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Sample records for central carbon metabolism

  1. Phenotypic bistability in Escherichia coli's central carbon metabolism

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    Kotte, Oliver; Volkmer, Benjamin; Radzikowski, Jakub L.; Heinemann, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuations in intracellular molecule abundance can lead to distinct, coexisting phenotypes in isogenic populations. Although metabolism continuously adapts to unpredictable environmental changes, and although bistability was found in certain substrate-uptake pathways, central carbon metabolism is

  2. Reconstruction of the central carbon metabolism of Aspergillus niger

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    David, Helga; Åkesson, Mats Fredrik; Nielsen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    The topology of central carbon metabolism of Aspergillus niger was identified and the metabolic network reconstructed, by integrating genomic, biochemical and physiological information available for this microorganism and other related fungi. The reconstructed network may serve as a valuable...

  3. Central carbon metabolism in the progression of mammary carcinoma

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    Richardson, Adam D.; Yang, Chen; Osterman, Andrei

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing belief that the metabolic program of breast tumor cells could be a therapeutic target. Yet, without detailed information on central carbon metabolism in breast tumors it is impossible to know which metabolic pathways to target, and how their inhibition might influence different stages of breast tumor progression. Here we perform the first comprehensive profiling of central metabolism in the MCF10 model of mammary carcinoma, where the steps of breast tumor progression (transformation, tumorigenicity and metastasis) can all be examined in the context of the same genetic background. The metabolism of [U-13C]-glucose by a series of progressively more aggressive MCF10 cell lines was tracked by 2D NMR and mass spectrometry. From this analysis the flux of carbon through distinct metabolic reactions was quantified by isotopomer modeling. The results indicate widespread changes to central metabolism upon cellular transformation including increased carbon flux through the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), the TCA cycle, as well as increased synthesis of glutamate, glutathione and fatty acids (including elongation and desaturation). The de novo synthesis of glycine increased upon transformation as well as at each subsequent step of breast tumor cell progression. Interestingly, the major metabolic shift in metastatic cells is a large increase in the de novo synthesis of proline. This work provides the first comprehensive view of changes to central metabolism as a result of breast tumor progression. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10549-007-9732-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:17879159

  4. The Central Carbon and Energy Metabolism of Marine Diatoms

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    Adriano Nunes-Nesi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are heterokont algae derived from a secondary symbiotic event in which a eukaryotic host cell acquired an eukaryotic red alga as plastid. The multiple endosymbiosis and horizontal gene transfer processes provide diatoms unusual opportunities for gene mixing to establish distinctive biosynthetic pathways and metabolic control structures. Diatoms are also known to have significant impact on global ecosystems as one of the most dominant phytoplankton species in the contemporary ocean. As such their metabolism and growth regulating factors have been of particular interest for many years. The publication of the genomic sequences of two independent species of diatoms and the advent of an enhanced experimental toolbox for molecular biological investigations have afforded far greater opportunities than were previously apparent for these species and re-invigorated studies regarding the central carbon metabolism of diatoms. In this review we discuss distinctive features of the central carbon metabolism of diatoms and its response to forthcoming environmental changes and recent advances facilitating the possibility of industrial use of diatoms for oil production. Although the operation and importance of several key pathways of diatom metabolism have already been demonstrated and determined, we will also highlight other potentially important pathways wherein this has yet to be achieved.

  5. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Shewanella spp. Reveals Evolutionary Robustness in Central Carbon Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Martin, Hector Garcia; Dehal, Paramvir S.; Deutschbauer, Adam; Llora, Xavier; Meadows, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-08-19

    Shewanella spp. are a group of facultative anaerobic bacteria widely distributed in marine and fresh-water environments. In this study, we profiled the central metabolic fluxes of eight recently sequenced Shewanella species grown under the same condition in minimal med-ium with [3-13C] lactate. Although the tested Shewanella species had slightly different growth rates (0.23-0.29 h31) and produced different amounts of acetate and pyruvate during early exponential growth (pseudo-steady state), the relative intracellular metabolic flux distributions were remarkably similar. This result indicates that Shewanella species share similar regulation in regard to central carbon metabolic fluxes under steady growth conditions: the maintenance of metabolic robustness is not only evident in a single species under genetic perturbations (Fischer and Sauer, 2005; Nat Genet 37(6):636-640), but also observed through evolutionary related microbial species. This remarkable conservation of relative flux profiles through phylogenetic differences prompts us to introduce the concept of metabotype as an alternative scheme to classify microbial fluxomics. On the other hand, Shewanella spp. display flexibility in the relative flux profiles when switching their metabolism from consuming lactate to consuming pyruvate and acetate.

  6. Exhaustive Analysis of a Genotype Space Comprising 10(15 Central Carbon Metabolisms Reveals an Organization Conducive to Metabolic Innovation.

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    Sayed-Rzgar Hosseini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available All biological evolution takes place in a space of possible genotypes and their phenotypes. The structure of this space defines the evolutionary potential and limitations of an evolving system. Metabolism is one of the most ancient and fundamental evolving systems, sustaining life by extracting energy from extracellular nutrients. Here we study metabolism's potential for innovation by analyzing an exhaustive genotype-phenotype map for a space of 10(15 metabolisms that encodes all possible subsets of 51 reactions in central carbon metabolism. Using flux balance analysis, we predict the viability of these metabolisms on 10 different carbon sources which give rise to 1024 potential metabolic phenotypes. Although viable metabolisms with any one phenotype comprise a tiny fraction of genotype space, their absolute numbers exceed 10(9 for some phenotypes. Metabolisms with any one phenotype typically form a single network of genotypes that extends far or all the way through metabolic genotype space, where any two genotypes can be reached from each other through a series of single reaction changes. The minimal distance of genotype networks associated with different phenotypes is small, such that one can reach metabolisms with novel phenotypes--viable on new carbon sources--through one or few genotypic changes. Exceptions to these principles exist for those metabolisms whose complexity (number of reactions is close to the minimum needed for viability. Increasing metabolic complexity enhances the potential for both evolutionary conservation and evolutionary innovation.

  7. Recent advances in engineering the central carbon metabolism of industrially important bacteria

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    Papagianni Maria

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper gives an overview of the recent advances in engineering the central carbon metabolism of the industrially important bacteria Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Corynobacterium glutamicum, Streptomyces spp., Lactococcus lactis and other lactic acid bacteria. All of them are established producers of important classes of products, e.g. proteins, amino acids, organic acids, antibiotics, high-value metabolites for the food industry and also, promising producers of a large number of industrially or therapeutically important chemicals. Optimization of existing or introduction of new cellular processes in these microorganisms is often achieved through manipulation of targets that reside at major points of central metabolic pathways, such as glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, the pentose phosphate pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle with the glyoxylate shunt. Based on the huge progress made in recent years in biochemical, genetic and regulatory studies, new fascinating engineering approaches aim at ensuring an optimal carbon and energy flow within central metabolism in order to achieve optimized metabolite production.

  8. Zinc disrupts central carbon metabolism and capsule biosynthesis in Streptococcus pyogenes.

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    Ong, Cheryl-lynn Y; Walker, Mark J; McEwan, Alastair G

    2015-06-01

    Neutrophils release free zinc to eliminate the phagocytosed bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus; GAS). In this study, we investigated the mechanisms underpinning zinc toxicity towards this human pathogen, responsible for diseases ranging from pharyngitis and impetigo, to severe invasive infections. Using the globally-disseminated M1T1 GAS strain, we demonstrate that zinc stress impairs glucose metabolism through the inhibition of the glycolytic enzymes phosphofructokinase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. In the presence of zinc, a metabolic shift to the tagatose-6-phosphate pathway allows conversion of D-galactose to dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde phosphate, partially bypassing impaired glycolytic enzymes to generate pyruvate. Additionally, zinc inhibition of phosphoglucomutase results in decreased capsule biosynthesis. These data indicate that zinc exerts it toxicity via mechanisms that inhibit both GAS central carbon metabolism and virulence pathways.

  9. Modulation of Central Carbon Metabolism by Acetylation of Isocitrate Lyase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Bi, Jing; Wang, Yihong; Yu, Heguo; Qian, Xiaoyan; Wang, Honghai; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Xuelian

    2017-01-01

    Several enzymes involved in central carbon metabolism such as isocitrate lyase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase are key determinants of pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). In this study, we found that lysine acetylation plays an important role in the modulation of central carbon metabolism in M. tb. Mutant of M. tb defective in sirtuin deacetylase exhibited improved growth in fatty acid-containing media. Global analysis of lysine acetylome of M. tb identified three acetylated lysine residues (K322, K331, and K392) of isocitrate lyase (ICL1). Using a genetically encoding system, we demonstrated that acetylation of K392 increased the enzyme activity of ICL1, whereas acetylation of K322 decreased its activity. Antibodies that specifically recognized acetyllysine at 392 and 322 of ICL1 were used to monitor the levels of ICL1 acetylation in M. tb cultures. The physiological significance of ICL1 acetylation was demonstrated by the observation that M. tb altered the levels of acetylated K392 in response to changes of carbon sources, and that acetylation of K392 affected the abundance of ICL1 protein. Our study has uncovered another regulatory mechanism of ICL1. PMID:28322251

  10. A vector library for silencing central carbon metabolism genes with antisense RNAs in Escherichia coli.

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    Nakashima, Nobutaka; Ohno, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Katsunori; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Tamura, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    We describe here the construction of a series of 71 vectors to silence central carbon metabolism genes in Escherichia coli. The vectors inducibly express antisense RNAs called paired-terminus antisense RNAs, which have a higher silencing efficacy than ordinary antisense RNAs. By measuring mRNA amounts, measuring activities of target proteins, or observing specific phenotypes, it was confirmed that all the vectors were able to silence the expression of target genes efficiently. Using this vector set, each of the central carbon metabolism genes was silenced individually, and the accumulation of metabolites was investigated. We were able to obtain accurate information on ways to increase the production of pyruvate, an industrially valuable compound, from the silencing results. Furthermore, the experimental results of pyruvate accumulation were compared to in silico predictions, and both sets of results were consistent. Compared to the gene disruption approach, the silencing approach has an advantage in that any E. coli strain can be used and multiple gene silencing is easily possible in any combination.

  11. Real-time detection of central carbon metabolism in living Escherichia coli and its response to perturbations.

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    Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R; Duus, Jens Ø

    2011-10-03

    The direct tracking of cellular reactions in vivo has been facilitated with recent technologies that strongly enhance NMR signals in substrates of interest. This methodology can be used to assay intracellular reactions that occur within seconds to few minutes, as the NMR signal enhancement typically fades on this time scale. Here, we show that the enhancement of (13)C nuclear spin polarization in deuterated glucose allows to directly follow the flux of glucose signal through rather extended reaction networks of central carbon metabolism in living Escherichia coli. Alterations in central carbon metabolism depending on the growth phase or upon chemical perturbations are visualized with minimal data processing by instantaneous observation of cellular reactions.

  12. Reliable Metabolic Flux Estimation in Escherichia coli Central Carbon Metabolism Using Intracellular Free Amino Acids

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    Nobuyuki Okahashi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available 13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA is a tool of metabolic engineering for investigation of in vivo flux distribution. A direct 13C enrichment analysis of intracellular free amino acids (FAAs is expected to reduce time for labeling experiments of the MFA. Measurable FAAs should, however, vary among the MFA experiments since the pool sizes of intracellular free metabolites depend on cellular metabolic conditions. In this study, minimal 13C enrichment data of FAAs was investigated to perform the FAAs-based MFA. An examination of a continuous culture of Escherichia coli using 13C-labeled glucose showed that the time required to reach an isotopically steady state for FAAs is rather faster than that for conventional method using proteinogenic amino acids (PAAs. Considering 95% confidence intervals, it was found that the metabolic flux distribution estimated using FAAs has a similar reliability to that of the PAAs-based method. The comparative analysis identified glutamate, aspartate, alanine and phenylalanine as the common amino acids observed in E. coli under different culture conditions. The results of MFA also demonstrated that the 13C enrichment data of the four amino acids is required for a reliable analysis of the flux distribution.

  13. Targeted proteome analysis of single-gene deletion strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking enzymes in the central carbon metabolism

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    Kinoshita, Syohei; Nishino, Shunsuke; Tomita, Atsumi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Central carbon metabolism is controlled by modulating the protein abundance profiles of enzymes that maintain the essential systems in living organisms. In this study, metabolic adaptation mechanisms in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated by direct determination of enzyme abundance levels in 30 wild type and mutant strains. We performed a targeted proteome analysis using S. cerevisiae strains that lack genes encoding the enzymes responsible for central carbon metabolism. Our analysis revealed that at least 30% of the observed variations in enzyme abundance levels could be explained by global regulatory mechanisms. A enzyme-enzyme co-abundance analysis revealed that the abundances of enzyme proteins involved in the trehalose metabolism and glycolysis changed in a coordinated manner under the control of the transcription factors for global regulation. The remaining variations were derived from local mechanisms such as a mutant-specific increase in the abundances of remote enzymes. The proteome data also suggested that, although the functional compensation of the deficient enzyme was attained by using more resources for protein biosynthesis, available resources for the biosynthesis of the enzymes responsible for central metabolism were not abundant in S. cerevisiae cells. These results showed that global and local regulation of enzyme abundance levels shape central carbon metabolism in S. cerevisiae by using a limited resource for protein biosynthesis. PMID:28241048

  14. Genetic analysis of central carbon metabolism unveils an amino acid substitution that alters maize NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity

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    Central carbon metabolism (CCM) is a fundamental component of life. The participating genes and enzymes are thought to be structurally and functionally conserved across and within species and thus have not been obvious targets as candidates for crop improvement. We test this functional conservatio...

  15. Elementary Flux Mode Analysis Revealed Cyclization Pathway as a Powerful Way for NADPH Regeneration of Central Carbon Metabolism.

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    Bin Rui

    Full Text Available NADPH regeneration capacity is attracting growing research attention due to its important role in resisting oxidative stress. Besides, NADPH availability has been regarded as a limiting factor in production of industrially valuable compounds. The central carbon metabolism carries the carbon skeleton flux supporting the operation of NADPH-regenerating enzyme and offers flexibility in coping with NADPH demand for varied intracellular environment. To acquire an insightful understanding of its NADPH regeneration capacity, the elementary mode method was employed to compute all elementary flux modes (EFMs of a network representative of central carbon metabolism. Based on the metabolic flux distributions of these modes, a cluster analysis of EFMs with high NADPH regeneration rate was conducted using the self-organizing map clustering algorithm. The clustering results were used to study the relationship between the flux of total NADPH regeneration and the flux in each NADPH producing enzyme. The results identified several reaction combinations supporting high NADPH regeneration, which are proven to be feasible in cells via thermodynamic analysis and coincident with a great deal of previous experimental report. Meanwhile, the reaction combinations showed some common characteristics: there were one or two decarboxylation oxidation reactions in the combinations that produced NADPH and the combination constitution included certain gluconeogenesis pathways. These findings suggested cyclization pathways as a powerful way for NADPH regeneration capacity of bacterial central carbon metabolism.

  16. The Sinorhizobium meliloti RNA chaperone Hfq influences central carbon metabolism and the symbiotic interaction with alfalfa

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    Jiménez-Zurdo José I

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial Hfq protein is able to interact with diverse RNA molecules, including regulatory small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs, and thus it is recognized as a global post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression. Loss of Hfq has an extensive impact in bacterial physiology which in several animal pathogens influences virulence. Sinorhizobium meliloti is a model soil bacterium known for its ability to establish a beneficial nitrogen-fixing intracellular symbiosis with alfalfa. Despite the predicted general involvement of Hfq in the establishment of successful bacteria-eukaryote interactions, its function in S. meliloti has remained unexplored. Results Two independent S. meliloti mutants, 2011-3.4 and 1021Δhfq, were obtained by disruption and deletion of the hfq gene in the wild-type strains 2011 and 1021, respectively, both exhibiting similar growth defects as free-living bacteria. Transcriptomic profiling of 1021Δhfq revealed a general down-regulation of genes of sugar transporters and some enzymes of the central carbon metabolism, whereas transcripts specifying the uptake and metabolism of nitrogen sources (mainly amino acids were more abundant than in the wild-type strain. Proteomic analysis of the 2011-3.4 mutant independently confirmed these observations. Symbiotic tests showed that lack of Hfq led to a delayed nodulation, severely compromised bacterial competitiveness on alfalfa roots and impaired normal plant growth. Furthermore, a large proportion of nodules (55%-64% elicited by the 1021Δhfq mutant were non-fixing, with scarce content in bacteroids and signs of premature senescence of endosymbiotic bacteria. RT-PCR experiments on RNA from bacteria grown under aerobic and microoxic conditions revealed that Hfq contributes to regulation of nifA and fixK1/K2, the genes controlling nitrogen fixation, although the Hfq-mediated regulation of fixK is only aerobiosis dependent. Finally, we found that some of the recently

  17. Dynamic proteomic analysis reveals a switch between central carbon metabolism and alcoholic fermentation in rice filling grains.

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    Xu, Sheng Bao; Li, Tang; Deng, Zhu Yun; Chong, Kang; Xue, Yongbiao; Wang, Tai

    2008-10-01

    Accumulation of reserve materials in filling grains involves the coordination of different metabolic and cellular processes, and understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the interconnections remains a major challenge for proteomics. Rice (Oryza sativa) is an excellent model for studying grain filling because of its importance as a staple food and the available genome sequence database. Our observations showed that embryo differentiation and endosperm cellularization in developing rice seeds were completed approximately 6 d after flowering (DAF); thereafter, the immature seeds mainly underwent cell enlargement and reached the size of mature seeds at 12 DAF. Grain filling began at 6 DAF and lasted until 20 DAF. Dynamic proteomic analyses revealed 396 protein spots differentially expressed throughout eight sequential developmental stages from 6 to 20 DAF and determined 345 identities. These proteins were involved in different cellular and metabolic processes with a prominently functional skew toward metabolism (45%) and protein synthesis/destination (20%). Expression analyses of protein groups associated with different functional categories/subcategories showed that substantially up-regulated proteins were involved in starch synthesis and alcoholic fermentation, whereas the down-regulated proteins in the process were involved in central carbon metabolism and most of the other functional categories/subcategories such as cell growth/division, protein synthesis, proteolysis, and signal transduction. The coordinated changes were consistent with the transition from cell growth and differentiation to starch synthesis and clearly indicated that a switch from central carbon metabolism to alcoholic fermentation may be important for starch synthesis and accumulation in the developmental process.

  18. Reconstruction of central carbon metabolism in Sulfolobus solfataricus using a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis map, stable isotope labelling and DNA microarray analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, B.P.L.; Walther, J.; Peter, S.; Kinnman, I.; Vos, de M.J.G.; Werken, van de H.J.G.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Oost, van der J.; Wright, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    In the last decade, an increasing number of sequenced archaeal genomes have become available, opening up the possibility for functional genomic analyses. Here, we reconstructed the central carbon metabolism in the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis an

  19. Impacts of high β-galactosidase expression on central metabolism of recombinant Pichia pastoris GS115 using glucose as sole carbon source via (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

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    Nie, Yongsheng; Huang, Mingzhi; Lu, Junjie; Qian, Jiangchao; Lin, Weilu; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2014-10-10

    The yeast Pichia pastoris GS115 is a widely used microbial cell factory for the production of heterologous protein. In order to reveal the impacts of high heterologous protein expression on the central metabolism of Pichia pastoris GS115 using glucose as sole carbon source, we engineered a high β-galactosidase expression strain P. pastoris G1HL and a low expression control strain P. pastoris GHL through controlling the initiation strength of constitutive promoter pGAP. The carbon flux distributions in these two strains were quantified via (13)C metabolic flux analysis. Compared to the control strain, G1HL showed a lower growth rate, a higher flux through glycolysis pathway, a higher flux through pentose phosphate pathway, and a lower flux through by-products secretion pathway. The metabolic flux redistribution in G1HL was thought to compensate the increased redox cofactors and energy demands caused by the high protein expression. Although the fluxes through Krebs cycle in two engineered strains were almost the same, they were significantly lower than those in wild strain. The enhanced expression of β-galactosidase by glutamate supplementation demonstrated the potential of P. pastoris GS115 to catabolize more carbon through the Krebs cycle for even higher protein expression. In conclusion, our work indicates that P. pastoris GS115 can readjusts the central metabolism for higher heterologous protein expression and provides strategies for strain development or process optimization for enhancing production of heterologous protein.

  20. Modeling Central Carbon Metabolic Processes in Soil Microbial Communities: Comparing Measured With Modeled

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    Dijkstra, P.; Fairbanks, D.; Miller, E.; Salpas, E.; Hagerty, S.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms regulating C cycling is hindered by our inability to directly observe and measure the biochemical processes of glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, and TCA cycle in intact and complex microbial communities. Position-specific 13C labeled metabolic tracer probing is proposed as a new way to study microbial community energy production, biosynthesis, C use efficiency (the proportion of substrate incorporated into microbial biomass), and enables the quantification of C fluxes through the central C metabolic network processes (Dijkstra et al 2011a,b). We determined the 13CO2 production from U-13C, 1-13C, 2-13C, 3-13C, 4-13C, 5-13C, and 6-13C labeled glucose and 1-13C and 2,3-13C pyruvate in parallel incubations in three soils along an elevation gradient. Qualitative and quantitative interpretation of the results indicate a high pentose phosphate pathway activity in soils. Agreement between modeled and measured CO2 production rates for the six C-atoms of 13C-labeled glucose indicate that the metabolic model used is appropriate for soil community processes, but that improvements can be made. These labeling and modeling techniques may improve our ability to analyze the biochemistry and (eco)physiology of intact microbial communities. Dijkstra, P., Blankinship, J.C., Selmants, P.C., Hart, S.C., Koch, G.W., Schwartz, E., Hungate, B.A., 2011a. Probing C flux patterns of soil microbial metabolic networks using parallel position-specific tracer labeling. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 43, 126-132. Dijkstra, P., Dalder, J.J., Selmants, P.C., Hart, S.C., Koch, G.W., Schwartz, E., Hungate, B.A., 2011b. Modeling soil metabolic processes using isotopologue pairs of position-specific 13C-labeled glucose and pyruvate. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 43, 1848-1857.

  1. Use of Position-Specific 13C Isotopomers to Examine Central Carbon Metabolism in the Thermophile 'Thermoflexus hugenholtzii'

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    Thomas, S.; Tamadonfar, K. O.; Dijkstra, P.; Dodsworth, J. A.; Hedlund, B. P.

    2013-12-01

    'Thermoflexus hugenholtzii' is a member of a newly discovered class of Chloroflexi. It is the dominant microorganism in certain hot springs; however, very little is known about its physiology, and it is unable to grow on defined media. In order to examine central carbon metabolism in 'T. hugenholtzii', the genome was annotated for genes encoding enzymes for central carbon metabolism, revealing complete pathways for glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Isotope experiments were conducted to test predicted activities by adding position-specific carbon-13 (13C)-labeled metabolites of glucose, pyruvate, acetate, TCA metabolites, and amino acids and measuring the production of 13CO2 during exponential growth. Use of these metabolites demonstrated broad heterotrophic activity of 'T. hugenholtzii,' despite its inability to grow on defined media. Use of glucose-U demonstrated an active glycolytic pathway and pyruvate-1 demonstrated the functioning of the pyruvate oxidation pathway after glycolysis. Use of the TCA cycle intermediates citrate and succinate demonstrated an active TCA cycle. Production of CO2 from alanine and cysteine demonstrated oxidation of amino acids. However, lack of activity on glucose-1 failed to reveal an active PPP suggesting 'T. hugenholtzii' may rely on exogenous sources of pentoses for nucleic acid biosynthesis.

  2. Carbon conversion efficiency and central metabolic fluxes in developing sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) embryos.

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    Alonso, Ana P; Goffman, Fernando D; Ohlrogge, John B; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2007-10-01

    The efficiency with which developing sunflower embryos convert substrates into seed storage reserves was determined by labeling embryos with [U-(14)C6]glucose or [U-(14)C5]glutamine and measuring their conversion to CO2, oil, protein and other biomass compounds. The average carbon conversion efficiency was 50%, which contrasts with a value of over 80% previously observed in Brassica napus embryos (Goffman et al., 2005), in which light and the RuBisCO bypass pathway allow more efficient conversion of hexose to oil. Labeling levels after incubating sunflower embryos with [U-(14)C4]malate indicated that some carbon from malate enters the plastidic compartment and contributes to oil synthesis. To test this and to map the underlying pattern of metabolic fluxes, separate experiments were carried out in which embryos were labeled to isotopic steady state using [1-(13)C1]glucose, [2-(13)C1]glucose, or [U-(13)C5]glutamine. The resultant labeling in sugars, starch, fatty acids and amino acids was analyzed by NMR and GC-MS. The fluxes through intermediary metabolism were then quantified by computer-aided modeling. The resulting flux map accounted well for the labeling data, was in good agreement with the observed carbon efficiency, and was further validated by testing for agreement with gas exchange measurements. The map shows that the influx of malate into oil is low and that flux through futile cycles (wasting ATP) is low, which contrasts with the high rates previously determined for growing root tips and heterotrophic cell cultures.

  3. The role of flexibility and optimality in the prediction of intracellular fluxes of microbial central carbon metabolism.

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    Tarlak, Fatih; Sadıkoğlu, Hasan; Çakır, Tunahan

    2014-07-29

    Prediction of intracellular metabolic fluxes based on optimal biomass assumption is a well-known computational approach. While there has been a significant emphasis on the optimality, cellular flexibility, the co-occurrence of suboptimal flux distributions in a microbial population, has hardly been considered in the related computational methods. We have implemented a flexibility-incorporated optimization framework to calculate intracellular fluxes based on a few extracellular measurement constraints. Taking into account slightly suboptimal flux distributions together with a dual-optimality framework (maximization of the growth rate followed by the minimization of the total enzyme amount) we were able to show the positive effect of incorporating flexibility and minimal enzyme consumption on the better prediction of intracellular fluxes of central carbon metabolism of two microorganisms: E. coli and S. cerevisiae.

  4. Toward 'omic scale metabolite profiling: a dual separation-mass spectrometry approach for coverage of lipid and central carbon metabolism.

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    Ivanisevic, Julijana; Zhu, Zheng-Jiang; Plate, Lars; Tautenhahn, Ralf; Chen, Stephen; O'Brien, Peter J; Johnson, Caroline H; Marletta, Michael A; Patti, Gary J; Siuzdak, Gary

    2013-07-16

    Although the objective of any 'omic science is broad measurement of its constituents, such coverage has been challenging in metabolomics because the metabolome is comprised of a chemically diverse set of small molecules with variable physical properties. While extensive studies have been performed to identify metabolite isolation and separation methods, these strategies introduce bias toward lipophilic or water-soluble metabolites depending on whether reversed-phase (RP) or hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) is used, respectively. Here we extend our consideration of metabolome isolation and separation procedures to integrate RPLC/MS and HILIC/MS profiling. An aminopropyl-based HILIC/MS method was optimized on the basis of mobile-phase additives and pH, followed by evaluation of reproducibility. When applied to the untargeted study of perturbed bacterial metabolomes, the HILIC method enabled the accurate assessment of key, dysregulated metabolites in central carbon pathways (e.g., amino acids, organic acids, phosphorylated sugars, energy currency metabolites), which could not be retained by RPLC. To demonstrate the value of the integrative approach, bacterial cells, human plasma, and cancer cells were analyzed by combined RPLC/HILIC separation coupled to ESI positive/negative MS detection. The combined approach resulted in the observation of metabolites associated with lipid and central carbon metabolism from a single biological extract, using 80% organic solvent (ACN:MeOH:H2O 2:2:1). It enabled the detection of more than 30,000 features from each sample type, with the highest number of uniquely detected features by RPLC in ESI positive mode and by HILIC in ESI negative mode. Therefore, we conclude that when time and sample are limited, the maximum amount of biological information related to lipid and central carbon metabolism can be acquired by combining RPLC ESI positive and HILIC ESI negative mode analysis.

  5. Immunosuppressive activity enhances central carbon metabolism and bioenergetics in myeloid-derived suppressor cells in vitro models

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    Hammami Ines

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tumor microenvironment contains a vast array of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines that alter myelopoiesis and lead to the maturation of immunosuppressive cells known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs. Incubating bone marrow (BM precursors with a combination of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin-6 (IL-6 generated a tumor-infiltrating MDSC-like population that impaired anti-tumor specific T-cell functions. This in vitro experimental approach was used to simulate MDSC maturation, and the cellular metabolic response was then monitored. A complementary experimental model that inhibited L-arginine (L-Arg metabolizing enzymes in MSC-1 cells, an immortalized cell line derived from primary MDSCs, was used to study the metabolic events related to immunosuppression. Results Exposure of BM cells to GM-CSF and IL-6 activated, within 24 h, L-Arg metabolizing enzymes which are responsible for the MDSCs immunosuppressive potential. This was accompanied by an increased uptake of L-glutamine (L-Gln and glucose, the latter being metabolized by anaerobic glycolysis. The up-regulation of nutrient uptake lead to the accumulation of TCA cycle intermediates and lactate as well as the endogenous synthesis of L-Arg and the production of energy-rich nucleotides. Moreover, inhibition of L-Arg metabolism in MSC-1 cells down-regulated central carbon metabolism activity, including glycolysis, glutaminolysis and TCA cycle activity, and led to a deterioration of cell bioenergetic status. The simultaneous increase of cell specific concentrations of ATP and a decrease in ATP-to-ADP ratio in BM-derived MDSCs suggested cells were metabolically active during maturation. Moreover, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK was activated during MDSC maturation in GM-CSF and IL-6–treated cultures, as revealed by the continuous increase of AMP-to-ATP ratios and the phosphorylation of AMPK. Likewise, AMPK activity was

  6. Modeling the Contribution of Allosteric Regulation for Flux Control in the Central Carbon Metabolism of E. coli

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    Machado, Daniel; Herrgard, Markus; Rocha, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Modeling cellular metabolism is fundamental for many biotechnological applications, including drug discovery and rational cell factory design. Central carbon metabolism (CCM) is particularly important as it provides the energy and precursors for other biological processes. However, the complex...... coli with allosteric interactions obtained from relevant databases. This model is used to integrate multi-omics datasets and analyze the coordinated changes in enzyme, metabolite, and flux levels between multiple experimental conditions. We observe cases where allosteric interactions have a major...

  7. Genetic analysis of central carbon metabolism unveils an amino acid substitution that alters maize NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengyi Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Central carbon metabolism (CCM is a fundamental component of life. The participating genes and enzymes are thought to be structurally and functionally conserved across and within species. Association mapping utilizes a rich history of mutation and recombination to achieve high resolution mapping. Therefore, applying association mapping in maize (Zea mays ssp. mays, the most diverse model crop species, to study the genetics of CCM is a particularly attractive system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a maize diversity panel to test the CCM functional conservation. We found heritable variation in enzyme activity for every enzyme tested. One of these enzymes was the NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH, E.C. 1.1.1.41, in which we identified a novel amino-acid substitution in a phylogenetically conserved site. Using candidate gene association mapping, we identified that this non-synonymous polymorphism was associated with IDH activity variation. The proposed mechanism for the IDH activity variation includes additional components regulating protein level. With the comparison of sequences from maize and teosinte (Zea mays ssp. Parviglumis, the maize wild ancestor, we found that some CCM genes had also been targeted for selection during maize domestication. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate the efficacy of association mapping for dissecting natural variation in primary metabolic pathways. The considerable genetic diversity observed in maize CCM genes underlies heritable phenotypic variation in enzyme activities and can be useful to identify putative functional sites.

  8. Control of Proteobacterial Central Carbon Metabolism by the HexR Transcriptional Regulator. A Case Study in Shewanella oneidensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyn, Semen; Li, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Qijing; Novichkov, Pavel; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Yang, Chen; Osterman, Andrei L.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2011-08-17

    Bacteria exploit multiple mechanisms for controlling central carbon metabolism (CCM). Thus, a bioinformatic analysis together with some experimental data implicated HexR transcriptional factor as a global CCM regulator in some lineages of Gammaproteobacteria operating as a functional replacement of Cra regulator characteristic of Enterobacteriales. In this study we combined a large-scale comparative genomic reconstruction of HexRcontrolled regulons in 87 species of Proteobacteria with the detailed experimental analysis of HexR regulatory network in Shewanella oneidensis model system. Although nearly all of the HexR-controlled genes are associated with CCM, remarkable variations were revealed in the scale (from 1-2 target operons in Enterobacteriales up to 20 operons in Aeromonadales) and gene content of HexR regulons between 11 compared lineages. A predicted 17-bp pseudo-palindrome with a consensus tTGTAATwwwATTACa, was confirmed as HexR-binding motif for 15 target operons (comprising 30 genes) by in vitro binding assays. The negative effect of the key CCM intermediate, 2-keto-3-deoxy-6- phosphogluconate, on the DNA-regulator complex formation was verified. A dual mode of HexR action on various target promoters, repression of genes involved in catabolic pathways and activation of gluconeogenic genes, was for the first time predicted by the bioinformatc analysis and experimentally verified by changed gene expression pattern in S. oneidensis AhexR mutant. Phenotypic profiling revealed the inability of this mutant to grow on lactate or pyruvate as a single carbon source. A comparative metabolic flux analysis of wild-type and mutant strains of S. oneidensis using 13Clactate labeling and GC-MS analysis confirmed the hypothesized HexR role as a master regulator of gluconeogenic flux from pyruvate via the transcriptional activation of phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PpsA).

  9. The carbon storage regulator (Csr system exerts a nutrient-specific control over central metabolism in Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Revelles

    Full Text Available The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the csrA51 mutant affects the growth efficiency on a broad range of physiologically relevant carbon sources, including compounds utilized by the Entner-Doudoroff (ED pathway. Detailed investigations of the metabolomes and fluxomes of mutants and wild-type cells grown on carbon sources representative of glycolysis and of the ED pathway (glucose and gluconate, respectively, revealed significant re-adjusting of central carbon metabolism for both compounds in the csrA51 mutant. However, the metabolic re-adjusting observed on gluconate was strikingly different from that observed on glucose, indicating a nutrient-specific control of metabolism by the Csr system.

  10. The carbon storage regulator (Csr) system exerts a nutrient-specific control over central metabolism in Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelles, Olga; Millard, Pierre; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Oswald, Eric; Létisse, Fabien; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr) system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations) showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the csrA51 mutant affects the growth efficiency on a broad range of physiologically relevant carbon sources, including compounds utilized by the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway. Detailed investigations of the metabolomes and fluxomes of mutants and wild-type cells grown on carbon sources representative of glycolysis and of the ED pathway (glucose and gluconate, respectively), revealed significant re-adjusting of central carbon metabolism for both compounds in the csrA51 mutant. However, the metabolic re-adjusting observed on gluconate was strikingly different from that observed on glucose, indicating a nutrient-specific control of metabolism by the Csr system.

  11. Exploring the Altered Dynamics of Mammalian Central Carbon Metabolic Pathway in Cancer Cells: A Classical Control Theoretic Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debjyoti Paul

    Full Text Available In contrast with normal cells, most of the cancer cells depend on aerobic glycolysis for energy production in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP bypassing mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, compared to normal cells, cancer cells exhibit higher consumption of glucose with higher production of lactate. Again, higher rate of glycolysis provides the necessary glycolytic intermediary precursors for DNA, protein and lipid synthesis to maintain high active proliferation of the tumor cells. In this scenario, classical control theory based approach may be useful to explore the altered dynamics of the cancer cells. Since the dynamics of the cancer cells is different from that of the normal cells, understanding their dynamics may lead to development of novel therapeutic strategies.We have developed a model based on the state space equations of classical control theory along with an order reduction technique to mimic the actual dynamic behavior of mammalian central carbon metabolic (CCM pathway in normal cells. Here, we have modified Michaelis Menten kinetic equation to incorporate feedback mechanism along with perturbations and cross talks associated with a metabolic pathway. Furthermore, we have perturbed the proposed model to reduce the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Thereafter, we have connected proportional-integral (PI controller(s with the model for tuning it to behave like the CCM pathway of a cancer cell. This methodology allows one to track the altered dynamics mediated by different enzymes.The proposed model successfully mimics all the probable dynamics of the CCM pathway in normal cells. Moreover, experimental results demonstrate that in cancer cells, a coordination among enzymes catalyzing pentose phosphate pathway and intermediate glycolytic enzymes along with switching of pyruvate kinase (M2 isoform plays an important role to maintain their altered dynamics.

  12. The redox-sensing regulator Rex modulates central carbon metabolism, stress tolerance response and biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob P Bitoun

    Full Text Available The Rex repressor has been implicated in regulation of central carbon and energy metabolism in gram-positive bacteria. We have previously shown that Streptococcus mutans, the primary causative agent of dental caries, alters its transcriptome upon Rex-deficiency and renders S. mutans to have increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, aberrations in glucan production, and poor biofilm formation. In this study, we showed that rex in S. mutans is co-transcribed as an operon with downstream guaA, encoding a putative glutamine amidotransferase. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that recombinant Rex bound promoters of target genes avidly and specifically, including those down-regulated in response to Rex-deficiency, and that the ability of recombinant Rex to bind to selected promoters was modulated by NADH and NAD(+. Results suggest that Rex in S. mutans can function as an activator in response to intracellular NADH/NAD(+ level, although the exact binding site for activator Rex remains unclear. Consistent with a role in oxidative stress tolerance, hydrogen peroxide challenge assays showed that the Rex-deficient mutant, TW239, and the Rex/GuaA double mutant, JB314, were more susceptible to hydrogen peroxide killing than the wildtype, UA159. Relative to UA159, JB314 displayed major defects in biofilm formation, with a decrease of more than 50-fold in biomass after 48-hours. Collectively, these results further suggest that Rex in S. mutans regulates fermentation pathways, oxidative stress tolerance, and biofilm formation in response to intracellular NADH/NAD(+ level. Current effort is being directed to further investigation of the role of GuaA in S. mutans cellular physiology.

  13. The Carbon Storage Regulator (Csr) System Exerts a Nutrient-Specific Control over Central Metabolism in Escherichia coli Strain Nissle 1917

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Revelles; Pierre Millard; Jean-Philippe Nougayrède; Ulrich Dobrindt; Eric Oswald; Fabien Létisse; Jean-Charles Portais

    2013-01-01

    The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr) system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations) showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the c...

  14. Investigating the effects of perturbations to pgi and eno gene expression on central carbon metabolism in Escherichia coli using 13 C metabolic flux analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usui Yuki

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has long been recognized that analyzing the behaviour of the complex intracellular biological networks is important for breeding industrially useful microorganisms. However, because of the complexity of these biological networks, it is currently not possible to obtain all the desired microorganisms. In this study, we constructed a system for analyzing the effect of gene expression perturbations on the behavior of biological networks in Escherichia coli. Specifically, we utilized 13 C metabolic flux analysis (13 C-MFA to analyze the effect of perturbations to the expression levels of pgi and eno genes encoding phosphoglucose isomerase and enolase, respectively on metabolic fluxes. Results We constructed gene expression-controllable E. coli strains using a single-copy mini F plasmid. Using the pgi expression-controllable strain, we found that the specific growth rate correlated with the pgi expression level. 13 C-MFA of this strain revealed that the fluxes for the pentose phosphate pathway and Entner-Doudoroff pathway decreased, as the pgi expression lelvel increased. In addition, the glyoxylate shunt became active when the pgi expression level was almost zero. Moreover, the flux for the glyoxylate shunt increased when the pgi expression level decreased, but was significantly reduced in the pgi-knockout cells. Comparatively, eno expression could not be decreased compared to the parent strain, but we found that increased eno expression resulted in a decreased specific growth rate. 13 C-MFA revealed that the metabolic flux distribution was not altered by an increased eno expression level, but the overall metabolic activity of the central metabolism decreased. Furthermore, to evaluate the impact of perturbed expression of pgi and eno genes on changes in metabolic fluxes in E. coli quantitatively, metabolic sensitivity analysis was performed. As a result, the perturbed expression of pgi gene had a great impact to the

  15. CeCaFDB: a curated database for the documentation, visualization and comparative analysis of central carbon metabolic flux distributions explored by 13C-fluxomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengdong; Shen, Tie; Rui, Bin; Zhou, Wenwei; Zhou, Xiangfei; Shang, Chuanyu; Xin, Chenwei; Liu, Xiaoguang; Li, Gang; Jiang, Jiansi; Li, Chao; Li, Ruiyuan; Han, Mengshu; You, Shanping; Yu, Guojun; Yi, Yin; Wen, Han; Liu, Zhijie; Xie, Xiaoyao

    2015-01-01

    The Central Carbon Metabolic Flux Database (CeCaFDB, available at http://www.cecafdb.org) is a manually curated, multipurpose and open-access database for the documentation, visualization and comparative analysis of the quantitative flux results of central carbon metabolism among microbes and animal cells. It encompasses records for more than 500 flux distributions among 36 organisms and includes information regarding the genotype, culture medium, growth conditions and other specific information gathered from hundreds of journal articles. In addition to its comprehensive literature-derived data, the CeCaFDB supports a common text search function among the data and interactive visualization of the curated flux distributions with compartmentation information based on the Cytoscape Web API, which facilitates data interpretation. The CeCaFDB offers four modules to calculate a similarity score or to perform an alignment between the flux distributions. One of the modules was built using an inter programming algorithm for flux distribution alignment that was specifically designed for this study. Based on these modules, the CeCaFDB also supports an extensive flux distribution comparison function among the curated data. The CeCaFDB is strenuously designed to address the broad demands of biochemists, metabolic engineers, systems biologists and members of the -omics community.

  16. Consequences of phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotranferase system and pyruvate kinase isozymes inactivation in central carbon metabolism flux distribution in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meza Eugenio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP is a key central metabolism intermediate that participates in glucose transport, as precursor in several biosynthetic pathways and it is involved in allosteric regulation of glycolytic enzymes. In this work we generated W3110 derivative strains that lack the main PEP consumers PEP:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS- and pyruvate kinase isozymes PykA and PykF (PTS-pykA- and PTS-pykF-. To characterize the effects of these modifications on cell physiology, carbon flux distribution and aromatics production capacity were determined. Results When compared to reference strain W3110, strain VH33 (PTS- displayed lower specific rates for growth, glucose consumption and acetate production as well as a higher biomass yield from glucose. These phenotypic effects were even more pronounced by the additional inactivation of PykA or PykF. Carbon flux analysis revealed that PTS inactivation causes a redirection of metabolic flux towards biomass formation. A cycle involving PEP carboxylase (Ppc and PEP carboxykinase (Pck was detected in all strains. In strains W3110, VH33 (PTS- and VH35 (PTS-, pykF-, the net flux in this cycle was inversely correlated with the specific rate of glucose consumption and inactivation of Pck in these strains caused a reduction in growth rate. In the PTS- background, inactivation of PykA caused a reduction in Ppc and Pck cycling as well as a reduction in flux to TCA, whereas inactivation of PykF caused an increase in anaplerotic flux from PEP to OAA and an increased flux to TCA. The wild-type and mutant strains were modified to overproduce L-phenylalanine. In resting cells experiments, compared to reference strain, a 10, 4 and 7-fold higher aromatics yields from glucose were observed as consequence of PTS, PTS PykA and PTS PykF inactivation. Conclusions Metabolic flux analysis performed on strains lacking the main activities generating pyruvate from PEP revealed the high

  17. New insights on transcriptional responses of genes involved in carbon central metabolism, respiration and fermentation to low ATP levels in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Sandra; de Anda, Ramón; Flores, Noemí; Romero-Garcia, Susana; Gosset, Guillermo; Bolívar, Francisco; Báez-Viveros, José Luis

    2013-04-01

    Adenosine-5-triphosphate (ATP) plays a fundamental role in many cellular processes such as transport, central carbon metabolism, biosynthetic reactions, macromolecular synthesis, signal transduction and cellular division. In addition, the intracellular [ATP]/[ADP] ratio in Escherichia coli plays an important role in controlling the specific rates of growth (µ), glucose consumption (qGlc ) and oxygen uptake (qO2), as well as the transcriptome pattern in the cell, as was recently reported. In the current study, the energetic level (expressed as [ATP]/[ADP] ratio) was substantially reduced in E. coli strains by either over-expressing the F1 -ATPase activity (JMAGD(+)) or inactivating ATP synthase (JMat(-)). The physiological characterization of the wild-type JM101 strain and its derivative JMAGD(+) and JMatp(-) strains was conducted in bioreactors containing minimal medium with glucose. The inactivation of the atp operon and F1 -ATPase overexpression significantly diminished the energetic level and cAMP concentration in derivative strains. Relative transcription levels of 105 genes involved in glucose transport, glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, fermentation, respiration, transcriptional regulators, transcription and genes involved in stress were determined by using qPCR. Interestingly, in the JMAGD(+) and JMatp(-) strains, having a reduced energetic level, many transcripts of glycolysis, TCA cycle and respiratory genes were down-regulated when compared to wild type JM101. The transcriptional responses, detected in the strains with reduced energetic level show down-regulation of genes involved in central carbon metabolism and respiration, these results are apposite to the observed trends of increased metabolic fluxes in glucose consumption, glycolysis, acetate synthesis, TCA cycle and respiration. Regulation mediated by CRP-cAMP complex may explain some observed transcriptional responses of TCA cycle genes, since cAMP concentration and crp transcript level

  18. 基于氧化还原酶活性时变研究巴利阿里假单胞菌中心碳代谢%Analysis of Central Carbon Metabolism in Pseudomonas balearica Based on Key Oxidoreductases Detecting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温卫卫; 周小芬; 王世珍; 方柏山

    2013-01-01

    Assaying the central carbon metabolism (CCM) through the enzyme's level may be one effective method to reveal the interaction between the adaptability of marine bacteria and the extreme environmental conditions. Marine bacteria may have different CCM with terrestrial bacteria as they have different growth environment. So it is valuable to research the related key oxidoreductases, which is important to uncover the CCM of marine bacteria. The response of central carbon metabolism of marine bacteria to incubation time was investigated based on key oxidoreductases detecting, while traditional metabolic analysis was carried out by 13C metabolic flux analysis. For example,Pseudomonas balearica isolated from sediment of China's offshore was investigated. Besides growth kinetics,the central carbon metabolism of P. balearica was uncovered by a comprehensive analysis of six key oxidoreductases, glu-cose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, 2-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, malic enzyme and isocitrate dehydrogenase. The changing regularity of key oxidoreductases activities of central carbon metabolism in P. balearica was revealed on protein level. A new technique for the study of microbial central carbon metabolism and the excavation of new enzyme preparations from marine microbial was provided.%以分离自中国北部湾沉积物的海洋菌株巴利阿里假单胞菌(Pseudomonas balearica)为例,在考察其生长动力学的同时,监测了其中心碳代谢(CCM)中6种关键氧化还原酶,葡萄糖-6-磷酸脱氢酶、丙酮酸脱氢酶、2-酮戊二酸脱氢酶、苹果酸脱氢酶、苹果酸酶及异柠檬酸脱氢酶的酶活性时变,从酶蛋白表达水平揭示了海洋生长条件下巴利阿里假单胞菌CCM中关键氧化还原酶的酶活性变化的规律,为研究微生物CCM和发掘海洋微生物新型酶制剂提供一种新思路.

  19. The CcpA regulon of Streptococcus suis reveals novel insights into the regulation of the streptococcal central carbon metabolism by binding of CcpA to two distinct binding motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenborg, Jörg; de Greeff, Astrid; Jarek, Michael; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2014-04-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) is a neglected zoonotic streptococcus causing fatal diseases in humans and in pigs. The transcriptional regulator CcpA (catabolite control protein A) is involved in the metabolic adaptation to different carbohydrate sources and virulence of S. suis and other pathogenic streptococci. In this study, we determined the DNA binding characteristics of CcpA and identified the CcpA regulon during growth of S. suis. Electrophoretic mobility shift analyses showed promiscuous DNA binding of CcpA to cognate cre sites in vitro. In contrast, sequencing of immunoprecipitated chromatin revealed two specific consensus motifs, a pseudo-palindromic cre motif (WWGAAARCGYTTTCWW) and a novel cre2 motif (TTTTYHWDHHWWTTTY), within the regulatory elements of the genes directly controlled by CcpA. Via these elements CcpA regulates expression of genes involved in carbohydrate uptake and conversion, and in addition in important metabolic pathways of the central carbon metabolism, like glycolysis, mixed-acid fermentation, and the fragmentary TCA cycle. Furthermore, our analyses provide evidence that CcpA regulates the genes of the central carbon metabolism by binding either the pseudo-palindromic cre motif or the cre2 motif in a HPr(Ser)∼P independent conformation.

  20. Effects of Conservation Tillage on Topsoil Microbial Metabolic Characteristics and Organic Carbon within Aggregates under a Rice (Oryza sativa L.)-Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Cropping System in Central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li-Jin; Lin, Shan; Liu, Tian-Qi; Cao, Cou-Gui; Li, Cheng-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Investigating microbial metabolic characteristics and soil organic carbon (SOC) within aggregates and their relationships under conservation tillage may be useful in revealing the mechanism of SOC sequestration in conservation tillage systems. However, limited studies have been conducted to investigate the relationship between SOC and microbial metabolic characteristics within aggregate fractions under conservation tillage. We hypothesized that close relationships can exist between SOC and microbial metabolic characteristics within aggregates under conservation tillage. In this study, a field experiment was conducted from June 2011 to June 2013 following a split-plot design of a randomized complete block with tillage practices [conventional intensive tillage (CT) and no tillage (NT)] as main plots and straw returning methods [preceding crop residue returning (S, 2100-2500 kg C ha-1) and removal (NS, 0 kg C ha(-1))] as subplots with three replications. The objective of this study was to reveal the effects of tillage practices and residue-returning methods on topsoil microbial metabolic characteristics and organic carbon (SOC) fractions within aggregates and their relationships under a rice-wheat cropping system in central China. Microbial metabolic characteristics investigated using the Biolog system was examined within two aggregate fractions (>0.25 and 0.25 aggregate, and 0.25 mm aggregate (11.3%), and 0.25 mm aggregate, and 0.25 mm aggregate, and tillage (NT and S) increased microbial metabolic activities and Shannon index in >0.25 and 0.25 mm aggregate in the upper (0-5 cm) soil layer under conservation tillage systems, as well as directly and indirectly by promoting DOC and MBC in tillage increased SOC in aggregates in the topsoil by improving microbial metabolic activities.

  1. Central serotonin metabolism and frequency of depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Praag, H.M. van; Haan, S. de

    1979-01-01

    Central serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) metabolism can be disturbed in a subgroup of patients with vital (endogenous, primary) depression. Presumably these disturbances do not result from the depression and have a predisposing rather than a causative relationship to it. This latter statement i

  2. Metabolism Is Central to Tolerogenic Dendritic Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Jing Sim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunological tolerance is a fundamental tenant of immune homeostasis and overall health. Self-tolerance is a critical component of the immune system that allows for the recognition of self, resulting in hyporeactivity instead of immunogenicity. Dendritic cells are central to the establishment of dominant immune tolerance through the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and regulatory polarization of T cells. Cellular metabolism holds the key to determining DC immunogenic or tolerogenic cell fate. Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cell maturation leads to a shift toward a glycolytic metabolic state and preferred use of glucose as a carbon source. In contrast, tolerogenic dendritic cells favor oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation. This dichotomous metabolic reprogramming of dendritic cells drives differential cellular function and plays a role in pathologies, such as autoimmune disease. Pharmacological alterations in metabolism have promising therapeutic potential.

  3. Metabolic syndrome and central retinal artery occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosanović-Jaković Natalija

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The accumulation of risk factors for central retinal artery occlusion can be seen in a single person and might be explained by the metabolic syndrome. Case report. We presented the case of a 52-year-old man with no light perception in his right eye. The visual loss was monocular and painless, fundoscopy showed central retinal artery occlusion and the laboratory investigation showed the raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 105 mm/h and the raised C-reactive protein of 22 mg/l. Specific laboratory investigations and fluorescein angiography excluded the presence of vasculitis, collagen vascular diseases, hypercoagulable state and antiphospholipid syndrome. Conclusion. The patient met all the five of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP criteria for the metabolic syndrome: hypertension, abnormal lipid profile, abnormal glucose metabolism, obesity and hyperuricemia. Measurement of C-reactive protein is useful for the assessment of therapeutic systemic effect on any abnormality in the metabolic syndrome. Individual therapy for all risk factors in the metabolic syndrome is necessary to prevent complications such as cardiovascular, retinal vascular diseases and stroke.

  4. (Carbon monoxide metabolism by photosynthetic bacteria)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    Research continued on the metabolism of carbon monoxide by Rhodospirillum rubrum. This report discusses progress on the activity, induction, inhibition, and spectroscopic analysis of the enzyme Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase. (CBS)

  5. Intracellular Acetyl Unit Transport in Fungal Carbon Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijbis, K.; Distel, B.

    2010-01-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is a central metabolite in carbon and energy metabolism. Because of its amphiphilic nature and bulkiness, acetyl-CoA cannot readily traverse biological membranes. In fungi, two systems for acetyl unit transport have been identified: a shuttle dependent on the carrier c

  6. Replicating DNA by cell factories: roles of central carbon metabolism and transcription in the control of DNA replication in microbes, and implications for understanding this process in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barańska, Sylwia; Glinkowska, Monika; Herman-Antosiewicz, Anna; Maciąg-Dorszyńska, Monika; Nowicki, Dariusz; Szalewska-Pałasz, Agnieszka; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2013-05-29

    Precise regulation of DNA replication is necessary to ensure the inheritance of genetic features by daughter cells after each cell division. Therefore, determining how the regulatory processes operate to control DNA replication is crucial to our understanding and application to biotechnological processes. Contrary to early concepts of DNA replication, it appears that this process is operated by large, stationary nucleoprotein complexes, called replication factories, rather than by single enzymes trafficking along template molecules. Recent discoveries indicated that in bacterial cells two processes, central carbon metabolism (CCM) and transcription, significantly and specifically influence the control of DNA replication of various replicons. The impact of these discoveries on our understanding of the regulation of DNA synthesis is discussed in this review. It appears that CCM may influence DNA replication by either action of specific metabolites or moonlighting activities of some enzymes involved in this metabolic pathway. The role of transcription in the control of DNA replication may arise from either topological changes in nucleic acids which accompany RNA synthesis or direct interactions between replication and transcription machineries. Due to intriguing similarities between some prokaryotic and eukaryotic regulatory systems, possible implications of studies on regulation of microbial DNA replication on understanding such a process occurring in human cells are discussed.

  7. Effects of central gastrin-releasing peptide on glucose metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jha, Pawan Kumar; Foppen, Ewout; Challet, Etienne; Kalsbeek, A.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) mediated signals in the central nervous system (CNS) influence many functions associated with energy metabolism. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the central effect of GRP on glucose metabolism in the male rat. Intracerebroventricular (icv) administ

  8. Photosynthetic carbon monoxide metabolism by sugarcane leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortschak, H.P.; Nickell, L.G.

    1973-01-01

    The photosynthetic carbon monoxide metabolism by sugarcane was studied to determine whether substantial quantities of CO are removed from the air by fields in Hawaii. Leaves metabolized low CO concentrations photosynthetically, with sucrose as an end product. Rates of uptake were of the order of 10/sup -4/ power mg/d sq m/hr. This was to low to be significant in removing CO from the atmosphere.

  9. Central nervous system control of triglyceride metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerling, Johanna Janetta (Janine)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes the role of the brain in the regulation of peripheral triglyceride metabolism, in the context of the metabolic syndrome. Based on various pharmacological studies we described the role of two hormones, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1, in the production and clearance of trigl

  10. Engineering central metabolism - a grand challenge for plant biologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetlove, Lee J; Nielsen, Jens; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2016-12-22

    The goal of increasing crop productivity and nutrient-use efficiency is being addressed by a number of ambitious research projects seeking to re-engineer photosynthetic biochemistry. Many of these projects will require the engineering of substantial changes in fluxes of central metabolism. However, as has been amply demonstrated in simpler systems such as microbes, central metabolism is extremely difficult to rationally engineer. This is because of multiple layers of regulation that operate to maintain metabolic steady state and because of the highly connected nature of central metabolism. In this review we discuss new approaches for metabolic engineering that have the potential to address these problems and dramatically improve the success with which we can rationally engineer central metabolism in plants. In particular, we advocate the adoption of an iterative 'design-build-test-learn' cycle using fast-to-transform model plants as test beds. This approach can be realised by coupling new molecular tools to incorporate multiple transgenes in nuclear and plastid genomes with computational modelling to design the engineering strategy and to understand the metabolic phenotype of the engineered organism. We also envisage that mutagenesis could be used to fine-tune the balance between the endogenous metabolic network and the introduced enzymes. Finally, we emphasise the importance of considering the plant as a whole system and not isolated organs: the greatest increase in crop productivity will be achieved if both source and sink metabolism are engineered.

  11. Carbon metabolic pathways in phototrophic bacteria and their broader evolutionary implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Hsiang eTang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis is the biological process that converts solar energy to biomass, bio-products and biofuel. It is the only major natural solar energy storage mechanism on Earth. To satisfy the increased demand for sustainable energy sources and identify the mechanism of photosynthetic carbon assimilation, which is one of the bottlenecks in photosynthesis, it is essential to understand the process of solar energy storage and associated carbon metabolism in photosynthetic organisms. Researchers have employed physiological studies, microbiological chemistry, enzyme assays, genome sequencing, transcriptomics, and 13C-based metabolomics/fluxomics to investigate central carbon metabolism and enzymes that operate in phototrophs. In this report, we review diverse CO2 assimilation pathways, acetate assimilation, carbohydrate catabolism, the TCA cycle and some key and/or unconventional enzymes in central carbon metabolism of phototrophic microorganisms. We also discuss the reducing equivalent flow during photoautotrophic and photoheterotrophic growth, evolutionary links in the central carbon metabolic network, and correlations between photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic organisms. Considering the metabolic versatility in these fascinating and diverse photosynthetic bacteria, many essential questions in their central carbon metabolism still remain to be addressed.

  12. Central Metabolic Pathways of Hyperthermophiles: Important Clues on how Metabolism Gives Rise to Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronimus, R. S.; Morgan, H. W.

    2004-06-01

    Vital clues on life's origins within the galaxy exist here on present day Earth. Life is currently divided into the three domains Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya based on the phylogeny of small ribosomal subunit RNA (16S/18S) gene sequences. The domains are presumed to share a ``last universal common ancestor'' (LUCA). Hyperthermophilic bacteria and archaea, which are able to thrive at 80^{circ}C or higher, dominate the bottom of the tree of life and are thus suggested to be the least evolved, or most ``ancient''. Geochemical data indicates that life first appeared on Earth approximately 3.8 billion years ago in a hot environment. Due to these considerations, hyperthermophiles represent the most appropriate microorganisms to investigate the origins of metabolism. The central biochemical pathway of gluconeogenesis/glycolysis (the Embden-Meyerhof pathway) which produces six carbon sugars from three carbon compounds is present in all organisms and can provide important hints concerning the early development of metabolism. Significantly, there are a number of striking deviations from the textbook canonical reaction sequence that are found, particularly in hyperthermophilic archaea. In this paper the phylogenetic istribution of enzymes of the pathway is detailed; overall, the distribution pattern provides strong evidence for the pathway to have developed from the bottom-up.

  13. Assimilation, dissimilation, and detoxification of formaldehyde, a central metabolic intermediate of methylotrophic metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurimoto, Hiroya; Kato, Nobuo; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2005-01-01

    Methanol is a valuable raw material used in the manufacture of useful chemicals as well as a potential source of energy to replace coal and petroleum. Biotechnological interest in the microbial utilization of methanol has increased because it is an ideal carbon source and can be produced from renewable biomass. Formaldehyde, a cytotoxic compound, is a central metabolic intermediate in methanol metabolism. Therefore, microorganisms utilizing methanol have adopted several metabolic strategies to cope with the toxicity of formaldehyde. Formaldehyde is initially detoxified through trapping by some cofactors, such as glutathione, mycothiol, tetrahydrofolate, and tetrahydromethanopterin, before being oxidized to CO2. Alternatively, free formaldehyde can be trapped by sugar phosphates as the first reaction in the C1 assimilation pathways: the xylulose monophosphate pathway for yeasts and the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) pathway for bacteria. In yeasts, although formaldehyde generation and consumption takes place in the peroxisome, the cytosolic formaldehyde oxidation pathway also plays a role in formaldehyde detoxification as well as energy formation. The key enzymes of the RuMP pathway are found in a variety of microorganisms including bacteria and archaea. Regulation of the genes encoding these enzymes and their catalytic mechanisms depend on the physiological traits of these organisms during evolution.

  14. Modelling central metabolic fluxes by constraint-based optimization reveals metabolic reprogramming of developing Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombié, Sophie; Nazaret, Christine; Bénard, Camille; Biais, Benoît; Mengin, Virginie; Solé, Marion; Fouillen, Laëtitia; Dieuaide-Noubhani, Martine; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Beauvoit, Bertrand; Gibon, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Modelling of metabolic networks is a powerful tool to analyse the behaviour of developing plant organs, including fruits. Guided by our current understanding of heterotrophic metabolism of plant cells, a medium-scale stoichiometric model, including the balance of co-factors and energy, was constructed in order to describe metabolic shifts that occur through the nine sequential stages of Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) fruit development. The measured concentrations of the main biomass components and the accumulated metabolites in the pericarp, determined at each stage, were fitted in order to calculate, by derivation, the corresponding external fluxes. They were used as constraints to solve the model by minimizing the internal fluxes. The distribution of the calculated fluxes of central metabolism were then analysed and compared with known metabolic behaviours. For instance, the partition of the main metabolic pathways (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, etc.) was relevant throughout fruit development. We also predicted a valid import of carbon and nitrogen by the fruit, as well as a consistent CO2 release. Interestingly, the energetic balance indicates that excess ATP is dissipated just before the onset of ripening, supporting the concept of the climacteric crisis. Finally, the apparent contradiction between calculated fluxes with low values compared with measured enzyme capacities suggest a complex reprogramming of the metabolic machinery during fruit development. With a powerful set of experimental data and an accurate definition of the metabolic system, this work provides important insight into the metabolic and physiological requirements of the developing tomato fruits.

  15. Central Carbon Metabolic Pathways in Streptomyces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keulen, Geertje; Siebring, Jeroen; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Dyson, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Streptomyces and other actinomycetes are fascinating soil bacteria of major economic importance. They produce 70% of antibiotics known to man and numerous other pharmaceuticals for treatment of, e.g. cancer, a range of infections, high cholesterol, or have immunosuppressive activity. It is not surpr

  16. Evaluating Soil Carbon Sequestration in Central Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doraiswamy, P. C.; Hunt, E. R.; McCarty, G. W.; Daughtry, C. S.; Izaurralde, C.

    2005-12-01

    The potential for reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration through landuse and management of agricultural systems is of great interest worldwide. Agricultural soils can be a source of CO2 when not properly managed but can also be a sink for sequestering CO2 through proper soil and crop management. The EPIC-CENTURY biogeochemical model was used to simulate the baseline level of soil carbon from soil survey data and project changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) under different tillage and crop management practices for corn and soybean crops. The study was conducted in central Iowa (50 km x 100 km) to simulate changes in soil carbon over the next 50 years. The simulations were conducted in two phases; initially a 25-year period (1971-1995) was simulated using conventional tillage practices since there was a transition in new management after 1995. In the second 25-year period (1996-2020), four different modeling scenarios were applied namely; conventional tillage, mulch tillage, no-tillage and no-tillage with a rye cover crop over the winter. The model simulation results showed potential gains in soil carbon in the top layers of the soil for conservation tillage. The simulations were made at a spatial resolution of 1.6 km x 1.6 km and mapped for the study area. There was a mean reduction in soil organic carbon of 0.095 T/ha per year over the 25-year period starting with 1996 for the conventional tillage practice. However, for management practices of mulch tillage, no tillage and no tillage with cover crop there was an increase in soil organic carbon of 0.12, 0.202 and 0.263 T/ha respectively over the same 25-year period. These results are in general similar to studies conducted in this region.

  17. [Carbon monoxide metabolism by photosynthetic bacteria]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    Research continued on the metabolism of carbon monoxide by Rhodospirillum rubrum. This report discusses progress on the activity, induction, inhibition, and spectroscopic analysis of the enzyme Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase. (CBS)

  18. Flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in Geobactermetallireducens during reduction of solubleFe(III)-NTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Chakraborty, Romy; Garcia-Martin, Hector; Chu,Jeannie; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the carbon fluxes in the central metabolism ofGeobacter metallireducens strain GS-15 using 13C isotopomer modeling.Acetate labeled in the 1st or 2nd position was the sole carbon source,and Fe-NTA was the sole terminal electron acceptor. The measured labeledacetate uptake rate was 21 mmol/gdw/h in the exponential growth phase.The resulting isotope labeling pattern of amino acids allowed an accuratedetermination of the in vivo global metabolic reaction rates (fluxes)through the central metabolic pathways using a computational isotopomermodel. The tracer experiments showed that G. metallireducens containedcomplete biosynthesis pathways for essential metabolism, and this strainmight also have an unusual isoleucine biosynthesis route (usingacetyl-CoA and pyruvate as the precursors). The model indicated that over90 percent of the acetate was completely oxidized to CO2 via a completetricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle while reducing iron. Pyruvate carboxylaseand phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase were present under theseconditions, but enzymes in the glyoxylate shunt and malic enzyme wereabsent. Gluconeogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway were mainlyemployed for biosynthesis and accounted for less than 3 percent of totalcarbon consumption. The model also indicated surprisingly highreversibility in the reaction between oxoglutarate and succinate. Thisstep operates close to the thermodynamic equilibrium possibly becausesuccinate is synthesized via a transferase reaction, and the conversionof oxoglutarate to succinate is a rate limiting step for carbonmetabolism. These findings enable a better understanding of therelationship between genome annotation and extant metabolic pathways inG. metallireducens.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants show common metabolic features in central metabolism irrespective of the underlying auxotrophism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André eKriegeskorte

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the classical phenotype, Staphylococcus aureus may exhibit the small colony-variant (SCV phenotype, which has been associated with chronic, persistent and/or relapsing infections. SCVs are characterized by common phenotypic features such as slow growth, altered susceptibility to antibiotic agents and pathogenic traits based on increased internalization and intracellular persistence. They show frequently auxotrophiesms mainly based on two different mechanisms: (i deficiencies in electron transport as shown for menadione- and/or hemin-auxotrophs and (ii thymidylate biosynthetic-defective SCVs. To get a comprehensive overview of the metabolic differences between both phenotypes, we compared sets of clinically derived menadione-, hemin- and thymidine-auxotrophic SCVs and stable site directed mutants exhibiting the SCV phenotype with their corresponding isogenic parental strains displaying the normal phenotype. Isotopologue profiling and transcriptional analysis of central genes involved in carbon metabolism, revealed large differences between both phenotypes. Labeling experiments with [U-13C6]glucose showed reduced 13C incorporation into aspartate and glutamate from all SCVs irrespective of the underlying auxotrophism. More specifically, these SCVs showed decreased fractions of 13C2-aspartate and glutamate; 13C3-glutamate was not detected at all in the SCVs. In comparison to the patterns in the corresponding experiment with the classical S. aureus phenotype, this indicated a reduced carbon flux via the citric acid cycle in all SCV phenotypes. Indeed, the aconitase-encoding gene (acnA was found down-regulated in all SCV phenotypes under study. In conclusion, all SCV phenotypes including clinical isolates and site-directed mutants displaying the SCV phenotype were characterized by down-regulation of citric acid cycle activity. The common metabolic features in central carbon metabolism found in all SCVs may explain similar

  20. Photorespiration has a dual origin and manifold links to central metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauwe, Hermann; Hagemann, Martin; Kern, Ramona; Timm, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Photorespiration is a Janus-headed metabolic process: it makes oxygenic photosynthesis possible by scavenging its major toxic by-product, 2-phosphoglycolate, but also leads to high losses of freshly assimilated CO(2) from most land plants. Photorespiration has been often classified as a wasteful process but is now increasingly appreciated as a key ancillary component of photosynthesis and therefore the global carbon cycle. As such, the photorespiratory cycle is one of the major highways for the flow of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere. Recent research revealed that this important pathway originated as a partner of oxygenic photosynthesis billions of years ago and is multiply linked to other pathways of central metabolism of contemporary land plants.

  1. New insights into Escherichia coli metabolism: carbon scavenging, acetate metabolism and carbon recycling responses during growth on glycerol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Gómez Karla

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycerol has enhanced its biotechnological importance since it is a byproduct of biodiesel synthesis. A study of Escherichia coli physiology during growth on glycerol was performed combining transcriptional-proteomic analysis as well as kinetic and stoichiometric evaluations in the strain JM101 and certain derivatives with important inactivated genes. Results Transcriptional and proteomic analysis of metabolic central genes of strain JM101 growing on glycerol, revealed important changes not only in the synthesis of MglB, LamB and MalE proteins, but also in the overexpression of carbon scavenging genes: lamB, malE, mglB, mglC, galP and glk and some members of the RpoS regulon (pfkA, pfkB, fbaA, fbaB, pgi, poxB, acs, actP and acnA. Inactivation of rpoS had an important effect on stoichiometric parameters and growth adaptation on glycerol. The observed overexpression of poxB, pta, acs genes, glyoxylate shunt genes (aceA, aceB, glcB and glcC and actP, suggested a possible carbon flux deviation into the PoxB, Acs and glyoxylate shunt. In this scenario acetate synthesized from pyruvate with PoxB was apparently reutilized via Acs and the glyoxylate shunt enzymes. In agreement, no acetate was detected when growing on glycerol, this strain was also capable of glycerol and acetate coutilization when growing in mineral media and derivatives carrying inactivated poxB or pckA genes, accumulated acetate. Tryptophanase A (TnaA was synthesized at high levels and indole was produced by this enzyme, in strain JM101 growing on glycerol. Additionally, in the isogenic derivative with the inactivated tnaA gene, no indole was detected and acetate and lactate were accumulated. A high efficiency aromatic compounds production capability was detected in JM101 carrying pJLBaroGfbrtktA, when growing on glycerol, as compared to glucose. Conclusions The overexpression of several carbon scavenging, acetate metabolism genes and the absence of acetate

  2. Engineering Plant One-Carbon Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Rhodes

    2005-02-09

    Primary and secondary metabolism intersect in the one-carbon (C1) area. Primary metabolism supplies most of the C1 units and competes with secondary metabolism for their use. This competition is potentially severe because secondary products such as lignin, alkaloids, and glycine betaine (GlyBet) require massive amounts of C1 units. Towards the goal of understanding how C1 metabolism is regulated at the metabolic and gene levels so as to successfully engineer C1 supply to match demand, we have: (1) cloned complete suites of C1 genes from maize and tobacco, and incorporated them into DNA arrays; (2) prepared antisense constructs and mutants engineered with alterations in C1 unit supply and demand; and (3) have quantified the impacts of these alterations on gene expression (using DNA arrays), and on metabolic fluxes (by combining isotope labeling, MS, NMR and computer modeling). Metabolic flux analysis and modeling in tobacco engineered for GlyBet synthesis by expressing choline oxidizing enzymes in either the chloroplast or cytosol, has shown that the choline biosynthesis network is rigid, and tends to resist large changes in C1 demand. A major constraint on engineering enhanced flux to GlyBet in tobacco is a low capacity of choline transport across the chloroplast envelope. Maize and sorghum mutants defective in GlyBet synthesis show greatly reduced flux of C1 units into choline in comparison to GlyBet-accumulating wildtypes, but this is not associated with altered expression of any of the C1 genes. Control of C1 flux to choline in tobacco, maize and sorghum appears to reside primarily at the level of N-methylation of phosphoethanolamine. A candidate signal for the control of this flux is the pool size of phosphocholine which down-regulates and feedback inhibits phosphoethanolamine N-methyltransferase. Methionine S-methyltransferase (MMT) catalyzes the synthesis of S-methylmethionine (SMM) from methionine (Met) and S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet). SMM can be

  3. Engineering Plant One-Carbon Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Rhodes

    2005-02-09

    Primary and secondary metabolism intersect in the one-carbon (C1) area. Primary metabolism supplies most of the C1 units and competes with secondary metabolism for their use. This competition is potentially severe because secondary products such as lignin, alkaloids, and glycine betaine (GlyBet) require massive amounts of C1 units. Towards the goal of understanding how C1 metabolism is regulated at the metabolic and gene levels so as to successfully engineer C1 supply to match demand, we have: (1) cloned complete suites of C1 genes from maize and tobacco, and incorporated them into DNA arrays; (2) prepared antisense constructs and mutants engineered with alterations in C1 unit supply and demand; and (3) have quantified the impacts of these alterations on gene expression (using DNA arrays), and on metabolic fluxes (by combining isotope labeling, MS, NMR and computer modeling). Metabolic flux analysis and modeling in tobacco engineered for GlyBet synthesis by expressing choline oxidizing enzymes in either the chloroplast or cytosol, has shown that the choline biosynthesis network is rigid, and tends to resist large changes in C1 demand. A major constraint on engineering enhanced flux to GlyBet in tobacco is a low capacity of choline transport across the chloroplast envelope. Maize and sorghum mutants defective in GlyBet synthesis show greatly reduced flux of C1 units into choline in comparison to GlyBet-accumulating wildtypes, but this is not associated with altered expression of any of the C1 genes. Control of C1 flux to choline in tobacco, maize and sorghum appears to reside primarily at the level of N-methylation of phosphoethanolamine. A candidate signal for the control of this flux is the pool size of phosphocholine which down-regulates and feedback inhibits phosphoethanolamine N-methyltransferase. Methionine S-methyltransferase (MMT) catalyzes the synthesis of S-methylmethionine (SMM) from methionine (Met) and S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet). SMM can be

  4. Effect of carbon source perturbations on transcriptional regulation of metabolic fluxes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ülgen Kutlu Ö

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Control effective flux (CEF of a reaction is the weighted sum of all fluxes through that reaction, derived from elementary flux modes (EFM of a metabolic network. Change in CEFs under different environmental conditions has earlier been proven to be correlated with the corresponding changes in the transcriptome. Here we use this to investigate the degree of transcriptional regulation of fluxes in the metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We do this by quantifying correlations between changes in CEFs and changes in transcript levels for shifts in carbon source, i.e. between the fermentative carbon source glucose and nonfermentative carbon sources like ethanol, acetate, and lactate. The CEF analysis is based on a simple stoichiometric model that includes reactions of the central carbon metabolism and the amino acid metabolism. Results The effect of the carbon shift on the metabolic fluxes was investigated for both batch and chemostat cultures. For growth on glucose in batch (respiro-fermentative cultures, EFMs with no by-product formation were removed from the analysis of the CEFs, whereas those including any by-products (ethanol, glycerol, acetate, succinate were omitted in the analysis of growth on glucose in chemostat (respiratory cultures. This resulted in improved correlations between CEF changes and transcript levels. A regression correlation coefficient of 0.60 was obtained between CEF changes and gene expression changes in the central carbon metabolism for the analysis of 5 different perturbations. Out of 45 data points there were no more than 6 data points deviating from the correlation. Additionally, up- or down-regulation of at least 75% of the genes were in qualitative agreement with the CEF changes for all perturbations studied. Conclusion The analysis indicates that changes in carbon source are associated with a high degree of hierarchical regulation of metabolic fluxes in the central carbon metabolism as the

  5. Integrating Kinetic Model of E. coli with Genome Scale Metabolic Fluxes Overcomes Its Open System Problem and Reveals Bistability in Central Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad A Mannan

    Full Text Available An understanding of the dynamics of the metabolic profile of a bacterial cell is sought from a dynamical systems analysis of kinetic models. This modelling formalism relies on a deterministic mathematical description of enzyme kinetics and their metabolite regulation. However, it is severely impeded by the lack of available kinetic information, limiting the size of the system that can be modelled. Furthermore, the subsystem of the metabolic network whose dynamics can be modelled is faced with three problems: how to parameterize the model with mostly incomplete steady state data, how to close what is now an inherently open system, and how to account for the impact on growth. In this study we address these challenges of kinetic modelling by capitalizing on multi-'omics' steady state data and a genome-scale metabolic network model. We use these to generate parameters that integrate knowledge embedded in the genome-scale metabolic network model, into the most comprehensive kinetic model of the central carbon metabolism of E. coli realized to date. As an application, we performed a dynamical systems analysis of the resulting enriched model. This revealed bistability of the central carbon metabolism and thus its potential to express two distinct metabolic states. Furthermore, since our model-informing technique ensures both stable states are constrained by the same thermodynamically feasible steady state growth rate, the ensuing bistability represents a temporal coexistence of the two states, and by extension, reveals the emergence of a phenotypically heterogeneous population.

  6. Heme oxygenase-1/carbon monoxide: from metabolism to molecular therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2009-09-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a ubiquitous inducible stress-response protein, serves a major metabolic function in heme turnover. HO activity cleaves heme to form biliverdin-IXalpha, carbon monoxide (CO), and iron. Genetic experiments have revealed a central role for HO-1 in tissue homeostasis, protection against oxidative stress, and in the pathogenesis of disease. Four decades of research have witnessed not only progress in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation and function of this illustrious enzyme, but also have opened remarkable translational applications for HO-1 and its reaction products. CO, once regarded as a metabolic waste, can act as an endogenous mediator of cellular signaling and vascular function. Exogenous application of CO by inhalation or pharmacologic delivery can confer cytoprotection in preclinical models of lung/vascular injury and disease, based on anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-proliferative properties. The bile pigments, biliverdin and bilirubin, end products of heme degradation, have also shown potential as therapeutics in vascular disease based on anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities. Further translational and clinical trials research will unveil whether the HO-1 system or any of its reaction products can be successfully applied as molecular medicine in human disease.

  7. An Integrative Approach to Energy, Carbon, and Redox Metabolism in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Special Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbeek, R.

    2003-06-30

    The main objectives for the first year were to produce a detailed metabolic reconstruction of synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 especially in interrelated areas of photosynthesis, respiration, and central carbon metabolism to support a more complete understanding and modeling of this organism. Additionally, Integrated Genomics, Inc., provided detailed bioinformatic analysis of selected functional systems related to carbon and energy generation and utilization, and of the corresponding pathways, functional roles and individual genes to support wet lab experiments by collaborators.

  8. Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-07-12

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism was held at Connecticut College, New London, Connecticut. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  9. Elucidating central metabolic redox obstacles hindering ethanol production in Clostridium thermocellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R Adam; Layton, Donovan S; Guss, Adam M; Olson, Daniel G; Lynd, Lee R; Trinh, Cong T

    2015-11-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is an anaerobic, Gram-positive, thermophilic bacterium that has generated great interest due to its ability to ferment lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. However, ethanol production is low due to the complex and poorly understood branched metabolism of C. thermocellum, and in some cases overflow metabolism as well. In this work, we developed a predictive stoichiometric metabolic model for C. thermocellum which incorporates the current state of understanding, with particular attention to cofactor specificity in the atypical glycolytic enzymes and the complex energy, redox, and fermentative pathways with the goal of aiding metabolic engineering efforts. We validated the model's capability to encompass experimentally observed phenotypes for the parent strain and derived mutants designed for significant perturbation of redox and energy pathways. Metabolic flux distributions revealed significant alterations in key metabolic branch points (e.g., phosphoenol pyruvate, pyruvate, acetyl-CoA, and cofactor nodes) in engineered strains for channeling electron and carbon fluxes for enhanced ethanol synthesis, with the best performing strain doubling ethanol yield and titer compared to the parent strain. In silico predictions of a redox-imbalanced genotype incapable of growth were confirmed in vivo, and a mutant strain was used as a platform to probe redox bottlenecks in the central metabolism that hinder efficient ethanol production. The results highlight the robustness of the redox metabolism of C. thermocellum and the necessity of streamlined electron flux from reduced ferredoxin to NAD(P)H for high ethanol production. The model was further used to design a metabolic engineering strategy to phenotypically constrain C. thermocellum to achieve high ethanol yields while requiring minimal genetic manipulations. The model can be applied to design C. thermocellum as a platform microbe for consolidated bioprocessing to produce ethanol and other reduced

  10. One Carbon Metabolism, Fetal Growth and Long Term Consequences

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    One carbon metabolism, or methyl transfer, is critical for metabolism in all cells, is involved in the synthesis of purines, pyrimidines, in the methylation of numerous substrates, proteins, DNA and RNA, and in the expression of a number of genes. Serine is the primary endogenous methyl donor to the one carbon pool. Perturbations in methyl transfer due to nutrient and hormonal changes can have profound effect on cell function, growth and proliferation. It is postulated that at critical stages...

  11. Quantitative Multilevel Analysis of Central Metabolism in Developing Oilseeds of Oilseed Rape During In Vitro Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwender, Jorg [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hebbelmann, Inga [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Heinzel, Nicholas [Leibniz Inst. of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Gatersleben (Germany); Hildebrandt, Tatjana [Univ. of Hannover (Germany); Rogers, Alistair [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Naik, Dhiraj [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Indian Inst. of Advanced Research Koba, Gujarat (India); Klapperstuck, Matthias [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Braun, Hans -Peter [Univ. of Hannover (Germany); Schreiber, Falk [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Univ. Halle-Wittenberg, Melbourne (Australia); Denolf, Peter [Bayer CropScience (Belgium); Borisjuk, Ljudmilla [Leibniz Inst. of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Gatersleben (Germany); Rolletschek, Hardy [Leibniz Inst. of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Gatersleben (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Seeds provide the basis for many food, feed, and fuel products. Continued increases in seed yield, composition, and quality require an improved understanding of how the developing seed converts carbon and nitrogen supplies into storage. Current knowledge of this process is often based on the premise that transcriptional regulation directly translates via enzyme concentration into flux. In an attempt to highlight metabolic control, we explore genotypic differences in carbon partitioning for in vitro cultured developing embryos of oilseed rape (Brassica napus). We determined biomass composition as well as 79 net fluxes, the levels of 77 metabolites, and 26 enzyme activities with specific focus on central metabolism in nine selected germplasm accessions. We observed a tradeoff between the biomass component fractions of lipid and starch. With increasing lipid content over the spectrum of genotypes, plastidic fatty acid synthesis and glycolytic flux increased concomitantly, while glycolytic intermediates decreased. The lipid/starch tradeoff was not reflected at the proteome level, pointing to the significance of (posttranslational) metabolic control. Enzyme activity/flux and metabolite/flux correlations suggest that plastidic pyruvate kinase exerts flux control and that the lipid/starch tradeoff is most likely mediated by allosteric feedback regulation of phosphofructokinase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Also, quantitative data were used to calculate in vivo mass action ratios, reaction equilibria, and metabolite turnover times. Compounds like cyclic 3',5'-AMP and sucrose-6-phosphate were identified to potentially be involved in so far unknown mechanisms of metabolic control. This study provides a rich source of quantitative data for those studying central metabolism..

  12. Quantitative Multilevel Analysis of Central Metabolism in Developing Oilseeds of Oilseed Rape during in Vitro Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwender, Jörg; Hebbelmann, Inga; Heinzel, Nicolas; Hildebrandt, Tatjana; Rogers, Alistair; Naik, Dhiraj; Klapperstück, Matthias; Braun, Hans-Peter; Schreiber, Falk; Denolf, Peter; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Rolletschek, Hardy

    2015-07-01

    Seeds provide the basis for many food, feed, and fuel products. Continued increases in seed yield, composition, and quality require an improved understanding of how the developing seed converts carbon and nitrogen supplies into storage. Current knowledge of this process is often based on the premise that transcriptional regulation directly translates via enzyme concentration into flux. In an attempt to highlight metabolic control, we explore genotypic differences in carbon partitioning for in vitro cultured developing embryos of oilseed rape (Brassica napus). We determined biomass composition as well as 79 net fluxes, the levels of 77 metabolites, and 26 enzyme activities with specific focus on central metabolism in nine selected germplasm accessions. Overall, we observed a tradeoff between the biomass component fractions of lipid and starch. With increasing lipid content over the spectrum of genotypes, plastidic fatty acid synthesis and glycolytic flux increased concomitantly, while glycolytic intermediates decreased. The lipid/starch tradeoff was not reflected at the proteome level, pointing to the significance of (posttranslational) metabolic control. Enzyme activity/flux and metabolite/flux correlations suggest that plastidic pyruvate kinase exerts flux control and that the lipid/starch tradeoff is most likely mediated by allosteric feedback regulation of phosphofructokinase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Quantitative data were also used to calculate in vivo mass action ratios, reaction equilibria, and metabolite turnover times. Compounds like cyclic 3',5'-AMP and sucrose-6-phosphate were identified to potentially be involved in so far unknown mechanisms of metabolic control. This study provides a rich source of quantitative data for those studying central metabolism.

  13. Mapping soil carbon stocks of Central Africa using SOTER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batjes, N.H.

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the soil carbon stocks of Central Africa although such baseline data are needed for research and policy development on soil carbon changes. Estimates are presented based on a 1:2 million scale soil and terrain (SOTER) database for Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and

  14. Ozone risk assessment for plants: Central role of metabolism-dependent changes in reducing power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dizengremel, Pierre [Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, UMR1137 Ecologie et Ecophysiologie Forestieres, Nancy-Universite, BP239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France)], E-mail: pierre.dizengremel@scbiol.uhp-nancy.fr; Le Thiec, Didier [INRA, UMR1137 Ecologie et Ecophysiologie Forestieres, Centre INRA de Nancy, F-54280 Champenoux (France)], E-mail: le_thiec@nancy.inra.fr; Bagard, Matthieu [Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, UMR1137 Ecologie et Ecophysiologie Forestieres, Nancy-Universite, BP239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France)], E-mail: matthieu.bagard@scbiol.uhp-nancy.fr; Jolivet, Yves [Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, UMR1137 Ecologie et Ecophysiologie Forestieres, Nancy-Universite, BP239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France)], E-mail: yves.jolivet@scbiol.uhp-nancy.fr

    2008-11-15

    The combination of stomatal-dependent ozone flux and total ascorbate level is currently presented as a correct indicator for determining the degree of sensitivity of plants to ozone. However, the large changes in carbon metabolism could play a central role in the strategy of the foliar cells in response to chronic ozone exposure, participating in the supply of reducing power and carbon skeletons for repair and detoxification, and modifying the stomatal mode of functioning. To reinforce the accuracy of the definition of the threshold for ozone risk assessment, it is proposed to also consider the redox pool (NAD(P)H), the ratio between carboxylases and the water use efficiency as indicators of the differential ozone tolerance of plants. - We propose reducing power, Rubisco/PEPc ratio and water use efficiency as additional indicators in ozone risk assessment for plants.

  15. Carbonate platform growth and demise offshore Central Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fyhn, Michael B.W.; Boldreel, Lars Ole; Nielsen, Lars H.;

    2013-01-01

    Fault Zone, the Tuy Hoa Carbonate Platform fringes the continental margin between Da Nang and Nha Trang. Here, platform growth initiated during the Early Miocene and continued until Middle Miocene time when regional uplift led to subaerial exposure, termination of platform growth and karstification...... is interpreted as a consequence of regional uplift and denudation of central and south Indochina starting during Middle Miocene time when the Tuy Hoa Carbonate Platform became subaerially exposed. Stressed carbonate growth conditions on the Triton Carbonate Platform probably resulted from increased inorganic...

  16. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle.

  17. Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism 2008 Gordon Research Conference (July 20-25, 2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen W. Ragsdale

    2009-08-12

    One-carbon (C-1) compounds play a central role in microbial metabolism. C-1 compounds include methane, carbon monoxide, CO2, and methanol as well as coenzyme-bound one-carbon compounds (methyl-B12, CH3-H4folate, etc). Such compounds are of broad global importance because several C-1 compounds (e.g., CH4) are important energy sources, some (e.g., CO2 and CH4) are potent greenhouse gases, and others (e.g., CH2Cl2) are xenobiotics. They are central in pathways of energy metabolism and carbon fixation by microbes and many are of industrial interest. Research on the pathways of one-carbon metabolism has added greatly to our understanding of evolution, structural biology, enzyme mechanisms, gene regulation, ecology, and applied biology. The 2008 meeting will include recent important findings in the following areas: (a) genomics, metagenomics, and proteomic studies that have expanded our understanding of autotrophy and C-1 metabolism and the evolution of these pathways; (b) redox regulation of carbon cycles and the interrelationship between the carbon cycle and other biogeochemical cycles (sulfur, nitrogen, oxygen); (c) novel pathways for carbon assimilation; (d) biotechnology related to C-1 metabolism; (e) novel enzyme mechanisms including channeling of C-1 intermediates during metabolism; and (f) the relationship between metal homeostasis and the global carbon cycle. The conference has a diverse and gender-balanced slate of speakers and session leaders. The wide variety of disciplines brought to the study of C-1 metabolism make the field an excellent one in which to train young researchers.

  18. Pathway thermodynamics highlights kinetic obstacles in central metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Elad; Bar-Even, Arren; Flamholz, Avi; Reznik, Ed; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Milo, Ron

    2014-02-01

    In metabolism research, thermodynamics is usually used to determine the directionality of a reaction or the feasibility of a pathway. However, the relationship between thermodynamic potentials and fluxes is not limited to questions of directionality: thermodynamics also affects the kinetics of reactions through the flux-force relationship, which states that the logarithm of the ratio between the forward and reverse fluxes is directly proportional to the change in Gibbs energy due to a reaction (ΔrG'). Accordingly, if an enzyme catalyzes a reaction with a ΔrG' of -5.7 kJ/mol then the forward flux will be roughly ten times the reverse flux. As ΔrG' approaches equilibrium (ΔrG' = 0 kJ/mol), exponentially more enzyme counterproductively catalyzes the reverse reaction, reducing the net rate at which the reaction proceeds. Thus, the enzyme level required to achieve a given flux increases dramatically near equilibrium. Here, we develop a framework for quantifying the degree to which pathways suffer these thermodynamic limitations on flux. For each pathway, we calculate a single thermodynamically-derived metric (the Max-min Driving Force, MDF), which enables objective ranking of pathways by the degree to which their flux is constrained by low thermodynamic driving force. Our framework accounts for the effect of pH, ionic strength and metabolite concentration ranges and allows us to quantify how alterations to the pathway structure affect the pathway's thermodynamics. Applying this methodology to pathways of central metabolism sheds light on some of their features, including metabolic bypasses (e.g., fermentation pathways bypassing substrate-level phosphorylation), substrate channeling (e.g., of oxaloacetate from malate dehydrogenase to citrate synthase), and use of alternative cofactors (e.g., quinone as an electron acceptor instead of NAD). The methods presented here place another arrow in metabolic engineers' quiver, providing a simple means of evaluating the

  19. Neural-metabolic coupling in the central visual pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ralph D; Li, Baowang

    2016-10-05

    Studies are described which are intended to improve our understanding of the primary measurements made in non-invasive neural imaging. The blood oxygenation level-dependent signal used in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) reflects changes in deoxygenated haemoglobin. Tissue oxygen concentration, along with blood flow, changes during neural activation. Therefore, measurements of tissue oxygen together with the use of a neural sensor can provide direct estimates of neural-metabolic interactions. We have used this relationship in a series of studies in which a neural microelectrode is combined with an oxygen micro-sensor to make simultaneous co-localized measurements in the central visual pathway. Oxygen responses are typically biphasic with small initial dips followed by large secondary peaks during neural activation. By the use of established visual response characteristics, we have determined that the oxygen initial dip provides a better estimate of local neural function than the positive peak. This contrasts sharply with fMRI for which the initial dip is unreliable. To extend these studies, we have examined the relationship between the primary metabolic agents, glucose and lactate, and associated neural activity. For this work, we also use a Doppler technique to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) together with neural activity. Results show consistent synchronously timed changes such that increases in neural activity are accompanied by decreases in glucose and simultaneous increases in lactate. Measurements of CBF show clear delays with respect to neural response. This is consistent with a slight delay in blood flow with respect to oxygen delivery during neural activation.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'.

  20. Metabolic profiling of breast cancer: Differences in central metabolism between subtypes of breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Lucas; Schlimpert, Manuel; Halbach, Sebastian; Erbes, Thalia; Stickeler, Elmar; Kammerer, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    Although the concept of aerobic glycolysis in cancer was already reported in the 1930s by Otto Warburg, the understanding of metabolic pathways remains challenging especially due to the heterogeneity of cancer. In consideration of four different time points (1, 2, 4, and 7 days of incubation), GC-MS profiling of metabolites was performed on cell extracts and supernatants of breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, -453, BT-474) with different sub classification and the breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A. To the exclusion of trypsinization, direct methanolic extraction, cell scraping and cell disruption was executed to obtain central metabolites. Major differences in biochemical pathways have been observed in the breast cancer cell lines compared to the breast epithelial cell line, as well as between the breast cancer cell lines themselves. Characteristics of breast cancer subtypes could be correlated to their individual metabolic profiles. PLS-DA revealed the discrimination of breast cancer cell lines from MCF-10A based on elevated amino acid levels. The observed metabolic signatures have great potential as biomarker for breast cancer as well as an improved understanding of subtype specific phenomenons of breast cancer.

  1. Nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur metabolism in natural Thioploca samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otte, S.; Kuenen, JG; Nielsen, LP

    1999-01-01

    Filamentous sulfur bacteria of the genus Thioploca occur as dense mats on the continental shelf off the coast of Chile and Peru. Since little is known about their nitrogen, sulfur, and carbon metabolism, this study was undertaken to investigate their (eco)physiology. Thioploca is able to store in...

  2. Computer Modeling of Carbon Metabolism Enables Biofuel Engineering (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-09-01

    In an effort to reduce the cost of biofuels, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has merged biochemistry with modern computing and mathematics. The result is a model of carbon metabolism that will help researchers understand and engineer the process of photosynthesis for optimal biofuel production.

  3. Carbon and energy metabolism of atp mutants of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Michelsen, Ole

    1992-01-01

    The membrane-bound H+-ATPase plays a key role in free-energy transduction of biological systems. We report how the carbon and energy metabolism of Escherichia coli changes in response to deletion of the atp operon that encodes this enzyme. Compared with the isogenic wild-type strain, the growth...

  4. Preferential use of central metabolism in vivo reveals a nutritional basis for polymicrobial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Alteri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The human genitourinary tract is a common anatomical niche for polymicrobial infection and a leading site for the development of bacteremia and sepsis. Most uncomplicated, community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI are caused by Escherichia coli, while another bacterium, Proteus mirabilis, is more often associated with complicated UTI. Here, we report that uropathogenic E. coli and P. mirabilis have divergent requirements for specific central pathways in vivo despite colonizing and occupying the same host environment. Using mutants of specific central metabolism enzymes, we determined glycolysis mutants lacking pgi, tpiA, pfkA, or pykA all have fitness defects in vivo for P. mirabilis but do not affect colonization of E. coli during UTI. Similarly, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway is required only for P. mirabilis in vivo. In contrast, gluconeogenesis is required only for E. coli fitness in vivo. The remarkable difference in central pathway utilization between E. coli and P. mirabilis during experimental UTI was also observed for TCA cycle mutants in sdhB, fumC, and frdA. The distinct in vivo requirements between these pathogens suggest E. coli and P. mirabilis are not direct competitors within host urinary tract nutritional niche. In support of this, we found that co-infection with E. coli and P. mirabilis wild-type strains enhanced bacterial colonization and persistence of both pathogens during UTI. Our results reveal that complementary utilization of central carbon metabolism facilitates polymicrobial disease and suggests microbial activity in vivo alters the host urinary tract nutritional niche.

  5. Central versus peripheral cardiovascular risk in metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather eEdgell

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS; i.e. 3 of 5 of the following risk factors (RFs: elevated blood pressure, waist circumference, triglycerides, blood glucose or reduced HDL are thought to be prone to serious cardiovascular disease and there is debate as to whether the disease begins in the peripheral vasculature or centrally. This study investigates hemodynamics, cardiac function/morphology, as well as mechanical properties of the central (heart, carotid artery and peripheral (total peripheral resistance, forearm vascular bed vasculature in individuals without (1-2 RFs; n=28, or with (≥3 RFs; n=46 MetS. After adjustments for statin and blood pressure medication use, those with MetS had lower mitral valve E/A ratios (<3 RFs: 1.24±0.07; ≥3 RFs: 1.01±0.04; P=0.025, and higher total peripheral resistance index (<3 RFs: 48±2 mmHg/L/min/m2; ≥3 RFs: 53±2 mmHg/L/min/m2; P=0.04. There were no differences in heart size, carotid artery measurements, cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity, pulse wave velocity, stroke volume index, or cardiac output index due to MetS after adjustments for statin and blood pressure medication use. In a separate analysis, the use of statins was associated with increased inertia in the brachial vascular bed, increased HbA1c and decreased LDL cholesterol. The independent use of anti-hypertensive medication was associated with decreased predicted VO2max, triglycerides, diastolic blood pressure, interventricular septum thickness, calculated left ventricle mass, left ventricle posterior wall thickness, and left ventricle pre-ejection period, but increased carotid stiffness, HDL cholesterol, and heart rate. These data imply that both a central cardiac effect and a peripheral effect of vascular resistance are expressed in MetS. These data also indicate that variance in between-group responses due to pharmacological treatments are important factors to consider in studying cardiovascular changes in these individuals.

  6. Flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in the Fe(III)-reducing organism Geobacter metallireducens via 13C isotopiclabeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Chakraborty, Romy; Martin, Hector Garcia; Chu,Jeannie; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-08-13

    We analyzed the carbon fluxes in the central metabolism ofGeobacter metallireducens strain GS-15 using 13C isotopomer modeling.Acetate labeled in the 1st or 2nd position was the sole carbon source,and Fe-NTA was the sole terminal electron acceptor. The measured labeledacetate uptake rate was 21 mmol/gdw/h in the exponential growth phase.The resulting isotope labeling pattern of amino acids allowed an accuratedetermination of the in vivo global metabolic reaction rates (fluxes)through the central metabolic pathways using a computational isotopomermodel. The model indicated that over 90 percent of the acetate wascompletely oxidized to CO2 via a complete tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cyclewhile reducing iron. Pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxykinase were present under these conditions, but enzymes in theglyoxylate shunt and malic enzyme were absent. Gluconeogenesis and thepentose phosphate pathway were mainly employed for biosynthesis andaccounted for less than 3 percent of total carbon consumption. The modelalso indicated surprisingly high reversibility in the reaction betweenoxoglutarate and succinate. This step operates close to the thermodynamicequilibrium possibly because succinate is synthesized via a transferasereaction, and its product, acetyl-CoA, inhibits the conversion ofoxoglutarate to succinate. These findings enable a better understandingof the relationship between genome annotation and extant metabolicpathways in G. metallireducens.

  7. Transcript abundance on its own cannot be used to infer fluxes in central metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg eSchwender

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made to define the extent to which metabolic flux in central plant metabolism is reflected by changes in the transcriptome and metabolome, based on an analysis of in vitro cultured immature embryos of two oilseed rape (Brassica napus accessions which contrast for seed lipid accumulation. Metabolic flux analysis was used to constrain a flux balance metabolic model which included 671 biochemical and transport reactions within the central metabolism. This highly confident flux information was eventually used for comparative analysis of flux versus transcript (metabolite. Metabolite profiling succeeded in identifying 79 intermediates within the central metabolism, some of which differed quantitatively between the two accessions and displayed a significant shift corresponding to flux. An RNA-Seq based transcriptome analysis revealed a large number of genes which were differentially transcribed in the two accessions, including some enzymes/proteins active in major metabolic pathways. With a few exceptions, differential activity in the major pathways (glycolysis, TCA cycle, amino acid and fatty acid synthesis was not reflected in contrasting abundances of the relevant transcripts. The conclusion was that transcript abundance on its own cannot be used to infer metabolic activity/fluxes in central plant metabolism. This limitation needs to be borne in mind in evaluating transcriptome data and designing metabolic engineering experiments.

  8. Methionine, homocysteine, one carbon metabolism and fetal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhan, Satish C; Marczewski, Susan E

    2012-06-01

    Methionine and folate are the key components of one carbon metabolism, providing the methyl groups for numerous methyl transferase reactions via the ubiquitous methyl donor, s-adenosyl methionine. Methionine metabolism is responsive to nutrient intake, is regulated by several hormones and requires a number of vitamins (B12, pyridoxine, riboflavin) as co-factors. The critical relationship between perturbations in the mother's methionine metabolism and its impact on fetal growth and development is now becoming evident. The relation of folate intake to fetal teratogenesis has been known for some time. Studies in human pregnancy show a continuous decrease in plasma homocysteine, and an increase in plasma choline concentrations with advancing gestation. A higher rate of transsulfuration of methionine in early gestation and of transmethylation in the 3rd trimester was seen in healthy pregnant women. How these processes are impacted by nutritional, hormonal and other influences in human pregnancy and their effect on fetal growth has not been examined. Isocaloric protein restriction in pregnant rats, resulted in fetal growth restriction and metabolic reprogramming. Isocaloric protein restriction in the non-pregnant rat, resulted in differential expression of a number of genes in the liver, a 50% increase in whole body serine biosynthesis and high rate of transmethylation, suggesting high methylation demands. These responses were associated with a significant decrease in intracellular taurine levels in the liver suggesting a role of cellular osmolarity in the observed metabolic responses. These unique changes in methionine and one carbon metabolism in response to physiological, nutritional and hormonal influences make these processes critical for cellular and organ function and growth.

  9. Comprehensive evaluation of one-carbon metabolism pathway gene variants and renal cell cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd M Gibson

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Folate and one-carbon metabolism are linked to cancer risk through their integral role in DNA synthesis and methylation. Variation in one-carbon metabolism genes, particularly MTHFR, has been associated with risk of a number of cancers in epidemiologic studies, but little is known regarding renal cancer. METHODS: Tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs selected to produce high genomic coverage of 13 gene regions of one-carbon metabolism (ALDH1L1, BHMT, CBS, FOLR1, MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, SHMT1, SLC19A1, TYMS and the closely associated glutathione synthesis pathway (CTH, GGH, GSS were genotyped for 777 renal cell carcinoma (RCC cases and 1,035 controls in the Central and Eastern European Renal Cancer case-control study. Associations of individual SNPs (n = 163 with RCC risk were calculated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex and study center. Minimum p-value permutation (Min-P tests were used to identify gene regions associated with risk, and haplotypes were evaluated within these genes. RESULTS: The strongest associations with RCC risk were observed for SLC19A1 (P(min-P = 0.03 and MTHFR (P(min-P = 0.13. A haplotype consisting of four SNPs in SLC19A1 (rs12483553, rs2838950, rs2838951, and rs17004785 was associated with a 37% increased risk (p = 0.02, and exploratory stratified analysis suggested the association was only significant among those in the lowest tertile of vegetable intake. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the first study to comprehensively examine variation in one-carbon metabolism genes in relation to RCC risk. We identified a novel association with SLC19A1, which is important for transport of folate into cells. Replication in other populations is required to confirm these findings.

  10. Thyroid Hormone Receptor beta Mediates Acute Illness-Induced Alterations in Central Thyroid Hormone Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Boelen; J. Kwakkel; O. Chassande; E. Fliers

    2009-01-01

    Acute illness in mice profoundly affects thyroid hormone metabolism in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. It remains unknown whether the thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-beta is involved in these changes. In the present study, we investigated central thyroid hormone metabolism during lipopolysacchar

  11. Correlations between carbon metabolism and virulence in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncet, Sandrine; Milohanic, Eliane; Mazé, Alain; Nait Abdallah, Jamila; Aké, Francine; Larribe, Mireille; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Dozot, Marie; De Bolle, Xavier; Letesson, Jean Jacques; Deutscher, Josef

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria have developed several mechanisms which allow the preferred utilization of the most efficiently metabolizable carbohydrates when these organisms are exposed to a mixture of carbon sources. Interestingly, the same or similar mechanisms are used by some pathogens to control various steps of their infection process. The efficient metabolism of a carbon source might serve as signal for proper fitness. Alternatively, the presence of a specific carbon source might indicate to bacterial cells that they thrive in infection-related organs, tissues or cells and that specific virulence genes should be turned on or switched off. Frequently, virulence gene regulators are affected by changes in carbon source availability. For example, expression of the gene encoding the Streptococcus pyogenes virulence regulator Mga is controlled by the classical carbon catabolite repression (CCR) mechanism operative in Firmicutes. The activity of PrfA, the major virulence regulator in Listeria monocytogenes, seems to be controlled by the phosphorylation state of phosphotransferase system(PTS) components. In Vibrio cholerae synthesis of HapR, which regulates the expression of genes required for motility, is controlled via the Crp/cAMP CCR mechanism, whereas synthesis of Salmonella enterica HilE, which represses genes in a pathogenicity island, is regulated by the carbohydrate-responsive, PTS-controlled Mlc.

  12. Should waist circumference be replaced by index of central obesity (ICO) in definition of metabolic syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, R; Mohan, V; Joshi, S

    2012-01-01

    Waist circumference has been widely used as the parameter of central obesity in defining metabolic syndrome. Global consensus definition of metabolic syndrome has suggested various race- and gender-specific cutoffs of waist circumference for quantifying central obesity. We have earlier proposed that using index of central obesity (ICO), the need for race- and gender-specific cutoffs may be obviated. We propose that waist circumference be supplanted with index of central obesity in all definitions of metabolic syndrome. Using index of central obesity a common cutoff of 0.5 applicable across races and genders might be obtained. Moreover, it will enhance the sensitivity of definition by diagnosing subjects who are shorter than general population. Among 258 male and 242 female diabetic patients, subjects with metabolic syndrome (defined as per gender-specific waist circumference cutoffs), were found to have a common lower range of index of central obesity suggesting that a common cutoff of waist circumference may be obtained. In another study from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey database, replacing index of central obesity with waist circumference was found to enhance the specificity and sensitivity of definition of metabolic syndrome.

  13. An integrative approach to energy, carbon, and redox metabolism in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbeek, Ross; Fonstein, Veronika; Osterman, Andrei; Gerdes, Svetlana; Vassieva, Olga; Zagnitko, Olga; Rodionov, Dmitry

    2005-02-15

    covering energy, carbon, and redox metabolism in the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and other cyanobacteria has been performed (Specific Aim 4). The main objectives for this year (adjusted to reflect a new, public domain, setting of the Project research team) were: Aim 1. To develop, test, and deploy a new open source system, the SEED, for integrating community-based annotation, and comparative analysis of all publicly available microbial genomes. Develop a comprehensive genomic database by integrating within SEED all publicly available complete and nearly complete genome sequences with special emphasis on genomes of cyanobacteria, phototrophic eukaryotes, and anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria--invaluable for comparative genomic studies of energy and carbon metabolism in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Aim 2. To develop the SEED's biological content in the form of a collection of encoded Subsystems largely covering the conserved cellular machinery in prokaryotes (and central metabolic machinery in eukaryotes). Aim 3. To develop, utilizing core SEED technology, the CyanoSEED--a specialized WEB portal for community-based annotation, and comparative analysis of all publicly available cyanobacterial genomes. Encode the set of additional subsystems representing key metabolic transformations in cyanobacteria and other photoautotrophs. We envisioned this resource as complementary to other public access databases for comparative genomic analysis currently available to the cyanobacterial research community. Aim 4. Perform in-depth analysis of several subsystems covering energy, carbon, and redox metabolism in the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and all other cyanobacteria with available genome sequences. Reveal inconsistencies and gaps in the current knowledge of these subsystems. Use functional and genome context analysis tools in CyanoSEED to predict, whenever possible, candidate genes for inferred functional roles. To disseminate freely these conjectures and predictions by publishing

  14. An integrative approach to energy, carbon, and redox metabolism in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbeek, Ross; Fonstein, Veronika; Osterman, Andrei; Gerdes, Svetlana; Vassieva, Olga; Zagnitko, Olga; Rodionov, Dmitry

    2005-02-15

    covering energy, carbon, and redox metabolism in the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and other cyanobacteria has been performed (Specific Aim 4). The main objectives for this year (adjusted to reflect a new, public domain, setting of the Project research team) were: Aim 1. To develop, test, and deploy a new open source system, the SEED, for integrating community-based annotation, and comparative analysis of all publicly available microbial genomes. Develop a comprehensive genomic database by integrating within SEED all publicly available complete and nearly complete genome sequences with special emphasis on genomes of cyanobacteria, phototrophic eukaryotes, and anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria--invaluable for comparative genomic studies of energy and carbon metabolism in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Aim 2. To develop the SEED's biological content in the form of a collection of encoded Subsystems largely covering the conserved cellular machinery in prokaryotes (and central metabolic machinery in eukaryotes). Aim 3. To develop, utilizing core SEED technology, the CyanoSEED--a specialized WEB portal for community-based annotation, and comparative analysis of all publicly available cyanobacterial genomes. Encode the set of additional subsystems representing key metabolic transformations in cyanobacteria and other photoautotrophs. We envisioned this resource as complementary to other public access databases for comparative genomic analysis currently available to the cyanobacterial research community. Aim 4. Perform in-depth analysis of several subsystems covering energy, carbon, and redox metabolism in the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and all other cyanobacteria with available genome sequences. Reveal inconsistencies and gaps in the current knowledge of these subsystems. Use functional and genome context analysis tools in CyanoSEED to predict, whenever possible, candidate genes for inferred functional roles. To disseminate freely these conjectures and predictions by publishing

  15. The Role of Diet in One-Carbon Metabolism and Epigenetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Mads Vendelbo

    Background: Dysregulation of one-carbon metabolism (OCM) is related to metabolic syndrome (MetS) through various mechanisms including epigenetics. Diet plays a central role in ensuring normal OCM regulation by supplying multiple nutrients. Foods such as whole grains and fish have been proposed...... acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) which might also play a role in OCM regulation and epigenetics. Aim: This PhD thesis investigates the role of diet in OCM regulation and the potential association between OCM and MetS. We further investigated whether a dietary intervention with high whole grain...... intake can affect OCM metabolites in plasma. Finally, we explored whether a fish oil supplement can induce epigenetic changes and whether these are related to MetS features. Methods: In two cross-sectional studies using the 3G-cohort, we investigated associations between plasma OCM metabolites, s...

  16. Carbon monoxide expedites metabolic exhaustion to inhibit tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegiel, Barbara; Gallo, David; Csizmadia, Eva; Harris, Clair; Belcher, John; Vercellotti, Gregory M; Penacho, Nuno; Seth, Pankaj; Sukhatme, Vikas; Ahmed, Asif; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Helczynski, Leszek; Bjartell, Anders; Persson, Jenny Liao; Otterbein, Leo E

    2013-12-01

    One classical feature of cancer cells is their metabolic acquisition of a highly glycolytic phenotype. Carbon monoxide (CO), one of the products of the cytoprotective molecule heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in cancer cells, has been implicated in carcinogenesis and therapeutic resistance. However, the functional contributions of CO and HO-1 to these processes are poorly defined. In human prostate cancers, we found that HO-1 was nuclear localized in malignant cells, with low enzymatic activity in moderately differentiated tumors correlating with relatively worse clinical outcomes. Exposure to CO sensitized prostate cancer cells but not normal cells to chemotherapy, with growth arrest and apoptosis induced in vivo in part through mitotic catastrophe. CO targeted mitochondria activity in cancer cells as evidenced by higher oxygen consumption, free radical generation, and mitochondrial collapse. Collectively, our findings indicated that CO transiently induces an anti-Warburg effect by rapidly fueling cancer cell bioenergetics, ultimately resulting in metabolic exhaustion.

  17. Central Obesity and Metabolic Risk Factors in Middle-aged Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Xue Yao; ZHENG Fen Ping; ZHOU Jia Qiang; DU Ying; PAN Qian Qian; ZHANG Sai Fei; YU Dan; LI Hong

    2014-01-01

    Objective Central obesity is considered to be a central component of metabolic syndrome. Waist circumference (WC) has been widely used as a simple indicator of central obesity. This study is aimed to evaluate the sensitivity of WC cut-off values for predicting metabolic risk factors in middle-aged Chinese. Methods The study involved 923 subjects aged 40-65 years. The metabolic risk factors were defined according to the Chinese Joint Committee for Developing Chinese Guidelines on Prevention and Treatment of Dyslipidemia in Adults. WC cut-off 85-90 cm and≥90 cm were used as cut-off values of central pre-obesity and central obesity in males, respectively, while WC 80-85 cm and≥85 cm were used as cut-off values of central pre-obesity and central obesity in females. Results First, WC values corresponding to body mass index (BMI) 24 kg/m2 and visceral fat area (VFA) 80 cm2 were 88.55 cm and 88.51 cm in males, and 81.46 cm and 82.51 cm in females respectively. Second, receiver operating characteristic curves showed that the optimal WC cut-off of value was 88.75 cm in males, higher than that in females (81.75 cm). Third, the subjects with higher WC values were more likely to have accumulating metabolic risk factors. The prevalence of metabolic risk factors increased linearly and significantly in relation to WC levels. Conclusion WC cut-off values of central pre-/central obesity are optimal to predict multiple metabolic risk factors.

  18. Transcriptional regulation of central amino acid metabolism in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the functional characterisation of the transcriptional regulators GlnR, ArgR and AhrC of Lactococcus lactis, which are responsible for the control of genes involved in the metabolism of the amino acids glutamine, glutamate and arginine. A chromosomal glnR deletion mutant was ma

  19. Carbohydrate metabolism and carbon fixation in Roseobacter denitrificans OCh114.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Hsiang Tang

    Full Text Available The Roseobacter clade of aerobic marine proteobacteria, which compose 10-25% of the total marine bacterial community, has been reported to fix CO(2, although it has not been determined what pathway is involved. In this study, we report the first metabolic studies on carbohydrate utilization, CO(2 assimilation, and amino acid biosynthesis in the phototrophic Roseobacter clade bacterium Roseobacter denitrificans OCh114. We develop a new minimal medium containing defined carbon source(s, in which the requirements of yeast extract reported previously for the growth of R. denitrificans can be replaced by vitamin B(12 (cyanocobalamin. Tracer experiments were carried out in R. denitrificans grown in a newly developed minimal medium containing isotopically labeled pyruvate, glucose or bicarbonate as a single carbon source or in combination. Through measurements of (13C-isotopomer labeling patterns in protein-derived amino acids, gene expression profiles, and enzymatic activity assays, we report that: (1 R. denitrificans uses the anaplerotic pathways mainly via the malic enzyme to fix 10-15% of protein carbon from CO(2; (2 R. denitrificans employs the Entner-Doudoroff (ED pathway for carbohydrate metabolism and the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway for the biosynthesis of histidine, ATP, and coenzymes; (3 the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP, glycolysis pathway is not active and the enzymatic activity of 6-phosphofructokinase (PFK cannot be detected in R. denitrificans; and (4 isoleucine can be synthesized from both threonine-dependent (20% total flux and citramalate-dependent (80% total flux pathways using pyruvate as the sole carbon source.

  20. Invariability of Central Metabolic Flux Distribution in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Under Environmental or Genetic Perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie; Martin, Hector Garcia; Deutschbauer, Adam; Feng, Xueyang; Huang, Rick; Llora, Xavier; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-04-21

    An environmentally important bacterium with versatile respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, displayed significantly different growth rates under three culture conditions: minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 3 hrs), salt stressed minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 6 hrs), and minimal medium with amino acid supplementation (doubling time {approx}1.5 hrs). {sup 13}C-based metabolic flux analysis indicated that fluxes of central metabolic reactions remained relatively constant under the three growth conditions, which is in stark contrast to the reported significant changes in the transcript and metabolite profiles under various growth conditions. Furthermore, ten transposon mutants of S. oneidensis MR-1 were randomly chosen from a transposon library and their flux distributions through central metabolic pathways were revealed to be identical, even though such mutational processes altered the secondary metabolism, for example, glycine and C1 (5,10-Me-THF) metabolism.

  1. Pyridoxine (Vitamin B6) and the Glutathione Peroxidase System; a Link between One-Carbon Metabolism and Antioxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalto, Danyel Bueno; Matte, Jean-Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin B6 (B6) has a central role in the metabolism of amino acids, which includes important interactions with endogenous redox reactions through its effects on the glutathione peroxidase (GPX) system. In fact, B6-dependent enzymes catalyse most reactions of the transsulfuration pathway, driving homocysteine to cysteine and further into GPX proteins. Considering that mammals metabolize sulfur- and seleno-amino acids similarly, B6 plays an important role in the fate of sulfur-homocysteine and its seleno counterpart between transsulfuration and one-carbon metabolism, especially under oxidative stress conditions. This is particularly important in reproduction because ovarian metabolism may generate an excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the peri-estrus period, which may impair ovulatory functions and early embryo development. Later in gestation, placentation raises embryo oxygen tension and may induce a higher expression of ROS markers and eventually embryo losses. Interestingly, the metabolic accumulation of ROS up-regulates the flow of one-carbon units to transsulfuration and down-regulates remethylation. However, in embryos, the transsulfuration pathway is not functional, making the understanding of the interplay between these two pathways particularly crucial. In this review, the importance of the maternal metabolic status of B6 for the flow of one-carbon units towards both maternal and embryonic GPX systems is discussed. Additionally, B6 effects on GPX activity and gene expression in dams, as well as embryo development, are presented in a pig model under different oxidative stress conditions. PMID:28245568

  2. PKM2, a Central Point of Regulation in Cancer Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Wong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic glycolysis is the dominant metabolic pathway utilized by cancer cells, owing to its ability to divert glucose metabolites from ATP production towards the synthesis of cellular building blocks (nucleotides, amino acids, and lipids to meet the demands of proliferation. The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2 catalyzes the final and also a rate-limiting reaction in the glycolytic pathway. In the PK family, PKM2 is subjected to a complex regulation by both oncogenes and tumour suppressors, which allows for a fine-tone regulation of PKM2 activity. The less active form of PKM2 drives glucose through the route of aerobic glycolysis, while active PKM2 directs glucose towards oxidative metabolism. Additionally, PKM2 possesses protein tyrosine kinase activity and plays a role in modulating gene expression and thereby contributing to tumorigenesis. We will discuss our current understanding of PKM2's regulation and its many contributions to tumorigenesis.

  3. Engineering of a tyrosol-producing pathway, utilizing simple sugar and the central metabolic tyrosine, in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Yasuharu; Tajima, Kenji; Munekata, Masanobu; Keasling, Jay D; Lee, Taek Soon

    2012-02-01

    Metabolic engineering was applied to the development of Escherichia coli capable of synthesizing tyrosol (2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethanol), an attractive phenolic compound with great industrial value, from glucose, a renewable carbon source. In this strain, tyrosine, which was supplied not only from the culture medium but also from the central metabolism, was converted into tyrosol via three steps: decarboxylation, amine oxidation, and reduction. The engineered strain synthesized both tyrosol and 4-hydroxyphenylacetate (4HPA), but disruption of the endogenous phenylacetaldehyde dehydrogenase gene shut off 4HPA production and improved the production of tyrosol as a sole product. The engineered mutant strain was capable of producing 0.5 mM tyrosol from 1% (w/v) glucose during a 48 h shake flask cultivation.

  4. Integrated in silico Analyses of Regulatory and Metabolic Networks of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 Reveal Relationships between Gene Centrality and Essentiality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Seob Song

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria dynamically relay environmental inputs to intracellular adaptations through a coordinated adjustment of photosynthetic efficiency and carbon processing rates. The output of such adaptations is reflected through changes in transcriptional patterns and metabolic flux distributions that ultimately define growth strategy. To address interrelationships between metabolism and regulation, we performed integrative analyses of metabolic and gene co-expression networks in a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Centrality analyses using the gene co-expression network identified a set of key genes, which were defined here as “topologically important.” Parallel in silico gene knock-out simulations, using the genome-scale metabolic network, classified what we termed as “functionally important” genes, deletion of which affected growth or metabolism. A strong positive correlation was observed between topologically and functionally important genes. Functionally important genes exhibited variable levels of topological centrality; however, the majority of topologically central genes were found to be functionally essential for growth. Subsequent functional enrichment analysis revealed that both functionally and topologically important genes in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 are predominantly associated with translation and energy metabolism, two cellular processes critical for growth. This research demonstrates how synergistic network-level analyses can be used for reconciliation of metabolic and gene expression data to uncover fundamental biological principles.

  5. One carbon metabolism in SAR11 pelagic marine bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Sun

    Full Text Available The SAR11 Alphaproteobacteria are the most abundant heterotrophs in the oceans and are believed to play a major role in mineralizing marine dissolved organic carbon. Their genomes are among the smallest known for free-living heterotrophic cells, raising questions about how they successfully utilize complex organic matter with a limited metabolic repertoire. Here we show that conserved genes in SAR11 subgroup Ia (Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique genomes encode pathways for the oxidation of a variety of one-carbon compounds and methyl functional groups from methylated compounds. These pathways were predicted to produce energy by tetrahydrofolate (THF-mediated oxidation, but not to support the net assimilation of biomass from C1 compounds. Measurements of cellular ATP content and the oxidation of (14C-labeled compounds to (14CO(2 indicated that methanol, formaldehyde, methylamine, and methyl groups from glycine betaine (GBT, trimethylamine (TMA, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO, and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP were oxidized by axenic cultures of the SAR11 strain Ca. P. ubique HTCC1062. Analyses of metagenomic data showed that genes for C1 metabolism occur at a high frequency in natural SAR11 populations. In short term incubations, natural communities of Sargasso Sea microbial plankton expressed a potential for the oxidation of (14C-labeled formate, formaldehyde, methanol and TMAO that was similar to cultured SAR11 cells and, like cultured SAR11 cells, incorporated a much larger percentage of pyruvate and glucose (27-35% than of C1 compounds (2-6% into biomass. Collectively, these genomic, cellular and environmental data show a surprising capacity for demethylation and C1 oxidation in SAR11 cultures and in natural microbial communities dominated by SAR11, and support the conclusion that C1 oxidation might be a significant conduit by which dissolved organic carbon is recycled to CO(2 in the upper ocean.

  6. [Carbon sources metabolic characteristics of airborne microbial communities in constructed wetlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhi-Wen; Wang, Lin; Xu, Ai-Ling; Wu, Deng-Deng; Xia, Yan

    2015-02-01

    Using BIOLOG-GN plates, this article describes the carbon sources metabolic characteristics of airborne microbial communities in a free surface-flow constructed wetland in different seasons and clarify the correlation between airborne microbial metabolic functions and environmental factors. The average well color development (AWCD), carbon metabolic profiles and McIntosh values of airborne microbial communities in different seasons were quite different. Analysis of the variations showed that AWCD in spring and summer differed significantly from that in autumn and winter (P metabolic community, carbohydrates metabolic community, polymers metabolic community and carboxylic acids metabolic community respectively. Principal component analysis showed that the carbon metabolic characteristics of airborne microbial community in autumn were similar to those in winter but different from those in spring and summer. The characteristics of carbon metabolism revealed differences between summer and spring, autumn, or winter. These differences were mainly caused by amines or amides while the differences between spring and autumn or winter were mainly caused by carboxylic acids. Environmental factors, including changes in wind speed, temperature, and humidity acted to influence the carbon sources metabolic properties of airborne microbial community. The dominant environmental factors that acted to influence the carbon sources metabolic properties of airborne microbial community varied between different seasons.

  7. Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of the carbonate facies in the Vindhyan Supergroup, central India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Banerjee; S K Bhattacharya; S Sarkar

    2006-02-01

    The Vindhyan sedimentary succession in central India spans a wide time bracket from the Paleopro- terozoic to the Neoproterozoic period.Chronostratigraphic significance of stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of the carbonate phase in Vindhyan sediments has been discussed in some recent studies.However,the subtle controls of facies variation,depositional setting and post-depositional diagenesis on stable isotope compositions are not yet clearly understood.The Vindhyan Super- group hosts four carbonate units,exhibiting a wide variability in depositional processes and paleogeography.A detailed facies-specific carbon and oxygen isotope study of the carbonate units was undertaken by us to investigate the effect of these processes and to identify the least altered isotope values.It is seen that both carbon and oxygen isotope compositions have been affected by early meteoric water diagenesis.The effect of diagenetic alteration is,however,more pronounced in case of oxygen isotopes than carbon isotopes.Stable isotope compositions remained insensitive to facies only when sediments accumulated in a shallow shelf setting without being exposed.Major alteration of original isotope ratios was observed in case of shallow marine carbonates,which became exposed to meteoric fluids during early diagenetic stage.Duration of exposure possibly determined the magnitude of alteration and shift from the original values.Moreover,dolomitization is found to be accompanied by appreciable alteration of isotope compositions in some of the carbonates.The present study suggests that variations in sediment depositional settings,in particular the possibility of subaerial exposure,need to be considered while extracting chronostratigraphic signi ficance from 13C data.

  8. Influence of carbon and nitrogen sources on growth, nitrogenase activity, and carbon metabolism of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejera, Noel A; Ortega, Eduardo; Rodés, Rosa; Lluch, Carmen

    2004-09-01

    The effects of different carbon and nitrogen sources on the growth, nitrogenase activity, and carbon metabolism of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus were investigated. The amino acids asparagine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid affected microbial growth and nitrogenase activity. Several enzymatic activities involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle were affected by the carbon source used. In addition, glucose and gluconate significantly increased the oxygen consumption (respiration rate) of whole cells of G. diazotrophicus grown under aerobic conditions. Enzymes responsible for direct oxidation of glucose and gluconate were especially active in cells grown with sucrose and gluconate. The presence of amino acids in the apoplastic and symplastic sap of sugarcane stems suggests that these compounds might be of importance in the regulation of growth and nitrogenase activity during the symbiotic association. The information obtained from the plant-bacterium association together with the results of other biochemical studies could contribute to the development of biotechnological applications of G. diazotrophicus.

  9. Integration of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxygen Metabolism in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    glycolysis and the  citric   acid   cycle  and monitored the effect on RpoS degradation  in vivo. Nutrient  upshifts trigger RpoS degradation  independently...Yuan  et  al.,  2009). We  successfully combined the simplified nitrogen assimilation model with simplified models of glycolysis and the  TCA  cycle  to...TCA  cycle  (where carbon and nitrogen metabolism directly intersect). Our  investigation  yielded  significant  advances  in  the  understanding  of  E

  10. Export and Metabolism of Carbon in Urban Watersheds: Climate Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. M.; Kaushal, S.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers export and transform globally-significant quantities of carbon from watersheds to coastal ecosystems. Urbanization and climate change influence these fluxes by altering the hydrologic regime, water temperature, and anthropogenic sources of organic matter. Here, we quantify export and metabolism of carbon in highly urbanized, coastal watersheds, and evaluate the importance of physical drivers linked to climate and land use. Using a combination of discrete-samples, continuous water quality sensors, lab experiments, and modeling, we quantified rates of DOC, DIC, and CO2 export as well as changes in DOC quality and in-stream metabolism in four highly developed watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay over three years. Annual DOC and DIC exports from the four watersheds varied from 9 to 23 and 19 to 59 Kg ha-1yr-1 respectively. The range of daily CO2 concentrations was 0.01 to 2.6mg L-1, equivalent to between 0.37 and 53% of daily DOC export across all streams and dates. All sites were net-heterotrophic for the majority of the year (NEP0) during spring and early summer. There was a significant (P<0.05) relationship between gross primary production and ecosystem respiration, suggesting that autotrophic respiration is an important fraction of ER, and labile algal biomass may influence oxygen demand downstream. Our results suggest that urban watersheds can export significant amounts of DOC, DIC, and CO2 to coastal zones. The influence of urbanization on coastal water quality and greenhouse gases may be exacerbated by climate change as temperatures and storm frequency continue to rise.

  11. Central Pathways Integrating Metabolism and Reproduction in Teleosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md eShahjahan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Energy balance plays an important role in the control of reproduction. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms connecting the two systems are not well understood especially in teleosts. The hypothalamus plays a crucial role in the regulation of both energy balance and reproduction, and contains a number of neuropeptides, including gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH, orexin, neuropeptide-Y (NPY, ghrelin, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP, α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH, cholecystokinin (CCK, 26RFa, nesfatin, kisspeptin, and gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH. These neuropeptides are involved in the control of energy balance and reproduction either directly or indirectly. On the other hand, synthesis and release of these hypothalamic neuropeptides are regulated by metabolic signals from the gut and the adipose tissue. Furthermore, neurons producing these neuropeptides interact with each other, providing neuronal basis of the link between energy balance and reproduction. This review summarizes the advances made in our understanding of the physiological roles of the hypothalamic neuropeptides in energy balance and reproduction in teleosts, and discusses how they interact with GnRH, kisspeptin, and pituitary gonadotropins to control reproduction in teleosts.

  12. Staphylococcus aureus redirects central metabolism to increase iron availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Friedman

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis is significantly influenced by the iron status of the host. However, the regulatory impact of host iron sources on S. aureus gene expression remains unknown. In this study, we combine multivariable difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry with multivariate statistical analyses to systematically cluster cellular protein response across distinct iron-exposure conditions. Quadruplicate samples were simultaneously analyzed for alterations in protein abundance and/or post-translational modification state in response to environmental (iron chelation, hemin treatment or genetic (Deltafur alterations in bacterial iron exposure. We identified 120 proteins representing several coordinated biochemical pathways that are affected by changes in iron-exposure status. Highlighted in these experiments is the identification of the heme-regulated transport system (HrtAB, a novel transport system which plays a critical role in staphylococcal heme metabolism. Further, we show that regulated overproduction of acidic end-products brought on by iron starvation decreases local pH resulting in the release of iron from the host iron-sequestering protein transferrin. These findings reveal novel strategies used by S. aureus to acquire scarce nutrients in the hostile host environment and begin to define the iron and heme-dependent regulons of S. aureus.

  13. No Association of SNPs in One-Carbon Metabolism Genes with Prostate Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Victoria L.; Rodriguez, Carmen; Sun, Juzhong; Talbot, Jeffrey T.; Thun, Michael J.; Calle, Eugenia E.

    2008-01-01

    One-carbon metabolism mediates the inter-conversion of folates for the synthesis of precursors used in DNA synthesis, repair and methylation. Inadequate folate nutrition or compromised metabolism can disrupt these processes and facilitate carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated associations of 39 candidate SNPs in nine one-carbon metabolism genes with risk of prostate cancer using 1,144 cases and 1,144 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort. None of these SNPs we...

  14. Enhancing Carbon Fixation by Metabolic Engineering: A Model System of Complex Network Modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Gregory Stephanopoulos

    2008-04-10

    In the first two years of this research we focused on the development of a DNA microarray for transcriptional studies in the photosynthetic organism Synechocystis and the elucidation of the metabolic pathway for biopolymer synthesis in this organism. In addition we also advanced the molecular biological tools for metabolic engineering of biopolymer synthesis in Synechocystis and initiated a series of physiological studies for the elucidation of the carbon fixing pathways and basic central carbon metabolism of these organisms. During the last two-year period we focused our attention on the continuation and completion of the last task, namely, the development of tools for basic investigations of the physiology of these cells through, primarily, the determination of their metabolic fluxes. The reason for this decision lies in the importance of fluxes as key indicators of physiology and the high level of information content they carry in terms of identifying rate limiting steps in a metabolic pathway. While flux determination is a well-advanced subject for heterotrophic organisms, for the case of autotrophic bacteria, like Synechocystis, some special challenges had to be overcome. These challenges stem mostly from the fact that if one uses {sup 13}C labeled CO{sub 2} for flux determination, the {sup 13}C label will mark, at steady state, all carbon atoms of all cellular metabolites, thus eliminating the necessary differentiation required for flux determination. This peculiarity of autotrophic organisms makes it imperative to carry out flux determination under transient conditions, something that had not been accomplished before. We are pleased to report that we have solved this problem and we are now able to determine fluxes in photosynthetic organisms from stable isotope labeling experiments followed by measurements of label enrichment in cellular metabolites using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. We have conducted extensive simulations to test the method and

  15. Nonstructural leaf carbohydrates dynamics of Pinus edulis during drought-induced tree mortality reveal role for carbon metabolism in mortality mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Henry D.; Germino, Matthew J.; Breshears, David D.; Barron-Gafford, Greg A.; Guardiola-Claramonte, Maite; Zou, Chris B.; Huxman, Travis E.

    2013-01-01

    * Vegetation change is expected with global climate change, potentially altering ecosystem function and climate feedbacks. However, causes of plant mortality, which are central to vegetation change, are understudied, and physiological mechanisms remain unclear, particularly the roles of carbon metabolism and xylem function.

  16. Effects of overexpression glucosamine deaminase on glucosamine synthesis and central carbon metabolism in Escherichia coli%过表达氨基葡萄糖脱氨酶对大肠杆菌氨基葡萄糖合成及中心碳代谢的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王珊珊; 高璐; 严明; 许琳

    2013-01-01

    The effects on glucosamine synthesis and central carbon metabolism in E.coli by overexpression glucosamine deaminase were investigated.The results showed that overexpression glucosamine deaminase nagB could improved the content of glucosamine by two times of that of Rosetta,under the conditions of 36 g/L glucose,pH 9.0,after 24 h fermentation.The content of pyruvate was 1.48 times,acetic acid was 1.74 times,citric acid was 2.99 times,α-ketoglutaric acid was 2.73 times of that of Rosetta,respectirely.Lactic acid content of recombinant was 2.53 g/L.Lactic acid content of the original bacteria was not detected.These preliminary findings showed that,overexpression of the glucosamine deaminase promoted the accumulation of glucosamine in E.coli,overexpression of the glucosamine deaminase also made the accumulation of pyruvate,acetic acid and lactic acid.Overexpression of the glucosamine deaminase has great impact on the TCA cycle,high level of the citric acid and α-ketoglutaric acid were detected.%考察过表达氨基葡萄糖脱氨酶对氨基葡萄糖合成及大肠杆菌(Escherichia coli中心碳代谢的影响.实验结果表明:过表达氨基葡萄糖脱氨酶使得在36 g/L葡萄糖,pH为9.0的发酵条件下,发酵24 h后,重组菌发酵液中氨基葡萄糖、丙酮酸和乙酸的量分别是对照菌Rosetta的2.1、1.48和1.74倍;而乳酸的量为2.53 g/L,对照菌Rosetta发酵液中的乳酸含量未检测到,重组菌发酵液中柠檬酸及α-酮戊二酸的含量分别是Rosetta的2.99和2.73倍.

  17. Central obesity measurements predict metabolic syndrome in a retrospective cohort study of postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Rosety-Rodríguez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The various diagnostic classifications in the literature concur as regards the important role of abdominal obesity in the onset and progression of metabolic syndrome. Accordingly, this study was aimed at clarifying whether central obesity measurements assessed by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA may predict metabolic syndrome in Spanish postmenopausal women. Material and methods: This historical cohort study included a total of 1326 postmenopausal women aged > 45 years old who had routinely undergone DXA to measure their bone mineral density between january 2006 and january 2011. The regions of interest (ROI envisaged in our study by using DXA were the lumbar regions L1-L4 and L4-L5. At the same time, they underwent a complete medical examination including personal medical history assessment, biochemical blood analysis, blood pressure measurement and anthropometrical evaluation. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed attending to the criteria established by National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NECP-ATP-III. Results: During the observation period, 537 women, representing 40.5% of the total studied, met the diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome. L1-L4 and L4-L5 abdominal fat mass determinations were associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in all regression models tested, showing an increasing gradient from the lowest to highest quintile. Conclusion: Central adiposity measurements assessed by DXA, especially L1-L4 region of interest, could be considered a powerful predictor of metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women.

  18. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeikus, J.G.; Jain, M.

    1993-12-31

    The project deals with understanding the fundamental biochemical mechanisms that physiologically control and regulate carbon and electron flow in anaerobic chemosynthetic bacteria that couple metabolism of single carbon compounds and hydrogen to the production of organic acids (formic, acetic, butyric, and succinic) or methane. The authors compare the regulation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen metabolism by fermentation, enzyme, and electron carrier analysis using Butyribacterium methylotrophicum, Anaeroblospirillum succiniciproducens, Methanosarcina barkeri, and a newly isolated tri-culture composed of a syntrophic butyrate degrader strain IB, Methanosarcina mazei and Methanobacterium formicicum as model systems. To understand the regulation of hydrogen metabolism during butyrate production or acetate degradation, hydrogenase activity in B. methylotrophicum or M. barkeri is measured in relation to growth substrate and pH; hydrogenase is purified and characterized to investigate number of hydrogenases; their localization and functions; and, their sequences are determined. To understand the mechanism for catabolic CO{sub 2} fixation to succinate the PEP carboxykinase enzyme and gene of A. succiniciproducens are purified and characterized. Genetically engineered strains of Escherichia coli containing the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase gene are examined for their ability to produce succinate in high yield. To understand the mechanism of fatty acid degradation by syntrophic acetogens during mixed culture methanogenesis formate and hydrogen production are characterized by radio tracer studies. It is intended that these studies provide strategies to improve anaerobic fermentations used for the production of organic acids or methane and, new basic understanding on catabolic CO{sub 2} fixation mechanisms and on the function of hydrogenase in anaerobic bacteria.

  19. Nitrogen-induced metabolic changes and molecular determinants of carbon allocation in Dunaliella tertiolecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kenneth Wei Min; Lin, Huixin; Shen, Hui; Lee, Yuan Kun

    2016-11-16

    Certain species of microalgae are natural accumulators of lipids, while others are more inclined to store starch. However, what governs the preference to store lipids or starch is not well understood. In this study, the microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta was used as a model to study the global gene expression profile regulating starch accumulation in microalgae. D. tertiolecta, when depleted of nitrogen, produced only 1% of dry cell weight (DCW) in neutral lipids, while starch was rapidly accumulated up to 46% DCW. The increased in starch content was accompanied by a coordinated overexpression of genes shunting carbon towards starch synthesis, a response not seen in the oleaginous microalgae Nannochloropsis oceanica, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii or Chlorella vulgaris. Genes in the central carbon metabolism pathways, particularly those of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, were also simultaneously upregulated, indicating a robust interchange of carbon skeletons for anabolic and catabolic processes. In contrast, fatty acid and triacylglycerol synthesis genes were downregulated or unchanged, suggesting that lipids are not a preferred form of storage in these cells. This study reveals the transcriptomic influence behind storage reserve allocation in D. tertiolecta and provides valuable insights into the possible manipulation of genes for engineering microorganisms to synthesize products of interest.

  20. Deep structures and carbon dioxide degassing in central Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiodini, G.; Frondini, F.; Ponziani, F. [Perugia Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    1995-02-01

    In Tyrrhenian Central Italy large amounts of CO{sub 2} are produced at depth mainly by metamorphism of marine carbonate rocks. During their ascent, the gases are trapped in deep structures, made up of Mesozoic permeable limestones covered by impermeable terrains, which become sources of a high CO{sub 2} flux toward the surface. The anomalous CO{sub 2} concentrations are detectable in groundwaters. The general map of the groundwater PCO{sub 2} values shows a decrease in the CO{sub 2} production moving from the western geothermal areas of Tuscany and Latium to the eastern sector, which is characterized by a normal heat flow. The PCO{sub 2} distribution suggests that the NW-SE extensional faults, which bound Plio-Pleistocene grabens, provide the easiest routes for the gas ascent. The geological, geophysical and geothermal deep drilling data suggest that the CO{sub 2} anomalies found in the western sector correspond to deep permeable structures of possible geothermal interest. (author)

  1. Carbon dioxide and methane emission dynamics in central London (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfter, Carole; Nemitz, Eiko; Barlow, Janet F.; Wood, Curtis R.

    2013-04-01

    London, with a population of 8.2 million, is the largest city in Europe. It is heavily built-up (typically 8% vegetation cover within the central boroughs) and boasts some of the busiest arteries in Europe despite efforts to reduce traffic in the city centre with the introduction of a congestion charging scheme in 2007. We report on two substantial pollution monitoring efforts in the heart of London between October 2006 and present. Fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) were measured continuously by eddy-covariance in central London from October 2006 until May 2008 from a 190 m telecommunication tower (BT tower; 51° 31' 17.4'' N 0° 8' 20.04'' W). The eddy-covariance system consisted of a Gill R3-50 ultrasonic anemometer operated at 20 Hz and a LI-COR 6262 infrared gas analyser. Air was sampled 0.3 m below the sensor head of the ultrasonic anemometer - which was itself mounted on a 3 m mast to the top of a 15 m lattice tower situated on the roof of the tower (instrument head at 190 m above street level) - and pulled down 45 m of 12.7 mm OD Teflon tubing. In addition, meteorological variables (temperature, relative humidity, pressure, precipitation, wind speed and direction) were also measured with a multi-sensor (Weather Transmitter WXT510, Vaisala). Eddy-covariance measurements at the BT tower location were reinstated in July 2011 and include methane (CH4), CO2 and H2O concentrations measured by a Picarro fast methane analyser (G2301-f). CO2 emissions were found to be mainly controlled by fossil fuel combustion (e.g. traffic, commercial and domestic heating). Diurnal averages of CO2 fluxes were found to be highly correlated to traffic. However changes in heating-related natural gas consumption and, to a lesser extent, photosynthetic activity in two large city centre green spaces (Hyde Park and Regent's Park) explained the seasonal variability. Annual estimates of net exchange of CO2 obtained by eddy-covariance agreed well with up-scaled data from the UK

  2. Hybrid dynamic modeling of Escherichia coli central metabolic network combining Michaelis–Menten and approximate kinetic equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, Rafael S.; Machado, Daniel; Rocha, Isabel;

    2010-01-01

    , represent nowadays the limiting factor in the construction of such models. In this study, we compare four alternative modeling approaches based on Michaelis–Menten kinetics for the bi-molecular reactions and different types of simplified rate equations for the remaining reactions (generalized mass action...... using the hybrid model composed of Michaelis–Menten and the approximate lin-log kinetics indicate that this is a possible suitable approach to model complex large-scale networks where the exact rate laws are unknown......., convenience kinetics, lin-log and power-law). Using the mechanistic model for Escherichia coli central carbon metabolism as a benchmark, we investigate the alternative modeling approaches through comparative simulations analyses. The good dynamic behavior and the powerful predictive capabilities obtained...

  3. One carbon metabolism in pregnancy: Impact on maternal, fetal and neonatal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhan, Satish C

    2016-11-01

    One carbon metabolism or methyl transfer, a crucial component of metabolism in all cells and tissues, supports the critical function of synthesis of purines, thymidylate and methylation via multiple methyl transferases driven by the ubiquitous methyl donor s-adenosylmethionine. Serine is the primary methyl donor to the one carbon pool. Intracellular folates and methionine metabolism are the critical components of one carbon transfer. Methionine metabolism requires vitamin B12, B6 as cofactors and is modulated by endocrine signals and is responsive to nutrient intake. Perturbations in one carbon transfer can have profound effects on cell proliferation, growth and function. Epidemiological studies in humans and experimental model have established a strong relationship between impaired fetal growth and the immediate and long term consequences to the health of the offspring. It is speculated that during development, maternal environmental and nutrient influences by their effects on one carbon transfer can impact the health of the mother, impair growth and reprogram metabolism of the fetus, and cause long term morbidity in the offspring. The potential for such effects is underscored by the unique responses in methionine metabolism in the human mother during pregnancy, the absence of transsulfuration activity in the fetus, ontogeny of methionine metabolism in the placenta and the unique metabolism of serine and glycine in the fetus. Dietary protein restriction in animals and marginal protein intake in humans causes characteristic changes in one carbon metabolism. The impact of perturbations in one carbon metabolism on the health of the mother during pregnancy, on fetal growth and the neonate are discussed and their possible mechanism explored.

  4. Palmitic acid induces central leptin resistance and impairs hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Licai; Yu, Yinghua; Szabo, Alexander; Wu, Yizhen; Wang, Hongqin; Camer, Danielle; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2015-05-01

    The consumption of diets rich in saturated fat largely contributes to the development of obesity in modern societies. A diet high in saturated fats can induce inflammation and impair leptin signaling in the hypothalamus. However, the role of saturated fatty acids on hypothalamic leptin signaling, and hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism remains largely undiscovered. In this study, we investigated the effects of intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of a saturated fatty acid, palmitic acid (PA, C16:0), on central leptin sensitivity, hypothalamic leptin signaling, inflammatory molecules and hepatic energy metabolism in C57BL/6J male mice. We found that the icv administration of PA led to central leptin resistance, evidenced by the inhibition of central leptin's suppression of food intake. Central leptin resistance was concomitant with impaired hypothalamic leptin signaling (JAK2-STAT3, PKB/Akt-FOXO1) and a pro-inflammatory response (TNF-α, IL1-β, IL-6 and pIκBa) in the mediobasal hypothalamus and paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei. Furthermore, the pre-administration of icv PA blunted the effect of leptin-induced decreases in mRNA expression related to gluconeogenesis (G6Pase and PEPCK), glucose transportation (GLUT2) and lipogenesis (FAS and SCD1) in the liver of mice. Therefore, elevated central PA concentrations can induce pro-inflammatory responses and leptin resistance, which are associated with disorders of energy homeostasis in the liver as a result of diet-induced obesity.

  5. Central Retinal Artery Occlusion in a Patient with Metabolic Syndrome X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Predrag Cekić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO in a patient with metabolic syndrome X. Case Report: A 64 year-old-man presented with abrupt, painless, and severe loss of vision in his left eye. Indirect ophthalmoscopy disclosed signs compatible with CRAO and laboratory investigations revealed erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 74 mm/h, C-reactive protein (CRP level of 21 mg/l, hyperglycemia, hyperuricemia, hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia. Fluorescein angiography and immunological studies excluded other systemic disorders. The patient met the full criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program for metabolic syndrome X. Conclusion: In addition to different vascular complications such as stroke, and cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome X may be associated with retinal vascular occlusions.

  6. Central metabolic responses to the overproduction of fatty acids in Escherichia coli based on 13C-metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lian; Xiao, Yi; Gebreselassie, Nikodimos; Zhang, Fuzhong; Antoniewiez, Maciek R; Tang, Yinjie J; Peng, Lifeng

    2014-03-01

    We engineered a fatty acid overproducing Escherichia coli strain through overexpressing tesA (“pull”) and fadR (“push”) and knocking out fadE (“block”). This “pull-push-block” strategy yielded 0.17 g of fatty acids (C12–C18) per gram of glucose (equivalent to 48% of the maximum theoretical yield) in batch cultures during the exponential growth phase under aerobic conditions. Metabolic fluxes were determined for the engineered E. coli and its control strain using tracer ([1,2-13C]glucose) experiments and 13C-metabolic flux analysis. Cofactor (NADPH) and energy (ATP) balances were also investigated for both strains based on estimated fluxes. Compared to the control strain, fatty acid overproduction led to significant metabolic responses in the central metabolism: (1) Acetic acid secretion flux decreased 10-fold; (2) Pentose phosphate pathway and Entner–Doudoroff pathway fluxes increased 1.5- and 2.0-fold, respectively; (3) Biomass synthesis flux was reduced 1.9-fold; (4) Anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylation flux decreased 1.7-fold; (5) Transhydrogenation flux converting NADH to NADPH increased by 1.7-fold. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed the engineered strain increased the transcription levels of pntA (encoding the membrane-bound transhydrogenase) by 2.1-fold and udhA (encoding the soluble transhydrogenase) by 1.4-fold, which is in agreement with the increased transhydrogenation flux. Cofactor and energy balances analyses showed that the fatty acid overproducing E. coli consumed significantly higher cellular maintenance energy than the control strain. We discussed the strategies to future strain development and process improvements for fatty acid production in E. coli.

  7. 13C-MFA delineates the photomixotrophic metabolism of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under light- and carbon-sufficient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Le; Berla, Bert; He, Lian; Pakrasi, Himadri B; Tang, Yinjie J

    2014-05-01

    The central carbon metabolism of cyanobacteria is under debate. For over 50 years, the lack of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase has led to the belief that cyanobacteria have an incomplete TCA cycle. Recent in vitro enzymatic experiments suggest that this cycle may in fact be closed. The current study employed (13) C isotopomers to delineate pathways in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. By tracing the incorporation of supplemented glutamate into the downstream metabolites in the TCA cycle, we observed a direct in vivo transformation of α-ketoglutarate to succinate. Additionally, isotopic tracing of glyoxylate did not show a functional glyoxylate shunt and glyoxylate was used for glycine synthesis. The photomixotrophic carbon metabolism was then profiled with (13) C-MFA under light and carbon-sufficient conditions. We observed that: (i) the in vivo flux through the TCA cycle reactions (α-ketoglutarate → succinate) was minimal (<2%); (ii) the flux ratio of CO2 fixation was six times higher than that of glucose utilization; (iii) the relative flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway was low (<2%); (iv) high flux through malic enzyme served as a main route for pyruvate synthesis. Our results improve the understanding of the versatile metabolism in cyanobacteria and shed light on their application for photo-biorefineries.

  8. Nutrients in Energy and One-Carbon Metabolism: Learning from Metformin Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano-Mateo, Fedra; Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Cabre, Noemi; Camps, Jordi; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; Menendez, Javier A.; Joven, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic vulnerability is associated with age-related diseases and concomitant co-morbidities, which include obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis and cancer. Most of the health problems we face today come from excessive intake of nutrients and drugs mimicking dietary effects and dietary restriction are the most successful manipulations targeting age-related pathways. Phenotypic heterogeneity and individual response to metabolic stressors are closely related food intake. Understanding the complexity of the relationship between dietary provision and metabolic consequences in the long term might provide clinical strategies to improve healthspan. New aspects of metformin activity provide a link to many of the overlapping factors, especially the way in which organismal bioenergetics remodel one-carbon metabolism. Metformin not only inhibits mitochondrial complex 1, modulating the metabolic response to nutrient intake, but also alters one-carbon metabolic pathways. Here, we discuss findings on the mechanism(s) of action of metformin with the potential for therapeutic interpretations. PMID:28208582

  9. GC-MS/MS survey of collision-induced dissociation of tert-butyldimethylsilyl-derivatized amino acids and its application to (13)C-metabolic flux analysis of Escherichia coli central metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawana, Shuichi; Iida, Junko; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Fumio

    2016-09-01

    Stable isotope labeling experiments using mass spectrometry have been employed to investigate carbon flow levels (metabolic flux) in mammalian, plant, and microbial cells. To achieve a more precise (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA), novel fragmentations of tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS)-amino acids were investigated by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The product ion scan analyses of 15 TBDMS-amino acids revealed 24 novel fragment ions. The amino acid-derived carbons included in the five fragment ions were identified by the analyses of (13)C-labeled authentic standards. The identification of the fragment ion at m/z 170 indicated that the isotopic abundance of S-methyl carbon in methionine could be determined from the cleavage of C5 in the precursor of [M-159](+) (m/z 218). It was also confirmed that the precision of (13)C-MFA in Escherichia coli central carbon metabolism could be improved by introducing (13)C-labeling data derived from novel fragmentations. Graphical Abstract Novel collision-induced dissociation fragmentations of tert-butyldimethylsilyl amino acids were investigated and identified by GC-MS/MS.

  10. Studies on carbon metabolism in wild type and mutants of Aspergillus nidulans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uitzetter, J.H.A.A.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis deals with carbon metabolism in the lower eukaryote Aspergillus nidulans. This fungus is an attractive organism as a model to study genetics in relation to metabolism in lower eukaryotes.In chapter I the present state of affairs in this field is summarized for A. nidulans and some of the

  11. Impacts of proline on the central metabolism of an industrial erythromycin-producing strain Saccharopolyspora erythraea via (13)C labeling experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ming; Huang, Mingzhi; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2016-08-10

    Saccharopolyspora erythraea E3 is an important industrial strain for erythromycin production and knowledge on its metabolism is limited. In the present work, (13)C labeling experiments were conducted to characterize the metabolism of S. erythraea E3. We found that S. erythraea E3 was difficult to grow on minimal medium with glucose as sole carbon source and the addition of proline remarkably improved the cell growth. The activity of EMP pathway was very low and ED pathway was alternatively the main glucose utilization pathway. The addition of proline resulted in remarkable changes in the fluxes of central metabolism. The fluxes in PP pathway, in TCA cycle and in ED pathway were 90% higher, 64% and 31% lower on Glc/Pro than on Glc, respectively. The maintenance energy on Glc/Pro was 58.4% lower than that on Glc. The energy charge was lower on Glc than on Glc/Pro, indicating that the cells on Glc suffered from energy burden. This study elucidates the impacts of proline on the central metabolism of S. erythraea and deepens the understanding of its metabolism.

  12. Hybrid dynamic modeling of Escherichia coli central metabolic network combining Michaelis-Menten and approximate kinetic equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rafael S; Machado, Daniel; Rocha, Isabel; Ferreira, Eugénio C

    2010-05-01

    The construction of dynamic metabolic models at reaction network level requires the use of mechanistic enzymatic rate equations that comprise a large number of parameters. The lack of knowledge on these equations and the difficulty in the experimental identification of their associated parameters, represent nowadays the limiting factor in the construction of such models. In this study, we compare four alternative modeling approaches based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics for the bi-molecular reactions and different types of simplified rate equations for the remaining reactions (generalized mass action, convenience kinetics, lin-log and power-law). Using the mechanistic model for Escherichia coli central carbon metabolism as a benchmark, we investigate the alternative modeling approaches through comparative simulations analyses. The good dynamic behavior and the powerful predictive capabilities obtained using the hybrid model composed of Michaelis-Menten and the approximate lin-log kinetics indicate that this is a possible suitable approach to model complex large-scale networks where the exact rate laws are unknown.

  13. Effect of sulfonamides as carbonic anhydrase VA and VB inhibitors on mitochondrial metabolic energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arechederra, Robert L; Waheed, Abdul; Sly, William S; Supuran, Claudiu T; Minteer, Shelley D

    2013-03-15

    Obesity is quickly becoming an increasing problem in the developed world. One of the major fundamental causes of obesity and diabetes is mitochondria dysfunction due to faulty metabolic pathways which alter the metabolic substrate flux resulting in the development of these diseases. This paper examines the role of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes in the metabolism of pyruvate, acetate, and succinate when specific isozyme inhibitors are present. Using a sensitive electrochemical approach of wired mitochondria to analytically measure metabolic energy conversion, we determine the resulting metabolic difference after addition of an inhibitory compound. We found that certain sulfonamide analogues displayed broad spectrum inhibition of metabolism, where others only had significant effect on some metabolic pathways. Pyruvate metabolism always displayed the most dramatically affected metabolism by the sulfonamides followed by fatty acid metabolism, and then finally succinate metabolism. This allows for the possibility of using designed sulfonamide analogues to target specific mitochondrial CA isozymes in order to subtly shift metabolism and glucogenesis flux to treat obesity and diabetes.

  14. Carbon and oxygen isotope geochemistry of Ediacaran outer platform carbonates, Paraguay Belt, central Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Riccomini

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available After the late Cryogenian glaciation the central region of Brazil was the site of extensive deposition of platformal carbonates of the Araras Group. This group includes a basal cap carbonate sequence succeeded by transgressive, deep platform deposits of bituminous lime mudstone and shale. Facies and stratigraphic data combined with carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses of the most complete section of the transgressive deposits, exposed in the Guia syncline, were used to evaluate the depositional paleoenvironment and to test the correlation of these deposits along the belt and with other units worldwide. The studied succession consists of 150 m thick tabular beds of black to grey lime mudstone and shale with predominantly negative delta13C PDB values around -2.5 to -1‰ . The delta13C PDB profile of Guia syncline shows a clear correlation with the upper portion of Guia Formation in the Cáceres region, about 200 km to the southwest. The delta13C PDB profile of the Araras Group is comparable with delta13C PDB profiles of Ediacaran units of the southern Paraguay Belt, western Canada, and the Congo and Kalahari cratons. Moreover, facies distribution, stratigraphy and the carbon isotopic profile of the Araras Group match the middle Tsumeb Subgroup in Namibia, which reinforces the Ediacaran age assigned to the Araras Group.Após a glaciação do final do Criogeniano, a região central do Brasil foi palco de extensa deposição de carbonatos plataformais do Grupo Araras. Este grupo inclui na sua base uma seqüência de capa carbonática sucedida por depósitos transgressivos de calcilutitos betuminosos e folhelhos de plataforma profunda. Dados de fácies e estratigráficos combinados com análises isotópicas de carbono e oxigênio da seção mais completa desses depósitos transgressivos, expostos no sinclinal da Guia, foram empregados para avaliar o paleambiente deposicional e para testar a correlação desses depósitos ao longo da faixa e tamb

  15. Disequilibrium δ18O values in microbial carbonates as a tracer of metabolic production of dissolved inorganic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Caroline; Millo, Christian; Ader, Magali; Chaduteau, Carine; Guyot, François; Ménez, Bénédicte

    2017-02-01

    Carbon and oxygen stable isotope compositions of carbonates are widely used to retrieve paleoenvironmental information. However, bias may exist in such reconstructions as carbonate precipitation is often associated with biological activity. Several skeleton-forming eukaryotes have been shown to precipitate carbonates with significant offsets from isotopic equilibrium with water. Although poorly understood, the origin of these biologically-induced isotopic shifts in biogenic carbonates, commonly referred to as "vital effects", could be related to metabolic effects that may not be restricted to mineralizing eukaryotes. The aim of our study was to determine whether microbially-mediated carbonate precipitation can also produce offsets from equilibrium for oxygen isotopes. We present here δ18O values of calcium carbonates formed by the activity of Sporosarcina pasteurii, a carbonatogenic bacterium whose ureolytic activity produces ammonia (thus increasing pH) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) that precipitates as solid carbonates in the presence of Ca2+. We show that the 1000 lnαCaCO3-H2O values for these bacterially-precipitated carbonates are up to 24.7‰ smaller than those expected for precipitation at isotopic equilibrium. A similar experiment run in the presence of carbonic anhydrase (an enzyme able to accelerate oxygen isotope equilibration between DIC and water) resulted in δ18O values of microbial carbonates in line with values expected at isotopic equilibrium with water. These results demonstrate for the first time that bacteria can induce calcium carbonate precipitation in strong oxygen isotope disequilibrium with water, similarly to what is observed for eukaryotes. This disequilibrium effect can be unambiguously ascribed to oxygen isotope disequilibrium between DIC and water inherited from the oxygen isotope composition of the ureolytically produced CO2, probably combined with a kinetic isotope effect during CO2 hydration/hydroxylation. The fact that

  16. Seasonal variations in inorganic carbon components in the central and eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.S.S.; DileepKumar, M.; George, M.D.; Rajendran, A.

    of carbon dioxide to atmosphere reached a maximum of approx 40 m mole m sup(-2) d sup(-1) around 16 degrees N in the central Arabian SEa during monsoon season. The carbon dioxide regenerated from soft tissue was higher during winter and is the least...

  17. Role of phosphate in the central metabolism of two lactic acid bacteria-a comparative systems biology approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levering, J.; Musters, M.W.J.M.; Bekker, M.; Bellomo, D.; Fiedler, T.; Vos, de W.M.; Hugenholtz, F.; Kreikemeyer, B.; Kummer, U.; Teusink, B.

    2012-01-01

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria survive in distinct environments, but show common metabolic characteristics. Here we studied the dynamic interactions of the central metabolism in Lactococcus lactis, extensively used as a starter culture in the dairy industry, and Streptococcus pyogenes, a human patho

  18. Hyperspectral imaging of endogenous fluorescent metabolic molecules to identify pain states in central nervous system tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staikopoulos, Vasiliki; Gosnell, Martin E.; Anwer, Ayad G.; Mustafa, Sanam; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Goldys, Ewa M.

    2016-12-01

    Fluorescence-based bio-imaging methods have been extensively used to identify molecular changes occurring in biological samples in various pathological adaptations. Auto-fluorescence generated by endogenous fluorescent molecules within these samples can interfere with signal to background noise making positive antibody based fluorescent staining difficult to resolve. Hyperspectral imaging uses spectral and spatial imaging information for target detection and classification, and can be used to resolve changes in endogenous fluorescent molecules such as flavins, bound and free NADH and retinoids that are involved in cell metabolism. Hyperspectral auto-fluorescence imaging of spinal cord slices was used in this study to detect metabolic differences within pain processing regions of non-pain versus sciatic chronic constriction injury (CCI) animals, an established animal model of peripheral neuropathy. By using an endogenous source of contrast, subtle metabolic variations were detected between tissue samples, making it possible to distinguish between animals from non-injured and injured groups. Tissue maps of native fluorophores, flavins, bound and free NADH and retinoids unveiled subtle metabolic signatures and helped uncover significant tissue regions with compromised mitochondrial function. Taken together, our results demonstrate that hyperspectral imaging provides a new non-invasive method to investigate central changes of peripheral neuropathic injury and other neurodegenerative disease models, and paves the way for novel cellular characterisation in health, disease and during treatment, with proper account of intrinsic cellular heterogeneity.

  19. Microbial heterotrophic metabolic rates constrain the microbial carbon pump

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Robinson, C; Ramaiah, N.

    addition incubations are poised to discern the complex interactions between metabolic rate, community structure, and organic and inorganic nutrient availability. In a changing global environment, it is important to understand how increasing sea surface...

  20. Central and Metabolic Effects of High Fructose Consumption: Evidence from Animal and Human Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Stoianov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fructose consumption has increased dramatically in the last 40 years, and its role in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome has been implicated by many studies. It is most often encountered in the diet as sucrose (glucose and fructose or high-fructose corn syrup (55% fructose. At high levels, dietary exposure to fructose triggers a series of metabolic changes originating in the liver, leading to hepatic steatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance, and decreased leptin sensitivity. Fructose has been identified to alter biological pathways in other tissues including the central nervous system (CNS, adipose tissue, and the gastrointestinal system. Unlike glucose, consumption of fructose produces smaller increases in the circulating satiety hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1, and does not attenuate levels of the appetite suppressing hormone ghrelin. In the brain, fructose contributes to increased food consumption by activating appetite and reward pathways, and stimulating hypothalamic AMPK activity, a nutrient-sensitive regulator of food intake. Recent studies investigating the neurophysiological factors linking fructose consumption and weight gain in humans have demonstrated differential activation of brain regions that govern appetite, motivation and reward processing. Compared to fructose, glucose ingestion produces a greater reduction of hypothalamic neuronal activity, and increases functional connectivity between the hypothalamus and other reward regions of the brain, indicating that these two sugars regulate feeding behavior through distinct neural circuits. This review article outlines the current findings in fructose-feeding studies in both human and animal models, and discusses the central effects on the CNS that may lead to increased appetite and food intake. Keywords: Fructose, Metabolic syndrome, Appetite, Central nervous system

  1. Global transcriptomic analysis of Cyanothece 51142 reveals robust diurnal oscillation of central metabolic processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockel, Jana; Welsh, Eric A.; Liberton, Michelle L.; Kunnavakkam, Rangesh V.; Aurora, Rajeev; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2008-04-22

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, and the only prokaryotes known to have a circadian cycle. Unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria such as Cyanothece 51142 can fix atmospheric nitrogen, a process exquisitely sensitive to oxygen. Thus, the intracellular environment of Cyanothece oscillates between aerobic and anaerobic conditions during a day-night cycle. This is accomplished by temporal separation of two processes: photosynthesis during the day, and nitrogen fixation at night. While previous studies have examined periodic changes transcript levels for a limited number of genes in Cyanothece and other unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria, a comprehensive study of transcriptional activity in a nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium is necessary to understand the impact of the temporal separation of photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation on global gene regulation and cellular metabolism. We have examined the expression patterns of nearly 5000 genes in Cyanothece 51142 during two consecutive diurnal periods. We found that ~30% of these genes exhibited robust oscillating expression profiles. Interestingly, this set included genes for almost all central metabolic processes in Cyanothece. A transcriptional network of all genes with significantly oscillating transcript levels revealed that the majority of genes in numerous individual pathways, such as glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway and glycogen metabolism, were co-regulated and maximally expressed at distinct phases during the diurnal cycle. Our analyses suggest that the demands of nitrogen fixation greatly influence major metabolic activities inside Cyanothece cells and thus drive various cellular activities. These studies provide a comprehensive picture of how a physiologically relevant diurnal light-dark cycle influences the metabolism in a photosynthetic bacterium

  2. Integration of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxygen Metabolism in Escherichia coli--Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Wingreen, Ned s; Rabitz, Herschel A; Xu, Yifan

    2012-10-22

    A key challenge for living systems is balancing utilization of multiple elemental nutrients, such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, whose availability is subject to environmental fluctuations. As growth can be limited by the scarcity of any one nutrient, the rate at which each nutrient is assimilated must be sensitive not only to its own availability, but also to that of other nutrients. Remarkably, across diverse nutrient conditions, E. coli grows nearly optimally, balancing effectively the conversion of carbon into energy versus biomass. To investigate the link between the metabolism of different nutrients, we quantified metabolic responses to nutrient perturbations using LC-MS based metabolomics and built differential equation models that bridge multiple nutrient systems. We discovered that the carbonaceous substrate of nitrogen assimilation, -ketoglutarate, directly inhibits glucose uptake and that the upstream glycolytic metabolite, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, ultrasensitively regulates anaplerosis to allow rapid adaptation to changing carbon availability. We also showed that NADH controls the metabolic response to changing oxygen levels. Our findings support a general mechanism for nutrient integration: limitation for a nutrient other than carbon leads to build-up of the most closely related product of carbon metabolism, which in turn feedback inhibits further carbon uptake.

  3. Carbon Metabolism, Uptake Kinetics, and Export: how Watershed Form Influences Carbon Mobilization and In-Stream Transformations in Headwater Catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seybold, E. C.; McGlynn, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the highly dynamic nature of hydrologic connectivity, and the vertical and spatial expansion of the active watershed area during wet periods. While activation of variable DOM and solute sources during expansion and contraction periods has been well documented in a number of systems, changes in nutrient loading to streams have rarely been linked explicitly to in-stream function. To this end, we investigated the linkages between terrestrial mobilization of DOC and DIC, in-stream biogeochemical cycling, and downstream transport across scales in two geomorphically contrasting watersheds located in Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest, Montana. We deployed a network of in-situ high frequency sensors with a focus on CO2, dissolved oxygen, fluorescent DOM, nitrate, and a suite of supporting chemical constituents every 30 minutes beginning with the onset of snowmelt and through summer baseflow recession. Our results suggest that DOM and DIC fluxes, as well as ecosystem processes such as metabolism, were coupled to watershed scale carbon accumulation and mobilization. In both watersheds, metabolism tracked the temporal trends of DOM loading from the terrestrial landscape, indicating that the streams are actively transforming allochthonous organic materials during transport. Headwater stream reaches in the watershed with more hydrologically connected riparian source areas exhibited elevated metabolism, carbon uptake, and carbon export as compared to streams in the watershed with less riparian connectivity, suggesting that the degree of riparian connectivity may explain spatial variation in metabolism and in-stream carbon cycling within and across stream networks. Ultimately, this study highlights the tight coupling between terrestrial uplands and in-stream ecosystem processes in headwater catchments, and identifies spatio-temporal variation in hydrologic connectivity as a key driver of in-stream metabolic variation. We posit that the

  4. Autism and Folate-dependent One-carbon Metabolism: Serendipity and Critical Branch-point Decisions in Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S Jill

    2013-11-01

    Folate-dependent one-carbon metabolism is present in every cell of the body. It represents a central systems biology hub that reverberates into countless other pathways with more specialized roles in specialized cell types throughout the body. I have spent 25 years of research on this core biochemical pathway with several unanticipated iterations that led me from Down syndrome to congenital heart defects to leukemia and finally to autism about 12 years ago. Figure 1 provides an overview of the three interdependent pathways involved in folate-dependent methionine "transmethylation" and "transsulfuration." Methionine is necessary for the synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the major methyl donor for all cellular methylation reactions. It is also the major precursor for cysteine, the rate-limiting amino acid for glutathione synthesis linking transmethylation and transsulfuration pathways. Methionine levels can be negatively affected by genetic and environmental factors that reduce folate availability and/or oxidative inhibition of the methionine synthase enzyme. Because these three metabolic pathways are mutually interdependent, genetic or environmental perturbation of folate or methionine metabolism will indirectly impact glutathione synthesis, and conversely, alterations in glutathione synthesis will alter flux through pathways of folate and methionine metabolism. This interdependency translates into broader impact on essential cellular functions.

  5. Soil microbial community and its interaction with soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics following afforestation in central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qi; Cheng, Xiaoli; Hui, Dafeng; Zhang, Qian; Li, Ming; Zhang, Quanfa

    2016-01-15

    Afforestation may alter soil microbial community structure and function, and further affect soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics. Here we investigated soil microbial carbon and nitrogen (MBC and MBN) and microbial community [e.g. bacteria (B), fungi (F)] derived from phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) analysis in afforested (implementing woodland and shrubland plantations) and adjacent croplands in central China. Relationships of microbial properties with biotic factors [litter, fine root, soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN) and inorganic N], abiotic factors (soil temperature, moisture and pH), and major biological processes [basal microbial respiration, microbial metabolic quotient (qCO2), net N mineralization and nitrification] were developed. Afforested soils had higher mean MBC, MBN and MBN:TN ratios than the croplands due to an increase in litter input, but had lower MBC:SOC ratio resulting from low-quality (higher C:N ratio) litter. Afforested soils also had higher F:B ratio, which was probably attributed to higher C:N ratios in litter and soil, and shifts of soil inorganic N forms, water, pH and disturbance. Alterations in soil microbial biomass and community structure following afforestation were associated with declines in basal microbial respiration, qCO2, net N mineralization and nitrification, which likely maintained higher soil carbon and nitrogen storage and stability.

  6. Determining novel functions of Arabidopsis 14-3-3 proteins in central metabolic processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz Celine

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 14-3-3 proteins are considered master regulators of many signal transduction cascades in eukaryotes. In plants, 14-3-3 proteins have major roles as regulators of nitrogen and carbon metabolism, conclusions based on the studies of a few specific 14-3-3 targets. Results In this study, extensive novel roles of 14-3-3 proteins in plant metabolism were determined through combining the parallel analyses of metabolites and enzyme activities in 14-3-3 overexpression and knockout plants with studies of protein-protein interactions. Decreases in the levels of sugars and nitrogen-containing-compounds and in the activities of known 14-3-3-interacting-enzymes were observed in 14-3-3 overexpression plants. Plants overexpressing 14-3-3 proteins also contained decreased levels of malate and citrate, which are intermediate compounds of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle. These modifications were related to the reduced activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase, which are key enzymes of TCA cycle. In addition, we demonstrated that 14-3-3 proteins interacted with one isocitrate dehydrogenase and two malate dehydrogenases. There were also changes in the levels of aromatic compounds and the activities of shikimate dehydrogenase, which participates in the biosynthesis of aromatic compounds. Conclusion Taken together, our findings indicate that 14-3-3 proteins play roles as crucial tuners of multiple primary metabolic processes including TCA cycle and the shikimate pathway.

  7. Mitochondrial Carriers Link the Catabolism of Hydroxyaromatic Compounds to the Central Metabolism in Candida parapsilosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Igor; Neboháčová, Martina; Gérecová, Gabriela; Katonová, Kornélia; Jánošíková, Eva; Jakúbková, Michaela; Centárová, Ivana; Dunčková, Ivana; Tomáška, L'ubomír; Pryszcz, Leszek P.; Gabaldón, Toni; Nosek, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic yeast Candida parapsilosis metabolizes hydroxyderivatives of benzene and benzoic acid to compounds channeled into central metabolism, including the mitochondrially localized tricarboxylic acid cycle, via the 3-oxoadipate and gentisate pathways. The orchestration of both catabolic pathways with mitochondrial metabolism as well as their evolutionary origin is not fully understood. Our results show that the enzymes involved in these two pathways operate in the cytoplasm with the exception of the mitochondrially targeted 3-oxoadipate CoA-transferase (Osc1p) and 3-oxoadipyl-CoA thiolase (Oct1p) catalyzing the last two reactions of the 3-oxoadipate pathway. The cellular localization of the enzymes indicates that degradation of hydroxyaromatic compounds requires a shuttling of intermediates, cofactors, and products of the corresponding biochemical reactions between cytosol and mitochondria. Indeed, we found that yeast cells assimilating hydroxybenzoates increase the expression of genes SFC1, LEU5, YHM2, and MPC1 coding for succinate/fumarate carrier, coenzyme A carrier, oxoglutarate/citrate carrier, and the subunit of pyruvate carrier, respectively. A phylogenetic analysis uncovered distinct evolutionary trajectories for sparsely distributed gene clusters coding for enzymes of both pathways. Whereas the 3-oxoadipate pathway appears to have evolved by vertical descent combined with multiple losses, the gentisate pathway shows a striking pattern suggestive of horizontal gene transfer to the evolutionarily distant Mucorales. PMID:27707801

  8. Novel pathway engineering design of the anaerobic central metabolic pathway in Escherichia coli to increase succinate yield and productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Ailen M; Bennett, George N; San, Ka-Yiu

    2005-05-01

    A novel in vivo method of producing succinate has been developed. A genetically engineered Escherichia coli strain has been constructed to meet the NADH requirement and carbon demand to produce high quantities and yield of succinate by strategically implementing metabolic pathway alterations. Currently, the maximum theoretical succinate yield under strictly anaerobic conditions through the fermentative succinate biosynthesis pathway is limited to one mole per mole of glucose due to NADH limitation. The implemented strategic design involves the construction of a dual succinate synthesis route, which diverts required quantities of NADH through the traditional fermentative pathway and maximizes the carbon converted to succinate by balancing the carbon flux through the fermentative pathway and the glyoxylate pathway (which has less NADH requirement). The synthesis of succinate uses a combination of the two pathways to balance the NADH. Consequently, experimental results indicated that these combined pathways gave the most efficient conversion of glucose to succinate with the highest yield using only 1.25 moles of NADH per mole of succinate in contrast to the sole fermentative pathway, which uses 2 moles of NADH per mole of succinate. A recombinant E. coli strain, SBS550MG, was created by deactivating adhE, ldhA and ack-pta from the central metabolic pathway and by activating the glyoxylate pathway through the inactivation of iclR, which encodes a transcriptional repressor protein of the glyoxylate bypass. The inactivation of these genes in SBS550MG increased the succinate yield from glucose to about 1.6 mol/mol with an average anaerobic productivity rate of 10 mM/h (approximately 0.64 mM/h-OD600). This strain is capable of fermenting high concentrations of glucose in less than 24 h. Additional derepression of the glyxoylate pathway by inactivation of arcA, leading to a strain designated as SBS660MG, did not significantly increase the succinate yield and it decreased

  9. Maintenance metabolism and carbon fluxes in Bacillus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decasper Seraina

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selection of an appropriate host organism is crucial for the economic success of biotechnological processes. A generally important selection criterion is a low maintenance energy metabolism to reduce non-productive consumption of substrate. We here investigated, whether various bacilli that are closely related to Bacillus subtilis are potential riboflavin production hosts with low maintenance metabolism. Results While B. subtilis exhibited indeed the highest maintenance energy coefficient, B. licheniformis and B. amyloliquefaciens exhibited only statistically insignificantly reduced maintenance metabolism. Both B. pumilus and B. subtilis (natto exhibited irregular growth patterns under glucose limitation such that the maintenance metabolism could not be determined. The sole exception with significantly reduced maintenance energy requirements was the B. licheniformis strain T380B. The frequently used spo0A mutation significantly increased the maintenance metabolism of B. subtilis. At the level of 13C-detected intracellular fluxes, all investigated bacilli exhibited a significant flux through the pentose phosphate pathway, a prerequisite for efficient riboflavin production. Different from all other species, B. subtilis featured high respiratory tricarboxylic acid cycle fluxes in batch and chemostat cultures. In particular under glucose-limited conditions, this led to significant excess formation of NADPH of B. subtilis, while anabolic consumption was rather balanced with catabolic NADPH formation in the other bacilli. Conclusion Despite its successful commercial production of riboflavin, B. subtilis does not seem to be the optimal cell factory from a bioenergetic point of view. The best choice of the investigated strains is the sporulation-deficient B. licheniformis T380B strain. Beside a low maintenance energy coefficient, this strain grows robustly under different conditions and exhibits only moderate acetate overflow, hence

  10. Network environ perspective for urban metabolism and carbon emissions: a case study of Vienna, Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoqing; Chen, Bin

    2012-04-17

    Cities are considered major contributors to global warming, where carbon emissions are highly embedded in the overall urban metabolism. To examine urban metabolic processes and emission trajectories we developed a carbon flux model based on Network Environ Analysis (NEA). The mutual interactions and control situation within the urban ecosystem of Vienna were examined, and the system-level properties of the city's carbon metabolism were assessed. Regulatory strategies to minimize carbon emissions were identified through the tracking of the possible pathways that affect these emission trajectories. Our findings suggest that indirect flows have a strong bearing on the mutual and control relationships between urban sectors. The metabolism of a city is considered self-mutualistic and sustainable only when the local and distal environments are embraced. Energy production and construction were found to be two factors with a major impact on carbon emissions, and whose regulation is only effective via ad-hoc pathways. In comparison with the original life-cycle tracking, the application of NEA was better at revealing details from a mechanistic aspect, which is crucial for informed sustainable urban management.

  11. Metabolic pathway visualization in living yeast by DNP-NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Sebastian; Karlsson, Magnus; Jensen, Pernille R; Lerche, Mathilde H; Duus, Jens Ø

    2011-10-01

    Central carbon metabolism of living Saccharomyces cerevisiae is visualized by DNP-NMR. Experiments are conducted as real time assays that detect metabolic bottlenecks, pathway use, reversibility of reactions and reaction mechanisms in vivo with subsecond time resolution.

  12. Regulation of secondary metabolism by the carbon-nitrogen status in tobacco: nitrate inhibits large sectors of phenylpropanoid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Christina; Palacios-Rojas, Natalia; Feil, Regina; Stitt, Mark

    2006-05-01

    Interactions between nitrogen and carbon metabolism modulate many aspects of the metabolism, physiology and development of plants. This paper investigates the contribution of nitrate and nitrogen metabolism to the regulation of phenylpropanoid and nicotine synthesis. Wild-type tobacco was grown on 12 or 0.2 mm nitrate and compared with a nitrate reductase-deficient mutant [Nia30(145)] growing on 12 mm nitrate. Nitrate-deficient wild-type plants accumulate high levels of a range of phenylpropanoids including chlorogenic acid, contain high levels of rutin, are highly lignified, but contain less nicotine than nitrogen-replete wild-type tobacco. Nia30(145) resembles nitrate-deficient wild-type plants with respect to the levels of amino acids, but accumulates large amounts of nitrate. The levels of phenylpropanoids, rutin and lignin resemble those in nitrogen-replete wild-type plants, whereas the level of nicotine resembles that in nitrate-deficient wild-type plants. Expression arrays and real time RT-PCR revealed that a set of genes required for phenylpropanoid metabolism including PAL, 4CL and HQT are induced in nitrogen-deficient wild-type plants but not in Nia30(145). It is concluded that nitrogen deficiency leads to a marked shift from the nitrogen-containing alkaloid nicotine to carbon-rich phenylpropanoids. The stimulation of phenylpropanoid metabolism is triggered by changes of nitrate, rather than downstream nitrogen metabolites, and is mediated by induction of a set of enzymes in the early steps of the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway.

  13. Targeting One-Carbon Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    gene and association studies with diabetes and diabetic nephropathy . Mol Genet Metab 82, 321–328. Elenbaas, B. (2001). Human breast cancer cells... Diabetic Nephropathy , and Increased GFPT2 mRNA Levels. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 89, 748–755. 48 Zhang, W.C., Shyh-Chang, N...Twist (HMLE-Twist-ER) following treatment with hydroxytamoxifen (OHT) (Mani et al., 2008; Taube et al., 2010). Over a 15-day treatment with OHT, the

  14. Oxygen and carbon metabolism of Zostera muelleri across a depth gradient - Implications for resilience and blue carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Angus J. P.; Gruber, Renee; Potts, Jaimie; Wright, Aaron; Welsh, David T.; Scanes, Peter

    2017-03-01

    There is growing interest in the role that seagrasses play as 'blue carbon' stores or sinks, and their potential to offset rising CO2 levels in the atmosphere. This study measured primary aspects of the carbon balance (biomass, community metabolism, dissolved organic carbon [DOC] fluxes, seston trapping) across the depth gradient in a Zostera muelleri meadow during the seasonal biomass minimum and maximum. Over the annual estimation, the meadow was neither a sink nor source of carbon, with inputs of seston (∼58% of total inputs) balanced by exports of wrack and DOC. The carbon sink represented by wrack export depends on the nature of the environment where the wrack accumulates; if it reaches subtidal sediments it will largely be remineralised over the annual cycle, whereas between 14 and 26% of the wrack may be preserved if the material is exported to terrestrial environments. The fate of DOC exuded by seagrasses is unknown due to a lack of knowledge about its composition and lability; however, a number of lines of evidence suggest that a large fraction of DOC is mineralised. The net community metabolism (NCM) of the meadow was balanced, indicating that photosynthetic O2 production balanced community respiration and/or the reoxidation of reduced compounds (sulphur and iron) in the rhizosphere. We suggest that a balanced NCM may be the preferred state for Zostera spp. and may limit their occurrence in environments where plants cannot balance the respiratory demand exerted by seston inputs. There was a close coupling between metabolism and biomass, which in turn is forced by antecedent light over the preceding 120 days (the time integration window for antecedent light that best predicted biomass). Increased metabolism with depth and seasonal variation in light is accompanied by a decrease in the above ground:below ground biomass ratio (AGB:BGB). This trend is suggested to be a morphological adaptation that balances the competing requirements of maintaining a

  15. Future forest aboveground carbon dynamics in the central United States: the importance of forest demographic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wenchi; He, Hong S.; Thompson, Frank R.; Wang, Wen J.; Fraser, Jacob S.; Shifley, Stephen R.; Hanberry, Brice B.; Dijak, William D.

    2017-01-01

    The Central Hardwood Forest (CHF) in the United States is currently a major carbon sink, there are uncertainties in how long the current carbon sink will persist and if the CHF will eventually become a carbon source. We used a multi-model ensemble to investigate aboveground carbon density of the CHF from 2010 to 2300 under current climate. Simulations were done using one representative model for each of the simple, intermediate, and complex demographic approaches (ED2, LANDIS PRO, and LINKAGES, respectively). All approaches agreed that the current carbon sink would persist at least to 2100. However, carbon dynamics after current carbon sink diminishes to zero differ for different demographic modelling approaches. Both the simple and the complex demographic approaches predicted prolonged periods of relatively stable carbon densities after 2100, with minor declines, until the end of simulations in 2300. In contrast, the intermediate demographic approach predicted the CHF would become a carbon source between 2110 and 2260, followed by another carbon sink period. The disagreement between these patterns can be partly explained by differences in the capacity of models to simulate gross growth (both birth and subsequent growth) and mortality of short-lived, relatively shade-intolerant tree species. PMID:28165483

  16. One-carbon metabolism in acetogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT

    One-carbon metabolism in acetogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Life on earth is sustained by the constant cycling of six essential elements: oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorous, an

  17. Biomarkers related to one-carbon metabolism as potential risk factors for distal colorectal adenomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, S. de; Schneede, J.; Ueland, P.M.; Vollset, S.E.; Meyer, K.; Fredriksen, A.; Midttun, O.; Bjorge, T.; Kampman, E.; Bretthauer, M.; Hoff, G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Efficient one-carbon metabolism, which requires adequate supply of methyl group donors and B-vitamins, may protect against colorectal carcinogenesis. However, plasma folate and vitamins B2 and B12 have inconsistently been associated with colorectal cancer risk, and there have been no pre

  18. Biomarkers Related to One-Carbon Metabolism as Potential Risk Factors for Distal Colorectal Adenomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, de S.; Schneede, J.; Ueland, P.M.; Vollset, S.E.; Meyer, K.; Fredriksen, A.; Midttun, O.; Bjorge, T.; Kampman, E.; Bretthauer, M.; Hoff, G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Efficient one-carbon metabolism, which requires adequate supply of methyl group donors and B-vitamins, may protect against colorectal carcinogenesis. However, plasma folate and vitamins B2 and B12 have inconsistently been associated with colorectal cancer risk, and there have been no pre

  19. Carbon and phosphorus regulating bacterial metabolism in oligotrophic boreal lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, L. O.; Graneli, W.; Daniel, C. B.;

    2011-01-01

    -P and glucose-C alone or in combination (0.01 and 0.3 mg L(-1), respectively) was added to 1.0 mu m filtered lake water and incubated in darkness at 20 degrees C. Additions of glucose (C) and phosphorus (P) alone did not lead to changes in the rates of bacterial metabolic processes, whereas bacterial...... respiration and bacterial production responded positively to C + P enrichment for most of the lakes sampled. Bacterial growth efficiency showed a wide range (2.5-28.7%) and low mean value (12%). These variations were not correlated with the DOC concentration. Our results show that heterotrophic bacterial...

  20. Role of inorganic carbon in lactic acid bacteria metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Bringel, Françoise

    2004-01-01

    International audience; Capnophiles are bacteria stimulated by bicarbonate and CO$_2$, the two major forms of inorganic carbon (IC) in physiological neutral liquids. Capnophiles are often pathogenic heterotrophs found in IC-rich ecological niches such as human cavities. Like capnophiles, the growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) such as Lactobacillus plantarum and Enterococcus faecalis is stimulated by IC. CO$_2$ or HCO$^{-}_3$ are substrates in carbamoyl phosphate (CP) synthesis and other car...

  1. Molecular and Metabolic Mechanisms of Carbon Sequestration in Marine Thrombolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobberley, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of my dissertation project has been to examine the molecular processes underlying carbon sequestration in lithifying microbial ecosystems, known as thrombolitic mats, and assess their feasibility for use in bioregenerative life support systems. The results of my research and education efforts funded by the Graduate Student Researchers Program can be summarized in four peer-reviewed research publication, one educational publication, two papers in preparation, and six research presentations at local and national science meetings (see below for specific details).

  2. Impacts of land use and climate change on carbon dynamics in south-central Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Guang; Kaire, M.; Wood, Eric C.; Diallo, O.; Tieszen, Larry L.

    2004-01-01

    Total carbon stock in vegetation and soils was reduced 37% in south-central Senegal from 1900 to 2000. The decreasing trend will continue during the 21st century unless forest clearing is stopped, selective logging dramatically reduced, and climate change, if any, relatively small. Developing a sustainable fuelwood and charcoal production system could be the most feasible and significant carbon sequestration project in the region. If future climate changes dramatically as some models have predicted, cropland productivity will drop more than 65% around 2100, posing a serious threat to food security and the efficiency of carbon sequestration projects.

  3. Coevolution trumps pleiotropy: carbon assimilation traits are independent of metabolic network structure in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opulente, Dana A; Morales, Christopher M; Carey, Lucas B; Rest, Joshua S

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypic traits may be gained and lost together because of pleiotropy, the involvement of common genes and networks, or because of simultaneous selection for multiple traits across environments (multiple-trait coevolution). However, the extent to which network pleiotropy versus environmental coevolution shapes shared responses has not been addressed. To test these alternatives, we took advantage of the fact that the genus Saccharomyces has variation in habitat usage and diversity in the carbon sources that a given strain can metabolize. We examined patterns of gain and loss in carbon utilization traits across 488 strains of Saccharomyces to investigate whether the structure of metabolic pathways or selection pressure from common environments may have caused carbon utilization traits to be gained and lost together. While most carbon sources were gained and lost independently of each other, we found four clusters that exhibit non-random patterns of gain and loss across strains. Contrary to the network pleiotropy hypothesis, we did not find that these patterns are explained by the structure of metabolic pathways or shared enzymes. Consistent with the hypothesis that common environments shape suites of phenotypes, we found that the environment a strain was isolated from partially predicts the carbon sources it can assimilate.

  4. Coevolution trumps pleiotropy: carbon assimilation traits are independent of metabolic network structure in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana A Opulente

    Full Text Available Phenotypic traits may be gained and lost together because of pleiotropy, the involvement of common genes and networks, or because of simultaneous selection for multiple traits across environments (multiple-trait coevolution. However, the extent to which network pleiotropy versus environmental coevolution shapes shared responses has not been addressed. To test these alternatives, we took advantage of the fact that the genus Saccharomyces has variation in habitat usage and diversity in the carbon sources that a given strain can metabolize. We examined patterns of gain and loss in carbon utilization traits across 488 strains of Saccharomyces to investigate whether the structure of metabolic pathways or selection pressure from common environments may have caused carbon utilization traits to be gained and lost together. While most carbon sources were gained and lost independently of each other, we found four clusters that exhibit non-random patterns of gain and loss across strains. Contrary to the network pleiotropy hypothesis, we did not find that these patterns are explained by the structure of metabolic pathways or shared enzymes. Consistent with the hypothesis that common environments shape suites of phenotypes, we found that the environment a strain was isolated from partially predicts the carbon sources it can assimilate.

  5. Age, extent and carbon storage of the central Congo Basin peatland complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargie, Greta C; Lewis, Simon L; Lawson, Ian T; Mitchard, Edward T A; Page, Susan E; Bocko, Yannick E; Ifo, Suspense A

    2017-02-02

    Peatlands are carbon-rich ecosystems that cover just three per cent of Earth's land surface, but store one-third of soil carbon. Peat soils are formed by the build-up of partially decomposed organic matter under waterlogged anoxic conditions. Most peat is found in cool climatic regions where unimpeded decomposition is slower, but deposits are also found under some tropical swamp forests. Here we present field measurements from one of the world's most extensive regions of swamp forest, the Cuvette Centrale depression in the central Congo Basin. We find extensive peat deposits beneath the swamp forest vegetation (peat defined as material with an organic matter content of at least 65 per cent to a depth of at least 0.3 metres). Radiocarbon dates indicate that peat began accumulating from about 10,600 years ago, coincident with the onset of more humid conditions in central Africa at the beginning of the Holocene. The peatlands occupy large interfluvial basins, and seem to be largely rain-fed and ombrotrophic-like (of low nutrient status) systems. Although the peat layer is relatively shallow (with a maximum depth of 5.9 metres and a median depth of 2.0 metres), by combining in situ and remotely sensed data, we estimate the area of peat to be approximately 145,500 square kilometres (95 per cent confidence interval of 131,900-156,400 square kilometres), making the Cuvette Centrale the most extensive peatland complex in the tropics. This area is more than five times the maximum possible area reported for the Congo Basin in a recent synthesis of pantropical peat extent. We estimate that the peatlands store approximately 30.6 petagrams (30.6 × 10(15) grams) of carbon belowground (95 per cent confidence interval of 6.3-46.8 petagrams of carbon)-a quantity that is similar to the above-ground carbon stocks of the tropical forests of the entire Congo Basin. Our result for the Cuvette Centrale increases the best estimate of global tropical peatland carbon stocks by

  6. Age, extent and carbon storage of the central Congo Basin peatland complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargie, Greta C.; Lewis, Simon L.; Lawson, Ian T.; Mitchard, Edward T. A.; Page, Susan E.; Bocko, Yannick E.; Ifo, Suspense A.

    2017-01-01

    Peatlands are carbon-rich ecosystems that cover just three per cent of Earth’s land surface, but store one-third of soil carbon. Peat soils are formed by the build-up of partially decomposed organic matter under waterlogged anoxic conditions. Most peat is found in cool climatic regions where unimpeded decomposition is slower, but deposits are also found under some tropical swamp forests. Here we present field measurements from one of the world’s most extensive regions of swamp forest, the Cuvette Centrale depression in the central Congo Basin. We find extensive peat deposits beneath the swamp forest vegetation (peat defined as material with an organic matter content of at least 65 per cent to a depth of at least 0.3 metres). Radiocarbon dates indicate that peat began accumulating from about 10,600 years ago, coincident with the onset of more humid conditions in central Africa at the beginning of the Holocene. The peatlands occupy large interfluvial basins, and seem to be largely rain-fed and ombrotrophic-like (of low nutrient status) systems. Although the peat layer is relatively shallow (with a maximum depth of 5.9 metres and a median depth of 2.0 metres), by combining in situ and remotely sensed data, we estimate the area of peat to be approximately 145,500 square kilometres (95 per cent confidence interval of 131,900–156,400 square kilometres), making the Cuvette Centrale the most extensive peatland complex in the tropics. This area is more than five times the maximum possible area reported for the Congo Basin in a recent synthesis of pantropical peat extent. We estimate that the peatlands store approximately 30.6 petagrams (30.6 × 1015 grams) of carbon belowground (95 per cent confidence interval of 6.3–46.8 petagrams of carbon)—a quantity that is similar to the above-ground carbon stocks of the tropical forests of the entire Congo Basin. Our result for the Cuvette Centrale increases the best estimate of global tropical peatland carbon

  7. Carbon Deflagration in Type Ia Supernova: I. Centrally Ignited Models

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, H; Malone, C M; Almgren, A; Bell, J B

    2013-01-01

    A leading model for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) begins with a white dwarf near the Chandrasekhar mass that ignites a degenerate thermonuclear runaway close to its center and explodes. In a series of papers, we shall explore the consequences of ignition at several locations within such dwarfs. Here we assume central ignition, which has been explored before, however, the problem is worth revisiting, if only to validate those previous studies and to further elucidate the relevant physics for future work. A perturbed sphere of hot iron ash with a radius of ~100 km is initialized at the middle of the star. The subsequent explosion is followed in several simulations using a thickened flame model in which the flame speed is either fixed --- within the range expected from turbulent combustion --- or based on the local turbulent intensity. Global results, including the explosion energy and bulk nucleosynthesis (e.g. 56Ni of 0.48--0.56 $\\Msun$) turn out to be insensitive to this speed. In all completed runs, the energy...

  8. Central action of FGF19 reduces hypothalamic AGRP/NPY neuron activity and improves glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelin, Geneviève; Jo, Young-Hwan; Li, Xiaosong; Schwartz, Gary J; Zhang, Ying; Dun, Nae J; Lyu, Rong-Ming; Blouet, Clémence; Chang, Jaw K; Chua, Streamson

    2014-02-01

    Tight control of glucose excursions has been a long-standing goal of treatment for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in order to ameliorate the morbidity and mortality associated with hyperglycemia. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 19 is a hormone-like enterokine released postprandially that emerged as a potential therapeutic agent for metabolic disorders, including diabetes and obesity. Remarkably, FGF19 treatment has hypoglycemic actions that remain potent in models of genetic and acquired insulin resistance. Here, we provided evidence that the central nervous system responds to FGF19 administered in the periphery. Then, in two mouse models of insulin resistance, leptin-deficiency and high-fat diet feeding, third intra-cerebro-ventricular infusions of FGF19 improved glycemic status, reduced insulin resistance and potentiated insulin signaling in the periphery. In addition, our study highlights a new mechanism of central FGF19 action, involving the suppression of AGRP/NPY neuronal activity. Overall, our work unveils novel regulatory pathways induced by FGF19 that will be useful in the design of novel strategies to control diabetes in obesity.

  9. Carbon and nitrogen stocks in the soils of Central and Eastern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batjes, N.H.

    2002-01-01

    Soil organic carbon and total nitrogen stocks are presented for Central and Eastern Europe. The study uses the soil geographic and attribute data held in a 1:2 500 000 scale Soil and Terrain (SOTER) database, covering Belarus, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, P

  10. Lack of differential pattern in central adiposity and metabolic syndrome in Barrett's esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Healy, L A

    2012-02-01

    Obesity is an established risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma, although the mechanism is unclear. A pathway from reflux to inflammation through metaplasia is the dominant hypothesis, and an added role relating to visceral adiposity and the metabolic syndrome has been mooted in Barrett\\'s esophagus (BE) patients. Whether BE differs from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in obesity and metabolic syndrome profiles is unclear, and this was the focus of this study. Patients with proven BE or GERD were randomly selected from the unit data registry and invited to attend for metabolic syndrome screening, anthropometry studies including segmental body composition analysis, and laboratory tests including fasting lipids, insulin, and C-reactive protein. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. One hundred and eighteen BE patients and 113 age- and sex-matched GERD controls were studied. The incidence of obesity (body mass index >30 kg\\/m(2)) was 36% and 38%, respectively, with the pattern of fat deposition predominantly central and an estimated trunk fat mass of 13 and 14 kg, respectively. Using the NCEP criteria, metabolic syndrome was significantly more common in the BE cohort (30% vs 20%, P < 0.05), but there was no significant difference using IDF criteria (42% vs 37%, P= 0.340). Central obesity and the metabolic syndrome are common in both Barrett\\'s and GERD cohorts, but not significantly different, suggesting that central obesity and the metabolic syndrome does not per se impact on the development of BE in a reflux population. In BE, the importance of obesity and the metabolic syndrome in disease progression merits further study.

  11. Proteomic Analysis of One-carbon Metabolism-related Marker in Liver of Rat Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Young-Ah; Lee, Ji Hye; Kwon, Eun Jin; Yoo, Jae Young; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Pang, Myung-Geol; Kim, Young Ju

    2015-11-01

    Maternal food intake has a significant effect on the fetal environment, and an inadequate maternal diet may result in intrauterine growth restriction. Intrauterine growth restriction newborn rat pups nursed by normal diet-fed dams exhibited rapid catch-up growth, which plays a critical role in the risk for metabolic and cardiovascular disease in later life. Specifically, one-carbon metabolism in the liver plays a critical role in placental and fetal growth. Impaired functioning of one-carbon metabolism is associated with increased homocysteine levels. In this study, we applied a comprehensive proteomic approach to identify differential expression of proteins related to one-carbon metabolism in the livers of rat offspring as an effect of maternal food restriction during gestation. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002578. We determined that betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1, methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1, and ATP synthase subunit beta mitochondrial (ATP5B) expression levels were significantly reduced in the livers of rat offspring exposed to maternal food restriction during gestation compared with in the offspring of rats fed a normal diet (p normal diet during lactation. However, in female offspring only expression levels of methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 were negatively correlated with homocysteine concentration. This study shows that maternal food restriction during late gestation and normal diet during lactation lead to increased homocysteine concentration through disturbance of one-carbon metabolism in the livers of male offspring. This suggests that male offspring have an increased gender-specific susceptibility to disease in later life through fetal programming.

  12. Histone Methylation Dynamics and Gene Regulation Occur through the Sensing of One-Carbon Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentch, Samantha J; Mehrmohamadi, Mahya; Huang, Lei; Liu, Xiaojing; Gupta, Diwakar; Mattocks, Dwight; Gómez Padilla, Paola; Ables, Gene; Bamman, Marcas M; Thalacker-Mercer, Anna E; Nichenametla, Sailendra N; Locasale, Jason W

    2015-11-01

    S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) link one-carbon metabolism to methylation status. However, it is unknown whether regulation of SAM and SAH by nutrient availability can be directly sensed to alter the kinetics of key histone methylation marks. We provide evidence that the status of methionine metabolism is sufficient to determine levels of histone methylation by modulating SAM and SAH. This dynamic interaction led to rapid changes in H3K4me3, altered gene transcription, provided feedback regulation to one-carbon metabolism, and could be fully recovered upon restoration of methionine. Modulation of methionine in diet led to changes in metabolism and histone methylation in the liver. In humans, methionine variability in fasting serum was commensurate with concentrations needed for these dynamics and could be partly explained by diet. Together these findings demonstrate that flux through methionine metabolism and the sensing of methionine availability may allow direct communication to the chromatin state in cells.

  13. A metagenomic window into carbon metabolism at 3 km depth in Precambrian continental crust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnabosco, Cara; Ryan, Kathleen; Lau, Maggie C Y; Kuloyo, Olukayode; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara; Kieft, Thomas L; van Heerden, Esta; Onstott, Tullis C

    2016-03-01

    Subsurface microbial communities comprise a significant fraction of the global prokaryotic biomass; however, the carbon metabolisms that support the deep biosphere have been relatively unexplored. In order to determine the predominant carbon metabolisms within a 3-km deep fracture fluid system accessed via the Tau Tona gold mine (Witwatersrand Basin, South Africa), metagenomic and thermodynamic analyses were combined. Within our system of study, the energy-conserving reductive acetyl-CoA (Wood-Ljungdahl) pathway was found to be the most abundant carbon fixation pathway identified in the metagenome. Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase genes that have the potential to participate in (1) both autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolisms through the reversible oxidization of CO and subsequent transfer of electrons for sulfate reduction, (2) direct utilization of H2 and (3) methanogenesis were identified. The most abundant members of the metagenome belonged to Euryarchaeota (22%) and Firmicutes (57%)-by far, the highest relative abundance of Euryarchaeota yet reported from deep fracture fluids in South Africa and one of only five Firmicutes-dominated deep fracture fluids identified in the region. Importantly, by combining the metagenomics data and thermodynamic modeling of this study with previously published isotopic and community composition data from the South African subsurface, we are able to demonstrate that Firmicutes-dominated communities are associated with a particular hydrogeologic environment, specifically the older, more saline and more reducing waters.

  14. A central role for carbon-overflow pathways in the modulation of bacterial cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinai Chittezham Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Similar to developmental programs in eukaryotes, the death of a subpopulation of cells is thought to benefit bacterial biofilm development. However mechanisms that mediate a tight control over cell death are not clearly understood at the population level. Here we reveal that CidR dependent pyruvate oxidase (CidC and α-acetolactate synthase/decarboxylase (AlsSD overflow metabolic pathways, which are active during staphylococcal biofilm development, modulate cell death to achieve optimal biofilm biomass. Whereas acetate derived from CidC activity potentiates cell death in cells by a mechanism dependent on intracellular acidification and respiratory inhibition, AlsSD activity effectively counters CidC action by diverting carbon flux towards neutral rather than acidic byproducts and consuming intracellular protons in the process. Furthermore, the physiological features that accompany metabolic activation of cell death bears remarkable similarities to hallmarks of eukaryotic programmed cell death, including the generation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage. Finally, we demonstrate that the metabolic modulation of cell death not only affects biofilm development but also biofilm-dependent disease outcomes. Given the ubiquity of such carbon overflow pathways in diverse bacterial species, we propose that the metabolic control of cell death may be a fundamental feature of prokaryotic development.

  15. Central Role of Pyruvate Kinase in Carbon Co-catabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noy, Tahel; Vergnolle, Olivia; Hartman, Travis E; Rhee, Kyu Y; Jacobs, William R; Berney, Michael; Blanchard, John S

    2016-03-25

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) displays a high degree of metabolic plasticity to adapt to challenging host environments. Genetic evidence suggests thatMtbrelies mainly on fatty acid catabolism in the host. However,Mtbalso maintains a functional glycolytic pathway and its role in the cellular metabolism ofMtbhas yet to be understood. Pyruvate kinase catalyzes the last and rate-limiting step in glycolysis and theMtbgenome harbors one putative pyruvate kinase (pykA, Rv1617). Here we show thatpykAencodes an active pyruvate kinase that is allosterically activated by glucose 6-phosphate (Glc-6-P) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). Deletion ofpykApreventsMtbgrowth in the presence of fermentable carbon sources and has a cidal effect in the presence of glucose that correlates with elevated levels of the toxic catabolite methylglyoxal. Growth attenuation was also observed in media containing a combination of short chain fatty acids and glucose and surprisingly, in media containing odd and even chain fatty acids alone. Untargeted high sensitivity metabolomics revealed that inactivation of pyruvate kinase leads to accumulation of phosphoenolpyruvate (P-enolpyruvate), citrate, and aconitate, which was consistent with allosteric inhibition of isocitrate dehydrogenase by P-enolpyruvate. This metabolic block could be relieved by addition of the α-ketoglutarate precursor glutamate. Taken together, our study identifies an essential role of pyruvate kinase in preventing metabolic block during carbon co-catabolism inMtb.

  16. Cerebral blood flow, oxidative metabolism and cerebrovascular carbon dioxide reactivity in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Strauss, Gitte Irene; Thomsen, Gerda;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal arterial carbon dioxide tension (P(a)CO(2)) in patients with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is unknown and controversial. The objective of this study was to measure global cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebrovascular CO(2) reactivity (CO(2)R), and cerebral metabolic rates...... to baseline ventilation, whereas CMR(glu) increased. CONCLUSION: In patients with acute bacterial meningitis, we found variable levels of CBF and cerebrovascular CO(2) reactivity, a low a-v DO(2), low cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen and glucose, and a cerebral lactate efflux. In these patients...

  17. A Natural Light/Dark Cycle Regulation of Carbon-Nitrogen Metabolism and Gene Expression in Rice Shoots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haixing; Liang, Zhijun; Ding, Guangda; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen; Cai, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Light and temperature are two particularly important environmental cues for plant survival. Carbon and nitrogen are two essential macronutrients required for plant growth and development, and cellular carbon and nitrogen metabolism must be tightly coordinated. In order to understand how the natural light/dark cycle regulates carbon and nitrogen metabolism in rice plants, we analyzed the photosynthesis, key carbon-nitrogen metabolites, and enzyme activities, and differentially expressed genes and miRNAs involved in the carbon and nitrogen metabolic pathway in rice shoots at the following times: 2:00, 6:00, 10:00, 14:00, 18:00, and 22:00. Our results indicated that more CO2 was fixed into carbohydrates by a high net photosynthetic rate, respiratory rate, and stomatal conductance in the daytime. Although high levels of the nitrate reductase activity, free ammonium and carbohydrates were exhibited in the daytime, the protein synthesis was not significantly facilitated by the light and temperature. In mRNA sequencing, the carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related differentially expressed genes were obtained, which could be divided into eight groups: photosynthesis, TCA cycle, sugar transport, sugar metabolism, nitrogen transport, nitrogen reduction, amino acid metabolism, and nitrogen regulation. Additionally, a total of 78,306 alternative splicing events have been identified, which primarily belong to alternative 5' donor sites, alternative 3' acceptor sites, intron retention, and exon skipping. In sRNA sequencing, four carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related miRNAs (osa-miR1440b, osa-miR2876-5p, osa-miR1877 and osa-miR5799) were determined to be regulated by natural light/dark cycle. The expression level analysis showed that the four carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related miRNAs negatively regulated their target genes. These results may provide a good strategy to study how natural light/dark cycle regulates carbon and nitrogen metabolism to ensure plant growth and

  18. Carbon mineralization in surface and subsurface soils in a subtropical mixed forest in central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F.; Tian, Q.

    2014-12-01

    About a half of soil carbon is stored in subsurface soil horizons, their dynamics have the potential to significantly affect carbon balancing in terrestrial ecosystems. However, the main factors regulating subsurface soil carbon mineralization are poorly understood. As affected by mountain humid monsoon, the subtropical mountains in central China has an annual precipitation of about 2000 mm, which causes strong leaching of ions and nutrition. The objectives of this study were to monitor subsurface soil carbon mineralization and to determine if it is affected by nutrient limitation. We collected soil samples (up to 1 m deep) at three locations in a small watershed with three soil layers (0-10 cm, 10-30 cm, below 30 cm). For the three layers, soil organic carbon (SOC) ranged from 35.8 to 94.4 mg g-1, total nitrogen ranged from 3.51 to 8.03 mg g-1, microbial biomass carbon (MBC) ranged from 170.6 to 718.4 μg g-1 soil. We measured carbon mineralization with the addition of N (100 μg N/g soil), P (50 μg P/g soil), and liable carbon (glucose labeled by 5 atom% 13C, at five levels: control, 10% MBC, 50% MBC, 100% MBC, 200% MBC). The addition of N and P had negligible effects on CO2 production in surface soil layers; in the deepest soil layer, the addition of N and P decreased CO2 production from 4.32 to 3.20 μg C g-1 soil carbon h-1. Glucose addition stimulated both surface and subsurface microbial mineralization of SOC, causing priming effects. With the increase of glucose addition rate from 10% to 200% MBC, the primed mineralization rate increased from 0.19 to 3.20 μg C g-1 soil carbon h-1 (fifth day of glucose addition). The magnitude of priming effect increased from 28% to 120% as soil layers go deep compare to the basal CO2 production (fifth day of 200% MBC glucose addition, basal CO2 production rate for the surface and the deepest soil was 11.17 and 2.88 μg C g-1 soil carbon h-1). These results suggested that the mineralization of subsurface carbon is more

  19. Study on the correlation of serum lipid metabolism and central retinal artery hemodynamics with diabetic retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran-Yang Guo

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the correlation of serum lipid metabolism and central retinal artery (CRA) hemodynamics with diabetic retinopathy (DR).Methods:A total of 120 patients with type 2 diabetes who were admitted in our hospital from May, 2015 to May, 2016 were included in the study and divided into NDR group (non-diabetic retinopathy), NPR group (non-proliferative retinopathy), and PR group (proliferative retinopathy) with 40 cases in each group according to DR clinical staging. Moreover, 50 healthy individuals who came for physical examinations were served as the control group. The full automatic biochemical analyzer was used to detect the levels of TG, TC, LDL-C, and HDL-C. The color Doppler flow imaging (CDFI) was used to detect EDV, PSV, RI, and PI of CRA and OA.Results:The levels of TG, TC, and LDL-C in NDG, NPR, and PR groups were gradually increased with the aggravation of retinopathy, HDL-C was reduced, the comparison among the three groups was statistically significant, and the comparison with the control group was statistically significant. EDV, PSV, and PI of CRA and OA in NDG, NPR, and PR groups were gradually increased with the aggravation of retinopathy, RI was reduced, the comparison among the three groups was statistically significant, and the comparison with the control group was statistically significant. Conclusions: The lipid metabolism disorder can promote the occurrence and development of DR. The change of CRA and OA hemodynamics is an important pathological basis for developing DR. Clinical detection of serum lipid level and monitoring of the changes of fundus artery hemocynamic parameters are of great significance in early detecting DR.

  20. Comparative study on CO2 sources in soil developed on carbonate rock and non-carbonate rock in Central Guizhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎廷宇; 王世杰; 郑乐平

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, by using concentration and carbon stable isotope the CO2 sources of soil profiles developed on limestone, dolostone and claystone basements in Central Guizhou, China are comparatively studied. The results show that CO2 concentration of soil profiles developed on different basements is different, having the following sequence: limestone>dolostone>claystone. Below the soil depth of 20 cm from the surface the ? 13C value of CO2 in soil profile developed on limestone ranges from -12.811‰ - -13.492‰(PDB), that in soil profile developed on dolostone varys from -13.212‰ - -14.271‰(PDB) and that in soil profile developed on claystone is about -20.234‰ - -21.485‰(PDB). Taking the carbon isotope of soil organic matter and carbonate rock as two isotopic endmembers, the proportion of soil CO2 generated by dissolution of carbonate rock is calculated, about 21%-25% for soil profile developed on limestone basement, 19%-21% for soil profile developed on dolostone basement. There is almost no influx of CO2 generated by the dissolution of carbonate rock in soil profile developed on claystone basement.

  1. Export of Dissolved Organic Matter, Nutrients and Carbon from Himalayan River System in Central Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical weathering is a vital ecosystem process and plays a central role in regulation of global carbon cycles. Weathering from Himalayan landscape supply high amount of major ions, nutrients and suspended sediments to the oceans. Surface water samples were collected from sixteen stations at different altitude along the Langtnag-Narayani Himalayan river system in central Nepal on a monthly basis for one year. This study aims to investigate spatiotemporal variations of dissolved organic matter, nutrients and carbonic species and to evaluate their controlling factors within the basin. The fluxes of these species appeared several fold higher at low elevation than at mid mountains and high elevation Himalaya sites. Seasonality appeared to exert major control on concentrations and fluxes of major solutes along the drainage network. The highest export rate of chemical species corresponded to the monsoon season, followed by the ones corresponding to post-monsoon and pre-monsoon seasons. Carbonate has major control on the flux of major solutes within the basin. The export rate of dissolved organic carbon and total dissolved nitrogen were about three and seventeen times higher respectively at the Narayani basin than its headwater at Langtang basin within the high Himalaya. Nitrate and phosphate export rates in the Narayani basin were 5.07 and 0.34 tons km-2 yr-1 respectively which is several fold higher than the rates in the high Himalaya probably due to input from agricultural activities. The export of dissolved inorganic carbon from the Narayani basin was 101.87 tons km-2 yr-1 of which bicarbonate appeared to be the dominant fraction (94.9%) followed by carbonic acid (4.7%) and carbonate (0.4%). Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) resulted under-saturated in the high elevation Himalayan basin and supersaturated at the low elevation Narayani basin. The concentration of pCO2 is considered to be an important factor for regulating weathering rates of any landscape.

  2. Central orchestration of peripheral nutrient partitioning and substrate utilization: implications for the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, R G P; Joly-Amado, A; Cansell, C; Castel, J; Martinez, S; Delbes, A S; Luquet, S

    2014-06-01

    Energy homoeostasis is maintained through a complex interplay of nutrient intake and energy expenditure. The central nervous system is an essential component of this regulation, as it integrates circulating signals of hunger and satiety to develop adaptive responses at the behavioural and metabolic levels, while the hypothalamus is regarded as a particularly crucial structure in the brain in terms of energy homoeostasis. The arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus contains at least two intermingled neuronal populations: the neurons that produce neuropeptide Y (NPY); and the Agouti-related protein (AgRP) produced by AgRP/NPY neurons situated below the third ventricle in close proximity to proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-producing neurons. POMC neurons exert their catabolic and anorectic actions by releasing α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), while AgRP neurons oppose this action by exerting tonic GABAergic inhibition of POMC neurons and releasing the melanocortin receptor inverse agonist AgRP. The release of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides by second-order AgRP neurons appears to take place on a multiple time scale, thereby allowing neuromodulation of preganglionic neuronal activity and subsequent control of nutrient partitioning - in other words, the coordinated regulation of conversion, storage and utilization of carbohydrates vs. lipids. This suggests that the function of AgRP neurons extends beyond the strict regulation of feeding to the regulation of efferent organ activity, such that AgRP neurons may now be viewed as an important bridge between central detection of nutrient availability and peripheral nutrient partitioning, thus providing a mechanistic link between obesity and obesity-related disorders.

  3. Nutritional Manipulation of One-Carbon Metabolism: Effects on Arsenic Methylation and Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan N. Hall

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to arsenic (As through drinking water is a substantial problem worldwide. The methylation of As, a reactive metalloid, generates monomethyl- (MMA and dimethyl-arsenical (DMA species. The biochemical pathway that catalyzes these reactions, one-carbon metabolism, is regulated by folate and other micronutrients. Arsenic methylation exerts a critical influence on both its urinary elimination and chemical reactivity. Mice having the As methyltransferase null genotype show reduced urinary As excretion, increased As retention, and severe systemic toxicity. The most toxic As metabolite in vitro is MMAIII, an intermediate in the generation of DMAV, a much less toxic metabolite. These findings have raised the question of whether As methylation is a detoxification or bioactivation pathway. Results of population-based studies suggest that complete methylation of inorganic As to DMA is associated with reduced risk for As-induced health outcomes, and that nutrients involved in one-carbon metabolism, such as folate, can facilitate As methylation and elimination.

  4. Carbon metabolism of enterobacterial human pathogens growing in epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Götz

    Full Text Available Analysis of the genome sequences of the major human bacterial pathogens has provided a large amount of information concerning their metabolic potential. However, our knowledge of the actual metabolic pathways and metabolite fluxes occurring in these pathogens under infection conditions is still limited. In this study, we analysed the intracellular carbon metabolism of enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC HN280 and EIEC 4608-58 and Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium (Stm 14028 replicating in epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2. To this aim, we supplied [U-(13C(6]glucose to Caco-2 cells infected with the bacterial strains or mutants thereof impaired in the uptake of glucose, mannose and/or glucose 6-phosphate. The (13C-isotopologue patterns of protein-derived amino acids from the bacteria and the host cells were then determined by mass spectrometry. The data showed that EIEC HN280 growing in the cytosol of the host cells, as well as Stm 14028 replicating in the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV utilised glucose, but not glucose 6-phosphate, other phosphorylated carbohydrates, gluconate or fatty acids as major carbon substrates. EIEC 4608-58 used C(3-compound(s in addition to glucose as carbon source. The labelling patterns reflected strain-dependent carbon flux via glycolysis and/or the Entner-Doudoroff pathway, the pentose phosphate pathway, the TCA cycle and anapleurotic reactions between PEP and oxaloacetate. Mutants of all three strains impaired in the uptake of glucose switched to C(3-substrate(s accompanied by an increased uptake of amino acids (and possibly also other anabolic monomers from the host cell. Surprisingly, the metabolism of the host cells, as judged by the efficiency of (13C-incorporation into host cell amino acids, was not significantly affected by the infection with either of these intracellular pathogens.

  5. Metabolic interactions of central nervous system medications and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, C A; Sproule, B A; Knoke, D M

    1999-05-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are prescribed alone and in combination with other psychotropic medications in the treatment of a variety of psychiatric disorders. Such combinations create the potential for pharmacokinetic interactions by affecting the activity of the cytochromes P450 (CYP450), drug metabolizing oxidative enzymes. SSRIs are not equivalent in their potential for interactions when combined with other central nervous system (CNS) medication. Generally citalopram and sertraline are characterized by weaker inhibition of CYP450 enzymes and, therefore, hold less potential for interaction than the other SSRIs. Paroxetine potently inhibits CYP2D6, which can result in increased neuroleptic serum concentrations, accompanied by increased CNS side-effects. Similarly, as a potent inhibitor of CYP2D6, fluoxetine can increase serum concentrations of neuroleptics and antidepressants and numerous case reports have documented concomitant adverse events. Fluoxetine also inhibits CYP3A and CYP2C19, increasing serum concentrations of some benzodiazepines. Fluvoxamine is a potent inhibitor of CYP1A2, a moderate inhibitor of CYP3A and a mild inhibitor of CYP2D6. Therefore, interactions with clozapine and benzodiazepines are evident.

  6. A moonlighting enzyme links Escherichia coli cell size with central metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert S Hill

    Full Text Available Growth rate and nutrient availability are the primary determinants of size in single-celled organisms: rapidly growing Escherichia coli cells are more than twice as large as their slow growing counterparts. Here we report the identification of the glucosyltransferase OpgH as a nutrient-dependent regulator of E. coli cell size. During growth under nutrient-rich conditions, OpgH localizes to the nascent septal site, where it antagonizes assembly of the tubulin-like cell division protein FtsZ, delaying division and increasing cell size. Biochemical analysis is consistent with OpgH sequestering FtsZ from growing polymers. OpgH is functionally analogous to UgtP, a Bacillus subtilis glucosyltransferase that inhibits cell division in a growth rate-dependent fashion. In a striking example of convergent evolution, OpgH and UgtP share no homology, have distinct enzymatic activities, and appear to inhibit FtsZ assembly through different mechanisms. Comparative analysis of E. coli and B. subtilis reveals conserved aspects of growth rate regulation and cell size control that are likely to be broadly applicable. These include the conservation of uridine diphosphate glucose as a proxy for nutrient status and the use of moonlighting enzymes to couple growth rate-dependent phenomena to central metabolism.

  7. Growth-related Metabolism of the Carbon Storage Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate in Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmaier, Nadine; Schunder, Eva; Kutzner, Erika; Tlapák, Hana; Rydzewski, Kerstin; Herrmann, Vroni; Stämmler, Maren; Lasch, Peter; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Heuner, Klaus

    2016-03-18

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires disease, has a biphasic life cycle with a switch from a replicative to a transmissive phenotype. During the replicative phase, the bacteria grow within host cells in Legionella-containing vacuoles. During the transmissive phenotype and the postexponential (PE) growth phase, the pathogens express virulence factors, become flagellated, and leave the Legionella-containing vacuoles. Using (13)C labeling experiments, we now show that, under in vitro conditions, serine is mainly metabolized during the replicative phase for the biosynthesis of some amino acids and for energy generation. During the PE phase, these carbon fluxes are reduced, and glucose also serves as an additional carbon substrate to feed the biosynthesis of poly-3-hydroxybuyrate (PHB), an essential carbon source for transmissive L. pneumophila. Whole-cell FTIR analysis and comparative isotopologue profiling further reveal that a putative 3-ketothiolase (Lpp1788) and a PHB polymerase (Lpp0650), but not enzymes of the crotonyl-CoA pathway (Lpp0931-0933) are involved in PHB metabolism during the PE phase. However, the data also reflect that additional bypassing reactions for PHB synthesis exist in agreement with in vivo competition assays using Acanthamoeba castellannii or human macrophage-like U937 cells as host cells. The data suggest that substrate usage and PHB metabolism are coordinated during the life cycle of the pathogen.

  8. Life-history strategies and carbon metabolism gene dosage in the Nakaseomyces yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Judith; Bolotin-Fukuhara, Monique; Bourgais, Aurélie; Fairhead, Cécile; Sicard, Delphine

    2016-03-01

    The Nakaseomyces clade consists of a group of six hemiascomyceteous yeasts (Candida glabrata, Nakaseomyces delphensis, C. nivarensis, C. bracarensis, C. castelli, N. bacillisporus), phylogenetically close to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, their representative being the well-known pathogenic yeast C. glabrata. Four species had been previously examined for their carbon assimilation properties and found to have similar properties to S. cerevisiae (repression of respiration in high glucose-i.e. Crabtree positivity-and being a facultative anaerobe). We examined here the complete set of the six species for their carbon metabolic gene content. We also measured different metabolic and life-history traits (glucose consumption rate, population growth rate, carrying capacity, cell size, cell and biomass yield). We observed deviations from the glycolytic gene redundancy observed in S. cerevisiae presumed to be an important property for the Crabtree positivity, especially for the two species C. castelli and N. bacillisporus which frequently have only one gene copy, but different life strategies. Therefore, we show that the decrease in carbon metabolic gene copy cannot be simply associated with a reduction of glucose consumption rate and can be counterbalanced by other beneficial genetic variations.

  9. Soil carbon dioxide emissions controlled by an extracellular oxidative metabolism identifiable by its isotope signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kéraval, Benoit; Lehours, Anne Catherine; Colombet, Jonathan; Amblard, Christian; Alvarez, Gaël; Fontaine, Sébastien

    2016-11-01

    Soil heterotrophic respiration is a major determinant of the carbon (C) cycle and its interactions with climate. Given the complexity of the respiratory machinery, it is traditionally considered that oxidation of organic C into carbon dioxide (CO2) strictly results from intracellular metabolic processes. Here we show that C mineralization can operate in soils deprived of all observable cellular forms. Moreover, the process responsible for CO2 emissions in sterilized soils induced a strong C isotope fractionation (up to 50 ‰) incompatible with respiration of cellular origin. The supply of 13C glucose in sterilized soil led to the release of 13CO2 suggesting the presence of respiratory-like metabolism (glycolysis, decarboxylation reaction, chain of electron transfer) carried out by soil-stabilized enzymes, and by soil mineral and metal catalysts. These findings indicate that CO2 emissions from soils can have two origins: (1) from the well-known respiration of soil heterotrophic microorganisms and (2) from an extracellular oxidative metabolism (EXOMET) or, at least, catabolism. These two metabolisms should be considered separately when studying effects of environmental factors on the C cycle because the likelihood is that they do not obey the same laws and they respond differently to abiotic factors.

  10. A novel role for central ACBP/DBI as a regulator of long-chain fatty acid metabolism in astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouyakdan, Khalil; Taïb, Bouchra; Budry, Lionel;

    2015-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that binds intracellular acyl-CoA esters. Several studies have suggested that ACBP acts as an acyl-CoA pool former and regulates long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) metabolism in peripheral tissues. In the brain, ACBP is known as Diaze......Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that binds intracellular acyl-CoA esters. Several studies have suggested that ACBP acts as an acyl-CoA pool former and regulates long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) metabolism in peripheral tissues. In the brain, ACBP is known...... (palmitate, stearate) LCFA metabolic fluxes in hypothalamic slices and astrocyte cultures. In addition, lack of ACBP differently affects the expression of genes involved in FA metabolism in cortical versus hypothalamic astrocytes. Finally, ACBP deficiency increases FA content and impairs their release...... in response to palmitate in hypothalamic astrocytes. Collectively, these findings reveal for the first time that central ACBP acts as a regulator of LCFA intracellular metabolism in astrocytes. Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) or diazepam-binding inhibitor is a secreted peptide acting centrally as a GABAA...

  11. Endothelial dysfunction in normal and prediabetic rats with metabolic syndrome exposed by oral gavage to carbon black nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Janne Kjærsgaard; Vesterdal, Lise Kristine; Sheykhzade, Majid

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to nanosized particles may increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases by endothelial dysfunction, particularly in susceptible subjects with metabolic syndrome. We investigated vasomotor dysfunction in aorta from obese and lean Zucker rats after oral exposure to nanosized carbon black (...

  12. Comparative study on CO2 sources in soil developed on carbonate rock and non-carbonate rock in Central Guizhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎廷宇; 王世杰; 郑乐平

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, by using concentration and carbon stable isotope the.CO2 sources of soil profiles developed on limestone, dolostone and claystone basements in Central Guizhou, China are comparatively studied. The results show that CO2 concentration of soil profiles developed on different basements is different, having the following sequence: limestone>dolostone>claystone. Below the soil depth of 20 cm from the surface the δ13C value of CO2 in soil profile developed on limestone ranges from -12.811‰ - -13.492‰(PDB), that in soil profile developed on dolostone varys from -13.212‰--14.271‰(PDB) and that in soil profile developed on claystone is about -20.234‰- -21.485‰(PDB). Taking the carbon isotope of soil organic matter and carbonate rock as two isotopic endmembers, the proportion of soil C02 generated by dissolution of carbonate rock is calculated, about 21%-25% for soil profile developed on limestone basement, 19%-21% for soil profile developed on dolostone basement. There is almost no influx of

  13. Changes of in vivo fluxes through central metabolic pathways during the production of nystatin by Streptomyces noursei in batch culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsbu, E.; Christensen, Bjarke; Nielsen, Jens

    2001-01-01

    of the amino acids and calculated fluxes of the central metabolism showed that changes in the primary and secondary metabolisms occurred simultaneously. Changes in the profiles for the integrated fluxes showed a decreased flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and an increased flux in the tricarboxylic...... acid cycle relative to the glucose uptake rate when the culture entered a phase with reduced specific growth rate and enhanced nystatin yield. The flux through the pentose phosphate pathway seemed to be adjusted according to the NADPH requirement during the different phases of the batch fermentation....

  14. BENTHIC METABOLISM ON A SHELTERED ROCKY SHORE: ROLE OF THE CANOPY IN THE CARBON BUDGET(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golléty, Claire; Migné, Aline; Davoult, Dominique

    2008-10-01

    While the importance of canopy-forming algae in structuring ecosystems is recognized, their role in the carbon budget is still not well understood. To our knowledge, no measurements of rocky shores primary production and respiration under emersion periods have been carried out in situ. A benthic chamber coupled to a CO2 -infrared gas analyzer was used to measure gross primary production and respiration on the Ascophyllum nodosum (L.) Le Jol. zone of a sheltered rocky shore in Brittany, France. Over a year of monthly measurements on the zone with and without the A. nodosum canopy showed fairly high production and respiration values for the global community as well as carbon fluxes due to the canopy that largely dominated the benthic metabolism of the zone. The strong canopy respiration relative to the primary production also suggested a high metabolic activity by microscopic heterotrophs on the surface of the alga. Both the canopy and the understory annual primary production and respiration were under the control of light and temperature seasonal variations. Finally, the range of the amount of carbon produced on the A. nodosum zone during diurnal emersions was estimated. Additional measures accounting for the day-night cycles and seasonal light variations over an entire tidal cycle are, however, necessary to establish an annual carbon budget. Such measures using the benthic chamber together with complementary techniques would allow a better understanding of the functioning of sheltered rocky shores.

  15. Epiphyte dynamics and carbon metabolism in a nutrient enriched Mediterranean seagrass ( Posidonia oceanica ) ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolaki, Eugenia T.; Holmer, Marianne; Marbà, Núria; Karakassis, Ioannis

    2011-08-01

    The study aimed at examining the relationship between epiphyte dynamics and carbon metabolism in seagrass ecosystems under nutrient enrichment. Temporal variability of epiphytes and factors controlling their dynamics (i.e. environmental conditions, substratum availability, substratum stability and herbivore pressure) were assessed in a fish farm impacted and an unaffected Mediterranean seagrass ( Posidonia oceanica) meadow in the Aegean Sea (Greece). The factors controlling epiphyte dynamics responded differently to nutrient enrichment and partly interacted, rendering their cumulative effect on epiphyte load difficult to elucidate. Yet epiphytes accumulated on seagrass leaves near to the fish farm throughout the year, contributing 2 times more in above-ground biomass at cages than the control station. Reduction in substratum availability (i.e. decrease in leaf biomass) and increase in herbivore pressure affected epiphyte load, albeit their effects were not strong enough to counterbalance the effect of nutrient input from fish farm effluents. Moderate yet continuous nutrient input possibly stimulated epiphyte growth in excess of herbivory, shifting the control of epiphytes from top-down to bottom-up. Epiphyte accumulation affected carbon metabolism in the seagrass ecosystem by contributing to enhanced dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release, but seagrass loss was so acute that increased epiphyte cover could not counterbalance the decrease in community carbon production which was mainly driven by seagrass decline.

  16. The PGC-1α/ERRα Axis Represses One-Carbon Metabolism and Promotes Sensitivity to Anti-folate Therapy in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Étienne Audet-Walsh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Reprogramming of cellular metabolism plays a central role in fueling malignant transformation, and AMPK and the PGC-1α/ERRα axis are key regulators of this process. The intersection of gene-expression and binding-event datasets for breast cancer cells shows that activation of AMPK significantly increases the expression of PGC-1α/ERRα and promotes the binding of ERRα to its cognate sites. Unexpectedly, the data also reveal that ERRα, in concert with PGC-1α, negatively regulates the expression of several one-carbon metabolism genes, resulting in substantial perturbations in purine biosynthesis. This PGC-1α/ERRα-mediated repression of one-carbon metabolism promotes the sensitivity of breast cancer cells and tumors to the anti-folate drug methotrexate. These data implicate the PGC-1α/ERRα axis as a core regulatory node of folate cycle metabolism and further suggest that activators of AMPK could be used to modulate this pathway in cancer.

  17. Carbon dioxide emissions embodied in international trade in Central Europe between 1995 and 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlčková Jana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate change and environmental policies are widely discussed, but much less is known about emissions embodied in goods traded internationally, and the distinction between emission producers and consumers. The carbon dioxide emissions embodied in international trade in Central European countries are subject to examination in this paper. As a result of industrial restructuring and environmental legislation, air pollution has improved significantly in Central European countries since the 1989 transition. On the other hand, economic growth has been accompanied by a rise in consumerism. Despite the increasing role of exports, the Visegrad group countries have become net importers of carbon dioxide emissions between 1995 and 2008. This seems to be the ‘standard trajectory’ of a country’s transition toward a more developed and consumption-oriented economy. The global patterns of carbon dioxide emissions embodied in manufacturing exports are also mapped, using network analysis and constructing ‘product space’. The analysis confirms that industrial re-structuring played an important role in lowering the production of carbon dioxide emissions in the Visegrad countries.

  18. Impact of total organic carbon (in sediments) and dissolved organic carbon (in overlying water column) on Hg sequestration by coastal sediments from the central east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakrabortya, P.; Sharma, B.M.; Babu, P.V.R.; Yao, K.M.; Jaychandran, S.

    Total organic carbon (TOC) (in sediment) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) (in water column) play important roles in controlling the mercury sequestration process by the sediments from the central east coast of India. This toxic metal prefers...

  19. Carbon stock and its responses to climate change in Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaofan; Zhang, Chi; Luo, Geping; Chen, Xi; Maisupova, Bagila; Madaminov, Abdullo A; Han, Qifei; Djenbaev, Bekmamat M

    2015-05-01

    Central Asia has a land area of 5.6 × 10(6) km(2) and contains 80-90% of the world's temperate deserts. Yet it is one of the least characterized areas in the estimation of the global carbon (C) stock/balance. This study assessed the sizes and spatiotemporal patterns of C pools in Central Asia using both inventory (based on 353 biomass and 284 soil samples) and process-based modeling approaches. The results showed that the C stock in Central Asia was 31.34-34.16 Pg in the top 1-m soil with another 10.42-11.43 Pg stored in deep soil (1-3 m) of the temperate deserts. They amounted to 18-24% of the global C stock in deserts and dry shrublands. The C stock was comparable to that of the neighboring regions in Eurasia or major drylands around the world (e.g. Australia). However, 90% of Central Asia C pool was stored in soil, and the fraction was much higher than in other regions. Compared to hot deserts of the world, the temperate deserts in Central Asia had relatively high soil organic carbon density. The C stock in Central Asia is under threat from dramatic climate change. During a decadal drought between 1998 and 2008, which was possibly related to protracted La Niña episodes, the dryland lost approximately 0.46 Pg C from 1979 to 2011. The largest C losses were found in northern Kazakhstan, where annual precipitation declined at a rate of 90 mm decade(-1) . The regional C dynamics were mainly determined by changes in the vegetation C pool, and the SOC pool was stable due to the balance between reduced plant-derived C influx and inhibited respiration.

  20. Topography and function of androgen-metabolizing enzymes in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruo, Yoshihiro

    2005-03-01

    The present review describes concisely the topography and function of the three androgen-metabolizing enzymes, namely aromatase, 5alpha-reductase and 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, in the central nervous system (CNS). Aromatase, estrogen synthetase, is the key enzyme for converting androgens to estrogens. Aromatase is indispensable for the sexual differentiation of the brain and the enzyme activity and expression of aromatase are high during the critical period of neural development, which extends from the late embryonal to the early neonatal period in rodents. Aromatase is expressed in neurons within specific hypothalamic and limbic regions. The locations of aromatase-immunoreactive neurons are divided into three groups according to the period of enzyme expression. Steroid 5alpha-reductase converts a number of steroids with a C3 ketone group and a C4-C5 double bond (delta4; androgens, progestins and glucocorticoids) to their 5alpha-reduced metabolites. Two isoforms of 5alpha-reductase are found and type 1 is predominant in neural tissues. The enzyme activity of 5alpha-reductase is found widely in the CNS and is high in white matter regions. The enzyme expression of 5alpha-reductase peaks during the late embryonic period. 3alpha-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase is the oxidoreductase that interconverts 3-ketosteroids to 3alpha-hydroxysteroids. Four isozymes have been found in humans and only one type has been found in rats. The enzyme converts 5alpha-reduced steroids (e.g. 5alpha-dihydroprogesterone) to tetrahydrosteroids (e.g. 3alpha,5alpha-tetrahydroprogesterone). The latter steroid is a potent stimulator of the GABA(A) receptor. The activity of 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase is high during the first 1-2 postnatal weeks, decreases with development and this enzyme is highly expressed in astrocytes.

  1. Metabolic engineering of carbon and redox flow in the production of small organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakker, Chandresh; Martínez, Irene; Li, Wei; San, Ka-Yiu; Bennett, George N

    2015-03-01

    The review describes efforts toward metabolic engineering of production of organic acids. One aspect of the strategy involves the generation of an appropriate amount and type of reduced cofactor needed for the designed pathway. The ability to capture reducing power in the proper form, NADH or NADPH for the biosynthetic reactions leading to the organic acid, requires specific attention in designing the host and also depends on the feedstock used and cell energetic requirements for efficient metabolism during production. Recent work on the formation and commercial uses of a number of small mono- and diacids is discussed with redox differences, major biosynthetic precursors and engineering strategies outlined. Specific attention is given to those acids that are used in balancing cell redox or providing reduction equivalents for the cell, such as formate, which can be used in conjunction with metabolic engineering of other products to improve yields. Since a number of widely studied acids derived from oxaloacetate as an important precursor, several of these acids are covered with the general strategies and particular components summarized, including succinate, fumarate and malate. Since malate and fumarate are less reduced than succinate, the availability of reduction equivalents and level of aerobiosis are important parameters in optimizing production of these compounds in various hosts. Several other more oxidized acids are also discussed as in some cases, they may be desired products or their formation is minimized to afford higher yields of more reduced products. The placement and connections among acids in the typical central metabolic network are presented along with the use of a number of specific non-native enzymes to enhance routes to high production, where available alternative pathways and strategies are discussed. While many organic acids are derived from a few precursors within central metabolism, each organic acid has its own special requirements for high

  2. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Endocrine System Blood Test: Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) Activity: Endocrine System Growth Disorders Diabetes Center Thyroid Disorders Your Endocrine System Movie: Endocrine ...

  3. The ability of flux balance analysis to predict evolution of central metabolism scales with the initial distance to the optimum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Harcombe

    Full Text Available The most powerful genome-scale framework to model metabolism, flux balance analysis (FBA, is an evolutionary optimality model. It hypothesizes selection upon a proposed optimality criterion in order to predict the set of internal fluxes that would maximize fitness. Here we present a direct test of the optimality assumption underlying FBA by comparing the central metabolic fluxes predicted by multiple criteria to changes measurable by a (13C-labeling method for experimentally-evolved strains. We considered datasets for three Escherichia coli evolution experiments that varied in their length, consistency of environment, and initial optimality. For ten populations that were evolved for 50,000 generations in glucose minimal medium, we observed modest changes in relative fluxes that led to small, but significant decreases in optimality and increased the distance to the predicted optimal flux distribution. In contrast, seven populations evolved on the poor substrate lactate for 900 generations collectively became more optimal and had flux distributions that moved toward predictions. For three pairs of central metabolic knockouts evolved on glucose for 600-800 generations, there was a balance between cases where optimality and flux patterns moved toward or away from FBA predictions. Despite this variation in predictability of changes in central metabolism, two generalities emerged. First, improved growth largely derived from evolved increases in the rate of substrate use. Second, FBA predictions bore out well for the two experiments initiated with ancestors with relatively sub-optimal yield, whereas those begun already quite optimal tended to move somewhat away from predictions. These findings suggest that the tradeoff between rate and yield is surprisingly modest. The observed positive correlation between rate and yield when adaptation initiated further from the optimum resulted in the ability of FBA to use stoichiometric constraints to predict the

  4. The Central Metabolism Regulator EIIAGlc Switches Salmonella from Growth Arrest to Acute Virulence through Activation of Virulence Factor Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Mazé

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Salmonella to cause disease depends on metabolic activities and virulence factors. Here, we show that a key metabolic protein, EIIAGlc, is absolutely essential for acute infection, but not for Salmonella survival, in a mouse typhoid fever model. Surprisingly, phosphorylation-dependent EIIAGlc functions, including carbohydrate transport and activation of adenylate cyclase for global regulation, do not explain this virulence phenotype. Instead, biochemical studies, in vitro secretion and translocation assays, and in vivo genetic epistasis experiments suggest that EIIAGlc binds to the type three secretion system 2 (TTSS-2 involved in systemic virulence, stabilizes its cytoplasmic part including the crucial TTSS-2 ATPase, and activates virulence factor secretion. This unexpected role of EIIAGlc reveals a striking direct link between central Salmonella metabolism and a crucial virulence mechanism.

  5. Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008255 Serum adiponectin level declines in the elderly with metabolic syndrome.WU Xiaoyan(吴晓琰),et al.Dept Geriatr,Huashan Hosp,Fudan UnivShanghai200040.Chin J Geriatr2008;27(3):164-167.Objective To investigate the correlation between ser-um adiponectin level and metabolic syndrome in the elderly·Methods Sixty-one subjects with metabolic syndrome and140age matched subjects without metabolic

  6. Vitamin B12: one carbon metabolism, fetal growth and programming for chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, E C; Katre, P; Yajnik, C S

    2014-01-01

    This review brings together human and animal studies and reviews that examine the possible role of maternal vitamin B12 (B12) on fetal growth and its programming for susceptibility to chronic disease. A selective literature review was undertaken to identify studies and reviews that investigate these issues, particularly in the context of a vegetarian diet that may be low in B12 and protein and high in carbohydrate. Evidence is accumulating that maternal B12 status influences fetal growth and development. Low maternal vitamin B12 status and protein intake are associated with increased risk of neural tube defect, low lean mass and excess adiposity, increased insulin resistance, impaired neurodevelopment and altered risk of cancer in the offspring. Vitamin B12 is a key nutrient associated with one carbon metabolic pathways related to substrate metabolism, synthesis and stability of nucleic acids and methylation of DNA which regulates gene expression. Understanding of factors regulating maternal-fetal one carbon metabolism and its role in fetal programming of non communicable diseases could help design effective interventions, starting with maternal nutrition before conception.

  7. Inorganic carbon turnover caused by digestion of carbonate sands and metabolic activity of holothurians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kenneth; Silverman, Jacob; Kravitz, Ben; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider-Mor, Aya; Barbosa, Sergio; Byrne, Maria; Caldeira, Ken

    2013-11-01

    Recent measurements have shown that holothurians (sea cucumbers) may play an important role in the cycling of CaCO3 in tropical coral reef systems through ingestion and processing of carbonate sediment. In this report, we present estimates of inorganic carbon turnover rates determined from laboratory incubations of Holothuria atra, Holothuria leucospilota and Stichopus herrmanni. The pH values of the gut lumen ranged from 7.0 to 7.6 when digestive tracts were filled with sediment compared with 6.1-6.7 in animals with empty digestive tracts. Empty gut volume estimates for H. atra and S. herrmanni were 36 ± 4 mL and 151 ± 14 mL, respectively. Based on these measurements and the density and porosity of carbonate sediments of coral reefs, it is estimated that these species process 19 ± 2 kg and 80 ± 7 kg CaCO3 sand yr-1 per individual, respectively. The annual CaCO3 dissolution rates per H. atra and S. herrmanni individual are estimated to be 6.5 ± 1.9 g and 9.6 ± 1.4 g, respectively, suggesting that 0.05 ± 0.02% and 0.1 ± 0.02% of the CaCO3 processed through their gut annually is dissolved. During incubations the CaCO3 dissolution of the fecal casts was 0.07 ± 0.01%, 0.04 ± 0.01% and 0.21 ± 0.05% for H. atra, H. leucospilota and S. herrmanni, respectively. The CaCO3 saturation state in the incubation seawater decreased markedly due to a greater increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) relative to total alkalinity (AT) as a result of respiration by the animals. Our results support the hypothesis that deposit feeders such as sea cucumbers play an important ecological role in the coral reef CaCO3 cycle.

  8. The relationship between microbial metabolic activity and biocorrosion of carbon steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierzewicz, Z; Cwalina, B; Chodurek, E; Wilczok, T

    1997-12-01

    The effect of metabolic activity (expressed by generation time, rate of H2S production and the activity of hydrogenase and adenosine phosphosulphate (APS)-reductase enzymes) of the 8 wild strains of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and of their resistance to metal ions (Hg2+, Cu2+, Mn2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Cr3+) on the rate of corrosion of carbon steel was studied. The medium containing lactate as the carbon source and sulphate as the electron acceptor was used for bacterial metabolic activity examination and in corrosive assays. Bacterial growth inhibition by metal ions was investigated in the sulphate-free medium. The rate of H2S production was approximately directly proportional to the specific activities of the investigated enzymes. These activities were inversely proportional to the generation time. The rate of microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel was directly proportional to bacterial resistance to metal ions (correlation coefficient r = 0.95). The correlation between the MIC rate and the activity of enzymes tested, although weaker, was also observed (r = 0.41 for APS-reductase; r = 0.69 for hydrogenase; critical value rc = 0.30, p = 0.05, n = 40).

  9. MapMaker and PathTracer for tracking carbon in genome-scale metabolic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervo, Christopher J; Reed, Jennifer L

    2016-05-01

    Constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA) modeling results can be difficult to interpret given the large numbers of reactions in genome-scale models. While paths in metabolic networks can be found, existing methods are not easily combined with constraint-based approaches. To address this limitation, two tools (MapMaker and PathTracer) were developed to find paths (including cycles) between metabolites, where each step transfers carbon from reactant to product. MapMaker predicts carbon transfer maps (CTMs) between metabolites using only information on molecular formulae and reaction stoichiometry, effectively determining which reactants and products share carbon atoms. MapMaker correctly assigned CTMs for over 97% of the 2,251 reactions in an Escherichia coli metabolic model (iJO1366). Using CTMs as inputs, PathTracer finds paths between two metabolites. PathTracer was applied to iJO1366 to investigate the importance of using CTMs and COBRA constraints when enumerating paths, to find active and high flux paths in flux balance analysis (FBA) solutions, to identify paths for putrescine utilization, and to elucidate a potential CO2 fixation pathway in E. coli. These results illustrate how MapMaker and PathTracer can be used in combination with constraint-based models to identify feasible, active, and high flux paths between metabolites.

  10. A RuBisCO-mediated carbon metabolic pathway in methanogenic archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Takunari; Mehrotra, Sandhya; Endo, Chikako; Kizu, Natsuko; Matusda, Mami; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Mizohata, Eiichi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Yokota, Akiho; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Ashida, Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    Two enzymes are considered to be unique to the photosynthetic Calvin–Benson cycle: ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), responsible for CO2 fixation, and phosphoribulokinase (PRK). Some archaea possess bona fide RuBisCOs, despite not being photosynthetic organisms, but are thought to lack PRK. Here we demonstrate the existence in methanogenic archaea of a carbon metabolic pathway involving RuBisCO and PRK, which we term ‘reductive hexulose-phosphate' (RHP) pathway. These archaea possess both RuBisCO and a catalytically active PRK whose crystal structure resembles that of photosynthetic bacterial PRK. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometric analysis of metabolites reveals that the RHP pathway, which differs from the Calvin–Benson cycle only in a few steps, is active in vivo. Our work highlights evolutionary and functional links between RuBisCO-mediated carbon metabolic pathways in methanogenic archaea and photosynthetic organisms. Whether the RHP pathway allows for autotrophy (that is, growth exclusively with CO2 as carbon source) remains unknown. PMID:28082747

  11. New Perspectives on Acetate and One-Carbon Metabolism in the Methanoarchaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferry, James [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-03-20

    Carbonic anhydrases catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate. Although widespread in prokaryotes of the domains Bacteria and Archaea, few have been investigated and the physiological functions are largely unknown. Carbonic anhydrases are of biotechnological interest for carbon dioxide capture and sequestration at point sources. Prokaryotes encode three independently evolved classes. The alpha-class is restricted to a few pathogens and the other two are uniformly distributed in phylogenetically and physiologically diverse species. Although wide-spread in prokaryotes, only three gamma-class enzymes have been biochemically characterized and the physiological functions have not been investigated. The gamma-class is prominent in anaerobic acetate-utilizing methane-producing species of the genus Methanosarcina that encode three subclasses. Enzymes from two of the subclasses, Cam and CamH from Methanosarcina thermophila, have been characterized and found to utilize iron in the active site which is the first example of an iron-containing carbonic anhydrase. No representative of the third subclass has been isolated, although this subclass constitutes the great majority of the β-class. This grant application proposed to characterize gamma-class carbonic anhydrases from diverse anaerobic prokaryotes from the domains Bacteria and Archaea to broaden the understanding of this enzyme. In particular, the three subclasses present the genetically tractable acetate-utilizing methanogen Methanosarcina acetivorans will be investigated to extend studies of acetate and one-carbon metabolism in this species. A genetic approach will be taken to ascertain the physiological functions. It is also proposed to delve deeper into the mechanism of Cam from M. thermophila, the archetype of the gamma-class, via a high resolution neutron structure and kinetic analysis of site-specific amino acid replacement variants. In the course of the investigation, goals were added to

  12. Inorganic Carbon Turnover caused by Digestion of Carbonate Sands and Metabolic Activity of Holothurians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Kenneth; Silverman, Jacob; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider-Mor, Aya; Barbosa, Sergio; Byrne, Maria; Caldeira, Ken

    2013-11-20

    Recent measurements have shown that holothurians (sea cucumbers) play an important role in the cycling of CaCO3 in tropical coral reef systems through ingestion and processing of carbonate sediment. In this study inorganic additional aspects of carbon turnover were determined in laboratory incubations of Holothuria atra, H. leucospilota and Stichopus herrmanni from One Tree Reef, Great Barrier Reef. The pH values of the gut lumen ranged from 6.1 to 6.7 in animals with empty digestive tracts as opposed to 7.0 to 7.6 when digestive tracts were filled with sediment. Empty gut volume estimates for H. atra and S. herrmanni were 36 ± 4 mL and 151 ± 14 mL, respectively. Based on these measurements it is estimated that these species process 19 ± 2kg and 80 ± 7kg CaCO3 sand yr-1 per individual, respectively. The annual dissolution rates of H. atra and S. herrmanni of 6.5±1.9g and 9.6±1.4g, respectively, suggest that 0.05±0.02% and 0.1±0.02% of the CaCO3 processed through their gut annually is dissolved. During the incubations the CaCO3 dissolution was 0.07±0.01%, 0.04±0.01% and 0.21±0.05% of the fecal casts for H. atra, H. leucospilota and S. herrmanni, respectively. The CaCO3 saturation state for both aragonite and calcite minerals during laboratory incubations decreased markedly due to a greater increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) relative to total alkalinity (AT) as a result of respiration by the animals. Our results support the hypothesis that deposit feeders such as sea cucumbers play an important ecological role in the coral reef CaCO3 cycle.

  13. An ancient riboswitch class in bacteria regulates purine biosynthesis and one-carbon metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Peter B; Nelson, James W; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-01-22

    Over 30 years ago, ZTP (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside 5'-triphosphate), a modified purine biosynthetic intermediate, was proposed to signal 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate (10f-THF) deficiency in bacteria. However, the mechanisms by which this putative alarmone or its precursor ZMP (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide, also known as AICAR) brings about any metabolic changes remain unexplained. Herein, we report the existence of a widespread riboswitch class that is most commonly associated with genes related to de novo purine biosynthesis and one-carbon metabolism. Biochemical data confirm that members of this riboswitch class selectively bind ZMP and ZTP with nanomolar affinity while strongly rejecting numerous natural analogs. Indeed, increases in the ZMP/ZTP pool, caused by folate stress in bacterial cells, trigger changes in the expression of a reporter gene fused to representative ZTP riboswitches in vivo. The wide distribution of this riboswitch class suggests that ZMP/ZTP signaling is important for species in numerous bacterial lineages.

  14. Toward microtesla MRI of hyperpolarized carbon-13 for real-time metabolic imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Zotev, V S; Savukov, I M; Matlashov, A N; Gómez, J J; Espy, M A

    2009-01-01

    Hyperpolarization of carbon-13 is a promising technique that has enabled MR angiography, perfusion mapping, and real-time metabolic imaging of C-13 labeled organic substances with unprecedented signal-to-noise levels. Because the hyperpolarization is performed outside an MRI scanner (using a special NMR-style hyperpolarizer), high magnetic fields of conventional MRI systems offer little advantage in terms of achievable C-13 polarization. Here we propose an ultimate low-field MRI scanner for imaging hyperpolarized C-13. It uses only microtesla-range magnetic fields and employs SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) sensors for broadband reception of MRI signals. We present the first images acquired by SQUID-based microtesla MRI with dynamic nuclear polarization (Overhauser enhancement). We also report the first NMR spectra of C-13 at microtesla fields, including spectra of metabolically relevant sodium pyruvate, bicarbonate, and alanine. Our results demonstrate feasibility and potential of the pro...

  15. PI3K: An attractive candidate for the central integration of metabolism and reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricedes eAcosta-Martinez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In neurons, as in a variety of other cell types, the enzyme phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K is a key intermediate that is common to the signaling pathways of a number of peripheral metabolic cues, including insulin and leptin, which are well known to regulate both metabolic and reproductive functions. In this article, I explore the possibility that PI3K is a key integrator of metabolic and neural signals regulating gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH/luteinizing hormone (LH release and explore the hypothesis that this enzyme is pivotal in many disorders where gonadotropin release is at risk. Although the mechanisms mediating the influence of metabolism and nutrition on fertility are currently unclear, the strong association between metabolic disorders and infertility is undeniable. For example, women suffering from anorectic disorders experience amenorrhea as a consequence of malnutrition-induced impairment of LH release, and at the other extreme, obesity is also commonly co-morbid with menstrual dysfunction and infertility. Impaired hypothalamic insulin and leptin receptor signaling is thought to be at the core of reproductive disorders associated with metabolic dysfunction. While low levels of leptin and insulin characterize states of negative energy balance, prolonged nutrient excess is associated with insulin and leptin resistance. Metabolic models known to alter GnRH/LH release such as diabetes, diet-induced obesity, and caloric restriction are also accompanied by impairment of PI3K signaling in insulin and leptin sensitive tissues including the hypothalamus. However, a clear link between this signaling pathway and the control of GnRH release by peripheral metabolic cues has not been established. Investigating the role of the signaling pathways shared by metabolic cues that are critical for a normal reproductive state can help identify possible targets in the treatment of metabolic and reproductive disorders such as Polycystic Ovarian

  16. Linking carbon storage with functional diversity in tropical rainforest in the central Congo Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeeck, Hans; Kearsley, Elizabeth; Bauters, Marijn; Beeckman, Hans; Huygens, Dries; Steppe, Kathy; Boeckx, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    This presentation will show an overview of results of the COBIMFO project (Congo basin integrated monitoring for forest carbon mitigation and biodiversity). In the framework of this project we have established 21 permanent 1 ha sampling plots in different forest types in the Yangambi reserve. This UNESCO Man and Biosphere reserve has an area of more than 6000 km² and is located in the heart of the Congo Basin near the Yangambi research station (DR Congo). Analysis of the inventory data of these plots revealed that carbon stocks in mature forests in this area of the Congo Basin are significantly lower (24%) than stocks recorded in the outer regions of the basin. These lower stocks are attributed to a lower maximal tree height (Kearsley et al. 2013). In addition to the carbon inventories we collected leaf and wood samples on all species within 95% basal area of each of the Yangambi plots. A total of 995 individuals were sampled, covering 123 tree species. On the samples we measured 15 traits related to leaf and wood morphology and functioning. In the presented study, relationships between the observed functional diversity and biomass are analysed. One of the remarkable results of our analysis is that species with a high functional distinctiveness have a low contribution to the basal area and the carbon stocks. In contrast, species with a high contribution to the carbon stock have a low contribution to the functional diversity. Similar patterns have been observed elsewhere (e.g. Amazon basin), but are now for the first time confirmed for central African rainforest. Finally, we also present the first results of an analysis of carbons stocks and functional diversity in tropical plantations from a unique 70-years old tree diversity experiment that was established during the colonial period at the Yangambi research station. Kearsley, E., de Haulleville, T., Hufkens, K., Kidimbu, A., Toirambe, B., Baert, G., Huygens, D., Kebede, Y., Defourny, P., Bogaert, J., Beeckman, H

  17. Carbon Stock Potential of Oak and Pine Forests in Garhwal Region in Indian Central Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanda Nautiyal

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Oak (Quercus leucotichophora and pine (Pinus roxburghii are the two most dominant forest types occurring in Indian Central Himalayas. CO2 mitigation potential of these two forest types was observed in the present study. Carbon stock densities for AGTB, BB, LHG, DWS, AGSB and SOC were estimated and higher values were recorded in oak forest stands. Total carbon density estimated was 2420.54 Mg/ha for oak forest of Gopeshwar and 986.93 Mg/ha for pine forest of Nandprayag. CO2 mitigation potential of oak forest of Gopeshwar was recorded to be 8,713.94 CO2e and of pine forests 3552.95 CO2e.

  18. Morphology and Mixing of Black Carbon Particles Collected in Central California During the CARES Field Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffet, Ryan; O' Brien, Rachel; Alpert, Peter A.; Kelly, Stephen T.; Pham, Don Q.; Gilles, Mary K.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-11-23

    Aerosol absorption is strongly dependent on the internal heterogeneity (mixing state) and morphology of individual particles containing black carbon (BC) and other non-absorbing species. Here, we examine an extensive microscopic data set collected in the California central valley during the CARES 2010 field campaign. During a period of high photochemical activity and pollution buildup, the particle mixing state and morphology were characterized using Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) at the carbon K-edge. Observations of compacted BC core morphologies and thick organic coatings at both urban and rural sites provide evidence of the aged nature of the particles. Based on the observation of thick coatings and more convex BC inclusion morphology, the contribution of fresh BC emissions at the urban site was relatively small. These measurements of BC morphology and mixing state provide important constraints for the morphological effects on BC optical properties expected in aged urban plumes.

  19. Modulation of snow reflectance and snowmelt from Central Asian glaciers by anthropogenic black carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, Julia; Flanner, Mark; Kang, Shichang; Sprenger, Michael; Zhang, Qianggong; Guo, Junming; Li, Yang; Schwikowski, Margit; Farinotti, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Deposited mineral dust and black carbon are known to reduce the albedo of snow and enhance melt. Here we estimate the contribution of anthropogenic black carbon (BC) to snowmelt in glacier accumulation zones of Central Asia based on in-situ measurements and modelling. Source apportionment suggests that more than 94% of the BC is emitted from mostly regional anthropogenic sources while the remaining contribution comes from natural biomass burning. Even though the annual deposition flux of mineral dust can be up to 20 times higher than that of BC, we find that anthropogenic BC causes the majority (60% on average) of snow darkening. This leads to summer snowmelt rate increases of up to 6.3% (7 cm a‑1) on glaciers in three different mountain environments in Kyrgyzstan, based on albedo reduction and snowmelt models.

  20. Central blockade of melanocortin receptors attenuates the metabolic and locomotor responses to peripheral interleukin-1beta administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Keith W; Reyes, Teresa M

    2008-03-01

    Loss of appetite and cachexia is an obstacle in the treatment of chronic infection and cancer. Proinflammatory cytokines released from activated immune cells and acting in the central nervous system (CNS) are prime candidates for mediating these metabolic changes, potentially affecting both energy intake as well as energy expenditure. The effect of intravenous administration of two proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-1beta (15 microg/kg) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha (10 microg/kg), on food and water intake, locomotor activity, oxygen consumption (VO2), and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) was evaluated. The two cytokines elicited a comparable decrease in food intake and activated similar numbers of cells in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH), a region that plays a critical role in the regulation of appetite and metabolism (determined via expression of the immediate early gene, c-fos). However, only IL-1beta reduced locomotion and RER, and increased VO2, while TNF-alpha was without effect. To examine the role of the melanocortins in mediating IL-1beta- induced metabolic changes, animals were pretreated centrally with a melanocortin receptor antagonist, HS014. Pretreatment with HS014 blocked the effect of IL-1beta on food intake and RER at later time points (beyond 8 h post injection), as well as the hypoactivity and increased metabolic rate. Further, HS014 blocked the induction of Fos-ir in the PVH. These data highlight the importance of the melanocortin system, particularly within the PVH, in mediating a broad range of metabolic responses to IL-1beta.

  1. Seasonal variations of dissolved organic carbon in precipitation over urban and forest sites in central Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siudek, Patrycja; Frankowski, Marcin; Siepak, Jerzy

    2015-07-01

    Spatial and temporal variability of carbon species in rainwater (bulk deposition) was studied for the first time at two sites located in urban area of Poznań City and protected woodland area (Jeziory), in central Poland, between April and December 2013. The mean concentration of total carbon (TC) for the first site was 5.86 mg L(-1), whereas for the second, 5.21 mg L(-1). Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration accounted for, on average, 87 and 91 % of total carbon in precipitation at urban and non-urban sites, respectively. Significant changes in TC concentrations in rainwater were observed at both sites, indicating that atmospheric transformation, transport, and removal mechanisms of carbonaceous particles were affected by seasonal fluctuations in biogenic/anthropogenic emission and meteorological conditions (i.e., precipitation height and type, atmospheric transport). During the warm season, the DOC concentration in rainwater was mostly influenced by mixed natural and anthropogenic sources. In contrast, during the cold season, the DOC concentration significantly increased mainly as a result of anthropogenic activities, i.e., intensive coal combustion, domestic wood burning, high-temperature processes, etc. In addition, during the winter measurements, significant differences in mean DOC concentration (Kruskal-Wallis test, p urban and non-urban sites. These data imply that carbonaceous compounds are of crucial importance in atmospheric chemistry and should be considered as an important parameter while considering wet deposition, reactions with different substances, especially over polluted environments.

  2. Untangling metabolic and spatial interactions of stress tolerance in plants. 1. Patterns of carbon metabolism within leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biel, Karl Y; Fomina, Irina R; Nazarova, Galina N; Soukhovolsky, Vladislav G; Khlebopros, Rem G; Nishio, John N

    2010-09-01

    The localization of the key photoreductive and oxidative processes and some stress-protective reactions within leaves of mesophytic C(3) plants were investigated. The role of light in determining the profile of Rubisco, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, catalase, fumarase, and cytochrome-c-oxidase across spinach leaves was examined by exposing leaves to illumination on either the adaxial or abaxial leaf surfaces. Oxygen evolution in fresh paradermal leaf sections and CO(2) gas exchange in whole leaves under adaxial or abaxial illumination was also examined. The results showed that the palisade mesophyll is responsible for the midday depression of photosynthesis in spinach leaves. The photosynthetic apparatus was more sensitive to the light environment than the respiratory apparatus. Additionally, examination of the paradermal leaf sections by optical microscopy allowed us to describe two new types of parenchyma in spinach-pirum mesophyll and pillow spongy mesophyll. A hypothesis that oxaloacetate may protect the upper leaf tissue from the destructive influence of active oxygen is presented. The application of mathematical modeling shows that the pattern of enzymatic distribution across leaves abides by the principle of maximal ecological utility. Light regulation of carbon metabolism across leaves is discussed.

  3. Reconnaissance survey for lightweight and carbon tetrachloride extractable hydrocarbons in the central and eastern basins of Lake Erie: September 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapotosky, J.E.; White, W.S.

    1980-10-01

    A reconnaissance survey of the central and eastern basins of Lake Erie (22,240 km/sup 2/) was conducted from September 17 to 27, 1978. The survey provided baseline information on natural gas and oil losses from geologic formations, prior to any potential development of natural gas resources beneath the United States portion of the Lake. Lightweight hydrocarbons indicative of natural gas (methane, ethane, propane, isobutane, and n-butane) are introduced into the waters of Lake Erie by escape from geologic formations and by biological/photochemical processes. The geochemical exploration technique of hydrocarbon sniffing provided enough data to reveal significant distribution patterns, approximate concentrations, and potential sources. Twelve sites with elevated lightweight hydrocarbon concentrations had a composition similar to natural gas. In one area of natural gas input, data analysis suggested a potential negative effect of natural gas on phytoplanktonic metabolism (i.e., ethylene concentration). Samples taken for liquid hydrocarbon analysis (carbon tetrachloride extractable hydrocarbons) correlated best with biologically derived lightweight hydrocarbons.

  4. Dust, Elemental Carbon and Other Impurities on Central Asian Glaciers: Origin and Radiative Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, J.; Flanner, M.; Kang, S.; Sprenger, M.; Zhang, Q.; Li, Y.; Guo, J.; Schwikowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    In Central Asia, more than 60 % of the population depends on water stored in glaciers and mountain snow. While temperature, precipitation and dynamic processes are key drivers of glacial change, deposition of light absorbing impurities such as mineral dust and black carbon can lead to accelerated melting through surface albedo reduction. Here, we discuss the origin of deposited mineral dust and black carbon and their impacts on albedo change and radiative forcing (RF). 218 snow samples were taken from 13 snow pits on 4 glaciers, Abramov (Pamir), Suek, Glacier No. 354 and Golubin (Tien Shan), representing deposition between summer 2012 and 2014. They were analyzed for elemental and organic carbon by a thermo-optical method, mineral dust by gravimetry, and iron by ICP-MS. Back trajectory ensembles were released every 6 hours with the Lagranto model for the covered period at all sites. Boundary layer "footprints" were calculated to estimate general source regions and combined with MODIS fire counts for potential fire contributions. Albedo reduction due to black carbon and mineral dust was calculated with the Snow-Ice-Aerosol-Radiative model (SNICAR), and surface spectral irradiances were derived from atmospheric radiative transfer calculations to determine the RF under clear-sky and all sky conditions using local radiation measurements. Dust contributions came from Central Asia, the Arabian Peninsula, the Sahara and partly the Taklimakan. Fire contributions were higher in 2014 and generally came from the West and North. We find that EC exerts roughly 3 times more RF than mineral dust in fresh and relatively fresh snow (~5 W/m2) and up to 6 times more in snow that experienced melting (> 10 W/m2) even though EC concentrations (average per snow pit from 90 to 700 ng/g) were up to two orders of magnitude lower than mineral dust (10 to 140 μg/g).

  5. A natural light/dark cycle regulation of carbon-nitrogen metabolism and gene expression in rice shoots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixing Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Light and temperature are two particularly important environmental cues for plant survival. Carbon and nitrogen are two essential macronutrients required for plant growth and development, and cellular carbon and nitrogen metabolism must be tightly coordinated. In order to understand how the natural light/dark cycle regulates carbon and nitrogen metabolism in rice plants, we analyzed the photosynthesis, key carbon-nitrogen metabolites and enzyme activities, and differentially expressed genes and miRNAs involved in the carbon and nitrogen metabolic pathway in rice shoots at the following times: 2:00, 6:00, 10:00, 14:00, 18:00 and 22:00. Our results indicated that more CO2 was fixed into carbohydrates by a high net photosynthetic rate, respiratory rate and stomatal conductance in the daytime. Although high levels of the nitrate reductase activity, free ammonium and carbohydrates were exhibited in the daytime, the protein synthesis was not significantly facilitated by the light and temperature. In mRNA sequencing, the carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related differentially expressed genes were obtained, which could be divided into eight groups: photosynthesis, TCA cycle, sugar transport, sugar metabolism, nitrogen transport, nitrogen reduction, amino acid metabolism and nitrogen regulation. Additionally, a total of 78,306 alternative splicing events have been identified, which primarily belong to alternative 5' donor sites, alternative 3' acceptor sites, intron retention and exon skipping. In sRNA sequencing, four carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related miRNAs (osa-miR1440b, osa-miR2876-5p, osa-miR1877 and osa-miR5799 were determined to be regulated by natural light/dark cycle. The expression level analysis showed that the four carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related miRNAs negatively regulated their target genes. These results may provide a good strategy to study how natural light/dark cycle regulates carbon and nitrogen metabolism to ensure plant

  6. Central nervous system: a conductor orchestrating metabolic regulations harmed by both hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Scheen, André

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the brain has a key role in the control of energy metabolism, body fat content and glucose metabolism. Neuronal systems, which regulate energy intake, energy expenditure, and endogenous glucose production, sense and respond to input from hormonal and nutrient-related signals that convey information regarding both body energy stores and current energy availability. In response to this input, adaptive changes occur that promote energy homeostasis and the maintenanc...

  7. Central Ghrelin Regulates Peripheral Lipid Metabolism in a Growth Hormone-Independent Fashion

    OpenAIRE

    Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Vázquez, María J.; Varela, Luis; Nogueiras, Rubén; Saha, Asish K.; Cordido, & Fernando; López,Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    GH plays a major role in the regulation of lipid metabolism and alterations in GH axis elicit major changes in fat distribution and mobilization. For example, in patients with GH deficiency (GHD) or in mice lacking the GH receptor, the percentage of fat is increased. In addition to the direct actions of GH on lipid metabolism, current evidence indicates that ghrelin, a stomach-derived peptide hormone with potent GH secretagogue action, increases lipogenesis in white adipose tissue (WAT) throu...

  8. Early pregnancy B vitamin status, one carbon metabolism, pregnancy outcome and child development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé-Navais, Pol; Cavallé-Busquets, Pere; Fernandez-Ballart, Joan D; Murphy, Michelle M

    2016-07-01

    Periconception supplementation with folic acid is recommended until 12 gestational weeks to prevent neural tube defects. Doses of folic acid contained in supplements and timing and length of use during pregnancy vary. The effects of status in periconception and pregnancy folate, cobalamin, betaine and their interactions on one carbon metabolism (1C), as well as the global effect of 1C on foetal growth and pregnancy outcome, are reviewed. Results from prospective studies are reviewed. Cessation of folic acid supplement use after the first trimester is associated with a sharp drop in plasma folate status and enhanced conversion of betaine to dimethylglycine. Dimethylglycine production is also higher in mothers with low folate status than in those with normal-high folate status. The effects of high doses of folic acid on one carbon metabolism in mothers with low early pregnancy cobalamin status and on foetal growth are also reviewed. Several studies report that moderately elevated early pregnancy fasting plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) is inversely associated with birth weight and a predictor of intrauterine growth retardation. There is also evidence for increased risk of preterm birth when maternal folate status is low.

  9. Expression of human dopamine receptor in potato (Solanum tuberosum results in altered tuber carbon metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Świędrych Anna

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Even though the catecholamines (dopamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine have been detected in plants their role is poorly documented. Correlations between norepinephrine, soluble sugars and starch concentration have been recently reported for potato plants over-expressing tyrosine decarboxylase, the enzyme mediating the first step of catecholamine synthesis. More recently norepinephrine level was shown to significantly increase after osmotic stress, abscisic acid treatment and wounding. Therefore, it is possible that catecholamines might play a role in plant stress responses by modulating primary carbon metabolism, possibly by a mechanism similar to that in animal cells. Since to date no catecholamine receptor has been identified in plants we transformed potato plants with a cDNA encoding human dopamine receptor (HD1. Results Tuber analysis of transgenic plants revealed changes in the activities of key enzymes mediating sucrose to starch conversion (ADP-glucose phosphorylase and sucrose synthase and sucrose synthesis (sucrose phosphate synthase leading to altered content of both soluble sugars and starch. Surprisingly the catecholamine level measured in transgenic plants was significantly increased; the reason for this is as yet unknown. However the presence of the receptor affected a broader range of enzyme activities than those affected by the massive accumulation of norepinephrine reported for plants over-expressing tyrosine decarboxylase. Therefore, it is suggested that the presence of the exogenous receptor activates catecholamine cAMP signalling in plants. Conclusions Our data support the possible involvement of catecholamines in regulating plant carbon metabolism via cAMP signalling pathway.

  10. Carbon Uptake and the Metabolism and Transport of Lipids in an Arbuscular Mycorrhiza1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Philip E.; Douds, David D.; Bécard, Guillaume; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    1999-01-01

    Both the plant and the fungus benefit nutritionally in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis: The host plant enjoys enhanced mineral uptake and the fungus receives fixed carbon. In this exchange the uptake, metabolism, and translocation of carbon by the fungal partner are poorly understood. We therefore analyzed the fate of isotopically labeled substrates in an arbuscular mycorrhiza (in vitro cultures of Ri T-DNA-transformed carrot [Daucus carota] roots colonized by Glomus intraradices) using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Labeling patterns observed in lipids and carbohydrates after substrates were supplied to the mycorrhizal roots or the extraradical mycelium indicated that: (a) 13C-labeled glucose and fructose (but not mannitol or succinate) are effectively taken up by the fungus within the root and are metabolized to yield labeled carbohydrates and lipids; (b) the extraradical mycelium does not use exogenous sugars for catabolism, storage, or transfer to the host; (c) the fungus converts sugars taken up in the root compartment into lipids that are then translocated to the extraradical mycelium (there being little or no lipid synthesis in the external mycelium); and (d) hexose in fungal tissue undergoes substantially higher fluxes through an oxidative pentose phosphate pathway than does hexose in the host plant. PMID:10364411

  11. Nutrition, One-Carbon Metabolism and Neural Tube Defects: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelei Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs are a group of severe congenital malformations, induced by the combined effects of genes and the environment. The most valuable finding so far has been the protective effect of folic acid supplementation against NTDs. However, many women do not take folic acid supplements until they are pregnant, which is too late to prevent NTDs effectively. Long-term intake of folic acid–fortified food is a good choice to solve this problem, and mandatory folic acid fortification should be further promoted, especially in Europe, Asia and Africa. Vitamin B2, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, choline, betaine and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs can also reduce the NTD risk by interacting with the one-carbon metabolism pathway. This suggest that multivitamin B combined with choline, betaine and n-3 PUFAs supplementation may have a better protective effect against NTDs than folic acid alone. Genetic polymorphisms involved in one-carbon metabolism are associated with NTD risk, and gene screening for women of childbearing age prior to pregnancy may help prevent NTDs induced by the risk allele. In addition, the consumption of alcohol, tea and coffee, and low intakes of fruit and vegetable are also associated with the increased risk of NTDs, and should be avoided by women of childbearing age.

  12. Central obesity as a precursor to the metabolic syndrome in the AusDiab study and Mauritius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Adrian J; Boyko, Edward J; Sicree, Richard A; Zimmet, Paul Z; Söderberg, Stefan; Alberti, K George M M; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Chitson, Pierrot; Shaw, Jonathan E

    2008-12-01

    Evidence from epidemiologic studies that central obesity precedes future metabolic change and does not occur concurrently with the appearance of the blood pressure, glucose, and lipid abnormalities that characterize the metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been lacking. Longitudinal surveys were conducted in Mauritius in 1987, 1992, and 1998, and in Australia in 2000 and 2005 (AusDiab). This analysis included men and women (aged > or = 25 years) in three cohorts: AusDiab 2000-2005 (n = 5,039), Mauritius 1987-1992 (n = 2,849), and Mauritius 1987-1998 (n = 1,999). MetS components included waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, fasting and 2-h postload plasma glucose, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin sensitivity (HOMA-S) (representing insulin sensitivity). Linear regression was used to determine which baseline components predicted deterioration in other MetS components over 5 years in AusDiab and 5 and 11 years in Mauritius, adjusted for age, sex, and ethnic group. Baseline waist circumference predicted deterioration (P Mauritius 1987-1992, and four of six in Mauritius 1987-1998. In contrast, an increase in waist circumference between baseline and follow-up was only predicted by insulin sensitivity (HOMA-S) at baseline, and only in one of the three cohorts. These results suggest that central obesity plays a central role in the development of the MetS and appears to precede the appearance of the other MetS components.

  13. SulfoSYS (Sulfolobus Systems Biology) : towards a silicon cell model for the central carbohydrate metabolism of the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus under temperature variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Sonja-Verena; Birkeland, Nils-Kare; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Gertig, Susanne; Haferkamp, Patrick; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kouril, Theresa; Manica, Andrea; Pham, Trong K.; Ruoff, Peter; Schleper, Christa; Schomburg, Dietmar; Sharkey, Kieran J.; Siebers, Bettina; Sierocinski, Pawel; Steuer, Ralf; van der Oost, John; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Wieloch, Patricia; Wright, Phillip C.; Zaparty, Melanie; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2009-01-01

    SulfoSYS (Sulfolobus Systems Biology) focuses on the study of the CCM (central carbohydrate metabolism) of Sulfolobus solfataricus and its regulation under temperature variation at the systems level. in Archaea, carbohydrates are metabolized by modifications of the classical pathways known from Bact

  14. SulfoSYS (Sulfolobus Systems Biology): towards a silicon cell model for the central carbohydrate metabolism of the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus under temperature variation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, S.V.; Birkeland, N.K.; Driessen, A.J.; Gertig, S.; Haferkamp, P.; Klenk, H.P.; Kouril, T.; Manica, A.; Pham, T.K.; Ruoff, P.; Schleper, C.; Schomburg, D.; Sharkey, K.J.; Siebers, A.G.; Sierocinski, P.; Steuer, R.; Oost, J. van der; Westerhoff, H.V.; Wieloch, P.; Wright, P.C.; Zaparty, M.

    2009-01-01

    SulfoSYS (Sulfolobus Systems Biology) focuses on the study of the CCM (central carbohydrate metabolism) of Sulfolobus solfataricus and its regulation under temperature variation at the systems level. In Archaea, carbohydrates are metabolized by modifications of the classical pathways known from Bact

  15. SulfoSYS (Sulfolobus Systems Biology): towards a silicon cell model for the central carbohydrate metabolism of the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus under temperature variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, S.V.; Birkeland, N.K.; Driessen, A.J.M.; Gertig, S.; Haferkamp, P.; Klenk, H.P.; Kouril, T.; Manica, A.; Pham, T.K.; Ruoff, P.; Schleper, C.; Schomburg, D.; Sharkey, K.; Siebers, B.; Sierocinski, P.; Steur, R.; Oost, van der J.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Wieloch, P.; Wright, P.C.; Zaparty, M.

    2009-01-01

    SulfoSYS (Sulfolobus Systems Biology) focuses on the study of the CCM (central carbohydrate metabolism) of Sulfolobus solfataricus and its regulation under temperature variation at the systems level. In Archaea, carbohydrates are metabolized by modifications of the classical pathways known from Bact

  16. Suppression of the External MitochondrialNADPH Dehydrogenase, NDB1, in Arabidopsisthaliana Affects Central Metabolism andVegetative Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent oxidation of cytosolic NADPH is mediated by NDB1, which is an external type II NADPHdehydrogenase in the plant mitochondrial electron transport chain. Using RNA interference, the NDB1 transcript wassuppressed by 80% in Arabidopsis thaliana plants, and external Ca2+-dependent NADPH dehydrogenase activity becameundetectable in isolated mitochondria. This was linked to a decreased level of NADP+ in rosettes of the transgenic lines.Sterile-grown transgenic seedlings displayed decreased growth specifically on glucose, and respiratory metabolism of 14C-glucose was increased. On soil, NDBl-suppressing plants had a decreased vegetative biomass, but leaf maximumquantum efficiency of photosystem Ⅱ and CO2 assimilation rates, as well as total respiration, were similar to the wild-type. The in vivo alternative oxidase activity and capacity were also similar in all genotypes. Metabolic profiling revealeddecreased levels of sugars, citric acid cycle intermediates, and amino acids in the transgenic lines. The NDBl-suppressioninduced transcriptomic changes associated with protein synthesis and glucosinolate and jasmonate metabolism. Thetranscriptomic changes also overlapped with changes observed in a mutant lacking ABAINSENSITIVE4 and in A. thalianaoverexpressing stress tolerance genes from rice. The results thus indicate that A. thaliana NDB1 modulates NADP(H)reduction levels, which in turn affect central metabolism and growth, and interact with defense signaling.

  17. Lanthanum carbonate versus sevelamer hydrochloride: improvement of metabolic acidosis and hyperkalemia in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiopoulos, Vassilis; Koutis, Ioannis; Trompouki, Sofia; Hadjiyannakos, Dimitrios; Lazarou, Dimitrios; Vlassopoulos, Dimosthenis

    2011-02-01

    Sevelamer hydrochloride (SH) has been reported to aggravate metabolic acidosis and hyperkalemia. This study was performed to evaluate acid-base status and serum potassium changes after replacing SH with lanthanum carbonate (LC) in hemodialysis patients. SH was prescribed for 24 weeks in 14 stable hemodialysis patients and replaced by LC in a similar treatment schedule. Laboratory tests, including indices of acid-base status, nutrition, bone/mineral metabolism, and dialysis adequacy, were performed monthly during the study. Dialysate bicarbonate, potassium and calcium concentrations remained constant. Serum bicarbonate and pH rose, and serum potassium dropped significantly under LC. Alkaline phosphatase also decreased significantly under LC. No significant differences were observed in the other studied parameters between the two treatment periods. Control of serum phosphate was similar under both phosphate-binders and no differences were observed in calcium, Ca × P product, CRP, or lipid levels. Dialysis adequacy was constantly kept within K/DOQI target-range. Although full compliance to treatment was reported, three patients on LC complained of gastrointestinal upset and/or a metallic taste, and four had difficulty chewing the LC tablet. LC improves metabolic acidosis and hyperkalemia in hemodialysis patients previously under SH. Although both medications are well-tolerated, the gastrointestinal side-effects appear to occur more frequently with LC; a fact that, together with difficulties in chewing the tablet, may result in decreased compliance.

  18. Expression profiling reveals Spot 42 small RNA as a key regulator in the central metabolism of Aliivibrio salmonicida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Geir Å

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spot 42 was discovered in Escherichia coli nearly 40 years ago as an abundant, small and unstable RNA. Its biological role has remained obscure until recently, and is today implicated in having broader roles in the central and secondary metabolism. Spot 42 is encoded by the spf gene. The gene is ubiquitous in the Vibrionaceae family of gamma-proteobacteria. One member of this family, Aliivibrio salmonicida, causes cold-water vibriosis in farmed Atlantic salmon. Its genome encodes Spot 42 with 84% identity to E. coli Spot 42. Results We generated a A. salmonicida spf deletion mutant. We then used microarray and Northern blot analyses to monitor global effects on the transcriptome in order to provide insights into the biological roles of Spot 42 in this bacterium. In the presence of glucose, we found a surprisingly large number of ≥ 2X differentially expressed genes, and several major cellular processes were affected. A gene encoding a pirin-like protein showed an on/off expression pattern in the presence/absence of Spot 42, which suggests that Spot 42 plays a key regulatory role in the central metabolism by regulating the switch between fermentation and respiration. Interestingly, we discovered an sRNA named VSsrna24, which is encoded immediately downstream of spf. This new sRNA has an expression pattern opposite to that of Spot 42, and its expression is repressed by glucose. Conclusions We hypothesize that Spot 42 plays a key role in the central metabolism, in part by regulating the pyruvat dehydrogenase enzyme complex via pirin.

  19. Carbon balance indicates a time limit for cultivation of organic soils in central Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sonja; Ammann, Christof; Alewell, Christine; Leifeld, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands serve as important carbon sinks. Globally, more than 30% of the soil organic carbon is stored in organic soils, although they cover only 3% of the land surface. The agricultural use of organic soils usually requires drainage thereby transforming these soils from a net carbon sink into a net source. Currently, about 2 to 3 Gt CO2 are emitted world-wide from degrading organic soils (Joosten 2011; Parish et al. 2008) which is ca. 5% of the total anthropogenic emissions. Besides these CO2 emissions, the resulting subsidence of drained peat soils during agricultural use requires that drainage system are periodically renewed and finally to use pumping systems after progressive subsidence. In Switzerland, the Seeland region is characterised by fens which are intensively used for agriculture since 1900. The organic layer is degrading and subsequently getting shallower and the underlying mineral soil, as lake marl or loam, is approaching the surface. The questions arises for how long and under which land use practises and costs these soils can be cultivated in the near future. The study site was under crop rotation until 2009 when it was converted to extensively used grassland with the water regime still being regulated. The soil is characterised by a degraded organic horizon of 40 to 70 cm. Since December 2014 we are measuring the carbon exchange of this grassland using the Eddy-Covariance method. For 2015, the carbon balance indicates that the degraded fen is a strong carbon source, with approximately 500 g C m-2 a-1. The carbon balance is dominated by CO2 emissions and harvest. Methane emissions are negligible. With the gained emission factors different future scenarios are evaluated for the current cultivation practise of organic soils in central Switzerland. Joosten, H., 2011: Neues Geld aus alten Mooren: Über die Erzeugung von Kohlenstoffzertifikaten aus Moorwiedervernässungen. Telma Beiheft 4, 183-202. Parish, F., A. Sirin, D. Charman, H. Joosten, T

  20. Systems-level analysis of nitrogen starvation-induced modifications of carbon metabolism in a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii starchless mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaby, Ian K; Glaesener, Anne G; Mettler, Tabea; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel T; Gallaher, Sean D; Liu, Bensheng; Boyle, Nanette R; Kropat, Janette; Stitt, Mark; Johnson, Shannon; Benning, Christoph; Pellegrini, Matteo; Casero, David; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2013-11-01

    To understand the molecular basis underlying increased triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in starchless (sta) Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants, we undertook comparative time-course transcriptomics of strains CC-4348 (sta6 mutant), CC-4349, a cell wall-deficient (cw) strain purported to represent the parental STA6 strain, and three independent STA6 strains generated by complementation of sta6 (CC-4565/STA6-C2, CC-4566/STA6-C4, and CC-4567/STA6-C6) in the context of N deprivation. Despite N starvation-induced dramatic remodeling of the transcriptome, there were relatively few differences (5 × 10(2)) observed between sta6 and STA6, the most dramatic of which were increased abundance of transcripts encoding key regulated or rate-limiting steps in central carbon metabolism, specifically isocitrate lyase, malate synthase, transaldolase, fructose bisphosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (encoded by ICL1, MAS1, TAL1, FBP1, and PCK1 respectively), suggestive of increased carbon movement toward hexose-phosphate in sta6 by upregulation of the glyoxylate pathway and gluconeogenesis. Enzyme assays validated the increase in isocitrate lyase and malate synthase activities. Targeted metabolite analysis indicated increased succinate, malate, and Glc-6-P and decreased Fru-1,6-bisphosphate, illustrating the effect of these changes. Comparisons of independent data sets in multiple strains allowed the delineation of a sequence of events in the global N starvation response in C. reinhardtii, starting within minutes with the upregulation of alternative N assimilation routes and carbohydrate synthesis and subsequently a more gradual upregulation of genes encoding enzymes of TAG synthesis. Finally, genome resequencing analysis indicated that (1) the deletion in sta6 extends into the neighboring gene encoding respiratory burst oxidase, and (2) a commonly used STA6 strain (CC-4349) as well as the sequenced reference (CC-503) are not congenic with respect to sta6 (CC-4348

  1. Climate Change in Central and West Asia. Routes to a More Secure, Low-Carbon Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-11-15

    ADB's Central and West Asian countries are Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, Pakistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. Geoclimatic and environmental factors make this region highly vulnerable to the risks and hazards of climate change. For example, accelerated glacial melt has serious implications for agriculture, water supply, and energy generation - problems exacerbated by overexploitation of natural resources. Countries may find it difficult to shift to low-carbon growth, since many have abundant fossil fuel and tend to use energy inefficiently. ADB is responding to these climate hazards and low-carbon pathways with a comprehensive strategy that strengthens policies, governance, and capacity support; expands the use of clean and renewable energy; encourages sustainable transport and urban development; promotes development that will be more resilient to climate change, especially in water-dependent sectors; and manages land use and forests for carbon sequestration. ADB's support is helping its developing member countries face the challenges of climate change and, with partners, is providing innovative solutions, while continuing to work to reduce poverty.

  2. A tachykinin-like neuroendocrine signalling axis couples central serotonin action and nutrient sensing with peripheral lipid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamiuc, Lavinia; Noble, Tallie; Witham, Emily; Ratanpal, Harkaranveer; Vaughan, Megan; Srinivasan, Supriya

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin, a central neuromodulator with ancient ties to feeding and metabolism, is a major driver of body fat loss. However, mechanisms by which central serotonin action leads to fat loss remain unknown. Here, we report that the FLP-7 neuropeptide and its cognate receptor, NPR-22, function as the ligand-receptor pair that defines the neuroendocrine axis of serotonergic body fat loss in Caenorhabditis elegans. FLP-7 is secreted as a neuroendocrine peptide in proportion to fluctuations in neural serotonin circuit functions, and its release is regulated from secretory neurons via the nutrient sensor AMPK. FLP-7 acts via the NPR-22/Tachykinin2 receptor in the intestine and drives fat loss via the adipocyte triglyceride lipase ATGL-1. Importantly, this ligand-receptor pair does not alter other serotonin-dependent behaviours including food intake. For global modulators such as serotonin, the use of distinct neuroendocrine peptides for each output may be one means to achieve phenotypic selectivity. PMID:28128367

  3. The activated sludge metabolic characteristics changing sole carbon source from readily biodegradable acetate to toxic phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changyong; Zhou, Yuexi; Song, Jiamei

    2016-01-01

    A sequencing batch reactor was used to investigate the effect of carbon sources on the metabolism of activated sludge. Acetate and phenol, with the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 330-350 mg L(-1), was used as the carbon source in Periods I and II, respectively. Acetate decreased in the initial 120 min with the intracellular storage materials (XSTO), extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and the soluble microbial products (SMP) accumulating to 131.0 mg L(-1), 347.5 mg L(-1), and 35.5 mg L(-1), respectively. Then, XSTO and EPS decreased to 124.5 mg L(-1) and 340.0 mg L(-1), respectively, in the following 120 min. When acetate was replaced by phenol, it could not be used at the beginning due to its toxicity. The XSTO decreased from 142 mg L(-1) to 54.6 mg L(-1) during the aeration period. The EPS had a significant increase, with the highest value of 618.1 mg L(-1), which then decreased to 245.6 mg L(-1) at 240 min. The phenol was gradually degraded with the acclimation and it can be fully degraded 18 d later. Meanwhile, the usage ratio of the internal carbon source decreased. The effluent SMP in Period II was 1.7 times that in Period I.

  4. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a particular food provides to the body. A chocolate bar has more calories than an apple, so ... acid phenylalanine, needed for normal growth and protein production). Inborn errors of metabolism can sometimes lead to ...

  5. International Workshop on Carbon Cycling and Coral Reef Metabolism; Sangosho no tanso junkan ni kansuru kokusai workshop hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-16

    The paper described the International Workshop on Carbon Cycling and Coral Reef Metabolism which was held at Miyako-jima, Okinawa Pref. on October 17-24, 1995. In the workshop, researchers got together which are involved in marine chemistry, marine biology, coral ecology, and environmental science, and discussed the carbon cycling and metabolism of coral reef. Discussions were made on what the coral reef ecosystem is, and what the definition of a sink or a source for CO2 is. Also discussed were scales of how much time and space should be considered to make these issues clear. Further, it was proposed that it was necessary to investigate carbon balance of both the whole system and the components of the system and to keep track of mass transfer among neighboring components of the system. Seventeen presentations were given. The workshop obtained a definite consensus on carbon balance of the coral reef system. 123 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Glycosphingolipids and the central regulation of metabolism : Sugar analogues as research tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrera Moro Chao, D.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes different studies using sugar analogues to investigate the impact of glycosphingolipid metabolism, in different brain structures involved in the development of α-synucleinopathies and the control of energy homeostasis. Part I comprises several novel approaches to visualize and

  7. Association of aberrations in one-carbon metabolism with molecular phenotype and grade of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Pavani, Addepalli; Rupasree, Yedluri; Divyya, Shree; Deepti, Sripurna; Digumarti, Raghunadha Rao; Gottumukkala, Suryanarayana Raju; Prayaga, Aruna; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2012-10-01

    We have earlier demonstrated the role of aberrant one-carbon metabolism in the etiology of breast cancer. In the current study, we examine the clinical utility of these factors in predicting the subtype of breast cancer and as indicators of disease progression. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and PCR-amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) approaches were used for genetic analysis. Plasma folate and homocysteine were measured using Axsym folate kit and reverse phase HPLC, respectively. Multiple linear regression models were used to test the predictability of disease progression. Luminal A subtype was associated with late age of onset, higher body mass index and lack of family history of breast cancer. Thymidylate synthase (TYMS) 5'-UTR 28 bp tandem repeat (OR: 2.09, 95% CI: 1.05-4.16) and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T (OR: 4.10, 95% CI: 1.40-11.95) were strongly associated with Luminal B. Reduced folate carrier (RFC1) G80A (OR: 2.92, 95% CI: 1.22-6.97) and methionine synthase (MTR) A2756G (OR: 4.71, 95% CI: 1.66-13.31) polymorphisms were associated with LuminA-HH subtype while MTHFR C677T showed association with HER-enriched (OR: 30.41, 95% CI: 6.47-142.91). Cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase (cSHMT) conferred protection against basal-like breast cancer (OR: 0.47, 95% CI: 0.22-0.98). HER-enriched and basal-like subtypes showed positive association with familial breast cancer and inverse association with plasma folate. Hyperhomocysteinemia was observed in Luminal B and basal-like subtypes. Multiple linear regression models of aberrant one-carbon metabolism were found to be moderate predictors of breast cancer grade (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, C = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.58-0.87, P = 0.008). To conclude, aberrations in one-carbon metabolism predict the subtype of breast cancer and disease progression.

  8. [Carbon emissions and low-carbon regulation countermeasures of land use change in the city and town concentrated area of central Liaoning Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Feng-ming; Liang, Wen-juan; Niu, Ming-fen; Wang, Jiao-yue

    2016-02-01

    Carbon emissions due to land use change have an important impact on global climate change. Adjustment of regional land use patterns has a great scientific significance to adaptation to a changing climate. Based on carbon emission/absorption parameters suitable for Liaoning Province, this paper estimated the carbon emission of land use change in the city and town concentrated area of central Liaoning Province. The results showed that the carbon emission and absorption were separately 308.51 Tg C and 11.64 Tg C from 1997 to 2010. It meant 3.8% of carbon emission. was offset by carbon absorption. Among the 296.87 Tg C net carbon emission of land use change, carbon emission of remaining land use type was 182.24 Tg C, accounting for 61.4% of the net carbon emission, while the carbon emission of land use transformation was 114.63 Tg C, occupying the rest 38.6% of net carbon emission. Through quantifying the mapping relationship between land use change and carbon emission, it was shown that during 1997-2004 the contributions of remaining construction land (40.9%) and cropland transform ation to construction land (40.6%) to carbon emission were larger, but the greater contributions to carbon absorption came from cropland transformation to forest land (38.6%) and remaining forest land (37.5%). During 2004-2010, the land use types for carbon emission and absorption were the same to the period of 1997-2004, but the contribution of remaining construction land to carbon emission increased to 80.6%, and the contribution of remaining forest land to carbon absorption increased to 71.7%. Based on the carbon emission intensity in different land use types, we put forward the low-carbon regulation countermeasures of land use in two aspects. In carbon emission reduction, we should strict control land transformation to construction land, increase the energy efficiency of construction land, and avoid excessive development of forest land and water. In carbon sink increase, we should

  9. Formation mechanism of carbonate cemented zones adjacent to the top overpressured surface in the central Junggar Basin,NW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Carbonate cemented zones are normally adjacent to the top overpressured surface in the central Junggar Basin,NW China.Stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions and petrological investigations of carbonate cements in the carbonate cemented zones indicate that:(1) carbonate cements are composed dominantly of ferrocalcite,ferroan dolomite,and ankerite;(2) carbonate cements are formed under a high temperature circumstance in the subsurface,and organic fluid migration has an important effect on the formation of them;and(3) carbon and oxygen ions in the carbonate cements migrate from the underlying overpressured system.This suggests that the occurrence of carbonate cemented zones in this region results from multiple phases of organic fluid expulsion out of the overpressure compartment through geological time.This study provides a plausible mechanism of the formation of carbonate cemented zones adjacent to the top overpressured surface in the clastic sedimentary basins,and has an important implication for understanding the internal correlation between the formation of carbonate cemented zones adjacent to top overpressured surface and geofluids expulsion out of overpressured system.

  10. Central Asian supra-glacier snow melt enhanced by anthropogenic black carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, Julia; Flanner, Mark; Kang, Shichang; Sprenger, Michael; Farinotti, Daniel; Zhang, Qianggong; Guo, Junming; Li, Yang; Lawrence, Mark; Schwikowski, Margit

    2016-04-01

    In Central Asia, more than 60 % of the population depends on water stored in glaciers and mountain snow. Densely populated areas near lower-lying mountain ranges are particularly vulnerable and a recent study showed that the region might lose 50 % of its glacier mass by 2050. While temperature, precipitation and dynamic processes are key drivers of glacial change, deposition of light absorbing impurities such as mineral dust and black carbon can lead to accelerated melting through surface albedo reduction. Here, we discuss the origin of deposited mineral dust and black carbon and their impacts on albedo change and snow melt. 218 snow samples were taken on 4 glaciers, Abramov (Pamir), Suek, Glacier No. 354 and Golubin (Tien Shan), representing deposition between summer 2012 and 2014. They were analyzed for elemental carbon, mineral dust and iron among other parameters. We find the elemental carbon concentration to be at the higher end of the range reported for neighboring mountain ranges between 70 and 502 ng g-1 (interquartile range). To investigate the origin of the snow impurities, we used a Lagrangian particle dispersion model, LAGRANTO. Back trajectory ensembles of 40 members with varied starting points to capture the meteorological spread were released every 6 hours for the covered period at all sites. "Footprints" were calculated and combined with emission inventories to estimate the relative contribution of anthropogenic and natural BC to deposited aerosol on the glaciers. We find that more than 94 % of BC is of anthropogenic origin and the major source region is Central Asia followed by the Middle East. Further exploring the implications of mineral dust and BC deposition, we calculate the snow albedo reduction with the Snow-Ice-Aerosol-Radiative model (SNICAR). Even though mineral dust concentrations were up to a factor of 50 higher than BC concentrations, BC dominates the albedo reduction. Using these results we calculate the snow melt induced by

  11. ¹³C metabolic flux analysis identifies an unusual route for pyruvate dissimilation in mycobacteria which requires isocitrate lyase and carbon dioxide fixation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dany J V Beste

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires the enzyme isocitrate lyase (ICL for growth and virulence in vivo. The demonstration that M. tuberculosis also requires ICL for survival during nutrient starvation and has a role during steady state growth in a glycerol limited chemostat indicates a function for this enzyme which extends beyond fat metabolism. As isocitrate lyase is a potential drug target elucidating the role of this enzyme is of importance; however, the role of isocitrate lyase has never been investigated at the level of in vivo fluxes. Here we show that deletion of one of the two icl genes impairs the replication of Mycobacterium bovis BCG at slow growth rate in a carbon limited chemostat. In order to further understand the role of isocitrate lyase in the central metabolism of mycobacteria the effect of growth rate on the in vivo fluxes was studied for the first time using ¹³C-metabolic flux analysis (MFA. Tracer experiments were performed with steady state chemostat cultures of BCG or M. tuberculosis supplied with ¹³C labeled glycerol or sodium bicarbonate. Through measurements of the ¹³C isotopomer labeling patterns in protein-derived amino acids and enzymatic activity assays we have identified the activity of a novel pathway for pyruvate dissimilation. We named this the GAS pathway because it utilizes the Glyoxylate shunt and Anapleurotic reactions for oxidation of pyruvate, and Succinyl CoA synthetase for the generation of succinyl CoA combined with a very low flux through the succinate--oxaloacetate segment of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. We confirm that M. tuberculosis can fix carbon from CO₂ into biomass. As the human host is abundant in CO₂ this finding requires further investigation in vivo as CO₂ fixation may provide a point of vulnerability that could be targeted with novel drugs. This study also provides a platform for further studies into the metabolism of M. tuberculosis using ¹³C-MFA.

  12. Genetic Polymorphisms of Phase II Metabolic Enzymes and Lung Cancer Susceptibility in a Population of Central South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-chun Chen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A case-control study was conducted for analyzing the genetic polymorphisms of phase II metabolic enzymes in 97 patients with lung cancer and 197 healthy subjects from Han ethnic group of Hunan Province located in Central South China. The results showed that the frequencies of glutathione S-transferase (GST M1-null (GSTM1- or GSTT1-null (GSTT1- genotype alone, or combined form of both in lung cancer patients were significantly higher than those of the controls. Genotypes of combining GSTP1 mutant/GSTM1(- or GSTP1 mutant/GSTT1(- led to high risk of lung cancer. Individuals carrying any two or all three of GSTM1(-, GSTT1(- and GSTP1 mutant genotypes have a distinctly increased risk of lung cancer when compared to those with GSTM1 present (GSTM1+: GSTM1+/+ or GSTM1+/−, GSTT1 present (GSTT1+: GSTT1+/+ or GSTT1+/− and GSTP1 wild genotypes. Furthermore, individuals possessing combined genotypes of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 rapid acetylator, GSTP1 mutant and both GSTT1(- and GSTM1(- have a remarkably higher lung cancer risk than those carrying combined NAT2 slow acetylator genotype, GSTP1 wild genotype and both GSTT1(+ and GSTM1(+ genotypes. All these findings suggest that the genetic polymorphisms of phase II metabolic enzymes affect the susceptibility of lung cancer in the Han ethnic group of Central South China.

  13. Essential roles of four-carbon backbone chemicals in the control of metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sabrina; Chriett; Luciano; Pirola

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of obesity worldwide and its related cardiometabolic complications is an urgent public health problem. While weight gain results from a negative balance between the energy expenditure and calorie intake, recent research has demonstrated that several small organic molecules containing a four-carbon backbone can modulate this balance by favoring energy expenditure, and alleviating endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress. Such small molecules include the bacterially produced short chain fatty acid butyric acid, its chemically produced derivative 4-phenylbutyric acid, the main ketone body D-β-hydroxybutyrate- synthesized by the liver- and the recently discovered myokine β-aminoisobutyric acid. Conversely, another butyraterelated molecule, α-hydroxybutyrate, has been found to be an early predictor of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. In this minireview, we summarize recent advances in the understanding of the mechanism of action of these molecules, and discuss their use as therapeutics to improve metabolic homeostasis or their detection as early biomarkers of incipient insulin resistance.

  14. Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis of Baseline Carbon Emissions and Removal in Tropical Rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Gonzalez; Benjamin Kroll; Carlos R. Vargas

    2006-01-10

    Conversion of tropical forest to agricultural land and pasture has reduced forest extent and the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation and reforestation can restore those ecosystem services. We have assessed forest species patterns, quantified deforestation and reforestation rates, and projected future baseline carbon emissions and removal in Amazon tropical rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru. The research area is a 4800 km{sup 2} buffer zone around the Parque Nacional Yanachaga-Chemillen, Bosque de Proteccion San Matias-San Carlos, and the Reserva Comunal Yanesha. A planned project for the period 2006-2035 would conserve 4000 ha of forest in a proposed 7000 ha Area de Conservacion Municipale de Chontabamba and establish 5600 ha of natural regeneration and 1400 ha of native species plantations, laid out in fajas de enriquecimiento (contour plantings), to reforest 7000 ha of agricultural land. Forest inventories of seven sites covering 22.6 ha in primary forest and 17 sites covering 16.5 ha in secondary forest measured 17,073 trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm. The 24 sites host trees of 512 species, 267 genera, and 69 families. We could not identify the family of 7% of the trees or the scientific species of 21% of the trees. Species richness is 346 in primary forest and 257 in the secondary forest. In primary forest, 90% of aboveground biomass resides in old-growth species. Conversely, in secondary forest, 66% of aboveground biomass rests in successional species. The density of trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm is 366 trees ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 533 trees ha{sup -1} in secondary forest, although the average diameter is 24 {+-} 15 cm in primary forest and 17 {+-} 8 cm in secondary forest. Using Amazon forest biomass equations and wood densities for 117 species, aboveground biomass is 240 {+-} 30 t ha{sup -1} in the primary sites and 90 {+-} 10 t ha{sup -1} in the

  15. Static magnetic field treatment of seeds improves carbon and nitrogen metabolism under salinity stress in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghel, Lokesh; Kataria, Sunita; Guruprasad, Kadur Narayan

    2016-10-01

    The effectiveness of magnetopriming was assessed for alleviation of salt-induced adverse effects on soybean growth. Soybean seeds were pre-treated with static magnetic field (SMF) of 200 mT for 1 h to evaluate the effect of magnetopriming on growth, carbon and nitrogen metabolism, and yield of soybean plants under different salinity levels (0, 25, and 50 mM NaCl). The adverse effect of NaCl-induced salt stress was found on growth, yield, and various physiological attributes of soybeans. Results indicate that SMF pre-treatment significantly increased plant growth attributes, number of root nodules, nodules, fresh weight, biomass accumulation, and photosynthetic performance under both non-saline and saline conditions as compared to untreated seeds. Polyphasic chlorophyll a fluorescence (OJIP) transients from magnetically treated plants gave a higher fluorescence yield at J-I-P phase. Nitrate reductase activity, PIABS , photosynthetic pigments, and net rate of photosynthesis were also higher in plants that emerged from SMF pre-treated seeds as compared to untreated seeds. Leghemoglobin content and hemechrome content in root nodules were also increased by SMF pre-treatment. Thus pre-sowing exposure of seeds to SMF enhanced carbon and nitrogen metabolism and improved the yield of soybeans in terms of number of pods, number of seeds, and seed weight under saline as well as non-saline conditions. Consequently, SMF pre-treatment effectively mitigated adverse effects of NaCl on soybeans. It indicates that magnetopriming of dry soybean seeds can be effectively used as a pre-sowing treatment for alleviating salinity stress. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:455-470, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Deforestation projections for carbon-rich peat swamp forests of Central Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Douglas O; Hardiono, Martin; Meijaard, Erik

    2011-09-01

    We evaluated three spatially explicit land use and cover change (LUCC) models to project deforestation from 2005-2020 in the carbon-rich peat swamp forests (PSF) of Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. Such models are increasingly used to evaluate the impact of deforestation on carbon fluxes between the biosphere and the atmosphere. We considered both business-as-usual (BAU) and a forest protection scenario to evaluate each model's accuracy, sensitivity, and total projected deforestation and landscape-level fragmentation patterns. The three models, Dinamica EGO (DE), GEOMOD and the Land Change Modeler (LCM), projected similar total deforestation amounts by 2020 with a mean of 1.01 million ha (Mha) and standard deviation of 0.17 Mha. The inclusion of a 0.54 Mha strict protected area in the LCM simulations reduced projected loss to 0.77 Mha over 15 years. Calibrated parameterizations of the models using nearly identical input drivers produced very different landscape properties, as measured by the number of forest patches, mean patch area, contagion, and Euclidean nearest neighbor determined using Fragstats software. The average BAU outputs of the models suggests that Central Kalimantan may lose slightly less than half (45.1%) of its 2005 PSF by 2020 if measures are not taken to reduce deforestation there. The relatively small reduction of 0.24 Mha in deforestation found in the 0.54 Mha protection scenario suggests that these models can identify potential leakage effects in which deforestation is forced to occur elsewhere in response to a policy intervention.

  17. Seed priming improves chilling tolerance in chickpea by modulating germination metabolism, trehalose accumulation and carbon assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad; Hussain, Mubshar; Nawaz, Ahmad; Lee, Dong-Jin; Alghamdi, Salem S; Siddique, Kadambot H M

    2017-02-01

    Chilling stress is one of the major abiotic stresses affecting chickpea productivity worldwide. This study evaluated the potential role of seed priming in improving resistance to chilling stress in chickpea (cv. Punjab, 2008). The priming treatments involved soaking seeds of chickpea cultivar Punjab 2008 in either water for 8 h (on-farm priming), aerated water (hydropriming) for 18 h, or CaCl2 solution (ψs -1.25 MPa; osmopriming) for 18 h. Primed and untreated seeds were grown either at 18/15 °C (control) or 13/10 °C (chilling stress). Chilling stress suppressed the growth of chickpea while seed priming mitigated the adverse effects of chilling stress by improving stand establishment, growth, water relations, photosynthesis, α-amylase activity, sugar metabolism, antioxidant enzyme activity, membrane stability, and leaf accumulation of proline, nitrogen, potassium and soluble phenolics. Seed priming also improved the performance of chickpea under optimal (control) conditions. The overall order of improvement in resistance to chilling by using seed priming was osmopriming > hydropriming > on-farm priming. Osmopriming improved seedling dry weight, specific leaf area, leaf CO2 net assimilation rate, maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII, α-amylase activity, trehalose content and leaf relative water content by 10, 22, 17, 20, 73, 48 and 7%, respectively, relative to the non-primed control under chilling stress. Under optimal temperature conditions, the corresponding values were 30, 32, 16, 10, 83, 75 and 5%, respectively. Sugar metabolism, especially trehalose content, was strongly linked with stand establishment, photosynthesis, antioxidant potential (under chilling stress) and plant biomass. Overall, seed priming improved chickpea performance under both optimal temperature conditions and chilling stress through better germination metabolism and the accumulation of trehalose, which protected from oxidative damage and helped to maintain carbon

  18. Effects of wildfire on soil organic carbon export by runoff in Central Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, M. E.; Faria, S. R.; Campos, I.; Caria, M. M. P. F.; Ferreira, R. S. V.; Machado, A. I.; Martins, M. A. S.; Pinto, R.; Prats, S. A.; Esteves, V. I.; Keizer, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    Forest fires, a frequent and recurrent phenomenon in Mediterranean ecosystems, have several ecological and environmental impacts caused in part by short- and medium-term effects on soil physical and chemical characteristics as well as on organic matter (OM) composition, properties and dynamics and hence upon microbial populations. This negatively affects soil health and quality, and enhances the occurrence of erosive processes and the loss of a non-renewable natural resource such is the soil. Due to the large C pool present in soils, even small changes in soil OM may have a significant effect on biogeochemical cycles and on global climate. Even though some authors consider that organic C mobilized by erosion processes may be protected from mineralization, the general tendency is to consider that soil erosion exposes OM to mineralization processes and represents the main factor of C losses from the planet's surface. Whilst it is well documented that wildfires can have major impacts on hydrological and erosion processes, the associated transport of organic matter has received considerably less research attention. The FIRECNUTS project (PTDC/AGR-CFL/104559/2008) addresses this research gap by studying, among others, the export of organic carbon in a recently burnt forest area of 250 ha in north-central Portugal (Sever do Vouga). To this end, five slopes with contrasting forest types (eucalypt vs. Maritime Pine plantations) and geologies (schist vs. granite) are being monitored for sediment losses since a wildfire that occurred in July 2010. For reference, also a neighboring, long-unburnt eucalypt plantation is being monitored. The sediments collected by sediment fences were measured and collected at monthly intervals during the first 6 or 12 months after fire. The total carbon content of the sediment samples was measured using a Shimazdu TOC analyzer. Preliminary results revealed marked differences in organic carbon concentrations between the two burnt eucalypt stands

  19. Metabolic syndrome in the rural population of Wardha, Central India: An exploratory factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep R Deshmukh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Metabolic syndrome - a plausible precondition for type II diabetes and cardiovascular diseases is also on rise. To understand the mechanistic complexity of metabolic syndrome it is imperative to study the specific contribution of the determinants of metabolic syndrome. Such study can help to identify the most significant factor which may be of use in early detection as well as prevention efforts. Such information is scarcely available from India and especially from rural India. Hence, the present study was undertaken to explore for such factor which might be considered crucial for development of such pathogenesis particularly in rural population of Wardha. Methods: A cross-sectional study comprising of 300 subjects was carried out in rural area of Primary Health Center, attached to medical college with approximate 31,000 populations. The anthropometric parameters such as height, weight, waist circumference were measured. Overnight fasting samples were collected for lipid profile (total cholesterol, triglyceride, high density lipoproteins, low density lipoproteins, very low density lipoproteins and fasting blood glucose levels. The National Cholesterol Education Programme Adult Treatment Panel, ATP-III guidelines were used to categorize the study subjects. As many of the variables are highly intercorrelated, exploratory factor analysis was carried out to reduce the data to a smaller number of independent factors that accounts for the most of the variances in the data. Principal component analysis was used as a method of extraction. Results: For both sexes, three factors were extracted accounting for about 71% variance in the measured variables. An adiposity factor which accounted for highest explained variance (28%, was the initial factor extracted. It was loaded positively by waist circumference, triglyceride, and very low density lipoprotein and negatively loaded by high density lipoprotein. Second factor extracted

  20. Metabolic flux analysis of Escherichia coli creB and arcA mutants reveals shared control of carbon catabolism under microaerobic growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikel, Pablo I; Zhu, Jiangfeng; San, Ka-Yiu; Méndez, Beatriz S; Bennett, George N

    2009-09-01

    Escherichia coli has several elaborate sensing mechanisms for response to availability of oxygen and other electron acceptors, as well as the carbon source in the surrounding environment. Among them, the CreBC and ArcAB two-component signal transduction systems are responsible for regulation of carbon source utilization and redox control in response to oxygen availability, respectively. We assessed the role of CreBC and ArcAB in regulating the central carbon metabolism of E. coli under microaerobic conditions by means of (13)C-labeling experiments in chemostat cultures of a wild-type strain, DeltacreB and DeltaarcA single mutants, and a DeltacreB DeltaarcA double mutant. Continuous cultures were conducted at D = 0.1 h(-1) under carbon-limited conditions with restricted oxygen supply. Although all experimental strains metabolized glucose mainly through the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, mutant strains had significantly lower fluxes in both the oxidative and the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathways. Significant differences were also found at the pyruvate branching point. Both pyruvate-formate lyase and the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex contributed to acetyl-coenzyme A synthesis from pyruvate, and their activity seemed to be modulated by both ArcAB and CreBC. Strains carrying the creB deletion showed a higher biomass yield on glucose compared to the wild-type strain and its DeltaarcA derivative, which also correlated with higher fluxes from building blocks to biomass. Glyoxylate shunt and lactate dehydrogenase were active mainly in the DeltaarcA strain. Finally, it was observed that the tricarboxylic acid cycle reactions operated in a rather cyclic fashion under our experimental conditions, with reduced activity in the mutant strains.

  1. Morphology and mixing of black carbon particles collected in central California during the CARES field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffet, Ryan C.; O'Brien, Rachel E.; Alpert, Peter A.; Kelly, Stephen T.; Pham, Don Q.; Gilles, Mary K.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Aerosol absorption is strongly dependent on the internal heterogeneity (mixing state) and morphology of individual particles containing black carbon (BC) and other non-absorbing species. Here, we examine an extensive microscopic data set collected in the California Central Valley during the CARES 2010 field campaign. During a period of high photochemical activity and pollution buildup, the particle mixing state and morphology were characterized using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the carbon K-edge. Observations of compacted BC core morphologies and thick organic coatings at both urban and rural sites provide evidence of the aged nature of particles, highlighting the importance of highly aged particles at urban sites during periods of high photochemical activity. Based on the observation of thick coatings and more convex BC inclusion morphology, either the aging was rapid or the contribution of fresh BC emissions at the urban site was relatively small compared to background concentrations. Most particles were observed to have the BC inclusion close to the center of the host. However, host particles containing inorganic rich inclusions had the BC inclusion closer to the edge of the particle. These measurements of BC morphology and mixing state provide important constraints for the morphological effects on BC optical properties expected in aged urban plumes.

  2. Carbonate platform facies development of the Turonian Wata Formation in central and eastern Sinai, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, M. A.; Farouk, S.; Hassan, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Wata carbonate platform in central and eastern Sinai show a clear pattern of evolutionary development during sedimentation. Three facies are recognized in the carbonate platform. Inner-platform in the south, inter-platform basin in the middle, and outer-platform in the northwest. Such classification was probably performed by the effect of Syrian Arc System that culminated during Turonian in Sinai. Inner-platform includes fining-upward cycles, each begins with packstone, followed by wackestone and capped by lime-mudstone or claystone or molluscan bioclastic wackestone at the base capped by sandy oolitic packstone or dolostone. The dominant faunal associations are molluscs, and echinoids. Inter-platform basin occurs north of inner-platform and extends northwest-southeast direction and comprises fining-upward cycles, each of which begins with bioclastic ostracodal packstone, calcisphere packstone, bioclastic packstone, capped by wackestone and lime-mudstone The faunal association includes, sponge spines, ostracodes, molluscan debris and calcispheres. They were deposited in shoal marine and barrier. The outer-platform occurs at Gebel Giddi and extended northwestwards. The lithofacies are entirely represented by calcisphere wackestone/packstone, with a reduced thickness of 20 m.

  3. Effects of oxidative stress on fatty acid- and one-carbon-metabolism in psychiatric and cardiovascular disease comorbidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assies, J.; Mocking, R.J.; Lok, A.; Ruhe, H.G.; Pouwer, F.; Schene, A.H.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in severe psychiatric disorders (depression, schizophrenia). Here, we provide evidence of how the effects of oxidative stress on fatty acid (FA) and one-carbon (1-C) cycle metabolism, which may initially represent adaptive respons

  4. Effects of oxidative stress on fatty acid- and one-carbon-metabolism in psychiatric and cardiovascular disease comorbidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assies, J.; Mocking, R. J. T.; Lok, A.; Ruhe, H. G.; Pouwer, F.; Schene, A. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in severe psychiatric disorders (depression, schizophrenia). Here, we provide evidence of how the effects of oxidative stress on fatty acid (FA) and one-carbon (1-C) cycle metabolism, which may initially represent adaptive respons

  5. Identification of glucose kinase-dependent and -independent pathways for carbon control of primary metabolism, development and antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor by quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbens, Jacob; Janus, Marleen; Florea, Bogdan I; Overkleeft, Herman S; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2012-12-01

    Members of the soil-dwelling prokaryotic genus Streptomyces are indispensable for the recycling of complex polysaccharides, and produce a wide range of natural products. Nutrient availability is a major determinant for the switch to development and antibiotic production in streptomycetes. Carbon catabolite repression (CCR), a main signalling pathway underlying this phenomenon, was so far considered fully dependent on the glycolytic enzyme glucose kinase (Glk). Here we provide evidence of a novel Glk-independent pathway in Streptomyces coelicolor, using advanced proteomics that allowed the comparison of the expression of some 2000 proteins, including virtually all enzymes for central metabolism. While CCR and inducer exclusion of enzymes for primary and secondary metabolism and precursor supply for natural products is mostly mediated via Glk, enzymes for the urea cycle, as well as for biosynthesis of the γ-butyrolactone Scb1 and the responsive cryptic polyketide Cpk are subject to Glk-independent CCR. Deletion of glkA led to strong downregulation of biosynthetic proteins for prodigionins and calcium-dependent antibiotic (CDA) in mannitol-grown cultures. Repression of bldB, bldN, and its target bldM may explain the poor development of S. coelicolor on solid-grown cultures containing glucose. A new model for carbon catabolite repression in streptomycetes is presented.

  6. Planktic foraminifer and coccolith contribution to carbonate export fluxes over the central Kerguelen Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembauville, M.; Meilland, J.; Ziveri, P.; Schiebel, R.; Blain, S.; Salter, I.

    2016-05-01

    We report the contribution of planktic foraminifers and coccoliths to the particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) export fluxes collected over an annual cycle (October 2011/September 2012) on the central Kerguelen Plateau in the Antarctic Zone (AAZ) south of the Polar Front (PF). The seasonality of PIC flux was decoupled from surface chlorophyll a concentration and particulate organic carbon (POC) fluxes and was characterized by a late summer (February) maximum. This peak was concomitant with the highest satellite-derived sea surface PIC and corresponded to a Emiliania huxleyi coccoliths export event that accounted for 85% of the annual PIC export. The foraminifer contribution to the annual PIC flux was much lower (15%) and dominated by Turborotalita quinqueloba and Neogloboquadrina pachyderma. Foraminifer export fluxes were closely related to the surface chlorophyll a concentration, suggesting food availability as an important factor regulating the foraminifer's biomass. We compared size-normalized test weight (SNW) of the foraminifers with previously published SNW from the Crozet Islands using the same methodology and found no significant difference in SNW between sites for a given species. However, the SNW was significantly species-specific with a threefold increase from T. quinqueloba to Globigerina bulloides. The annual PIC:POC molar ratio of 0.07 was close to the mean ratio for the global ocean and lead to a low carbonate counter pump effect (~5%) compared to a previous study north of the PF (6-32%). We suggest that lowers counter pump effect south of the PF despite similar productivity levels is due to a dominance of coccoliths in the PIC fluxes and a difference in the foraminifers species assemblage with a predominance of polar species with lower SNW.

  7. METABOLISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To determine the allele frequencies of genetic variants 373 Ala→Pro and 451 Arg→Gln of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and to explore their potential impacts on serum lipid metabolism. Methods: The genotypes in CETP codon 373 and 451 in 91 German healthy students and 409 an-

  8. Vision Issues and Space Flight: Evaluation of One-Carbon Metabolism Polymorphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.; Gregory, Jesse F.; Zeisel, Steven; Ueland, Per; Gibson, C. R.; Mader, Thomas; Kinchen, Jason; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Zwart, Sara R.

    2015-01-01

    Intermediates of the one-carbon metabolic pathway are altered in astronauts who experience vision-related issues during and after space flight. Serum concentrations of homocysteine, cystathionine, 2-methylcitric acid, and methylmalonic acid were higher in astronauts with ophthalmic changes than in those without (Zwart et al., J Nutr, 2012). These differences existed before, during, and after flight. Potential confounding factors did not explain the differences. Genetic polymorphisms could contribute to these differences, and could help explain why crewmembers on the same mission do not all have ophthalmic issues, despite the same environmental factors (e.g., microgravity, exercise, diet). A follow-up study was conducted to evaluate 5 polymorphisms of enzymes in the one-carbon pathway, and to evaluate how these relate to vision and other ophthalmic changes after flight. Preliminary evaluations of the genetic data indicate that all of the crewmembers with the MTRR GG genotype had vision issues to one degree or another. However, not everyone who had vision issues had this genetic polymorphism, so the situation is more complex than the involvement of this single polymorphism. Metabolomic and further data analyses are underway to clarify these findings, but the preliminary assessments are promising.

  9. DRUM: a new framework for metabolic modeling under non-balanced growth. Application to the carbon metabolism of unicellular microalgae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Baroukh

    Full Text Available Metabolic modeling is a powerful tool to understand, predict and optimize bioprocesses, particularly when they imply intracellular molecules of interest. Unfortunately, the use of metabolic models for time varying metabolic fluxes is hampered by the lack of experimental data required to define and calibrate the kinetic reaction rates of the metabolic pathways. For this reason, metabolic models are often used under the balanced growth hypothesis. However, for some processes such as the photoautotrophic metabolism of microalgae, the balanced-growth assumption appears to be unreasonable because of the synchronization of their circadian cycle on the daily light. Yet, understanding microalgae metabolism is necessary to optimize the production yield of bioprocesses based on this microorganism, as for example production of third-generation biofuels. In this paper, we propose DRUM, a new dynamic metabolic modeling framework that handles the non-balanced growth condition and hence accumulation of intracellular metabolites. The first stage of the approach consists in splitting the metabolic network into sub-networks describing reactions which are spatially close, and which are assumed to satisfy balanced growth condition. The left metabolites interconnecting the sub-networks behave dynamically. Then, thanks to Elementary Flux Mode analysis, each sub-network is reduced to macroscopic reactions, for which simple kinetics are assumed. Finally, an Ordinary Differential Equation system is obtained to describe substrate consumption, biomass production, products excretion and accumulation of some internal metabolites. DRUM was applied to the accumulation of lipids and carbohydrates of the microalgae Tisochrysis lutea under day/night cycles. The resulting model describes accurately experimental data obtained in day/night conditions. It efficiently predicts the accumulation and consumption of lipids and carbohydrates.

  10. Comparative genomic reconstruction of transcriptional networks controlling central metabolism in the Shewanella genus

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    Kovaleva Galina

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-scale prediction of gene regulation and reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria is one of the critical tasks of modern genomics. The Shewanella genus is comprised of metabolically versatile gamma-proteobacteria, whose lifestyles and natural environments are substantially different from Escherichia coli and other model bacterial species. The comparative genomics approaches and computational identification of regulatory sites are useful for the in silico reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria. Results To explore conservation and variations in the Shewanella transcriptional networks we analyzed the repertoire of transcription factors and performed genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors and their DNA binding sites, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Forty five regulons were newly inferred from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in the Enterobacteria and Pseudomonas spp.. Multiple variations in regulatory strategies between the Shewanella spp. and E. coli include regulon contraction and expansion (as in the case of PdhR, HexR, FadR, numerous cases of recruiting non-orthologous regulators to control equivalent pathways (e.g. PsrA for fatty acid degradation and, conversely, orthologous regulators to control distinct pathways (e.g. TyrR, ArgR, Crp. Conclusions We tentatively defined the first reference collection of ~100 transcriptional regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The resulting regulatory network contains ~600 regulated genes per genome that are mostly involved in metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, metals, and stress responses. Several reconstructed regulons including NagR for N-acetylglucosamine catabolism were experimentally validated in S

  11. Annual benthic metabolism and organic carbon fluxes in a semi-enclosed Mediterranean bay dominated by the macroalgae Caulerpa prolifera.

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    Sergio eRuiz-Halpern

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Coastal areas play an important role on carbon cycling. Elucidating the dynamics on the production, transport and fate of organic carbon is relevant to gain a better understanding of the role coastal areas play in the global carbon budget. Here, we assess the metabolic status and associated organic carbon fluxes of a semi-enclosed Mediterranean bay supporting a meadow of Caulerpa prolifera. We test whether the EDOC pool is a significant component of the organic carbon pool and associated fluxes in this ecosystem. The Bay of Portocolom was in net metabolic balance on a yearly basis, but heterotrophic during the summer months. Community respiration (CR was positively correlated to C. prolifera biomass, while net community production (NCP had a negative correlation. The benthic compartment represented, on average, 72.6 ± 5.2 % of CR and 86.8 ± 4.5 % of gross primary production (GPP. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC production peaked in summer and was always positive, with the incubations performed in the dark almost doubling the flux of those performed in the light. Exchangeable dissolved organic carbon (EDOC, however, oscillated between production and uptake, being completely recycled within the system and representing around 14% of the DOC flux. The pools of bottom and surface DOC were high for an oligotrophic environment, and were positively correlated to the pool of EDOC. Thus, despite being in metabolic balance, this ecosystem acted as a conduit for organic carbon (OC, as it is able to export OC to adjacent areas derived from allochtonous inputs during heterotrophic conditions. These inputs likely come from groundwater discharge, human activity in the watershed, delivered to the sediments through the high capacity of C. prolifera to remove particles from the water column, and from the air-water exchange of EDOC, demonstrating that these communities are a major contributor to the cycling of OC in coastal embayments.

  12. Assessment of alternative management practices and policies affecting soil carbon in agroecosystems of the central United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donigian, A.S.; Barnwell, T.O.; Jackson, R.B.; Patwardhan, A.S.; Weinrich, K.B.

    1994-04-01

    The goal of the U.S. EPA BIOME Agroecosystems Assessment Project is to evaluate the degree to which agroecosystems can be technically managed, on a sustainable basis, to conserve and sequester carbon, reduce the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, and provide reference datasets and methodologies for agricultural assessment. The report provides preliminary estimates of carbon sequestration potential for the central United States including the Corn Belt, the Great Lakes, and portions of the Great Plains. This study region comprises 44% of the land area and 60% to 70% of the agricultural cropland of the conterminous United States. The assessment methodology includes the integration of the RAMS economic model, the Century soil carbon model, meteorologic and soils data bases, and GIS display and analysis capabilities in order to assess the impacts on soil carbon of current agricultural trends and conditions, alternative tillage practices, use of cover crops, and Conservation Reserve Program policy.

  13. Computational and experimental analysis of redundancy in the central metabolism of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Segura

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous model-based analysis of the metabolic network of Geobacter sulfurreducens suggested the existence of several redundant pathways. Here, we identified eight sets of redundant pathways that included redundancy for the assimilation of acetate, and for the conversion of pyruvate into acetyl-CoA. These equivalent pathways and two other sub-optimal pathways were studied using 5 single-gene deletion mutants in those pathways for the evaluation of the predictive capacity of the model. The growth phenotypes of these mutants were studied under 12 different conditions of electron donor and acceptor availability. The comparison of the model predictions with the resulting experimental phenotypes indicated that pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase is the only activity able to convert pyruvate into acetyl-CoA. However, the results and the modeling showed that the two acetate activation pathways present are not only active, but needed due to the additional role of the acetyl-CoA transferase in the TCA cycle, probably reflecting the adaptation of these bacteria to acetate utilization. In other cases, the data reconciliation suggested additional capacity constraints that were confirmed with biochemical assays. The results demonstrate the need to experimentally verify the activity of key enzymes when developing in silico models of microbial physiology based on sequence-based reconstruction of metabolic networks.

  14. Central Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Influences Liver and Adipose Metabolism Via Specific Hypothalamic Nuclei and Efferent Autonomic/JNK1 Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbernon, Monica; Beiroa, Daniel; Vázquez, María J.; Morgan, Donald A.; Veyrat–Durebex, Christelle; Porteiro, Begoña; Díaz–Arteaga, Adenis; Senra, Ana; Busquets, Silvia; Velásquez, Douglas A.; Al–Massadi, Omar; Varela, Luis; Gándara, Marina; López–Soriano, Francisco–Javier; Gallego, Rosalía; Seoane, Luisa M.; Argiles, Josep M.; López, Miguel; Davis, Roger J.; Sabio, Guadalupe; Rohner–Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Rahmouni, Kamal; Dieguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Specific neuronal circuits modulate autonomic outflow to liver and white adipose tissue. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-deficient mice are hypophagic, lean, and do not develop hepatosteatosis when fed a high-fat diet. Herein, we sought to investigate the role of MCH, an orexigenic neuropeptide specifically expressed in the lateral hypothalamic area, on hepatic and adipocyte metabolism. METHODS Chronic central administration of MCH and adenoviral vectors increasing MCH signaling were performed in rats and mice. Vagal denervation was performed to assess its effect on liver metabolism. The peripheral effects on lipid metabolism were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. RESULTS We showed that the activation of MCH receptors promotes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease through the parasympathetic nervous system, whereas it increases fat deposition in white adipose tissue via the suppression of sympathetic traffic. These metabolic actions are independent of parallel changes in food intake and energy expenditure. In the liver, MCH triggers lipid accumulation and lipid uptake, with c-Jun N-terminal kinase being an essential player, whereas in adipocytes MCH induces metabolic pathways that promote lipid storage and decreases lipid mobilization. Genetic activation of MCH receptors or infusion of MCH specifically in the lateral hypothalamic area modulated hepatic lipid metabolism, whereas the specific activation of this receptor in the arcuate nucleus affected adipocyte metabolism. CONCLUSIONS Our findings show that central MCH directly controls hepatic and adipocyte metabolism through different pathways. PMID:23142626

  15. Oxygen-18 incorporation into malic acid during nocturnal carbon dioxide fixation in crassulacean acid metabolism plants: a new approach to estimating in vivo carbonic anhydrase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtum, J.A.M.; Summons, R.; Roeske, C.A.; Comins, H.N.; O' Leary, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants fix carbon dioxide at night by the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate. If CO2 fixation is conducted with TC YO2, then in the absence of carbonic anhydrase, the malate formed by dark CO2 fixation should also contain high levels of carbon-13 and oxygen-18. Conversely, if carbonic anhydrase is present and highly active, oxygen exchange between CO2 and cellular H2O will occur more rapidly than carboxylation, and the ( TC) malate formed will contain little or no oxygen-18 above the natural abundance level. The presence of oxygen-18 in these molecules can be detected either by nuclear magnetic resonance or by mass spectrometry. Studies of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the presence and absence of carbonic anhydrase in vitro confirm the validity of the method. When CAM plants are studied by this method, we find that most species show incorporation of a significant amount of oxygen-18. Comparison of these results with results of isotope fractionation and gas exchange studies permits calculation of the in vivo activity of carbonic anhydrase toward HCO3 compared with that of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. The ratio (carbonic anhydrase activity/phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity) is species dependent and varies from a low of about 7 for Ananas comosus to values near 20 for Hoya carnosa and Bryophyllum pinnatum, 40 for Kalanchoee daigremontiana, and 100 or greater for Bryophyllum tubiflorum, Kalanchoee serrata, and Kalanchoae tomentosa. Carbonic anhydrase activity increases relative to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity at higher temperature. 37 references, 2 figures, 8 tables.

  16. Association between in vivo alcohol metabolism and genetic variation in pathways that metabolize the carbon skeleton of ethanol and NADH reoxidation in the Alcohol Challenge Twin Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Penelope A; Macgregor, Stuart; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela AF; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Whitfield, John B

    2013-01-01

    Background Variation in alcohol metabolism affects the duration of intoxication and alcohol use. While the majority of genetic association studies investigating variation in alcohol metabolism have focused on polymorphisms in alcohol or aldehyde dehydrogenases, we have now tested for association with genes in alternative metabolic pathways that catalyze the carbon skeleton of ethanol and NADH reoxidation. Methods 950 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning 14 genes (ACN9, ACSS1, ACSS2, ALDH1A1, CAT, CYP2E1, GOT1, GOT2, MDH1, MDH2, SLC25A10, SLC25A11, SLC25A12, SLC25A13) were genotyped in 352 young adults who participated in an alcohol challenge study. Traits tested were blood and breath alcohol concentration, peak alcohol concentration and rates of alcohol absorption and elimination. Allelic association was tested using quantitative univariate and multivariate methods. Results A CYP2E1 promoter SNP (rs4838767, minor allele frequency 0.008) exceeded the threshold for study-wide significance (4.01 × 10−5) for two early blood alcohol concentration (BAC), eight breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) measures and the peak BrAC. For each phenotype the minor C-allele was related to a lower alcohol concentration, most strongly for the fourth BrAC (P = 2.07 × 10−7) explaining ~8% of the phenotypic variance. We also observed suggestive patterns of association with variants in ALDH1A1 and on chromosome 17 near SLC25A11 for aspects of blood and breath alcohol metabolism. A SNP upstream of GOT1 (rs2490286) reached study-wide significance for multivariate BAC metabolism (P = 0.000040). Conclusions Overall, we did not find strong evidence that variation in genes coding for proteins that further metabolize the carbon backbone of acetaldehyde, or contribute to mechanisms for regenerating NAD from NADH, affects alcohol metabolism in our European-descent subjects. However, based on the breath alcohol data, variation in the promoter of CYP2E1 may play a role in pre

  17. Seasonal and spatial contrasts of sedimentary organic carbon in floodplain lakes of the central Amazon basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrinho, Rodrigo; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Abril, Gwenaël; Zell, Claudia; Moreira-Turcq, Patricia; Mortillaro, Jean-Michel; Meziane, Tarik; Damsté, Jaap; Bernardes, Marcelo

    2014-05-01

    Three-quarters of the area of flooded land in the world are temporary wetlands (Downing, 2009), which play a significant role in the global carbon cycle(Einsele et al., 2001; Cole et al., 2007; Battin et al., 2009; Abril et al., 2013). Previous studies of the Amazonian floodplain lakes (várzeas), one important compartment of wetlands, showed that the sedimentation of organic carbon (OC) in the floodplain lakes is strongly linked to the periodical floods and to the biogeography from upstream to downstream(Victoria et al., 1992; Martinelli et al., 2003). However, the main sources of sedimentary OC remain uncertain. Hence, the study of the sources of OC buried in floodplain lake sediments can enhance our understanding of the carbon balance of the Amazon ecosystems. In this study, we investigated the seasonal and spatial pattern of sedimentary organic matter in five floodplain lakes of the central Amazon basin (Cabaliana, Janauaca, Canaçari, Miratuba, and Curuai) which have different morphologies, hydrodynamics and vegetation coverage. Surface sediments were collected in four hydrological seasons: low water (LW), rising water (RW), high water (HW) and falling water (FW) in 2009 and 2010. We investigated commonly used bulk geochemical tracers such as C:N ratio and stable isotopic composition of organic carbon (δ13COC). These results were compared with lignin-phenol parameters as an indicator of vascular plant detritus (Hedges and Ertel, 1982) and branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) to trace the soil OC from land to the aquatic settings (Hopmans et al., 2004). Our data showed that during the RW and FW seasons, the concentration of lignin and brGDGTs were higher in comparison to other seasons. Our study also indicated that floodplain lake sediments primarily consisted of a mixture of C3 plant detritus and soil OC. However, a downstream increase in C4 plant-derived OC contribution was observed along the gradient of increasingly open waters, i

  18. Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis of Baseline Carbon Emissions and Removal in Tropical Rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Gonzalez; Benjamin Kroll; Carlos R. Vargas

    2006-01-10

    Conversion of tropical forest to agricultural land and pasture has reduced forest extent and the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation and reforestation can restore those ecosystem services. We have assessed forest species patterns, quantified deforestation and reforestation rates, and projected future baseline carbon emissions and removal in Amazon tropical rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru. The research area is a 4800 km{sup 2} buffer zone around the Parque Nacional Yanachaga-Chemillen, Bosque de Proteccion San Matias-San Carlos, and the Reserva Comunal Yanesha. A planned project for the period 2006-2035 would conserve 4000 ha of forest in a proposed 7000 ha Area de Conservacion Municipale de Chontabamba and establish 5600 ha of natural regeneration and 1400 ha of native species plantations, laid out in fajas de enriquecimiento (contour plantings), to reforest 7000 ha of agricultural land. Forest inventories of seven sites covering 22.6 ha in primary forest and 17 sites covering 16.5 ha in secondary forest measured 17,073 trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm. The 24 sites host trees of 512 species, 267 genera, and 69 families. We could not identify the family of 7% of the trees or the scientific species of 21% of the trees. Species richness is 346 in primary forest and 257 in the secondary forest. In primary forest, 90% of aboveground biomass resides in old-growth species. Conversely, in secondary forest, 66% of aboveground biomass rests in successional species. The density of trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm is 366 trees ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 533 trees ha{sup -1} in secondary forest, although the average diameter is 24 {+-} 15 cm in primary forest and 17 {+-} 8 cm in secondary forest. Using Amazon forest biomass equations and wood densities for 117 species, aboveground biomass is 240 {+-} 30 t ha{sup -1} in the primary sites and 90 {+-} 10 t ha{sup -1} in the

  19. The Role of CYP2E1 in Alcohol Metabolism and Sensitivity in the Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heit, Claire; Dong, Hongbin; Chen, Ying; Thompson, David C.; Deitrich, Richard A.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol consumption has effects on the central nervous system (CNS), manifesting as motor incoordination, sleep induction (hypnosis), anxiety, amnesia, and the reinforcement or aversion of alcohol consumption. Acetaldehyde (the direct metabolite of ethanol oxidation) contributes to many aspects of the behavioral effects of ethanol. Given acetaldehyde cannot pass through the blood brain barrier, its concentration in the CNS is primarily determined by local production from ethanol. Catalase and cytochrome P450 2E1(CYP2E1) represent the major enzymes in the CNS that catalyze ethanol oxidation. CYP2E1 is expressed abundantly within the microsomes of certain brain cells and is localized to particular brain regions. This chapter focuses on the discussion of CYP2E1 in ethanol metabolism in the CNS, covering topics including how it is regulated, where it is expressed and how it influences sensitivity to ethanol in the brain. PMID:23400924

  20. Research Challenges in Central Nervous System Manifestations of Inborn Errors of Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, P.I.; Pariser, A.R.; Groft, S. C.; Ishihara, R.W.; McNeil, D.E.; Tagle, D.; Griebel, D.J.; Kaler, S.G.; Mink, J.W.; Shapiro, E.G.; Bjoraker, K.J.; Krivitzky, L.; Provenzale, J.M.; Gropman, A.; Orchard, P.; Raymond, G.; Cohen, B.H.; Steiner, R.D.; Goldkind, S. F.; Nelson, R. M.; Kakkis, E.; Patterson, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    The Research Challenges in CNS Manifestations of Inborn Errors of Metabolism workshop was designed to address challenges in translating potential therapies for these rare disorders, and to highlight novel therapeutic strategies and innovative approaches to CNS delivery, assessment of effects and directions for the future in the treatment of these diseases. Therapies for the brain in inborn errors represent some of the greatest challenges to translational research due to the special properties of the brain, and of inborn errors themselves. This review covers the proceedings of this workshop as submitted by participants. Scientific, ethical and regulatory issues are discussed, along with ways to measure outcomes and the conduct of clinical trials. Participants included regulatory and funding agencies, clinicians, scientists, industry and advocacy groups. PMID:21176882

  1. The regulatory role of Streptomyces coelicolor TamR in central metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Sivapragasam, Smitha; Grove, Anne

    2015-03-01

    Trans-aconitate methyltransferase regulator (TamR) is a member of the ligand-responsive multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family of transcription factors. In Streptomyces coelicolor, TamR regulates transcription of tamR (encoding TamR), tam (encoding trans-aconitate methyltransferase) and sacA (encoding aconitase); up-regulation of these genes promotes metabolic flux through the citric acid cycle. DNA binding by TamR is attenuated and transcriptional derepression is achieved on binding of ligands such as citrate and trans-aconitate to TamR. In the present study, we show that three additional genes are regulated by S. coelicolor TamR. Genes encoding malate synthase (aceB1; SCO6243), malate dehydrogenase (mdh; SCO4827) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (idh; SCO7000) are up-regulated in vivo when citrate and trans-aconitate accumulate, and TamR binds the corresponding gene promoters in vitro, a DNA binding that is attenuated by cognate ligands. Mutations to the TamR binding site attenuate DNA binding in vitro and result in constitutive promoter activity in vivo. The predicted TamR binding sites are highly conserved in the promoters of these genes in Streptomyces species that encode divergent tam-tamR gene pairs, suggesting evolutionary conservation. Like aconitase and trans-aconitate methyltransferase, malate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and malate synthase are closely related to the citric acid cycle, either catalysing individual reaction steps or, in the case of malate synthase, participating in the glyoxylate cycle to produce malate that enters the citric acid cycle to replenish the intermediate pool. Taken together, our data suggest that TamR plays an important and conserved role in promoting metabolic flux through the citric acid cycle.

  2. Gastrointestinal hormone actions in the central regulation of energy metabolism: potential sensory roles for the circumventricular organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyda, T D; Smith, P M; Ferguson, A V

    2009-04-01

    A variety of circulating signals provide essential information to the central nervous system (CNS) regarding nutritional status. The gastrointestinal system produces many such molecules that are now known to have profound effects on feeding behavior and the control of metabolism as a consequence of their ability to regulate the neural circuitry involved in metabolic homeostasis. Although many of these substances have been suggested to directly access such brain centers, their lipophobic characteristics suggest that alternative mechanisms should be considered. In this paper, we consider one such alternative, namely, that a specialized group of CNS structures collectively known as the sensory circumventricular organs (CVOs), which are not protected by the normal blood-brain barrier, may play important roles in such blood to brain communications. Specifically, we review a developing literature that shows receptors for, and functional actions of, gastrointestinal hormones such as amylin, cholecystokinin, ghrelin and peptide YY in the area postrema and subfornical organ. Collectively, these observations suggest potentially significant roles for the sensory CVOs in the regulation of energy balance.

  3. Betaine supplementation prevents fatty liver induced by a high-fat diet: effects on one-carbon metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deminice, Rafael; da Silva, Robin P; Lamarre, Simon G; Kelly, Karen B; Jacobs, René L; Brosnan, Margaret E; Brosnan, John T

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of betaine supplementation on the regulation of one-carbon metabolism and liver lipid accumulation induced by a high-fat diet in rats. Rats were fed one of three different liquid diets: control diet, high-fat diet and high-fat diet supplemented with betaine. The control and high-fat liquid diets contained, respectively, 35 and 71 % of energy derived from fat. Betaine supplementation involved the addition of 1 % (g/L) to the diet. After three weeks on the high-fat diet the rats had increased total liver fat concentration, liver triglycerides, liver TBARS and plasma TNF-α. The high-fat diet decreased the hepatic S-adenosylmethionine concentration and the S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio compared to the control as well as altering the expression of genes involved in one-carbon metabolism. Betaine supplementation substantially increased the hepatic S-adenosylmethionine concentration (~fourfold) and prevented fatty liver and hepatic injury induced by the high-fat diet. It was accompanied by the normalization of the gene expression of BHMT, GNMT and MGAT, which code for key enzymes of one-carbon metabolism related to liver fat accumulation. In conclusion, the regulation of the expression of MGAT by betaine supplementation provides an additional and novel mechanism by which betaine supplementation regulates lipid metabolism and prevents accumulation of fat in the liver.

  4. Radio-metabolite analysis of carbon-11 biochemical partitioning to non-structural carbohydrates for integrated metabolism and transport studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babst, Benjamin A; Karve, Abhijit A; Judt, Tatjana

    2013-06-01

    Metabolism and phloem transport of carbohydrates are interactive processes, yet each is often studied in isolation from the other. Carbon-11 ((11)C) has been successfully used to study transport and allocation processes dynamically over time. There is a need for techniques to determine metabolic partitioning of newly fixed carbon that are compatible with existing non-invasive (11)C-based methodologies for the study of phloem transport. In this report, we present methods using (11)C-labeled CO2 to trace carbon partitioning to the major non-structural carbohydrates in leaves-sucrose, glucose, fructose and starch. High-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) was adapted to provide multisample throughput, raising the possibility of measuring different tissues of the same individual plant, or for screening multiple plants. An additional advantage of HPTLC was that phosphor plate imaging of radioactivity had a much higher sensitivity and broader range of sensitivity than radio-HPLC detection, allowing measurement of (11)C partitioning to starch, which was previously not possible. Because of the high specific activity of (11)C and high sensitivity of detection, our method may have additional applications in the study of rapid metabolic responses to environmental changes that occur on a time scale of minutes. The use of this method in tandem with other (11)C assays for transport dynamics and whole-plant partitioning makes a powerful combination of tools to study carbohydrate metabolism and whole-plant transport as integrated processes.

  5. A Candidate Gene Study of Folate-Associated One Carbon Metabolism Genes and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, A. Joan; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Lee, Won; Conti, David V.; Kennedy, Kathleen; Duggan, David J; Poynter, Jenny N.; Campbell, Peter T.; Newcomb, Polly; Martinez, Maria Elena; Hopper, John L.; Le Marchand, Loic; Baron, John A.; Limburg, Paul J.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Haile, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Folate-associated one carbon metabolism (FOCM) may play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Variation in FOCM genes may explain some of the underlying risk of colorectal cancer. Methods This study utilized data from 1,805 population-based colorectal cancer cases and 2,878 matched sibling controls from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (C-CFR). We used a comprehensive tagSNP approach to select 395 tagSNPs in 15 genes involved in folate and vitamin B12 metabolism. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina GoldenGate or Sequenom platforms. Risk factor and dietary data were collected using self-completed questionnaires. MSI status was determined using standard techniques and tumor subsite was obtained from pathology reports. The association between SNPs and colorectal cancer was assessed using conditional logistic regression with sibships as the matching factor and assuming a log additive or co-dominant model. Results In the log additive model, two linked (r2=0.99) tagSNPs in the DHFR gene (rs1677693 and rs1643659) were associated with a significant decrease in CRC risk after correction for multiple testing (OR=0.87; 95% CI=0.71 – 0.94; P=0.029 and OR=0.87 95% CI=0.71 – 0.95, P=0.034 for rs1677693 and rs1643659 respectively. These two linked (r2=0.99) tagSNPs and one tagSNP in the MTR gene (rs4659744) were significantly associated with reduced CRC risk only among individuals not using multivitamin supplements. Conclusions Overall, we found only moderate evidence that genetic variation in 15 folate pathway genes may affect CRC risk except in non multivitamin users. Impact This study suggests that multivitamin supplement use may modify the association between folate pathway genes and CRC risk in a post folic acid supplemented population. PMID:20615890

  6. Long-term monitoring reveals carbon-nitrogen metabolism key to microcystin production in eutrophic lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas J Beversdorf

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The environmental drivers contributing to cyanobacterial dominance in aquatic systems have been extensively studied. However, understanding of toxic versus non-toxic cyanobacterial population dynamics and the mechanisms regulating cyanotoxin production remain elusive, both physiologically and ecologically. One reason is the disconnect between laboratory and field-based studies. Here, we combined three years of temporal data, including microcystin (MC concentrations, 16 years of long-term ecological research, and 10 years of molecular data to investigate the potential factors leading to the selection of toxic Microcystis and MC production. Our analysis revealed that nitrogen (N speciation and inorganic carbon (C availability might be important drivers of Microcystis population dynamics and that an imbalance in cellular C: N ratios may trigger MC production. More specifically, precipitous declines in ammonium concentrations lead to a transitional period of N stress, even in the presence of high nitrate concentrations, that we call the toxic phase. Following the toxic phase, temperature and cyanobacterial abundance remained elevated but MC concentrations drastically declined. Increases in ammonium due to lake turnover may have led to down regulation of MC synthesis or a shift in the community from toxic to non-toxic species. While total phosphorus (P to total N ratios were relatively low over the time-series, MC concentrations were highest when total N to total P ratios were also highest. Similarly, high C: N ratios were also strongly correlated to the toxic phase. We propose a metabolic model that corroborates molecular studies and reflects our ecological observations that C and N metabolism may regulate MC production physiologically and ecologically. In particular, we hypothesize that an imbalance between 2-oxoglutarate and ammonium in the cell regulates MC synthesis in the environment.

  7. Effect of Mitochondrial Dysfunction on Carbon Metabolism and Gene Expression in Flower Tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria V.Busi; Maria E.Gomez-Lobato; Sebastian P.Rius; Valeria R.Turowski; Paula Casati; Eduardo J.Zabaleta; Diego F.Gomez-Casati; Alejandro Araya

    2011-01-01

    We characterized the transcriptomic response of transgenic plants carrying a mitochondrial dysfunction induced by the expression of the unedited form of the ATP synthase subunit 9.The u-ATP9 transgene driven by A9 and APETALA3 promoters induce mitochondrial dysfunction revealed by a decrease jn both oxygen uptake and adenine nucleotides(ATP,ADP)levels without changes in the ATP/ADP ratio.Furthermore,we measured an increase in ROS accumulation and a decrease in glutathione and ascorbate levels with a concomitant oxidative stress response.The transcriptome analysis of young Arabidopsis flowers,validated by Qrt-PCR and enzymatic or functional tests,showed dramatic changes in u-ATP9 plants.Both lines display a modification in the expression of various genes involved in carbon,lipid,and cell wall metabolism,suggesting that an important metabolic readjustment occurs in plants with a mitochondrial dysfunction.Interestingly,transcript levels involved in mitochondrial respiration,protein synthesis,and degradation are affected.Moreover,the Ievels of several mRNAs encoding for transcription factors and DNA binding proteins were also changed.Some of them are involved in stress and hormone responses,suggesting that several signaling pathways overlap.Indeed,the transcriptome data revealed that the mitochondrial dysfunction dramatically alters the expression of genes involved in signaling pathways,including those related to ethylene,absicic acid,and auxin signal transduction.Our data suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction model used in this report may be usefuI to uncover the retrograde signaling mechanism between the nucleus and mitochondria in plant cells.

  8. Vision changes after spaceflight are related to alterations in folate- and vitamin B-12-dependent one-carbon metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Sara R; Gibson, C Robert; Mader, Thomas H; Ericson, Karen; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Heer, Martina; Smith, Scott M

    2012-03-01

    Approximately 20% (7 of 38) of astronauts on International Space Station (ISS) missions have developed measurable ophthalmic changes after flight. This study was conducted to determine if the folate- and vitamin B-12-dependent 1-carbon metabolic pathway is altered in these individuals. Since 2006, we have conducted experiments on the ISS to evaluate nutritional status and related biochemical indices of astronauts before, during, and after flight. Data were modeled to evaluate differences between individuals with ophthalmic changes (n = 5) and those without them (n = 15), all of whom were on ISS missions of 48-215 d. We also determined whether mean preflight serum concentrations of the 1-carbon metabolites and changes in measured cycloplegic refraction after flight were associated. Serum homocysteine (Hcy), cystathionine, 2-methylcitric acid (2MCA), and methylmalonic acid concentrations were 25-45% higher (P refraction (P < 0.05), and preflight serum concentrations of 2MCA tended to be associated (P = 0.06) with ophthalmic changes. The biochemical differences observed in crewmembers with vision issues strongly suggest that their folate- and vitamin B-12-dependent 1-carbon transfer metabolism was affected before and during flight. The consistent differences in markers of 1-carbon metabolism between those who did and those who did not develop changes in vision suggest that polymorphisms in enzymes of this pathway may interact with microgravity to cause these pathophysiologic changes.

  9. Anaerobic hydrocarbon and fatty acid metabolism by syntrophic bacteria and their impact on carbon steel corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Neil Lyles

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The microbial metabolism of hydrocarbons is increasingly associated with the corrosion of carbon steel in sulfate-rich marine waters. However, how such transformations influence metal biocorrosion in the absence of an electron acceptor is not fully recognized. We grew a marine alkane-utilizing, sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfoglaeba alkanexedens, with either sulfate or Methanospirillum hungatei as electron acceptors, and tested the ability of the cultures to catalyze metal corrosion. Axenically, D. alkanexedens had a higher instantaneous corrosion rate and produced more pits in carbon steel coupons than when the same organism was grown in syntrophic co-culture with the methanogen. Since anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation pathways converge on fatty acid intermediates, the corrosive ability of a known fatty acid-oxidizing syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus aciditrophicus was compared when grown in pure culture or in co-culture with a H2-utilizing sulfate-reducing bacterium (Desulfovibrio sp., strain G11 or a methanogen (M. hungatei. The instantaneous corrosion rates in the cultures were not substantially different, but the syntrophic, sulfate-reducing co-culture produced more pits in coupons than other combinations of microorganisms. Lactate-grown cultures of strain G11 had higher instantaneous corrosion rates and coupon pitting compared to the same organism cultured with hydrogen as an electron donor. Thus, if sulfate is available as an electron acceptor, the same microbial assemblages produce sulfide and low molecular weight organic acids that exacerbated biocorrosion. Despite these trends, a surprisingly high degree of variation was encountered with the corrosion assessments. Differences in biomass, initial substrate concentration, rates of microbial activity or the degree of end product formation did not account for the variations. We are forced to ascribe such differences to the metallurgical properties of the coupons.

  10. Anaerobic hydrocarbon and fatty acid metabolism by syntrophic bacteria and their impact on carbon steel corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Christopher N; Le, Huynh M; Beasley, William Howard; McInerney, Michael J; Suflita, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    The microbial metabolism of hydrocarbons is increasingly associated with the corrosion of carbon steel in sulfate-rich marine waters. However, how such transformations influence metal biocorrosion in the absence of an electron acceptor is not fully recognized. We grew a marine alkane-utilizing, sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfoglaeba alkanexedens, with either sulfate or Methanospirillum hungatei as electron acceptors, and tested the ability of the cultures to catalyze metal corrosion. Axenically, D. alkanexedens had a higher instantaneous corrosion rate and produced more pits in carbon steel coupons than when the same organism was grown in syntrophic co-culture with the methanogen. Since anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation pathways converge on fatty acid intermediates, the corrosive ability of a known fatty acid-oxidizing syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus aciditrophicus was compared when grown in pure culture or in co-culture with a H2-utilizing sulfate-reducing bacterium (Desulfovibrio sp., strain G11) or a methanogen (M. hungatei). The instantaneous corrosion rates in the cultures were not substantially different, but the syntrophic, sulfate-reducing co-culture produced more pits in coupons than other combinations of microorganisms. Lactate-grown cultures of strain G11 had higher instantaneous corrosion rates and coupon pitting compared to the same organism cultured with hydrogen as an electron donor. Thus, if sulfate is available as an electron acceptor, the same microbial assemblages produce sulfide and low molecular weight organic acids that exacerbated biocorrosion. Despite these trends, a surprisingly high degree of variation was encountered with the corrosion assessments. Differences in biomass, initial substrate concentration, rates of microbial activity or the degree of end product formation did not account for the variations. We are forced to ascribe such differences to the metallurgical properties of the coupons.

  11. Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Cerebral Metabolism: Potential Applications in Stroke and Disorders of the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Julius Gene S; Schmidt, Elena B

    2015-09-01

    No compound has generated more attention in both the scientific and recently in the political arena as much as cannabinoids. These diverse groups of compounds referred collectively as cannabinoids have both been vilified due to its dramatic and potentially harmful psychotropic effects and glorified due to its equally dramatic and potential application in a number of acute and chronic neurological conditions. Previously illegal to possess, cannabis, the plant where natural form of cannabinoids are derived, is now accepted in a growing number of states for medicinal purpose, and some even for recreational use, increasing opportunities for more scientific experimentation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the growing body of literature on cannabinoids and to present an overview of our current state of knowledge of the human endocannabinoid system in the hope of defining the future of cannabinoids and its potential applications in disorders of the central nervous system, focusing on stroke.

  12. The central role of chloride in the metabolic acid-base changes in canine parvoviral enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, Richard K; Schoeman, Johan P; Leisewitz, Andrew L

    2014-04-01

    The acid-base disturbances in canine parvoviral (CPV) enteritis are not well described. In addition, the mechanisms causing these perturbations have not been fully elucidated. The purpose of the present study was to assess acid-base changes in puppies suffering from CPV enteritis, using a modified strong ion model (SIM). The hypothesis of the study was that severe acid-base disturbances would be present and that the SIM would provide insights into pathological mechanisms, which have not been fully appreciated by the Henderson-Hasselbalch model. The study analysed retrospective data, obtained from 42 puppies with confirmed CPV enteritis and 10 healthy control dogs. The CPV-enteritis group had been allocated a clinical score, to allow classification of the data according to clinical severity. The effects of changes in free water, chloride, l-lactate, albumin and phosphate were calculated, using a modification of the base excess algorithm. When the data were summated for each patient, and correlated to each individual component, the most important contributor to the metabolic acid-base changes, according to the SIM, was chloride (Penteritis are multifactorial and complex, with the SIM providing information in terms of the origin of these changes.

  13. Isotopic characterization of the Precambrian carbonate aquifers under the city of Bangui (Central African Republic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huneau, Frederic; Djebebe-Ndjiguim, Chantal-Laure; Foto, Eric; Ito, Mari; Celle-Jeanton, Helene; Garel, Emilie; Mabingui, Joseph

    2013-04-01

    The city of Bangui, the capital of the Central African Republic, is located on the right bank of the Ubangi River which is the northernmost tributary of the Congo River. From its foundation in 1889 this city has always suffered from serious problems of water management. This is related to the specificity of the site configuration (steep hills surrounding a large swampy flat valley poorly drained) and to the urbanisation process responsible for the waterproofing of soils and the associated increased runoff processes under tropical humid condition.This paper presents the results of a geochemical and isotopic survey carried out in 2011 aiming at evaluating the type and chemical quality of the groundwater resources of the Bangui region. By combining geological, hydrogeochemical and isotopic data it appears that the underground of Bangui seems favourable to the development of a secured and sustainable water supply from groundwater provided that the conditions of exploitation would be constrained by the local authorities. The deep fractured (and locally kastified) Precambrian carbonate aquifers known as Bimbo and Fatima formations are identified as target resources considering the relatively good quality of the resource from the chemical point of view, and the semi-confined structure of the aquifer preventing the mixing with shallow aquifers already strongly impacted by domestic and industrial pollutions.

  14. Architecture and evolution of an Early Permian carbonate complex on a tectonically active island in east-central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Calvin H.; Magginetti, Robert T.; Stone, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The newly named Upland Valley Limestone represents a carbonate complex that developed on and adjacent to a tectonically active island in east-central California during a brief interval of Early Permian (late Artinskian) time. This lithologically unique, relatively thin limestone unit lies within a thick sequence of predominantly siliciclastic rocks and is characterized by its high concentration of crinoidal debris, pronounced lateral changes in thickness and lithofacies, and a largely endemic fusulinid fauna. Most outcrops represent a carbonate platform and debris derived from it and shed downslope, but another group of outcrops represents one or possibly more isolated carbonate buildups that developed offshore from the platform. Tectonic activity in the area occurred before, probably during, and after deposition of this short-lived carbonate complex.

  15. The effects of lead on the gaseous exchange and photosynthetic carbon metabolism of pea seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy W. Poskuta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Roots of whole 3 week-old pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L. var. "Bordi" were immersed for 24 h in solutions of lead chloride at Pb copcentrations of 200, 400, 800,12000 mg dm3. Accumulation of lead in roots was independent of the Pb concentration, whereas the accumulation of Pb in shoots was an almost linear function of the concentration of this element in the root medium. This treatment caused Pb concentration-dependent inhibition of apparent photosynthesis (APS, photorespiration (PR, 14CO2 uptake, stomatal opening and transpiration of shoots and also germination of seeds. The most sensitive to Pb contamination was CO2 exchange, then transpiration and to a lesser degree germination of seeds. Lead caused a considerable alteration of photosynthetic and photorespiratory carbon metabolism, restricted the 14C-labeling of: phosphoglycerate, ribose+ribulose, sucrose, glycolate and glycine+serine. Under conditions of C02 uptake limited by lead, an enhancement of the 14C-labeling of malate+citrate, alanine and glucose was observed.

  16. 2004 Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism Gordon Conference - August 1-6, 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph A. Krzycki

    2005-09-15

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2004 Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism Gordon Conference - August 1-6, 2004 was held at Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA from August 1-6, 2004. The Conference was well-attended with 117 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, 'free time' was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field.

  17. [Use of genes of carbon metabolism enzymes as molecular markers of Chlorobi Phylum representatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turova, T P; Kovaleva, O L; Gorlenko, V M; Ivanovskiĭ, R N

    2014-01-01

    This work examined the feasibility of using certain genes of carbon metabolism enzymes as molecular markers adequate for studying phylogeny and ecology of green sulfur bacteria (GSB) of the Chlorobi phylum. Primers designed to amplify the genes of ATP citrate lyase (aclB) and citrate synthase (gltA) revealed the respective genes in the genomes of all of the newly studied GSB strains. The phylogenetic trees constructed based on nucleotide sequences of these genes and amino acid sequences of the conceptually translated proteins were on the whole congruent with the 16S rRNA gene tree, with the single exception of GltA of Chloroherpeton thalassium, which formed a separate branch beyond the cluster comprised by other representatives of the Chlorobi phylum. Thus, the aclB genes but not gltA genes proved to be suitable for the design of primers specific to all Chlorobi representatives. Therefore, it was the aclB gene that was further used asa molecular marker to detect GSB in enrichment cultures and environmental samples. AclB phylotypes of GSB were revealed in all of the samples studied, with the exception of environmental samples from soda lakes. The identification of the revealed phylotypes was in agreement with the identification based on the FMO protein gene (fmo), is a well-known Chlorobi-specific molecular marker.

  18. Mapping genetic variants underlying differences in the central nitrogen metabolism in fermenter yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Matías; Cubillos, Francisco A; García, Verónica; Salinas, Francisco; Aguilera, Omayra; Liti, Gianni; Martínez, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Different populations within a species represent a rich reservoir of allelic variants, corresponding to an evolutionary signature of withstood environmental constraints. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are widely utilised in the fermentation of different kinds of alcoholic beverages, such as, wine and sake, each of them derived from must with distinct nutrient composition. Importantly, adequate nitrogen levels in the medium are essential for the fermentation process, however, a comprehensive understanding of the genetic variants determining variation in nitrogen consumption is lacking. Here, we assessed the genetic factors underlying variation in nitrogen consumption in a segregating population derived from a cross between two main fermenter yeasts, a Wine/European and a Sake isolate. By linkage analysis we identified 18 main effect QTLs for ammonium and amino acids sources. Interestingly, majority of QTLs were involved in more than a single trait, grouped based on amino acid structure and indicating high levels of pleiotropy across nitrogen sources, in agreement with the observed patterns of phenotypic co-variation. Accordingly, we performed reciprocal hemizygosity analysis validating an effect for three genes, GLT1, ASI1 and AGP1. Furthermore, we detected a widespread pleiotropic effect on these genes, with AGP1 affecting seven amino acids and nine in the case of GLT1 and ASI1. Based on sequence and comparative analysis, candidate causative mutations within these genes were also predicted. Altogether, the identification of these variants demonstrate how Sake and Wine/European genetic backgrounds differentially consume nitrogen sources, in part explaining independently evolved preferences for nitrogen assimilation and representing a niche of genetic diversity for the implementation of practical approaches towards more efficient strains for nitrogen metabolism.

  19. Mapping genetic variants underlying differences in the central nitrogen metabolism in fermenter yeasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías Jara

    Full Text Available Different populations within a species represent a rich reservoir of allelic variants, corresponding to an evolutionary signature of withstood environmental constraints. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are widely utilised in the fermentation of different kinds of alcoholic beverages, such as, wine and sake, each of them derived from must with distinct nutrient composition. Importantly, adequate nitrogen levels in the medium are essential for the fermentation process, however, a comprehensive understanding of the genetic variants determining variation in nitrogen consumption is lacking. Here, we assessed the genetic factors underlying variation in nitrogen consumption in a segregating population derived from a cross between two main fermenter yeasts, a Wine/European and a Sake isolate. By linkage analysis we identified 18 main effect QTLs for ammonium and amino acids sources. Interestingly, majority of QTLs were involved in more than a single trait, grouped based on amino acid structure and indicating high levels of pleiotropy across nitrogen sources, in agreement with the observed patterns of phenotypic co-variation. Accordingly, we performed reciprocal hemizygosity analysis validating an effect for three genes, GLT1, ASI1 and AGP1. Furthermore, we detected a widespread pleiotropic effect on these genes, with AGP1 affecting seven amino acids and nine in the case of GLT1 and ASI1. Based on sequence and comparative analysis, candidate causative mutations within these genes were also predicted. Altogether, the identification of these variants demonstrate how Sake and Wine/European genetic backgrounds differentially consume nitrogen sources, in part explaining independently evolved preferences for nitrogen assimilation and representing a niche of genetic diversity for the implementation of practical approaches towards more efficient strains for nitrogen metabolism.

  20. Comparative genomic reconstruction of transcriptional networks controlling central metabolism in the Shewanella genus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Novichkov, Pavel; Stavrovskaya, Elena D.; Rodionova, Irina A.; Li, Xiaoqing; Kazanov, Marat D.; Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Kazakov, Alexey E.; Kovaleva, Galina Y.; Permina, Elizabeth A.; Laikova, Olga N.; Overbeek, Ross; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Arkin, Adam P.; Dubchak, Inna; Osterman, Andrei L.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2011-06-15

    Genome-scale prediction of gene regulation and reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria is one of the critical tasks of modern genomics. Despite the growing number of genome-scale gene expression studies, our abilities to convert the results of these studies into accurate regulatory annotations and to project them from model to other organisms are extremely limited. The comparative genomics approaches and computational identification of regulatory sites are useful for the in silico reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria. The Shewanella genus is comprised of metabolically versatile gamma-proteobacteria, whose lifestyles and natural environments are substantially different from Escherichia coli and other model bacterial species. To explore conservation and variations in the Shewanella transcriptional networks we analyzed the repertoire of transcription factors and performed genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors and their DNA binding sites, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Forty five regulons were newly inferred from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in the Enterobacteria and Pseudomonas spp.. However, even orthologous regulators with conserved DNA-binding motifs may control substantially different gene sets, revealing striking differences in regulatory strategies between the Shewanella spp. and E. coli. Multiple examples of regulatory network rewiring include regulon contraction and expansion (as in the case of PdhR, HexR, FadR), and numerous cases of recruiting non-orthologous regulators to control equivalent pathways (e.g. NagR for N-acetylglucosamine catabolism and PsrA for fatty acid degradation) and, conversely, orthologous regulators to control distinct pathways (e.g. TyrR, ArgR, Crp).

  1. Neurochemistry of Pressure-Induced Nitrogen and Metabolically Inert Gas Narcosis in the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostain, Jean-Claude; Lavoute, Cécile

    2016-06-13

    Gases that are not metabolized by the organism are thus chemically inactive under normal conditions. Such gases include the "noble gases" of the Periodic Table as well as hydrogen and nitrogen. At increasing pressure, nitrogen induces narcosis at 4 absolute atmospheres (ATAs) and more in humans and at 11 ATA and more in rats. Electrophysiological and neuropharmacological studies suggest that the striatum is a target of nitrogen narcosis. Glutamate and dopamine release from the striatum in rats are decreased by exposure to nitrogen at a pressure of 31 ATA (75% of the anesthetic threshold). Striatal dopamine levels decrease during exposure to compressed argon, an inert gas more narcotic than nitrogen, or to nitrous oxide, an anesthetic gas. Inversely, striatal dopamine levels increase during exposure to compressed helium, an inert gas with a very low narcotic potency. Exposure to nitrogen at high pressure does not change N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor activities in Substantia Nigra compacta and striatum but enhances gama amino butyric acidA (GABAA) receptor activities in Substantia Nigra compacta. The decrease in striatal dopamine levels in response to hyperbaric nitrogen exposure is suppressed by recurrent exposure to nitrogen narcosis, and dopamine levels increase after four or five exposures. This change, the lack of improvement of motor disturbances, the desensitization of GABAA receptors on dopamine cells during recurrent exposures and the long-lasting decrease of glutamate coupled with the higher sensitivity of NMDA receptors, suggest a nitrogen toxicity induced by repetitive exposures to narcosis. These differential changes in different neurotransmitter receptors would support the binding protein theory. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1579-1590, 2016.

  2. Metabolic peculiarity of 134Cs and its radioimmunotoxicological effect on central and peripheral immune cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱寿彭; 夏芬

    1996-01-01

    A fitted equation with least square method to describe the retention of 134Cs in whole body is obtained by a whole body counter.That is R(t)=18.04exp(-9.3175t)+ 45.13exp(-0.0423t),where R(t) is in %,and t in d.The equationn consists of two half-life components,the fast component is T1/2=0.07d,and the slow is T1/2=16.14d,Study on the localization of 134Cs at cellular level was carried out by freezing microautoradiography.The results indicate of 134Cs at cellular level was carried out by freezing microautoradiography.The results indicate that 134Cs was chiefly in ionizing form accumulated in red as well as white blood cells.In bone marrow cells 134Cs predominantly deposited in young cells and less in mature cells.Distribution of 134Cs penetrated quickly into the tissue cells.The observation of investigating radioimmunotoxicological effect induced by 134Cs shows that the inhibition of thymocytes is higher than bone marrow cells,the spleen T lynmphocytes are more sensitive to 134Cs than B lymphocytes and lymphocytes of peripheral immune cells are more sensitive to radiation than central immune cells.

  3. Environmental regulation of carbon isotope composition and crassulacean acid metabolism in three plant communities along a water availability gradient

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Expression of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is characterized by extreme variability within and between taxa and its sensitivity to environmental variation. In this study, we determined seasonal fluctuations in CAM photosynthesis with measurements of nocturnal tissue acidification and carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of bulk tissue and extracted sugars in three plant communities along a precipitation gradient (500, 700, and 1,000 mm year−1) on the Yucatan Peninsula. We also related the ...

  4. Carbon 13-Metabolic Flux Analysis derived constraint-based metabolic modelling of Clostridium acetobutylicum in stressed chemostat conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallenius, Janne; Maaheimo, Hannu; Eerikäinen, Tero

    2016-11-01

    The metabolism of butanol producing bacteria Clostridium acetobutylicum was studied in chemostat with glucose limited conditions, butanol stimulus, and as a reference cultivation. COnstraint-Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA) was applied using additional constraints from (13)C Metabolic Flux Analysis ((13)C-MFA) and experimental measurement results. A model consisting of 451 metabolites and 604 reactions was utilized in flux balance analysis (FBA). The stringency of the flux spaces considering different optimization objectives, i.e. growth rate maximization, ATP maintenance, and NADH/NADPH formation, for flux variance analysis (FVA) was studied in the different modelled conditions. Also a previously uncharacterized exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by C. acetobutylicum was characterized on monosaccharide level. The major monosaccharide components of the EPS were 40n-% rhamnose, 34n-% glucose, 13n-% mannose, 10n-% galactose, and 2n-% arabinose. The EPS was studied to have butanol adsorbing property, 70(butanol)mg(EPS)g(-1) at 37°C.

  5. Carbon Disulfide (CS2) Interference in Glucose Metabolism from Unconventional Oil and Gas Extraction and Processing Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Alisa L; Patel, Jay T; Al-Angari, Samiah S

    2016-01-01

    Carbon disulfide (CS2) has been historically associated with the manufacturing of rayon, cellophane, and carbon tetrachloride production. This study is one of the first to identify elevated atmospheric levels of CS2 above national background levels and its mechanisms to dysregulate normal glucose metabolism. Interference in glucose metabolism can indirectly cause other complications (diabetes, neurodegenerative disease, and retinopathy), which may be preventable if proper precautions are taken. Rich et al found CS2 and 12 associated sulfide compounds present in the atmosphere in residential areas where unconventional shale oil and gas extraction and processing operations were occurring. Ambient atmospheric concentrations of CS2 ranged from 0.7 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to 103 ppbv over a continuous 24-hour monitoring period. One-hour ambient atmospheric concentrations ranged from 3.4 ppbv to 504.6 ppbv. Using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Urban Air Toxic Monitoring Program study as a baseline comparison for atmospheric CS2 concentrations found in this study, it was determined that CS2 atmospheric levels were consistently elevated in areas where unconventional oil and gas extraction and processing occurred. The mechanisms by which CS2 interferes in normal glucose metabolism by dysregulation of the tryptophan metabolism pathway are presented in this study. The literature review found an increased potential for alteration of normal glucose metabolism in viscose rayon occupational workers exposed to CS2. Occupational workers in the energy extraction industry exposed to CS2 and other sulfide compounds may have an increased potential for glucose metabolism interference, which has been an indicator for diabetogenic effect and other related health impacts. The recommendation of this study is for implementation of regular monitoring of blood glucose levels in CS2-exposed populations as a preventative health measure.

  6. Carbonate cementation-dissolution in deep-seated sandstones near the overpressure top in central Junggar Basin, Xinjiang, NW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhi; HE Sheng; WANG Furong; HE Zhiliang; WU Hengzhi; MENG Xianlong

    2009-01-01

    Fluid/rock interaction occurs frequently in the sandstones near the overpressure top in central Junggar Basin, and carbonate cementation-dissolution is related closely to the formation of secondary pores in the reservoir sandstones. From petrological, hydrochemical and fluid-inclusion studies of the deep-seated sandstones near the overpressure top in central Junggar Basin and the carbon and oxygen isotopic characteristics of carbonate cements in those sandstones, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) Carbonates are the major cements. Two-stage cemen-tation was commonly developed, with late-stage ferroan carbonate cementation being dominant; several secondary porosity zones were developed vertically in the sandstones near the overpressure top, and there is a mutually com-pensatory relationship between the carbonate contents and the mean porosity; (2) the alkalescent formation-water chemical environments are in favor of carbonate precipitation; (3) there were two phases of thermal fluid activity which are related to the late-stage carbonate cementation-dissolution; (4) with the overpressure top as the boundary, carbonate cements in the sandstones have slightly negative δ13C and δ180 values, showing such a variation trend that the δ13C and δ18O values near the coal-bearing Jurassic strata are lighter, those in the overpressure top are heavier, and those at the upper part of the overpressure top are lighter, which is considered to be the result of kinetic isotope fractionation driven by episodically overpressured fluid flow; (5) carbonate cementation is closely associated with the decarboxylation of organic acids, and secondary porosity zones resultant from dissolution by organic acids and CO2 derived from Jurassic coal-beating strata, are the most important reservoir space of hydrocarbon, Studies of the mechanisms of carbonate cementation-dissolution and formation of secondary pores in the deep-seated sandstones near the overpressure top are of great

  7. Assessment of changes in energy metabolism parameters provoked by carbon tetrachloride in Wistar rats and the protective effect of white grape juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Gabardo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of organic and conventional grape juices consumption on the behavior of rats and their neuroprotective effect on the activity of brain energy metabolism enzymes in different brain areas of adult rats on the experimental model of hepatic encephalopathy. Male Wistar rats (90-days-old were treated once a day with conventional or organic white grape juice by gavage for 14 days (7 μL/g. On the 15th day the rats received carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 in a single dose of 3.0 mL/kg. Cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were dissected to measure the activity of creatine kinase (CK and pyruvate kinase (PK. No changes in feeding behavior were observed after the treatment with the grapes juices. However, there was an increase in grooming behavior in the open field test provoked by both juices. CCl4 inhibited CK activity in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of the rats and CCl4 also reduced PK activity in all brain structures studied. Furthermore, both white grape juices prevented the decrease in the activity of CK and PK. Therefore, we can suggest that organic and conventional white grape juices could restore the activity of enzymes with a central role in brain energy metabolism.

  8. Choline and methionine differentially alter methyl carbon metabolism in bovine neonatal hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Tawny L.

    2017-01-01

    Intersections in hepatic methyl group metabolism pathways highlights potential competition or compensation of methyl donors. The objective of this experiment was to examine the expression of genes related to methyl group transfer and lipid metabolism in response to increasing concentrations of choline chloride (CC) and DL-methionine (DLM) in primary neonatal hepatocytes that were or were not exposed to fatty acids (FA). Primary hepatocytes isolated from 4 neonatal Holstein calves were maintained as monolayer cultures for 24 h before treatment with CC (61, 128, 2028, and 4528 μmol/L) and DLM (16, 30, 100, 300 μmol/L), with or without a 1 mmol/L FA cocktail in a factorial arrangement. After 24 h of treatment, media was collected for quantification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and cell lysates were collected for quantification of gene expression. No interactions were detected between CC, DLM, or FA. Both CC and DLM decreased the expression of methionine adenosyltransferase 1A (MAT1A). Increasing CC did not alter betaine-homocysteine S-methyltranferase (BHMT) but did increase 5-methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase (MTR) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) expression. Increasing DLM decreased expression of BHMT and MTR, but did not affect MTHFR. Expression of both phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) were decreased by increasing CC and DLM, while carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A) was unaffected by either. Treatment with FA decreased the expression of MAT1A, MTR, MTHFR and tended to decrease PEMT but did not affect BHMT and MTTP. Treatment with FA increased CPT1A expression. Increasing CC increased secretion of VLDL and decreased the accumulation of ROS in media. Within neonatal bovine hepatocytes, choline and methionine differentially regulate methyl carbon pathways and suggest that choline may play a critical role in

  9. 13C-metabolic flux ratio and novel carbon path analyses confirmed that Trichoderma reesei uses primarily the respirative pathway also on the preferred carbon source glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saloheimo Markku

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei is an important host organism for industrial enzyme production. It is adapted to nutrient poor environments where it is capable of producing large amounts of hydrolytic enzymes. In its natural environment T. reesei is expected to benefit from high energy yield from utilization of respirative metabolic pathway. However, T. reesei lacks metabolic pathway reconstructions and the utilization of the respirative pathway has not been investigated on the level of in vivo fluxes. Results The biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in T. reesei supported by genome-level evidence were reconstructed with computational carbon path analysis. The pathway reconstructions were a prerequisite for analysis of in vivo fluxes. The distribution of in vivo fluxes in both wild type strain and cre1, a key regulator of carbon catabolite repression, deletion strain were quantitatively studied by performing 13C-labeling on both repressive carbon source glucose and non-repressive carbon source sorbitol. In addition, the 13C-labeling on sorbitol was performed both in the presence and absence of sophorose that induces the expression of cellulase genes. Carbon path analyses and the 13C-labeling patterns of proteinogenic amino acids indicated high similarity between biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in T. reesei and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, however, mitochondrial rather than cytosolic biosynthesis of Asp was observed under all studied conditions. The relative anaplerotic flux to the TCA cycle was low and thus characteristic to respiratory metabolism in both strains and independent of the carbon source. Only minor differences were observed in the flux distributions of the wild type and cre1 deletion strain. Furthermore, the induction of the hydrolytic gene expression did not show altered flux distributions and did not affect the relative amino acid requirements or relative anabolic

  10. Spatial variability of soil carbon stock in the Urucu river basin, Central Amazon-Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceddia, Marcos Bacis; Villela, André Luis Oliveira; Pinheiro, Érika Flávia Machado; Wendroth, Ole

    2015-09-01

    The Amazon Forest plays a major role in C sequestration and release. However, few regional estimates of soil organic carbon (SOC) stock in this ecoregion exist. One of the barriers to improve SOC estimates is the lack of recent soil data at high spatial resolution, which hampers the application of new methods for mapping SOC stock. The aims of this work were: (i) to quantify SOC stock under undisturbed vegetation for the 0-30 and the 0-100 cm under Amazon Forest; (ii) to correlate the SOC stock with soil mapping units and relief attributes and (iii) to evaluate three geostatistical techniques to generate maps of SOC stock (ordinary, isotopic and heterotopic cokriging). The study site is located in the Central region of Amazon State, Brazil. The soil survey covered the study site that has an area of 80 km(2) and resulted in a 1:10,000 soil map. It consisted of 315 field observations (96 complete soil profiles and 219 boreholes). SOC stock was calculated by summing C stocks by horizon, determined as a product of BD, SOC and the horizon thickness. For each one of the 315 soil observations, relief attributes were derived from a topographic map to understand SOC dynamics. The SOC stocks across 30 and 100 cm soil depth were 3.28 and 7.32 kg C m(-2), respectively, which is, 34 and 16%, lower than other studies. The SOC stock is higher in soils developed in relief forms exhibiting well-drained soils, which are covered by Upland Dense Tropical Rainforest. Only SOC stock in the upper 100 cm exhibited spatial dependence allowing the generation of spatial variability maps based on spatial (co)-regionalization. The CTI was inversely correlated with SOC stock and was the only auxiliary variable feasible to be used in cokriging interpolation. The heterotopic cokriging presented the best performance for mapping SOC stock.

  11. Variation of Soil Organic Carbon and Its Major Constraints in East Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Xinqing; Huang, Yimin; Huang, Daikuan; Hu, Lu; Feng, Zhaodong; Cheng, Jianzhong; Wang, Bing; Ni, Jian; Shurkhuu, Tserenpil

    2016-01-01

    Variation of soil organic carbon (SOC) and its major constraints in large spatial scale are critical for estimating global SOC inventory and projecting its future at environmental changes. By analyzing SOC and its environment at 210 sites in uncultivated land along a 3020km latitudinal transect in East Central Asia, we examined the effect of environmental factors on the dynamics of SOC. We found that SOC changes dramatically with the difference as high as 5 times in north China and 17 times in Mongolia. Regardless, C:N remains consistent about 12. Path analysis indicated that temperature is the dominant factor in the variation of SOC with a direct effect much higher than the indirect one, the former breaks SOC down the year round while the latter results in its growth mainly via precipitation in the winter half year. Precipitation helps accumulate SOC, a large part of the effect, however, is taken via temperature. NH4+-N and topography also affect SOC, their roles are played primarily via climatic factors. pH correlates significantly with SOC, the effect, however, is taken only in the winter months, contributing to the decay of SOC primarily via temperature. These factors explained as much as 79% of SOC variations, especially in the summer months, representing the major constraints on the SOC stock. Soil texture gets increasingly fine southward, it does not, however, constitute an apparent factor. Our results suggested that recent global warming should have been adversely affecting SOC stock in the mid-latitude as temperature dominates other factors as the constraint.

  12. Modeling the diversion of primary carbon flux into secondary metabolism under variable nitrate and light/dark conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbat, Romain; Robin, Christophe; Lillo, Cathrine; Drengstig, Tormod; Ruoff, Peter

    2016-08-01

    In plants, the partitioning of carbon resources between growth and defense is detrimental for their development. From a metabolic viewpoint, growth is mainly related to primary metabolism including protein, amino acid and lipid synthesis, whereas defense is based notably on the biosynthesis of a myriad of secondary metabolites. Environmental factors, such as nitrate fertilization, impact the partitioning of carbon resources between growth and defense. Indeed, experimental data showed that a shortage in the nitrate fertilization resulted in a reduction of the plant growth, whereas some secondary metabolites involved in plant defense, such as phenolic compounds, accumulated. Interestingly, sucrose, a key molecule involved in the transport and partitioning of carbon resources, appeared to be under homeostatic control. Based on the inflow/outflow properties of sucrose homeostatic regulation we propose a global model on how the diversion of the primary carbon flux into the secondary phenolic pathways occurs at low nitrate concentrations. The model can account for the accumulation of starch during the light phase and the sucrose remobilization by starch degradation during the night. Day-length sensing mechanisms for variable light-dark regimes are discussed, showing that growth is proportional to the length of the light phase. The model can describe the complete starch consumption during the night for plants adapted to a certain light/dark regime when grown on sufficient nitrate and can account for an increased accumulation of starch observed under nitrate limitation.

  13. Effect of Temperature on Precipitation Rate of Calcium Carbonate Produced through Microbial Metabolic Process of Bio Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prima Yane Putri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is the most widely used construction material in civil engineering. But plain concrete is a brittle material and has little resistance to cracking. The cracking in concrete promotes deterioration such as the corrosion of reinforcing rebar, therefore, repair in filling the crack is often carried out. Recently, repair methods using bio-based materials associated with microbial metabolic processes leading to precipitation of calcium carbonate have been intensively studied. In this study, influencing factors on the precipitation rate depending on the constituents of bio-based material comprising yeast, glucose and calcium acetate mixed in tris buffer solution was examined for improving the rate of initial reactions. In addition, effect of temperature change on the amount of calcium carbonate precipitation was also investigated. The precipitates were identified by X-ray diffraction. It was shown that the increase of temperature lead to a change on calcium carbonate precipitation and caused the pH decrease under 7.0.

  14. The olenekian carbonates of the Bucovinian nappe (the central sector of the Haghimas syncline, Eastern Carpathians. Lithology and microfacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Popescu

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Early Triassic carbonate outcrops were studied in the central sector of the Hăghimaş Syncline with regard to stratigraphy, microfacies and facies interpretation.This is the first microfacies study of these deposits. Early Triassic carbonates in the Hăghimaş Syncline are represented by two stratified successions: limestones and dolomites. The limestones overlie very rarely the detritic basal deposits (Induan which marks the beginning of the alpine transgression. The stratified dolomites underlie frequently the Early Anisian massive dolomites. The contact between the stratified limestones and stratified dolomites is only exposed on Calu brook outcrop (the western flank of the Hăghimaş Syncline. The age of the investigated carbonates is Olenekian, based on the occurrence of Meandrospira pusilla biozone (in limestones. The foraminifera are very scarce in dolomites, represented mostly by Earlandia taxa. Microfacies data indicate the existence of a carbonate platform. The Olenekian carbonates yield a broad spectrum of microfacies types, predominantly micrites and biomicrites with foraminifera associated with echinoderms, ostracods, radiolarians, calcitized gastropods etc. These facies types are also known from the carbonate platforms in other parts of the Tethys.

  15. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for the production of putrescine: a four carbon diamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhi-Gang; Xia, Xiao-Xia; Lee, Sang Yup

    2009-11-01

    A four carbon linear chain diamine, putrescine (1,4-diaminobutane), is an important platform chemical having a wide range of applications in chemical industry. Biotechnological production of putrescine from renewable feedstock is a promising alternative to the chemical synthesis that originates from non-renewable petroleum. Here we report development of a metabolically engineered strain of Escherichia coli that produces putrescine at high titer in glucose mineral salts medium. First, a base strain was constructed by inactivating the putrescine degradation and utilization pathways, and deleting the ornithine carbamoyltransferase chain I gene argI to make more precursors available for putrescine synthesis. Next, ornithine decarboxylase, which converts ornithine to putrescine, was amplified by a combination of plasmid-based and chromosome-based overexpression of the coding genes under the strong tac or trc promoter. Furthermore, the ornithine biosynthetic genes (argC-E) were overexpressed from the trc promoter, which replaced the native promoter in the genome, to increase the ornithine pool. Finally, strain performance was further improved by the deletion of the stress responsive RNA polymerase sigma factor RpoS, a well-known global transcription regulator that controls the expression of ca. 10% of the E. coli genes. The final engineered E. coli strain was able to produce 1.68 g L(-1) of putrescine with a yield of 0.168 g g(-1) glucose. Furthermore, high cell density cultivation allowed production of 24.2 g L(-1) of putrescine with a productivity of 0.75 g L(-1) h(-1). The strategy reported here should be useful for the bio-based production of putrescine from renewable resources, and also for the development of strains capable of producing other diamines, which are important as nitrogen-containing platform chemicals.

  16. Central obesity and atherogenic dyslipidemia in metabolic syndrome are associated with increased risk for colorectal adenoma in a Chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Tsann

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS is composed of cardiovascular risk factors including insulin resistance, obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Most of the components of MetS have been linked to the development of neoplasm. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between individual components of MetS and colorectal adenoma. Methods The study subjects were recruited from a pool of 4872 individuals who underwent a health check-up examination during the period January 2006 to May 2008. Each participant fulfilled a structured questionnaire. MetS was defined based on the America Heart Association and National Heart Lung Blood Institute criteria. Subjects with history of colon cancer, colon polyps, colitis, or prior colonic surgery were excluded. Results A total of 4122 subjects were included for final analysis (2367 men and 1755 women; mean age, 49.6 ± 11.7 years. Of them, MetS was diagnosed in 708 men (29.9% and in 367 women (20.9%. Among the patients with MetS, 34.6% had adenoma, 31.7% had hyperplastic polyps and 23.3% were polyp-free (p Conclusions Of the components of MetS analyzed in this study, central obesity and dyslipidemia are independent risk factors for colorectal adenoma. With regard to the prevention of colorectal neoplasm, life-style modification such as weight reduction is worthwhile.

  17. Phosphate binders and metabolic acidosis in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis—sevelamer hydrochloride, calcium carbonate, and bixalomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanai, Toru; Tada, Hideo; Ono, Takashi; Fukumitsu, Toma

    2015-01-01

    The serum bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) levels are decreased in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients treated with sevelamer hydrochloride (SH). We assessed the effects of bixalomer on the chronic metabolic acidosis in these patients. We examined 12 of the 122 consecutive Japanese patients with end-stage renal disease on HD, who orally ingested a dose of SH (≥2250 mg), and an arterial blood gas analysis and biochemical analysis were performed before HD. Patients whose serum HCO3(-) levels were under 18 mmol/L were changed from SH to the same dose of bixalomer. A total of 12 patients were treated with a large amount of SH. Metabolic acidosis (a serum HCO3(-) level under 18 mmol/L) was found in eight patients. These patients were also treated with or without small dose of calcium carbonate (1.2 ± 1.1 g). The dose of SH was changed to that of bixalomer. After 1 month, the serum HCO3(-) levels increased from 16.3 ± 1.4 to 19.6 ± 1.7 mmol/L (P Metabolic acidosis was not observed in four patients (serum HCO3(-) level: 20.3 ± 0.7 mmol/L) likely because they were taking 3 g of calcium carbonate with SH. In the present study, the development of chronic metabolic acidosis was induced by HCl containing phosphate binders, such as SH, and partially ameliorated by calcium carbonate, then subsequently improved after changing the treatment to bixalomer.

  18. Hepatic methionine homeostasis is conserved in C57BL/6N mice on high-fat diet despite major changes in hepatic one-carbon metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Dahlhoff

    Full Text Available Obesity is an underlying risk factor in the development of cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Increased hepatic lipid accumulation is a hallmark in the progression of NAFLD and impairments in liver phosphatidylcholine (PC metabolism may be central to the pathogenesis. Hepatic PC biosynthesis, which is linked to the one-carbon (C1 metabolism by phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase, is known to be important for hepatic lipid export by VLDL particles. Here, we assessed the influence of a high-fat (HF diet and NAFLD status in mice on hepatic methyl-group expenditure and C1-metabolism by analyzing changes in gene expression, protein levels, metabolite concentrations, and nuclear epigenetic processes. In livers from HF diet induced obese mice a significant downregulation of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS and an increased betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT expression were observed. Experiments in vitro, using hepatoma cells stimulated with peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα agonist WY14,643, revealed a significantly reduced Cbs mRNA expression. Moreover, metabolite measurements identified decreased hepatic cystathionine and L-α-amino-n-butyrate concentrations as part of the transsulfuration pathway and reduced hepatic betaine concentrations, but no metabolite changes in the methionine cycle in HF diet fed mice compared to controls. Furthermore, we detected diminished hepatic gene expression of de novo DNA methyltransferase 3b but no effects on hepatic global genomic DNA methylation or hepatic DNA methylation in the Cbs promoter region upon HF diet. Our data suggest that HF diet induces a PPARα-mediated downregulation of key enzymes in the hepatic transsulfuration pathway and upregulates BHMT expression in mice to accommodate to enhanced dietary fat processing while preserving the essential amino acid methionine.

  19. Characterization of a novel, brain-penetrating CB1 receptor inverse agonist: metabolic profile in diet-induced obese models and aspects of central activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Laura H; Commerford, S Renee; Gerber, Sarah P; Chen, Yu Alice; Dardik, Beatriz; Chaperon, Frederique; Schwartzkopf, Chad; Nguyen-Tran, Van; Hollenbeck, Thomas; McNamara, Peter; He, Xiaohui; Liu, Hong; Seidel, H Martin; Jaton, Anne-Liese; Gromada, Jesper; Teixeira, Sandra

    2011-12-01

    Pharmacologic antagonism of cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1 receptors) in the central nervous system (CNS) suppresses food intake, promotes weight loss, and improves the metabolic profile. Since the CB1 receptor is expressed both in the CNS and in peripheral tissues, therapeutic value may be gained with CB1 receptor inverse agonists acting on receptors in both domains. The present report examines the metabolic and CNS actions of a novel CB1 receptor inverse agonist, compound 64, a 1,5,6-trisubstituted pyrazolopyrimidinone. Compound 64 showed similar or superior binding affinity, in vitro potency, and pharmacokinetic profile compared to rimonabant. Both compounds improved the metabolic profile in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats and obese cynomolgus monkeys. Weight loss tended to be greater in compound 64-treated DIO rats compared to pair-fed counterparts, suggesting that compound 64 may have metabolic effects beyond those elicited by weight loss alone. In the CNS, reversal of agonist-induced hypothermia and hypolocomotion indicated that compound 64 possessed an antagonist activity in vivo. Dosed alone, compound 64 suppressed extinction of conditioned freezing (10 mg/kg) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (30 mg/kg), consistent with previous reports for rimonabant, although for REM sleep, compound 64 was greater than threefold less potent than for metabolic effects. Together, these data suggested that (1) impairment of extinction learning and REM sleep suppression are classic, centrally mediated responses to CB1 receptor inverse agonists, and (2) some separation may be achievable between central and peripheral effects with brain-penetrating CB1 receptor inverse agonists while maintaining metabolic efficacy. Furthermore, chronic treatment with compound 64 contributes to evidence that peripheral CB1 receptor blockade may yield beneficial outcomes that exceed those elicited by weight loss alone.

  20. Growth and metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in chemostat cultures under carbon-, nitrogen-, or carbon- and nitrogen-limiting conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, C; von Stockar, U.; Marison, I; Gustafsson, L.

    1993-01-01

    Aerobic chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were performed under carbon-, nitrogen-, and dual carbon- and nitrogen-limiting conditions. The glucose concentration was kept constant, whereas the ammonium concentration was varied among different experiments and different dilution rates. It was found that both glucose and ammonium were consumed at the maximal possible rate, i.e., the feed rate, over a range of medium C/N ratios and dilution rates. To a small extent, this was due to a c...

  1. Central metabolism in Mycobacterium smegmatis during the transition from O2-rich to O2-poor conditions as studied by isotopomer-assisted metabolite analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yinjie J; Shui, Wenqing; Myers, Samuel; Feng, Xueyang; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Keasling, Jay D

    2009-08-01

    Isotopomer-assisted metabolite analysis was used to investigate the central metabolism of Mycobacterium smegmatis and its transition from normal growth to a non-replicating state under a hypoxic environment. Tween 80 significantly promoted aerobic growth by improving O(2) transfer, while only small amount was degraded and metabolized via the TCA cycle for biomass synthesis. As the bacillus encountered hypoxic stress, isotopomer analysis suggested: (1) isocitrate lyase activity increased, which further induced glyoxylate pathway and glycine dehydrogenase for replenishing NAD(+); (2) the relative amount of acetyl-CoA entering the TCA cycle was doubled, whereas little entered the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways.

  2. Inter-relationships between single carbon units' metabolism and resting energy expenditure in weight-losing patients with small cell lung cancer. Effects of methionine supply and chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sengeløv, H; Hansen, O P; Simonsen, L;

    1994-01-01

    The one-carbon unit metabolism was investigated in 8 weight-losing patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC). At diagnosis, 6 of the 8 patients had elevated formiminoglutamic acid (FIGLU) excretion after a histidine load, suggesting a lack of one-carbon units. In accordance, a signifi...

  3. Spatial variability of soil carbon stock in the Urucu river basin, Central Amazon-Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceddia, Marcos Bacis, E-mail: marcosceddia@gmail.com [Department of Soil, Institute of Agronomy, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropédica, RJ 23890-000 (Brazil); Villela, André Luis Oliveira [Colégio Técnico da UFRRJ, RJ, Seropédica 23890-000 (Brazil); Pinheiro, Érika Flávia Machado [Department of Soil, Institute of Agronomy, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropédica, RJ 23890-000 (Brazil); Wendroth, Ole [Department of Plant & Soil Sciences, University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Amazon Forest plays a major role in C sequestration and release. However, few regional estimates of soil organic carbon (SOC) stock in this ecoregion exist. One of the barriers to improve SOC estimates is the lack of recent soil data at high spatial resolution, which hampers the application of new methods for mapping SOC stock. The aims of this work were: (i) to quantify SOC stock under undisturbed vegetation for the 0–30 and the 0–100 cm under Amazon Forest; (ii) to correlate the SOC stock with soil mapping units and relief attributes and (iii) to evaluate three geostatistical techniques to generate maps of SOC stock (ordinary, isotopic and heterotopic cokriging). The study site is located in the Central region of Amazon State, Brazil. The soil survey covered the study site that has an area of 80 km{sup 2} and resulted in a 1:10,000 soil map. It consisted of 315 field observations (96 complete soil profiles and 219 boreholes). SOC stock was calculated by summing C stocks by horizon, determined as a product of BD, SOC and the horizon thickness. For each one of the 315 soil observations, relief attributes were derived from a topographic map to understand SOC dynamics. The SOC stocks across 30 and 100 cm soil depth were 3.28 and 7.32 kg C m{sup −2}, respectively, which is, 34 and 16%, lower than other studies. The SOC stock is higher in soils developed in relief forms exhibiting well-drained soils, which are covered by Upland Dense Tropical Rainforest. Only SOC stock in the upper 100 cm exhibited spatial dependence allowing the generation of spatial variability maps based on spatial (co)-regionalization. The CTI was inversely correlated with SOC stock and was the only auxiliary variable feasible to be used in cokriging interpolation. The heterotopic cokriging presented the best performance for mapping SOC stock. - Highlights: • The SOC stocks across 30 and 100 cm depth were 3.28 and 7.32 kg C m{sup −2}, respectively. • SOC stocks were 34 and 16

  4. A comparison of central venous-arterial and mixed venous-arterial carbon dioxide tension gradient in circulatory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, K M; Harding, R; Chamberlain, J

    2007-10-01

    The arterial and mixed venous carbon dioxide tension gradient has been shown to increase when there is a decrease in cardiac output. Monitoring central venous gases is an attractive alternative to monitoring mixed venous gases in circulatory failure because central venous catheterisation is a less invasive procedure than pulmonary artery catheterisation. This study aims to evaluate the agreement between central venous-arterial carbon dioxide (CVA-CO2) and mixed venous-arterial carbon dioxide (SVA-CO2) tension gradients and assess whether CVA-CO2 tension gradient can be used to predict cardiac output in circulatory failure. Samples of arterial, central venous and mixed venous blood were obtained from 16 patients with circulatory failure at different inspired oxygen concentrations and cardiac indexes within 24 hours of study enrolment. CVA-CO2 and SVA-CO2 tension gradient were not interchangeable numerically (bias = 0.14 mmHg, 95% limits of agreement: -3.0 to 3.2 mmHg). CVA-CO2 (Spearman correlation coefficient r = -0.385) and SVA-CO, (r = -0.578) tension gradient were significantly correlated with the cardiac index but the cardiac index only accounted for 21% and 32% of the variability of CVA-CO, and SVA-CO2 tension gradient, respectively. The ability of CVA-CO2 tension gradient (area under the ROC curve = 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.49-0.99; P = 0.08) to predict a low cardiac output state (cardiac index tension gradient appeared to be limited to their negative predictive value to exclude a low cardiac output state when CVA-CO, or SVA-CO, tension gradient was normal (< or =5 mmHg).

  5. Early differentiation in biomass production and carbon sequestration of white poplar and its two hybrids in Central Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hormoz Sohrabi; Mohammad Kazem Parsapour; Ali Soltani; Yaghoub Iranmanesh

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the potential of white poplar (Populus alba L.) and its inter-sectional hybridization with euphrates poplar (P. euphratica Oliv.) for carbon storage and sequestration in central Iran. Trials were established at planting density of 2,500 trees per hectare in block ran-domized design with three replicates. After 6 years, we measured the above-ground biomass of tree components (trunk, branch, bark, twig and leaf), and assessed soil carbon at three depths. P. alba × euphratica plantation stored significantly more carbon (22.3 t ha-1) than P. alba (16.7 t ha-1) and P. euphratica × alba (13.1 t ha-1). Most of the carbon was accumulated in the above-ground biomass (61.1%in P. alba, 72.4%in P. alba × euphra-tica and 56.0% in P. euphratica × alba). There was no significant difference in soil carbon storage. Also, biomass allocation was different between white poplar P. alba and its inter-sectional hybridization. Therefore, there was a yield difference due to genomic imprinting, which increased the possibility that paternally and maternally inherited wood production alleles would be differentially expressed in the new crossing.

  6. Stable isotope probing and Raman spectroscopy for monitoring carbon flow in a food chain and revealing metabolic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengqiu; Huang, Wei E; Gibson, Christopher M; Fowler, Patrick W; Jousset, Alexandre

    2013-02-05

    Accurately measuring carbon flows is a challenge for understanding processes such as diverse intracellular metabolic pathways and predator-prey interactions. Combined with stable isotope probing (SIP), single-cell Raman spectroscopy was demonstrated for the first time to link the food chain from carbon substrate to bacterial prey up to predators at the single-cell level in a quantitative and nondestructive manner. Escherichia coli OP50 with different (13)C content, which were grown in a mixture of (12)C- and fully carbon-labeled (13)C-glucose (99%) as a sole carbon source, were fed to the nematode. The (13)C signal in Caenorhabditis elegans was proportional to the (13)C content in E. coli. Two Raman spectral biomarkers (Raman bands for phenylalanine at 1001 cm(-1) and thymine at 747 cm(-1) Raman bands), were used to quantify the (13)C content in E. coli and C. elegans over a range of 1.1-99%. The phenylalanine Raman band was a suitable biomarker for prokaryotic cells and thymine Raman band for eukaryotic cells. A biochemical mechanism accounting for the Raman red shifts of phenylalanine and thymine in response to (13)C-labeling is proposed in this study and is supported by quantum chemical calculation. This study offers new insights of carbon flow via the food chain and provides a research tool for microbial ecology and investigation of biochemical pathways.

  7. Greenhouse gas footprint and the carbon flow associated with different solid waste management strategy for urban metabolism in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, K M Nazmul

    2017-02-15

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) and associated climate change consequences are gripping attention globally, while MSW management as a vital subsystem of urban metabolism significantly influences the urban carbon cycles. This study evaluates the GHG emissions and carbon flow of existing and proposed MSW management in Bangladesh through scenario analysis, including landfill with landfill gas (LFG) recovery, waste to energy (WtE), and material recovery facility (MRF). The analysis indicates that, scenario H2 and H5 emitted net GHGs -152.20kg CO2 eq. and -140.32kg CO2 eq., respectively, in comparison with 420.88kg CO2 eq. of scenario H1 for managing per ton of wastes during the reference year 2015. The annual horizontal carbon flux of the waste input was 319Gg and 158Gg during 2015 in Dhaka and Chittagong, respectively. An integrated strategy of managing the wastes in the urban areas of Bangladesh involving WtE incineration plant and LFG recovery to generate electricity as well as MRF could reverse back 209.46Gg carbon and 422.29Gg carbon to the Chittagong and Dhaka urban system, respectively. This study provides valuable insights for the MSW policy framework and revamp of existing MSW management practices with regards to reduction of GHGs emissions from the waste sector in Bangladesh.

  8. Systematically variable planktonic carbon metabolism along a land-to-lake gradient in a Great Lakes coastal zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinke, Anthony D; Kendall, Scott T; Kroll, Daniel J; Strickler, Eric A; Weinert, Maggie E; Holcomb, Thomas M; Defore, Angela A; Dila, Deborah K; Snider, Michael J; Gereaux, Leon C; Biddanda, Bopaiah A

    2014-11-01

    During the summers of 2002-2013, we measured rates of carbon metabolism in surface waters of six sites across a land-to-lake gradient from the upstream end of drowned river-mouth Muskegon Lake (ML) (freshwater estuary) to 19 km offshore in Lake Michigan (LM) (a Great Lake). Despite considerable inter-year variability, the average rates of gross production (GP), respiration (R) and net production (NP) across ML (604 ± 58, 222 ± 22 and 381 ± 52 µg C L(-1) day(-1), respectively) decreased steeply in the furthest offshore LM site (22 ± 3, 55 ± 17 and -33 ± 15 µg C L(-1)day(-1), respectively). Along this land-to-lake gradient, GP decreased by 96 ± 1%, whereas R only decreased by 75 ± 9%, variably influencing the carbon balance along this coastal zone. All ML sites were consistently net autotrophic (mean GP:R = 2.7), while the furthest offshore LM site was net heterotrophic (mean GP:R = 0.4). Our study suggests that pelagic waters of this Great Lakes coastal estuary are net carbon sinks that transition into net carbon sources offshore. Reactive and dynamic estuarine coastal zones everywhere may contribute similarly to regional and global carbon cycles.

  9. Systematically variable planktonic carbon metabolism along a land-to-lake gradient in a Great Lakes coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinke, Anthony D.; Kendall, Scott T.; Kroll, Daniel J.; Strickler, Eric A.; Weinert, Maggie E.; Holcomb, Thomas M.; Defore, Angela A.; Dila, Deborah K.; Snider, Michael J.; Gereaux, Leon C.; Biddanda, Bopaiah A.

    2014-01-01

    During the summers of 2002–2013, we measured rates of carbon metabolism in surface waters of six sites across a land-to-lake gradient from the upstream end of drowned river-mouth Muskegon Lake (ML) (freshwater estuary) to 19 km offshore in Lake Michigan (LM) (a Great Lake). Despite considerable inter-year variability, the average rates of gross production (GP), respiration (R) and net production (NP) across ML (604 ± 58, 222 ± 22 and 381 ± 52 µg C L−1 day−1, respectively) decreased steeply in the furthest offshore LM site (22 ± 3, 55 ± 17 and −33 ± 15 µg C L−1day−1, respectively). Along this land-to-lake gradient, GP decreased by 96 ± 1%, whereas R only decreased by 75 ± 9%, variably influencing the carbon balance along this coastal zone. All ML sites were consistently net autotrophic (mean GP:R = 2.7), while the furthest offshore LM site was net heterotrophic (mean GP:R = 0.4). Our study suggests that pelagic waters of this Great Lakes coastal estuary are net carbon sinks that transition into net carbon sources offshore. Reactive and dynamic estuarine coastal zones everywhere may contribute similarly to regional and global carbon cycles. PMID:25954055

  10. Lipids Reprogram Metabolism to Become a Major Carbon Source for Histone Acetylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDonnell, Eoin; Crown, Scott B; Fox, Douglas B;

    2016-01-01

    Cells integrate nutrient sensing and metabolism to coordinate proper cellular responses to a particular nutrient source. For example, glucose drives a gene expression program characterized by activating genes involved in its metabolism, in part by increasing glucose-derived histone acetylation...

  11. Metabolic bone disease and central retinal degeneration in a kitten due to nutritional inadequacy of an all-meat raw diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Lenox

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A 5-month-old castrated male Sphynx kitten presented with left hindlimb lameness shortly after adoption. Prior to adoption, the breeder had fed the kitten an exclusively raw chicken diet. Radiographs revealed generalized osteopenia and a left tibia–fibula fracture. Ophthalmic examination revealed corneal vascularization and opacity in the right eye, and lesions suggestive of feline central retinal degeneration in the left eye. The patient’s diagnoses included metabolic bone disease and feline central retinal degeneration, which can result from taurine deficiency. The kitten’s nutritional diseases were managed with a complete and balanced canned diet designed for kitten growth and with taurine supplementation.

  12. Organic Carbon Dynamics beyond the Perspective of Monitoring: Impact of Historical Landscape Utilization on the Past Lake-Water Carbon Trajectory in Central Boreal Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Jacob, C.; Tolu, J.; Bigler, C.; Bindler, R.

    2014-12-01

    To date, the key drivers behind the recent observed increase in organic carbon (OC) concentrations in surface waters are still controversial. The lack of long-term monitoring data - over centuries and millennia - leaves us with an ambiguous understanding of the past trajectory of OC concentrations in surface waters, and inhibits a better mechanistic understanding of past and a reliable prediction of future changes in OC levels.By using a paleolimnological approach, we reconstructed past lake-water total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations in lakes across the boreal landscape of central Sweden. Reconstructions are based on a transfer function between visible near-infrared spectra of surface sediments and the corresponding TOC concentration in the water column. Potential drivers behind changes in TOC were determined by a multi-proxy analysis of one of the studied lake sediment records including organic and inorganic geochemistry as well as biological proxies (pollen, diatoms).Our results show a significant decrease in lake-water TOC beginning already ~550 years ago. This decline continued until the mid-20th century when TOC concentrations started to increase again. These dynamics in TOC coincide with changes in proxies indicating catchment disturbance by human activities. The chronology of these changes corresponds to the expansion and decline of a landscape-wide system of summer forest grazing and farming in central Sweden from the 15th century to the turn of the 20th century. Frequent grazing and exploitation of forests and mires reduce aboveground vegetation and physically disturb soils. This further affects the carbon cycling by enhancing carbon turnover, reducing the thickness of organic soils and consequently altering the transport of OC from the catchment to lakes.Our findings suggest that recent changes in lake-water TOC in Sweden are strongly associated with historical patterns in land use and not only on-going changes in climate or sulfur deposition.

  13. Does use of oral contraceptives enhance the toxicity of carbon disulfide through interactions with pyridoxine and tryptophan metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, E J

    1980-01-01

    It is proposed that oral contraceptive (OC) users are at increased risk to experiencing adverse psychological disorders (e.g. irritability, depression) from exposures to elevated levels of carbon disulfide (CS2). This theory is based on studies indicating that both OCs and CS2 induce either a vitamin B6 deficiency and/or enhance its requirement. Since disruptions of B6 metabolism are thought to explain, at least in part, the adverse psychological effects of OCs and CS2, it is speculated that joint exposure to these substances may result in an exaggerated disruption of B6 metabolism with the development of CS2 induced adverse psychological effects occurring at exposure levels below those normally associated with adverse effects.

  14. Implications of central obesity-related variants in LYPLAL1, NRXN3, MSRA, and TFAP2B on quantitative metabolic traits in adult Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Dorthe S; Banasik, Karina; Justesen, Johanne M;

    2011-01-01

    Background Two meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have suggested that four variants: rs2605100 in lysophospholipase-like 1 (LYPLAL1), rs10146997 in neuroxin 3 (NRXN3), rs545854 in methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MSRA), and rs987237 in transcription factor activating enhancer......-binding protein 2 beta (TFAP2B) associate with measures of central obesity. To elucidate potential underlying phenotypes we aimed to investigate whether these variants associated with: 1) quantitative metabolic traits, 2) anthropometric measures (waist circumference (WC), waist-hip ratio, and BMI), or 3) type 2...... diabetes, and central and general overweight and obesity. Methodology/Principal Findings The four variants were genotyped in Danish individuals using KASPar®. Quantitative metabolic traits were examined in a population-based sample (n = 6,038) and WC and BMI were furthermore analyzed in a combined study...

  15. Inter-Strain Differences in Liver Injury and One-Carbon Metabolism in Alcohol-Fed Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Masato; Ji, Cheng; Kosyk, Oksana; Shymonyak, Svitlana; Melnyk, Stepan; Kono, Hiroshi; Tryndyak, Volodymyr; Muskhelishvili, Levan; Pogribny, Igor P.; Kaplowitz, Neil; Rusyn, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Alcoholic liver injury is a major public health issue worldwide. Even though the major mechanisms of this disease have been established over the past decades, little is known about genetic susceptibility factors that may predispose individuals who abuse alcoholic beverages to liver damage and subsequent pathological conditions. We hypothesized that a panel of genetically diverse mouse strains may be used to examine the role of ER stress and one-carbon metabolism in the mechanism of inter-individual variability in alcoholic liver injury. We administered alcohol (up to 27 mg/kg/d) in high fat diet using intragastric intubation model for 28 days to male mice from 14 inbred strains (129S1/SvImJ, AKR/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cByJ, BTBR T+tf/J, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/10J, DBA/2J, FVB/NJ, KK/HIJ, MOLF/EiJ, NZW/LacJ, PWD/PhJ, and WSB/EiJ). Profound inter-strain differences (more than 3-fold) in alcohol-induced steatohepatitis were observed among the strains in spite of consistently high levels of urine alcohol that was monitored throughout the study. We found that endoplasmic reticulum stress genes were induced only in strains with the highest liver injury. Liver glutathione and methyl donor levels were affected in all strains, albeit to a different degree. Most pronounced effects that were closely associated with the degree of liver injury were hyperhomocysteinemia and strain-dependent differences in expression patterns of one-carbon metabolism-related genes. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that strain differences in alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis are striking and independent of alcohol exposure and the most severely affected strains exhibit major differences in the expression of ER stress markers and genes of one-carbon metabolism. PMID:22307928

  16. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of one-carbon metabolism and cancers of the esophagus, stomach, and liver in a Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen-Chih Chang

    Full Text Available One-carbon metabolism (folate metabolism is considered important in carcinogenesis because of its involvement in DNA synthesis and biological methylation reactions. We investigated the associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in folate metabolic pathway and the risk of three GI cancers in a population-based case-control study in Taixing City, China, with 218 esophageal cancer cases, 206 stomach cancer cases, 204 liver cancer cases, and 415 healthy population controls. Study participants were interviewed with a standardized questionnaire, and blood samples were collected after the interviews. We genotyped SNPs of the MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, DNMT1, and ALDH2 genes, using PCR-RFLP, SNPlex, or TaqMan assays. To account for multiple comparisons and reduce the chances of false reports, we employed semi-Bayes (SB shrinkage analysis. After shrinkage and adjusting for potential confounding factors, we found positive associations between MTHFR rs1801133 and stomach cancer (any T versus C/C, SB odds-ratio [SBOR]: 1.79, 95% posterior limits: 1.18, 2.71 and liver cancer (SBOR: 1.51, 95% posterior limits: 0.98, 2.32. There was an inverse association between DNMT1 rs2228612 and esophageal cancer (any G versus A/A, SBOR: 0.60, 95% posterior limits: 0.39, 0.94. In addition, we detected potential heterogeneity across alcohol drinking status for ORs relating MTRR rs1801394 to esophageal (posterior homogeneity P = 0.005 and stomach cancer (posterior homogeneity P = 0.004, and ORs relating MTR rs1805087 to liver cancer (posterior homogeneity P = 0.021. Among non-alcohol drinkers, the variant allele (allele G of these two SNPs was inversely associated with the risk of these cancers; while a positive association was observed among ever-alcohol drinkers. Our results suggest that genetic polymorphisms related to one-carbon metabolism may be associated with cancers of the esophagus, stomach, and liver. Heterogeneity across alcohol consumption status of

  17. Untangling the role of one-carbon metabolism in colorectal cancer risk: a comprehensive Bayesian network analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myte, Robin; Gylling, Björn; Häggström, Jenny; Schneede, Jörn; Magne Ueland, Per; Hallmans, Göran; Johansson, Ingegerd; Palmqvist, Richard; Van Guelpen, Bethany

    2017-01-01

    The role of one-carbon metabolism (1CM), particularly folate, in colorectal cancer (CRC) development has been extensively studied, but with inconclusive results. Given the complexity of 1CM, the conventional approach, investigating components individually, may be insufficient. We used a machine learning-based Bayesian network approach to study, simultaneously, 14 circulating one-carbon metabolites, 17 related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and several environmental factors in relation to CRC risk in 613 cases and 1190 controls from the prospective Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. The estimated networks corresponded largely to known biochemical relationships. Plasma concentrations of folate (direct), vitamin B6 (pyridoxal 5-phosphate) (inverse), and vitamin B2 (riboflavin) (inverse) had the strongest independent associations with CRC risk. Our study demonstrates the importance of incorporating B-vitamins in future studies of 1CM and CRC development, and the usefulness of Bayesian network learning for investigating complex biological systems in relation to disease. PMID:28233834

  18. The central and eastern Arabian Sea as a perennial source of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.S.S.; DileepKumar, M.; George, M.D.

    Seasonal (winter monsoon, intermonsoon and southwest monsoon) and interannual (between southwest monsoon seasons of 1995 and 1996) variations in total carbon dioxide (TCO sub(2)) and partial pressure of CO sub(2) (pCO sub(2)) were studied...

  19. Accretionary Lapilli (Carbonate Spherules) at the Cretaceous-Paleogene ('KT') Boundary in Belize (Central America)

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, D. T.; Petruny, L. W.

    2013-08-01

    The Chicxulub impact event produced accretionary lapilli (or carbonate spherules) that fell across a wide area. This paper compares Chicxulub ('KT') accretionary lapilli from two sites in Belize: Albion Island and Armenia.

  20. Vegetation evolution on the central Chinese Loess Plateau since late Quaternary evidenced by elemental carbon isotopic composition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Bin; SHEN ChengDe; ZHENG HongBo; ZHAO MeiXun; SUN YanMin

    2009-01-01

    There are many controversial issues in loess studies such as natural vegetation types on the Chinese Loess Plateau during the historical periods and the spatial and temporal evolution of C3/C4 plants.Elemental carbon isotopic composition (δ13Cec) in the loess section may offer new evidence for these problems. Elemental carbon (EC) is produced by incomplete combustion of vegetation, and its carbon isotopic composition has a very small difference from that of the formal vegetation, then δ13Cec can be used as a record to recover the changes of vegetation. Elemental carbon was extracted by applying the oxidation method from the loess-paleosol sequence in the central Chinese Loess Plateau, and its carbon isotope composition was analyzed by the isotope mass spectrometer. The results showed that the vegetation in this region was a mixed type of C3 and C4 plants, dominated with C3 plants in most of the time. Since late Quaternary, C3/C4 plants may not follow a simple glacial-interglacial cycle mode on the Chinese Loess Plateau, but showing fluctuations. C3 plants increased gradually in L4 period, and more C3 plants occurred during S3 period, and C4 plants increased again during L3-L2 periods, after that, C3plants dominated again during S1-S0 periods. During periods of paleosol development, C3 plants were abundant in S3 and S1, and there were more C4 plants in S2 and S0. During periods of loess sedimentation, there were more C3 plants in L4 and L1, and there were more C4 plants in L3 and L2. On the orbital timescale, the vegetation variations revealed by δ13Cec record are consistent with the results of pollen data and also similar to the results obtained by organic carbon isotopic composition since the last glacial period.

  1. Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Richard Pancake; JyunSyung Tsau; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2010-03-07

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide was injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide was injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By March 7,2010, 8,736 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver A7, Colliver A3, Colliver A14 and Graham A4 located on adjacent leases. About 19,166 bbl of incremental oil were estimated to have been produced from these wells as of March 7, 2010. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Estimated oil recovery attributed to the CO2 flood is 27,902 bbl which is equivalent to a gross CO2 utilization of 4.8 MCF/bbl. The pilot project is not economic.

  2. δ13C chemostratigraphy in the upper Tremadocian through lower Katian (Ordovician carbonate succession of the Siljan district, central Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Lehnert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on δ13C data from two drillcores recovered from the Siljan district, we present a first continuous carbon isotope record of the upper Tremadocian–lower Katian limestone succession of central Sweden. New names for some isotopic carbon excursions from the Cambrian–Ordovician boundary through the basal Darriwilian are introduced. The Mora 001 core from the western part of the Siljan impact structure ranges through the Lower–Middle Ordovician, whereas the Solberga 1 core from its eastern part ranges through the Middle–lower Upper Ordovician. Upper Tremadocian and Floian units are extremely condensed and include extensive stratigraphic gaps. Multiple hardgrounds, sometimes with minor karstic overprint, imply recurrent periods of erosion and/or non-deposition. Like in other parts of Sweden, the Dapingian and Darriwilian succession is characterized by a relatively complete sedimentary record and low sedimentation rates.

  3. Land use change and carbon cycle in arid and semi-arid lands of East and Central Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Dramatic changes in land use have occurred in arid and semi-arid landsof Asia during the 20th century. Grassland conversion into croplands and ecosystem degradation is widespread due to the high growth rate of human population and political reforms of pastoral systems. Rangeland degradation made many parts of this region vulnerable to environmental and political changes. The collapse of the livestock sector in some states of central Asia, expansion of livestock inChina and intensive degradation of grasslands in China are examples of the responses of pastoral systems to these changes over the past decades. Carbon dynamics in this region is highly variable in space and time. Land use/cover changes with widespread reduction of forest and grasslands increased carbon emission from the region.

  4. Carbon Emission from Forest Fires on Scots Pine Logging Sites in the Angara Region of Central Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, G. A.; Conard, S. G.; McRae, D. J.; Kukavskaya, E. A.; Bogorodskaya, A. V.; Kovaleva, N. M.

    2010-12-01

    Wildfire and large-scale forest harvesting are the two major disturbances in the Russian boreal forests. Non-recovered logged sites total about a million hectares in Siberia. Logged sites are characterized by higher fire hazard than forest sites due to the presence of generally untreated logging slash (i.e., available fuel) which dries out much more rapidly compared to understory fuels. Moreover, most logging sites can be easily accessed by local population; this increases the risk for fire ignition. Fire impacts on the overstory trees, subcanopy woody layer, and ground vegetation biomass were estimated on 14 logged and unlogged comparison sites in the Lower Angara Region in 2009-2010 as part of the NASA-funded NEESPI project, The Influence of Changing Forestry Practices on the Effects of Wildfire and on Interactions Between Fire and Changing Climate in Central Siberia. Based on calculated fuel consumption, we estimated carbon emission from fires on both logged and unlogged burned sites. Carbon emission from fires on logged sites appeared to be twice that on unlogged sites. Soil respiration decreased on both site types after fires. This reduction may partially offset fire-produced carbon emissions. Carbon emissions from fire and post-fire ecosystem damage on logged sites are expected to increase under changing climate conditions and as a result of anticipated increases in future forest harvesting in Siberia.

  5. Application of central composite design to optimize the amount of carbon source and prebiotics for Bifidobacterium bifidum BB01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Guowei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to obtain the optimum proportion of the carbon source and prebiotics for Bifidobacterium bifidum BB01 by the central composite design (CCD. The effect of carbon source (lactose and two prebiotics (inulin and fructooligosaccharides on the BB01 were observed by measuring the OD600 value, pH value and the viable counts at 18h. The final optimized concentrations of carbon source and prebiotics were: lactose 1.6%, inulin 0.26%, and fructooligosaccharides 0.22%. The result indicates that the growth of B. bifidum BB01 shows an significant increase in the optimized culture medium (p < 0.05, the OD600 value reached 1.434 at 18h, which increased 6.58% compared to the control. And the viable counts of B. bifidum BB01 increased 24.36% and reached (2.17±0.06 ×109cfu/mL. The results show that the optimization of the carbon source and prebiotics using CCD in this study is workable and necessary.

  6. Microbial community structure and functional metabolic diversity are associated with organic carbon availability in an agricultural soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Juan; LI Yan-ting; YANG Xiang-dong; ZHANG Jian-jun; LIN Zhi-an; ZHAO Bing-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Exploration of soil environmental characteristics governing soil microbial community structure and activity may improve our understanding of biogeochemical processes and soil quality. The impact of soil environmental characteristics especialy organic carbon availability after 15-yr different organic and inorganic fertilizer inputs on soil bacterial community structure and functional metabolic diversity of soil microbial communities were evaluated in a 15-yr fertilizer experiment in Chang-ping County, Beijing, China. The experiment was a wheat-maize rotation system which was established in 1991 including four different fertilizer treatments. These treatments included: a non-amended control (CK), a commonly used application rate of inorganic fertilizer treatment (NPK); a commonly used application rate of inorganic fertilizer with swine manure in-corporated treatment (NPKM), and a commonly used application rate of inorganic fertilizer with maize straw incorporated treatment (NPKS). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the 16S rRNA gene was used to determine the bacterial community structure and single carbon source utilization proifles were determined to characterize the microbial community functional metabolic diversity of different fertilizer treatments using Biolog Eco plates. The results indicated that long-term fertilized treatments signiifcantly increased soil bacterial community structure compared to CK. The use of inorganic fertilizer with organic amendments incorporated for long term (NPKM, NPKS) signiifcantly promoted soil bacterial structure than the application of inorganic fertilizer only (NPK), and NPKM treatment was the most important driver for in-creases in the soil microbial community richness (S) and structural diversity (H). Overal utilization of carbon sources by soil microbial communities (average wel color development, AWCD) and microbial substrate utilization diversity and evenness indices (H’ and E) indicated that long

  7. Myocardial blood flow and metabolism in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A study with carbon-11 acetate and positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiwata, Sugao; Maruno, Hirotaka; Nishiyama, Shinichiro; Seki, Akira [Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Senda, Michio; Toyama, Hinako

    1997-03-01

    The underlying pathophysiology of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is still unclear. Positron emission tomography is a suitable and promising technique for the detection of possible metabolic consequences of the disease. To assess regional myocardial blood flow and metabolism, 19 asymptomatic or only mildly symptomatic patients with HCM and 10 normal control subjects were studied using carbon-11 acetate and fluorine-18-labelled deoxyglucose (FDG) as tracers of myocardial blood flow (Ao), oxygen consumption (k), and exogenous glucose utilization. In the patients, regional Ao in the hypertrophied septum and apex (H) was similar to that in the nonhypertrophied free wall (N) (91.3{+-}3.9% vs 92.9{+-}3.1%; p=NS). However, the k values were significantly lower in H than in N (0.044{+-}0.012 vs 0.060{+-}0.016/min, p<0.0001). The k value in N and normal control subjects (0.062{+-}0.013) was similar. Postprandial FDG uptake was lower in H than in N (70{+-}16 vs 91{+-}7%; p<0.0001) in 16 patients and slightly higher in 3 patients. Fasting FDG study showed increased FDG uptake in H in 3 out of 13 patients, suggesting a disorder of the myocardial microvascular circulation. A relative decrease in hypertrophied septal and apical oxidative metabolism and glucose utilization without any corresponding perfusion defect could reflect abnormal regional aerobic metabolism in the disproportionately thickened myocardium in patients with HCM. This suggests that a primary myocardial metabolic defect might be present in patients with HCM. (author)

  8. Molecular evidence for the coordination of nitrogen and carbon metabolisms, revealed by a study on the transcriptional regulation of the agl3EFG operon that encodes a putative carbohydrate transporter in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Xu-Feng; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jin

    2016-03-18

    In the agl3EFGXYZ operon (SCO7167-SCO7162, abbreviated as agl3 operon) of Streptomyces coelicolor M145, agl3EFG genes encode a putative ABC-type carbohydrate transporter. The transcription of this operon has been proved to be repressed by Agl3R (SCO7168), a neighboring GntR-family regulator, and this repression can be released by growth on poor carbon sources. Here in this study, we prove that the transcription of agl3 operon is also directly repressed by GlnR, a central regulator governing the nitrogen metabolism in S. coelicolor. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) employing the agl3 promoter and mixtures of purified recombinant GlnR and Agl3R indicates that GlnR and Agl3R bind to different DNA sequences within the promoter region of agl3 operon, which is further confirmed by the DNase I footprinting assay. As Agl3R and GlnR have been demonstrated to sense the extracellular carbon and nitrogen supplies, respectively, it is hypothesized that the transcription of agl3 operon is stringently governed by the availabilities of extracellular carbon and nitrogen sources. Consistent with the hypothesis, the agl3 operon is further found to be derepressed only under the condition of poor carbon and rich nitrogen supplies, when both regulators are inactivated. It is believed that activation of the expression of agl3 operon may facilitate the absorption of extracellular carbohydrates to balance the ratio of intracellular carbon to nitrogen.

  9. Characterization of a FGF19 variant with altered receptor specificity revealed a central role for FGFR1c in the regulation of glucose metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongfei Ge

    Full Text Available Diabetes and associated metabolic conditions have reached pandemic proportions worldwide, and there is a clear unmet medical need for new therapies that are both effective and safe. FGF19 and FGF21 are distinctive members of the FGF family that function as endocrine hormones. Both have potent effects on normalizing glucose, lipid, and energy homeostasis, and therefore, represent attractive potential next generation therapies for combating the growing epidemics of type 2 diabetes and obesity. The mechanism responsible for these impressive metabolic effects remains unknown. While both FGF19 and FGF21 can activate FGFRs 1c, 2c, and 3c in the presence of co-receptor βKlotho in vitro, which receptor is responsible for the metabolic activities observed in vivo remains unknown. Here we have generated a variant of FGF19, FGF19-7, that has altered receptor specificity with a strong bias toward FGFR1c. We show that FGF19-7 is equally efficacious as wild type FGF19 in regulating glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism in both diet-induced obesity and leptin-deficient mouse models. These results are the first direct demonstration of the central role of the βKlotho/FGFR1c receptor complex in glucose and lipid regulation, and also strongly suggest that activation of this receptor complex alone might be sufficient to achieve all the metabolic functions of endocrine FGF molecules.

  10. Characterization of a FGF19 variant with altered receptor specificity revealed a central role for FGFR1c in the regulation of glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hongfei; Baribault, Helene; Vonderfecht, Steven; Lemon, Bryan; Weiszmann, Jennifer; Gardner, Jonitha; Lee, Ki Jeong; Gupte, Jamila; Mookherjee, Paramita; Wang, Minghan; Sheng, Jackie; Wu, Xinle; Li, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes and associated metabolic conditions have reached pandemic proportions worldwide, and there is a clear unmet medical need for new therapies that are both effective and safe. FGF19 and FGF21 are distinctive members of the FGF family that function as endocrine hormones. Both have potent effects on normalizing glucose, lipid, and energy homeostasis, and therefore, represent attractive potential next generation therapies for combating the growing epidemics of type 2 diabetes and obesity. The mechanism responsible for these impressive metabolic effects remains unknown. While both FGF19 and FGF21 can activate FGFRs 1c, 2c, and 3c in the presence of co-receptor βKlotho in vitro, which receptor is responsible for the metabolic activities observed in vivo remains unknown. Here we have generated a variant of FGF19, FGF19-7, that has altered receptor specificity with a strong bias toward FGFR1c. We show that FGF19-7 is equally efficacious as wild type FGF19 in regulating glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism in both diet-induced obesity and leptin-deficient mouse models. These results are the first direct demonstration of the central role of the βKlotho/FGFR1c receptor complex in glucose and lipid regulation, and also strongly suggest that activation of this receptor complex alone might be sufficient to achieve all the metabolic functions of endocrine FGF molecules.

  11. Frozen in Time? Microbial strategies for survival and carbon metabolism over geologic time in a Pleistocene permafrost chronosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackelprang, R.; Douglas, T. A.; Waldrop, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Permafrost soils have received tremendous interest due to their importance as a global carbon store with the potential to be thawed over the coming centuries. Instead of being 'frozen in time,' permafrost contains active microbes. Most metagenomic studies have focused on Holocene aged permafrost. Here, we target Pleistocene aged ice and carbon rich permafrost (Yedoma), which can differ in carbon content and stage of decay. Our aim was to understand how microbes in the permafrost transform organic matter over geologic time and to identify physiological and biochemical adaptations that enable long-term survival. We used next-generation sequencing to characterize microbial communities along a permafrost age gradient. Samples were collected from the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) Permafrost Tunnel near Fox, AK, which penetrates a hillside providing access to permafrost ranging in age from 12 to 40 kyr. DNA was extracted directly from unthawed samples. 16S rRNA amplicon (16S) and shotgun metagenome sequencing revealed significant age-driven differences. First, microbial diversity declines with permafrost age, likely due to long-term exposure to environmental stresses and a reduction in metabolic resources. Second, we observed taxonomic differences among ages, with an increasing abundance of Firmicutes (endospore-formers) in older samples, suggesting that dormancy is a common survival strategy in older permafrost. Ordination of 16S and metagenome data revealed age-based clustering. Genes differing significantly between age categories included those involved in lipopolysaccharide assembly, cold-response, and carbon processing. These data point to the physiological adaptations to long-term frozen conditions and to the metabolic processes utilized in ancient permafrost. In fact, a gene common in older samples is involved in cadaverine production, which could potentially explain the putrefied smell of Pleistocene aged permafrost. Coupled with soil

  12. Characteristics of Gaseous Carbon Emission from a Tropical Peatland Fire: A Plot-Scale Field Experiment in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Y.; Darung, U.; Limin, S. H.; Hatano, R.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical peatland in Southeast Asia is a vast reservoir of terrestrial carbon, which covers 24.8 million hectares and stores 68.5 PgC peat, equal to 11-14% of global peat carbon. In recent decades, large scale peatland fire has occurred frequently in that region, in which many areas of peatland were reclaimed with intention to use the land for forest plantation and rice paddy. We conducted a plot-scale peat burning experiment to elucidate the characteristics of gaseous carbon emission from a tropical peatland fire at the ground level. The experimental site was established at an open area 20 km southeast from Palangka Raya, Central Kalimantan Province, Indonesia. The size of the burning plot is 4 m in length and 3 m in width. Gas samples were collected at heights of 1.0, 0.5, 0.0 (aboveground), -0.1 and -0.2 m (belowground) through stainless steel and/or aluminum tubes settled across the edge of the plot. The concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4) and particulate matter (PM) was determined. Soil temperature was recorded every 10 minutes 0.1 and 0.2 m below the ground surface. Twelve iron rods were installed in 1-m by 1-m square grid to determine the depth of burn scar. After ignition, flaming stage of peat burning was ceased within 1-2 hours. The following smoldering stage continued for a week. In the flaming stage, soil temperature at -0.1 m increased tentatively. After the smoldering stage began, the temperature rapidly increased to 350-450°C. Response of soil temperature at -0.2 m was less prominent. Concentrations of gaseous components became maximal in the flaming stage. During the smoldering stage, the concentrations gradually decreased. The influence of burning on CO2 and PM was prominently remained at -0.1 m, whereas those at -0.2 m were not so much. The averaged burnt depth was 5.8±5.1 cm. Based on bulk density of 0.22 g/cm3 and carbon content of 55.5%, the amount of carbon lost from the plot was 85.3 kg. Most of the

  13. Plastidial metabolite transporters integrate photorespiration with carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhut, Marion; Hocken, Nadine; Weber, Andreas P M

    2015-07-01

    Plant photorespiration is an essential prerequisite for oxygenic photosynthesis. This metabolic repair pathway bestrides four compartments, which poses the requirement for several metabolites transporters for pathway function. However, in contrast to the well-studied enzymatic steps of the core photorespiratory cycle, only few photorespiratory translocators have been identified to date. In this review, we give an overview of established and unknown plastidic transport proteins involved in photorespiration and intertwined nitrogen and sulfur metabolism, respectively. Furthermore, we discuss the evolutionary origin of the dicarboxylate translocators and the recently identified glycolate glycerate translocator.

  14. L-Lactic acid production from glycerol coupled with acetic acid metabolism by Enterococcus faecalis without carbon loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Nao; Oba, Mana; Iwamoto, Mariko; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Noguchi, Takuya; Bonkohara, Kaori; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed Ali; Zendo, Takeshi; Shimoda, Mitsuya; Sakai, Kenji; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol is a by-product in the biodiesel production process and considered as one of the prospective carbon sources for microbial fermentation including lactic acid fermentation, which has received considerable interest due to its potential application. Enterococcus faecalis isolated in our laboratory produced optically pure L-lactic acid from glycerol in the presence of acetic acid. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis using [1, 2-(13)C2] acetic acid proved that the E. faecalis strain QU 11 was capable of converting acetic acid to ethanol during lactic acid fermentation of glycerol. This indicated that strain QU 11 restored the redox balance by oxidizing excess NADH though acetic acid metabolism, during ethanol production, which resulted in lactic acid production from glycerol. The effects of pH control and substrate concentration on lactic acid fermentation were also investigated. Glycerol and acetic acid concentrations of 30 g/L and 10 g/L, respectively, were expected to be appropriate for lactic acid fermentation of glycerol by strain QU 11 at a pH of 6.5. Furthermore, fed-batch fermentation with 30 g/L glycerol and 10 g/L acetic acid wholly exhibited the best performance including lactic acid production (55.3 g/L), lactic acid yield (0.991 mol-lactic acid/mol-glycerol), total yield [1.08 mol-(lactic acid and ethanol)]/mol-(glycerol and acetic acid)], and total carbon yield [1.06 C-mol-(lactic acid and ethanol)/C-mol-(glycerol and acetic acid)] of lactic acid and ethanol. In summary, the strain QU 11 successfully produced lactic acid from glycerol with acetic acid metabolism, and an efficient fermentation system was established without carbon loss.

  15. Pathways of carbon oxidation in continental margin sediments off central Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamdrup, B; Canfield, Donald Eugene

    1996-01-01

    Rates and oxidative pathways of organic carbon mineralization were determined in sediments at six stations on the shelf and slope off Concepcion Bay at 36.5 degrees S. The depth distribution of C oxidation rates was determined to 10 cm from accumulation of dissolved inorganic C in 1-5-d incubatio...

  16. Isotopic studies of beach rock carbonates from Konkan, central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumar, B.; Rajamanickam, G.V.; Gujar, A.R.

    The beach rock carbonates from the 200 km long stretch from Guhagar in the north to Deogad in the south along the Konkan coast (Maharashtra, India) are studied for sup(14)C dating and sup(13)C : sup(12)C and sup(18)O : sup(16)O ratio determination...

  17. Systems-Level Analysis of Nitrogen Starvation–Induced Modifications of Carbon Metabolism in a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Starchless Mutant[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaby, Ian K.; Glaesener, Anne G.; Mettler, Tabea; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel T.; Gallaher, Sean D.; Liu, Bensheng; Boyle, Nanette R.; Kropat, Janette; Stitt, Mark; Johnson, Shannon; Benning, Christoph; Pellegrini, Matteo; Casero, David; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2013-01-01

    To understand the molecular basis underlying increased triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in starchless (sta) Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants, we undertook comparative time-course transcriptomics of strains CC-4348 (sta6 mutant), CC-4349, a cell wall–deficient (cw) strain purported to represent the parental STA6 strain, and three independent STA6 strains generated by complementation of sta6 (CC-4565/STA6-C2, CC-4566/STA6-C4, and CC-4567/STA6-C6) in the context of N deprivation. Despite N starvation–induced dramatic remodeling of the transcriptome, there were relatively few differences (5 × 102) observed between sta6 and STA6, the most dramatic of which were increased abundance of transcripts encoding key regulated or rate-limiting steps in central carbon metabolism, specifically isocitrate lyase, malate synthase, transaldolase, fructose bisphosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (encoded by ICL1, MAS1, TAL1, FBP1, and PCK1 respectively), suggestive of increased carbon movement toward hexose-phosphate in sta6 by upregulation of the glyoxylate pathway and gluconeogenesis. Enzyme assays validated the increase in isocitrate lyase and malate synthase activities. Targeted metabolite analysis indicated increased succinate, malate, and Glc-6-P and decreased Fru-1,6-bisphosphate, illustrating the effect of these changes. Comparisons of independent data sets in multiple strains allowed the delineation of a sequence of events in the global N starvation response in C. reinhardtii, starting within minutes with the upregulation of alternative N assimilation routes and carbohydrate synthesis and subsequently a more gradual upregulation of genes encoding enzymes of TAG synthesis. Finally, genome resequencing analysis indicated that (1) the deletion in sta6 extends into the neighboring gene encoding respiratory burst oxidase, and (2) a commonly used STA6 strain (CC-4349) as well as the sequenced reference (CC-503) are not congenic with respect to sta6 (CC-4348

  18. Simultaneous tracing of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Roland; Jain, Mohit

    2016-05-24

    Stable isotope tracing is a powerful method for interrogating metabolic enzyme activities across the metabolic network of living cells. However, most studies of mammalian cells have used (13)C-labeled tracers only and focused on reactions in central carbon metabolism. Cellular metabolism, however, involves other biologically important elements, including nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, phosphate and sulfur. Tracing stable isotopes of such elements may help shed light on poorly understood metabolic pathways. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-resolution mass spectrometry to simultaneously trace carbon and nitrogen metabolism in human cells cultured with (13)C- and (15)N-labeled glucose and glutamine. To facilitate interpretation of the complex isotopomer data generated, we extend current methods for metabolic flux analysis to handle multivariate mass isotopomer distributions (MMIDs). We find that observed MMIDs are broadly consistent with known biochemical pathways. Whereas measured (13)C MIDs were informative for central carbon metabolism, (15)N isotopes provided evidence for nitrogen-carrying reactions in amino acid and nucleotide metabolism. This computational and experimental methodology expands the scope of metabolic flux analysis beyond carbon metabolism, and may prove important to understanding metabolic phenotypes in health and disease.

  19. Carbon dioxide and helium dissolved gases in groundwater at central Tenerife Island, Canary Islands: chemical and isotopic characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero-Diaz, Rayco; López, Dina; Perez, Nemesio M.; Custodio, Emilio; Sumino, Hirochika; Melián, Gladys V.; Padrón, Eleazar; Hernandez, Pedro A.; Calvo, David; Barrancos, José; Padilla, Germán; Sortino, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Seismic-volcanic unrest was detected between 2004 and 2005 in the central and northwest zones of Tenerife Island (Canary Islands, Spain). With the aim of strengthening the program of geochemical and seismic-volcanic surveillance, a study of the origin, characteristics, and spatial distribution of dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) and helium (He) gases in the volcanic aquifer of central Tenerife Island and around Teide volcano was carried out. This work also improves the hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical conceptual model of groundwater flow. Dissolved CO2 concentrations in sampled groundwater are several orders of magnitude higher than that of air-saturated water (ASW) suggesting a significant contribution of non-atmospheric CO2, mainly magmatic, confirmed through measurement of isotopic compositions (δ13CTDIC) and total dissolved inorganic carbon (TDIC) concentrations. A vertical stratification of dissolved CO2 and δ13CTDIC values was observed in the volcanic aquifer at the eastern region of Las Cañadas Caldera. Stratification seems to be controlled by both degree of magmatic CO2-water interaction and CO2 degassing and the original δ13Cco2(g) isotopic composition. The highest dissolved helium (4He) concentrations in groundwater seem to be related to radiogenic contributions resulting from water-rock interactions, and increase with residence time, instead of with endogenous magmatic inputs. Isotopic systematics show that the dissolved gases in groundwater of central Tenerife are variable mixtures of CO2-3He-rich fluids of volcanic-hydrothermal origin with both organic and atmospheric components. The results suggest that the eastern area of Las Cañadas Caldera, the South Volcanic Ridge, and the Teide summit cone are the areas most affected by degassing of the volcanic-hydrothermal system, and they are therefore the most suitable zones for future geochemical monitoring.

  20. Central Composite Design (CCD) applied for statistical optimization of glucose and sucrose binary carbon mixture in enhancing the denitrification process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jun-Wei; Beh, Hoe-Guan; Ching, Dennis Ling Chuan; Ho, Yeek-Chia; Baloo, Lavania; Bashir, Mohammed J. K.; Wee, Seng-Kew

    2016-12-01

    The present study provides an insight into the optimization of a glucose and sucrose mixture to enhance the denitrification process. Central Composite Design was applied to design the batch experiments with the factors of glucose and sucrose measured as carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratio each and the response of percentage removal of nitrate-nitrogen (NO3 --N). Results showed that the polynomial regression model of NO3 --N removal had been successfully derived, capable of describing the interactive relationships of glucose and sucrose mixture that influenced the denitrification process. Furthermore, the presence of glucose was noticed to have more consequential effect on NO3 --N removal as opposed to sucrose. The optimum carbon sources mixture to achieve complete removal of NO3 --N required lesser glucose (C:N ratio of 1.0:1.0) than sucrose (C:N ratio of 2.4:1.0). At the optimum glucose and sucrose mixture, the activated sludge showed faster acclimation towards glucose used to perform the denitrification process. Later upon the acclimation with sucrose, the glucose uptake rate by the activated sludge abated. Therefore, it is vital to optimize the added carbon sources mixture to ensure the rapid and complete removal of NO3 --N via the denitrification process.

  1. Oral facial clefts and gene polymorphisms in metabolism of folate/one-carbon and vitamin A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyles, Abee L; Wilcox, Allen J; Taylor, Jack A;

    2009-01-01

    An increased risk of facial clefts has been observed among mothers with lower intake of folic acid or vitamin A around conception. We hypothesized that the risk of clefts may be further moderated by genes involved in metabolizing folate or vitamin A. We included 425 case-parent triads in which th...

  2. Carbon catabolite repression and global control of the carbohydrate metabolism in Lactococcus lactis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luesink, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    In view of the economic importance of fermented dairy products considerable scientific attention has been given to various steps of fermentation processes, including the L-lactate formation of lactic acid bacteria (de Vos, 1996). In particular, the carbohydrate metabolism of L. lactis has been the s

  3. Carbon budget of Nyungwe Tropical Montane Rain Forest in Central Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyirambangutse, B.; Zibera, E.; Uwizeye, F. K.; Hansson, L.; Nsabimana, D.; Pleijel, H.; Uddling, J.; Wallin, G.

    2015-12-01

    African tropical rainforests host rich biodiversity and play many roles at different scales such as local, regional and global, in the functioning of the earth system. Despite that the African tropical forests are the world's second largest, it has been neglected in terms of understanding the storage and fluxes of carbon and other nutrients. The question of whether this biome is a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 is still not answered, and little is known concerning the climate change response. Tropical montane forests are even more poorly sampled compared with their importance. Deeper understanding of these ecosystems is required to provide insights on how they might react under global change. To answer questions related to these issues for African tropical montane forests, 15 permanent 0.5 ha plots were established in 2011 in Nyungwe tropical montane rainforest gazetted as a National Park to protect its extensive floral and faunal diversity. The plots are arranged along an east-westerly transect and includes both primary and secondary forest communities. The study is connected to the global ecosystem monitoring network (GEM, http://gem.tropicalforests.ox.ac.uk/). The aim is to characterize spatial and temporal heterogeneity of carbon and nutrient dynamics processes. The role of microclimate, topography, human disturbances, and plant species to the variability of these pools and processes will be explored. We compare stocks and fluxes of carbon and nutrients of the secondary and primary forest communities. The carbon stock are determined by an inventory of height and diameter at breast height (dbh) of all trees with a dbh above 5 cm, wood density, biomass of understory vegetation, leaf area index, standing and fallen dead wood, fine root biomass and organic content of various soil layers (litter, organic and mineral soil down to 45 cm depth). The carbon fluxes are determined by measurements of photosynthesis and respiration of leaves, above and below ground

  4. Genome-wide meta-analysis of homocysteine and methionine metabolism identifies five one carbon metabolism loci and a novel association of ALDH1L1 with ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circulating homocysteine levels (tHcy), a product of the folate one carbon metabolism pathway (FOCM) through the demethylation of methionine, are heritable and are associated with an increased risk of common diseases such as stroke, cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer and dementia. The FOCM is the ...

  5. Metabolic Syndrome in Italian Obese Children and Adolescents: Stronger Association with Central Fat Depot than with Insulin Sensitivity and Birth Weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Brufani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate whether body fat distribution, birth weight, and family history for diabetes (FHD were associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS in children and adolescents. Methods. A total of 439 Italian obese children and adolescents (5–18 years were enrolled. Subjects were divided into 2 groups: prepubertal and pubertal. MetS was diagnosed according to the adapted National Cholesterol Education Program criteria. Birth weight percentile, central obesity index (measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, insulin sensitivity (ISI, and disposition index were evaluated. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine variables associated with MetS. Results. The prevalence of MetS was 17%, with higher percentage in adolescents than in children (21 versus 12%. In the overall population, central obesity index was a stronger predictor of MetS than insulin sensitivity and low birth weight. When the two groups were considered, central fat depot remained the strongest predictor of MetS, with ISI similarly influencing the probability of MetS in the two groups and birth weight being negatively associated to MetS only in pubertal individuals. Neither FHD nor degree of fatness was a significant predictor of MetS. Conclusion. Simple clinical parameters like increased abdominal adiposity and low birth weight could be useful tools to identify European obese adolescents at risk for metabolic complications.

  6. High-fat simple carbohydrate feeding impairs central and peripheral monoamine metabolic pathway triggering the onset of metabolic syndrome in C57Bl/6J mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena S D'Souza

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: HFSC diet impairs the central and peripheral dopaminergic and noradrenergic pathways in mice as evidenced by the disturbances in their hypothalamic, plasma, and urine levels and this might be one of the early factors contributing towards the development of the MetS.

  7. Ecological network analysis for carbon metabolism of eco-industrial parks: a case study of a typical eco-industrial park in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Chen, Bin; Feng, Kuishuang; Hubacek, Klaus

    2015-06-16

    Energy production and industrial processes are crucial economic sectors accounting for about 62% of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions globally in 2012. Eco-industrial parks are practical attempts to mitigate GHG emissions through cooperation among businesses and the local community in order to reduce waste and pollution, efficiently share resources, and help with the pursuit of sustainable development. This work developed a framework based on ecological network analysis to trace carbon metabolic processes in eco-industrial parks and applied it to a typical eco-industrial park in Beijing. Our findings show that the entire metabolic system is dominated by supply of primary goods from the external environment and final demand. The more carbon flows through a sector, the more influence it would exert upon the whole system. External environment and energy providers are the most active and dominating part of the carbon metabolic system, which should be the first target to mitigate emissions by increasing efficiencies. The carbon metabolism of the eco-industrial park can be seen as an evolutionary system with high levels of efficiency, but this may come at the expense of larger levels of resilience. This work may provide a useful modeling framework for low-carbon design and management of industrial parks.

  8. Radon, carbon dioxide and fault displacements in central Europe related to the Tōhoku Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briestenský, M; Thinová, L; Praksová, R; Stemberk, J; Rowberry, M D; Knejflová, Z

    2014-07-01

    Tectonic instability may be measured directly using extensometers installed across active faults or it may be indicated by anomalous natural gas concentrations in the vicinity of active faults. This paper presents the results of fault displacement monitoring at two sites in the Bohemian Massif and Western Carpathians. These data have been supplemented by radon monitoring in the Mladeč Caves and by carbon dioxide monitoring in the Zbrašov Aragonite Caves. A significant period of tectonic instability is indicated by changes in the fault displacement trends and by anomalous radon and carbon dioxide concentrations. This was recorded around the time of the catastrophic MW=9.0 Tōhoku Earthquake, which hit eastern Japan on 11 March 2011. It is tentatively suggested that the Tōhoku Earthquake in the Pacific Ocean and the unusual geodynamic activity recorded in the Bohemian Massif and Western Carpathians both reflect contemporaneous global tectonic changes.

  9. Lights, Camera, Action ... and Cooling - The case for centralized low carbon energy at Fox Studios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Alastair [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Regnier, Cindy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Fox Studios partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to retrofit two production stages and one of its central cooling plants, to reduce energy consumption by at least 30% as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program. Although this case study reports expected savings arising from proposed design recommendations for a unique building type and the unusual load characteristics associated with its use, the EEMs implemented for the central plant are applicable to any large campus, office and higher education facility. The intent is that by making the energy-efficiency measures (EEMs) set that were assessed as cost-effective from this project applicable to a larger number of buildings on the campus Fox Studios will be able to implement an integrated campus-wide energy strategy for the long term. The significant challenges for this project in the design phase included identifying how to assess and analyze multiple system types, develop a coherent strategy for assessment and analysis, implement the measurement and verification activities to collect the appropriate data (in terms of capturing ‘normal’ operating characteristics and granularity) and determine the best approach to providing cooling to the site buildings based on the nature of existing systems and the expected improvement in energy performance of the central cooling plant. The analytical framework adopted provides a blueprint for similar projects at other large commercial building campuses.

  10. Genome sequencing of Sulfolobus sp. A20 from Costa Rica and comparative analyses of the putative pathways of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism in various Sulfolobus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Dai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The genome of Sulfolobus sp. A20 isolated from a hot spring in Costa Rica was sequenced. This circular genome of the strain is 2,688,317 bp in size and 34.8% in G+C content, and contains 2,591 open reading frames (ORFs. Strain A20 shares ~95.6% identity at the 16S rRNA gene sequence level and less than 30% DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH values with the most closely related known Sulfolobus species (i.e., S. islandicus and S. solfataricus, suggesting that it represents a novel Sulfolobus species. Comparison of the genome of strain A20 with those of the type strains of S. solfataricus, S. acidocaldarius, S. islandicus and S. tokodaii, which were isolated from geographically separated areas, identified 1,801 genes conserved among all Sulfolobus species analyzed (core genes. Comparative genome analyses show that central carbon metabolism in Sulfolobus is highly conserved, and enzymes involved in the Entner-Doudoroff pathway, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the CO2 fixation pathways are predominantly encoded by the core genes. All Sulfolobus species encode genes required for the conversion of ammonium into glutamate/glutamine. Some Sulfolobus strains have gained the ability to utilize additional nitrogen source such as nitrate (i.e. S. islandicus strain REY15A, LAL14/1, M14.25 and M16.27 or urea (i.e. S. islandicus HEV10/4, S. tokodaii strain7 and S. metallicus DSM 6482. The strategies for sulfur metabolism are most diverse and least understood. S. tokodaii encodes sulfur oxygenase/reductase (SOR, whereas both S. islandicus and S. solfataricus contain genes for sulfur reductase (SRE. However, neither SOR nor SRE genes exist in the genome of strain A20, raising the possibility that an unknown pathway for the utilization of elemental sulfur may be present in the strain. The ability of Sulfolobus to utilize nitrate or sulfur is encoded by a gene cluster flanked by IS elements or their remnants. These clusters appear to have become fixed at a specific

  11. Genome Sequencing of Sulfolobus sp. A20 from Costa Rica and Comparative Analyses of the Putative Pathways of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Sulfur Metabolism in Various Sulfolobus Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xin; Wang, Haina; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Li, Kuan; Zhang, Xiaoling; Mora-López, Marielos; Jiang, Chengying; Liu, Chang; Wang, Li; Zhu, Yaxin; Hernández-Ascencio, Walter; Dong, Zhiyang; Huang, Li

    2016-01-01

    The genome of Sulfolobus sp. A20 isolated from a hot spring in Costa Rica was sequenced. This circular genome of the strain is 2,688,317 bp in size and 34.8% in G+C content, and contains 2591 open reading frames (ORFs). Strain A20 shares ~95.6% identity at the 16S rRNA gene sequence level and Sulfolobus species (i.e., Sulfolobus islandicus and Sulfolobus solfataricus), suggesting that it represents a novel Sulfolobus species. Comparison of the genome of strain A20 with those of the type strains of S. solfataricus, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, S. islandicus, and Sulfolobus tokodaii, which were isolated from geographically separated areas, identified 1801 genes conserved among all Sulfolobus species analyzed (core genes). Comparative genome analyses show that central carbon metabolism in Sulfolobus is highly conserved, and enzymes involved in the Entner-Doudoroff pathway, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the CO2 fixation pathways are predominantly encoded by the core genes. All Sulfolobus species encode genes required for the conversion of ammonium into glutamate/glutamine. Some Sulfolobus strains have gained the ability to utilize additional nitrogen source such as nitrate (i.e., S. islandicus strain REY15A, LAL14/1, M14.25, and M16.27) or urea (i.e., S. islandicus HEV10/4, S. tokodaii strain7, and S. metallicus DSM 6482). The strategies for sulfur metabolism are most diverse and least understood. S. tokodaii encodes sulfur oxygenase/reductase (SOR), whereas both S. islandicus and S. solfataricus contain genes for sulfur reductase (SRE). However, neither SOR nor SRE genes exist in the genome of strain A20, raising the possibility that an unknown pathway for the utilization of elemental sulfur may be present in the strain. The ability of Sulfolobus to utilize nitrate or sulfur is encoded by a gene cluster flanked by IS elements or their remnants. These clusters appear to have become fixed at a specific genomic site in some strains and lost in other strains during the

  12. Carbon and nitrogen tracers of land use effects on net ecosystem metabolism in mangrove estuaries, southwest Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Matthew; Mora, Germán; Graniero, Lauren; Surge, Donna

    2016-11-01

    Four estuaries in southwest Florida with different land-use characteristics in their watersheds were chosen to investigate the effects of anthropogenic land use on estuarine biogeochemical cycling. We compared C:N ratios, concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), chlorophyll-a (chl-a) and particulate organic carbon (POC), stable isotope ratios of DIC (δ13CDIC) and POC (δ13CPOC), and nitrogen isotope ratios of particulate organic nitrogen (δ15NPON) among these estuaries. Values of δ13CDIC ranged from -14.1 to +0.9‰. The more negative values occurred upstream, resulting from DIC inputs derived from both the degradation of organic carbon and dissolution of carbonates. Upstream DIC concentrations were as high as 8066 μmol L-1, suggesting high respiration rates. Further, a comparison of DIC values to a conservative mixing model indicates net heterotrophic metabolic state in all four estuaries. Supporting this interpretation, low δ13CPOC values suggest that terrestrial plants were the main source of POC in the upstream sampling points. However, C:N ratios ranged from 7.2 to 13.4, and were consistent with the decomposition of both terrestrial and aquatic sources. Chl-a concentrations were variable and typically below 20 μg L-1, indicating moderate to low levels of autotrophy in all estuaries. Elevated chl-a concentrations indicative of increased primary productivity occurred at intermediate salinities, and were possibly caused by the mixing front at mid-estuary locations. There were no apparent differences in δ15NPON among estuaries, suggesting that the N sources to these estuaries are comparable. The combined results show no differences between near-natural and anthropogenically influenced estuaries, indicating a minimal effect of anthropogenic activities on the parameters measured, possibly as a result of the filtering capacity of the extensive surrounding mangrove vegetation.

  13. Dynamics of seawater carbonate chemistry, production, and calcification of a coral reef flat, central Great Barrier Reef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Albright

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification is projected to shift coral reefs from a state of net accretion to one of net dissolution this century. Presently, our ability to predict global-scale changes to coral reef calcification is limited by insufficient data relating seawater carbonate chemistry parameters to in situ rates of reef calcification. Here, we investigate diel and seasonal trends in carbonate chemistry of the Davies Reef flat in the central Great Barrier Reef and relate these trends to benthic carbon fluxes by quantifying net ecosystem calcification (nec and net community production (ncp. Results show that seawater carbonate chemistry of the Davies Reef flat is highly variable over both diel and seasonal cycles. pH (total scale ranged from 7.92 to 8.17, pCO2 ranged from 272 to 542 μatm, and aragonite saturation state (Ωarag ranged from 2.9 to 4.1. Diel cycles in carbonate chemistry were primarily driven by ncp, and warming explained 35% and 47% of the seasonal shifts in pCO2 and pH, respectively. Daytime ncp averaged 37 ± 19 mmol C m−2 h−1 in summer and 33 ± 13 mmol C m−2 h−1 in winter; nighttime ncp averaged −30 ± 25 and −7 ± 6 mmol C m−2 h−1 in summer and winter, respectively. Daytime nec averaged 11 ± 4 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 in summer and 8 ± 3 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 in winter, whereas nighttime nec averaged 2 ± 4 mmol and −1 ± 3 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 in summer and winter, respectively. Net ecosystem calcification was highly sensitive to changes in Ωarag for both seasons, indicating that relatively small shifts in Ωarag may drive measurable shifts in calcification rates, and hence carbon budgets, of coral reefs throughout the year.

  14. Carbonate cementation as related to the diagenesis of clay in a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate system: Examples from the Centerfield biostrome, east central Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, C.D. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States))

    1994-03-01

    The Middle Devonian Mahantango Formation consists of siliciclastic and mixed carbonate-siliciclastic sediment packages that pulse in and out of the stratigraphy. The formation crops out in several places throughout the folded rocks of eastern Pennsylvania and Maryland. The Centerfield Member is one of the mixed siliciclastic-carbonate packages in the Mahantango Fm. This member crops out in east central Pennsylvania. The Centerfield Mbr. has been interpreted as a series of biostromes and contain abundant rugosan corals, crinoids, bryozoans, and brachiopods. The biostromes have undergone a complex diagenetic history. Illite, smectite, chlorite and muscovite have been found with the use of powder x-ray diffraction and petrographic analysis. The smectite and some of the illite are depositional clays, while, the remaining illite, chlorite and muscovite represent recrystallization of the depositional clays. There are six phases of cement in the biostrome. The paragenetic sequence of the cements is as follows: non-ferroan low magnesian calcite (LMC), intermediate ferroan LMC, ferroan LMC, non-ferroan dolomite, ferroan baroque dolomite, and quartz cement in the form of chert and blocky cement. Staining shows that the iron content of the cement changes within individual crystals and between cement phases. Preliminary data suggest that the cements may be directly related to the steady release of ions during the diagenesis of the surrounding clays in the shale.

  15. Metabolism of carbon-14-labeled benzene and toluene in avocado fruit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, E.F.; Olson, A.C.

    1969-01-01

    The method of exposing avocado fruit to /sup 14/C labeled benzene or toluene was as follows. Fuerte variety avocado fruit was used. It was exposed to the vapor of the hydrocarbons which were circulated in a container. Three mature preclimacteric fruit were used in each experiment. The nonvolatile metabolites from both hydrocarbons were separated into classes of compounds by their solution in water, separation of lipids, and passage of the aqueous solution through ion exchange columns. The results indicate that in avocados the relatively inert hydrocarbons benzene and toluene are metabolized to a series of compounds, toluene to a greater extent than benzene. Both are metabolized to a small but significant extent to CO/sub 2/. 7 references, 2 tables.

  16. Calcium and Vitamin D Metabolism in Submariners. Carbon Dioxide, Sunlight, and Absorption Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-15

    synthe- sis, and melatonin production by the pineal gland . Less obvious and explainable^are findings by several investigators of increased 30 yard...hypercapnia--’ ’ and- in the persistent renal response in the post-exposure period. Poyart ’ studied the bone CO? content in rats and found...calcium-pnosphorus metabolism in hypokinetic rats . Aviat. Space. Environ. Med. 55: 534-537. 47. Will, M.R. 1973. Intestinal absorption of calcium

  17. Mechanical stability model of progradational carbonate platform margins under tectonic loads: Deformation of Cretaceous carbonate platforms in the Sierra Madre Oriental fold-thrust belt (east central Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Juan; Suter, Max

    2015-02-01

    Shortening in the Sierra Madre Oriental fold-thrust belt (east central Mexico) is localized along the margins of Cretaceous carbonate platforms and controlled by mechanical stratigraphy. The platform margins are deformed by imbricate series of thrust ramps, whereas the coeval basins and platform interiors are deformed by map-scale detachment folds. Here we present a finite element model to evaluate the influence of the boundary geometry and boundary conditions on the style of deformation observed at these basinward progradational platform margins. We calculate the stress distribution in a linearly elastic platform-basin transition zone under the action of horizontal tectonic stress, taking into account changes of rock mechanical properties across the platform margin, as well as their dependence on direction, and infer the resulting fracture patterns based on the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. Stress concentrations are predicted at the contacts between the massive rocks of the platform margin and the well-layered rocks of both, the platform interior and the adjacent basin. Brittle failure of the platform border can be mostly attributed to three effects: mechanical coupling between the carbonate platform and a substratum of moderate to low viscosity, variations in layering and texture that governed the mechanical properties of the involved carbonates as well as their dependence on direction, and the development of sharp domain boundary corners associated with progradational facies changes. In contrast, the dip of the basement and a possible taper of the overlying Upper Cretaceous shale toward the basin appear to have little influence on the mechanical failure of the platform margin.

  18. Dynamics of dissolved inorganic carbon and aquatic metabolism in the Tana River basin, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamooh, F.; Borges, A.V.; Meysman, F.J.R.; Van Den Meersche, K.; Dehairs, F.; Merckx, R.; Bouillon, S.

    2013-01-01

    A basin-wide study was conducted in the Tana River basin (Kenya) in February 2008 (dry season), September–November 2009 (wet season) and June–July 2010 (end of the wet season) to assess the dynamics and sources of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) as well as to quantify CO2 fluxes, community respirat

  19. Effects of dissolved carbon dioxide on energy metabolism and stress responses in European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, G.A.; Schrama, J.W.; Capelle, J.; Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated carbon dioxide concentrations reduce feed intake and growth in several fish species and induce stress responses. In this study, the effects of moderately elevated CO2 levels on performance, energy partitioning, swimming activity and stress response in European seabass were assessed. Europea

  20. Polyol synthesis in Aspergillus niger : influence of oxygen availability, carbon and nitrogen sources on the metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diano, Audrey; Bekker-Jensen, S; Dynesen, Jens Østergaard

    2006-01-01

    Polyol production has been studied in Aspergillus niger under different conditions. Fermentations have been run using high concentration of glucose or xylose as carbon source and ammonium or nitrate as nitrogen source. The growth of biomass, as freely dispersed hyphae, led to an increase of medium...

  1. LIDAR-based urban metabolism approach to neighbourhood scale energy and carbon emissions modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christen, A. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Geography; Coops, N. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Forest Sciences; Canada Research Chairs, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Kellet, R. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture

    2010-07-01

    A remote sensing technology was used to model neighbourhood scale energy and carbon emissions in a case study set in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC). The study was used to compile and aggregate atmospheric carbon flux, urban form, and energy and emissions data in a replicable neighbourhood-scale approach. The study illustrated methods of integrating diverse emission and uptake processes on a range of scales and resolutions, and benchmarked comparisons of modelled estimates with measured energy consumption data obtained over a 2-year period from a research tower located in the study area. The study evaluated carbon imports, carbon exports and sequestration, and relevant emissions processes. Fossil fuel emissions produced in the neighbourhood were also estimated. The study demonstrated that remote sensing technologies such as LIDAR and multispectral satellite imagery can be an effective means of generating and extracting urban form and land cover data at fine scales. Data from the study were used to develop several emissions reduction and energy conservation scenarios. 6 refs.

  2. Dynamic Metabolic Flux Analysis Demonstrated on Cultures Where the Limiting Substrate Is Changed from Carbon to Nitrogen and Vice Versa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaspard Lequeux

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main requirement for metabolic flux analysis (MFA is that the cells are in a pseudo-steady state, that there is no accumulation or depletion of intracellular metabolites. In the past, the applications of MFA were limited to the analysis of continuous cultures. This contribution introduces the concept of dynamic MFA and extends MFA so that it is applicable to transient cultures. Time series of concentration measurements are transformed into flux values. This transformation involves differentiation, which typically increases the noisiness of the data. Therefore, a noise-reducing step is needed. In this work, polynomial smoothing was used. As a test case, dynamic MFA is applied on Escherichia coli cultivations shifting from carbon limitation to nitrogen limitation and vice versa. After switching the limiting substrate from N to C, a lag phase was observed accompanied with an increase in maintenance energy requirement. This lag phase did not occur in the C- to N-limitation case.

  3. The Effect of Different Nitrogen Form on Key Enzyme Activity of Sugarbeet (Vulgaris L.) Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This article analyses the effect of the proportion of the different nitrogen forms on key enzyme activity of carbon and nitrogen metabolism under the condition of nutritional water while Tian Yan-7 was used as experimental material. The result showed that nitrate reductase(NR) activity in the leaves gradually enhanced with the increase of NO-3. No matter in root or leaves ,glutamina synthetase (GS) activity first enhanced with increasing NH4+ when NH4+ was lower than that of NO-3 ,and GS activity was the highest when NH4+and NO3-was equal ,then GS activity declined with NH4+ increasing further. In the anaphase of growth ,synthetic activity in root of sucrose synthetase(SS) in the mixed NH4+ and NO3- was obviously highr than or NO3- alone. Both of the root and sugar yields were the highest when the proportion of NH4+ and NO3- was 1: 1.

  4. Soybeans grown in the Chernobyl area produce fertile seeds that have increased heavy metal resistance and modified carbon metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Klubicová

    Full Text Available Plants grow and reproduce in the radioactive Chernobyl area, however there has been no comprehensive characterization of these activities. Herein we report that life in this radioactive environment has led to alteration of the developing soybean seed proteome in a specific way that resulted in the production of fertile seeds with low levels of oil and β-conglycinin seed storage proteins. Soybean seeds were harvested at four, five, and six weeks after flowering, and at maturity from plants grown in either non-radioactive or radioactive plots in the Chernobyl area. The abundance of 211 proteins was determined. The results confirmed previous data indicating that alterations in the proteome include adaptation to heavy metal stress and mobilization of seed storage proteins. The results also suggest that there have been adjustments to carbon metabolism in the cytoplasm and plastids, increased activity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and decreased condensation of malonyl-acyl carrier protein during fatty acid biosynthesis.

  5. Shigella reroutes host cell central metabolism to obtain high-flux nutrient supply for vigorous intracellular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentner, David; Martano, Giuseppe; Callon, Morgane; Chiquet, Petra; Brodmann, Maj; Burton, Olga; Wahlander, Asa; Nanni, Paolo; Delmotte, Nathanaël; Grossmann, Jonas; Limenitakis, Julien; Schlapbach, Ralph; Kiefer, Patrick; Vorholt, Julia A; Hiller, Sebastian; Bumann, Dirk

    2014-07-08

    Shigella flexneri proliferate in infected human epithelial cells at exceptionally high rates. This vigorous growth has important consequences for rapid progression to life-threatening bloody diarrhea, but the underlying metabolic mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we used metabolomics, proteomics, and genetic experiments to determine host and Shigella metabolism during infection in a cell culture model. The data suggest that infected host cells maintain largely normal fluxes through glycolytic pathways, but the entire output of these pathways is captured by Shigella, most likely in the form of pyruvate. This striking strategy provides Shigella with an abundant favorable energy source, while preserving host cell ATP generation, energy charge maintenance, and survival, despite ongoing vigorous exploitation. Shigella uses a simple three-step pathway to metabolize pyruvate at high rates with acetate as an excreted waste product. The crucial role of this pathway for Shigella intracellular growth suggests targets for antimicrobial chemotherapy of this devastating disease.

  6. Ecosystem-groundwater interactions under changing land uses: Linking water, salts, and carbon across central Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobbagy, E. G.; Nosetto, M. D.; Santoni, C. S.; Jackson, R. B.

    2007-05-01

    Although most ecosystems display a one-way connection with groundwater based on the regulation of deep water drainage (recharge), this link can become reciprocal when the saturated zone is shallow and plants take up groundwater (discharge). In what context is the reciprocal link most likely? How is it affected by land use changes? Has it consequences on salt and carbon cycling? We examine these questions across a precipitation gradient in the Pampas and Espinal of Argentina focusing on three vegetation change situations (mean annual rainfall): afforestation of humid (900-1300 mm) and subhumid grassland (700-900 mm/yr of rainfall), annual cultivation of subhumid grasslands (700-800 mm/yr), and annual cultivation of semiarid forests (500-700 mm). Humid and subhumid grasslands have shallow (salinity of tree species. Cultivation with corn and soybean can lead to groundwater consumption in the driest belt of subhumid grassland. Up to five-fold yield increases in lowlands vs. uplands during the driest years indicate a dramatic impact of groundwater use on carbon uptake and groundwater salinization suggests a recharge-to- discharge switch. In dry forests groundwater is not accessible (> 15 m deep) and recharge under natural conditions is null. The establishment of crops, however, triggers the onset of recharge, as evidenced by vadose zones getting wetter and leached of atmospheric chloride. Cropping may cause water table raises leading to a two-way coupling of ecosystems and groundwater in the future, as it has been documented for similar settings in Australia and the Sahel. In the Pampas land use change interacts with groundwater consumption leading to higher carbon uptake (humid and subhumid grasslands) and salt accumulation (subhumid grasslands). In the Espinal (semiarid forest) land use change currently involves a one-way effect on groundwater recharge that may switch to a reciprocal connection if regional water table raises occur. Neglecting the role of groundwater

  7. Low contribution of internal metabolism to carbon dioxide emissions along lotic and lentic environments of a Mediterranean fluvial network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gener, Lluís.; Schiller, Daniel; Marcé, Rafael; Arroita, Maite; Casas-Ruiz, Joan Pere; Staehr, Peter Anton; Acuña, Vicenç; Sabater, Sergi; Obrador, Biel

    2016-12-01

    Inland waters are significant sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. CO2 supersaturation and subsequent CO2 emissions from inland waters can be driven by internal metabolism, external inputs of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) derived from the catchment, and other processes (e.g., internal geochemical reactions of calcite precipitation or photochemical mineralization of organic solutes). However, the sensitivity of the magnitude and sources of CO2 emissions to fluvial network hydromorphological alterations is still poorly understood. Here we investigated both the magnitude and sources of CO2 emissions from lotic (i.e., running waters) and lentic (i.e., stagnant waters associated to small dams) waterbodies of a Mediterranean fluvial network by computing segment-scale mass balances of CO2. Our results showed that sources other than internal metabolism sustained most (82%) of the CO2 emissions from the studied fluvial network. The magnitude and sources of CO2 emissions in lotic waterbodies were highly dependent on hydrology, with higher emissions dominated by DIC inputs derived from the catchment during high flows and lower emissions partially fueled by CO2 produced biologically within the river during low flows. In contrast, CO2 emissions in lentic waterbodies were low, relatively stable over the time and the space, and dominated by DIC inputs from the catchment regardless of the different hydrological situations. Overall, our results stress the sensitivity of fluvial networks to human activities and climate change and particularly highlight the role of hydromorphological conditions on modulating the magnitude and sources of CO2 emissions from fluvial networks.

  8. Context-dependent metabolic networks

    CERN Document Server

    Beguerisse-Díaz, Mariano; Oyarzún, Diego; Picó, Jesús; Barahona, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Cells adapt their metabolism to survive changes in their environment. We present a framework for the construction and analysis of metabolic reaction networks that can be tailored to reflect different environmental conditions. Using context-dependent flux distributions from Flux Balance Analysis (FBA), we produce directed networks with weighted links representing the amount of metabolite flowing from a source reaction to a target reaction per unit time. Such networks are analyzed with tools from network theory to reveal salient features of metabolite flows in each biological context. We illustrate our approach with the directed network of the central carbon metabolism of Escherichia coli, and study its properties in four relevant biological scenarios. Our results show that both flow and network structure depend drastically on the environment: networks produced from the same metabolic model in different contexts have different edges, components, and flow communities, capturing the biological re-routing of metab...

  9. Metabolism of hydrophobic carbon sources and regulation of it in n-alkane-assimilating yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Ryouichi

    2013-01-01

    A potent ability to assimilate hydrophobic compounds, including n-alkanes and fatty acids as carbon sources, is one of important characteristics of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, and has been studied for both basic microbiological interest and biotechnological applications. This review summarizes recent progress on the metabolism of n-alkanes and its transcriptional control in response to n-alkanes and to fatty acids in Y. lipolytica. In the metabolism of n-alkanes, cytochromes P450ALK catalyze their initial hydroxylation to fatty alcohols, which are subsequently converted to fatty acids and utilized. The transcription of ALK1, encoding a predominant cytochrome P450ALK, is regulated in response to n-alkanes by two basic helix-loop-helix transcription activators, Yas1p and Yas2p, and Opi1-family transcription repressor Yas3p. Transcription of the genes involved in fatty acid utilization and peroxisome biogenesis is controlled by Ctf1-family Zn2Cys6 type transcription factor Por1p in response to fatty acids in Y. lipolytica.

  10. Overexpressing of OsAMT1-3, a High Affinity Ammonium Transporter Gene, Modifies Rice Growth and Carbon-Nitrogen Metabolic Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aili Bao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AMT1-3 encodes the high affinity NH4+ transporter in rice roots and is predominantly expressed under nitrogen starvation. In order to evaluate the effect of AMT1-3 gene on rice growth, nitrogen absorption and metabolism, we generated AMT1-3-overexpressing plants and analyzed the growth phenotype, yield, carbon and nitrogen metabolic status, and gene expression profiles. Although AMT1-3 mRNA accumulated in transgenic plants, these plants displayed significant decreases in growth when compared to the wild-type plants. The nitrogen uptake assay using a 15N tracer revealed poor nitrogen uptake ability in AMT1-3-overexpressing plants. We found significant decreases in AMT1-3-overexpressing plant leaf carbon and nitrogen content accompanied with a higher leaf C/N ratio. Significant changes in soluble proteins and carbohydrates were also observed in AMT1-3-overexpressing plants. In addition, metabolite profile analysis demonstrated significant changes in individual sugars, organic acids and free amino acids. Gene expression analysis revealed distinct expression patterns of genes that participate in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. Additionally, the correlation between the metabolites and gene expression patterns was consistent in AMT1-3-overexpressing plants under both low and high nitrogen growth conditions. Therefore, we hypothesized that the carbon and nitrogen metabolic imbalance caused by AMT1-3 overexpressing attributed to the poor growth and yield of transgenic plants.

  11. Promoter methylation of E-cadherin, p16, and RAR-beta(2) genes in breast tumors and dietary intake of nutrients important in one-carbon metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberrant DNA methylation plays a critical role in carcinogenesis, and the availability of dietary factors involved in 1-carbon metabolism may contribute to aberrant DNA methylation. We investigated the association of intake of folate, vitamins B(2), B(6), B(12), and methionine with promoter methylat...

  12. The effect of zilpaterol hydrochloride supplementation on energy metabolism and nitrogen and carbon retention of steers fed at maintenance and fasting intake levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    An indirect calorimetry trial examined energy metabolism, apparent nutrient digestibility (appND), carbon retention (CR) and nitrogen retention (NR) of cattle supplemented with zilpaterol hydrochloride (Z). Beef steers (n=20; 463 ± 14 kg) blocked (n=5) by weight and source were individually fed and ...

  13. Overexpressing of OsAMT1-3, a High Affinity Ammonium Transporter Gene, Modifies Rice Growth and Carbon-Nitrogen Metabolic Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Aili; Liang, Zhijun; Zhao, Zhuqing; Cai, Hongmei

    2015-04-23

    AMT1-3 encodes the high affinity NH₄⁺ transporter in rice roots and is predominantly expressed under nitrogen starvation. In order to evaluate the effect of AMT1-3 gene on rice growth, nitrogen absorption and metabolism, we generated AMT1-3-overexpressing plants and analyzed the growth phenotype, yield, carbon and nitrogen metabolic status, and gene expression profiles. Although AMT1-3 mRNA accumulated in transgenic plants, these plants displayed significant decreases in growth when compared to the wild-type plants. The nitrogen uptake assay using a 15N tracer revealed poor nitrogen uptake ability in AMT1-3-overexpressing plants. We found significant decreases in AMT1-3-overexpressing plant leaf carbon and nitrogen content accompanied with a higher leaf C/N ratio. Significant changes in soluble proteins and carbohydrates were also observed in AMT1-3-overexpressing plants. In addition, metabolite profile analysis demonstrated significant changes in individual sugars, organic acids and free amino acids. Gene expression analysis revealed distinct expression patterns of genes that participate in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. Additionally, the correlation between the metabolites and gene expression patterns was consistent in AMT1-3-overexpressing plants under both low and high nitrogen growth conditions. Therefore, we hypothesized that the carbon and nitrogen metabolic imbalance caused by AMT1-3 overexpressing attributed to the poor growth and yield of transgenic plants.

  14. Dynamics of seawater carbonate chemistry, production, and calcification of a coral reef flat, Central Great Barrier Reef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Albright

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification is projected to shift coral reefs from a state of net accretion to one of net dissolution this century. Presently, our ability to predict global-scale changes to coral reef calcification is limited by insufficient data relating seawater carbonate chemistry parameters to in situ rates of reef calcification. Here, we investigate natural trends in carbonate chemistry of the Davies Reef flat in the central Great Barrier Reef on diel and seasonal timescales and relate these trends to benthic carbon fluxes by quantifying net ecosystem calcification (nec and net community production (ncp. Results show that seawater carbonate chemistry of the Davies Reef flat is highly variable over both diel and seasonal timescales. pH (total scale ranged from 7.92 to 8.17, pCO2 ranged from 272 to 542 μatm, and aragonite saturation state (Ωarag ranged from 2.9 to 4.1. Diel cycles in carbonate chemistry were primarily driven by ncp, and warming explained 35% and 47% of the seasonal shifts in pCO2 and pH, respectively. Daytime ncp averaged 36 ± 19 mmol C m−2 h−1 in summer and 33 ± 13 mmol C m−2 h−1 in winter; nighttime ncp averaged −22 ± 20 and −7 ± 6 mmol C m−2 h−1 in summer and winter, respectively. Daytime nec averaged 11 ± 4 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 in summer and 8 ± 3 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 in winter, whereas nighttime nec averaged 2 ± 4 mmol and −1 ± 3 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 in summer and winter, respectively. Net ecosystem calcification was positively correlated with Ωarag for both seasons. Linear correlations of nec and Ωarag indicate that the Davies Reef flat may transition from a state of net calcification to net dissolution at Ωarag values of 3.4 in summer and 3.2 in winter. Diel trends in Ωarag indicate that the reef flat is currently below this calcification threshold 29.6% of the time in summer and 14.1% of the time in winter.

  15. Effect of Direct Seeding Mulch-Based Systems on Soil Carbon Storage and Macrofauna in Central Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Blanchart

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Soils represent a large carbon pool, approximately 1500 Gt, equivalent to almost three times the quantity stored in terrestrial biomass and twice the amount stored in the atmosphere. Any modification of land-use or land management can induce variations in soil carbon stocks, even in agricultural systems that are perceived to be in a steady state. These modifications also alter soil macrofauna that is known to affect soil carbon dynamics. Direct seeding Mulch-based Cropping (DMC systems with two crops per year without soil tillage have widely been adopted over the last 10 to 15 years in the Cerrado (central region of Brazil. They are replacing the traditional soybean monocropping with fallow under conventional tillage (CT. The objective of this study was to examine how DMC practices affect soil organic carbon (SOC dynamics and macrofauna (Rio Verde, Goias State. The approach was to determine soil C stocks and macrofauna in five fields under DMC aged 1, 5, 7, 11 and 13 years. In order to compare DMC systems with the native system of the region and previous land-use, a situation under native Cerrado (tree-savanna like vegetation and a field conducted traditionally (CT were also studied. Soil C stocks were calculated for the 0-10 and 0-40 cm soil depth and also for the first 400 kg m-2 of soil to compare the same amount of soil and to suppress the potential artefact of soil compaction when sample is based on fix layer depth. Soil macrofauna was hand-sorted from soil monoliths (30 cm depth, TSBF method. In our study, the annual rate of carbon storage was equal to ca. 1.6 MgC ha-1, which is in the range of values measured for DMC in different areas of Brazil, i.e., 0.4 to 1.7 MgC ha-1 with the highest rates obtained in the Cerrado region. Compared to natural vegetation, soil macrofauna in cropped systems was strongly modified. In CT, biomass and density were very low and much lower than in DMC systems. With increasing age of DMC, total macrofauna

  16. Aphotic zone carbonate production on a Miocene ramp, Central Apennines, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corda, Laura; Brandano, Marco

    2003-09-01

    The lower Miocene Latium-Abruzzi platform was a low-angle ramp that developed under tropical-to-subtropical conditions, but was dominated by bryomol and rhodalgal sediment associations. The Aquitanian to Serravallian sequence described here paraconformably overlies the Cretaceous limestones. It consists of a lowstand systems tract, a transgressive systems tract and a highstand systems tract. Based on facies analysis and on the light dependence of biotic associations, the ramp is divided into three parts: an inner ramp, a middle ramp and an outer ramp. The inner ramp facies are represented by a few metres of coral framestone, rhodolith floatstone-rudstone and balanid macroids floatstone without wave-related structures. The middle ramp consists of structureless bioclastic grainstone to packstone, floatstone and rudstone with rhodoliths and larger foraminifera. The outer ramp facies—proximal sector—are composed of crudely stratified bryozoan-dominated packstone to floatstone which extend over the whole platform. The outer ramp facies—intermediate sector—are represented by wackestone, packstone and rarely grainstone with foraminifera and echinoid fragments. The final depositional profile of the ramp was strongly influenced by the main organisms producing sediment. During the lowstand, the resulting profile is a ramp type. During the transgressive phase, the rapid spreading of the outer ramp facies belt, as a consequence of the enhanced productivity of the light-independent biota, is believed to be promoted by a change from oligotrophic to eutrophic conditions. Climate and/or tectonics are presumed to have played an important role in continental runoff and then in the nutrients delivery. During the highstand phase, the system returns to rates of production uniform throughout the platform. The high rates of carbonate production occurring in the aphotic zone are quite unusual in tropical settings and represent a provocative trend in apparent contrast with the

  17. Changes in photosynthetic carbon metabolism in senescent leaves of chickpea, Cicer arietinum L.

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrashekhar V. Murumkar; Prakash D Chavan

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic processes in mature and senescent leaves of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) have been compared. With age, leaf photosynthetic pigments viz. chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoids, and rate of 14°C fixation were considerably affected. Analysis of δ13C, and short term photosynthetic products showed no major change in the path of photosynthetic carbon fixation. Study of long term photosynthetic 14C assimilation revealed that in old senescent leaves, 14C incorporation into orga...

  18. Vertical flux of particulate organic carbon in the central South China Sea estimated from 234Th-238U disequilibria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Hao; ZENG Zhi; HE Jianhua; CHEN Liqi; YIN Mingduan; ZENG Shi; ZENG Wenyi

    2008-01-01

    234Th-238u disequilibria were applied to examine the particle dynamics in the euphotic zone of the central South China Sea during the spring 2002 cruise. The particulate organic carbon (POC), 234Th (including both dissolved and particulate) and 238U in the water column at three stations were determined. The profiles of 234Th/238U activity ratio at the three stations all showed consistent 234Th deficit as compared to 238U in the upper 100 m water column. Based on the profiles of the dissolved and particulate 234Th and a steady state box model, the dissolved 234Th scavenging rates, the particulate 234Th removal rates and their resident times were quantified. It was found that the POC downward export fluxes out of the upper 100 m euphotic zone ranged from 9.40 to 14.78 mmol.m-2.d-1. The results from this study provide new information for our understanding of carbon biogeochemical cycle in the South China Sea.

  19. Effects of COD to Phosphorus Ratios on the Metabolism of PAOs in Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal with Different Carbon Sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Jiang; Junguo He; Xiaonan Yang; Jianzheng Li

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the phosphorus removal and metabolism under various COD/P ratio, a sludge highly enriched in PAOs was used to investigate the impacts of COD/P in batch tests under different carbon supply conditions. Acetate, propionate and a mixture of acetate and propionate at a ratio of 3 ∶ 1 ( COD basis) was used as carbon sources with the COD/P of 20, 15,10 and 5�0 gCOD/gP, respectively. The minimum COD/P ratios for complete P removal were found to be 8�24 gCOD/gP for acetate, 11�40 gCOD/gP for propionate and 9�10 gCOD/gP for the 3 ∶ 1 mixture of acetate and propionate. Converted to a mass basis, all three cases had a very similar ratio of 7�7 gVFA/gP, which represented a useful guide for operation of EBPR plants to identify possible shortages inVFAs. The trend in PHV accumulation during the anaerobic period along with the decrease of COD/P ratios suggested that, PAOs may use the TCA pathway for anaerobic VFA uptake to maintain the required NADH production with reduced glycogen degradation. During the aerobic phase, the glycogen pool was reduced but remained enough compared to the requirement for anaerobic VFA uptake, and the synthesis and degradation of glycogen was not the inhibition factor of PAOs.

  20. Persistence of Carbonate Platform Environments in Central Mexico during the Oceanic Anoxic Event 2: impact of the Carribean Plateau?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomou, Brahimsamba; Adatte, Thierry; Föllmi, Karl; Arnaud-Vanneau, Annie; Fleitmann, Dominik

    2010-05-01

    The Cenomanian-Turonian Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 is described as an interruption of normal pelagic sediment deposition by several distinct intervals of widespread oceanic anoxia (Schlanger & Jenkyns, 1976; Jenkyns, 1980; Arthur et al., 1990) characterized by black shales deposition coinciding with a positive shift in carbon isotope excursion. Some authors show a relationship between OAEs and massive volcanic events associated with the emplacement of large igneous provinces (LIPs) and sea floor spreading at mid-ocean ridges (Kuroda et al., 2007; Snow et al., 2005). High metal abundance anomalies recorded in pelagic sections (e.g. Pueblo, Colorado) coincide with the massive volcanism that built the Carribean plateau (around 93-94 Ma), associated with the onset of OAE 2 (Snow et al., 2005). Mort et al., (2007) demonstrate that the onset of the OAE 2 was triggered by a short-lived but significant increase in phosphorus burial. The bottom waters became anoxic and switched from being a P sink to a P source, sustaining the productivity in a positive feedback loop. However, the behaviour of phosphorus and trace metals at larger scale, in different paleogeography and paleodepht is still poorly known. The Axaxacualco and Baranca el Cañon sections, located at the Guerrero-Morelos carbonate platform in southern Mexico exhibit a fully correlateable d13C curves. In the distal part of the carbonate platform at Axaxacualco, the maximum d13C positive excursion coincides with oligotrophic carbonate platform environments supported by low concentrations in P and characterized by abundant and diversified benthic microfauna and rudists. The impact of OAE appears may be more significant in the proximal part of the carbonate platform at Barranca, characterized by the deposition of thick laminated microbialites indicative of mesotrophic conditions. The Morelos Carbonate platform with oligotrophic to mesotrophic conditions was persistent throughout the entire OAE2 in Central Mexico despite

  1. Evidence and future scenarios of a low-carbon energy transition in Central America: a case study in Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barido, Diego Ponce de Leon; Johnston, Josiah; Moncada, Maria V.; Callaway, Duncan; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2015-10-01

    The global carbon emissions budget over the next decades depends critically on the choices made by fast-growing emerging economies. Few studies exist, however, that develop country-specific energy system integration insights that can inform emerging economies in this decision-making process. High spatial- and temporal-resolution power system planning is central to evaluating decarbonization scenarios, but obtaining the required data and models can be cost prohibitive, especially for researchers in low, lower-middle income economies. Here, we use Nicaragua as a case study to highlight the importance of high-resolution open access data and modeling platforms to evaluate fuel-switching strategies and their resulting cost of power under realistic technology, policy, and cost scenarios (2014-2030). Our results suggest that Nicaragua could cost-effectively achieve a low-carbon grid (≥80%, based on non-large hydro renewable energy generation) by 2030 while also pursuing multiple development objectives. Regional cooperation (balancing) enables the highest wind and solar generation (18% and 3% by 2030, respectively), at the least cost (US127 MWh-1). Potentially risky resources (geothermal and hydropower) raise system costs but do not significantly hinder decarbonization. Oil price sensitivity scenarios suggest renewable energy to be a more cost-effective long-term investment than fuel oil, even under the assumption of prevailing cheap oil prices. Nicaragua’s options illustrate the opportunities and challenges of power system decarbonization for emerging economies, and the key role that open access data and modeling platforms can play in helping develop low-carbon transition pathways.

  2. soil carbon pools within oak forest is endangered by global climate change in central mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Oliva, Felipe; Merino, Agustín; González-Rodriguez, Antonio; Chávez-Vergara, Bruno; Tapia-Torres, Yunuen; Oyama, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Forest soil represents the main C pool in terrestrial ecosystems. In particular, temperate forest ecosystems play an important role in the C budget among tropical countries, such as Mexico. For example, the temperate forest ecosystem contains higher C contents on average (295 Mg C ha-1) than the soil C associated with other ecosystems in Mexico (between 56 to 287 Mg C ha-1). At a regional scale, oak forest has the highest C content (460 Mg C ha-1) among the forest ecosystem in Michoacán State at Central Mexico. At the local scale, the soil C content is strongly affected by the composition of organic matter produced by the plant species. The oak species are very diverse in Mexico, distributed within two sections: Quercus sensu stricto and Lobatae. The oak species from Quercus s.s. section produced litterfall with lower concentrations of recalcitrant and thermostable compounds than oak species from Lobatae section, therefore the soil under the former species had higher microbial activity and nutrient availability than the soil under the later species. However, the forest fragment with higher amount of oak species from Quercus s.s. section increases the amount of soil C contents. Unfortunately, Quercus species distribution models for the central western region of Mexico predict a decrease of distribution area of the majority of oak species by the year 2080, as a consequence of higher temperatures and lower precipitation expected under climate change scenarios. Additionally to these scenarios, the remnant oak forest fragments suffer strong degradation due to uncontrolled wood extraction and deforestation. For this reason, the conservation of oak forest fragments is a priority to mitigate the greenhouse gases emission to the atmosphere. In order to enhance the protection of these forest fragments it is required that the society identify the ecosystem services that are provided by these forest fragments.

  3. Aerosol black carbon quantification in the central Indo-Gangetic Plain: Seasonal heterogeneity and source apportionment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishya, Aditya; Singh, Prayagraj; Rastogi, Shantanu; Babu, S. Suresh

    2017-03-01

    Two years of aerosol spectral light absorption measurements, using filter based technique, from the central Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP), Gorakhpur (26.75°N, 83.38°E, 85 m amsl), are analyzed to study their seasonal behavior and to quantify their magnitude in terms of absorbing aerosols loading and source speciation. Spectral absorption analysis reveals a four-fold enhancement in absorption in winter (W) and post-monsoon (PoM) seasons at UV wavelengths as compared to IR wavelengths on account of increased biomass burning aerosol contribution to total absorbing aerosol load. Aerosols from the biomass sources contribute 28% during W and PoM seasons as against 16% in pre-monsoon (PM) and monsoon (M) seasons to the total absorbing aerosol content. A Mode shift in the distribution of the Absorption Ångström exponent (α) from 1.3 to 1.6 from PM-M seasons to PoM-W seasons signifies change in source type of absorbing aerosols from fossil fuel to biomass burning and their relative source strength. Due to near stagnant wind conditions combined with shallow boundary layer height, where air masses travelling to the central IGP are confined to a smaller volume, in W and PoM seasons, local sources assume more prominence rather than long-range transport of aerosols. Long-term measurements of aerosols physicochemical and radiative properties from this measurement location will enhance our understanding of the complex aerosol system over the IGP and its climatic implications.

  4. Analysis of metabolic alterations in Arabidopsis following changes in the carbon dioxide and oxygen partial pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexandra Florian; Stefan Timm; Zoran Nikoloski; Takayuki Tohge; Hermann Bauwe; Wagner LArajo; Alisdair RFernie

    2014-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants are subject to a multitude of environmental variations including several which directly affect their interaction with the atmosphere. Given the indiscriminant nature of Rubisco, the relative rates of photosynthesis and photorespiration are known to be responsive to changes in gas composition. However, compre-hensive profiling methods have not yet been applied in order to characterize the wider consequences of these changes on primary metabolism in general. Moreover, although transcrip-tional profiling has revealed that a subset of photorespiratory enzymes are co-expressed, whether transcriptional responses play a role in short-term responses to atmospheric composi-tional changes remains unknown. To address these questions, plants Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) ecotype Columbia (Col-O) grown under normal air conditions were transferred to different CO2 and O2 concentrations and characterized at the physiological, molecular, and metabolic levels fol owing this transition. The results reveal alterations in the components, which are directly involved in, or supporting, photorespiration, including transcripts and metabolite levels. The results further highlight that the majority of the regulation of these pathways is not mediated at the level of transcription and that the photorespiratory pathway is essential also in conditions in which flux through the pathway is minimized, yet suggest that flux through this pathway is not mediated at the level of transcription.

  5. Sensitivity of chemical reaction networks: a structural approach. 1. Examples and the carbon metabolic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Atsushi; Fiedler, Bernold

    2015-02-21

    In biological cells, chemical reaction pathways lead to complex network systems like metabolic networks. One experimental approach to the dynamics of such systems examines their "sensitivity": each enzyme mediating a reaction in the system is increased/decreased or knocked out separately, and the responses in the concentrations of chemicals or their fluxes are observed. In this study, we present a mathematical method, named structural sensitivity analysis, to determine the sensitivity of reaction systems from information on the network alone. We investigate how the sensitivity responses of chemicals in a reaction network depend on the structure of the network, and on the position of the perturbed reaction in the network. We establish and prove some general rules which relate the sensitivity response to the structure of the underlying network. We describe a hierarchical pattern in the flux response which is governed by branchings in the network. We apply our method to several hypothetical and real life chemical reaction networks, including the metabolic network of the Escherichia coli TCA cycle.

  6. In vivo carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of heart metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurohr, K J; Barrett, E J; Shulman, R G

    1983-03-01

    Guinea pig heart metabolism was studied in vivo by 13C NMR at 20.18 MHz. High-quality proton-decoupled 13C NMR spectra with excellent signal-to-noise ratios and resolution could be obtained in 6 min. Natural-abundance spectra showed resonances that could be assigned to fatty acids, but glycogen was not seen. During intravenous infusion of D-[1-13C]glucose and insulin, the time course of myocardial glycogen synthesis was followed serially for up to 4 hr. Anoxia resulted in degradation of the labeled glycogen within 6 min and appearance of 13C label in lactic acid. Infusion of sodium [2-13C]acetate resulted in incorporation of label into the C-4, C-2, and C-3 positions of glutamate and glutamine, reflecting "scrambling" of the label expected from tricarboxylic acid cycle activity. Examination of the 31P NMR spectrum of the guinea pig heart in vivo demonstrated no change in the high-energy phosphates during the time periods of the 13C NMR experiments. Our studies indicate that 13C NMR is a unique non-destructive tool for the study of heart metabolism in vivo.

  7. Effect of U and {sup 137}Cs chronic contamination on dopamine and serotonin metabolism in the central nervous system of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houpert, P.; Lestaevel, P. [Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de la RadioProtection de l' Homme, Service de RadioBiologie et d' Epidemiologie, Lab. RadioToxicologie experimentale, Pierrelatte (France)]. E-mail: philippe.lestaevel@irsn.fr; Amourette, C. [Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees Emile Parde, Dept. de Radiobiologie et Radiopathologie, La Tronche (France); Dhieux, B.; Bussy, C.; Paquet, F. [Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de la RadioProtection de l' Homme, Service de RadioBiologie et d' Epidemiologie, Lab. RadioToxicologie experimentale, Pierrelatte (France)

    2004-02-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident, the most significant problem for the population of the former Soviet Union for the next 50-70 years will be chronic internal contamination by radionuclides. One of the few experiments carried out in this field reported that neurotransmitter metabolism in the central nervous system of the rat was disturbed after feeding with oats contaminated by {sup 137}Cs for 1 month. The present study assessed the effect of chronic contamination by depleted U or {sup 137}Cs on the metabolism of two neurotransmitters in cerebral areas of rats. Dopamine and serotonin were chosen because their metabolism has been shown to be disturbed after external irradiation, even at moderate doses. Dopamine, serotonin, and some of their catabolites were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with an electrochemical detector in five cerebral structures of rats contaminated over a 1-month period by drinking water (40 mg U{center_dot}L{sup -1} or 6500 Bq {sup 137}Cs{center_dot}L{sup -1}). In the striatum, hippocampus, cerebral cortex, thalamus, and cerebellum, the dopamine, serotonin, and catabolite levels were not significantly different between the control rats and rats contaminated by U or {sup 137}Cs. These results are not in accordance with those previously described. (author)

  8. Influence of central inhibition of sympathetic nervous activity on myocardial metabolism in chronic heart failure: acute effects of the imidazoline I1-receptor agonist moxonidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobini, Reza; Fu, Michael; Jansson, Per-Anders; Bergh, Claes-Håkan; Scharin Täng, Margareta; Waagstein, Finn; Andersson, Bert

    2006-03-01

    Although beta-adrenergic blockade is beneficial in heart failure, inhibition of central sympathetic outflow using moxonidine has been associated with increased mortality. In the present study, we studied the acute effects of the imidazoline-receptor agonist moxonidine on haemodynamics, NA (noradrenaline) kinetics and myocardial metabolism. Fifteen patients with CHF (chronic heart failure) were randomized to a single dose of 0.6 mg of sustained-release moxonidine or matching placebo. Haemodynamics, NA kinetics and myocardial metabolism were studied over a 2.5 h time period. There was a significant reduction in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures, together with a decrease in cardiac index in the moxonidine group. Furthermore, there was a simultaneous reduction in systemic and cardiac net spillover of NA in the moxonidine group. Analysis of myocardial consumption of substrates in the moxonidine group showed a significant increase in non-esterified fatty acid consumption and a possible trend towards an increase in myocardial oxygen consumption compared with the placebo group (P=0.16). We conclude that a single dose of moxonidine (0.6 mg) in patients already treated with a beta-blocker reduced cardiac and overall sympathetic activity. The finding of increased lipid consumption without decreased myocardial oxygen consumption indicates a lack of positive effects on myocardial metabolism under these conditions. We suggest this might be a reason for the failure of moxonidine to prevent deaths in long-term studies in CHF.

  9. Euglena in time: Evolution, control of central metabolic processes and multi-domain proteins in carbohydrate and natural product biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis C. O’Neill

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Euglena gracilis is a eukaryotic microalgae that has been the subject of scientific study for hundreds of years. It has a complex evolutionary history, with traces of at least four endosymbiotic genomes and extensive horizontal gene transfer. Given the importance of Euglena in terms of evolutionary cell biology and its unique taxonomic position, we initiated a de novo transcriptome sequencing project in order to understand this intriguing organism. By analysing the proteins encoded in this transcriptome, we can identify an extremely complex metabolic capacity, rivalling that of multicellular organisms. Many genes have been acquired from what are now very distantly related species. Herein we consider the biology of Euglena in different time frames, from evolution through control of cell biology to metabolic processes associated with carbohydrate and natural products biochemistry.

  10. Changes in photosynthetic carbon metabolism in senescent leaves of chickpea, Cicer arietinum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrashekhar V. Murumkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic processes in mature and senescent leaves of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. have been compared. With age, leaf photosynthetic pigments viz. chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoids, and rate of 14°C fixation were considerably affected. Analysis of δ13C, and short term photosynthetic products showed no major change in the path of photosynthetic carbon fixation. Study of long term photosynthetic 14C assimilation revealed that in old senescent leaves, 14C incorporation into organic acid and sugar fractions was enhanced.

  11. {sup 210}Pb dating of sediments from the central and the northern Adriatic Sea: The deposition and preservation of sedimentary organic carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, T.; Fowler, S.; Miquel, J.C.; La Rosa, J.

    1996-04-01

    A central goal of the ELNA project is to assess the carbon assimilation capacity of the Northern Adriatic Sea. This requires fundamental quantitative information on budgets and sinks of organic carbon. Any change in carbon production in the water column should be reflected in the underlying sediments. Moreover, the fraction of particulate organic carbon reaching the sea floor which is subsequently preserved in the sediment will be strongly coupled to sediment accumulation and mixing. In this study a series of box cores were collected in order to characterize a hypothetical eutrophication gradient extending from the Po River outflow region in the north down to the shallow meso-Adriatic depression (Jabuka Pit). The main tasks assigned to IAEA-MEL were to provide {sup 210}Pb derived sedimentation and dry-mass accumulation rates and to examine the possible correlations between sedimentary processes, the deposition and preservation of sedimentary organic carbon and pelagic primary productivity.

  12. Escherichia coli carbon source metabolism affects longevity of its predator Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brokate-Llanos, Ana María; Garzón, Andrés; Muñoz, Manuel J

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition is probably the most determinant factor affecting aging. Microorganisms of the intestinal flora lay in the interface between available nutrients and nutrients that are finally absorbed by multicellular organisms. They participate in the processing and transformation of these nutrients in a symbiotic or commensalistic relationship. In addition, they can also be pathogens. Alive Escherichia coli OP50 are usually used to culture the bacteriovorus nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Here, we report a beneficial effect of low concentration of saccharides on the longevity of C. elegans. This effect is only observed when the bacterium can metabolize the sugar, suggesting that physiological changes in the bacterium feeding on the saccharides are the cause of this beneficial effect.

  13. Clumped Isotope Thermometry Reveals Variations in Soil Carbonate Seasonal Biases Over >4 km of Relief in the Semi-Arid Andes of Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgener, L. K.; Huntington, K. W.; Hoke, G. D.; Schauer, A. J.; Ringham, M. C.; Latorre Hidalgo, C.; Díaz, F.

    2015-12-01

    The application of carbonate clumped isotope thermometry to soil carbonates has the potential to shed new light on questions regarding terrestrial paleoclimate. In order to better utilize this paleoclimate tool, outstanding questions regarding seasonal biases in soil carbonate formation and the relationship between soil carbonate formation temperatures (T(Δ47)) and surface temperatures must be resolved. We address these questions by comparing C, O, and clumped isotope data from Holocene/modern soil carbonates to modern meteorological data. The data were collected along a 170 km transect with >4 km of relief in central Chile (~30°S). Previous studies have suggested that soil carbonates should record a warm season bias and form in isotopic equilibrium with soil water and soil CO2. We identify two discrete climate zones separated by the local winter snow line (~3200 m). Below this boundary, precipitation falls as rain and soil carbonate T(Δ47) values at depths >40 cm resemble summer soil temperatures; at higher elevations, precipitation falls as snow and T(Δ47) values resemble mean annual soil temperatures. Soil carbonates from the highest sample site (4700 m), which is devoid of vegetation and located near perennial snow fields, yield anomalous δ18O, δ13C, and T(Δ47) values, indicative of kinetic isotope effects that we attribute to cryogenic carbonate formation. Our results suggest that soil carbonates from depths <40 cm are affected by large, high frequency variations in temperature and precipitation, and should not be used as paleotemperature proxies. These findings (1) highlight the role of soil moisture in modulating soil carbonate formation and the resulting T(Δ47) values, (2) underscore the importance of understanding past soil moisture conditions when attempting to reconstruct paleotemperatures using carbonate clumped isotope thermometry, and (3) suggest that soil carbonates from high elevation or high latitude sites may form under non

  14. Reservoir Potential of Silurian Carbonate Mud Mounds in the Southern Sichuan Basin, Central China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wenzhi; YANG Xiaoping; Steve KERSHAW; ZHANG Baomin

    2006-01-01

    Lower Silurian mud mounds of the Shinuilan Formation, located in the southern Sichuan Basin, China, have developed in open shelf settings in deeper water than shallow-water reef-bearing limestones that occur in the region. An integration of the outcrop, drill data and seismic profiles show that contemporaneous faults have controlled the boundary and distribution of the sedimentary facies of Lower Silurian rocks in the southern Sichuan Basin. Mounds appear to have developed in the topographic lows formed by synsedimentary faulting, on the shelf of the Yangtze Platform. Average mound thickness is 20 m, maximum 35 m. Mounds are composed mainly of micrite, possibly microbially bound, and are overlain by shales. Mound tops are preferentially dolomitized, with the Mg2+ source probably from the clay content of the mound-top carbonate. Microfacies analysis and reconstruction of the diagenetic history reveal that the mound tops have higher porosity, and are gas targets; in contrast, mound cores and limbs show pores filled by three generations of calcite cement, and therefore have a low gas potential.

  15. 犬尿氨酸代谢通路与中枢神经系统%The Kynurenine Metabolic Pathway and the Central Nervous System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宁宁; 高平进

    2008-01-01

    The kynurenine metabolic pathway involves in a cascade of enzyme reaction generated multiple biologically-active compounds.These metabolites are called"kynurenines" which participate in diverse pathophysiological processes,particularly in the central nervous system.The kynurenines have important physiological functions.For example.quinolinic acid is an Nmethyl-D-aspartate(NMDA)receptor agonist.and it can be largely accumulated in the central nervous system in many infectious nervous system diseases,resulting in neuronal excitotoxicity and death.Kynurenic acid antagonizes excitatory glutamate receptors to reduce excitotoxicityinduced neuronal death.This article reviews the related researches of the effects of kynurenine metabolic pathway on the central nervous system.%犬尿氨酸代谢通路涉及一系列酶促反应,生成多种具有生物学活性的化合物,这些代谢产物统称为"犬尿氨酸能物质".犬尿氨酸能物质参与多种病理生理学过程,在中枢神经系统中有着重要的生理功能.例如,喹咻酸是N-甲基-D-天冬氨酸受体激动剂,在许多感染性神经系统疾病中可大量堆积在中枢神经系统,导致神经元因兴奋性中毒而死亡.犬尿喹啉酸可拮抗兴奋性谷氨酸盐受体,减少因兴奋性中毒导致的神经元死亡.文章就犬尿氨酸代谢通路在中枢神经系统中作用的相关研究做了综述.

  16. Iron and carbon metabolism by a mineral-oxidizing Alicyclobacillus-like bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Adibah; Hallberg, Kevin B; Johnson, D Barrie

    2008-04-01

    A novel iron-oxidizing, moderately thermophilic, acidophilic bacterium (strain "GSM") was isolated from mineral spoil taken from a gold mine in Montana. Biomolecular analysis showed that it was most closely related to Alicyclobacillus tolerans, although the two bacteria differed in some key respects, including the absence (in strain GSM) of varpi-alicyclic fatty acids and in their chromosomal base compositions. Isolate GSM was able to grow in oxygen-free media using ferric iron as terminal electron acceptor confirming that it was a facultative anaerobe, a trait not previously described in Alicyclobacillus spp.. The acidophile used both organic and inorganic sources of energy and carbon, although growth and iron oxidation by isolate GSM was uncoupled in media that contained both fructose and ferrous iron. Fructose utilization suppressed iron oxidation, and oxidation of ferrous iron occurred only when fructose was depleted. In contrast, fructose catabolism was suppressed when bacteria were harvested while actively oxidizing iron, suggesting that both ferrous iron- and fructose-oxidation are inducible in this acidophile. Isolate GSM accelerated the oxidative dissolution of pyrite in liquid media either free of, or amended with, organic carbon, although redox potentials were significantly different in these media. The potential of this isolate for commercial mineral processing is discussed.

  17. Moderate voluntary exercise attenuates the metabolic syndrome in melanocortin-4 receptor-deficient rats showing central dopaminergic dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Obici

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Central dopamine dysregulation during VWR reinforces the link between MC4R function and molecular and behavioral responding to rewards. The data also suggest that exercise can be a successful lifestyle intervention in MC4R-haploinsufficient individuals despite reduced positive reinforcement during exercise training.

  18. Impact of predicted changes in rainfall and atmospheric carbon dioxide on maize and wheat yeilds in the Central Rift Valley of Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muluneh, A.; Biazin, B.; Stroosnijder, L.; Bewket, W.; Keesstra, S.D.

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses potential impacts of climate change on maize and wheat yields in the Central Rift Valley (CRV) of Ethiopia. We considered effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and changes in rainfall during the main (Kiremt) and the short (Belg) rainfall cropping seasons during th

  19. DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC CARBON IN DIFFERENT SOIL FRACTIONS IN ECOSYSTEMS OF CENTRAL AMAZONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Dalmo de Oliveira Marques

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Organic matter plays an important role in many soil properties, and for that reason it is necessary to identify management systems which maintain or increase its concentrations. The aim of the present study was to determine the quality and quantity of organic C in different compartments of the soil fraction in different Amazonian ecosystems. The soil organic matter (FSOM was fractionated and soil C stocks were estimated in primary forest (PF, pasture (P, secondary succession (SS and an agroforestry system (AFS. Samples were collected at the depths 0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-40, 40-60, 60-80, 80-100, 100-160, and 160-200 cm. Densimetric and particle size analysis methods were used for FSOM, obtaining the following fractions: FLF (free light fraction, IALF (intra-aggregate light fraction, F-sand (sand fraction, F-clay (clay fraction and F-silt (silt fraction. The 0-5 cm layer contains 60 % of soil C, which is associated with the FLF. The F-clay was responsible for 70 % of C retained in the 0-200 cm depth. There was a 12.7 g kg-1 C gain in the FLF from PF to SS, and a 4.4 g kg-1 C gain from PF to AFS, showing that SS and AFS areas recover soil organic C, constituting feasible C-recovery alternatives for degraded and intensively farmed soils in Amazonia. The greatest total stocks of carbon in soil fractions were, in decreasing order: (101.3 Mg ha-1 of C - AFS > (98.4 Mg ha-1 of C - FP > (92.9 Mg ha-1 of C - SS > (64.0 Mg ha-1 of C - P. The forms of land use in the Amazon influence C distribution in soil fractions, resulting in short- or long-term changes.

  20. Metabolic Profiling with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Capillary Electrophoresis-Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Carbon-Nitrogen Status of Tobacco Leaves Across Different Planting Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jieyu; Zhao, Yanni; Hu, Chunxiu; Zhao, Chunxia; Zhang, Junjie; Li, Lili; Zeng, Jun; Peng, Xiaojun; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2016-02-05

    The interaction between carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism can reflect plant growth status and environmental factors. Little is known regarding the connections between C-N metabolism and growing regions under field conditions. To comprehensively investigate the relationship in mature tobacco leaves, we established metabolomics approaches based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (CE-TOF-MS). Approximately 240 polar metabolites were determined. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that the growing region greatly influenced the metabolic profiles of tobacco leaves. A metabolic correlation network and related pathway maps were used to reveal the global overview of the alteration of C-N metabolism across three typical regions. In Yunnan, sugars and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates were closely correlated with amino acid pools. Henan tobacco leaves showed positive correlation between the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) intermediates and C-rich secondary metabolism. In Guizhou, the proline and asparagine had significant links with TCA cycle intermediates and urea cycle, and antioxidant accumulation was observed in response to drought. These results demonstrate that combined analytical approaches have great potential to detect polar metabolites and provide information on C-N metabolism related to planting regional characteristics.

  1. METABOLIC ENGINEERING TO DEVELOP A PATHWAY FOR THE SELECTIVE CLEAVAGE OF CARBON-NITROGEN BONDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Kilbane II

    2004-10-01

    The objective of the project is to develop biochemical pathways for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. The initial phase of the project was focused on the isolation or development of an enzyme capable of cleaving the C-N bond in aromatic amides, specifically 2-aminobiphenyl. The objective of the second phase of the research will be to construct a biochemical pathway for the selective removal of nitrogen from carbazole by combining the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 with the gene(s) encoding an appropriate deaminase. The objective of the final phase of the project will be to develop derivative C-N bond cleaving enzymes that have broader substrate ranges and to demonstrate the use of such strains to selectively remove nitrogen from petroleum. During the first year of the project (October, 2002-September, 2003) enrichment culture experiments resulted in the isolation of microbial cultures that utilize aromatic amides as sole nitrogen sources, several amidase genes were cloned and were included in directed evolution experiments to obtain derivatives that can cleave C-N bonds in aromatic amides, and the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11, and Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10 were cloned in vectors capable of replicating in Escherichia coli. During the second year of the project (October, 2003-September, 2004) enrichment culture experiments succeeded in isolating a mixed bacterial culture that can utilize 2-aminobiphenyl as a sole nitrogen source, directed evolution experiments were focused on the aniline dioxygenase enzyme that is capable of deaminating aniline, and expression vectors were constructed to enable the expression of genes encoding C-N bond cleaving enzymes in Rhodococcus hosts. The construction of a new metabolic pathway to selectively remove nitrogen from carbazole and other molecules typically found in petroleum should lead to the development of a process to improve oil refinery efficiency by reducing the

  2. The Stable Level of Glutamine synthetase 2 Plays an Important Role in Rice Growth and in Carbon-Nitrogen Metabolic Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Aili; Zhao, Zhuqing; Ding, Guangda; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen; Cai, Hongmei

    2015-06-04

    Glutamine synthetase 2 (GS2) is a key enzyme involved in the ammonium metabolism in plant leaves. In our previous study, we obtained GS2-cosuppressed plants, which displayed a normal growth phenotype at the seedling stage, while at the tillering stage they showed a chlorosis phenotype. In this study, to investigate the chlorosis mechanism, we systematically analyzed the plant growth, carbon-nitrogen metabolism and gene expressions between the GS2-cosuppressed rice and wild-type plants. The results revealed that the GS2-cosuppressed plants exhibited a poor plant growth phenotype and a poor nitrogen transport ability, which led to nitrogen accumulation and a decline in the carbon/nitrogen ratio in the stems. Interestingly, there was a higher concentration of soluble proteins and a lower concentration of carbohydrates in the GS2-cosuppressed plants at the seedling stage, while a contrasting result was displayed at the tillering stage. The analysis of the metabolic profile showed a significant increase of sugars and organic acids. Additionally, gene expression patterns were different in root and leaf of GS2-cosuppressed plants between the seedling and tillering stage. These results indicated the important role of a stable level of GS2 transcription during normal rice development and the importance of the carbon-nitrogen metabolic balance in rice growth.

  3. Alcohol-induced One-carbon Metabolism Impairment Promotes Dysfunction of DNA Base Excision Repair in Adult Brain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Anna-Kate; Hewetson, Aveline; Agrawal, Rajiv G.; Dagda, Marisela; Dagda, Raul; Moaddel, Ruin; Balbo, Silvia; Sanghvi, Mitesh; Chen, Yukun; Hogue, Ryan J.; Bergeson, Susan E.; Henderson, George I.; Kruman, Inna I.

    2012-01-01

    The brain is one of the major targets of chronic alcohol abuse. Yet the fundamental mechanisms underlying alcohol-mediated brain damage remain unclear. The products of alcohol metabolism cause DNA damage, which in conditions of DNA repair dysfunction leads to genomic instability and neural death. We propose that one-carbon metabolism (OCM) impairment associated with long term chronic ethanol intake is a key factor in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity, because OCM provides cells with DNA precursors for DNA repair and methyl groups for DNA methylation, both critical for genomic stability. Using histological (immunohistochemistry and stereological counting) and biochemical assays, we show that 3-week chronic exposure of adult mice to 5% ethanol (Lieber-Decarli diet) results in increased DNA damage, reduced DNA repair, and neuronal death in the brain. These were concomitant with compromised OCM, as evidenced by elevated homocysteine, a marker of OCM dysfunction. We conclude that OCM dysfunction plays a causal role in alcohol-induced genomic instability in the brain because OCM status determines the alcohol effect on DNA damage/repair and genomic stability. Short ethanol exposure, which did not disturb OCM, also did not affect the response to DNA damage, whereas additional OCM disturbance induced by deficiency in a key OCM enzyme, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) in Mthfr+/− mice, exaggerated the ethanol effect on DNA repair. Thus, the impact of long term ethanol exposure on DNA repair and genomic stability in the brain results from OCM dysfunction, and MTHFR mutations such as Mthfr 677C→T, common in human population, may exaggerate the adverse effects of ethanol on the brain. PMID:23118224

  4. Carbon and nitrogen metabolism in barley plants exposed to UV-B radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghisi, R.; Trentin, A.R.; Masi, A.; Ferretti, M. [Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Agrarie, Legnaro, Padova (Italy)

    2002-10-01

    The effect of UV-B radiation on FW, leaf and stem length, photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution, levels of carbohydrates and nitrates, and extractable activities of some of the enzymes involved in C and N metabolism was evaluated in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Express) seedlings during the 9 days following transfer to an UV-B enriched environment. The results show that under our experimental conditions UV-B radiation scarcely affects the photosynthetic competence of barley leaves, expressed as RuBP carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.39) activity, O{sub 2} evolution rate and chlorophyll content. Nevertheless, this treatment induced significant alterations of the enzyme activity of nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1) and glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2), although only after a few days of treatment. The effects were not confined to the exposed tissue, but were detectable also at the root level. In fact, nitrate reductase decreased in response to UV-B in both leaf and root tissue, whereas glutamine synthetase was affected only in the root. In contrast, nitrate content was not influenced by the treatment, neither in root nor in leaf tissue, whilst leaf sucrose diminished in exposed plants only on the last day of treatment. (au)

  5. Metabolic Engineering to Develop a Pathway for the Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Nitrogen Bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Kilbane II

    2005-10-01

    The objective of the project is to develop a biochemical pathway for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. Specifically a novel biochemical pathway will be developed for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in carbazole. The cleavage of the first C-N bond in carbazole is accomplished by the enzyme carbazole dioxygenase, that catalyzes the conversion of carbazole to 2-aminobiphenyl-2,3-diol. The genes encoding carbazole dioxygenase were cloned from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 and from Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10. The selective cleavage of the second C-N bond has been challenging, and efforts to overcome that challenge have been the focus of recent research in this project. Enrichment culture experiments succeeded in isolating bacterial cultures that can metabolize 2-aminobiphenyl, but no enzyme capable of selectively cleaving the C-N bond in 2-aminobiphenyl has been identified. Aniline is very similar to the structure of 2-aminobiphenyl and aniline dioxygenase catalyzes the conversion of aniline to catechol and ammonia. For the remainder of the project the emphasis of research will be to simultaneously express the genes for carbazole dioxygenase and for aniline dioxygenase in the same bacterial host and then to select for derivative cultures capable of using carbazole as the sole source of nitrogen.

  6. Patterns of Carbon Partitioning in Leaves of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Species during Deacidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, J. T.; Holtum, JAM.

    1996-09-01

    Carbohydrates stored during deacidification in the light were examined in 11 Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species from widely separated taxa grown under uniform conditions. The hypothesis that NAD(P) malic enzyme CAM species store chloroplastic starch and glucans, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase species store extrachloroplastic sugars or polymers was disproved. Of the six malic enzyme species examined, Kalanchoe tubiflora, Kalanchoe pinnata, Kalanchoe daigremontiana, and Vanilla planifolia stored mainly starch. Sansevieria hahnii stored sucrose and Agave guadalajarana did not store starch, glucose, fructose, or sucrose. Of the five phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase species investigated, Ananus comosus stored extrachloroplastic carbohydrate, but Stapelia gigantea, Hoya carnosa, and Portea petropolitana stored starch, whereas Aloe vera stored both starch and glucose. Within families, the major decarboxylase was common for all species examined, whereas storage carbohydrate could differ both between and within genera. In the Bromeliaceae, A. comosus stored mainly fructose, but P. petropolitana stored starch. In the genus Aloe, A. vera stored starch and glucose, but A. arborescens is known to store a galactomannan polymer. We postulate that the observed variation in carbohydrate partitioning between CAM species is the result of two principal components: (a) constraints imposed by the CAM syndrome itself, and (b) diversity in biochemistry resulting from different evolutionary histories.

  7. Observability of plant metabolic networks is reflected in the correlation of metabolic profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwahn, Kevin; Küken, Anika; Kliebenstein, Daniel James;

    2016-01-01

    to obtain information about the entire system. Yet, the extent to which the data profiles reflect the role of components in the observability of the system remains unexplored. Here we first identify the sensor metabolites in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by employing state...... with in silico generated metabolic profiles from a medium-size kinetic model of plant central carbon metabolism. Altogether, due to the small number of identified sensors, our study implies that targeted metabolite analyses may provide the vast majority of relevant information about plant metabolic systems....

  8. Carbonate extraction process for the metabolic, isozymic and proteomic profiling of rose-scented geranium (Pelargonium sp.), a hyper-acidic plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangwan, Rajender Singh; Sangwan, Neelam Singh; Sharma, Pankaj Kumar; Chaurasiya, Narayan Das; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Tyagi, Bali Ram; Srivastava, Avdhesh Kumar

    2008-01-01

    Rose-scented geranium (Pelargonium sp.) is a valuable monoterpene-yielding plant. It has been well characterised phytochemically through the isolation of >270 secondary metabolites, however, there is hardly any biochemical or metabolic information concerning this plant. Initial attempts to investigate its metabolism failed to produce any enzyme activity in the tissue extracts prepared in routine extraction buffers owing to the intrinsic properties of the tissue matrix. It was recognised that cellular hyper-acidity (cell sap pH approximately 3.0) gave rise to very low protein levels in the extracts, thus prohibiting detection of activities of even primary metabolic enzymes that are usually abundantly present in plants. Tissue extraction in Tris solution without pH adjustment (as used for studies involving citrus and banana) led to little or no improvement. Therefore, a novel approach using sodium carbonate solution as an efficient extraction system for enzymes and proteins from the plant was studied. Functionality of the carbonate extraction has been demonstrated through its effectiveness, a several-fold superior performance, in yielding protein, monitoring primary metabolism and secondary metabolic enzymes, and isozymic and polypeptide profiling. The process may also be helpful in the reliable analysis of other acidic plant tissues.

  9. Sodium entry during action potentials of mammalian central neurons: incomplete inactivation and reduced metabolic efficiency in fast-spiking neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Brett C.; Bean, Bruce P.

    2009-01-01

    We measured the time course of sodium entry during action potentials of mouse central neurons at 37 °C to examine how efficiently sodium entry is coupled to depolarization. In cortical pyramidal neurons, sodium entry was nearly completely confined to the rising phase of the spike: only ~25% more sodium enters than the theoretical minimum necessary for spike depolarization. However, in fast-spiking GABAergic neurons (cerebellar Purkinje cells and cortical interneurons), twice as much sodium en...

  10. Impacts of climatic changes on carbon and water balance components of boreal forest ecosystems in central part of European Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olchev, A.; Novenko, E.; Desherevskaya, O.; Kurbatova, J.

    2009-04-01

    Within the framework of the study the possible impacts of climatic changes on carbon and water balances of boreal forest ecosystems of the central part of European Russia for period up to 2100 was estimated using results of model simulations and field measurements. The boreal forests of the Central Forest State Natural Biosphere Reserve (CFSNBR) were selected for the study. They are located at the southern boundary of south taiga zone in the European part of Russia (Tver region) and it can be expected that they will be very sensitive to modern climate warming. Expected future pattern of climatic parameters in the study area was derived using the global climatic model ECHAM5 (MPI Hamburg, Germany) and climatic scenarios B1, A1B and A2 (IPCC 2007). The possible scenarios of species composition changes of the boreal forests were developed using reconstructions of Holocene vegetation cover and climatic conditions on the base of pollen and plant macrofossil analysis of peat profiles in CFSNBR. The annual future pattern of CO2 and H2O fluxes of the forests were simulated using a process-based Mixfor-SVAT model (Olchev et al. 2002, 2008). The main advantage of Mixfor-SVAT is that it allows us to describe CO2 and H2O fluxes both in mono-specific and mixed forest stands. It is able to quantify both total ecosystem fluxes and flux partitioning among different tree species and canopy layers. It is obvious that it can be very helpful to describe accurately effects of species composition changes on structure of dynamics of carbon and water balance of forest ecosystems. Results of modeling experiments show that expected climatic and vegetation changes can have significant impact on evapotranspiration, transpiration, Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), Gross (GPP) and Net (NPP) Primary Productivities of boreal forest ecosystems. These changes have a clear seasonal trend and they are depended on species composition of a forest stand. This study was supported by the Russian Foundation

  11. Early Cretaceous Shallow-Water Platform Carbonates of the Bolkar Mountains, Central Taurides - South Turkey: Facies Analysis and Depositional Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Cemile; Taslı, Kemal; Koç, Hayati

    2016-10-01

    The study area comprises southern non-metamorphic part of the Bolkar Mountains which are situated in southern Turkey, eastern part of the Central Taurides. The studied five outcrops form geologically parts of the tectonostratigraphic units called as allochthonous Aladag Unit and autochthonous Geyikdagi Unit. The aim of this study is to describe microfacies and depositional environments of the Bolkar Mountains Early Cretaceous shallow- water platform carbonates. The Lower Cretaceous is represented by continuous thick- bedded to massive dolomite sequence ranging from 100 to 150 meters thick, which only contains locally laminated limestone intercalations in the Yüğlük section and thick to very thick-bedded uniform limestones ranging from approximately 50 to 120 meters, consist of mainly laminated- fenestral mudstone, peloidal-intraclastic grainstone-packstone, bioclastic packstone- wackestone, benthic foraminiferal-intraclastic grainstone-packstone, ostracod-fenestral wackestone-mudstone, dasycladacean algal packstone-wackestone and ooidal grainstone microfacies. Based on a combination sedimantological data, facies/microfacies and micropaleontological (predominantly dasycladacean algae and diverse benthic foraminifera) analysis, it is concluded that Early Cretaceous platform carbonates of the Bolkar Mountains reflect a tidally affected tidal-flat and restricted lagoon settings. During the Berriasian- Valanginian unfavourable facies for benthic foraminifera and dolomitization were predominate. In the Hauterivian-early Aptian, the effect of dolomitization largely disappeared and inner platform conditions still prevailed showing alternations of peritidal and lagoon facies, going from peritidal plains (representing various sub-environments including supratidal, intertidal area, tidal-intertidal ponds and ooid bars) dominated by ostracod and miliolids, to dasycladacean algae-rich restricted lagoons-subtidal. These environments show a transition in the vertical and

  12. {sup 210}Pb dating of sediments from the central and northern Adriatic Sea: deposition and preservation of sedimentary organic carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, T. F., LLNL

    1998-04-01

    Lead-210 ({sup 21O}Pb) and organic C depth distribution profiles in sediments from the northern and central Adriatic Sea were measured as part of the EEC funded project on Eutrophic Limits of the Northern Adriatic (ELNA). {sup 210}Pb derived mass-accumulation rates decrease southward from between 0.15 and 0.2 g cm{sup -2}y{sup -1} close to the Po River outflow (> 24 m, water depth) to less than 0.04 g cm{sup -2}y{sup -1} in the Jabuka Pit (246 m, water depth) in the central Adriatic Sea. The mass- accumulation rates obtained in the Jabuka Pit correspond to mean sedimentation rates of about 0.03 cm y{sup -1} (ref. porosity = 0.5) and fall between 5 to 20 times lower than rates found for north Adriatic shelf cores. Estimated sedimentation rates are considered as upper limits because of the possible effects of bioturbation and physical disturbance on the {sup 21O}Pb sedimentary record but are consistent with data from previous work. Rates of sediment accumulation and carbon burial appear to be strongly influenced by the transport of fluvial materials from land and transport of fine-grained particles. First-order estimates of organic C burial rates into surface sediment ranged from 1 to 0.028 mMol cm{sup -2}y{sup -1} between the Po delta and the Jabuka Pit regions, respectively. We estimate that a maximum of 50% of organic C preserved in surface sediment may be derived from biological production in the overlying water column.

  13. Central nervous determination of food storage--a daily switch from conservation to expenditure: implications for the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreier, Felix; Kalsbeek, Andries; Ruiter, Marieke; Yilmaz, Ajda; Romijn, Johannes A; Sauerwein, Hans P; Fliers, Eric; Buijs, Ruud M

    2003-11-01

    Here, we present a neuroendocrine concept to review the circularly interacting energy homeostasis system between brain and body. Body-brain interaction is circular because the brain immediately integrates an input to an output, and because part of this response may be that the brain modulates the sensitivity of this perception. First, we describe how the brain senses the body through neurons and blood-borne factors. Direct neuronal connections report the state of various organs. In addition, humoral factors are perceived by the blood-brain barrier and circumventricular organs. We describe how circulating energy carriers are sensed and what signals reach the brain during food intake, exercise and an immune response. We describe that the brain regulates the homeostatic process at two fundamentally different levels during the active and inactive states. The unbalanced output of the brain in the metabolic syndrome is discussed in relation with such circadian rhythms and with regional activity of the autonomic nervous system. In line with the above, we suggest a new approach for the diagnosis and therapy of the metabolic syndrome.

  14. Fungi, bacteria and soil pH: the oxalate-carbonate pathway as a model for metabolic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gaëtan; Guggiari, Matteo; Bravo, Daniel; Zopfi, Jakob; Cailleau, Guillaume; Aragno, Michel; Job, Daniel; Verrecchia, Eric; Junier, Pilar

    2012-11-01

    The oxalate-carbonate pathway involves the oxidation of calcium oxalate to low-magnesium calcite and represents a potential long-term terrestrial sink for atmospheric CO(2). In this pathway, bacterial oxalate degradation is associated with a strong local alkalinization and subsequent carbonate precipitation. In order to test whether this process occurs in soil, the role of bacteria, fungi and calcium oxalate amendments was studied using microcosms. In a model system with sterile soil amended with laboratory cultures of oxalotrophic bacteria and fungi, the addition of calcium oxalate induced a distinct pH shift and led to the final precipitation of calcite. However, the simultaneous presence of bacteria and fungi was essential to drive this pH shift. Growth of both oxalotrophic bacteria and fungi was confirmed by qPCR on the frc (oxalotrophic bacteria) and 16S rRNA genes, and the quantification of ergosterol (active fungal biomass) respectively. The experiment was replicated in microcosms with non-sterilized soil. In this case, the bacterial and fungal contribution to oxalate degradation was evaluated by treatments with specific biocides (cycloheximide and bronopol). Results showed that the autochthonous microflora oxidized calcium oxalate and induced a significant soil alkalinization. Moreover, data confirmed the results from the model soil showing that bacteria are essentially responsible for the pH shift, but require the presence of fungi for their oxalotrophic activity. The combined results highlight that the interaction between bacteria and fungi is essential to drive metabolic processes in complex environments such as soil.

  15. Simulation of Flux Distribution in Central Metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Hybridized Genetic Algorithm%杂合基因算法在酵母中间代谢途径代谢通量分析中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张慧敏; 姚善泾

    2007-01-01

    A scheme of investigating the intracellular metabolic fluxes in central metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on isotope model and tracer experiment was developed. The metabolic model applied in this study includes the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, the pentose phosphate pathway, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, CO2 anaplerotic reactions, ethanol and acetate formation, and pathways involved in amino acid synthesis. The approach of hybridized genetic algorithm combined with the sequential simplex technique was used to optimize a quadratic error function without the requirement of the information on the partial derivatives. The impact of some key parameters on the algorithm was studied. This approach was proved to be rapid and numerically stable in the analysis of the central metabolism of S.cerevisiae.

  16. Effects of lanthanum carbonate versus calcium carbonate on vascular stiffness and bone mineral metabolism in hemodialysis patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada K

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kentaro Wada,1 Yuko Wada,2 Haruhito Adam Uchida,3 Shuichi Tsuruoka4 1Division of Nephrology and Dialysis, Department of Internal Medicine, Nippon Kokan Fukuyama Hospital, Hiroshima, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Central Hospital, Hiroshima, 3Department of Chronic Kidney Disease and Cardiovascular Disease, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, 4Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan Background: Vascular calcification contributes to cardiovascular disease in hemodialysis (HD patients with diabetes. The randomized controlled trial reported here compared the effects of lanthanum carbonate (LC and calcium carbonate (CC on vascular stiffness assessed using brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV, intima-media thickness (IMT, bone mineral density (BMD, and serum markers of chronic kidney disease – mineral and bone disorder in such patients. Methods: Ba-PWV, IMT, BMD, and the biomarkers osteocalcin (OC and bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP were examined in 43 type 2 diabetes HD patients treated with LC (n=21 or CC (n=22 for 2 years. Results: Forty-one patients completed the study (19, LC; 22, CC. The mean ba-PWV significantly increased only in the CC group (median: 2,280.5 to 2,402.5 cm/s, P<0.05, after 24-month treatment; it remained unchanged in the LC group (median: 1,830.5 to 2,018.3 cm/s. However, the difference between the groups did not reach statistical significance. Changes in IMT and BMD were not different between the two groups. Changes in serum phosphorus, corrected calcium, and intact parathyroid hormone levels were similar between the groups. The incidence of fracture was 0% (0/19 in the LC group, and 13.6% (3/22 in the CC group (P=0.2478. The OC/BAP ratio increased significantly in the LC group (median: 0.83 to 2.47, compared with in the CC group (median: 0.77 to 1.40 (P=0.036. Conclusion: From

  17. Glucose metabolism in the antibiotic producing actinomycete Nonomuraea sp ATCC 39727

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Nina; Bruheim, Per; Nielsen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    primary carbon metabolism in further detail, Nonomuraea was cultivated with [1-C-13] glucose as the only carbon source and the C-13-labeling patterns of proteinogenic amino acids were determined by GC-MS analysis. Through this method, the fluxes in the central carbon metabolism during balanced growth were......The actinomycete Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727, producer of the glycopeptide A40926 that is used as precursor for the novel antibiotic dalbavancin, has an unusual carbon metabolism. Glucose is primarily metabolized via the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway, although the energetically more favorable Embden...... - Meyerhof - Parnas (EMP) pathway is present in this organism. Moreover, Nonomuraea utilizes a PPi-dependent phosphofructokinase, an enzyme that has been connected with anaerobic metabolism in eukaryotes and higher plants, but recently has been recognized in several actinomycetes. In order to study its...

  18. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein is Related to Central Obesity and the Number of Metabolic Syndrome Components in Jamaican Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Nadia R.; Ferguson, Trevor S.; Bennett, Franklyn I.; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K.; Younger-Coleman, Novie O. M.; Jackson, Maria D.; Samms-Vaughan, Maureen E.; Wilks, Rainford J.

    2014-01-01

    associated with central obesity and the number of metabolic syndrome components. PMID:26664862

  19. High sensitivity C-reactive protein is related to central obesity and the number of metabolic syndrome components in Jamaican young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia R Bennett

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundHigh-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP has been shown to predict cardiovascular disease (CVD endpoints and is associated with CVD risk factors and the metabolic syndrome. This study evaluated the association between hsCRP and CVD risk factors among Afro-Caribbean young adults in Jamaica. MethodsWe conducted a cross-sectional analysis of data from the Jamaica 1986 Birth Cohort Study. Data were collected between 2005 and 2007 when participants were 18-20 years old. All participants completed an interviewer administered questionnaire and had anthropometric and blood pressure (BP measurements performed. Fasting blood samples were collected for measurement of glucose, lipids and hsCRP. Logistic regression models were used to identify factors independently associated with high hsCRP.ResultsAnalyses included 342 men and 404 women with mean age 18.8 ± 0.6 years. Approximately 15% of the participants had high risk hsCRP (>3 mg/L, with a higher prevalence among women (20% vs. 9%; p<0.001. The prevalence of elevated hsCRP increased with BMI category, high waist circumference (WC, high triglycerides, low HDL, and lower parental education among women, but only for high WC and lower parental education among men. In logistic regression models controlling for sex and parental education, high WC was associated with significantly higher odds of high hsCRP (OR 7.8, 95%CI 4.8-12.9, p<0.001. In a similar model high hsCRP was also associated with the number of metabolic syndrome components. Compared to participants with no metabolic syndrome component, having one metabolic syndrome component was associated with a two-fold higher odds of high hsCRP (OR 2.2, 95%CI 1.3-3.8, p=0.005, while having three components was associated with a fourteen-fold higher odds of high hsCRP (OR 13.5, 95%CI 2.4-76.0, p<0.001. ConclusionHigh hsCRP is common among Jamaican young adults and is strongly associated with central obesity and the number of metabolic syndrome

  20. Metabolic changes in deafferented central neurons of an insect, Acheta domesticus. I. Effects upon amino acid uptake and incorporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, M.R.; Edwards, J.S.

    1982-11-01

    Chronic cercal deafferentation of the terminal ganglion in developing crickets (Acheta domesticus), which is known to suppress normal development of giant interneuron dendritic arborizations is shown here to reduce (/sup 3/H)leucine uptake and incorporation into ganglion proteins. Short term deafferentation of adult crickets, in contrast, does not depress amino acid uptake and incorporation significantly. Following unilateral long term deafferentation of the terminal ganglion, a comparison was made of the (/sup 3/H)leucine incorporation into primary dendritic processes and somata of deafferented and normally innervated medial giant interneurons (MGIs) within the same ganglion by means of quantitative autoradiography. Grain densities within dendrites of deafferented MGIs were significantly lower than in paired control MGIs' grain densities within somata of deafferented MGIs also were reduced, although the effects of deafferentation were less pronounced in somata than in target dendrites. These results imply a specific influence of afferent innervation on protein metabolism during growth and development of target postsynaptic elements.

  1. Structure of a normal seismogenic fault zone in carbonates: The Vado di Corno Fault, Campo Imperatore, Central Apennines (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demurtas, Matteo; Fondriest, Michele; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Clemenzi, Luca; Storti, Fabrizio; Bistacchi, Andrea; Di Toro, Giulio

    2016-09-01

    The Vado di Corno Fault Zone (VCFZ) is an active extensional fault cutting through carbonates in the Italian Central Apennines. The fault zone was exhumed from ∼2 km depth and accommodated a normal throw of ∼2 km since Early-Pleistocene. In the studied area, the master fault of the VCFZ dips N210/54° and juxtaposes Quaternary colluvial deposits in the hangingwall with cataclastic dolostones in the footwall. Detailed mapping of the fault zone rocks within the ∼300 m thick footwall-block evidenced the presence of five main structural units (Low Strain Damage Zone, High Strain Damage Zone, Breccia Unit, Cataclastic Unit 1 and Cataclastic Unit 2). The Breccia Unit results from the Pleistocene extensional reactivation of a pre-existing Pliocene thrust. The Cataclastic Unit 1 forms a ∼40 m thick band lining the master fault and recording in-situ shattering due to the propagation of multiple seismic ruptures. Seismic faulting is suggested also by the occurrence of mirror-like slip surfaces, highly localized sheared calcite-bearing veins and fluidized cataclasites. The VCFZ architecture compares well with seismological studies of the L'Aquila 2009 seismic sequence (mainshock MW 6.1), which imaged the reactivation of shallow-seated low-angle normal faults (Breccia Unit) cut by major high-angle normal faults (Cataclastic Units).

  2. METABOLIC ENGINEERING TO DEVELOP A PATHWAY FOR THE SELECTIVE CLEAVAGE OF CARBON-NITROGEN BONDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Kilbane III

    2003-12-01

    pathway. The construction of a new metabolic pathway to selectively remove nitrogen from carbazole and other molecules typically found in petroleum should lead to the development of a process to improve oil refinery efficiency by reducing the poisoning, by nitrogen, of catalysts used in the hydrotreating and catalytic cracking of petroleum.

  3. Visualizing Single Cell Biology: Nanosims Studies of Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism in Diazotrophic Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett-Ridge, J.; Finzi, J. A.; Capone, D. G.; Popa, R.; Nealson, K. H.; Ng, W.; Spormann, A. M.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Weber, P. K.

    2007-12-01

    , inter-species transfers (with Rhizobium epibionts), and within-cell depth profiles. Spatial enrichment patterns were correlated with morphological features evidenced in TEM images of microtomed filaments. These features indicate how 15N and 13C "hotspots" are dispersed throughout individual cells in different species, and may indicate isolated locations of increased N2 fixation, sites of amino acid/protein synthesis, or cyanophycin storage granules. This combination of Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS) analysis and high resolution microscopy allows isotopic analysis to be linked to morphological features and holds great promise for fine-scale studies of bacteria metabolism.

  4. Effect of Carbon Monoxide Donor CORM-2 on Vitamin D3 Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Feger

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Carbon monoxide (CO interferes with cytochrome-dependent cellular functions and acts as gaseous transmitter. CO is released from CO-releasing molecules (CORM including tricarbonyl-dichlororuthenium (II dimer (CORM-2, molecules considered for the treatment of several disorders including vascular dysfunction, inflammation, tissue ischemia and organ rejection. Cytochrome P450-sensitive function include formation of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH2D3 by renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 1-alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp27b1. The enzyme is regulated by PTH, FGF23 and klotho. 1,25(OH2D3 regulates Ca2+ and phosphate transport as well as klotho expression. The present study explored, whether CORM-2 influences 1,25(OH2D3 formation and klotho expression. Methods: Mice were treated with intravenous CORM-2 (20 mg/kg body weight. Plasma 1,25(OH2D3 and FGF23 concentrations were determined by ELISA, phosphate, calcium and creatinine concentrations by colorimetric methods, transcript levels by quantitative RT-PCR and protein expression by western blotting. Fgf23 mRNA transcript levels were further determined in rat osteosarcoma UMR106 cells without or with prior treatment for 24 hours with 20 µM CORM-2. Results: CORM-2 injection within 24 hours significantly increased FGF23 plasma levels and decreased 1,25(OH2D3 plasma levels, renal Cyp27b1 gene expression as well as renal klotho protein abundance and transcript levels. Moreover, treatment of UMR106 cells with CORM-2 significantly increased Fgf23 transcript levels. Conclusion: CO-releasing molecule CORM-2 enhances FGF23 expression and release and decreases klotho expression and 1,25(OH2D3 synthesis.

  5. Engineering the central biosynthetic and secondary metabolic pathways of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1201 to improve phenazine-1-carboxylic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kaiming; Zhou, Lian; Jiang, Haixia; Sun, Shuang; Fang, Yunling; Liu, Jianhua; Zhang, Xuehong; He, Ya-Wen

    2015-11-01

    The secondary metabolite phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) is an important component of the newly registered biopesticide Shenqinmycin. We used a combined method involving gene, promoter, and protein engineering to modify the central biosynthetic and secondary metabolic pathways in the PCA-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1201. The PCA yield of the resulting strain PA-IV was increased 54.6-fold via the following strategies: (1) blocking PCA conversion and enhancing PCA efflux pumping; (2) increasing metabolic flux towards the PCA biosynthetic pathway through the over-production of two DAHP synthases and blocking the synthesis of 21 secondary metabolites; (3) increasing the PCA precursor supply through the engineering of five chorismate-utilizing enzymes; (4) engineering the promoters of two PCA biosynthetic gene clusters. Strain PA-IV produced 9882 mg/L PCA in fed-batch fermentation, which is twice as much as that produced by the current industrial strain. Strain PA-IV was also genetically stable and comparable to Escherichia coli in cytotoxicity.

  6. Bacterial adaptation through distributed sensing of metabolic fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotte, Oliver; Zaugg, Judith B.; Heinemann, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    The recognition of carbon sources and the regulatory adjustments to recognized changes are of particular importance for bacterial survival in fluctuating environments. Despite a thorough knowledge base of Escherichia coli’s central metabolism and its regulation, fundamental aspects of the employed s

  7. Miocene climate as recorded on slope carbonates : examples from Malta (Central Mediterranean) and Northeastern Australia (Marion Plateau, ODP LEG 194)

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Cédric Michaël

    2003-08-01

    This study investigated the slope carbonates of two Miocene carbonate systems: the Maltese Islands (in the Central Mediterranean) and the Marion Plateau (Northeastern Australia, drilled during ODP Leg 194). The aim of the study was to trace the impact of the Miocene cooling steps (events Mi1-Mi6) in these carbonate systems, especially the Mi3 event, which took place around 13.6 Ma and deeply impacted the marine oxygen isotope record. This event also profoundly impacted oceanographic and climatic patterns, eventually leading to the establishment of the modern ice-house world. In particular, East Antarctica became ice covered at that period. The rational behind the present study was to investigate the impact that this event had on shallow water systems in order to complement the deep-sea record and hence acquire a more global perspective on Miocene climate change. The Maltese Islands were investigated for trends in bulk-rock carbon and oxygen isotopes, as well as bulk-rock mineralogy, clay minerals analysis and organic geochemisty. Results showed that the mid Miocene cooling event deeply impacted sedimentation at that location by changing sedimentation from carbonate to clay-rich sediments. Moreover, it was discovered that each phase of Antarctic glaciation, not just the major mid Miocene event, resulted in higher terrigenous input on Malta. Mass accumulation rates revealed that this was linked to increased runoff during periods when Antarctica was glaciated, and thus that the carbonate sediments were “diluted” by clay-rich sediments. The model subsequently developed to explain this implies feedback from Antarctic glaciations creating cold, dense air masses that push the ITCZ Northward, thus increasing precipitation on the North African subcontinent. Increased precipitation (or stronger African monsoon) accelerated continental weathering and runoff, thus bringing more terrigenous sediment to the paleo-location of the slope sediments of Malta. Spectral analysis of

  8. Optimizing the distribution of resources between enzymes of carbon metabolism can dramatically increase photosynthetic rate: a numerical simulation using an evolutionary algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xin-Guang; de Sturler, Eric; Long, Stephen P

    2007-10-01

    The distribution of resources between enzymes of photosynthetic carbon metabolism might be assumed to have been optimized by natural selection. However, natural selection for survival and fecundity does not necessarily select for maximal photosynthetic productivity. Further, the concentration of a key substrate, atmospheric CO(2), has changed more over the past 100 years than the past 25 million years, with the likelihood that natural selection has had inadequate time to reoptimize resource partitioning for this change. Could photosynthetic rate be increased by altered partitioning of resources among the enzymes of carbon metabolism? This question is addressed using an "evolutionary" algorithm to progressively search for multiple alterations in partitioning that increase photosynthetic rate. To do this, we extended existing metabolic models of C(3) photosynthesis by including the photorespiratory pathway (PCOP) and metabolism to starch and sucrose to develop a complete dynamic model of photosynthetic carbon metabolism. The model consists of linked differential equations, each representing the change of concentration of one metabolite. Initial concentrations of metabolites and maximal activities of enzymes were extracted from the literature. The dynamics of CO(2) fixation and metabolite concentrations were realistically simulated by numerical integration, such that the model could mimic well-established physiological phenomena. For example, a realistic steady-state rate of CO(2) uptake was attained and then reattained after perturbing O(2) concentration. Using an evolutionary algorithm, partitioning of a fixed total amount of protein-nitrogen between enzymes was allowed to vary. The individual with the higher light-saturated photosynthetic rate was selected and used to seed the next generation. After 1,500 generations, photosynthesis was increased substantially. This suggests that the "typical" partitioning in C(3) leaves might be suboptimal for maximizing the light

  9. Dynamics of dissolved inorganic carbon and aquatic metabolism in the Tana River Basin, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tamooh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A basin-wide study was conducted in the Tana River Basin (Kenya, in February 2008 (dry season, September–November 2009 (wet season, and June–July 2010 (end of the wet season to assess the dynamics and sources of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC as well as to quantify CO2 fluxes, community respiration (R, and primary production (P. Samples were collected along the altitudinal gradient (from 3600 m to 8 m in several headwater streams, reservoirs (Kamburu and Masinga, and main Tana River. DIC concentrations ranged from 0.2 mmol L–1 to 4.8 mmol L–1 but with exceptionally high values (3.5 ± 1.6 mmol L–1 in Nyambene Hills tributaries. The wide range of δ13CDIC values (−15.0‰ to −2.4‰ indicate variable sources of DIC with headwater streams recording higher signatures compared to main Tana River. With few exceptions, the entire riverine network was supersaturated in CO2, implying the system is a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere. pCO2 values were generally higher in the lower main Tana River compared to headwater tributaries, opposite to the pattern typically observed in other river networks. This was attributed to high suspended sediment in the main Tana River fuelling in-stream community respiration and net heterotrophy. This was particularly evident during 2009 wet season campaign (median pCO2 of 1432 ppm compared to 2010 end of wet season (1002 ppm and 2008 dry season (579 ppm. First-order estimates show in-stream community respiration was responsible for the bulk of total CO2 evasion (59% to 89% in main Tana River while in tributaries respiration accounted for 4% to 52% of total CO2 evasion, suggesting CO2evasion in tributaries was sustained by processes than respiration, such as CO2-oversaturated groundwater input. While sediment loads increase downstream and thus light availability decreases in the water column, both chlorophyll a (0.2 μg L–1 to 9.6 μg L–1 and primary production (0.004 μmol L–1 h–1 to 7.38 μmol L

  10. New Features on the Environmental Regulation of Metabolism Revealed by Modeling the Cellular Proteomic Adaptations Induced by Light, Carbon, and Inorganic Nitrogen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérin, Stéphanie; Leprince, Pierre; Sluse, Francis E; Franck, Fabrice; Mathy, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are currently emerging to be very promising organisms for the production of biofuels and high-added value compounds. Understanding the influence of environmental alterations on their metabolism is a crucial issue. Light, carbon and nitrogen availability have been reported to induce important metabolic adaptations. So far, the influence of these variables has essentially been studied while varying only one or two environmental factors at the same time. The goal of the present work was to model the cellular proteomic adaptations of the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon the simultaneous changes of light intensity, carbon concentrations (CO2 and acetate), and inorganic nitrogen concentrations (nitrate and ammonium) in the culture medium. Statistical design of experiments (DOE) enabled to define 32 culture conditions to be tested experimentally. Relative protein abundance was quantified by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). Additional assays for respiration, photosynthesis, and lipid and pigment concentrations were also carried out. A hierarchical clustering survey enabled to partition biological variables (proteins + assays) into eight co-regulated clusters. In most cases, the biological variables partitioned in the same cluster had already been reported to participate to common biological functions (acetate assimilation, bioenergetic processes, light harvesting, Calvin cycle, and protein metabolism). The environmental regulation within each cluster was further characterized by a series of multivariate methods including principal component analysis and multiple linear regressions. This metadata analysis enabled to highlight the existence of a clear regulatory pattern for every cluster and to mathematically simulate the effects of light, carbon, and nitrogen. The influence of these environmental variables on cellular metabolism is described in details and thoroughly discussed. This work provides an overview of the

  11. New features on the environmental regulation of metabolism revealed by modeling the cellular proteomic adaptations induced by light, carbon and inorganic nitrogen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Gérin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are currently emerging to be very promising organisms for the production of biofuels and high-added value compounds. Understanding the influence of environmental alterations on their metabolism is a crucial issue. Light, carbon and nitrogen availability have been reported to induce important metabolic adaptations. So far, the influence of these variables has essentially been studied while varying only one or two environmental factors at the same time. The goal of the present work was to model the cellular proteomic adaptations of the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon the simultaneous changes of light intensity, carbon concentrations (CO2 and acetate and inorganic nitrogen concentrations (nitrate and ammonium in the culture medium. Statistical design of experiments (DOE enabled to define 32 culture conditions to be tested experimentally. Relative protein abundance was quantified by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE. Additional assays for respiration, photosynthesis, and lipid and pigment concentrations were also carried out. A hierarchical clustering survey enabled to partition biological variables (proteins + assays into eight co-regulated clusters. In most cases, the biological variables partitioned in the same cluster had already been reported to participate to common biological functions (acetate assimilation, bioenergetic processes, light harvesting, Calvin cycle and protein metabolism. The environmental regulation within each cluster was further characterized by a series of multivariate methods including principal component analysis and multiple linear regressions. This metadata analysis enabled to highlight the existence of a clear regulatory pattern for every cluster and to mathematically simulate the effects of light, carbon and nitrogen. The influence of these environmental variables on cellular metabolism is described in details and thoroughly discussed. This work provides an overview

  12. Abnormally activated one-carbon metabolic pathway is associated with mtDNA hypermethylation and mitochondrial malfunction in the oocytes of polycystic gilt ovaries

    OpenAIRE

    Longfei Jia; Juan Li; Bin He; Yimin Jia; Yingjie Niu; Chenfei Wang; Ruqian Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with hyperhomocysteinemia and polycystic ovaries (PCO) usually produce oocytes of poor quality. However, the intracellular mechanism linking hyperhomocysteinemia and oocyte quality remains elusive. In this study, the quality of the oocytes isolated from healthy and polycystic gilt ovaries was evaluated in vitro in association with one-carbon metabolism, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) methylation, and mitochondrial function. PCO oocytes demonstrated ...

  13. The CCAAT box-binding factor stimulates ammonium assimilation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, defining a new cross-pathway regulation between nitrogen and carbon metabolisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, V D; Bohn, C; Bolotin-Fukuhara, M; Daignan-Fornier, B

    1996-04-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms are connected via the incorporation of ammonia into glutamate; this reaction is catalyzed by the NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) encoded by the GDH1 gene. In this report, we show that the GDH1 gene requires the CCAAT box-binding activator (HAP complex) for optimal expression. This conclusion is based on several lines of evidence: (1) overexpression of GDH1 can correct the growth defect of hap2 and hap3 mutants on ammonium sulfate as a nitrogen source, (ii) Northern (RNA) blot analysis shows that the steady-state level of GDH1 mRNA is strongly lowered in a hap2 mutant, (iii) expression of a GDH1-lacZ fusion is drastically reduced in hap mutants, (iv) NADP-GDH activity is several times lower in the hap mutants compared with that in the isogenic wild-type strain, and finally, (v) site-directed mutagenesis of two consensual HAP binding sites in the GDH1 promoter strongly reduces expression of GDH1 and makes it HAP independent. Expression of GDH1 is also regulated by the carbon source, i.e., expression is higher on lactate than on ethanol, glycerol, or galactose, with the lowest expression being found on glucose. Finally, we show that a hap2 mutation does not affect expression of other genes involved in nitrogen metabolism (GDH2, GLN1, and GLN3 encoding, respectively, the NAD-GDH, glutamine synthetase, and a general activator of several nitrogen catabolic genes). The HAP complex is known to regulate expression of several genes involved in carbon metabolism; its role in the control of GDH1 gene expression, therefore, provides evidence for a cross-pathway regulation between carbon and nitrogen metabolisms.

  14. Abnormally activated one-carbon metabolic pathway is associated with mtDNA hypermethylation and mitochondrial malfunction in the oocytes of polycystic gilt ovaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Longfei; Li, Juan; He, Bin; Jia, Yimin; Niu, Yingjie; Wang, Chenfei; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-01-13

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with hyperhomocysteinemia and polycystic ovaries (PCO) usually produce oocytes of poor quality. However, the intracellular mechanism linking hyperhomocysteinemia and oocyte quality remains elusive. In this study, the quality of the oocytes isolated from healthy and polycystic gilt ovaries was evaluated in vitro in association with one-carbon metabolism, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) methylation, and mitochondrial function. PCO oocytes demonstrated impaired polar body extrusion, and significantly decreased cleavage and blastocyst rates. The mitochondrial distribution was disrupted in PCO oocytes, together with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and deformed mitochondrial structure. The mtDNA copy number and the expression of mtDNA-encoded genes were significantly lower in PCO oocytes. Homocysteine concentration in follicular fluid was significantly higher in PCO group, which was associated with significantly up-regulated one-carbon metabolic enzymes betaine homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT), glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1. Moreover, mtDNA sequences coding for 12S, 16S rRNA and ND4, as well as the D-loop region were significantly hypermethylated in PCO oocytes. These results indicate that an abnormal activation of one-carbon metabolism and hypermethylation of mtDNA may contribute, largely, to the mitochondrial malfunction and decreased quality of PCO-derived oocytes in gilts.

  15. Modelling and analysis of central metabolism operating regulatory interactions in salt stress conditions in a L-carnitine overproducing E. coli strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Santos

    Full Text Available Based on experimental data from E. coli cultures, we have devised a mathematical model in the GMA-power law formalism that describes the central and L-carnitine metabolism in and between two steady states, non-osmotic and hyperosmotic (0.3 M NaCl. A key feature of this model is the introduction of type of kinetic order, the osmotic stress kinetic orders (g(OSn, derived from the power law general formalism, which represent the effect of osmotic stress in each metabolic process of the model.By considering the values of the g(OSn linked to each metabolic process we found that osmotic stress has a positive and determinant influence on the increase in flux in energetic metabolism (glycolysis; L-carnitine biosynthesis production; the transformation/excretion of Acetyl-CoA into acetate and ethanol; the input flux of peptone into the cell; the anabolic use of pyruvate and biomass decomposition. In contrast, we found that although the osmotic stress has an inhibitory effect on the transformation flux from the glycolytic end products (pyruvate to Acetyl-CoA, this inhibition is counteracted by other effects (the increase in pyruvate concentration to the extent that the whole flux increases. In the same vein, the down regulation exerted by osmotic stress on fumarate uptake and its oxidation and the production and export of lactate and pyruvate are reversed by other factors up to the point that the first increased and the second remained unchanged.The model analysis shows that in osmotic conditions the energy and fermentation pathways undergo substantial rearrangement. This is illustrated by the observation that the increase in the fermentation fluxes is not connected with fluxes towards the tricaboxylic acid intermediates and the synthesis of biomass. The osmotic stress associated with these fluxes reflects these changes. All these observations support that the responses to salt stress observed in E. coli might be conserved in halophiles.Flux evolution

  16. Transcriptional control of monolignol biosynthesis in Pinus taeda: factors affecting monolignol ratios and carbon allocation in phenylpropanoid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anterola, Aldwin M.; Jeon, Jae-Heung; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2002-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling of the phenylpropanoid pathway in Pinus taeda cell suspension cultures was carried out using quantitative real time PCR analyses of all known genes involved in the biosynthesis of the two monolignols, p-coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols (lignin/lignan precursors). When the cells were transferred to a medium containing 8% sucrose and 20 mm potassium iodide, the monolignol/phenylpropanoid pathway was induced, and transcript levels for phenylalanine ammonia lyase, cinnamate 4-hydroxylase, p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase, 4-coumarate:CoA ligase, caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase, and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase were coordinately up-regulated. Provision of increasing levels of exogenously supplied Phe to saturating levels (40 mm) to the induction medium resulted in further up-regulation of their transcript levels in the P. taeda cell cultures; this in turn was accompanied by considerable increases in both p-coumaryl and coniferyl alcohol formation and excretion. By contrast, transcript levels for both cinnamate 4-hydroxylase and p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase were only slightly up-regulated. These data, when considered together with metabolic profiling results and genetic manipulation of various plant species, reveal that carbon allocation to the pathway and its differential distribution into the two monolignols is controlled by Phe supply and differential modulation of cinnamate 4-hydroxylase and p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase activities, respectively. The coordinated up-regulation of phenylalanine ammonia lyase, 4-coumarate:CoA ligase, caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase in the presence of increasing concentrations of Phe also indicates that these steps are not truly rate-limiting, because they are modulated according to metabolic demand. Finally, the transcript profile of a putative acid/ester O-methyltransferase, proposed as an alternative catalyst for O-methylation leading

  17. Mass concentrations of black carbon measured by four instruments in the middle of Central East China in June 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Y.; Komazaki, Y.; Pochanart, P.; Liu, Y.; Akimoto, H.; Gao, J.; Wang, T.; Wang, Z.

    2008-12-01

    Mass concentrations of black carbon (BC) were determined in June 2006 at the top of Mount Tai (36.26° N, 117.11° E, 1534 m a.s.l.), located in the middle of Central East China, using four different instruments: a multi-angle absorption photometer (5012 MAAP, Thermo), a particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP, Radiance Research), an ECOC semi-continuous analyzer (Sunset Laboratory) and an Aethalometer (AE-21, Magee Scientific). High correlation coefficients (R2>0.88) were obtained between the measurements of the BC mass concentrations made using the different instruments. From the range of the slopes of the linear least-square fittings, we concluded that BC concentrations regionally-representative of the area were measured in a range with a maximum-to-minimum ratio of 1.5 (an exception was that the BC (PM2.5) concentrations derived from MAAP were ~2 times higher than the optical measurements (PM2.5) derived from the ECOC analyzer). While this range is significant, it is still sufficiently narrow to better constrain the large and highly uncertain emission rate of BC from Central East China. In detail, two optical instruments (the MAAP and the PSAP equipped with a heated inlet 400°C) tended to give higher concentrations than the thermal EC concentrations observed by the ECOC analyzer. The ratios of optical BC to thermal EC showed