosystems. In particular, temperate forest ecosystems play an important role in the C budget among tropical countries, such as Mexico. For example, the temperate forest ecosystem contains higher C contents on average (295 Mg C ha-1) than the soil C associated with other ecosystems in Mexico (between 56 to 287 Mg C ha-1). At a regional scale, oak forest has the highest C content (460 Mg C ha-1) among the forest ecosystem in Michoacán State at Central Mexico. At the local scale, the soil C content is strongly affected by the composition of organic matter produced by the plant species. The oak species are very diverse in Mexico, distributed within two sections: Quercus sensu stricto and Lobatae. The oak species from Quercus s.s. section produced litterfall with lower concentrations of recalcitrant and thermostable compounds than oak species from Lobatae section, therefore the soil under the former species had higher microbial activity and nutrient availability than the soil under the later species. However, the forest fragment with higher amount of oak species from Quercus s.s. section increases the amount of soil C contents. Unfortunately, Quercus species distribution models for the central western region of Mexico predict a decrease of distribution area of the majority of oak species by the year 2080, as a consequence of higher temperatures and lower precipitation expected under climate change scenarios. Additionally to these scenarios, the remnant oak forest fragments suffer strong degradation due to uncontrolled wood extraction and deforestation. For this reason, the conservation of oak forest fragments is a priority to mitigate the greenhouse gases emission to the atmosphere. In order to enhance the protection of these forest fragments it is required that the society identify the ecosystem services that are provided by these forest fragments.

  5. Sedimentology of a Mid-Late Ordovician carbonate mud-mound complex from the Kathmandu nappe in Central Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pas, Damien; Da Silva, Anne-Christine; Dhital, Megh Raj; Boulvain, Frédéric

    2011-08-01

    This sedimentological study of the Godavari quarry is the first relating to the Palaeozoic Tethyan sedimentary rocks of the Katmandu nappe (Central Nepal). Sedimentological analyses led to the identification of six microfacies belonging to a large carbonate mud-mound complex, which can be divided into mound, flank and off-mound main depositional settings. Identification of two dasycladaceans ( Dasyporell a cf. silurica ( Stolley, 1893) and Vermiporella sp.) in the mound facies gives a Mid-Late Ordovician age to this newly discovered Godavari carbonate mud-mound, which makes this mound one of the oldest ever described in the Asian continent. The mound microfacies are characterized by a high micritic content, the presence of stromatactis and the prevalence of red coloured sediments (the red pigmentation probably being related to organic precipitation of iron). The flank microfacies are characterized by a higher crinoid and argillaceous content and the presence of bio- and lithoclasts concentrated in argillaceous lenses. Finally, the off-mound microfacies show very few bioclasts and a high argillaceous content. Palaeoenvionmental interpretation of microfacies, in terms of bathymetry, leads us to infer that the Godavari mud-mound started to grow in a deep environment setting below the photic and wave action zones and that it evolved to occupy a location below the fair weather wave base. Cementation of cavities within the mound facies underlines a typical transition from a marine to a burial diagenetic environment characterized by: (1) a radiaxial non luminescent feroan calcite cement (marine) showing a bright orange luminescent band in its middle part; (2) a bright zoned orange fringe of automorphic feroan calcite (meteoric phreatic); (3) a dull orange xenomorphic feroan calcite cement in the centre of cavities (burial) and (4) a saddle dolomite within the centre of larger cavities. The faunal assemblage (diversity and relative proportion) of the Godavari mound facies

  6. Evidence and future scenarios of a low-carbon energy transition in Central America: a case study in Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barido, Diego Ponce de Leon; Johnston, Josiah; Moncada, Maria V.; Callaway, Duncan; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2015-10-01

    The global carbon emissions budget over the next decades depends critically on the choices made by fast-growing emerging economies. Few studies exist, however, that develop country-specific energy system integration insights that can inform emerging economies in this decision-making process. High spatial- and temporal-resolution power system planning is central to evaluating decarbonization scenarios, but obtaining the required data and models can be cost prohibitive, especially for researchers in low, lower-middle income economies. Here, we use Nicaragua as a case study to highlight the importance of high-resolution open access data and modeling platforms to evaluate fuel-switching strategies and their resulting cost of power under realistic technology, policy, and cost scenarios (2014-2030). Our results suggest that Nicaragua could cost-effectively achieve a low-carbon grid (≥80%, based on non-large hydro renewable energy generation) by 2030 while also pursuing multiple development objectives. Regional cooperation (balancing) enables the highest wind and solar generation (18% and 3% by 2030, respectively), at the least cost (US127 MWh-1). Potentially risky resources (geothermal and hydropower) raise system costs but do not significantly hinder decarbonization. Oil price sensitivity scenarios suggest renewable energy to be a more cost-effective long-term investment than fuel oil, even under the assumption of prevailing cheap oil prices. Nicaragua’s options illustrate the opportunities and challenges of power system decarbonization for emerging economies, and the key role that open access data and modeling platforms can play in helping develop low-carbon transition pathways.

  7. Sources and metabolism of carbon in a Canadian boreal hydroelectric reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Average emission values of 1 to 2 g of CO2·m-2·d-1 were observed for hydroelectric reservoirs located in northern Quebec. Here, using isotopic approaches, we try to document the sources and pathways of this CO2 with special attention to seasonal patterns and to the cycling of organic carbon in the reservoir Robert-Bourassa . It is located in the Boreal forest area, south-east of Hudson Bay and is part of a series of 8 reservoirs (including notably LG-2 and LG-3). It has a mean surface area of 2835 km2 and was flooded in 1979. The isotopic monitoring of the reservoir started in 1998. However, we will essentially refer here to data collected during the summers of 2001 and 2002. Three sampling strategies were retained: i) sampling in surface waters of ∼15 sites scattered across the reservoir, ii) sampling along three water columns (from shallow to deep sites), and iii) sampling of of inflow and outflow waters of the reservoir, once a month during 1 year. At each sampling site, in situ measurements included: water and air temperatures, pH, alkalinity and wind speed. Samples were collected at each site for the measurement of concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), C/N ratios of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and isotopic compositions of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), DOC, air CO2 and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON). Samples were also collected for the measurements of 14C-concentrations in DOM and of δ18O-values of dissolved oxygen (DO). δ13C-values of DIC vary, throughout the reservoir, from -9 per mille to -14 per mille vs VPDB (i.e., from -13 to -19, for the corresponding dissolved CO2) whereas δ13C-values in the overlying air-CO2 vary from -9 to -11 per mille. Both show a shift towards more depleted values under windy conditions. δ13C-values in DOC vary little in the reservoir. They average -27.1±0.2 per mille. C/N ratios of DOM vary between 12 and 38 with a mean of 30. The 14C activity of DOM, at the deepest sampling station vary between 106

  8. Current views on the regulation of autotrophic carbon dioxide fixation via the Calvin cycle in bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Dijkhuizen, L; Harder, W

    1984-01-01

    The Calvin cycle of carbon dioxide fixation constitutes a biosynthetic pathway for the generation of (multi-carbon) intermediates of central metabolism from the one-carbon compound carbon dioxide. The product of this cycle can be used as a precursor for the synthesis of all components of cell material. Autotrophic carbon dioxide fixation is energetically expensive and it is therefore not surprising that in the various groups of autotrophic bacteria the operation of the cycle is under strict m...

  9. In vivo studies of pyridine nucleotide metabolism in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyridine nucleotide metabolism has been studied in vivo in a prokaryotic (Escherichia coli) and a eukaryotic (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) system cultured in a medium containing carbon-13-labeled nicotinic acid, followed by NMR detection of the labeled organisms. Chemical exchange between oxidized and reduced nucleotides is found to be sufficiently slow on the NMR time scale to permit the observation of separate resonances corresponding to each redox state. The possibility of significant exchange broadening of reduced pyridine nucleotide resonances under some conditions was further evaluated based on comparative NMR studies utilizing organisms cultured in the presence of either [2-13C]nicotinate or [5-13C]nicotinate. Based on these experiments, it was concluded that broadening as a consequence of intermediate exchange is not significant. Although it was initially anticipated that the carbon-13 resonances arising from the di- and triphosphopyridine nucleotide pools could not be distinguished, the absence of observable resonances corresponding to reduced nucleotides in oxygenated yeast and E. coli cells suggests that the NMR method is fairly specific for determining the redox status of the diphosphopyridine nucleotide pool. Studies of the effects of a variety of perturbations including variation of the oxygen supply, addition of ethanol, and addition of the oxidative phosphorylation uncoupler dinitrophenol have been carried out. Dramatic differences in the response of the catabolic reduction charge, CRC = [NADH]/[NADH] + [NAD+], between the yeast and E. coli cells are observed. The CRC values for the yeast undergo large changes in response to these perturbations which are not observed for the bacterial cells. 52 references, 9 figures, 2 tables

  10. Fluxes of nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide over four potential biofuel crops in Central Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeri, M.; Hickman, G. C.; Bernacchi, C.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are important greenhouse gases that contribute to global climate change. Agriculture is a significant source of N2O to the atmosphere due to the use of nitrogen-based fertilizers. Fluxes of N2O and CO2 are measured using the flux-gradient technique over four different crops at the Energy Farm, a University of Illinois research facility in Urbana, Illinois. Measurements started in June of 2009 and are part of a project that aims to assess the impacts of potential biofuel crops on the carbon, water and nitrogen cycles. The species chosen are Maize (Zea mays), Miscanthus (Miscanthus x giganteus), Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and Prairie (a mix of several native species). The choice of species was based on their potential for the production of second-generation biofuels, i.e., fuels derived from the decomposition of the cellulosic material in the plant biomass. The use of corn residue for cellulosic biofuels might impact the carbon cycle through the reduction of soil organic content. Miscanthus is a perennial grass with great potential for biomass production. However, the total water used during the growing season and its water use efficiency might impose limits on the regions where this biofuel crop can be sustainably planted on a large scale. Switchgrass and the prairie species are less productive but might be suited for being well adapted and easy to establish. This study is the first side-by-side comparison of fluxes of N2O for these agro-ecosystems. The measurements are performed at micrometeorological towers placed at the center of 4 ha plots. The air is sampled at two heights over the vegetation and is analyzed in a tunable diode laser (TDL) installed nearby. A valve system cycles the TDL measurements trough all the intakes in the plots. The fluxes are calculated using the flux-gradient method, which requires the knowledge of the scalar vertical gradient as well as of the friction velocity (u*) and the Monin

  11. Facilitating Understanding of the Purine Nucleotide Cycle and the One-Carbon Pool: Part II--Metabolism of the One-Carbon Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinze, Ifeanyi J.

    2005-01-01

    Some metabolic processes such as glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and lipogenesis are readily understood because they are circumscribed in metabolic pathways that have clearly identifiable beginning points, end products, and other features. Other metabolic pathways that do not appear to be straightforward pose difficulties for students. In part I of…

  12. Using Eddy Covariance Sensors to Quantify Carbon Metabolism of Peatlands: A Case Study in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Ertekin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Net ecosystem exchange (NEE of carbon dioxide (CO2 was measured in a cool temperate peatland in northwestern Turkey on a continuous basis using eddy covariance (EC sensors and multiple (non-linear regression-M(NLR-models. Our results showed that hourly NEE varied between −1.26 and 1.06 mg CO2 m−2 s−1, with a mean value of 0.11 mg CO2 m−2 s−1. Nighttime ecosystem respiration (RE was on average measured as 0.23 ± 0.09 mg CO2 m−2 s−1. Two best-fit M(NLR models estimated daytime RE as 0.64 ± 0.31 and 0.24 ± 0.05 mg CO2 m−2 s−1. Total RE as the sum of nighttime and daytime RE ranged from 0.47 to 0.87 mg CO2 m−2 s−1, thus yielding estimates of gross primary productivity (GPP at −0.35 ± 0.18 and −0.74 ± 0.43 mg CO2 m−2 s−1. Use of EC sensors and M(NLR models is one of the most direct ways to quantify turbulent CO2 exchanges among the soil, vegetation and atmosphere within the atmospheric boundary layer, as well as source and sink behaviors of ecosystems.

  13. Modelling and analysis of central metabolism operating regulatory interactions in salt stress conditions in a L-carnitine overproducing E. coli strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Santos

    Full Text Available Based on experimental data from E. coli cultures, we have devised a mathematical model in the GMA-power law formalism that describes the central and L-carnitine metabolism in and between two steady states, non-osmotic and hyperosmotic (0.3 M NaCl. A key feature of this model is the introduction of type of kinetic order, the osmotic stress kinetic orders (g(OSn, derived from the power law general formalism, which represent the effect of osmotic stress in each metabolic process of the model.By considering the values of the g(OSn linked to each metabolic process we found that osmotic stress has a positive and determinant influence on the increase in flux in energetic metabolism (glycolysis; L-carnitine biosynthesis production; the transformation/excretion of Acetyl-CoA into acetate and ethanol; the input flux of peptone into the cell; the anabolic use of pyruvate and biomass decomposition. In contrast, we found that although the osmotic stress has an inhibitory effect on the transformation flux from the glycolytic end products (pyruvate to Acetyl-CoA, this inhibition is counteracted by other effects (the increase in pyruvate concentration to the extent that the whole flux increases. In the same vein, the down regulation exerted by osmotic stress on fumarate uptake and its oxidation and the production and export of lactate and pyruvate are reversed by other factors up to the point that the first increased and the second remained unchanged.The model analysis shows that in osmotic conditions the energy and fermentation pathways undergo substantial rearrangement. This is illustrated by the observation that the increase in the fermentation fluxes is not connected with fluxes towards the tricaboxylic acid intermediates and the synthesis of biomass. The osmotic stress associated with these fluxes reflects these changes. All these observations support that the responses to salt stress observed in E. coli might be conserved in halophiles.Flux evolution

  14. Microfossils from silicified stromatolitic carbonates of the Upper Proterozoic Limestone-Dolomite 'Series', central East Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J. W.; Knoll, A. H.; Swett, K.

    1989-01-01

    Silicified flake conglomerates and in situ stratiform stromatolites of the Upper Proterozoic (c. 700-800 Ma) Limestone-Dolomite 'Series', central East Greenland, contain well preserved microfossils. Five stratigraphic horizons within the 1200 m succession contain microbial mat assemblages, providing a broad palaeontological representation of late Proterozoic peritidal mat communities. Comparison of assemblages demonstrates that the taxonomy and diversity of mat builder, dweller, and allochthonous populations all vary considerably within and among horizons. The primary mat builder in most assemblages is Siphonophycus inornatum, a sheath-forming prokaryote of probable but not unequivocally established cyanobacterial affinities. An unusual low diversity unit in Bed 17 is dominated by a different builder, Tenuofilum septatum, while a thin cryptalgal horizon in Bed 18 is built almost exclusively by Siphonophycus kestron. Although variable taphonomic histories contribute to observed assemblage variation, most differences within and among horizons appear to reflect the differential success or failure of individual microbial populations in colonizing different tidal flat microenvironments. Twenty-two taxa are recognized, of which two are described as new: Myxococcoides stragulescens n.sp. and Scissilisphaera gradata n. sp.

  15. Visualizing Single Cell Biology: Nanosims Studies of Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism in Diazotrophic Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett-Ridge, J.; Finzi, J. A.; Capone, D. G.; Popa, R.; Nealson, K. H.; Ng, W.; Spormann, A. M.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Weber, P. K.

    2007-12-01

    , inter-species transfers (with Rhizobium epibionts), and within-cell depth profiles. Spatial enrichment patterns were correlated with morphological features evidenced in TEM images of microtomed filaments. These features indicate how 15N and 13C "hotspots" are dispersed throughout individual cells in different species, and may indicate isolated locations of increased N2 fixation, sites of amino acid/protein synthesis, or cyanophycin storage granules. This combination of Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS) analysis and high resolution microscopy allows isotopic analysis to be linked to morphological features and holds great promise for fine-scale studies of bacteria metabolism.

  16. METABOLIC ENGINEERING TO DEVELOP A PATHWAY FOR THE SELECTIVE CLEAVAGE OF CARBON-NITROGEN BONDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Kilbane III

    2003-12-01

    pathway. The construction of a new metabolic pathway to selectively remove nitrogen from carbazole and other molecules typically found in petroleum should lead to the development of a process to improve oil refinery efficiency by reducing the poisoning, by nitrogen, of catalysts used in the hydrotreating and catalytic cracking of petroleum.

  17. Effect of direct seeding mulch-based systems on soil carbon storage and macrofauna in central Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchart, E.; Bernoux, M.; Sarda, X.; Feller, C. [Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement, Montpellier (France); Siqueira Neto, M.; Cerri, C.C.; Piccolo, M. [CENA-USP, Piracicaba (Brazil). Lab. Biogeoquimica Ambiental; Douzet, J.M. [CIRAD, Antsirabe (Madagascar); Scopel, E. [CIRAD-CA, Planaltina (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    Soils represent a large carbon pool, approximately 1500 Gt, equivalent to almost three times the quantity stored in terrestrial biomass and twice the amount stored in the atmosphere. The management and maintenance of soil carbon is therefore an integral part of the global carbon cycle. Land use change, inappropriate agricultural practices and climate change can all lead to a net release of C from soils to the atmosphere, exacerbating the problems of greenhouse gas release. Any modification of land-use or land management can induce variations in soil carbon stocks, even in agricultural systems that are perceived to be in a steady state. These modifications also alter soil macrofauna that is known to affect soil carbon dynamics. Direct seeding Mulch-based Cropping (DMC) systems with two crops per year without soil tillage have widely been adopted over the last 10 to 15 years in the Cerrado (central region) of Brazil. They are replacing the traditional soybean monocropping with fallow under conventional tillage (CT). Th e objective of this study was to examine how DMC practices affect soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics and macrofauna (Rio Verde, Goias State). The approach was to determine soil C stocks and macrofauna in five fi elds under DMC aged 1, 5, 7, 11 and 13 years. In order to compare DMC systems with the native system of the region and previous land-use, a situation under native Cerrado (tree-savanna like vegetation) and a field conducted traditionally (CT) were also studied. Soil C stocks were calculated for the 0-10 and 0-40 cm soil depth and also for the fi rst 400 kg m{sup -2} of soil to compare the same amount of soil and to suppress the potential artefact of soil compaction when sample is based on fix layer depth. Soil macrofauna was hand-sorted from soil monoliths (30 cm depth, TSBF method). In our study, the annual rate of carbon storage was equal to ca. 1.6 MgC ha{sup -1}, which is in the range of values measured for DMC in different areas of Brazil

  18. Layer-by-layer carbon nanotube bio-templates for in situ monitoring of the metabolic activity of nitrifying bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Kenneth J.; Guest, Jeremy S.; Ho, Genevieve; Lynch, Jerome P.; Love, Nancy G.

    2009-03-01

    Despite the wide variety of effective disinfection and wastewater treatment techniques for removing organic and inorganic wastes, pollutants such as nitrogen remain in wastewater effluents. If left untreated, these nitrogenous wastes can adversely impact the environment by promoting the overgrowth of aquatic plants, depleting dissolved oxygen, and causing eutrophication. Although nitrification/denitrification processes are employed during advanced wastewater treatment, effective and efficient operation of these facilities require information of the pH, dissolved oxygen content, among many other parameters, of the wastewater effluent. In this preliminary study, a biocompatible CNT-based nanocomposite is proposed and validated for monitoring the biological metabolic activity of nitrifying bacteria in wastewater effluent environments (i.e., to monitor the nitrification process). Using carbon nanotubes and a pH-sensitive conductive polymer (i.e., poly(aniline) emeraldine base), a layer-by-layer fabrication technique is employed to fabricate a novel thin film pH sensor that changes its electrical properties in response to variations in ambient pH environments. Laboratory studies are conducted to evaluate the proposed nanocomposite's biocompatibility with wastewater effluent environments and its pH sensing performance.

  19. The carbon assimilation network in Escherichia coli is densely connected and largely sign-determined by directions of metabolic fluxes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Baldazzi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory networks consist of direct interactions but also include indirect interactions mediated by metabolites and signaling molecules. We describe how these indirect interactions can be derived from a model of the underlying biochemical reaction network, using weak time-scale assumptions in combination with sensitivity criteria from metabolic control analysis. We apply this approach to a model of the carbon assimilation network in Escherichia coli. Our results show that the derived gene regulatory network is densely connected, contrary to what is usually assumed. Moreover, the network is largely sign-determined, meaning that the signs of the indirect interactions are fixed by the flux directions of biochemical reactions, independently of specific parameter values and rate laws. An inversion of the fluxes following a change in growth conditions may affect the signs of the indirect interactions though. This leads to a feedback structure that is at the same time robust to changes in the kinetic properties of enzymes and that has the flexibility to accommodate radical changes in the environment.

  20. DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC CARBON IN DIFFERENT SOIL FRACTIONS IN ECOSYSTEMS OF CENTRAL AMAZONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Dalmo de Oliveira Marques

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Organic matter plays an important role in many soil properties, and for that reason it is necessary to identify management systems which maintain or increase its concentrations. The aim of the present study was to determine the quality and quantity of organic C in different compartments of the soil fraction in different Amazonian ecosystems. The soil organic matter (FSOM was fractionated and soil C stocks were estimated in primary forest (PF, pasture (P, secondary succession (SS and an agroforestry system (AFS. Samples were collected at the depths 0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-40, 40-60, 60-80, 80-100, 100-160, and 160-200 cm. Densimetric and particle size analysis methods were used for FSOM, obtaining the following fractions: FLF (free light fraction, IALF (intra-aggregate light fraction, F-sand (sand fraction, F-clay (clay fraction and F-silt (silt fraction. The 0-5 cm layer contains 60 % of soil C, which is associated with the FLF. The F-clay was responsible for 70 % of C retained in the 0-200 cm depth. There was a 12.7 g kg-1 C gain in the FLF from PF to SS, and a 4.4 g kg-1 C gain from PF to AFS, showing that SS and AFS areas recover soil organic C, constituting feasible C-recovery alternatives for degraded and intensively farmed soils in Amazonia. The greatest total stocks of carbon in soil fractions were, in decreasing order: (101.3 Mg ha-1 of C - AFS > (98.4 Mg ha-1 of C - FP > (92.9 Mg ha-1 of C - SS > (64.0 Mg ha-1 of C - P. The forms of land use in the Amazon influence C distribution in soil fractions, resulting in short- or long-term changes.

  1. Export of dissolved organic carbon from the Penobscot River basin in north-central Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Thomas G.; Aiken, George R.

    2013-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) flux from the Penobscot River and its major tributaries in Maine was determined using continuous discharge measurements, discrete water sampling, and the LOADEST regression software. The average daily flux during 2004–2007 was 71 kg C ha−1 yr−1 (392 Mt C d−1), an amount larger than measured in most northern temperate and boreal rivers. Distinct seasonal variation was observed in the relation between concentration and discharge (C–Q). During June through December (summer/fall), there was a relatively steep positive C–Q relation where concentration increased by a factor of 2–3 over the approximately 20-fold range of observed stream discharge for the Penobscot River near Eddington, Maine. In contrast, during January through May (winter/spring), DOC concentration did not increase with increasing discharge. In addition, we observed a major shift in the C–Q between 2004–2005 and 2006–2007, apparently resulting from unprecedented rainfall, runoff, and soil flushing beginning in late fall 2005. The relative contribution to the total Penobscot River basin DOC flux from each tributary varied dramatically by season, reflecting the role of large regulated reservoirs in certain basins. DOC concentration and flux per unit watershed area were highest in tributaries containing the largest areas in palustrine wetlands. Tributary DOC concentration and flux was positively correlated to percentage wetland area. Climatic or environmental changes that influence the magnitude or timing of river discharge or the abundance of wetlands will likely affect the export of DOC to the near-coastal ocean.

  2. Phosphorus-31 and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of glucose and xylose metabolism in Candida tropicalis cell suspensions.

    OpenAIRE

    Lohmeier-Vogel, E M; Hahn-Hägerdal, B.; Vogel, H J

    1995-01-01

    The metabolism of glucose and xylose was studied as a function of oxygenation in suspensions of Candida tropicalis by 31P and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Both the rate of carbohydrate metabolism and the cytoplasmic pH were independent of the rate of oxygenation in cells metabolizing glucose. However, these two parameters were markedly dependent on the rate of oxygenation in C. tropicalis cells metabolizing xylose. For example, the cytoplasmic pH in fully oxygenated xylose-met...

  3. Perfil metabólico e antropométrico dos Suyá: Parque Indígena do Xingu, Brasil Central Metabolic and anthropometric profile of Suyá: Xingu Indigenous Park, Central Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia Morais Antonio de Salvo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever o perfil metabólico e antropométrico de índios Suyá que vivem no Parque Indígena do Xingu (Mato Grosso. MÉTODO: Neste estudo transversal foram avaliados 86 índios Suyá com idade de > 20 anos, de ambos os sexos. Durante o exame físico foram obtidos os valores de pressão arterial, peso, altura, perímetros corporais e dobras cutâneas. Amostras de sangue foram coletadas para dosagem de lipoproteínas, glicemia e ácido úrico. Na análise dos dados foram utilizados os testes estatísticos qui-quadrado (para proporções ou t de Student (para valores médios nas comparações das distribuições das variáveis relativas ao estado nutricional e perfil metabólico, segundo sexo e faixa etária dos sujeitos. RESULTADOS: As mulheres, quando comparadas aos homens, apresentaram valores médios estatisticamente menores das variáveis antropométricas (peso, índice de massa corporal, perímetro de cintura, do braço e dobras cutâneas, de pressão arterial, triglicérides, VLDL e ácido úrico. Foram encontrados, entre os Suyá, 46,5%, com excesso de peso, 12,8% com obesidade generalizada, 38,4% com obesidade central, 26,7%, apresentaram alterações pressóricas, 4% glicemia de jejum alterada, 63,9% dislipidemia e 21,9% síndrome metabólica. CONCLUSÃO: Foram observadas alterações metabólicas e antropométricas entre os índios Suyá. Intervenções educativas devem ser implementadas para resgatar hábitos e estilo de vida tradicionais a fim de conter o avanço deste quadro.OBJECTIVE: To describe the metabolic and anthropometric profile of Suyá people living in the Xingu Indigenous Park (Mato Grosso. METHOD: In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated 86 Suyá Indians aged >20 years, of both genders. During the physical examination, we measured blood pressure, weight, height, body perimeters, and skin fold thickness. Samples of blood were collected for lipoprotein, glucose, and uric acid dosage. Chi-square (proportions

  4. New Features on the Environmental Regulation of Metabolism Revealed by Modeling the Cellular Proteomic Adaptations Induced by Light, Carbon, and Inorganic Nitrogen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérin, Stéphanie; Leprince, Pierre; Sluse, Francis E; Franck, Fabrice; Mathy, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are currently emerging to be very promising organisms for the production of biofuels and high-added value compounds. Understanding the influence of environmental alterations on their metabolism is a crucial issue. Light, carbon and nitrogen availability have been reported to induce important metabolic adaptations. So far, the influence of these variables has essentially been studied while varying only one or two environmental factors at the same time. The goal of the present work was to model the cellular proteomic adaptations of the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon the simultaneous changes of light intensity, carbon concentrations (CO2 and acetate), and inorganic nitrogen concentrations (nitrate and ammonium) in the culture medium. Statistical design of experiments (DOE) enabled to define 32 culture conditions to be tested experimentally. Relative protein abundance was quantified by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). Additional assays for respiration, photosynthesis, and lipid and pigment concentrations were also carried out. A hierarchical clustering survey enabled to partition biological variables (proteins + assays) into eight co-regulated clusters. In most cases, the biological variables partitioned in the same cluster had already been reported to participate to common biological functions (acetate assimilation, bioenergetic processes, light harvesting, Calvin cycle, and protein metabolism). The environmental regulation within each cluster was further characterized by a series of multivariate methods including principal component analysis and multiple linear regressions. This metadata analysis enabled to highlight the existence of a clear regulatory pattern for every cluster and to mathematically simulate the effects of light, carbon, and nitrogen. The influence of these environmental variables on cellular metabolism is described in details and thoroughly discussed. This work provides an overview of the

  5. Isolation of a non-fermentative bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, using intracellular carbon for denitrification and phosphorus-accumulation and relevant metabolic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Wang, Qin; Sun, Yanfu; Zhou, Kangqun; Liu, Wen; Lu, Qian; Ming, Caibing; Feng, Xidan; Du, Jianjun; Jia, Xiaoshan; Li, Jun

    2016-07-01

    A newly designed pilot-scale system was developed to enrich denitrifying phosphate-accumulating organisms (DNPAOs) for nitrogen and phosphorus nutrient removal synchronously. A strain of DNPAOs was isolated and its biochemical characteristics and metabolic mechanisms of this bacterial strain were analyzed. The results showed that compared with previously reported system, this newly designed system has higher removal rates of nutrients. Removal efficiencies of NH3-N, TN, TP, and COD in actual wastewater were 82.64%, 79.62%, 87.22%, and 90.41%, respectively. Metabolic activity of DNPAOs after anoxic stage in this study even reached 94.64%. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a strain of non-fermentative DNPAOs with strong nitrogen and phosphorus removal abilities. Study on the metabolic mechanisms suggested that intracellular PHB of P. aeruginosa plays dual roles, supplying energy for phosphorus accumulation and serving as a major carbon source for denitrification. PMID:26995616

  6. Carbon sequestration and water use of a young hybrid poplar plantation in north-central Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybrid poplar (HP) is an important fast-growing crop with the potential to provide a reliable supply of biomass for the pulp and bioenergy industries while also sequestering carbon (C) in the soil. We used the eddy-covariance technique to measure CO2, water vapor and sensible heat fluxes above a three-year-old HP plantation on high productivity land near St Albert, Alberta. Measurements showed that the annual C balance of the plantation shifted from a C source of about 1.54 Mg C ha−1 y−1 in the 2nd year (2010) to a C sink of 0.80 Mg C ha−1 y−1 in the 3rd year (2011). Water use or evapotranspiration (E) for 1 June – 31 October increased from 272 mm in 2010 to 321 mm in 2011, and exceeded the respective values of total precipitation of 251 mm and 298 mm for the same period. Annual E in 2010 of 364 mm was less than annual precipitation of 398 mm. In 2011, annual E (442 mm) exceeded annual P (411 mm) by 31 mm; it also exceeded the annual plantation water use Ewb, estimated using a water balance method assuming no drainage from the root zone, by 40 mm. However, both courses of cumulative E and Ewb closely followed cumulative P. Monthly E increased with increasing net radiation and gross primary productivity. Growing season mean albedo increased from 0.16 in 2010 to 0.21 in 2011 and was consistent with the increase in broadband NDVI. Values of albedo during winter months (November–April) exceeded 0.80. The results suggested that as the plantation grows, growing season albedo, annual C sequestration, and annual water use will increase with the possibility that the latter may exceed annual precipitation. This emphasizes the need to study the long-term sustainability of HP plantations in relation to annual P and its temporal distribution, especially when HP plantations will likely be established on large contiguous areas to supply biomass feedstock for the expanding pulp and bioenergy industries in Western Canada. -- Highlights: •The plantation was a C source

  7. {sup 210}Pb dating of sediments from the central and northern Adriatic Sea: deposition and preservation of sedimentary organic carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, T. F., LLNL

    1998-04-01

    Lead-210 ({sup 21O}Pb) and organic C depth distribution profiles in sediments from the northern and central Adriatic Sea were measured as part of the EEC funded project on Eutrophic Limits of the Northern Adriatic (ELNA). {sup 210}Pb derived mass-accumulation rates decrease southward from between 0.15 and 0.2 g cm{sup -2}y{sup -1} close to the Po River outflow (> 24 m, water depth) to less than 0.04 g cm{sup -2}y{sup -1} in the Jabuka Pit (246 m, water depth) in the central Adriatic Sea. The mass- accumulation rates obtained in the Jabuka Pit correspond to mean sedimentation rates of about 0.03 cm y{sup -1} (ref. porosity = 0.5) and fall between 5 to 20 times lower than rates found for north Adriatic shelf cores. Estimated sedimentation rates are considered as upper limits because of the possible effects of bioturbation and physical disturbance on the {sup 21O}Pb sedimentary record but are consistent with data from previous work. Rates of sediment accumulation and carbon burial appear to be strongly influenced by the transport of fluvial materials from land and transport of fine-grained particles. First-order estimates of organic C burial rates into surface sediment ranged from 1 to 0.028 mMol cm{sup -2}y{sup -1} between the Po delta and the Jabuka Pit regions, respectively. We estimate that a maximum of 50% of organic C preserved in surface sediment may be derived from biological production in the overlying water column.

  8. The role of carbon from recycled sediments in the origin of ultrapotassic igneous rocks in the Central Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conticelli, Sandro; Avanzinelli, Riccardo; Ammannati, Edoardo; Casalini, Martina

    2015-09-01

    The Central Mediterranean region is one of the most important areas on Earth for studying subduction-related potassic and ultrapotassic magmatism, derived from partial melting of the metasomatised lithospheric mantle wedge. In this region, leucite-free (i.e., lamproite) and leucite-bearing (i.e., kamafugite, leucitite, and plagioleucitite) ultrapotassic rocks closely occur, in a time-related progression, linked to the evolution of both the mantle source and the regional tectonic regime. Time- and space-related magmatism migration followed the roll-back of the subducting slab and the anticlockwise drift of the Italian Peninsula. Leucite-free silica-rich lamproites are restricted to the early stage of magmatism and are associated with ultrapotassic shoshonites and high-K calc-alkaline volcanic rocks. Leucite-bearing (i.e., Roman Province) rocks are erupted consistently later than lamproite-like and associated shoshonitic rocks, with post-leucititic volcanism occurring in the late stage of volcanic activity with eruption of alkali-basaltic to latitic and trachytic rocks, often after major caldera-forming events. Present-day ultrapotassic volcanism is restricted to the Neapolitan area. Central Mediterranean potassic and ultrapotassic rocks are extremely enriched in incompatible trace elements with variable fractionation of Ta, Nb, and Ti in comparison to Th and large ion lithophile elements (LILE). They are also variably enriched in radiogenic Sr and Pb and unradiogenic Nd. The main geochemical and isotopic signatures are consistent with sediment recycling within the mantle wedge via subduction. A twofold metasomatism, induced by the recycle of pelitic sediments and dehydration of lawsonite-bearing schists generates the early metasomatic events that enriched the mantle wedge from which leucite-free ultrapotassic rocks (i.e., lamproite) were generated. Recycling of carbonate-rich pelites played an important role in the shift to silica-undersaturated ultrapotassic rocks

  9. Differential proteomic analysis reveals novel links between primary metabolism and antibiotic production in Amycolatopsis balhimycina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallo, G.; Renzone, G.; Alduina, R.;

    2010-01-01

    constitutively expressed protein isoforms, which were associated with 203 ORFs in the A. balhimycina genome. These data, providing insights on the major metabolic pathways/molecular processes operating in this organism, were used to compile 2-DE reference maps covering 3-10, 4-7 and 4.5-5.5 pH gradients...... available over the World Wide Web as interactive web pages (http://www.unipa.it/ampuglia/Abal-proteome-maps). Functional clustering analysis revealed that differentially expressed proteins belong to functional groups involved in central carbon metabolism, amino acid metabolism and protein biosynthesis......, energetic and redox balance, sugar/amino sugar metabolism, balhimycin biosynthesis and transcriptional regulation or with hypothetical and/or unknown function. Interestingly, proteins involved in the biosynthesis of balhimycin precursors, such as amino acids, amino sugars and central carbon metabolism...

  10. Variation and control of soil organic carbon and other nutrients in permafrost regions on central Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variation and control of soil organic carbon (SOC) and other nutrients in permafrost regions are critical for studying the carbon cycle and its potential feedbacks to climate change; however, they are poorly understood. Soil nutrients samples at depths of 0–10, 10–20, 20–30, and 30–40 cm, were sampled eight times in 2009 in alpine swamp meadow, alpine meadow and alpine steppe in permafrost regions of the central Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. SOC and total nitrogen (TN) in the alpine swamp meadow and meadow decreased with soil depth, whereas the highest SOC content in the alpine steppe was found at depths of 20–30 cm. The vertical profiles of total and available phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) were relatively uniform for all the three grassland types. Correlation and linear regression analyses showed that soil moisture (SM) was the most important parameter for the vertical variation of SOC and other soil nutrients, and that belowground biomass (BGB) was the main source of SOC and TN. The spatial variations (including seasonal variation) of SOC and TN at plot scale were large. The relative deviation of SOC ranged from 7.18 to 41.50 in the alpine swamp meadow, from 2.88 to 35.91 in the alpine meadow, and from 9.33 to 68.38 in the alpine steppe. The spatial variations in the other soil nutrients varied among different grassland types. The most important factors for spatial variations (including seasonal variation) of SOC, TN, total P, available P, and both total and available K were: SM, SM and temperature, SM, air temperature, and SM and BGB, respectively. The large variation in the three grassland types implies that spatial variation at plot scale should be considered when estimating SOC storage and its dynamics. (letter)

  11. Decomposition, nitrogen and carbon mineralization from food and cover crop residues in the central plateau of Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, M J; Mulvaney, M J; Hodges, S C; Thompson, T L; Thomason, W E

    2016-01-01

    Cover crops are a major focus of conservation agriculture efforts because they can provide soil cover and increase nutrient availability after their mineralization in cropping systems. To evaluate the effect of residue type and placement on rate of decomposition and carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) mineralization, residues from two food crops, maize (Zea mays L.) and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and two promising cover crops, sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L.) and sorghum sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench x S. bicolor var. Sudanese [Piper] Stapf) were used in a litterbag study in the Central Plateau region of Haiti from May to September, 2013. Residues were placed in litterbags at a rate equivalent to 3.25 Mg residue ha(-1) either on the soil surface or buried at 15 cm to represent a tilled and no-tillage system, respectively. Initial C:N ratios were: maize > common bean > sorghum sudangrass > sunn hemp. Highest residue mass loss rates and C and N mineralization generally occurred in the reverse order. Overall, surface-placed residues decomposed more slowly with 40 and 17 % of initial residue mass of surface and buried residues, respectively, remaining at 112 days. Carbon and N mineralization was higher when residues were buried. Net N mineralization of buried residues was 0.12, 0.07, 0.06, and 0.03 g N g residue(-1) for sunn hemp, sorghum sudangrass, maize, and common bean, respectively over 112 days. To achieve the goal of increasing nutrient supply while maintaining year-round cover, a combination of grass and legume cover crops may be required with benefits increasing over multiple seasons. PMID:27429883

  12. Drought effects on soil carbon dioxide production in two ecosystems in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Straaten, Oliver

    2010-05-01

    Drought response on soil CO2 production dynamics were examined in two tropical ecosystems in central Sulawesi, Indonesia. Large-scale throughfall displacement roofs were built in a cacao (Theobroma cacao) / Gliricidia sepium agroforestry plantation (560 m.a.s.l.) and in a sub-montane tropical rainforest (1050 m.a.s.l.) to simulate drought conditions. At each site, ecosystem drought responses from three roof plots were compared to three undisturbed control plots. Soil CO2 production was measured spatially at the soil surface and vertically within the soil profile to 2.5 m depth every two weeks. 1. The cacao / Gliricidia ecosystem exhibited a mild drought response. Here, soil CO2 production decreased by 13% in comparison to the control plots during the 13 month induced drought. The mild drought response is attributed to two reasons. First, soil CO2 efflux exhibited an inverse parabolic relationship with soil moisture (R2 = 0.32): soil CO2 efflux peaked at intermediate moisture conditions, but was low when soil conditions became dry (in the induced drought plots), and when the soil became water saturated (in the control plots). This means that respiration differences between control and roof plots may have been masked when soil moisture conditions were saturated in the control and concurrently dry in roof plots. Secondly, the shallow rooted cacao understory grown next to the deeper rooted Gliricidia overstory created a favourable set of site conditions that enabled the ecosystem to mitigate serious drought stress. The experiment had a CO2 neutral effect overall: emissions were initially reduced during the induced drought period but rebounded and surpassed the control during the five month rewetting phase, thus compensating for earlier declines. 2. In contrast, the sub-montane tropical rainforest experienced a severe decrease in soil CO2 production. Here, soil CO2 efflux decreased by an average of 39% in comparison to the control during the 24 month induced drought

  13. Clinical usefulness of positron emission tomography in the evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen metabolism under glycerol and carbon dioxide loadings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanada, Shuji; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Senda, Michio

    1987-02-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO/sub 2/) were studied in normal cerebral cortices by positron emission tomography using continuous inhalation method of oxygen-15 labeled carbon dioxide and oxygen, and single inhalation method of oxygen-15 labeled carbon monoxide. The values of CBF, CMRO/sub 2/, and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) in cerebral cortices of 18 healthy normal volunteers represented 40 +- 7 ml/100 ml/min, 3.2 +- 0.5 ml O/sub 2//100 ml/min, and 0.43 +- 0.07, respectively. In cases with glycerol loading, CBF increased in 10/14 cases. Studies of 6 cases with intracranial pressure indicated the presence of mechanism by which depressed CMRO/sub 2/ improved and was kept in normal values. The loading of 5% carbon dioxide showed an increase in CBF in cases with cerebral infarction, which implied the good cerebral vascular response to the elevated arterial carbon dioxide, but no particular changes were observed in CMRO/sub 2/ which seemed to be less responsive to the elevated arterial carbon dioxide level. In cases with moyamoya disease, 5% carbon dioxide loading showed no changes in CBF and CMRO/sub 2/. This suggested the poor cerebral vascular response to the elevation of arterial carbon dioxide, while X-ray CT failed to demonstrate any abnormalities in corresponding areas. Positron emission tomography proved to have a great potentiality regarding the evaluation of the changes in cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen metabolism under various loadings.

  14. Cut off values for abdominal obesity as a criterion of metabolic syndrome in an ethnic Kyrgyz population (Central Asian region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirrakhimov Aibek E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People of different racial and ethnic backgrounds have a distinct pattern of central fat deposition, thus making it necessary to devise a race based approach for the diagnosis and evaluation of abdominal obesity (AO. This is the first study to determine the optimal waist circumference (WC cutoff values for definition of AO in an ethnic Kyrgyz population. Methods 323 persons of Kyrgyz ethnicity (183 women and 140 men, with a mean age of 51.8 ± 9.5 years old were included in the study. Measurement of blood pressure (BP, anthropometric data (including body mass index calculation and WC measurement, fasting blood sugar, serum lipid parameters and insulin were performed in all examined individuals. Insulin resistance (IR was considered as HOMA index (insulin × fasting glucose/22.5 ≥ 2.77. Sensitivity and specificity for the presence of IR or two other criteria of MS (according to the international classification, 2009 were calculated by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves for men and women separately. Results The optimal sensitivity and specificity obtained from the ROC curves for IR were 88 cm in women (sensitivity of 0.85, 95%CI (0.72-0.93, specificity of 0.58, 95%CI (0.49-0.66 and 94 cm for men (sensitivity of 0.8, 95% CI (0.65-0.91, specificity of 0.61, 95% CI (0.51-0.71. The data from the ROC curve for any two other MS criteria confirmed the results and the WC 88 cm in women (sensitivity of 0.82, 95% CI (0.72-0.9, specificity of 0.72, 95% CI (0.62-0.8 and 94 cm in men (sensitivity of 0.74, 95% CI (0.62-0.84, specificity of 0.73, 95% CI (0.61-0.83 were corresponded to the optimal sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion WC ≥ 88 cm and ≥ 94 cm should be used as a criterion for the diagnosis of AO for Kyrgyz women and men respectively based on these results.

  15. Biosynthesis and Metabolic Fate of Phenylalanine in Conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, María B; El-Azaz, Jorge; de la Torre, Fernando N; Cañas, Rafael A; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2016-01-01

    The amino acid phenylalanine (Phe) is a critical metabolic node that plays an essential role in the interconnection between primary and secondary metabolism in plants. Phe is used as a protein building block but it is also as a precursor for numerous plant compounds that are crucial for plant reproduction, growth, development, and defense against different types of stresses. The metabolism of Phe plays a central role in the channeling of carbon from photosynthesis to the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. The study of this metabolic pathway is particularly relevant in trees, which divert large amounts of carbon into the biosynthesis of Phe-derived compounds, particularly lignin, an important constituent of wood. The trunks of trees are metabolic sinks that consume a considerable percentage of carbon and energy from photosynthesis, and carbon is finally immobilized in wood. This paper reviews recent advances in the biosynthesis and metabolic utilization of Phe in conifer trees. Two alternative routes have been identified: the ancient phenylpyruvate pathway that is present in microorganisms, and the arogenate pathway that possibly evolved later during plant evolution. Additionally, an efficient nitrogen recycling mechanism is required to maintain sustained growth during xylem formation. The relevance of phenylalanine metabolic pathways in wood formation, the biotic interactions, and ultraviolet protection is discussed. The genetic manipulation and transcriptional regulation of the pathways are also outlined. PMID:27468292

  16. Human cytochrome P450 3A4 and a carbon nanofiber modified film electrode as a platform for the simple evaluation of drug metabolism and inhibition reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qiang; Kato, Dai; Kamata, Tomoyuki; Guo, Qiaohui; You, Tianyan; Niwa, Osamu

    2013-11-01

    Electrochemical biosensors consisting of cytochrome P450 enzyme modified electrodes have been developed to provide a simple method for screening the metabolism of a drug and its inhibitor. Here, we report a very simple electrochemically driven biosensor for detecting drug metabolism and its inhibition based on cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and a carbon nanofiber (CNF) modified film electrode without any other modified layers such as mediator films. Direct electron transfer (DET) between CYP3A4 and CNFs was observed at a formal potential of -0.302 V. The electrocatalytic reduction current increased with the addition of drugs including testosterone and quinidine. In contrast, the reduction current was greatly suppressed in the presence of ketoconazole, which is a CYP3A4 inhibitor. CNFs with high conductivity, a large surface area and sufficient edge planes provide a suitable microenvironment for achieving excellent DET and biocatalysis properties, which could not be observed when we used other carbon materials such as carbon nanotube (CNT) and carbon black (CB) modified electrodes, indicating that our system is promising as a new bioelectronic platform for electrochemical biosensing. PMID:24027778

  17. Continuous light increases growth, daily carbon gain, antioxidants, and alters carbohydrate metabolism in a cultivated and a wild tomato species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Mohammad S; Kjaer, Katrine H; Rosenqvist, Eva; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    Cultivated tomato species develop leaf injury while grown in continuous light (CL). Growth, photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism and antioxidative enzyme activities of a cultivated (Solanum lycopersicum L. 'Aromata') and a wild tomato species (Solanum pimpinellifolium L.) were compared in this study aiming to analyze the species-specific differences and thermoperiod effects in responses to CL. The species were subjected to three photoperiodic treatments for 12 days in climate chambers: 16-h photoperiod with a light/dark temperature of 26/16°C (P16D10 or control); CL with a constant temperature of 23°C (P24D0); CL with a variable temperature of 26/16°C (P24D10). The results showed that both species grown in CL had higher dry matter production due to the continuous photosynthesis and a subsequent increase in carbon gain. In S. lycopersicum, the rate of photosynthesis and the maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II declined in CL with the development of leaf chlorosis, reduction in the leaf chlorophyll content and a higher activity of antioxidative enzymes. The normal diurnal patterns of starch and sugar were only present under control conditions. The results demonstrated that CL conditions mainly affected the photosynthetic apparatus of a cultivated species (S. lycopersicum), and to a less degree to the wild species (S. pimpinellifolium). The negative effects of the CL could be alleviated by diurnal temperature variations, but the physiological mechanisms behind these are less clear. The results also show that the genetic potential for reducing the negative effects of CL does exist in the tomato germplasm. PMID:26217371

  18. Continuous light increases growth, daily carbon gain, antioxidants and alters carbohydrate metabolism in a cultivated and a wild tomato species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sabibul Haque

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cultivated tomato species develop leaf injury while grown in continuous light (CL. Growth, photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism and antioxidative enzyme activities of a cultivated (Solanum lycopersicum L. ‘Aromata’ and a wild tomato species (Solanum pimpinellifolium L. were compared in this study aiming to analyse the species-specific differences and thermoperiod effects in responses to CL. The species were subjected to three photoperiodic treatments for 12 days in climate chambers: 16-h photoperiod with a light/dark temperature of 26/16ºC (P16D10 or control; CL with a constant temperature of 23ºC (P24D0; CL with a variable temperature of 26/16ºC (P24D10. The results showed that both species grown in CL had higher dry matter production due to the continuous photosynthesis and a subsequent increase in carbon gain. In S. lycopersicum, the rate of photosynthesis and the maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II declined in CL with the development of leaf chlorosis, reduction in the leaf chlorophyll content and a higher activity of antioxidative enzymes. The normal diurnal patterns of starch and sugar were only present under control conditions. The results demonstrated that CL conditions mainly affected the photosynthetic apparatus of a cultivated species (S. lycopersicum, and to a less degree to the wild species (S. pimpinellifolium. The negative effects of the CL could be alleviated by diurnal temperature variations, but the physiological mechanisms behind these are less clear. The results also show that the genetic potential for reducing the negative effects of CL does exist in the tomato germplasm.

  19. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy measurements in the extreme ultraviolet region of central carbon concentrations during high power neutral beam heating in TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon concentration in the central region of TFTR discharges with high power neutral beam heating has been measured by charge-extracted recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) of the C+5 n = 3--4 transition in the extreme ultraviolet region. The carbon concentrations were deduced from absolute measurements of the line brightness using a calculation of the beam attenuation and the appropriate cascade-corrected line excitation rates. As a result of the high ion temperatures in most of the discharges, the contribution of beam halo neutrals to the line brightness was significant and therefore had to be included in the modeling of the data. Carbon concentrations have been measured in discharges with Ip = 1.0-1.6 MA and beam power in the range of 2.6-30 MW, including a number of supershots. The results are in good agreement with carbon concentrations deduced from the visible bremsstrahlung Zeff and metallic impurity concentrations measured by x-ray pulse-height analysis, demonstrating the reliability of the atomic rates used in the beam attenuation and line excitation calculations. Carbon is the dominant impurity species in these discharges; the oxygen concentration measured via CXRS in a high beam power case was 0.0006 of ne, compard to 0.04 for carbon. Trends with Ip and beam power in the carbon concentration and the inferred deuteron concentration are presented. The carbon concentration is independent of Ip and decreases from 0.13 at 2.6 MW beam power to 0.04 at 30 MW, while the deuteron concentration increases from 0.25 to 0.75 over the same range of beam power. These changes are primarily the result of beam particle fueling, as the carbon density did not vary significantly with beam power. The time evolutions of the carbon and deuteron concentrations during two high power beam pulses, one which exhibited a carbon bloom and one which did not, are compared. 30 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Analysis of the energy metabolism of urban socioeconomic sectors and the associated carbon footprints: Model development and a case study for Beijing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cities consume 80% of the world's energy; therefore, analyzing urban energy metabolism and the resulting carbon footprint provides basic data for formulating target carbon emission reductions. While energy metabolism includes both direct and indirect consumptions among sectors, few researchers have studied indirect consumption due to a lack of data. In this study, we used input–output analysis to calculate the energy flows among directly linked sectors. Building on this, we used ecological network analysis to develop a model of urban energy flows and also account for energy consumption embodied by the flows among indirectly linked sectors (represented numerically as paths with a length of 2 or more). To illustrate the model, monetary input–output tables for Beijing from 2000 to 2010 were analyzed to determine the embodied energy consumption and associated carbon footprints of these sectors. This analysis reveals the environmental pressure based on the source (energy consumption) and sink (carbon footprint) values. Indirect consumption was Beijing's primary form, and the carbon footprint therefore resulted mainly from indirect consumption (both accounting for ca. 60% of the total, though with considerable variation among sectors). To reduce emissions, the utilization efficiency of indirect consumption must improve. - Highlights: • We quantified the embodied energy transfers among Beijing's socioeconomic sectors. • We calculated the sectors' intensity of energy consumption and carbon footprint. • The indirect energy consumption was higher than the direct for all sectors. • The high-indirect-consumption sectors are at the end of industrial supply chains. • High-indirect-consumption sectors can improve upstream products energy efficiency

  1. Genome-wide meta-analysis of homocysteine and methionine metabolism identifies five one carbon metabolism loci and a novel association of ALDH1L1 with ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R Williams

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Circulating homocysteine levels (tHcy, a product of the folate one carbon metabolism pathway (FOCM through the demethylation of methionine, are heritable and are associated with an increased risk of common diseases such as stroke, cardiovascular disease (CVD, cancer and dementia. The FOCM is the sole source of de novo methyl group synthesis, impacting many biological and epigenetic pathways. However, the genetic determinants of elevated tHcy (hyperhomocysteinemia, dysregulation of methionine metabolism and the underlying biological processes remain unclear. We conducted independent genome-wide association studies and a meta-analysis of methionine metabolism, characterized by post-methionine load test tHcy, in 2,710 participants from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS and 2,100 participants from the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention (VISP clinical trial, and then examined the association of the identified loci with incident stroke in FHS. Five genes in the FOCM pathway (GNMT [p = 1.60 × 10(-63], CBS [p = 3.15 × 10(-26], CPS1 [p = 9.10 × 10(-13], ALDH1L1 [p = 7.3 × 10(-13] and PSPH [p = 1.17 × 10(-16] were strongly associated with the difference between pre- and post-methionine load test tHcy levels (ΔPOST. Of these, one variant in the ALDH1L1 locus, rs2364368, was associated with incident ischemic stroke. Promoter analyses reveal genetic and epigenetic differences that may explain a direct effect on GNMT transcription and a downstream affect on methionine metabolism. Additionally, a genetic-score consisting of the five significant loci explains 13% of the variance of ΔPOST in FHS and 6% of the variance in VISP. Association between variants in FOCM genes with ΔPOST suggest novel mechanisms that lead to differences in methionine metabolism, and possibly the epigenome, impacting disease risk. These data emphasize the importance of a concerted effort to understand regulators of one carbon metabolism as potential therapeutic targets.

  2. Carbon of Woody Debris in Plateau-type Karst Evergreen and Deciduous Broad-leaved Mixed Forest of Central Guizhou Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Ni, J.; Liu, L.; Guo, C.

    2014-12-01

    Woody debris (WD) is an essential structural and functional component of forest ecosystems, and plays very significant roles for the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nutrients. Coarse woody debris (CWD) is considered to be the major part in forest WD and it is primarily composed of logs, snags, stumps and large branches, while fine woody debris (FWD) mainly consists of small twigs. Composition, spatial distribution and carbon storage of WD have been studied in plateau-type karst evergreen and deciduous broad-leaved mixed forest in Tianlong Mountain of central Guizhou Province. Results showed that the carbon storage of WD in karst forests was less than non-karst forests. The major components of WD were fallen trees and snags with 10-20 cm in diameter. Fallen trees and snags with diameter greater than 20 cm were the smallest part of WD. The situation of WD in this region reflects the structural characteristics of WD in mid-late stage of plateau-type karst evergreen and deciduous broad-leaved mixed forest succession. The potential contribution of WD to the regional carbon cycle, and its relationship with climate change were finally discussed. The WD (especially CWD) plays an important role in the carbon cycle of karst forest. Forest WD production and decay rates may partially depend on climatic conditions, the accumulation of CWD and FWD carbon stocks in forests may be correlated with climate. Key words: woody debris, karst forests, carbon storage, spatial distribution, CWD, FWD.

  3. Isotopic characteristics of two kinds of hydrothermal carbonation in the Maria Lazara gold deposit. Goias Estate of Central Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the hydrothermal halo of the Maria Lazara gold deposit, two kinds of carbonation were identified: pervasive carbonation, which corresponds to the disseminations of calcite in the hydrothermal halo represented by the biotite-sulfide and carbonate-chlorite zones and, venular carbonation expressed by quartz and calcite veins inserted in the inner biotite-sulfide zone show an organic carbon component depleted in C. In the carbonate-chlorite zone the calcite isotopic behavior reflects the Co2 derived from the metamorphism o the basic host-rocks. (author)

  4. Fractures Patterns of Tight Carbonates of Upper Jurassic Arab-D Member and Upper Jubaila Formation Outcrops, Central Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullatif, Osman; Abdlmutalib, Ammar

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the fracture patterns of the upper Jurassic Arab-D member and upper Jubaila Formation outcropping in central Saudi Arabia. These strata represent the outcrop equivalent for Arab-D reservoir. The upper Jubaila Formation was deposited in the lower to upper slope to ramp crest leading to deposition Stromatoporoid lithofacies association, while Arab-D member deposited under deep to shallow lagoonal settings including skeletal bank and tidal flat lithofacies associations. This study utilized high resolution outcrop scale integrated fracture analysis, sedimentological and stratigraphical approach and methods.The field data included lithofacies, stratigraphic hierarchy, cyclicity and fracture measurements of orientation, length, spacing, intensity, and aperture. The Arab-D member is affected by five fracture patterns: (a) regular large scale fractures NW striking, several meters widely spaced, vertically dipping and cutting through several beds; (b) regular medium scale fractures striking NE and vertically dipping, moderately spaced and extending from two to three meters in length and cut through two or three beds; (c) regular small scale fractures that are arrested near the bed boundary vertically dipping and having less than one meter length and spacing; (d) irregular fractures filled with chemically weathered materials; (e) large scale fractures oriented perpendicular to the first fracture pattern in (a) along the outcrop strike and also cut on the top of the resistive sandy grainstone lithofacies of Arab D member. In contrast, the Upper Jubaila Formation is characterized mostly by medium scale NW and NE striking fractures that near vertically dipping and extended within one or two beds. Irregular small scale fractures also occur within parts of the beds of this group.Fracture formation and development in the Arab D and Jubaila Formation are partially attributed to regional tectonics affected the study area and locally to stratigraphic and

  5. Preliminary Black Carbon Record (1805 - 1943 AD) from the High Altitude Dasuopu Ice Core (7200 m) in the Central Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, J. D.; Kaspari, S.; Wegner, A.; Thompson, L. G.; Gabrielli, P.

    2013-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) produced by the incomplete combustion of fossil and biofuels both amplifies mid-tropospheric atmospheric warming and decreases glacier surface albedo, and thus may influence regional climatic trends and water resource availability. The rapidly developing economies in Asia have been identified as significant sources of BC to the atmosphere on a continental scale in recent decades, but records available from this region to reconstruct BC concentrations spatially and temporally are limited. The analysis of BC preserved in glacier ice can provide a record of atmospheric BC content over time. We analyzed the Dasuopu Glacier ice core (Central Himalaya) for BC concentration at ~5 cm resolution using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (Droplet Measurement Technologies), and use the resultant record to describe trends in atmospheric BC from 1805 - 1943 AD. The Dasuopu ice core is unique because it was obtained at an exceptionally high elevation (7200 m a.s.l.) which may insolate it from local BC sources and reflect BC trends in a more mixed upper troposphere. Preliminary analysis of discrete sections shows that the Dasuopu ice core captures the seasonal BC deposition signal exceptionally well, with higher BC concentrations during winter-spring and lower concentrations during the summer monsoon season. Peak winter-spring concentrations pre-1890 are 10 ng g-1, increasing to as high as 30 ng g-1 during the 1890s - 1943. Additionally, background BC concentrations prior to 1890 are less than 0.5 ng g-1, and are consistently higher than 0.5 ng g-1 during the 1890s - 1943. The early 20th century BC increases are coincident with post-colonial industrialization of the Indian subcontinent. Preliminary results from the Dasuopu ice core highlight the utility of the BC record to detect perturbations in the carbon cycle at a regional scale, and the importance of an exceptionally high altitude location for detecting and preserving an atmospheric BC record. Future analyses

  6. Report on compounds labelled with nitrogen-13 or carbon-11 used in cancer metabolic studies with quantitative two-dimensional scanning and pet tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of compounds labelled with radionuclides of the elements commonly involved in metabolic processes (oxygen, carbon, nitrogen) is becoming important in the non-invasive study of organ and tumour function. The application of compounds labelled with 13N and 11C to the study of amino-acid metabolism and changes in vasculature following chemotherapy and radiation therapy is described. In particular, 13N-labelled L-glutamate has been found to be useful in visualizing a number of human tumours including osteogenic sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, pineal gland tumours, primitive neuroectodermal tumours, medulloblastoma and several other solid tumours. In patients with bone tumours, changes in 13N-L-glutamate scans during chemotherapy were found to correlate with changes in other clinical parameters, such as serum alkaline phosphatase, histology and 99Tcsup(m)-bone scans, thus indicating that labelled L-glutamate is potentially useful in evaluating the response of solid tumours to chemotherapy. Scans of patients and volunteers using 13N-L-glutamate and 13N-L-valine indicate that the L-amino acids may be useful in studies of metabolic processes in the liver, myocardium and pancreas. Red blood cells, labelled with 11C-carbon monoxide via inhalation of the radioactive gas, have been used to assess changes in tumour vascularity following radiation therapy. Alpha-aminoisobutyric acid labelled with 11C has been synthesized and its distribution in normal and tumour-bearing dogs has been studied. (author)

  7. Central composite design approach towards optimization of flamboyant pods derived steam activated carbon for its use as heterogeneous catalyst in transesterification of Hevea brasiliensis oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Activated carbon was prepared from novel precursor flamboyant pods (Delonix regia). • Activation process was optimized using central composite design approach. • Prepared activated carbon at optimized condition was used as support for KOH. • Carbon based heterogeneous catalyst was used in transesterification of HBO. • Effect of catalyst loading and alcohol ratio on biodiesel yield was studied. - Abstract: The present investigation emphasises the preparation of carbon based KOH impregnated heterogeneous catalyst from flamboyant pods (Delonix regia) for the production of biodiesel from novel feedstock Hevea brasiliensis oil (HBO). Initially, carbonized char was physically activated by superheated steam and the process was optimized to study the effects of activation time and temperature by central composite design approach (CCD) using response surface methodology (RSM). Activated carbon was impregnated with KOH at four different ratios. Biodiesel production process was carried out at constant temperature 60 °C, reaction time 1 h, and 5 g of carbon based catalyst at varying quantities of catalyst loading (0.5, 2, 3.5, 5 wt%) and methanol to oil ratio (5:1–20:1). The influence of parameters on the biodiesel yield at varied condition was studied. Maximum yield of 89.3% was obtained at methanol to oil ratio 15:1 and catalyst loading 3.5 wt% and corresponding yield at same process parameters was observed to be 88.7% implying the significant activity of catalyst in reutilization. Produced biodiesel was characterized following ASTM standards. The experimental analysis confirmed that the carbonaceous catalyst developed from flamboyant pods under optimized condition is capable of transesterifying HBO into biodiesel

  8. Promotion of renewable energy to mitigate impact of heavy use of carbon energy on society and climate change in Central Sub-Saharan Africa remote areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenfack, Joseph; Bignom, Blaise

    2015-04-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa owns important renewable energy potential and is still heavily using carbon energy. This is having a negative impact on the climate and on the environment. Given the local cost of carbon energy, the purchase power of people, the availability and the reserve of carbon energy in the area, this resource is being heavily used. This practice is harmful to the climate and is also resulting on poor effort to promote renewable energy in remote areas. The important renewable energy potential is still suffering from poor development. The purpose of this paper is among other things aiming at showing the rate of carbon energy use and its potential impact on climate and environment. We will also ensure that the renewable energy resources of Central Sub-Saharan Africa are known and are subject to be used optimally to help mitigate climate change. After showing some negative impacts of carbon energy used in the area, the work also suggests actions to promote and sustain the development of renewable energy. Based on the knowledge of the Central African energy sector, this paper will identify actions for reduce access to carbon energy and improved access to sustainable, friendly, affordable energy services to users as well as a significant improvement of energy infrastructure and the promotion of energy efficiency. We will show all type of carbon energy used, the potential for solar, biomass and hydro while showing where available the level of development. After a swot analysis of the situation, identified obstacles for the promotion of clean energy will be targeted. Finally, suggestions will be made to help the region develop a vision aiming at developing good clean energy policy to increase the status of renewable energy and better contribute to fight against climate change. Cameroon case study will be examined as illustration. Analysis will be made from data collected in the field. |End Text|

  9. On the peritidal cycles and their diagenetic evolution in the Lower Jurassic carbonates of the Calcare Massiccio Formation (Central Apennines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandano Marco

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the environmental changes and high-frequency cyclicity recorded by Lower Jurassic shallow-water carbonates known as the Calcare Massiccio Formation which crop out in the central Apennines of Italy. Three types of sedimentary cycle bounded by subaerial erosion have been recognized: Type I consists of a shallowing upward cycle with oncoidal floatstones to rudstones passing gradationally up into peloidal packstone alternating with cryptoalgal laminites and often bounded by desiccation cracks and pisolitic-peloidal wackestones indicating a period of subaerial exposure. Type II shows a symmetrical trend in terms of facies arrangement with peloidal packstones and cryptoalgal laminites present both at the base and in the upper portion of the cycle, separated by oncoidal floatstones to rudstones. Type III displays a shallowing upward trend with an initial erosion surface overlain by oncoidal floatstones to rudstones that, in turn, are capped by pisolitic-peloidal wackestones and desiccation sheet cracks. Sheet cracks at the top of cycles formed during the initial phase of subaerial exposure were successively enlarged by dissolution during prolonged subaerial exposure. The following sea-level fall produced dissolution cavities in subtidal facies, while the successive sea-level rise resulted in the precipitation of marine cements in dissolution cavities. Spectral analysis revealed six peaks, five of which are consistent with orbital cycles. While a tectonic control cannot be disregarded, the main signal recorded by the sedimentary succession points toward a main control related to orbital forcing. High frequency sea-level fluctuations also controlled diagenetic processes.

  10. Implications of floristic and environmental variation for carbon cycle dynamics in boreal forest ecosystems of central Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zicheng; Apps, M.J.; Bhatti, J.S. [Canadan Forest Service, Edmonton (Canada). Northern Forestry Centre

    2002-06-01

    Species composition, detritus, and soil data from 97 boreal forest stands along a transect in central Canada were analysed using Correspondence Analysis to determine the dominant environmental/site variables that differentiate these forest stands. Picea mariana stands were densely clustered together on the understorey DCA plot, suggesting a consistent understorey species composition (feather mosses and Ericaceae), whereas Populus tremuloides stands had the most diverse understorey species composition (ca. 30 species, mostly shrubs and herbs). Pinus banksiana stands had several characteristic species of reindeer lichens (Cladina spp.), but saplings and Pinus seedlings were rare. Although climatic variables showed large variation along the transect, the CCA results indicated that site conditions are more important in determining species composition and differentiating the stand types. Forest floor characteristics (litter and humus layer, woody debris, and drainage) appear to be among the most important site variables. Stands of Picea had significantly higher average carbon (C) densities in the combined litter and humus layer (43,530 kg-C/ha) than either Populus (25,500 kg-C/ha) or Pinus (19,400 kg-C/ha). The thick surface organic layer in lowland Picea stands plays an important role in regulating soil temperature and moisture, and organic-matter decomposition, which in turn affect the ecosystem C-dynamics. During forest succession after a stand-replacing disturbance (e.g. fires), tree biomass and surface organic layer thickness increase in all stand types as forests recover; however, woody biomass detritus first decreases and then increases after ca. 80 yr. Soil C densities show slight decrease with ages in Populus stands, but increase in other stand types. These results indicate the complex C-transfer processes among different components (tree biomass, detritus, forest floor, and soil) of boreal ecosystems at various stages of succession.

  11. Reservoir Characterization for CO2 Sequestration: Assessing the Potential of the Devonian Carbonate Nisku Formation of Central Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Wabamun Lake area of Central Alberta, Canada includes several large CO2 point source emitters, collectively producing more than 30 Mt annually. Previous studies established that deep saline aquifers beneath the Wabamun Lake area have good potential for the large-scale injection and storage of CO2. This study reports on the characterization of the Devonian carbonate Nisku Formation for evaluation as a CO2 repository. Major challenges for characterization included sparse well and seismic data, poor quality flow tests, and few modern measurements. Wire-line porosity measurements were present in only one-third of the wells, so porosity and flow capacity (permeability-thickness) were estimated using wire-line electrical measurements. The Archie cementation factor appears to vary between 2 and 3, creating uncertainty when predicting porosity using the electrical measurements; however, high-porosity zones could be identified. The electrically-based flow capacity predictions showed more favorable values using a correlation with core than the relation based on drill stem and production tests. This behavior is expected, since the flow test flow capacities are less influenced by local occurrences of very permeable vuggy and moldic rocks. Facies distributions were modeled using both pixel and object methods. The object models, using dimensions obtained from satellite imaging of modern day environments, gave results that were more consistent with the geological understanding of the Nisku and showed greater large-scale connectivity than the pixel model. Predicted volumes show considerable storage capacity in the Nisku, but flow simulations suggest injection capacities are below an initial 20 Mt/year target using vertical wells. More elaborate well designs, including fracture stimulation or multi-lateral wells may allow this goal to be reached or surpassed. (authors)

  12. Burial fluxes and sources of organic carbon in sediments of the central Yellow Sea mud area over the past 200 years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shu; YANG Qian; LIU Sai; CAI Deling; QU Keming; SUN Yao

    2015-01-01

    Long-term changes of composition, sources and burial fluxes of TOC (total organic carbon) in sediments of the central Yellow Sea mud area and their possible affecting factors are discussed in this paper. Firstly, similarity analysis is employed to confirm that the carbon burial features resulted from two collected cores are typical in the central Yellow Sea mud area where YSWC (Yellow Sea Warm Current) is prevalent. On this basis, the burial flux of TOC here was considered to be 235.5–488.4 μmol/(cm2∙a) since the first industrial revolution, accounting for about 70%–90% among burial fluxes of TC (total carbon) in the sediments. Compared TOC/TC ratio in the two cores with that in other marine sediments worldwide, we suggest that the growth of calcareous/non-calcareous organisms and dissolution of IC (inorganic carbon) are important factors controlling the TOC/TC ratio in sediment. Results of two-end mixed model based onδ13C data indicate that marine-derived organic carbon (OCa) is the main part among total burial organic carbon which accounts for a ratio over 85%. Due to the high TOC/TC ratio in the two cores, TC in the sediments also mainly exists as OCa, and the proportion of OCa is about 60%–80%. Away from the shore and relatively high primary production in upper waters are the main reasons that OCa is predominant among all burial OC in sediments of the central Yellow Sea mud area. Burial of OC in this mud area is probably mainly influenced by the human activities. Although the economic development during the late 19th century caused by the first industrial revolution in China did not obviously increase the TOC burial fluxes in the sediments, the rise of industry and agriculture after the founding of new China has clearly increased the TOC burial flux since 1950s. Otherwise, we also realize that among TC burial fluxes, TIC account for about 10%–30% in sediments of the central Yellow Sea mud area, so its burial could not be simply ignored here

  13. Risk of Visual Impairment and Intracranial Hypertension After Space Flight: Evaluation of the Role of Polymorphism of Enzymes Involved in One-Carbon Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. M.; Gregory, J. F.; Zeisel, G. H.; Gibson, C. R.; Mader, T. H.; Kinchen, J.; Ueland, P.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Heer, M.; Zwart, S. R.

    2016-01-01

    Data from the Nutritional Status Assessment protocol provided biochemical evidence that the one-carbon metabolic pathway may be altered in individuals experiencing vision-related issues during and after space flight (1, 2). Briefly, serum concentrations of homocysteine, cystathionine, 2-methylcitric acid, and methylmalonic acid were significantly (Penzymes in the one-carbon pathway, and to evaluate how these relate to vision and other medical aspects of the eye. Specifically, we investigated 5 polymorphisms in MTRR, MTHFR, SHMT, and CBS genes and their association with ophthalmic changes after flight in 49 astronauts. The number of G alleles of MTRR 66 and C alleles of SHMT1 1420 both contributed to the odds of visual disturbances (3). Block regression showed that B-vitamin status at landing and genetics were significant predictors for many of the ophthalmic outcomes studied (3). In conclusion, we document an association between MTRR 66 and SHMT1 1420 polymorphisms and space flightinduced vision changes. These data document that individuals with an altered 1-carbon metabolic pathway may be predisposed to anatomic and/or physiologic changes that render them susceptible to ophthalmic damage during space flight.

  14. Demise of the northern Tethyan Urgonian carbonate platform and subsequent transition towards pelagic conditions: the sedimentary record of the Col de la Plaine Morte area, central Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Föllmi K.B.; Gainon F.

    2008-01-01

    The sedimentary succession of the Col de la Plaine Morte area (Helvetic Alps, central Switzerland) documents the disappearance of the northern Tethyan Urgonian platform in unprecedented detail and suggests stepwise platform demise, with each drowning phase documented by erosion and phosphogenesis. The first identified drowning phase terminated Urgonian carbonate production in a predominantly photozoan mode. Using a correlation of the whole-rock δ13C record with the well-dated record from SE F...

  15. Light-dark (12:12) cycle of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in Crocosphaera watsonii WH8501: relation to the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dron, Anthony; Rabouille, Sophie; Claquin, Pascal; Le Roy, Bertrand; Talec, Amélie; Sciandra, Antoine

    2012-04-01

    This study provides with original data sets on the physiology of the unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium Crocosphaera watsonii WH8501, maintained in continuous culture in conditions of obligate diazotrophy. Cultures were exposed to a 12:12 light-dark regime, representative of what they experience in nature and where growth is expected to be balanced. Nitrogen and carbon metabolism were monitored at high frequency and their dynamics was compared with the cell cycle. Results reveal a daily cycle in the physiological and biochemical parameters, tightly constrained by the timely decoupled processes of N(2) fixation and carbon acquisition. The cell division rate increased concomitantly to carbon accumulation and peaked 6 h into the light. The carbon content reached a maximum at the end of the light phase. N(2) fixation occurred mostly during the dark period and peaked between 9 and 10 h into the night, while DNA synthesis, reflected by DNA fluorescence, increased until the end of the night. Consequently, cells in G1- and S-phases present a marked decrease in their C:N ratio. Nitrogen acquisition through N(2) fixation exceeded 1.3- to 3-fold the nitrogen requirements for growth, suggesting that important amounts of nitrogen are excreted even under conditions supposed to favour balanced, carbon and nitrogen acquisitions. PMID:22188053

  16. How does land use link terrestrial and aquatic carbon in western North America?: Implications from an agricultural case study in central Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, S. A.; Sigler, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    The fate of soil organic matter with expanding human land use is of increasing concern for planetary health and ecological sustainability. In North American grasslands, cultivation has commonly resulted in loss of stored soil organic carbon to dissolved phases in groundwater and surface water, as well as to atmospheric CO2 via decomposition. In addition, cultivation has released nutrients stored in organic matter and facilitated water movement through soils to benefit crops, increasing groundwater recharge rates. This has altered groundwater chemistry both by changing biogeochemistry of the terrestrial-aquatic interface and by increasing addition of nutrients, herbicides, and pesticides to these systems. In this presentation, we consider the effects of food production practices on terrestrial-aquatic carbon linkages in former grassland ecosystems of western North America. Our data from an agricultural area in central Montana begin to reveal how elevated nitrate and pesticide levels in groundwater on an isolated landform reflect transformation over the last century of a temperate grassland ecosystem for wheat and cattle production. Rates and pathways of carbon and nitrogen loss are inferred from the concentration and isotopic character of both water and carbon and nitrogen over three years in soils, shallow groundwater, emergent springs and surface waters. In this semi-arid, non-irrigated context, the fate of soil organic matter is linked with redistribution of pedogenic carbonate as well as other soil and rock derived solutes. We consider implications for future trends in dissolved carbon and nitrogen in surface waters in the region.

  17. The CCAAT box-binding factor stimulates ammonium assimilation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, defining a new cross-pathway regulation between nitrogen and carbon metabolisms.

    OpenAIRE

    Dang, V D; Bohn, C.; Bolotin-Fukuhara, M.; Daignan-Fornier, B

    1996-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms are connected via the incorporation of ammonia into glutamate; this reaction is catalyzed by the NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) encoded by the GDH1 gene. In this report, we show that the GDH1 gene requires the CCAAT box-binding activator (HAP complex) for optimal expression. This conclusion is based on several lines of evidence: (1) overexpression of GDH1 can correct the growth defect of hap2 and hap3 mutants on a...

  18. Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almaas, E

    2007-01-20

    The availability of whole-cell level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30,000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy-tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations have relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reaction are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central-carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.

  19. Inter-relationships between single carbon units' metabolism and resting energy expenditure in weight-losing patients with small cell lung cancer. Effects of methionine supply and chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sengeløv, H; Hansen, O P; Simonsen, L; Bülow, J; Nielsen, O J; Ovesen, Liselotte

    The one-carbon unit metabolism was investigated in 8 weight-losing patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC). At diagnosis, 6 of the 8 patients had elevated formiminoglutamic acid (FIGLU) excretion after a histidine load, suggesting a lack of one-carbon units. In accordance, a...... significant decrease of FIGLU excretion was observed in the patients after oral administration of DL-methionine for 4 days. The elevated FIGLU excretion was positively correlated to weight loss prior to diagnosis and negatively correlated to serum albumin at time of diagnosis. After 3 months of combination...... chemotherapy, FIGLU excretion was reduced in all patients except 1, who had progressive disease. Despite the elevated FIGLU excretions, all patients had normal blood folate levels. The resting energy expenditure (REE) was recorded in 7 patients, and a significant, positive correlation was observed between...

  20. Preparation of carbon-11 labelled acetate and palmitic acid for the study of myocardial metabolism by emission-computerised axial tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods have been developed for the labelling of acetate and palmitic acid with the positron-emitting radionuclide, 11C(T=20.4 min). Labelling was achieved via carbonation of the appropriate alkyl magnesium bromide (methyl magnesium bromide or n-pentadecyl magnesium bromide) with 11C-labelled carbon dioxide produced by the 14Np(p,α)11C nuclear reaction. The radiochemical yield and speed of each method of labelling are such that a radiochemically pure product is obtained in injectable form and in activity (>10 mCi) suitable for the study of myocardial metabolism by emission-computerised axial tomography. High pressure liquid chromatography and thin layer chromatography were used to assess the radiochemical purity of each radiopharmaceutical. The specific activity of 11C-labelled acetate was estimated by an enzymic procedure to be greater than 0.5 Ci/μmole. (author)

  1. Structure of the carbon isotope excursion in a high-resolution lacustrine Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum record from central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zuoling; Wang, Xu; Hu, Jianfang; Yang, Shiling; Zhu, Min; Dong, Xinxin; Tang, Zihua; Peng, Ping'an; Ding, Zhongli

    2014-12-01

    The carbon isotope excursion (CIE) associated with the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) has been recognized for the first time in the micritic carbonate, total organic carbon (TOC) and black carbon (BC) contained within the lacustrine sediments from the Nanyang Basin, central China. The remarkably large excursion (∼ - 6 ‰) in the δ13CTOC and δ13CBC values is possibly attributable to increased humidity and elevated pCO2 concentration. The ∼ - 4 ‰ CIE recorded in the δ13Ccalcite, reflecting the average isotope change of the watershed system, is consistent with that observed in planktonic foraminifera. This correspondence suggests that the true magnitude of the carbon isotope excursion in the ocean-atmosphere system is likely close to - 4 ‰. The ∼10 m excursion onset in our multi-proxy δ13C records demonstrates that the large input of 13C-depleted carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system was not geologically instantaneous. Despite difference and somewhat smoothness in detailed pattern of the CIE due to localized controls on different substrates, inorganic and organic δ13C data generally depict a gradual excursion onset at least over timescales of thousands of years. In addition, continental temperature reconstruction, based on the distribution of membrane lipids of bacteria, suggests a warming of ∼4 °C prior to the PETM and ∼7 °C increase in temperature during the PETM. The temperature data are overall similar in pattern and trend to the δ13C change across the PETM. These observations, combined with pre-CIE warming, are in line with the idea that 13C-depleted carbon release operated as a positive feedback to temperature, suggesting supply from one or more large organic carbon reservoirs on Earth's surface.

  2. Analysis of carbon and nitrogen co-metabolism in yeast by ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry applying {sup 13}C- and {sup 15}N-labeled substrates simultaneously

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, Lars M. [TU Dortmund University, Laboratory of Chemical Biotechnology, Department of Biochemical and Chemical Engineering, Dortmund (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Applied Microbiology - iAMB, Aachen Biology and Biotechnology - ABBt, Aachen (Germany); Desphande, Rahul R. [TU Dortmund University, Laboratory of Chemical Biotechnology, Department of Biochemical and Chemical Engineering, Dortmund (Germany); Michigan State University, Department of Plant Biology, East Lansing, MI (United States); Schmid, Andreas [TU Dortmund University, Laboratory of Chemical Biotechnology, Department of Biochemical and Chemical Engineering, Dortmund (Germany); Hayen, Heiko [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS-e.V, Dortmund (Germany); University of Wuppertal, Department of Food Chemistry, Wuppertal (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    Alternative metabolic pathways inside a cell can be deduced using stable isotopically labeled substrates. One prerequisite is accurate measurement of the labeling pattern of targeted metabolites. Experiments are generally limited to the use of single-element isotopes, mainly {sup 13}C. Here, we demonstrate the application of direct infusion nanospray, ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) for metabolic studies using differently labeled elemental isotopes simultaneously - i.e., {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N - in amino acids of a total protein hydrolysate. The optimized strategy for the analysis of metabolism by a hybrid linear ion trap-FTICR-MS comprises the collection of multiple adjacent selected ion monitoring scans. By limiting both the width of the mass range and the number of ions entering the ICR cell with automated gain control, sensitive measurements of isotopologue distribution were possible without compromising mass accuracy and isotope intensity mapping. The required mass-resolving power of more than 60,000 is only achievable on a routine basis by FTICR and Orbitrap mass spectrometers. Evaluation of the method was carried out by comparison of the experimental data to the natural isotope abundances of selected amino acids and by comparison to GC/MS results obtained from a labeling experiment with {sup 13}C-labeled glucose. The developed method was used to shed light on the complexity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae carbon-nitrogen co-metabolism by administering both {sup 13}C-labeled glucose and {sup 15}N-labeled alanine. The results indicate that not only glutamate but also alanine acts as an amino donor during alanine and valine synthesis. Metabolic studies using FTICR-MS can exploit new possibilities by the use of multiple-labeled elemental isotopes. (orig.)

  3. Measuring and modeling C flux rates through the central metabolic pathways in microbial communities using position-specific 13C-labeled tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, P.; van Groenigen, K.; Hagerty, S.; Salpas, E.; Fairbanks, D. E.; Hungate, B. A.; KOCH, G. W.; Schwartz, E.

    2012-12-01

    The production of energy and metabolic precursors occurs in well-known processes such as glycolysis and Krebs cycle. We use position-specific 13C-labeled metabolic tracers, combined with models of microbial metabolic organization, to analyze the response of microbial community energy production, biosynthesis, and C use efficiency (CUE) in soils, decomposing litter, and aquatic communities. The method consists of adding position-specific 13C -labeled metabolic tracers to parallel soil incubations, in this case 1-13C and 2,3-13C pyruvate and 1-13C and U-13C glucose. The measurement of CO2 released from the labeled tracers is used to calculate the C flux rates through the various metabolic pathways. A simplified metabolic model consisting of 23 reactions is solved using results of the metabolic tracer experiments and assumptions of microbial precursor demand. This new method enables direct estimation of fundamental aspects of microbial energy production, CUE, and soil organic matter formation in relatively undisturbed microbial communities. We will present results showing the range of metabolic patterns observed in these communities and discuss results from testing metabolic models.

  4. Metabolic and Transcriptional Reprogramming in Developing Soybean (Glycine max Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Grene

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Soybean (Glycine max seeds are an important source of seed storage compounds, including protein, oil, and sugar used for food, feed, chemical, and biofuel production. We assessed detailed temporal transcriptional and metabolic changes in developing soybean embryos to gain a systems biology view of developmental and metabolic changes and to identify potential targets for metabolic engineering. Two major developmental and metabolic transitions were captured enabling identification of potential metabolic engineering targets specific to seed filling and to desiccation. The first transition involved a switch between different types of metabolism in dividing and elongating cells. The second transition involved the onset of maturation and desiccation tolerance during seed filling and a switch from photoheterotrophic to heterotrophic metabolism. Clustering analyses of metabolite and transcript data revealed clusters of functionally related metabolites and transcripts active in these different developmental and metabolic programs. The gene clusters provide a resource to generate predictions about the associations and interactions of unknown regulators with their targets based on “guilt-by-association” relationships. The inferred regulators also represent potential targets for future metabolic engineering of relevant pathways and steps in central carbon and nitrogen metabolism in soybean embryos and drought and desiccation tolerance in plants.

  5. Effect of Direct Seeding Mulch-Based Systems on Soil Carbon Storage and Macrofauna in Central Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Eric Blanchart; Martial Bernoux; Xavier Sarda; Marcos Siqueira Neto; Carlos C. Cerri; Marisa Piccolo; Jean-marie Douzet; Eric Scopel; Christian Feller

    2007-01-01

    Soils represent a large carbon pool, approximately 1500 Gt, equivalent to almost three times the quantity stored in terrestrial biomass and twice the amount stored in the atmosphere. Any modification of land-use or land management can induce variations in soil carbon stocks, even in agricultural systems that are perceived to be in a steady state. These modifications also alter soil macrofauna that is known to affect soil carbon dynamics. Direct seeding Mulch-based Cropping (DMC) systems with ...

  6. Sources and the flux pattern of dissolved carbon in rivers of the Yenisey basin draining the Central Siberian Plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frequent measurements of dissolved organic (DOC) and inorganic (DIC) carbon concentrations in rivers during snowmelt, the entire ice-free season, and winter were made in five large watersheds (15 000–174 000 km2) of the Central Siberian Plateau (Yenisey River basin). These differ in the degree of continuous permafrost coverage, mean annual air temperature, and the proportion of tundra and forest vegetation. With an annual DOC export from the catchment areas of 2.8–4.7 gC m−2 as compared to an annual DIC export of 1.0–2.8 gC m−2, DOC was the dominant component of terrigenous C released to rivers. There was strong temporal variation in the discharge of DOC and DIC. Like for other rivers of the pan-arctic and boreal zones, snowmelt dominated annual fluxes, being 55–71% for water runoff, 64–82% for DOC and 37–41% for DIC. Likewise, DOC and DIC exhibited also a strong spatial variation in C fluxes, with both dissolved C species decreasing from south to north. The rivers of the southern part of the plateau had the largest flow-weighted DOC concentrations among those previously reported for Siberian rivers, but the smallest flow-weighted DIC concentrations. In the study area, DOC and DIC fluxes were negatively correlated with the distribution of continuous permafrost and positively correlated with mean annual air temperature. A synthesis of literature data shows similar trends from west to east, with an eastward decrease of dissolved C concentrations and an increased proportion of DOC in the total dissolved C flux. It appears that there are two contemporary limitations for river export of terrigenous C across Siberia: (1) low productivity of ecosystems with respect to potentially mobilizable organic C, slow weathering rates with concomitant small formation of bicarbonate, and/or wildfire disturbance limit the pools of organic and inorganic C that can be mobilized for transport in rivers (source-limited), and (2) mobilization of available pools of C is

  7. Linked gene networks involved in nitrogen and carbon metabolism and levels of water-soluble carbohydrate accumulation in wheat stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, C Lynne; Casu, Rosanne E; Rattey, Allan; Dreccer, M Fernanda; Kam, Jason W; van Herwaarden, Anthony F; Shorter, Ray; Xue, Gang Ping

    2011-12-01

    High levels of water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) provide an important source of stored assimilate for grain filling in wheat. To better understand the interaction between carbohydrate metabolism and other metabolic processes associated with the WSC trait, a genome-wide expression analysis was performed using eight field-grown lines from the high and low phenotypic tails of a wheat population segregating for WSC and the Affymetrix wheat genome array. The 259 differentially expressed probe sets could be assigned to 26 functional category bins, as defined using MapMan software. There were major differences in the categories to which the differentially expressed probe sets were assigned; for example, probe sets upregulated in high relative to low WSC lines were assigned to category bins such as amino acid metabolism, protein degradation and transport and to be involved in starch synthesis-related processes (carbohydrate metabolism bin), whereas downregulated probe sets were assigned to cell wall-related bins, amino acid synthesis and stress and were involved in sucrose breakdown. Using the set of differentially expressed genes as input, chemical-protein network analyses demonstrated a linkage between starch and N metabolism via pyridoxal phosphate. Twelve C and N metabolism-related genes were selected for analysis of their expression response to varying N and water treatments in the field in the four high and four low WSC progeny lines; the two nitrogen/amino acid metabolism genes demonstrated a consistent negative association between their level of expression and level of WSC. Our results suggest that the assimilation of nitrogen into amino acids is an important factor that influences the levels of WSC in the stems of field-grown wheat. PMID:21789636

  8. Interactions between carbon metabolism and the uptake and assimilation of inorganic nitrogen in Ankistrodesmus falcatus (Corda) Ralfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrate uptake in nitrogen-limited Ankistrodesmus falcatus (Corba) Ralfs was found to be directly dependent on: (1) nitrate concentration; (2) the availability of carbon dioxide or recently synthesised carbon skeletons; (3) light intensity and (4) the presence of ammonium or metabolites of ammonium assimilation. Nitrate uptake was found to obey simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In the absence of carbon dioxide, nitrate uptake was destabilised and resulted in nitrate efflux from the cells. If the cells were pre-adapted to high levels of carbon dioxide, a decrease in the concentration of supplied carbon dioxide resulted in only a transient suppression of nitrate uptake. These results indicate that carbon dioxide was required for the stabilisation of the nitrate uptake system and that nitrate uptake, reduction and assimilation could proceed if supplies of recently synthesised carbon skeletons were available for subsequent ammonium incorporation into amino acids. It was concluded that the mobilisation of storage carbohydrate could provide the necessary reducing potential and ATP for nitrate uptake. The addition of ammonium to A. falcatus cells accumulating nitrate resulted in the immediate cessation of nitrate uptake and subsequent nitrate efflux from the cells. Assays of nitrate reductase activity indicated that the activity of the enzyme increased under nitrogen-limitation. Nitrogen-limited, nitrate-growth and ammonium-grown cultures of A. falcatus were used to determine the effects of nitrate and ammonium addition on photosynthetic oxygen exchange, carbon fixation and the path of carbon flow. The addition of these species of inorganic nitrogen resulted in the suppression of photosynthetic oxygen evolution and carbon fixation. Labelling with 14C was used during the carbon fixation studies

  9. Regulation of Dual Glycolytic Pathways for Fructose Metabolism in Heterofermentative Lactobacillus panis PM1

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Tae Sun; Korber, Darren R; Tanaka, Takuji

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus panis PM1 belongs to the group III heterofermentative lactobacilli that use the 6-phosphogluconate/phosphoketolase (6-PG/PK) pathway as their central metabolic pathway and are reportedly unable to grow on fructose as a sole carbon source. We isolated a variant PM1 strain capable of sporadic growth on fructose medium and observed its distinctive characteristics of fructose metabolism. The end product pattern was different from what is expected in typical group III lactobacilli us...

  10. Metabolic perturbation of an essential pathway: evaluation of a glycine precursor of Coenzyme A

    OpenAIRE

    Rothmann, Michael; Kang, MinJin; Villa, Reymundo; Ntai, Ioanna; La Clair, James J.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Chapman, Eli; Burkart, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Pantetheine, and its corresponding disulfide pantethine, play a key role in metabolism as a building block of coenzyme A (CoA), an essential cofactor utilized in ~4% of primary metabolism and central to fatty acid, polyketide, and non-ribosomal peptide synthases. Using a combination of recombinant engineering and chemical synthesis, we demonstrate that the disulfide of N-pantoylglycyl-2-aminoethanethiol (GlyPan), with one carbon deletion from pantetheine, can rescue a mutant E. coli strain MG...

  11. World-Economy Centrality and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: A New Look at the Position in the Capitalist World-System and Environmental Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Prew

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the ever-growing concern of climate change, much attention has been paid to the factors driving carbon dioxide emissions. Previous research in the World-Systems perspective has identified a relationship between carbon dioxide emissions and position in the world-economy. This study intends to build on the previous research by developing a new, more parsimonious indicator of World-System position based on Immanuel Wallerstein’s theoretical concepts of incorporation and core-periphery processes. The new World-System indicator is derived from the centrality measure in network analysis based on import data from the International Monetary Fund’s Direction of Trade Statistics. Based on the theoretical concepts of core-periphery processes, carbon dioxide emissions are predicted to rise based on the predominance of energy-intensive, high-technology, core processes within the nation. The results tend to demonstrate a strong relationship between carbon dioxide emissions and position in the world-economy, and the new World-System position indicator is more strongly related with carbon dioxide emissions than Gross Domestic Product per capita.

  12. Expression and activity of carbonic anhydrase IX is associated with metabolic dysfunction in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Ying; Wang, H.; Oosterwijk, E.; Tu, C.; Shiverick, K.T.; Silverman, D.N.; Frost, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    The expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), a marker for hypoxic tumors, is correlated with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. We show herein that the MDA-MB-231 cells, a "triple-negative," basal B line, express exclusively CAIX, while a luminal cell line (T47D) expresses carbonic anhydra

  13. PSR1 Is a Global Transcriptional Regulator of Phosphorus Deficiency Responses and Carbon Storage Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajhaiya, Amit K; Dean, Andrew P; Zeef, Leo A H; Webster, Rachel E; Pittman, Jon K

    2016-03-01

    Many eukaryotic microalgae modify their metabolism in response to nutrient stresses such as phosphorus (P) starvation, which substantially induces storage metabolite biosynthesis, but the genetic mechanisms regulating this response are poorly understood. Here, we show that P starvation-induced lipid and starch accumulation is inhibited in a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant lacking the transcription factor Pi Starvation Response1 (PSR1). Transcriptomic analysis identified specific metabolism transcripts that are induced by P starvation but misregulated in the psr1 mutant. These include transcripts for starch and triacylglycerol synthesis but also transcripts for photosynthesis-, redox-, and stress signaling-related proteins. To further examine the role of PSR1 in regulating lipid and starch metabolism, PSR1 complementation lines in the psr1 strain and PSR1 overexpression lines in a cell wall-deficient strain were generated. PSR1 expression in the psr1 lines was shown to be functional due to rescue of the psr1 phenotype. PSR1 overexpression lines exhibited increased starch content and number of starch granules per cell, which correlated with a higher expression of specific starch metabolism genes but reduced neutral lipid content. Furthermore, this phenotype was consistent in the presence and absence of acetate. Together, these results identify a key transcriptional regulator in global metabolism and demonstrate transcriptional engineering in microalgae to modulate starch biosynthesis. PMID:26704642

  14. Progress on photosynthetic carbon metabolism types in marine macroalgae%大型海藻光合碳代谢类型的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    芦笛

    2013-01-01

    As a part of marine algae, marine macroalgae, whose edible and medicinal values are widely applied, participate in global CO2 and O2 turnover through photosynthesis. Therefore, when viewed from ecology as well as economics, the process of photosynthetic CO2 fixation and metabolism in marine macroalgae is of great significance. Up to the present, metabonomics and enzymology researches on photosynthetic carbon metabolism in marine macroalgae have proved the existence of the PEPCK-or PEPC-type C4 pathway as well as the CAM pathway in addition to the C3 pathway, although the integrality of the pathways is still unknown. Moreover, the results of photosynthetic gas exchange indicate that the photosynthetic carbon metabolism pathway in macroalgae performs the C4-like type on the whole. This situation resembles some terrestrial C3 plants with additional C4 pathway. Therefore, researches on photosynthetic carbon metabolism pathways in macroalgae remain to be explored in depth in the future.%作为海洋藻类的一部分,大型海藻通过光合作用参与了海洋对全球CO2和O2的周转,其食用和药用价值也得到了广泛应用。因此无论从生态还是经济角度来看,研究大型海藻通过光合作用对CO2进行固定和代谢的过程都具有重要意义。到目前为止,世界上对大型海藻光合碳代谢途径的研究从代谢组学和酶学角度证明了大型海藻体内除了C3途径外,还同时存在不能确定完整与否的PEPCK或PEPC类型的C4途径或CAM途径;光合气体交换的结果显示其光合碳代谢途径从整体上表现出类似C4(C4-like)类型。这种情况与一些体内存在C4途径的陆生C3植物相似。因此大型海藻光合碳代谢途径仍然有待深入研究。

  15. Plastidial Glycolytic Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Is an Important Determinant in the Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism of Heterotrophic Cells in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoman, Armand D; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Rosa-Téllez, Sara; Flores-Tornero, María; Serrano, Ramón; Bueso, Eduardo; Fernie, Alisdair R; Segura, Juan; Ros, Roc

    2015-11-01

    This study functionally characterizes the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plastidial glycolytic isoforms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPCp) in photosynthetic and heterotrophic cells. We expressed the enzyme in gapcp double mutants (gapcp1gapcp2) under the control of photosynthetic (Rubisco small subunit RBCS2B [RBCS]) or heterotrophic (phosphate transporter PHT1.2 [PHT]) cell-specific promoters. Expression of GAPCp1 under the control of RBCS in gapcp1gapcp2 had no significant effect on the metabolite profile or growth in the aerial part (AP). GAPCp1 expression under the control of the PHT promoter clearly affected Arabidopsis development by increasing the number of lateral roots and having a major effect on AP growth and metabolite profile. Our results indicate that GAPCp1 is not functionally important in photosynthetic cells but plays a fundamental role in roots and in heterotrophic cells of the AP. Specifically, GAPCp activity may be required in root meristems and the root cap for normal primary root growth. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses indicate that the lack of GAPCp activity affects nitrogen and carbon metabolism as well as mineral nutrition and that glycerate and glutamine are the main metabolites responding to GAPCp activity. Thus, GAPCp could be an important metabolic connector of glycolysis with other pathways, such as the phosphorylated pathway of serine biosynthesis, the ammonium assimilation pathway, or the metabolism of γ-aminobutyrate, which in turn affect plant development. PMID:26134167

  16. POSSIBLE LATE MIDDLE ORDOVICIAN ORGANIC CARBON ISOTOPE EXCURSION: EVIDENCE FROM ORDOVICIAN OILS AND HYDROCARBON SOURCE ROCKS, MID-CONTINENT AND EAST-CENTRAL UNITED STATES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Joseph R.; Jacobson, Stephen R.; Witzke, Brian J.; Risatti, J. Bruno; Anders, Donald E.; Watney, W. Lynn; Newell, K. David; Vuletich, April K.

    1987-01-01

    Oils generated by Middle Ordovician rocks are found throughout the Mid-Continent and east-central regions of the United States. Gas chromatographic characteristics of these oils include a relatively high abundance of n-alkanes with carbon numbers less than 20, a strong predominance of odd-numbered n-alkanes between C//1//0 and C//2//0, and relatively small amounts of branched and cyclic alkanes. The wide ranges in delta **1**3C for oils and rock extracts reflect a major, positive excursion(s) in organic matter delta **1**3C in late Middle Ordovician rocks. This excursion has at least regional significance in that it can be documented in sections 480 mi apart in south-central Kansas and eastern Iowa. The distance may be as much as 930 mi. The parallel shifts in organic and carbonate delta **1**3C in core samples from 1 E. M. Greene well, Washington County, Iowa, imply changes in the isotope composition of the ocean-atmosphere carbon reservoir. These and other aspects of the subject are discussed.

  17. Phylogeny, Morphology, and Metabolic and Invasive Capabilities of Epicellular Fish Coccidium Goussia janae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dogga, S.K.; Bartošová-Sojková, Pavla; Lukeš, Julius; Soldati-Favre, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 166, č. 6 (2015), s. 659-676. ISSN 1434-4610 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Apicomplexa * Coccidia * Goussia janae * phylogeny * ultrastructure * invasion * central carbon metabolism. Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.045, year: 2014

  18. Expression and Activity of Carbonic Anhydrase IX Is Associated With Metabolic Dysfunction in MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ying LI; Wang, Hai; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Tu, Chingkuang; Shiverick, Kathleen T.; Silverman, David N.; Frost, Susan C.

    2009-01-01

    The expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), a marker for hypoxic tumors, is correlated with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. We show herein that the MDA-MB-231 cells, a “triple-negative,” basal B line, express exclusively CAIX, while a luminal cell line (T47D) expresses carbonic anhydrase XII (CAXII). CAIX expression in the basal B cells is both density-and hypoxia-dependent and is correlated with carbonic anhydrase activity. Evidence is provided that CAIX contributes to extracel...

  19. Assessment of the effects of dobutamine on myocardial blood flow and oxidative metabolism in normal human subjects using nitrogen-13 ammonia and carbon-11 acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivokapich, J; Huang, S C; Schelbert, H R

    1993-06-01

    The dual purposes of this study with positron emission tomography were to measure the effects of dobutamine on myocardial blood flow and oxidative metabolism, and to compare carbon-11 (C-11) acetate versus nitrogen-13 (N-13) ammonia in quantitating flow in normal subjects. Flow was quantitated with N-13 ammonia at rest and at peak dobutamine infusion (40 micrograms/kg/min) in 21 subjects. In 11 subjects, oxidative metabolism was also estimated at rest and peak dobutamine infusion using the clearance rate of C-11 acetate, k mono (min-1). A 2-compartment kinetic model was applied to the early phase of the C-11 acetate data to estimate flow. The rest and peak dobutamine rate-pressure products were 7,318 +/- 1,102 and 19,937 +/- 3,964 beats/min/mm Hg, respectively, and correlated well (r = 0.77) with rest and peak dobutamine flows of 0.77 +/- 0.14 and 2.25 ml/min/g determined using N-13 ammonia as a flow tracer. Rest and dobutamine flows estimated with C-11 acetate were highly correlated with those determined with N-13 ammonia (r = 0.92). k mono increased from 0.05 +/- 0.01 to 0.18 +/- 0.02 min-1, and correlated highly with the increase in flows (r = 0.91) and rate-pressure products (r = 0.94). Thus, the increase in cardiac demand associated with dobutamine is highly correlated with an increase in supply and oxidative metabolism. C-11 acetate is a unique tracer that can be used to image both flow and metabolism simultaneously. PMID:8498380

  20. Fructose Alters Intermediary Metabolism of Glucose in Human Adipocytes and Diverts Glucose to Serine Oxidation in the One–Carbon Cycle Energy Producing Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalakshmi Varma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Increased consumption of sugar and fructose as sweeteners has resulted in the utilization of fructose as an alternative metabolic fuel that may compete with glucose and alter its metabolism. To explore this, human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel Syndrome (SGBS preadipocytes were differentiated to adipocytes in the presence of 0, 1, 2.5, 5 or 10 mM of fructose added to a medium containing 5 mM of glucose representing the normal blood glucose concentration. Targeted tracer [1,2-13C2]-d-glucose fate association approach was employed to examine the influence of fructose on the intermediary metabolism of glucose. Increasing concentrations of fructose robustly increased the oxidation of [1,2-13C2]-d-glucose to 13CO2 (p < 0.000001. However, glucose-derived 13CO2 negatively correlated with 13C labeled glutamate, 13C palmitate, and M+1 labeled lactate. These are strong markers of limited tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, fatty acid synthesis, pentose cycle fluxes, substrate turnover and NAD+/NADP+ or ATP production from glucose via complete oxidation, indicating diminished mitochondrial energy metabolism. Contrarily, a positive correlation was observed between glucose-derived 13CO2 formed and 13C oleate and doses of fructose which indicate the elongation and desaturation of palmitate to oleate for storage. Collectively, these results suggest that fructose preferentially drives glucose through serine oxidation glycine cleavage (SOGC pathway one-carbon cycle for NAD+/NADP+ production that is utilized in fructose-induced lipogenesis and storage in adipocytes.

  1. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity's association with markers of iron, 1-carbon metabolism, and antioxidant status among US adults: a structural equations modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May A Beydoun

    Full Text Available We tested a model in which Helicobacter pylori seropositivity (Hps predicted iron status, which in turn acted as a predictor for markers of 1-C metabolism that were then allowed to predict antioxidant status.National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES 1999-2000 cross-sectional data among adults aged 20-85 y were analyzed (n = 3,055. Markers of Hps, iron status (serum ferritin and transferrin saturation (TS; 1-C metabolism (serum folate (FOLserum, B-12, total homocysteine (tHcy, methylmalonic acid (MMA and antioxidant status (vitamins A and E were entered into a structural equations model (SEM.Predictors of Hps included older age, lower education and income, racial/ethnic groups (lowest among Non-Hispanic Whites, and lifetime cigarette smoking. SEM modeling indicated that Hps had a direct inverse relationship with iron status (combining serum ferritin and TS which in turn was positively related to 1-C metabolites (higher serum folate, B-12 or lower tHcy/MMA that were positively associated with antioxidant status (combining serum vitamins A and E. Another pathway that was found bypassed 1-C metabolites (Hps → Iron_st → Antiox. The sum of all indirect effects from Hps combining both pathways and the other indirect pathways in the model (Hps → Iron_st → OneCarbon; Hps →OneCarbon →Antiox was estimated at β = -0.006±0.003, p<0.05.In sum, of the total effect of H. pylori seropositivity on antioxidant status, two significant indirect pathways through Iron status and 1-Carbon metabolites were found. Randomized controlled trials should be conducted to uncover the concomitant causal effect of H. pylori eradication on improving iron status, folate, B-12 and antioxidant status among H. pylori seropositive individuals.

  2. An assessment on in-vehicle concentration of carbon monoxide for taxis in central business district of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabi ollah Mansouri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Carbon monoxide is colorless and odorless gas. In high concentrations, CO is deadly poisonous and in low concentrations can cause fatigue, headache, dizziness and seizures. Carbon monoxide has a high affinity to combines hemoglobin which can decrease oxygen capacity in blood. To address this problem, human body begins to produce red blood cells, this can increases blood viscosity and thus increase diseases such as stroke and heart attack. About 60 percent of total emissions of carbon monoxide are associated automobile exhaust. In this study, concentration of carbon monoxide has been measured in the cabin space of taxis in high-traffic areas of Tehran.Materials and Methods: This study is carried out in spring and summer 2011. Concentrations of carbon monoxide in different types of taxi cabin space (Peugeot, Samand, Pride and Peykan were measured by carbon monoxide meter Q RAE 2 models in different conditions of motion: high speed (over 45 kilometers per hour, low speed (15-30 kilometers per hour and stop (0 kilometers per hour. Results: Results showed that concentration of carbon monoxide in old vehicles (above 10 years is more than three times compared to new vehicles and outdoor. In addition, according to the measured values, at low speeds, values of CO rapidly increased, so that in speeds of less than 15 km, values of CO go beyond standard values (9 ppm.Conclusion: Results show that the mean value of the measured concentration of carbon monoxide is higher than amounts recommended by WHO and EPA and local authorities such as Air Quality Control Organization of Tehran. Concentrations observed in this study are up to 40 more than results of a study by German researchers in summer 1995 and winter 1996.

  3. The influence of climate cycles on the water regime and carbonate profile in chernozems of Central European Russia and adjacent territories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazykina, G. S.; Ovechkin, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of long-term "dry" and "wet" climatic cycles on the water regime, hydrological parameters, and carbonate profiles of chernozems in Central European Russia and adjacent territories was studied. The hydrological and carbonate profiles were found to change during the wet cycle. However, the upper part of the hydrological profile is basically unchanging, whereas in its lower part, the number of hydrological horizons and contrast in their moistening decrease in the forest-steppe chernozems and increase in the steppe chernozems. The frequency of through wetting of chernozems increases during the wet cycles. The vertical lithological heterogeneity of the parent material affects the soil moisture status. In the wet climatic cycle, the moisture content above the lithological contact increases resulting in the development of the features of soil hydromorphism. In the carbonate profile, the character of pedofeatures is changing: some carbonate neoformations disappear, while the other ones develop. Possible variations of the periodically percolative water regime were revealed in chernozems. The classification of water regime proposed by A.A. Rode may be updated based on the data obtained during the dry climatic cycle. Rode's hypothesis about cyclic variations in the soil water regime is confirmed.

  4. Synoptic evaluation of carbon cycling in Beaufort Sea during summer: contrasting river inputs, ecosystem metabolism and air-sea CO2 fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, A.; Coupel, P.; Else, B.; Nahavandian, S.; Lansard, B.; Raimbault, P.; Papakyriakou, T.; Gratton, Y.; Fortier, L.; Tremblay, J.-É.; Babin, M.

    2013-10-01

    The accelerated decline in Arctic sea ice combined with an ongoing trend toward a more dynamic atmosphere is modifying carbon cycling in the Arctic Ocean. A critical issue is to understand how net community production (NCP; the balance between gross primary production and community respiration) responds to changes and modulates air-sea CO2 fluxes. Using data collected as part of the ArcticNet-Malina 2009 expedition in southeastern Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean), we synthesize information on sea ice, wind, river, water column properties, metabolism of the planktonic food web, organic carbon fluxes and pools, as well as air-sea CO2 exchange, with the aim of identifying indices of ecosystem response to environmental changes. Data were analyzed to develop a non-steady-state carbon budget and an assessment of NCP against air-sea CO2 fluxes. The mean atmospheric forcing was a mild upwelling-favorable wind (~5 km h-1) blowing from the N-E and a decaying ice cover (600 mg C m-2d-1) over the shelf prior to our survey, (2) freshwater dilution by river runoff and ice melt, and (3) the presence of cold surface waters offshore. Only the Mackenzie River delta and localized shelf areas directly affected by upwelling were identified as substantial sources of CO2 to the atmosphere (>10mmol C m-2d-1). Although generally state.

  5. Synoptic evaluation of carbon cycling in the Beaufort Sea during summer: contrasting river inputs, ecosystem metabolism and air-sea CO2 fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, A.; Coupel, P.; Else, B.; Nahavandian, S.; Lansard, B.; Raimbault, P.; Papakyriakou, T.; Gratton, Y.; Fortier, L.; Tremblay, J.-É.; Babin, M.

    2014-05-01

    The accelerated decline in Arctic sea ice and an ongoing trend toward more energetic atmospheric and oceanic forcings are modifying carbon cycling in the Arctic Ocean. A critical issue is to understand how net community production (NCP; the balance between gross primary production and community respiration) responds to changes and modulates air-sea CO2 fluxes. Using data collected as part of the ArcticNet-Malina 2009 expedition in the southeastern Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean), we synthesize information on sea ice, wind, river, water column properties, metabolism of the planktonic food web, organic carbon fluxes and pools, as well as air-sea CO2 exchange, with the aim of documenting the ecosystem response to environmental changes. Data were analyzed to develop a non-steady-state carbon budget and an assessment of NCP against air-sea CO2 fluxes. During the field campaign, the mean wind field was a mild upwelling-favorable wind (~ 5 km h-1) from the NE. A decaying ice cover ( 600 mg C m-2 d-1) over the shelf prior to our survey, (2) freshwater dilution by river runoff and ice melt, and (3) the presence of cold surface waters offshore. Only the Mackenzie River delta and localized shelf areas directly affected by upwelling were identified as substantial sources of CO2 to the atmosphere (> 10 mmol C m-2 d-1). Daily PP rates were generally state.

  6. Initial Characterization of Carbon Metabolism in Iron Oxidizing Microbial Communities of Acidic Hot Springs in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, H. W.; Jennings, R. D.; Whitmore, L.; Inskeep, W. P.; Moran, J.

    2012-12-01

    the organism produces during autotrophic growth, and are conducting isotopic labeling experiments to determine if these compounds serve as substrates for the iron oxide mat communities. However, isotopic analysis of DIC in the springs as well as bulk iron oxide mat definitively show that fixation of DIC by M. yellowstonensis is not the only source of C within the mats. Metagenome analysis of the microbial communities and genome analysis of isolates suggest the presence of heterotrophic metabolic pathways. Indeed, initial labeling experiments demonstrate strong heterotrophic metabolism in the iron oxide mats as well as in M. yellowstonensis. Several potential sources of reduced C are available in the springs, but whether any of these potential substrates actually feed the iron mat communities is yet to be determined. Carbon isotope ratios of the bulk iron mat communities and potential heterotrophic C sources suggest that heterotrophic uptake of these sources, like autotrophy of DIC, is not the only source of C in the system. Identifying the major active carbon pools and potential geochemical and microbial carbon links will illuminate carbon cycling in this system and should provide insights into how energy is transferred from key chemolithotrophic reactions to other components of the microbial system.

  7. Peculiarities of One-Carbon Metabolism in the Strict Carnivorous Cat and the Role in Feline Hepatic Lipidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marica Bakovic

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Research in various species has indicated that diets deficient in labile methyl groups (methionine, choline, betaine, folate produce fatty liver and links to steatosis and metabolic syndrome, but also provides evidence of the importance of labile methyl group balance to maintain normal liver function. Cats, being obligate carnivores, rely on nutrients in animal tissues and have, due to evolutionary pressure, developed several physiological and metabolic adaptations, including a number of peculiarities in protein and fat metabolism. This has led to specific and unique nutritional requirements. Adult cats require more dietary protein than omnivorous species, maintain a consistently high rate of protein oxidation and gluconeogenesis and are unable to adapt to reduced protein intake. Furthermore, cats have a higher requirement for essential amino acids and essential fatty acids. Hastened use coupled with an inability to conserve certain amino acids, including methionine, cysteine, taurine and arginine, necessitates a higher dietary intake for cats compared to most other species. Cats also seemingly require higher amounts of several B-vitamins compared to other species and are predisposed to depletion during prolonged inappetance. This carnivorous uniqueness makes cats more susceptible to hepatic lipidosis.

  8. Reservoir Characterization for CO2 Sequestration: Assessing the Potential of the Devonian Carbonate Nisku Formation of Central Alberta Caractérisation de réservoir en vue du stockage géologique de CO2 : évaluation du potentiel offert par les carbonates dévoniens de la formation de Nisku, en Alberta central

    OpenAIRE

    Eisinger C.; Jensen J

    2011-01-01

    The Wabamun Lake area of Central Alberta, Canada includes several large CO2 point source emitters, collectively producing more than 30 Mt annually. Previous studies established that deep saline aquifers beneath the Wabamun Lake area have good potential for the large-scale injection and storage of CO2. This study reports on the characterization of the Devonian carbonate Nisku Formation for evaluation as a CO2 repository. Major challenges for characterization included sparse well and seis...

  9. Vision Changes after Space Flight Are Related to Alterations in Folate-Dependent One-Carbon Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.; Gibson, C. Robert; Mader, Thomas H.; Ericson, Karen; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Heer, Martina; Zwart, Sara R.

    2011-01-01

    About 20% of astronauts on International Space Station missions have developed measurable ophthalmic changes after flight. This study was conducted to determine whether the folate-dependent 1-carbon pathway is altered in these individuals. Data were modeled to evaluate differences between individuals with ophthalmic changes (n=5) and those without them (n=15). We also correlated mean preflight serum concentrations of the 1-carbon metabolites with changes in measured refraction after flight. Serum homocysteine (HCy), cystathionine, 2-methylcitric acid, and methylmalonic acid concentrations were 25%-45% higher (Pvision issues strongly suggests impairment of the folate-dependent 1-carbon transfer pathway. Impairment of this pathway, by polymorphisms, diet or other means, may interact with components of the microgravity environment to influence these pathophysiologic changes. This study was funded by the NASA Human Research Program.

  10. Differential effects of Th1, monocyte/macrophage and Th2 cytokine mixtures on early gene expression for molecules associated with metabolism, signaling and regulation in central nervous system mixed glial cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Studzinski Diane

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytokines secreted by immune cells and activated glia play central roles in both the pathogenesis of and protection from damage to the central nervous system (CNS in multiple sclerosis (MS. Methods We have used gene array analysis to identify the initial direct effects of cytokines on CNS glia by comparing changes in early gene expression in CNS glial cultures treated for 6 hours with cytokines typical of those secreted by Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes and monocyte/macrophages (M/M. Results In two previous papers, we summarized effects of these cytokines on immune-related molecules, and on neural and glial related proteins, including neurotrophins, growth factors and structural proteins. In this paper, we present the effects of the cytokines on molecules involved in metabolism, signaling and regulatory mechanisms in CNS glia. Many of the changes in gene expression were similar to those seen in ischemic preconditioning and in early inflammatory lesions in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, related to ion homeostasis, mitochondrial function, neurotransmission, vitamin D metabolism and a variety of transcription factors and signaling pathways. Among the most prominent changes, all three cytokine mixtures markedly downregulated the dopamine D3 receptor, while Th1 and Th2 cytokines downregulated neuropeptide Y receptor 5. An unexpected finding was the large number of changes related to lipid metabolism, including several suggesting a switch from diacylglycerol to phosphatidyl inositol mediated signaling pathways. Using QRT-PCR we validated the results for regulation of genes for iNOS, arginase and P glycoprotein/multi-drug resistance protein 1 (MDR1 seen at 6 hours with microarray. Conclusion Each of the three cytokine mixtures differentially regulated gene expression related to metabolism and signaling that may play roles in the pathogenesis of MS, most notably with regard to mitochondrial function and neurotransmitter

  11. Carbon sequestration in Chir-Pine (Pinus roxburghii Sarg.) forests un-der various disturbance levels in Kumaun Central Himalaya

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Harshit Pant; Ashish Tewari

    2014-01-01

    We studied variations in tree biomass and carbon sequestra-tion rates of Chir Pine (Pinus roxburghii. Sarg.) forest in three categories of forest disturbance, protected, moderately disturbed, and highly dis-turbed. In the first year, total biomass was 14.7 t⋅ha-1 in highly disturbed site, 94.46 t⋅ha-1 in moderately disturbed forest, and 112.0 t⋅ha-1 in pro-tected forest. The soil organic carbon in the top 20 cm of soil ranged from 0.63 to 1.2%. The total rate of carbon sequestration was 0.60 (t/ha)·a-1on the highly disturbed site, 1.03 (t/ha)·a-1 on the moderately disturbed site, and 4.3 (t/ha)·a-1 on the protected site.

  12. Single-operator multiparameter metabolic analyzer (SOMMA) for total carbon dioxide (C{sub T}) with coulometric detection. Operator`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    This manual contains the presently known information about using the SOMMA (Single-Operator Multiparameter Metabolic Analyzer) -Coulometer system for total carbon dioxide (C{sub T}) analysis of seawater samples. Being Version 1.0, it is preliminary and will be revised as new information is obtained from SOMMA users. As part of a US Department of Energy (DOE) program to conduct a global survey of CO{sub 2} in the ocean in conjunction with the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) Hydrographic Program and Joint Global Ocean Flux Study, C{sub T} measurements are being made with SOMMA systems by several US and foreign laboratories. The purpose of the manual and future versions is to improve the accuracy and precision of seawater analysis through better documentation of methods and to facilitate communication of new operating procedures.

  13. Effect of Nitrogen and Potassium Nutrition on Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism at Late Growing Stage and Grain Yield Formation in Spring Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Study on the relationship between grain yield formation and metabolism of carbon and nitrogen as influenced by N and K nutrition level during maturation was carried out through field experiments and biochemistry analyses. The results confirmed that it was necessary to maintain a higher photosynthetic capacity of leaves and abundant N supplies for root at late growing stages. The soluble protein content, RuBPC and PEPC activities in leaves, harvest index(HI) and harvest index of nitrogen (HIN)increased obviously with appropriate N and K application rate, which accelerated C and N translocation from vegetative parts to grain, enhanced photosynthetic capacity of leaves and abundant(but not excessive)N supply for root during late growing period.

  14. Physiological and Metabolic Effects of Carbon Monoxide Oxidation in the Model Marine Bacterioplankton Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3

    OpenAIRE

    Cunliffe, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Ruegeria pomeroyi expresses carbon monoxide (CO) dehydrogenase and oxidizes CO; however, CO has no effect on growth. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra showed that CO has no effect on cellular metabolite profiles. These data support ecosystem models proposing that, even though bacterioplankton CO oxidation is biogeochemically significant, it has an insignificant effect on bacterioplankton productivity.

  15. Modulatory effect of plasma folate and polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolism on catecholamine methyltransferase (COMT) H108L associated oxidative DNA damage and breast cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was aimed to investigate the modulatory role of plasma folate and eight putatively functional polymorphisms of one-carbon metabolism on catecholamine methyltransferase (COMT)-mediated oxidative DNA damage and breast cancer risk. Plasma folate and 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) were estimated by commercially available kits, while polymorphisms were screened by PCR-RFLP and PCR-AFLP methods. COMT H108L polymorphism showed independent association with breast cancer (OR: 1.73, 95% CI: 1.31 -2.30). No significant interaction was observed between folate status and COMT genotype. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) analysis gave evidence for the significant epistatic (gene-gene) interactions (p<0.0001) of COMT H108L with reduced folate carrier 1 (RFC1) G80A, thymidylate synthase (TYMS) 5'-UTR 3R2R, TYMS 3'-UTR ins6/del6. Increased plasma 8-oxodG were observed in cases compared to controls (mean ± SE: 5.59 ± 0.60 vs. 3.50 ± 0.40 ng/ml, p<0.004). Plasma folate deficiency alone was not a significant predictor of 8-oxodG elevation. The genotype combinations namely, RFC1 G80A/methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) A66G, RFC1 G80A/SHMT C1420T/TYMS 3R2R and serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) C1420T/TYMS 3R2R/methionine synthase (MTR) A2756G/COMT H108L were strong predictors of 8-oxodG elevation in the order of risk. To conclude, the current study provides substantial evidence for a cross talk between one-carbon metabolism and COMT catalysis that might influence oxidative DNA damage and breast cancer risk. (author)

  16. Long-term tillage impacts on soil aggregation and carbon dynamics under wheat-fallow in the central Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conventional tillage (CT) winter wheat (Tritucum aestivum L.) with summer fallow (WF) is the predominant cropping system in the central Great Plains. We investigated the effect of 39 yr of different tillage intensities, conventional tillage (CT); moldboard plow (MP); no-tillage (NT); and reduced ti...

  17. Infrared spectral and carbon isotopic characteristics of micro- and macro-diamonds from the Panda kimberlite (Central Slave Craton, Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, G. L.; Stachel, T.; Stern, R. A.; Carlson, J.; Harris, J. W.

    2013-09-01

    One hundred and twenty-one micro-diamonds (Panda kimberlite (Ekati mine, Central Slave Craton, Canada) were analyzed for nitrogen content, nitrogen aggregation state (%B) and platelet and hydrogen peak areas (cm- 2). Micro-diamond nitrogen concentrations range from 2‰, but mostly vary by bearing metasomatic fluid/melt that isotopically evolves as it percolates upward through the lithosphere.

  18. Comparative Analysis of Genomics and Proteomics in the New Isolated Bacillus thuringiensis X022 Revealed the Metabolic Regulation Mechanism of Carbon Flux Following Cu2+ Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Meifang; Xie, Junyan; Liu, Xuemei; Li, Yang; Rang, Jie; Zhang, Tong; Zhou, Fengjuan; Xia, Liqiu; Hu, Shengbiao; Sun, Yunjun; Ding, Xuezhi

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) X022 is a novel strain isolated from soil in China, and showed strong insecticidal activity against several Lepidopteran pests. In this work, we performed whole genome sequencing of this Bt strain using the next-generation sequencing technology, and further conducted a comparative analysis with the proteomics data of the specific spore-release period based on LC-MS/MS approach. The Bt X022 genome consisted of one circular chromosomal DNA and seven plasmids, which were further functionally annotated using the RAST server. Comparative analysis of insecticidal substances showed that X022 contained genes coding for three Cry proteins (Cry1Ac, Cry1Ia and Cry2Ab) and a vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip3A). However, three insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) (Cry1Ca, Cry1Ac and Cry1Da) were detected by proteomics in the spore-release period. Moreover, a putative biosynthetic gene cluster and the metabolic pathway for poly-β-hydroxybutyrate in Bt X022 were deduced based on the comparative analysis of genomic and proteomic data, which revealed the metabolic regulation mechanism of carbon flux correlated with increased production of ICPs caused by Cu2+. Hence, these results provided a deeper understanding of the genetic background and protein expression profile of Bt X022. This study established a foundation for directed genetic modification and further application of this new isolated Bt strain. PMID:27303381

  19. Comparative Analysis of Genomics and Proteomics in the New Isolated Bacillus thuringiensis X022 Revealed the Metabolic Regulation Mechanism of Carbon Flux Following Cu(2+) Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Meifang; Xie, Junyan; Liu, Xuemei; Li, Yang; Rang, Jie; Zhang, Tong; Zhou, Fengjuan; Xia, Liqiu; Hu, Shengbiao; Sun, Yunjun; Ding, Xuezhi

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) X022 is a novel strain isolated from soil in China, and showed strong insecticidal activity against several Lepidopteran pests. In this work, we performed whole genome sequencing of this Bt strain using the next-generation sequencing technology, and further conducted a comparative analysis with the proteomics data of the specific spore-release period based on LC-MS/MS approach. The Bt X022 genome consisted of one circular chromosomal DNA and seven plasmids, which were further functionally annotated using the RAST server. Comparative analysis of insecticidal substances showed that X022 contained genes coding for three Cry proteins (Cry1Ac, Cry1Ia and Cry2Ab) and a vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip3A). However, three insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) (Cry1Ca, Cry1Ac and Cry1Da) were detected by proteomics in the spore-release period. Moreover, a putative biosynthetic gene cluster and the metabolic pathway for poly-β-hydroxybutyrate in Bt X022 were deduced based on the comparative analysis of genomic and proteomic data, which revealed the metabolic regulation mechanism of carbon flux correlated with increased production of ICPs caused by Cu(2+.) Hence, these results provided a deeper understanding of the genetic background and protein expression profile of Bt X022. This study established a foundation for directed genetic modification and further application of this new isolated Bt strain. PMID:27303381

  20. Comparison of carbon uptake estimates from forest inventory and Eddy-Covariance for a montane rainforest in central Sulawesi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimsch, Florian; Kreilein, Heiner; Rauf, Abdul; Knohl, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Rainforests in general and montane rainforests in particular have rarely been studied over longer time periods. We aim to provide baseline information of a montane tropical forest's carbon uptake over time in order to quantify possible losses through land-use change. Thus we conducted a re-inventory of 22 10-year old forest inventory plots, giving us a rare opportunity to quantify carbon uptake over such a long time period by traditional methods. We discuss shortfalls of such techniques and why our estimate of 1.5 Mg/ha/a should be considered as the lower boundary and not the mean carbon uptake per year. At the same location as the inventory, CO2 fluxes were measured with the Eddy-Covariance technique. Measurements were conducted at 48m height with an LI 7500 open-path infrared gas analyser. We will compare carbon uptake estimates from these measurements to those of the more conventional inventory method and discuss, which factors are probably responsible for differences.

  1. LAND-USE CHANGE AND CARBON FLUX BETWEEN 1970S AND 1990S IN CENTRAL HIGHLANDS OF CHIAPAS, MEXICO

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present results of a study in an intensively impacted and highly fragmented landscape in which we apply field-measured carbon (C) density values to land-use/land-cover (LU/LC) statistics to estimate the flux of C between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere from the 1970s...

  2. Coarsely crystalline cryogenic cave carbonate – a new archive to estimate the Last Glacial minimum permafrost depth in Central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žák, Karel; Richter, D. K.; Filippi, Michal; Živor, Roman; Deininger, M.; Mangini, A.; Scholz, D.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 6 (2012), s. 1821-1837. ISSN 1814-9324 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP210/10/1760 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : caves * cave carbonate * permafrost * Last Glacial Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.556, year: 2012

  3. Effect of Secondary Cooling Conditions on Solidification Structure and Central Macrosegregation in Continuously Cast High-Carbon Rectangular Billet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jie; Chen, Weiqing

    2015-10-01

    Solidification structures of high carbon rectangular billet with a size of 180 mm × 240 mm in different secondary cooling conditions were simulated using cellular automaton-finite element (CAFE) coupling model. The adequacy of the model was compared with the simulated and the actual macrostructures of 82B steel. Effects of the secondary cooling water intensity on solidification structures including the equiaxed grain ratio and the equiaxed grain compactness were discussed. It was shown that the equiaxed grain ratio and the equiaxed grain compactness changed in the opposite direction at different secondary cooling water intensities. Increasing the secondary cooling water intensity from 0.9 or 1.1 to 1.3 L/kg could improve the equiaxed grain compactness and decrease the equiaxed grain ratio. Besides, the industrial test was conducted to investigate the effect of different secondary cooling water intensities on the center carbon macrosegregation of 82B steel. The optimum secondary cooling water intensity was 0.9 L/kg, while the center carbon segregation degree was 1.10. The relationship between solidification structure and center carbon segregation was discussed based on the simulation results and the industrial test.

  4. Subcellular compartmentation of sugar signalling: Links among carbon cellular status, route of sucrolysis, sink-source allocation, and metabolic partitioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel eTiessen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings suggest that both subcellular compartmentation and route of sucrolysis are important for plant development, growth, and yield. Signalling effects are dependent on the tissue, cell type and stage of development. Downstream effects also depend on the amount and localisation of hexoses and disaccharides. All enzymes of sucrose metabolism (e.g. invertase, hexokinase, fructokinase, sucrose synthase, and sucrose 6-phosphate synthase are not produced from single genes, but from paralogue families in plant genomes. Each paralogue has unique expression across plant organs and developmental stages. Multiple isoforms can be targeted to different cellular compartments (e.g. plastids, mitochondria, nuclei, and cytosol. Many of the key enzymes are regulated by post-transcriptional modifications and associate in multimeric protein complexes. Some isoforms have regulatory functions, either in addition to or in replacement of their catalytic activity. This explains why some isozymes are not redundant, but also complicates elucidation of their specific involvement in sugar signalling. The subcellular compartmentation of sucrose metabolism forces refinement of some of the paradigms of sugar signalling during physiological processes. For example, the catalytic and signalling functions of diverse paralogues needs to be more carefully analysed in the context of post-genomic biology. It is important to note that it is the differential localization of both the sugars themselves as well as the sugar-metabolizing enzymes that ultimately led to sugar signalling. We conclude that a combination of subcellular complexity and gene duplication/subfunctionalization gave rise to sugar signalling as a regulatory mechanism in plant cells.

  5. Carbon Monoxide, Hydrogen, and Formate Metabolism during Methanogenesis from Acetate by Thermophilic Cultures of Methanosarcina and Methanothrix Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Zinder, S H; Anguish, T.

    1992-01-01

    CO and H2 have been implicated in methanogenesis from acetate, but it is unclear whether they are directly involved in methanogenesis or electron transfer in acetotrophic methanogens. We compared metabolism of H2, CO, and formate by cultures of the thermophilic acetotrophic methanogens Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1 and Methanothrix sp. strain CALS-1. M. thermophila accumulated H2 to partial pressures of 40 to 70 Pa (1 Pa = 0.987 × 10-5 atm), as has been previously reported for this and othe...

  6. Changes in ecosystem structure related to the type and extent of woody cover alter carbon dynamics and surface energy exchange in central Texas ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, M. E.; Heilman, J.; McInnes, K.; Owens, K.; Kjelgaard, J.; Thijs, A.

    2006-12-01

    Rangeland ecosystems account for almost two thirds the total land area in Texas. Over the past century, heavy livestock grazing and fire suppression coupled with changes in climate have facilitated the expansion of woody species into rangelands throughout the state. Based in part on the assumption that woody species use more water than their herbaceous counterparts, land managers have used a variety of techniques to reduce tree and shrub abundance to combat the loss of forage for cattle. As a result, the structure of rangelands in Texas is complex, characterized by woody vegetation that is patchy in distribution, and continually changing between grassland, savanna and woodland. Despite the large areal extent of Texas rangelands, very little is known about how the observed changes in ecosystem structure impact carbon cycle dynamics and surface energy exchange. To reduce these uncertainties, we explored explicit relationships between structure and function in these ecosystems by comparing tower-based measurements of carbon and water vapor exchange made simultaneously from July 2004-Dec 2005 across three representative land covers in central Texas: open grassland, savanna with 30% Ashe juniper and honey mesquite cover, and closed canopy woodland. Here we report our findings on what impact the type and pattern of woody plant cover has on biological controls and patterns of carbon sequestration, evapotranspiration, and sensitivity to precipitation pulses. Monthly measurements of leaf level gas exchange, soil respiration rates, herbaceous net ecosystem exchange, and sap flow measurements on dominant woody species were used to augment eddy covariance estimates of ecosystem-atmosphere exchange. The addition of woody species significantly increased carbon sequestration in these ecosystems. Net ecosystem production from July 05-Jun 05 in the grassland, savanna and forest ecosystems was -14 g C m-2, -413 g C m-2, -450 g C m-2, respectively. Evapotranspiration was less

  7. High-throughput metabolic state analysis: The missing link in integrated functional genomics of yeasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villas-Bôas, Silas Granato; Moxley, Joel. F; Åkesson, Mats Fredrik; Stephanopoulos, G.; Nielsen, Jens

    2005-01-01

    achieve comparable throughput, effort and cost compared with DNA arrays. Our sample workup method enables simultaneous metabolite measurements throughout central carbon metabolism and amino acid biosynthesis, using a standard GC-MS platform that was optimized for this Purpose. As an implementation proof......-of-concept, we assayed metabolite levels in two yeast strains and two different environmental conditions in the context of metabolic pathway reconstruction. We demonstrate that these differential metabolite level data distinguish among sample types, such as typical metabolic fingerprinting or footprinting. More...

  8. Vitamins B2 and B6 and genetic polymorphisms related to one-carbon metabolism as risk factors for gastric adenocarcinoma in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eussen, S.J.; Vollset, S.E.; Hustad, S.; Midttun, O.; Meyer, K.; Fredriksen, A.; Ueland, P.M.; Jenab, M.; Slimani, N.; Ferrari, P.; Agudo, A.; Sala, N.; Capella, G.; Giudice, G. Del; Palli, D.; Boeing, H.; Weikert, C.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Buchner, F.L.; Carneiro, F.; Berrino, F.; Vineis, P.; Tumino, R.; Panico, S.; Berglund, G.; Manjer, J.; Stenling, R.; Hallmans, G.; Martinez, C.; Arrizola, L.; Barricarte, A.; Navarro, C.; Rodriguez, L.; Bingham, S.; Linseisen, J.; Kaaks, R.; Overvad, K.; Tjonneland, A.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Numans, M.E.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Morois, S.; Trichopoulou, A.; Lund, E.; Plebani, M.; Riboli, E.; Gonzalez, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    B vitamins and polymorphisms in genes coding for enzymes involved in one-carbon metabolism may affect DNA synthesis and methylation and thereby be implicated in carcinogenesis. Previous data on vitamins B2 and B6 and genetic polymorphisms other than those involving MTHFR as risk factors for gastric

  9. Flux balance analysis of plant metabolism: the effect of biomass composition and model structure on model predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huili eYuan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The biomass composition represented in constraint-based metabolic models is a key component for predicting cellular metabolism using flux balance analysis (FBA. Despite major advances in analytical technologies, it is often challenging to obtain a detailed composition of all major biomass components experimentally. Studies examining the influence of the biomass composition on the predictions of metabolic models have so far mostly been done on models of microorganisms. Little is known about the impact of varying biomass composition on flux prediction in FBA models of plants, whose metabolism is very versatile and complex because of the presence of multiple subcellular compartments. Also, the published metabolic models of plants differ in size and complexity. In this study, we examined the sensitivity of the predicted fluxes of plant metabolic models to biomass composition and model structure. These questions were addressed by evaluating the sensitivity of predictions of growth rates and central carbon metabolic fluxes to varying biomass compositions in three different genome-/large-scale metabolic models of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results showed that fluxes through the central carbon metabolism were robust to changes in biomass composition. Nevertheless, comparisons between the predictions from three models using identical modelling constraints and objective function showed that model predictions were sensitive to the structure of the models, highlighting large discrepancies between the published models.

  10. Carbon balance at represenative agroecosystems of Central European Russia with different crops assessed by eddy covariance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroslavtsev, Alexis; Meshalkina, Joulia; Mazirov, Ilya

    2016-04-01

    Despite the fact that in Russia cropland's soils carbon loses 9 time higher than forest's soils ones (Stolbovoi, 2002), agroecosystems were not given sufficient attention and most of the papers are devoted to forestry and natural ecosystems. Carbon balance was calculated at the Precision Farming Experimental Fields of the Russian Timiryazev State Agricultural University, Moscow, Russia, for two agroecosystems with different crops from the same crop rotation studied for 2 years. The experimental site has a temperate and continental climate and situated in south taiga zone with Arable Sod-Podzoluvisols (Albeluvisols Umbric). Vertical fluxes of carbon dioxide were measured with eddy covariance technique, statistical method to measure and calculate turbulent fluxes within atmospheric boundary layers (Burba, 2013). Crop rotation included potato, winter wheat, barley and vetch and oat mix. Two fields of the same crop rotation were studied in 2013-2014. One of the fields (A) was used in 2013 for barley planting (Hordeum vulgare L.). The field B was in 2013 used for planting together vetch (Vicia sativa L.) and oats (Avena sativa L.). Inversely oats and vetch grass mixt was sown in 2014 on field A. Winter wheat was sown on field A in the very beginning of September. On the second field (B) in 2014 winter wheat occurred from under the snow in the phase of tillering, after harvesting it in mid of July, white mustard (Sinapis alba) was sown for green manure. Carbon uptake (NEE negative values) was registered only for the field with winter wheat and white mustard; perhaps because the two crops were cultivated on the field within one growing season. Three other cases showed CO2 emission. Great difference in 82 g C m‑2 per year in NEE between two fields with vetch and oat mix was related to higher difference in grass yields. NEE for barley field was positive during the whole year; considering only the growing season, NEE for barley was 100 g C m‑2 lower and was negative

  11. Elucidation of rice rhizosphere metagenome in relation to methane and nitrogen metabolism under elevated carbon dioxide and temperature using whole genome metagenomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, P; Roy, K S; Das, M; Ray, S; Balachandar, D; Karthikeyan, S; Nayak, A K; Mohapatra, T

    2016-01-15

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) mineralization is one of the key processes of biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem in general and rice ecology in particular. Rice rhizosphere is a rich niche of microbial diversity influenced by change in atmospheric temperature and concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Structural changes in microbial communities in rhizosphere influence the nutrient cycling. In the present study, the bacterial diversity and population dynamics were studied under ambient CO2 (a-CO2) and elevated CO2+temperature (e-CO2T) in lowland rice rhizosphere using whole genome metagenomic approach. The whole genome metagenomic sequence data of lowland rice exhibited the dominance of bacterial communities including Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Planctomycetes. Interestingly, four genera related to methane production namely, Methanobacterium, Methanosphaera, Methanothermus and Methanothermococcus were absent in a-CO2 but noticed under e-CO2T. The acetoclastic pathway was found as the predominant pathway for methanogenesis, whereas, the serine pathway was found as the principal metabolic pathway for CH4 oxidation in lowland rice. The abundances of reads of enzymes in the acetoclastic methanogenesis pathway and serine pathways of methanotrophy were much higher in e-CO2T (328 and 182, respectively) as compared with a-CO2 (118 and 98, respectively). Rice rhizosphere showed higher structural diversities and functional activities in relation to N metabolism involving nitrogen fixation, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction and denitrification under e-CO2T than that of a-CO2. Among the three pathways of N metabolism, dissimilarity pathways were predominant in lowland rice rhizosphere and more so under e-CO2T. Consequently, under e-CO2T, CH4 emission, microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) and dehydrogenase activities were 45%, 20% and 35% higher than a-CO2, respectively. Holistically, a high bacterial diversity and

  12. Differential CO2 effect on primary carbon metabolism of flag leaves in durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Erice, Gorka; Sanz-Sáez, Alvaro; Abadie, Cyril; Gilard, Françoise; Gil-Quintana, Erena; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Staudinger, Christiana; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Araus, Jose L; Bourguignon, Jacques; Irigoyen, Juan J; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2015-12-01

    C sink/source balance and N assimilation have been identified as target processes conditioning crop responsiveness to elevated CO2 . However, little is known about phenology-driven modifications of C and N primary metabolism at elevated CO2 in cereals such as wheat. Here, we examined the differential effect of elevated CO2 at two development stages (onset of flowering, onset of grain filling) in durum wheat (Triticum durum, var. Sula) using physiological measurements (photosynthesis, isotopes), metabolomics, proteomics and (15) N labelling. Our results show that growth at elevated CO2 was accompanied by photosynthetic acclimation through a lower internal (mesophyll) conductance but no significant effect on Rubisco content, maximal carboxylation or electron transfer. Growth at elevated CO2 altered photosynthate export and tended to accelerate leaf N remobilization, which was visible for several proteins and amino acids, as well as lysine degradation metabolism. However, grain biomass produced at elevated CO2 was larger and less N rich, suggesting that nitrogen use efficiency rather than photosynthesis is an important target for improvement, even in good CO2 -responsive cultivars. PMID:26081746

  13. Modelling light-dark regime influence on the carbon-nitrogen metabolism in a unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Grimaud, Ghjuvan Micaelu; Dron, Anthony; Rabouille, Sophie; Sciandra, Antoine; Bernard, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    We propose a dynamical model depicting nitrogen (N2 ) fixation (diazotrophy) in a unicellular cyanobacterium, Crocosphaera watsonii, grown under light limitation and obligate diazotrophy. In this model, intracellular carbon and nitrogen are both divided into a functional pool and a storage pool. An internal pool that explicitly describes the nitrogenase enzyme is also added. The model is successfully validated with continuous culture experiments of C. watsonii under three light regimes, indic...

  14. Carbon-dependent control of electron transfer and central carbon pathway genes for methane biosynthesis in the Archaean, Methanosarcina acetivorans strain C2A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunsalus Robert P

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The archaeon, Methanosarcina acetivorans strain C2A forms methane, a potent greenhouse gas, from a variety of one-carbon substrates and acetate. Whereas the biochemical pathways leading to methane formation are well understood, little is known about the expression of the many of the genes that encode proteins needed for carbon flow, electron transfer and/or energy conservation. Quantitative transcript analysis was performed on twenty gene clusters encompassing over one hundred genes in M. acetivorans that encode enzymes/proteins with known or potential roles in substrate conversion to methane. Results The expression of many seemingly "redundant" genes/gene clusters establish substrate dependent control of approximately seventy genes for methane production by the pathways for methanol and acetate utilization. These include genes for soluble-type and membrane-type heterodisulfide reductases (hdr, hydrogenases including genes for a vht-type F420 non-reducing hydrogenase, molybdenum-type (fmd as well as tungsten-type (fwd formylmethanofuran dehydrogenases, genes for rnf and mrp-type electron transfer complexes, for acetate uptake, plus multiple genes for aha- and atp-type ATP synthesis complexes. Analysis of promoters for seven gene clusters reveal UTR leaders of 51-137 nucleotides in length, raising the possibility of both transcriptional and translational levels of control. Conclusions The above findings establish the differential and coordinated expression of two major gene families in M. acetivorans in response to carbon/energy supply. Furthermore, the quantitative mRNA measurements demonstrate the dynamic range for modulating transcript abundance. Since many of these gene clusters in M. acetivorans are also present in other Methanosarcina species including M. mazei, and in M. barkeri, these findings provide a basis for predicting related control in these environmentally significant methanogens.

  15. The impact of land-cover change on carbon and water cycling in the U.S. central plains grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Tyler

    Using the eddy covariance technique, the impact of land cover variability on carbon and water cycling was examined at three different grasslands in Northeast Kansas. One site 8 km north of Lawrence, Kansas at the Nelson Environmental Study Area (NESA) experiences woody-encroachment and is burned every three years. The remaining two sites are located at the Konza Prairie Biological Station, 8 km south of Manhattan, Kansas. KZU is located in an annual burned, non-grazed watershed in an upland area. K4B experiences woody encroachment and has prescribed burns every four years. Water-use efficiency was used to examine how the carbon and water cycling of these ecosystems respond to land cover change. Analysis suggest that the two grasslands experiencing woody-encroachment (NESA and K4B) show more efficient water use values than the grassland that is not (KZU). This may be due to a possible difference in rooting depth between woody-vegetation and grasses.

  16. Impact of Soil Conservation Policies on Carbon Sequestration in Agricultural Soils of the Central United States (The)

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Paul D.; P. G. Lakshminarayan; Toshitsugu Otake; Babcock, Bruce A.

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of conservation policies on soil organic carbon in agricultural soils, the authors link information from the 1992 National Resources Inventory (NRI) database and the extensive physical data on soils and climate from the SOILS5 database. These data serve as input for a biophysical process model calibrated for the conditions prevalent in the study region. Results indicate that reducing soil erosion, rather than removing land from agricultural production, is the most effec...

  17. Multi-frequency observations of seawater carbonate chemistry on the central coast of the western Antarctic Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie B. Schram

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Assessments of benthic coastal seawater carbonate chemistry in Antarctica are sparse. The studies have generally been short in duration, during the austral spring/summer, under sea ice, or offshore in ice-free water. Herein we present multi-frequency measurements for seawater collected from the shallow coastal benthos on a weekly schedule over one year (May 2012–May 2013, daily schedule over three months (March–May 2013 and semidiurnal schedule over five weeks (March–April 2013. A notable pH increase (max pH = 8.62 occurred in the late austral spring/summer (November–December 2012, coinciding with sea-ice break-out and subsequent increase in primary productivity. We detected semidiurnal variation in seawater pH with a maximum variation of 0.13 pH units during the day and 0.11 pH units during the night. Daily variation in pH is likely related to biological activity, consistent with previous research. We calculated the variation in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC over each seawater measurement frequency, focusing on the primary DIC drivers in the Palmer Station region. From this, we estimated net biological activity and found it accounts for the greatest variations in DIC. Our seasonal data suggest that this coastal region tends to act as a carbon dioxide source during austral winter months and as a strong sink during the summer. These data characterize present-day seawater carbonate chemistry and the extent to which these measures vary over multiple time scales. This information will inform future experiments designed to evaluate the vulnerability of coastal benthic Antarctic marine organisms to ocean acidification.

  18. Cold-seep-driven carbonate deposits at the Central American forearc: contrasting evolution and timing in escarpment and mound settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebetrau, V.; Augustin, N.; Kutterolf, S.; Schmidt, M.; Eisenhauer, A.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.; Weinrebe, W.

    2014-10-01

    Continuous surface cores of cold-seep carbonates were recovered offshore Pacific Nicaragua and Costa Rica from 800 to 1,500-m water depths (Meteor 66/3) in order to decipher their evolution and methane enriched fluid emanation in contrasting geological settings. Cores from the mounds Iguana, Perezoso, Baula V and from the Jaco Scarp escarpment were used for a multi-method approach. For both settings aragonite was revealed as dominant authigenic carbonate phase in vein fillings and matrix cementation, followed by Mg-calcite as second most abundant. This common precipitation process of CaCO3 polymorphs could be ascribed as indirectly driven by chemical changes of the advecting pore water due to anaerobic oxidation of methane. A more direct influence of seep-related microbial activity on the authigenic mineral assemblage in both settings is probably reflected by the observed minor amounts of dolomite and a dolomite-like CaMg carbonate (MgCO3 ~ 42 %). δ13C data of Jaco Scarp samples are significantly lower (-43 to -56 ‰ PDB) than for mound samples (-22 to -36 ‰ PDB), indicating differences in fluid composition and origin. Noteworthy, δ18O values of Scarp samples correlate most closely with the ocean signature at their time of formation. Documenting the archive potential, a high resolution case study of a mound core implies at least 40 changes in fluid supply within a time interval of approximately 14 ky. As most striking difference, the age data indicate a late-stage downward-progressing cementation front for all three mound cap structures (approx. 2-5 cm/ky), but a significantly faster upward carbonate buildup in the bulging sediments on top of the scarp environment (approx. 120 cm/ky). The latter data set leads to the hypothesis of chemoherm carbonate emplacement in accord with reported sedimentation rates until decompression of the advective fluid system, probably caused by the Jaco Scarp landslide and dating this to approximately 13,000 years ago.

  19. Recovery of Carbonate Ecosystems Following the End-Triassic Mass Extinction: Insights from Mercury Anomalies and Their Relationship to the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsetti, F. A.; Thibodeau, A. M.; Ritterbush, K. A.; West, A. J.; Yager, J. A.; Ibarra, Y.; Bottjer, D. J.; Berelson, W.; Bergquist, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent high-resolution age dating demonstrates that the end-Triassic mass extinction overlapped with the eruption of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), and the release of CO2 and other volatiles to the atmosphere has been implicated in the extinction. Given the potentially massive release of CO2, ocean acidification is commonly considered a factor in the extinction and the collapse of shallow marine carbonate ecosystems. However, the timing of global marine biotic recovery versus the CAMP eruptions is more uncertain. Here, we use Hg concentrations and Hg/TOC ratios as indicators of CAMP volcanism in continental shelf sediments, the primary archive of faunal data. In Triassic-Jurassic strata, Muller Canyon, Nevada, Hg and Hg/TOC levels are low prior to the extinction, rise sharply in the extinction interval, peak just prior to the appearance of the first Jurassic ammonite, and remain above background in association with a depauperate (low diversity) earliest Jurassic fauna. The return of Hg to pre-extinction levels is associated with a significant pelagic and benthic faunal recovery. We conclude that significant biotic recovery did not begin until CAMP eruptions ceased. Furthermore, the initial benthic recovery in the Muller Canyon section involves the expansion of a siliceous sponge-dominated ecosystem across shallow marine environments, a feature now known from other sections around the world (e.g., Peru, Morocco, Austria, etc.). Carbonate dominated benthic ecosystems (heralded by the return of abundant corals and other skeletal carbonates) did not recover for ~1 million years following the last eruption of CAMP, longer than the typical duration considered for ocean acidification events, implying other factors may have played a role in carbonate ecosystem dynamics after the extinction.

  20. Transport, compartmentation, and metabolism of homoserine in higher plant cells. Carbon-13- and phosphorus-31-nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport, compartmentation, and metabolism of homoserine was characterized in two strains of meristematic higher plant cells, the dicotyledonous sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) and the monocotyledonous weed Echinochloa colonum. Homoserine is an intermediate in the synthesis of the aspartate-derived amino acids methionine, threonine (Thr), and isoleucine. Using 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance, we showed that homoserine actively entered the cells via a high-affinity proton-symport carrier (K(m) approximately 50-60 micromolar) at the maximum rate of 8 +/- 0.5 micromol h-1 g-1 cell wet weight, and in competition with serine or Thr. We could visualize the compartmentation of homoserine, and observed that it accumulated at a concentration 4 to 5 times higher in the cytoplasm than in the large vacuolar compartment. 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance permitted us to analyze the phosphorylation of homoserine. When sycamore cells were incubated with 100 micromolar homoserine, phosphohomoserine steadily accumulated in the cytoplasmic compartment over 24 h at the constant rate of 0.7 micromol h-1 g-1 cell wet weight, indicating that homoserine kinase was not inhibited in vivo by its product, phosphohomoserine. The rate of metabolism of phosphohomoserine was much lower (0.06 micromol h-1 g-1 cell wet weight) and essentially sustained Thr accumulation. Similarly, homoserine was actively incorporated by E. colonum cells. However, in contrast to what was seen in sycamore cells, large accumulations of Thr were observed, whereas the intracellular concentration of homoserine remained low, and phosphohomoserine did not accumulate. These differences with sycamore cells were attributed to the presence of a higher Thr synthase activity in this strain of monocot cells

  1. Dynamics of bacterial metabolic profile and community structure during the mineralization of organic carbon in intensive swine farm wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Ma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Land application of intensive swine farm wastewater has raised serious environmental concerns due to the accumulation and microbially mediated transformation of large amounts of swine wastewater organic C (SWOC. Therefore, the study of SWOC mineralization and dynamics of wastewater microorganisms is essential to understand the environmental impacts of swine wastewater application. We measured the C mineralization of incubated swine wastewaters with high (wastewater H and low (wastewater L organic C concentrations. The dynamics of bacteria metabolic profile and community structure were also investigated. The results showed that SWOC mineralization was properly fitted by the two-simultaneous reactions model. The initial potential rate of labile C mineralization of wastewater H was 46% higher than that of wastewater L, whereas the initial potential rates of recalcitrant C mineralization of wastewaters H and L were both around 23 mg L-1 d-1. The bacterial functional and structural diversities significantly decreased for both the wastewaters during SWOC mineralization, and were all negatively correlated to specific UV absorbance (SUVA254; P < 0.01. The bacteria in the raw wastewaters exhibited functional similarity, and both metabolic profile and community structure changed with the mineralization of SWOC, mainly under the influence of SUVA254 (P < 0.001. These results suggested that SWOC mineralization was characterized by rapid mineralization of labile C and subsequent slow decomposition of recalcitrant C pool, and the quality of SWOC varied between the wastewaters with different amounts of organic C. The decreased bio-availability of dissolved organic matter affected the dynamics of wastewater bacteria during SWOC mineralization.

  2. Internalization of externalities in the generation costs of electric power centrals of carbon, combined cycle and nuclear; Internalizacion de externalidades en los costos de generacion de centrales electricas de carbon, ciclo combinado y nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez R, M.C. [Universidad Anahuac del Norte (Mexico); Palacios H, J.; Ramirez S, R.; Alonso V, G. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5 Ocoyoacac 52750 Edo. de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: fgrivera@avantel.net

    2007-07-01

    The technologies of electric power generation that use fossil fuels, they incorporate in the Even Total Cost of Generation (CTNG) only the direct costs of generation (investment, fuel costs, operation costs and maintenance). nevertheless, the nuclear energy incorporates besides the direct costs, the externalities that causes to the human health and the environment. In this work the CTNG is calculated that incorporates the externalities, of a thermoelectric power station of coal, a plant of combined cycle and of four reactors of Generation III (ABWR, ACR, AP1000 and EPR). The obtained results show that the nuclear power station has smaller CTNG that the technologies that use fossil fuels. It is important to stand out that they are only considering the externalities of the stage of electricity generation, for what the mining phase and transport of the fuel toward the central are not considered in the present document. (Author)

  3. Assessment of Functional Disturbances in the Central Nervous System Caused by Severe Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolkach, P G; Basharin, V A; Grebenyuk, A N

    2016-02-01

    An experimental model was developed for assessment of disturbances in CNS functions of laboratory animals caused by severe carbon monoxide poisoning. Normalization of the state of experimental rats after acute poisoning was accompanied by the development of cognitive abnormalities. Disturbances in the long-term memory were observed on days 1 and 14 after CO poisoning, while abnormalities in the short-term memory developed on days 1, 7, and 14. Learning impairment were recorded on day 8, while the training course began on day 7. PMID:26906199

  4. Central composite design and genetic algorithm applied for the optimization of ultrasonic-assisted removal of malachite green by ZnO Nanorod-loaded activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, M; Azad, F Nasiri; Dashtian, K; Hajati, S; Goudarzi, A; Soylak, M

    2016-10-01

    Maximum malachite green (MG) adsorption onto ZnO Nanorod-loaded activated carbon (ZnO-NR-AC) was achieved following the optimization of conditions, while the mass transfer was accelerated by ultrasonic. The central composite design (CCD) and genetic algorithm (GA) were used to estimate the effect of individual variables and their mutual interactions on the MG adsorption as response and to optimize the adsorption process. The ZnO-NR-AC surface morphology and its properties were identified via FESEM, XRD and FTIR. The adsorption equilibrium isotherm and kinetic models investigation revealed the well fit of the experimental data to Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic model, respectively. It was shown that a small amount of ZnO-NR-AC (with adsorption capacity of 20mgg(-1)) is sufficient for the rapid removal of high amount of MG dye in short time (3.99min). PMID:27318150

  5. Foliar photochemical processes and carbon metabolism under favourable and adverse winter conditions in a Mediterranean mixed forest, Catalonia (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperlich, D.; Chang, C. T.; Peñuelas, J.; Gracia, C.; Sabaté, S.

    2014-10-01

    Evergreen trees in the Mediterranean region must cope with a wide range of environmental stresses from summer drought to winter cold. The mildness of Mediterranean winters can periodically lead to favourable environmental conditions above the threshold for a positive carbon balance, benefitting evergreen woody species more than deciduous ones. The comparatively lower solar energy input in winter decreases the foliar light saturation point. This leads to a higher susceptibility to photoinhibitory stress especially when chilly (advantage of evergreen species that are able to photosynthesize all year round where a significant fraction can be attributed to winter months, compensates for the lower carbon uptake during spring and summer in comparison to deciduous species. We investigated the ecophysiological behaviour of three co-occurring mature evergreen tree species (Quercus ilex L., Pinus halepensis Mill., and Arbutus unedo L.). Therefore, we collected twigs from the field during a period of mild winter conditions and after a sudden cold period. After both periods, the state of the photosynthetic machinery was tested in the laboratory by estimating the foliar photosynthetic potential with CO2 response curves in parallel with chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. The studied evergreen tree species benefited strongly from mild winter conditions by exhibiting extraordinarily high photosynthetic potentials. A sudden period of frost, however, negatively affected the photosynthetic apparatus, leading to significant decreases in key physiological parameters such as the maximum carboxylation velocity (Vc, max), the maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate (Jmax), and the optimal fluorometric quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm). The responses of Vc, max and Jmax were highly species specific, with Q. ilex exhibiting the highest and P. halepensis the lowest reductions. In contrast, the optimal fluorometric quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm) was significantly

  6. Determination of energy metabolites in cancer cells by porous graphitic carbon liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the assessment of energy metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szoboszlai, Norbert, E-mail: szobosz@chem.elte.hu [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmány Péter stny 1/A, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Guo, Xinghua [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Food Chemistry, Graz University of Technology, Stremayrgasse 9, 8010 Graz (Austria); Ozohanics, Olivér [Research Centre for Natural Sciences of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Pusztaszeri u. 59-67, H-1025 Budapest (Hungary); Oláh, Júlia [1st Institute of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, H-1085 Budapest (Hungary); Gömöry, Ágnes [Research Centre for Natural Sciences of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Pusztaszeri u. 59-67, H-1025 Budapest (Hungary); Mihucz, Victor G. [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmány Péter stny 1/A, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Jeney, András [1st Institute of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, H-1085 Budapest (Hungary); Vékey, Károly [Research Centre for Natural Sciences of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Pusztaszeri u. 59-67, H-1025 Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • All types of sugar metabolites can be investigated in one run on graphitic stationary phase. • Method development for acidic metabolites of energy metabolism using a single LC–MS run. • Study of 15 acidic energy metabolites on a PGC column using common eluents. • Lactate, acidic amino acid, organic acid and sugar phosphate determination in a single run. • Metabolism of U-{sup 13}C glucose and 1-{sup 13}C acetate in ZR-75-1 cells studied. - Abstract: A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of fifteen glucose, or acetate derived metabolites isolated from tumor cells. Glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolites as well as acidic amino acids were separated on a HPLC porous graphitic carbon (PGC) column and simultaneously determined by means of triple quadrupole MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Target compounds were eluted within 10 min with 8% v/v formic acid as an electronic modifier added to a 4:1 v/v methanol water mobile phase. The calibration is linear in the 1–100 μM concentration range for each analyte. The limit of detection ranges between 0.39 and 2.78 μM for the analytes concerned. To test the PGC–HPLC–MS/MS method in metabolomic studies, ZR-75.1 human mammary adenocarcinoma cells were labeled with U-{sup 13}C glucose or 1-{sup 13}C acetate. Applying the MRM mode, the incorporation of {sup 13}C into metabolites, isolated from the tumor cells, and derived from glucose or acetate, could be properly identified.

  7. Partitioning between primary and secondary metabolism of carbon allocated to roots in four maize genotypes under water deficit and its effects on productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyne Oliveira Lavinsky

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants may respond to drought by altering biomass allocation to shoots and roots or by changing the metabolic activities in these organs. To determine how drought changes the partitioning of carbon allocated to growth and secondary metabolism in maize roots and how it affects photosynthesis (A and productivity in maize, we evaluated leaf gas exchange, yield componentes, root morphology, and primary and secondary metabolites including total soluble sugars (TSS, starch (S, phenolics (PHE, and lignin (LIG. Data were collected from pot-grown plants of four maize genotypes: BRS 1010 and 2B710 (sensitive genotypes and DKB390 and BRS1055 (tolerant genotypes under two soil water tensions: field capacity (FC, − 18 kPa and water deficit (WD, − 138 kPa. WD was applied at the pre-flowering stage for 12 days and then the water supply was restored and maintained at optimum levels until the end of the cycle. For genotype BRS 1055 under FC, the greatest A did not result in greater grain biomass (DGB because the accumulated photoassimilates had already filled the cells, and thus the excessive TSS synthesized in leaves was allocated to roots in large amounts. However, the sharp decrease in A caused by WD imposition in this genotype did not affect the influx pressure of leaf TSS, which was due largely to conversion of primary metabolites to PHE compounds to increase the length of fine roots. In leaves of DKB390 under WD, both S and TSS were reduced, whereas PHE were increased to prevent excessive water loss and xylem cavitation. Under WD, both BRS1010 and 2B710 genotypes displayed reduced allocation of biomass to shoots and roots and LIG content in leaves, as well as lower A and DGB values. In BRS1010 this response was coupled to S decrease in leaves and TSS increase in roots, whereas in 2B710 there was a concomitant S increase in roots.

  8. Determination of energy metabolites in cancer cells by porous graphitic carbon liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the assessment of energy metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • All types of sugar metabolites can be investigated in one run on graphitic stationary phase. • Method development for acidic metabolites of energy metabolism using a single LC–MS run. • Study of 15 acidic energy metabolites on a PGC column using common eluents. • Lactate, acidic amino acid, organic acid and sugar phosphate determination in a single run. • Metabolism of U-13C glucose and 1-13C acetate in ZR-75-1 cells studied. - Abstract: A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of fifteen glucose, or acetate derived metabolites isolated from tumor cells. Glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolites as well as acidic amino acids were separated on a HPLC porous graphitic carbon (PGC) column and simultaneously determined by means of triple quadrupole MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Target compounds were eluted within 10 min with 8% v/v formic acid as an electronic modifier added to a 4:1 v/v methanol water mobile phase. The calibration is linear in the 1–100 μM concentration range for each analyte. The limit of detection ranges between 0.39 and 2.78 μM for the analytes concerned. To test the PGC–HPLC–MS/MS method in metabolomic studies, ZR-75.1 human mammary adenocarcinoma cells were labeled with U-13C glucose or 1-13C acetate. Applying the MRM mode, the incorporation of 13C into metabolites, isolated from the tumor cells, and derived from glucose or acetate, could be properly identified

  9. Partitioning between primary and secondary metabolism of carbon allocated to roots in four maize genotypes under water deficit and its effects on productivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alyne Oliveira Lavinsky; Paulo César Magalhães; Roniel Geraldo Ávila; Mariana Melo Diniz; Thiago Corrêa de Souza

    2015-01-01

    Plants may respond to drought by altering biomass allocation to shoots and roots or by changing the metabolic activities in these organs. To determine how drought changes the partitioning of carbon allocated to growth and secondary metabolism in maize roots and how it affects photosynthesis (A) and productivity in maize, we evaluated leaf gas exchange, yield componentes, root morphology, and primary and secondary metabolites including total soluble sugars (TSS), starch (S), phenolics (PHE), and lignin (LIG). Data were collected from pot-grown plants of four maize genotypes:BRS 1010 and 2B710 (sensitive genotypes) and DKB390 and BRS1055 (tolerant genotypes) under two soil water tensions:field capacity (FC,−18 kPa) and water deficit (WD,−138 kPa). WD was applied at the pre-flowering stage for 12 days and then the water supply was restored and maintained at optimum levels until the end of the cycle. For genotype BRS 1055 under FC, the greatest A did not result in greater grain biomass (DGB) because the accumulated photoassimilates had already filled the cells, and thus the excessive TSS synthesized in leaves was allocated to roots in large amounts. However, the sharp decrease in A caused by WD imposition in this genotype did not affect the influx pressure of leaf TSS, which was due largely to conversion of primary metabolites to PHE compounds to increase the length of fine roots. In leaves of DKB390 under WD, both S and TSS were reduced, whereas PHE were increased to prevent excessive water loss and xylem cavitation. Under WD, both BRS1010 and 2B710 genotypes displayed reduced allocation of biomass to shoots and roots and LIG content in leaves, as well as lower A and DGB values. In BRS1010 this response was coupled to S decrease in leaves and TSS increase in roots, whereas in 2B710 there was a concomitant S increase in roots.

  10. Partitioning between primary and secondary metabolism of carbon allocated to roots in four maize genotypes under water deficit and its effects on productivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alyne; Oliveira; Lavinsky; Paulo; César; Magalh?es; Roniel; Geraldo; ávila; Mariana; Melo; Diniz; Thiago; Corrêa; de; Souza

    2015-01-01

    Plants may respond to drought by altering biomass allocation to shoots and roots or by changing the metabolic activities in these organs. To determine how drought changes the partitioning of carbon allocated to growth and secondary metabolism in maize roots and how it affects photosynthesis(A) and productivity in maize, we evaluated leaf gas exchange, yield componentes, root morphology, and primary and secondary metabolites including total soluble sugars(TSS), starch(S), phenolics(PHE), and lignin(LIG). Data were collected from pot-grown plants of four maize genotypes: BRS 1010 and 2B710(sensitive genotypes) and DKB390 and BRS1055(tolerant genotypes) under two soil water tensions: field capacity(FC,-18 kP a) and water deficit(WD,-138 kP a). WD was applied at the pre-flowering stage for 12 days and then the water supply was restored and maintained at optimum levels until the end of the cycle. For genotype BRS 1055 under FC, the greatest A did not result in greater grain biomass(DGB) because the accumulated photoassimilates had already filled the cells, and thus the excessive TSS synthesized in leaves was allocated to roots in large amounts. However, the sharp decrease in A caused by WD imposition in this genotype did not affect the influx pressure of leaf TSS, which was due largely to conversion of primary metabolites to PHE compounds to increase the length of fine roots. In leaves of DKB390 under WD, both S and TSS were reduced, whereas PHE were increased to prevent excessive water loss and xylem cavitation. Under WD, both BRS1010 and2B710 genotypes displayed reduced allocation of biomass to shoots and roots and LIG content in leaves, as well as lower A and DGB values. In BRS1010 this response was coupled to S decrease in leaves and TSS increase in roots, whereas in 2B710 there was a concomitant S increase in roots.

  11. Establishing research strategies, methodologies and technologies to link genomics and proteomics to seagrass productivity, community metabolism and ecosystem carbon fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eMazzuca

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A complete understanding of the mechanistic basis of marine ecosystem functioning is only possible through integrative and interdisciplinary research. This enables the prediction of change and possibly the mitigation of the consequences of anthropogenic impacts. One major aim of the COST Action ES0609 Seagrasses productivity. From genes to ecosystem management, is the calibration and synthesis of various methods and the development of innovative techniques and protocols for studying seagrass ecosystems.During ten days, twenty researchers representing a range of disciplines (molecular biology, physiology, botany, ecology, oceanography, underwater acoustics gathered at the marine station of STARESO (Corsica to study together the nearby Posidonia oceanica meadow. The Station de Recherches Sous-marine et Océanographiques (STARESO is located in an oligotrophic area classified as "pristine site" where environmental disturbances caused by anthropogenic pressure are exceptionally low. The healthy P. oceanica meadow, that grows in front of the lab, colonizes the sea bottom from the surface to 37 m depth. During the study, genomic and proteomic approaches were integrated with ecophysiological and physical approaches with the aim of understanding changes in seagrass productivity and metabolism at different depths and along daily cycles. In this paper we report details on the approaches utilized and we forecast the potential of the data that will come from this synergistic approach not only for P. oceanica but for seagrasses in general.

  12. Influences of riverine and upwelling waters on the coastal carbonate system off Central Chile and their ocean acidification implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Cristian A.; Contreras, Paulina Y.; Pérez, Claudia A.; Sobarzo, Marcus; Saldías, Gonzalo S.; Salisbury, Joe

    2016-06-01

    A combined data set, combining data from field campaigns and oceanographic cruises, was used to ascertain the influence of both river discharges and upwelling processes, covering spatial and temporal variation in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and aragonite saturation state. This work was conducted in one of the most productive river-influenced upwelling areas in the South Pacific coasts (36°S). Additionally, further work was also conducted to ascertain the contribution of different DIC sources, influencing the dynamics of DIC along the land-ocean range. Six sampling campaigns were conducted across seven stations at the Biobío River basin, covering approximately 200 km. Three research cruises were undertaken simultaneously, covering the adjacent continental shelf, including 12 sampling stations for hydrographic measurements. Additionally, six stations were also sampled for chemical analyses, covering summer, winter, and spring conditions over 2010 and 2011. Our results evidenced that seaward extent of the river plume was more evident during the winter field campaign, when highest riverine DIC fluxes were observed. The carbonate system along the river-ocean continuum was very heterogeneous varying over spatial and temporal scales. High DIC and pCO2 were observed in river areas with larger anthropogenic effects. CO2 supersaturation at the river plume was observed during all campaigns due to the influence of low pH river waters in winter/spring and high-pCO2 upwelling waters in summer. δ13CDIC evidenced that main DIC sources along the river and river plume corresponded to the respiration of terrestrial organic matter. We have linked this natural process to the carbonate saturation on the adjacent river-influenced coastal area, suggesting that Ωaragonite undersaturation in surface/subsurface waters is largely modulated by the influence of both river discharge and coastal upwelling events in this productive coastal area. Conditions of low Ωaragonite might impact

  13. Outdoor near-roadway, community and residential pollen, carbon dioxide and particulate matter measurements in the urban core of an agricultural region in central CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shendell, Derek G.; Therkorn, Jennifer H.; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Meng, Qingyu; Kelly, Sarah W.; Foster, Christine A.

    2012-04-01

    We can control asthma through proper clinical and environmental management and education. The U.S. population is growing, urbanizing and aging; seniors of low-to-middle income families are working and living longer. We conducted community-based participatory research in Visalia, Tulare County, California with a prospective, cross-sectional repeated measures design and quantitative and qualitative process; home environment and health-related outcomes data were collected. In this paper, we presented results of the air quality sampling-pollen, carbon dioxide (CO2) and particulate matter (PM) outdoors away from most major sources (agricultural fields, large pollinating trees, etc)-at a community central site close to a mobile line source and participant homes in the cooling season, July, 2009. Weather was hot and dry with light winds; diurnal variation ranged between 65-107 °F (18-42 °C) and 12-76% relative humidity at the study's central site. Co-located active (reference) and passive (PAAS) samplers were used for pollen; passive monitoring for CO2 (Telaire 7001) and active sampling for PM were conducted. Overall, we observed spatial variability in CO2, fine PM (PM2.5), and pollen counts. Weekday and study week average CO2 and PM2.5 concentrations were higher near study homes compared to central site sampling points, but peak measures and overnight/pre-dawn time period averages were elevated at the central site. Pollen counts were typically lower at homes-even if grass, trees, flowers or potted plants were present-compared to the central site closer to and generally downwind from commercial agricultural tree production. Data are new; the nine-county San Joaquin Valley has one pollen count station in the national network, and two of four government outdoor air monitoring stations in the county are in national parks. We suggest-given poor air quality in large part due to PM-adding routine pollen counts to regional/state agency air monitoring sites and more CO2 and PM

  14. Influence of a carbamate pesticide on growth, respiration (14C)-carbon metabolism and symbiosis of a Rhizobium sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addition of aldicarb (2 methyl-2(methyl thio) propionaldehyde-O-methyl carbamoyl oxime) in the growth medium enhanced the growth of Rhizobium sp. (cowpea group) at 2ppm level while an inhibition was observed at the normal (5 ppm) and higher (10 ppm) concentrations. Respiration of the cells was also inhibited by 5 and 10 ppm levels of the chemical eventhough a stimulation was observed at 2 ppm (lower) concentration. The insecticide, when incorporated at 5 and 10 ppm levels in the medium increased the 14C-glucose incorporation and considerably altered the assimilation of the radioactive carbon in different fractions of rhizobium cells. Soil application of this insecticide (Temik 10 G) reduced the number of nodules formed and the total nitrogen content in cowpea plants inoculated with the Rhizobium sp. but enhanced the dry matter production of cowpea plants. (Auth.)

  15. Community shifts and carbon translocation within metabolically-active rhizosphere microorganisms in grasslands under elevated CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Müller

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the microbial communities that are actively involved in the assimilation of rhizosphere-C and are most sensitive in their activity to elevated atmospheric CO2 in grassland ecosystems. For this, we analyzed 13C signatures in microbial biomarker phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA from an in situ 13CO2 pulse-labeling experiment in the Gießen Free-Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment grasslands (GiFACE, Germany exposed to ambient and elevated (i.e. 50% above ambient CO2 concentrations. Carbon-13 PLFA measurements at 3 h, 10 h and 11 months after the pulse-labeling indicated a much faster transfer of newly produced rhizosphere-C to fungal compared to bacterial PLFA. After 11 months, the proportion of 13C had decreased in fungal PLFA but had increased in bacterial PLFA compared to a few hours after the pulse-labeling. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of the rapidly assimilated rhizosphere-C was still present in fungal PLFA after 11 months. These results demonstrate the dominant role of fungi in the immediate assimilation of rhizodeposits in grassland ecosystems, while also suggesting a long-term retention of rhizosphere-C in the fungal mycelium as well as a possible translocation of the rhizosphere-C from the fungal to bacterial biomass. Elevated CO2 caused an increase in the relative abundance of root-derived PLFA-C in the saprotrophic fungal PLFA 18:2ω6,9 as well as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal PLFA 16:1ω5, but a decrease in the saprotrophic fungal biomarker PLFA 18:1ω9. This suggests enhanced rhizodeposit-C assimilation only by selected fungal communities under elevated CO2.

  16. Carbonate Sequence Stratigraphy of a Back-Arc Basin: A Case Study of the Qom Formation in the Kashan Area, Central Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guoqiang; ZHANG Shaonan; LI Zhongdong; SONG Lailiang; LIU Huimin

    2007-01-01

    The Qom Formation comprises Oligo-Miocene deposits from a marine succession distributed in the Central Basin of Iran. It is composed of five members designated as A-F. Little previous work exists on the sequence stratigraphy. Based on an integrated study of sequence stratigraphy with outcrop data, wells and regional seismic profiles, the Qom Formation is interpreted as a carbonate succession deposited in a mid-Tertiary back-arc basin. There are two second-order sequences (designated as SS1 and SS2) and five third-order sequences (designated as S1-S5). Five distinct systems tracts including transgressive, highstand, forced regressive, slope margin and lowstand have been recognized. The relationship between the sequences and lithologic sub-units has been collated and defined (S1 to S5 individually corresponding to A-C1, C2-C4, D-E, the lower and upper portions of F); a relative sea level change curve and the sequence stratigraphic framework have been established and described in detail. The coincidence of relative sea level change between that of the determined back-arc basin and the world indicates that the sedimentary cycles of the Qom Formation are mainly controlled by eustatic cycles. The variable combination of the systems tracts and special tectonic-depositional setting causally underpin multiple sequence stratigraphic framework styles seen in the carbonates of the back-arc basin revealing: (1) a continental margin basin that developed some form of barrier, characterized by the development of multiple cycles of carbonate-evaporites; (2) a flat carbonate ramp, which occurred on the southern shelf formed by the lack of clastic supply from nearby magmatic islands plus mixed siliciclastics and carbonates that occurred on the northern shelf due to a sufficient clastics supply from the land; and (3) a forced regressive stratigraphic stacking pattern that occured on the southern shelf and in basin lows due to the uplifting of the southern shelf. Thick and widespread

  17. Estimating Aboveground Forest Carbon Stock of Major Tropical Forest Land Uses Using Airborne Lidar and Field Measurement Data in Central Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, R. B.; Watanabe, M.; Motohka, T.; Shiraishi, T.; shimada, M.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical forests are providing environmental goods and services including carbon sequestration, energy regulation, water fluxes, wildlife habitats, fuel, and building materials. Despite the policy attention, the tropical forest reserve in Southeast Asian region is releasing vast amount of carbon to the atmosphere due to deforestation. Establishing quality forest statistics and documenting aboveground forest carbon stocks (AFCS) are emerging in the region. Airborne and satellite based large area monitoring methods are developed to compliment conventional plot based field measurement methods as they are costly, time consuming, and difficult to implement for large regions. But these methods still require adequate ground measurements for calibrating accurate AFCS model. Furthermore, tropical region comprised of varieties of natural and plantation forests capping higher variability of forest structures and biomass volumes. To address this issue and the needs for ground data, we propose the systematic collection of ground data integrated with airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data. Airborne LiDAR enables accurate measures of vertical forest structure, including canopy height and volume demanding less ground measurement plots. Using an appropriate forest type based LiDAR sampling framework, structural properties of forest can be quantified and treated similar to ground measurement plots, producing locally relevant information to use independently with satellite data sources including synthetic aperture radar (SAR). In this study, we examined LiDAR derived forest parameters with field measured data and developed general and specific AFCS models for tropical forests in central Sumatra. The general model is fitted for all types of natural and plantation forests while the specific model is fitted to the specific forest type. The study region consists of natural forests including peat swamp and dry moist forests, regrowth, and mangrove and plantation forests

  18. Effects of tillage and nitrogen fertilizers on CH4 and CO2 emissions and soil organic carbon in paddy fields of central China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cheng-Fang

    Full Text Available Quantifying carbon (C sequestration in paddy soils is necessary to help better understand the effect of agricultural practices on the C cycle. The objective of the present study was to assess the effects of tillage practices [conventional tillage (CT and no-tillage (NT] and the application of nitrogen (N fertilizer (0 and 210 kg N ha(-1 on fluxes of CH(4 and CO(2, and soil organic C (SOC sequestration during the 2009 and 2010 rice growing seasons in central China. Application of N fertilizer significantly increased CH(4 emissions by 13%-66% and SOC by 21%-94% irrespective of soil sampling depths, but had no effect on CO(2 emissions in either year. Tillage significantly affected CH(4 and CO(2 emissions, where NT significantly decreased CH(4 emissions by 10%-36% but increased CO(2 emissions by 22%-40% in both years. The effects of tillage on the SOC varied with the depth of soil sampling. NT significantly increased the SOC by 7%-48% in the 0-5 cm layer compared with CT. However, there was no significant difference in the SOC between NT and CT across the entire 0-20 cm layer. Hence, our results suggest that the potential of SOC sequestration in NT paddy fields may be overestimated in central China if only surface soil samples are considered.

  19. Effects of tillage and nitrogen fertilizers on CH4 and CO2 emissions and soil organic carbon in paddy fields of central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng-Fang, Li; Dan-Na, Zhou; Zhi-Kui, Kou; Zhi-Sheng, Zhang; Jin-Ping, Wang; Ming-Li, Cai; Cou-Gui, Cao

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying carbon (C) sequestration in paddy soils is necessary to help better understand the effect of agricultural practices on the C cycle. The objective of the present study was to assess the effects of tillage practices [conventional tillage (CT) and no-tillage (NT)] and the application of nitrogen (N) fertilizer (0 and 210 kg N ha(-1)) on fluxes of CH(4) and CO(2), and soil organic C (SOC) sequestration during the 2009 and 2010 rice growing seasons in central China. Application of N fertilizer significantly increased CH(4) emissions by 13%-66% and SOC by 21%-94% irrespective of soil sampling depths, but had no effect on CO(2) emissions in either year. Tillage significantly affected CH(4) and CO(2) emissions, where NT significantly decreased CH(4) emissions by 10%-36% but increased CO(2) emissions by 22%-40% in both years. The effects of tillage on the SOC varied with the depth of soil sampling. NT significantly increased the SOC by 7%-48% in the 0-5 cm layer compared with CT. However, there was no significant difference in the SOC between NT and CT across the entire 0-20 cm layer. Hence, our results suggest that the potential of SOC sequestration in NT paddy fields may be overestimated in central China if only surface soil samples are considered. PMID:22574109

  20. Carbon cycle dynamics and solar activity embedded in a high-resolution 14C speleothem record from Belize, Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechleitner, Franziska A.; Breitenbach, Sebastian F. M.; McIntyre, Cameron; Asmerom, Yemane; Prufer, Keith M.; Polyak, Victor; Culleton, Brendan J.; Kennett, Douglas J.; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Baldini, James U. L.

    2015-04-01

    Speleothem 14C has recently emerged as a potentially powerful proxy for climate reconstruction. Several studies have highlighted the link between karst hydrology and speleothem 14C content, and a number of possible causes for this relationship have been proposed, such as dripwater flow dynamics in the karst and changes in soil organic matter (SOM) turnover time (e.g. Griffiths et al., 2012). Here we present a high resolution 14C record for a stalagmite (YOK-I) from Yok Balum cave in southern Belize, Central America. YOK-I grew continuously over the last 2000 years, and has been dated very precisely with the U-Th method (40 dates, mean uncertainty ventilation and hydrologic resilience to seismic activity, Journal of Cave and Karst Studies

  1. Effects of wind farm construction on concentrations and fluxes of dissolved organic carbon and suspended sediment from peat catchments at Braes of Doune, central Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Grieve

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the impacts of disturbance associated with the construction of a wind farm on fluxes of dissolved organic carbon (DOC and suspended sediment from a blanket peat catchment in central Scotland during the period immediately following completion of construction. Six streams draining the site were sampled on six dates from October 2006, when construction was completed, and an additional three control streams to the west of the site were sampled on the same dates. Turbidity and stage were recorded semi-continuously in the two largest streams (one disturbed and one control, which were also sampled during storm events. Absorbance (400 nm and DOC concentrations were determined on all samples, and suspended sediment was determined on the event samples. Absorbance and DOC were closely correlated in both the disturbed and undisturbed streams, with slightly greater absorbance per unit DOC in the disturbed streams. DOC concentrations in disturbed tributaries were always greater than those in undisturbed streams, with mean differences ranging from 2 to around 5 mg L-1. DOC and stage were positively correlated during events with maximum concentrations in excess of 30 mg L 1 at peak flow. Suspended sediment concentrations were markedly elevated in the disturbed stream with maximum concentrations at peak flow some 4–5 times greater than in the control. The colour of the sediment suggested that it was highly organic in nature at peak flow, and suspended particulate organic carbon represented a further loss of C from the site. Using flow-weighted mean DOC concentrations calculated for the storms monitored in autumn 2007, dissolved carbon losses can be estimated for the catchments of the disturbed and control streams. From these data the additional DOC loss related to disturbance associated with the wind farm is estimated at 5 g m-2.

  2. Interaction between ultrapotassic magmas and carbonate rocks: Evidence from geochemical and isotopic (Sr, Nd, O) compositions of granular lithic clasts from the Alban Hills Volcano, Central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peccerillo, Angelo; Federico, Marcella; Barbieri, Mario; Brilli, Mauro; Wu, Tsai-Wan

    2010-05-01

    Magma-carbonate rock interaction is investigated through a geochemical and Sr-Nd-O isotope study of granular lithic clasts ( ejecta) from the Alban Hills ultrapotassic volcano, Central Italy. Some samples (Group-1) basically represent intrusive equivalents of Alban Hills magmas. A few samples (Group-2) are ultramafic, have high MgO (˜30 to 40 wt%) and δ 18O‰, and originated by accumulation of mafic phases that crystallised from ultrapotassic melts during assimilation of dolomitic rocks. Group-3 ejecta consist of dominant K-feldspar, and show major element compositions similar to phonolites, which, however, are absent among the Alban Hills volcanics. Finally, another group (Group-4) contains corroded K-feldspars, surrounded by a microgranular to porphyritic matrix, made of igneous minerals (K-feldspar, foids, clinopyroxene, phlogopite) plus wollastonite, garnet, and some cuspidine. Group-4 ejecta are depleted in SiO 2 and enriched in CaO with respect to Group-3. The analysed ejecta have similar 143Nd/ 144Nd (0.51204-0.51217) as the Alban Hills lavas, whereas 87Sr/ 86Sr (0.70900-0.71067) is similar to lower. Whole rocks δ 18O‰ ranges from +7.0 to +13.2, reaching maximum values in ultramafic samples. A positive correlation with CaO is observed in single rock groups. Large Ion Lithophile Element (LILE) abundances and REE fractionation are generally high, and extreme values of Th, U and LREE are found in some Group-3 and Group-4 rocks. Mineralogical, petrological and geochemical data reveal extensive interaction between magma and carbonate wall rocks, involving both dolostones and limestones. These processes had dramatic effects on magma compositions, especially on phonolites, which were transformed to foidites. Evidence of such a process is found in Group-4 samples, in which K-feldspar is observed to react with a matrix that represents strongly undersaturated melts formed by interaction between silicate magma and carbonates. Trace element data also testify to a

  3. The arogenate dehydratase gene family: towards understanding differential regulation of carbon flux through phenylalanine into primary versus secondary metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corea, Oliver R A; Bedgar, Diana L; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2012-10-01

    Phe is formed from arogenate in planta through the action of arogenate dehydratase (ADT), and there are six ADT isoenzymes in the "model" vascular plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. This raised the possibility that specific ADTs may be differentially regulated so as to control Phe biosynthesis for protein synthesis vs its much more massive deployment for phenylpropanoid metabolism. In our previous reverse genetics study using 25 single/multiple ADT knockout (KO) lines, a subset of these knockouts was differentially reduced in their lignin contents. In the current investigation, it was hypothesized that Phe pool sizes might correlate well with reduction in lignin contents in the affected KO lines. The free amino acid contents of these KO lines were thus comprehensively analyzed in stem, leaf and root tissues, over a growth/developmental time course from 3 to 8 weeks until senescence. The data obtained were then compared to, and contrasted with, the differential extent of lignin deposition occurring in the various lines. Relative changes in pool sizes were also analyzed by performing a pairwise confirmatory factor analysis for Phe:Tyr, Phe:Trp and Tyr:Trp, following determination of the deviation from the mean for Phe, Tyr and Trp in each plant line. It was found that the Phe pool siz