WorldWideScience

Sample records for central axotomy effects

  1. A comparison of peripheral and central axotomy effects on neurofilament and tubulin gene expression in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expression of major cytoskeletal protein mRNAs was studied in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after crushing either their central or peripheral branch axons. mRNA levels in DRG neurons were examined by quantitative in situ hybridization with radiolabeled cDNA probes specific for the low-molecular-weight neurofilament protein (NF-L) and beta-tubulin. The large-sized (greater than 1000 microns 2) neurons which give rise to myelinated axons in lumbar ganglia (L4 and L5) were studied 1 d through 8 weeks after either dorsal root or sciatic nerve crush. NF-L and beta-tubulin mRNA levels in axotomized DRG neurons were compared to those in contralateral control DRG neurons, as well as to those in normal (completely untreated) DRG cells. In the case of NF-L mRNA, changes were observed after central as well as peripheral branch axotomy and the time course and magnitude of changes were similar after both types of axotomy. NF-L mRNA levels initially decreased (first 2 weeks after crush) and then began to return towards control levels at longer survival times. Similar, but less pronounced, changes in NF-L mRNA levels also occurred in contralateral DRG neurons (which were uninjured); the changes in contralateral neurons were not simply a result of surgical stress since no changes in NF-L mRNA levels were observed in sham-operated DRG neurons. In the case of tubulin mRNA, changes were observed after central as well as peripheral branch axotomy by in situ hybridization, but the time course and magnitude of changes were different after each type of axotomy

  2. Neurofilament protein synthesis in DRG neurons decreases more after peripheral axotomy than after central axotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytoskeletal protein synthesis was studied in DRG neurons after transecting either their peripheral or their central branch axons. Specifically, the axons were transected 5-10 mm from the lumbar-5 ganglion on one side of the animal; the DRGs from the transected side and contralateral control side were labeled with radiolabeled amino acids in vitro; radiolabeled proteins were separated by 2-dimensional (2D) PAGE; and the amounts of radiolabel in certain proteins of the experimental and control ganglia were quantified and compared. We focused on the neurofilament proteins because they are neuron-specific. If either the peripheral or central axons were cut, the amounts of radiolabeled neurofilament protein synthesized by the DRG neurons decreased between 1 and 10 d after transection. Neurofilament protein labeling decreased more after transection of the peripheral axons than after transection of the central axons. In contrast to axonal transections, sham operations or heat shock did not decrease the radiolabeling of the neurofilament proteins, and these procedures also affected the labeling of actin, tubulin, and the heat-shock proteins differently from transection. These results and others indicate that axonal transection leads to specific changes in the synthesis of cytoskeletal proteins of DRG neurons, and that these changes differ from those produced by stress to the animal or ganglia. Studies of the changes in neurofilament protein synthesis from 1 to 40 d after axonal transection indicate that the amounts of radiolabeled neurofilament protein synthesis were decreased during axonal elongation, but that they returned toward control levels when the axons reached cells that stopped elongation

  3. Reorganization of central terminals of myelinated primary afferents in the rat dorsal horn following peripheral axotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, C J; Shortland, P; Reynolds, M; Ridings, J; Doubell, T; Coggeshall, R E

    1995-09-11

    We have investigated the time course and extent to which peripheral nerve lesions cause a morphological reorganization of the central terminals of choleragenoid-horseradish peroxidase (B-HRP)-labelled primary afferent fibers in the mammalian dorsal horn. Choleragenoid-horseradish peroxidase is retrogradely transported by myelinated (A) sensory axons to laminae I, III, IV and V of the normal dorsal horn of the spinal cord, leaving lamina II unlabelled. We previously showed that peripheral axotomy results in the sprouting of numerous B-HRP-labelled large myelinated sensory axons into lamina II. We show here that this spread of B-HRP-labelled axons into lamina II is detectable at 1 week, maximal by 2 weeks and persists for over 6 months postlesion. By 9 months, however, B-HRP fibers no longer appear in lamina II. The sprouting into lamina II occurs whether regeneration is allowed (crush) or prevented (section with ligation), and does not reverse at times when peripheral fibers reinnervate the periphery. We also show that 15 times more synaptic terminals in lamina II are labelled by B-HRP 2 weeks after axotomy than in the normal. We interpret this as indicating that the sprouting fibers are making synaptic contacts with postsynaptic targets. This implies that A-fiber terminal reorganization is a prominent and long-lasting but not permanent feature of peripheral axotomy. We also provide evidence that this sprouting is the consequence of a combination of an atrophic loss of central synaptic terminals and the conditioning of the sensory neurons by peripheral axotomy. The sprouting of large sensory fibers into the spinal territory where postsynaptic targets usually receive only small afferent fiber input may bear on the intractable touch-evoked pain that can follow nerve injury. PMID:7499558

  4. The Effects of Phrenic Nerve Degeneration by Axotomy and Crush on the Electrical Activities of Diaphragm Muscles of Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkiş, Mehmet Eşref; Kavak, Servet; Sayır, Fuat; Him, Aydin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of axotomy and crush-related degeneration on the electrical activities of diaphragm muscle strips of experimental rats. In the present study, twenty-one male Wistar-albino rats were used and divided into three groups. The animals in the first group were not crushed or axotomized and served as controls. Phrenic nerves of the rats in the second and third groups were crushed or axotomized in the diaphragm muscle. Resting membrane potential (RMP) was decreased significantly in both crush and axotomy of diaphragm muscle strips of experimental rats (p crush and axotomy rats (p Crushing or axotomizing the phrenic nerves may produce electrical activities in the diaphragm muscle of the rat by depolarization time and half-repolarization time prolonged in crush and axotomy rats. PMID:26972299

  5. Effect of MDMA-Induced Axotomy on the Dorsal Raphe Forebrain Tract in Rats: An In Vivo Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang-Hsin Chiu

    Full Text Available 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, also known as "Ecstasy", is a common recreational drug of abuse. Several previous studies have attributed the central serotonergic neurotoxicity of MDMA to distal axotomy, since only fine serotonergic axons ascending from the raphe nucleus are lost without apparent damage to their cell bodies. However, this axotomy has never been visualized directly in vivo. The present study examined the axonal integrity of the efferent projections from the midbrain raphe nucleus after MDMA exposure using in vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI. Rats were injected subcutaneously six times with MDMA (5 mg/kg or saline once daily. Eight days after the last injection, manganese ions (Mn2+ were injected stereotactically into the raphe nucleus, and a series of MEMRI images was acquired over a period of 38 h to monitor the evolution of Mn2+-induced signal enhancement across the ventral tegmental area, the medial forebrain bundle (MFB, and the striatum. The MDMA-induced loss of serotonin transporters was clearly evidenced by immunohistological staining consistent with the Mn2+-induced signal enhancement observed across the MFB and striatum. MEMRI successfully revealed the disruption of the serotonergic raphe-striatal projections and the variable effect of MDMA on the kinetics of Mn2+ accumulation in the MFB and striatum.

  6. Exacerbation of facial motoneuron loss after facial nerve axotomy in CCR3-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek A Wainwright

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated a neuroprotective mechanism of FMN (facial motoneuron survival after facial nerve axotomy that is dependent on CD4+ Th2 cell interaction with peripheral antigen-presenting cells, as well as CNS (central nervous system-resident microglia. PACAP (pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide is expressed by injured FMN and increases Th2-associated chemokine expression in cultured murine microglia. Collectively, these results suggest a model involving CD4+ Th2 cell migration to the facial motor nucleus after injury via microglial expression of Th2-associated chemokines. However, to respond to Th2-associated chemokines, Th2 cells must express the appropriate Th2-associated chemokine receptors. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that Th2-associated chemokine receptors increase in the facial motor nucleus after facial nerve axotomy at timepoints consistent with significant T-cell infiltration. Microarray analysis of Th2-associated chemokine receptors was followed up with real-time PCR for CCR3, which indicated that facial nerve injury increases CCR3 mRNA levels in mouse facial motor nucleus. Unexpectedly, quantitative- and co-immunofluorescence revealed increased CCR3 expression localizing to FMN in the facial motor nucleus after facial nerve axotomy. Compared with WT (wild-type, a significant decrease in FMN survival 4 weeks after axotomy was observed in CCR3−/− mice. Additionally, compared with WT, a significant decrease in FMN survival 4 weeks after axotomy was observed in Rag2−/− (recombination activating gene-2-deficient mice adoptively transferred CD4+ T-cells isolated from CCR3−/− mice, but not in CCR3−/− mice adoptively transferred CD4+ T-cells derived from WT mice. These results provide a basis for further investigation into the co-operation between CD4+ T-cell- and CCR3-mediated neuroprotection after FMN injury.

  7. Intrinsic response of thoracic propriospinal neurons to axotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelzner Dennis J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central nervous system axons lack a robust regenerative response following spinal cord injury (SCI and regeneration is usually abortive. Supraspinal pathways, which are the most commonly studied for their regenerative potential, demonstrate a limited regenerative ability. On the other hand, propriospinal (PS neurons, with axons intrinsic to the spinal cord, have shown a greater regenerative response than their supraspinal counterparts, but remain relatively understudied in regards to spinal cord injury. Results Utilizing laser microdissection, gene-microarray, qRT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry, we focused on the intrinsic post-axotomy response of specifically labelled thoracic propriospinal neurons at periods from 3-days to 1-month following T9 spinal cord injury. We found a strong and early (3-days post injury, p.i upregulation in the expression of genes involved in the immune/inflammatory response that returned towards normal by 1-week p.i. In addition, several regeneration associated and cell survival/neuroprotective genes were significantly up-regulated at the earliest p.i. period studied. Significant upregulation of several growth factor receptor genes (GFRa1, Ret, Lifr also occurred only during the initial period examined. The expression of a number of pro-apoptotic genes up-regulated at 3-days p.i. suggest that changes in gene expression after this period may have resulted from analyzing surviving TPS neurons after the cell death of the remainder of the axotomized TPS neuronal population. Conclusions Taken collectively these data demonstrate that thoracic propriospinal (TPS neurons mount a very dynamic response following low thoracic axotomy that includes a strong regenerative response, but also results in the cell death of many axotomized TPS neurons in the first week after spinal cord injury. These data also suggest that the immune/inflammatory response may have an important role in mediating the early strong

  8. Spinal motoneuron synaptic plasticity after axotomy in the absence of inducible nitric oxide synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanon Renata G

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Astrocytes play a major role in preserving and restoring structural and physiological integrity following injury to the nervous system. After peripheral axotomy, reactive gliosis propagates within adjacent spinal segments, influenced by the local synthesis of nitric oxide (NO. The present work investigated the importance of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS activity in acute and late glial responses after injury and in major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I expression and synaptic plasticity of inputs to lesioned alpha motoneurons. Methods In vivo analyses were carried out using C57BL/6J-iNOS knockout (iNOS-/- and C57BL/6J mice. Glial response after axotomy, glial MHC I expression, and the effects of axotomy on synaptic contacts were measured using immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. For this purpose, 2-month-old animals were sacrificed and fixed one or two weeks after unilateral sciatic nerve transection, and spinal cord sections were incubated with antibodies against classical MHC I, GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein - an astroglial marker, Iba-1 (an ionized calcium binding adaptor protein and a microglial marker or synaptophysin (a presynaptic terminal marker. Western blotting analysis of MHC I and nNOS expression one week after lesion were also performed. The data were analyzed using a two-tailed Student's t test for parametric data or a two-tailed Mann-Whitney U test for nonparametric data. Results A statistical difference was shown with respect to astrogliosis between strains at the different time points studied. Also, MHC I expression by iNOS-/- microglial cells did not increase at one or two weeks after unilateral axotomy. There was a difference in synaptophysin expression reflecting synaptic elimination, in which iNOS-/- mice displayed a decreased number of the inputs to alpha motoneurons, in comparison to that of C57BL/6J. Conclusion The findings herein indicate that i

  9. KATP channel subunits in rat dorsal root ganglia: alterations by painful axotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemes Geza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP channels in neurons mediate neuroprotection, they regulate membrane excitability, and they control neurotransmitter release. Because loss of DRG neuronal KATP currents is involved in the pathophysiology of pain after peripheral nerve injury, we characterized the distribution of the KATP channel subunits in rat DRG, and determined their alterations by painful axotomy using RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Results PCR demonstrated Kir6.1, Kir6.2, SUR1 and SUR2 transcripts in control DRG neurons. Protein expression for all but Kir6.1 was confirmed by Western blots and immunohistochemistry. Immunostaining of these subunits was identified by fluorescent and confocal microscopy in plasmalemmal and nuclear membranes, in the cytosol, along the peripheral fibers, and in satellite glial cells. Kir6.2 co-localized with SUR1 subunits. Kir6.2, SUR1, and SUR2 subunits were identified in neuronal subpopulations, categorized by positive or negative NF200 or CGRP staining. KATP current recorded in excised patches was blocked by glybenclamide, but preincubation with antibody against SUR1 abolished this blocking effect of glybenclamide, confirming that the antibody targets the SUR1 protein in the neuronal plasmalemmal membrane. In the myelinated nerve fibers we observed anti-SUR1 immunostaining in regularly spaced funneled-shaped structures. These structures were identified by electron microscopy as Schmidt-Lanterman incisures (SLI formed by the Schwann cells. Immunostaining against SUR1 and Kir6.2 colocalized with anti-Caspr at paranodal sites. DRG excised from rats made hyperalgesic by spinal nerve ligation exhibited similar staining against Kir6.2, SUR1 or SUR2 as DRG from controls, but showed decreased prevalence of SUR1 immunofluorescent NF200 positive neurons. In DRG and dorsal roots proximal to axotomy SLI were smaller and showed decreased SUR1 immunofluorescence. Conclusions We

  10. Both systemic and local application of Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF is neuroprotective after retinal ganglion cell axotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietz Gunnar PH

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hematopoietic Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF plays a crucial role in controlling the number of neutrophil progenitor cells. Its function is mediated via the G-CSF receptor, which was recently found to be expressed also in the central nervous system. In addition, G-CSF provided neuroprotection in models of neuronal cell death. Here we used the retinal ganglion cell (RGC axotomy model to compare effects of local and systemic application of neuroprotective molecules. Results We found that the G-CSF receptor is robustly expressed by RGCs in vivo and in vitro. We thus evaluated G-CSF as a neuroprotectant for RGCs and found a dose-dependent neuroprotective effect of G-CSF on axotomized RGCs when given subcutaneously. As stem stell mobilization had previously been discussed as a possible contributor to the neuroprotective effects of G-CSF, we compared the local treatment of RGCs by injection of G-CSF into the vitreous body with systemic delivery by subcutaneous application. Both routes of application reduced retinal ganglion cell death to a comparable extent. Moreover, G-CSF enhanced the survival of immunopurified RGCs in vitro. Conclusion We thus show that G-CSF neuroprotection is at least partially independent of potential systemic effects and provide further evidence that the clinically applicable G-CSF could become a treatment option for both neurodegenerative diseases and glaucoma.

  11. Effects of low level laser treatment on the survival of axotomized retinal ganglion cells in adult Hamsters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwok-Fai So; Mason Chin Pang Leung; Qi Cui

    2014-01-01

    Injury to axons close to the neuronal bodies in the mammalian central nervous system causes a large proportion of parenting neurons to degenerate. It is known that optic nerve transection close to the eye in rodents leads to a loss of about half of retinal ganglion cells in 1 week and about 90% in 2 weeks. Using low level laser treatment in the present study, we demonstrated that treatment with helium-neon (660 nm) laser with 15 mW power could delay retinal ganglion cell death after optic nerve axotomy in adult hamsters. The effect was most apparent in the ifrst week with a short period of treatment time (5 minutes) in which 65–66% of retinal ganglion cells survived the optic nerve axotomy whereas 45–47% of retinal ganglion cells did so in optic nerve axotomy controls. We also found that single dose and early commencement of laser irradiation were important in protecting retinal ganglion cells following optic nerve axotomy. These ifndings thus convincingly show that appropriate laser treatment may be neuroprotective to retinal gan-glion cells.

  12. Axonal regeneration and development of de novo axons from distal dendrites of adult feline commissural interneurons after a proximal axotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenrich, Keith K; Skelton, Nicole; MacDermid, Victoria E;

    2007-01-01

    Following proximal axotomy, several types of neurons sprout de novo axons from distal dendrites. These processes may represent a means of forming new circuits following spinal cord injury. However, it is not know whether mammalian spinal interneurons, axotomized as a result of a spinal cord injur...

  13. Axotomy of tributaries of the pelvic and pudendal nerves induces changes in the neurochemistry of mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons and the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Carly J; Tomasella, Eugenia; Malet, Mariana; Seroogy, Kim B; Hökfelt, Tomas; Villar, Marcelo J; Gebhart, G F; Brumovsky, Pablo R

    2016-05-01

    Using immunohistochemical techniques, we characterized changes in the expression of several neurochemical markers in lumbar 4-sacral 2 (L4-S2) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron profiles (NPs) and the spinal cord of BALB/c mice after axotomy of the L6 and S1 spinal nerves, major tributaries of the pelvic (targeting pelvic visceral organs) and pudendal (targeting perineum and genitalia) nerves. Sham animals were included. Expression of cyclic AMP-dependent transcription factor 3 (ATF3), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT) types 1 and -2 was analysed seven days after injury. L6-S1 axotomy induced dramatic de novo expression of ATF3 in many L6-S1 DRG NPs, and parallel significant downregulations in the percentage of CGRP-, TRPV1-, TH- and VGLUT2-immunoreactive (IR) DRG NPs, as compared to their expression in uninjured DRGs (contralateral L6-S1-AXO; sham mice); VGLUT1 expression remained unaltered. Sham L6-S1 DRGs only showed a small ipsilateral increase in ATF3-IR NPs (other markers were unchanged). L6-S1-AXO induced de novo expression of ATF3 in several lumbosacral spinal cord motoneurons and parasympathetic preganglionic neurons; in sham mice the effect was limited to a few motoneurons. Finally, a moderate decrease in CGRP- and TRPV1-like-immunoreactivities was observed in the ipsilateral superficial dorsal horn neuropil. In conclusion, injury of a mixed visceral/non-visceral nerve leads to considerable neurochemical alterations in DRGs matched, to some extent, in the spinal cord. Changes in these and potentially other nociception-related molecules could contribute to pain due to injury of nerves in the abdominopelvic cavity. PMID:25749859

  14. Assimilation: central and peripheral effects

    OpenAIRE

    Weert, C.M.M. de; Kruysbergen, N.A.W.H. van

    1997-01-01

    Assimilation and contrast have opposite effects: Contrast leads to an increase of perceived differences between neighbouring fields, whereas assimilation leads to a reduction. It is relatively easy to demonstrate these effects, but the precise localisation of these effects in the perceptual system is not yet possible. In an experiment the strength of assimilation effects was modified by adding spatial noise. By varying the localisation in perceived space of the added noise (by presentation of...

  15. Central neurotransmitter disturbances underlying developmental neurotoxicological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmiran, M; Swaab, D F

    1986-01-01

    Transmission of information among neurons is of a chemical nature. The activity of the neurotransmitter in the brain is regulated by the spontaneous activity of neurotransmitter cell body and the sensitivity of both pre- and post-synaptic receptors. Neurotransmitters are present at very early stages of brain development; they do not only mediate the behavioral-physiological responses of the immature animal, but have trophic effects on the maturation of target neurons as well. Many centrally acting drugs which are frequently used also during pregnancy for the treatment of depression, hypertension, epilepsy, asthma, insomnia, hyperkinetism and other neurological and psychiatric disorders act directly on brain neurotransmitters (in particular monoamines) and behavioral states. Chronic administration of drugs acting on monoamines (such as clonidine, imipramine, alpha-methyl-Dopa, reserpine, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, diazepam) disturb the spontaneous activity and behavioral state dependency of the monoaminergic cells, influences neurotransmitter turnover and change the sensitivity of both pre- and post-synaptic receptors. Sensory deprivation during a critical period of development is known to produce permanent effect on the brain; e.g., monocular deprivation during a particular period of development in a kitten leads to a rewiring of the connectivity in the visual system in the adult cat. Disturbances in neurotransmitter activity during early life will induce a comparable reorganization of the chemical structure of the adult brain. PMID:2878401

  16. Axotomy-induced neurotrophic withdrawal causes the loss of phenotypic differentiation and downregulation of NGF signalling, but not death of septal cholinergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inestrosa Nibaldo C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Septal cholinergic neurons account for most of the cholinergic innervations of the hippocampus, playing a key role in the regulation of hippocampal synaptic activity. Disruption of the septo-hippocampal pathway by an experimental transection of the fimbria-fornix drastically reduces the target-derived trophic support received by cholinergic septal neurons, mainly nerve growth factor (NGF from the hippocampus. Axotomy of cholinergic neurons induces a reduction in the number of neurons positive for cholinergic markers in the medial septum. In several studies, the reduction of cholinergic markers has been interpreted as analogous to the neurodegeneration of cholinergic cells, ruling out the possibility that neurons lose their cholinergic phenotype without dying. Understanding the mechanism of cholinergic neurodegeneration after axotomy is relevant, since this paradigm has been extensively explored as an animal model of the cholinergic impairment observed in neuropathologies such as Alzheimer's disease. The principal aim of this study was to evaluate, using modern quantitative confocal microscopy, neurodegenerative changes in septal cholinergic neurons after axotomy and to assess their response to delayed infusion of NGF in rats. Results We found that there is a slow reduction of cholinergic cells labeled by ChAT and p75 after axotomy. However, this phenomenon is not accompanied by neurodegenerative changes or by a decrease in total neuronal number in the medial septum. Although the remaining axotomized-neurons appear healthy, they are unable to respond to delayed NGF infusion. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that at 3 weeks, axotomized cholinergic neurons lose their cholinergic phenotype without dying and down-regulate their NGF-receptors, precluding the possibility of a response to NGF. Therefore, the physiological role of NGF in the adult septal cholinergic system is to support phenotypic differentiation and not survival

  17. SOD1G93A transgenic mouse CD4+ T cells mediate neuroprotection after facial nerve axotomy when removed from a suppressive peripheral microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Mesnard-Hoaglin, Nichole A.; Xin, Junping; Haulcomb, Melissa M.; Batka, Richard J.; Sanders, Virginia M.; Jones, Kathryn J.

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease involving motoneuron (MN) axonal withdrawal and cell death. Previously, we established that facial MN (FMN) survival levels in the SOD1G93A transgenic mouse model of ALS are reduced and nerve regeneration is delayed, similar to immunodeficient RAG2-/- mice, after facial nerve axotomy. The objective of this study was to examine the functionality of SOD1G93A splenic microenvironment, focusing on CD4+ T cells, with regard t...

  18. Effects of radiotherapy on central venous ports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During radiotherapy of patients with implant able central venous ports we are often afraid of complications resulting from ports damage on the one hand and their interaction with surrounding tissues on the other hand. In experimental conditions venous ports were exposed to radiation. It was found that radiation reflected from a port is negligible and should not put patients at risk. Radiotherapy does not cause any changes within a port chamber, however it substantially affects elasticity of a polyurethane port catheter and to a minimal extent affects silicone catheter. (authors)

  19. Central obscuration effects on optical synthetic aperture imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-wen; Luo, Xiao; Zheng, Li-gong; Zhang, Xue-jun

    2014-02-01

    Due to the central obscuration problem exists in most optical synthetic aperture systems, it is necessary to analyze its effects on their image performance. Based on the incoherent diffraction limited imaging theory, a Golay-3 type synthetic aperture system was used to study the central obscuration effects on the point spread function (PSF) and the modulation transfer function (MTF). It was found that the central obscuration does not affect the width of the central peak of the PSF and the cutoff spatial frequency of the MTF, but attenuate the first sidelobe of the PSF and the midfrequency of the MTF. The imaging simulation of a Golay-3 type synthetic aperture system with central obscuration proved this conclusion. At last, a Wiener Filter restoration algorithm was used to restore the image of this system, the images were obviously better.

  20. In vivo two-photon imaging of climbing fibers plasticity after laser axotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra Mascaro, A. L.; Cesare, P.; Sacconi, L.; Grasselli, G.; Mandolesi, G.; Maco, B.; Knott, G. W.; De Paola, V.; Strata, P.; Pavone, F. S.

    2013-06-01

    In the adult nervous system, different neuronal classes show different regenerative behavior. Although previous studies demonstrated that olivocerebellar fibers are capable of axonal regeneration in a suitable environment as a response to injury, we have hitherto no details about the real dynamics of fiber regeneration. We set up a model of singularly axotomized climbing fibers (CF) to investigate their reparative properties in the adult central nervous system (CNS) in vivo. Here we describe the approach followed to characterize the reactive plasticity after injury.

  1. Ciliary neurotrophic factor prevents retrograde neuronal death in the adult central nervous system.

    OpenAIRE

    Clatterbuck, R E; Price, D L; Koliatsos, V E

    1993-01-01

    The neurocytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) was described originally as an activity that supports the survival of neurons of the chicken ciliary ganglia in vitro. The widespread expression of CNTF and its principal binding protein, CNTF receptor alpha, in the central and peripheral nervous systems suggests a broader trophic role for this peptide. In the present study, we report that CNTF prevents axotomy-induced cell death of neurons in the anteroventral and anterodorsal thalamic nuc...

  2. A tectonomagnetic effect detected in Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Palangio

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Significant variations in the absolute value of the geomagnetic field intensity related to tectonic events, as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, have been observed in several cases. To detect such a tectonomagnetic effect related to seismic activity, a seismomagnetic network was installed by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica (ING in the Abruzzi region (CentraI Italy, in July 1989. This area is being uplifting since the Pliocene. A logistic compromise between geophysical requirements and the electrified railway system tracks distribution led to the installation of five total magnetic field intensity data acquisition sites. From July 1989 to September 1992 geomagnetic intensity data were simultaneously recorded at all stations and compared to that recorded at the L'Aquila Observatory, located in the same area. A variation of about 10 nT in the absolute level of the geomagnetic field was measured at two stations located on the eastern side of the network. We suggest that the detected magnetic anomaly could resuIt from aseismic-changes in crustal stress during this time.

  3. Disassembly of the cholinergic postsynaptic apparatus induced by axotomy in mouse sympathetic neurons: the loss of dystrophin and beta-dystroglycan immunoreactivity precedes that of the acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccaria, M L; De Stefano, M E; Properzi, F; Gotti, C; Petrucci, T C; Paggi, P

    1998-08-01

    In mouse sympathetic superior cervical ganglion (SCG), cortical cytoskeletal proteins such as dystrophin (Dys) and beta1sigma2 spectrin colocalize with beta-dystroglycan (beta-DG), a transmembrane dystrophin-associated protein, and the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the postsynaptic specialization. The function of the dystrophin-dystroglycan complex in the organization of the neuronal cholinergic postsynaptic apparatus was studied following changes in the immunoreactivity of these proteins during the disassembly and subsequent reassembly of the postsynaptic specializations induced by axotomy of the ganglionic neurons. After axotomy, a decrease in the number of intraganglionic synapses was observed (t1/2 8 h 45'), preceded by a rapid decline of postsynaptic specializations immunopositive for beta-DG, Dys, and alpha3 AChR subunit (alpha3AChR) (t1/2 3 h 45', 4 h 30' and 6 h, respectively). In contrast, the percentage of postsynaptic densities immunopositive for beta1sigma2 spectrin remained unaltered. When the axotomized neurons began to regenerate their axons, the number of intraganglionic synapses increased, as did that of postsynaptic specializations immunopositive for beta-DG, Dys, and alpha3AChR. The latter number increased more slowly than that of Dys and beta-DG. These observations suggest that in SCG neurons, the dystrophin-dystroglycan complex might play a role in the assembly-disassembly of the postsynaptic apparatus, and is probably involved in the stabilization of AChR clusters. PMID:9720492

  4. [Analgesic effects of cannabinoids on central pain syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igon'kina, S I; Churiukanov, M V; Churiukanov, V V; Kukushkin, M L

    2011-01-01

    It was shown that cannabinoids anandamide, HU210 and WIN 55,212-2 inhibit both spontaneous episodes of pain and mechanical allodynia in rats with central pain syndrome caused by disturbance of inhibitory processes in the dorsal horns of lumbar spinal cord. The analgesic effect is most pronounced in the intrathecal route of administration. The intensity of analgesic actions of cannabinoids on the central pain syndrome in rats, depending on the drug is as follows: HU210 > WIN 55,212-2 > anandamide. PMID:22359935

  5. Central depressant and nootropic effects of daytime melatonin in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Onaolapo, Olakunle J; Onaolapo, Adejoke Y; Abiola, Akanni A; Lillian, Eniafe A

    2014-01-01

    Background Effects of orally administered daytime melatonin on novelty induced behaviors and spatial working memory in mice were evaluated using the open field, the Y maze and the radial arm maze. Purpose To ascertain the possible nootropic and/or central excitatory or inhibitory effects of daytime oral melatonin in mice. Methods Adult male mice from our colony, assigned to three and four groups for open field tests and memory tests respectively were given vehicle (normal saline), a standard ...

  6. Radiation induced effects in the developing central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The embryo and the human foetus are particularly sensitive to ionizing radiation and this sensitivity presents various qualitative and quantitative functional changes during intra-uterine development. Apart from radiation induced carcinogenesis, the most serious consequence of prenatal exposure in human beings is severe mental retardation. The principal data on radiation effects on human beings in the development of the central nervous system come form epidemiological studies carried out in individuals exposed in utero during the atomic explosion at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These observations demonstrate the existence of a time of maximum radiosensitivity between the weeks 8 and 15 of the gestational period, a period in which the proliferation and neuronal migration takes place. Determination of the characteristics of dose-response relationship and the possible existence of a threshold dose of radiation effects on the development of the central nervous system is relevant to radiation protection against low dose radiation and the establishment of dose limits for occupational exposure and the public. Studies were conducted on the generation of nitrous-oxide and its relation with the production of active species of oxygen in brains of exposed rats in utero exposed to doses of up to 1 Gy during their maximum radiosensitivity. The possible role of the mechanism of radiation induced damage in the development of the central nervous system is discussed

  7. Essential role of UCP1 modulating the central effects of thyroid hormones on energy balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayte Alvarez-Crespo

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: We conclude that UCP1 is essential for mediation of the central effects of thyroid hormones on energy balance, and we suggest that similar UCP1-dependent effects may underlie central energy balance effects of other agents.

  8. Effective centrality and explosive synchronization in complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, A; Villacorta-Atienza, J A; Leyva, I; Almendral, J A; Sendiña-Nadal, I; Boccaletti, S

    2015-12-01

    Synchronization of networked oscillators is known to depend fundamentally on the interplay between the dynamics of the graph's units and the microscopic arrangement of the network's structure. We here propose an effective network whose topological properties reflect the interplay between the topology and dynamics of the original network. On that basis, we are able to introduce the effective centrality, a measure that quantifies the role and importance of each network's node in the synchronization process. In particular, in the context of explosive synchronization, we use such a measure to assess the propensity of a graph to sustain an irreversible transition to synchronization. We furthermore discuss a strategy to induce the explosive behavior in a generic network, by acting only upon a fraction of its nodes. PMID:26764757

  9. Effects of ENSO on Autumn Rainfall in Central Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thang Van Vu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available 28 years (1980–2007 of station and gridded reanalysis data were used to investigate the effects of El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO on autumn rainfall in the Extended Central Vietnam (ECV region. Results show that, under El Niño conditions, autumn rainfall in Central Vietnam is reduced by about 10 to 30%. This reduction seems to be caused by a weakening of the North East monsoon circulation, which appears to be linked to an anomalous anticyclonic vortex and a positive sea level pressure anomaly over the East Sea. In addition, the disappearance of a secondary moisture source over the southern region of the East Sea also favors the reduction in rainfall over this region. Conversely, during La Niña, the total autumn rainfall in the ECV region increases by about 9 to 19%. The strengthening of the North East monsoon, with a cyclonic wind anomaly over the East Sea, helps to increase the moisture supply to the area by about 10 to 20%, resulting in enhanced rainfall in the ECV. It is also found that the La Niña conditions do not only cause an increase in rainfall, but also change the temporal distribution of the monthly rainfall over the region, with more rainfall in the latter months of the year.

  10. Peripheral and Central Effects of Melatonin on Blood Pressure Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Pechanova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The pineal hormone, melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, shows potent receptor-dependent and -independent actions, which participate in blood pressure regulation. The antihypertensive effect of melatonin was demonstrated in experimental and clinical hypertension. Receptor-dependent effects are mediated predominantly through MT1 and MT2 G-protein coupled receptors. The pleiotropic receptor-independent effects of melatonin with a possible impact on blood pressure involve the reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging nature, activation and over-expression of several antioxidant enzymes or their protection from oxidative damage and the ability to increase the efficiency of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Besides the interaction with the vascular system, this indolamine may exert part of its antihypertensive action through its interaction with the central nervous system (CNS. The imbalance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic vegetative system is an important pathophysiological disorder and therapeutic target in hypertension. Melatonin is protective in CNS on several different levels: It reduces free radical burden, improves endothelial dysfunction, reduces inflammation and shifts the balance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic system in favor of the parasympathetic system. The increased level of serum melatonin observed in some types of hypertension may be a counter-regulatory adaptive mechanism against the sympathetic overstimulation. Since melatonin acts favorably on different levels of hypertension, including organ protection and with minimal side effects, it could become regularly involved in the struggle against this widespread cardiovascular pathology.

  11. Effects of sleep deprivation on central auditory processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberalesso Paulo Breno

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sleep deprivation is extremely common in contemporary society, and is considered to be a frequent cause of behavioral disorders, mood, alertness, and cognitive performance. Although the impacts of sleep deprivation have been studied extensively in various experimental paradigms, very few studies have addressed the impact of sleep deprivation on central auditory processing (CAP. Therefore, we examined the impact of sleep deprivation on CAP, for which there is sparse information. In the present study, thirty healthy adult volunteers (17 females and 13 males, aged 30.75 ± 7.14 years were subjected to a pure tone audiometry test, a speech recognition threshold test, a speech recognition task, the Staggered Spondaic Word Test (SSWT, and the Random Gap Detection Test (RGDT. Baseline (BSL performance was compared to performance after 24 hours of being sleep deprived (24hSD using the Student’s t test. Results Mean RGDT score was elevated in the 24hSD condition (8.0 ± 2.9 ms relative to the BSL condition for the whole cohort (6.4 ± 2.8 ms; p = 0.0005, for males (p = 0.0066, and for females (p = 0.0208. Sleep deprivation reduced SSWT scores for the whole cohort in both ears [(right: BSL, 98.4 % ± 1.8 % vs. SD, 94.2 % ± 6.3 %. p = 0.0005(left: BSL, 96.7 % ± 3.1 % vs. SD, 92.1 % ± 6.1 %, p  Conclusion Sleep deprivation impairs RGDT and SSWT performance. These findings confirm that sleep deprivation has central effects that may impair performance in other areas of life.

  12. Hydrologic Effects of Brush Management in Central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, J. R.; Slattery, R.

    2011-12-01

    Encroachment of woody vegetation into traditional savanna grassland ecosystems in central Texas has largely been attributed to land use practices of settlers, most notably overgrazing and fire suppression. Implementing brush management practices (removing the woody vegetation and allowing native grasses to reestablish in the area), could potentially change the hydrology in a watershed. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with several local, State, and Federal cooperators, studied the hydrologic effects of ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei) removal as a brush management conservation practice in the Honey Creek State Natural Area in Comal County, Tex. Two adjacent watersheds of 104 and 159 hectares were used in a paired study. Rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration (Bowen ratio method), and water quality data were collected in both watersheds. Using a hydrologic mass balance approach, rainfall was allocated to surface-water runoff, evapotranspiration, and groundwater recharge. Groundwater recharge was not directly measured, but estimated as the residual of the hydrologic mass balance. After hydrologic data were collected in both watersheds for 3 years, approximately 80 percent of the woody vegetation (ashe juniper) was selectively removed from the 159 hectare watershed (treatment watershed). Brush management was not implemented in the other (reference) watershed. Hydrologic data were collected in both watersheds for six years after brush management implementation. The resulting data were examined for differences in the hydrologic budget between the reference and treatment watersheds as well as between pre- and post-brush management periods to assess effects of the treatment. Preliminary results indicate there are differences in the hydrologic budget as well as water quality between the watersheds during pre- and post-treatment periods.

  13. Differential cellular FGF-2 upregulation in the rat facial nucleus following axotomy, functional electrical stimulation and corticosterone: a possible therapeutic target to Bell's palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Gabriela P

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The etiology of Bell's palsy can vary but anterograde axonal degeneration may delay spontaneous functional recovery leading the necessity of therapeutic interventions. Corticotherapy and/or complementary rehabilitation interventions have been employed. Thus the natural history of the disease reports to a neurotrophic resistance of adult facial motoneurons leading a favorable evolution however the related molecular mechanisms that might be therapeutically addressed in the resistant cases are not known. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 pathway signaling is a potential candidate for therapeutic development because its role on wound repair and autocrine/paracrine trophic mechanisms in the lesioned nervous system. Methods Adult rats received unilateral facial nerve crush, transection with amputation of nerve branches, or sham operation. Other group of unlesioned rats received a daily functional electrical stimulation in the levator labii superioris muscle (1 mA, 30 Hz, square wave or systemic corticosterone (10 mgkg-1. Animals were sacrificed seven days later. Results Crush and transection lesions promoted no changes in the number of neurons but increased the neurofilament in the neuronal neuropil of axotomized facial nuclei. Axotomy also elevated the number of GFAP astrocytes (143% after crush; 277% after transection and nuclear FGF-2 (57% after transection in astrocytes (confirmed by two-color immunoperoxidase in the ipsilateral facial nucleus. Image analysis reveled that a seven days functional electrical stimulation or corticosterone led to elevations of FGF-2 in the cytoplasm of neurons and in the nucleus of reactive astrocytes, respectively, without astrocytic reaction. Conclusion FGF-2 may exert paracrine/autocrine trophic actions in the facial nucleus and may be relevant as a therapeutic target to Bell's palsy.

  14. The pleiotropic effects of erythropoietin in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buemi, M; Cavallaro, E; Floccari, F; Sturiale, A; Aloisi, C; Trimarchi, M; Corica, F; Frisina, N

    2003-03-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is a hydrophobic sialoglycoproteic hormone produced by the kidney and responsible for the proliferation, maturation, and differentiation of the precursors of the erythroid cell line. Human recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEpo) is used to treat different types of anemia, not only in uremic patients but also in newborns with anemia of prematurity, in patients with cancer-related anemia or myeloproliferative disease, thalassemias, bone marrow transplants, or those with chronic infectious diseases. The pleiotropic functions of Epo are well known. It has been shown that this hormone can modulate the inflammatory and immune response, has direct hemodynamic and vasoactive effects, could be considered a proangiogenic factor because of its interaction with vascular endothelial growth factor, and its ability to stimulate mitosis and motility of endothelial cells. The multifunctional role of Epo has further been confirmed by the discovery in the central nervous system of a specific Epo/Epo receptor (EpoR) system. Both Epo and EpoR are expressed by astrocytes and neurons and Epo is present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Therefore, novel functions of Epo, tissue-specific regulation, and the mechanisms of action have been investigated. In this review we have tried to summarize the current data on the role of Epo on brain function. We discuss the different sites of cerebral expression and mechanisms of regulation of Epo and its receptor and its role in the development and maturation of the brain. Second, we discuss the neurotrophic and neuroprotective function of Epo in different conditions of neuronal damage, such as hypoxia, cerebral ischemia, and subarachnoid hemorrhage, and the consequent possibility that rHuEpo therapy could soon be used in clinical practice to limit neuronal damage induced by these diseases. PMID:12638727

  15. Centralization in Decentralization : A case study of centralized goal-settings effect on employee motivation in a multiunit organization

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Sofia; Gustavsson, Karin

    2013-01-01

    With this study we aim to create an understanding about motivational effect of using centralized goal-setting in multiunit organizations. Multiunit organizations are often decentralized in their structure, allowing units and their employees to have control over their day-to-day activities and decisions. At the same time, the organization requires control in order to create uniformity. A way to impose control is by using performance targets for the units and its employees. The employees are us...

  16. Effect of reforestation on streamflow in central New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, William Joseph; Ayer, Gordon Roundy

    1961-01-01

    Hydrologic data have been collected since 1932 in central New York State to determine the effect of reforestation on streamflow. Data are available for three small partly reforested areas and for one nonreforested control area. From 35 to 58 percent of the 3 areas were reforested, mostly with species of pine and spruce. The trees were allowed to grow without thinning or cutting, and by 1958 these reforested areas had developed into dense coniferous woodlots. Intensive statistical analyses of the data from the four study areas were made in 1958. Analyses were made for three hydrologic periods: the dormant season represented by the 6-month period ending April 30, the growing season represented by the 6-month period ending October 31, and the year represented by the 12-month period ending April 30. Analyses of the hydrologic data using multiple correlation with time as a variable and analyses of covariance between early and late periods of record indicated that several significant changes had occurred in the streamflow from the partly reforested study areas. Based on correlation with precipitation, total runoff for the dormant season from the 3 study areas was reduced by annual rates of 0.17 to 0.29 inches per year. Based on correlations with streamflow from a control area, total runoff from the partly reforested Shackham Brook area was reduced by average rates of 0.14 inches per growing season, 0.23 inches per dormant season, and 0.36 inches per hydrologic year. Peak discharges on Shackham Brook during the dormant season were reduced by 1958 by an average of 41 percent for the season, with reductions ranging from an average of 66 percent for November to an average of 16 percent for April. No significant changes were found in the peak discharges for the growing season, rates of base-flow recession, volumes of direct runoff, or annual low flows of streams in the three partly reforested areas. The significant reductions in total runoff are attributed to increases in

  17. Effects of sleep deprivation on central auditory processing

    OpenAIRE

    Liberalesso Paulo Breno; D’Andrea Karlin Fabianne; Cordeiro Mara L; Zeigelboim Bianca; Marques Jair; Jurkiewicz Ari

    2012-01-01

    AbstractBackgroundSleep deprivation is extremely common in contemporary society, and is considered to be a frequent cause of behavioral disorders, mood, alertness, and cognitive performance. Although the impacts of sleep deprivation have been studied extensively in various experimental paradigms, very few studies have addressed the impact of sleep deprivation on central auditory processing (CAP). Therefore, we examined the impact of sleep deprivation on CAP, for which there is sparse informat...

  18. Neurotrophic effects of neudesin in the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Ikuo; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Zhao, Ying; Konishi, Morichika; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Neudesin (neuron-derived neurotrophic factor; NENF) was identified as a neurotrophic factor that is involved in neuronal differentiation and survival. It is abundantly expressed in the central nervous system, and its neurotrophic activity is exerted via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways. Neudesin is also an anorexigenic factor that suppresses food intake in the hypothalamus. It is a member of the membrane-associated progesterone rece...

  19. Impairment of toll-like receptors 2 and 4 leads to compensatory mechanisms after sciatic nerve axotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Freria, C. M.; Bernardes, D.; G. L. Almeida; Simões, G. F.; Barbosa, G. O.; A.L.R. Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Background Peripheral nerve injury results in retrograde cell body-related changes in the spinal motoneurons that will contribute to the regenerative response of their axons. Successful functional recovery also depends on molecular events mediated by innate immune response during Wallerian degeneration in the nerve microenvironment. A previous study in our lab demonstrated that TLR 2 and 4 develop opposite effects on synaptic stability in the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury. Therefo...

  20. Central and peripheral testosterone effects in men with heart failure: An approach for cardiovascular research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ?eljko; Bu?i?; Viktor; ?uli?

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure(HF) is a syndrome recognized as a health problem worldwide. Despite advances in treatment, patients with HF still have increased morbidity and mortality. Testosterone is one of the most researched hormones in the course of HF. Growing interest regarding the effect of testosterone, on a variety of body systems, has increased the knowledge about its mechanisms of action. The terms central and peripheral effects are used to distinguish the effects of testosterone on cardiac and extracardiac structures. Central effects include influences on cardiomyocytes and electrophysiology. Peripheral effects include influences on blood vessels, baroreceptor reactivity, skeletal muscles and erythropoesis. Current knowledge about peripheral effects of testosterone may explain much about beneficiary effects in the pathophysiology of HF syndrome. However, central, i.e., cardiac effects of testosterone are to be further explored.

  1. Management and effects of mesiodens teeth on the upper central incisor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study illustrates the orthodontic management of erupted or unerupted mesiodens teeth in the maxilla. The effect of mesiodens varies from impaction, displacement or rotation of the central incisors, space loss, and median diastema. (author)

  2. Assessment Drives Learning: The Effect of Central Exit Exams on Curricular Knowledge and Mathematical Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Jürges, Hendrik; Schneider, Kerstin; Senkbeil, Martin; Claus H. Carstensen

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we use data from the German PISA 2003 sample to study the effects of central exit examinations on student performance, student attitudes, and teacher behavior. Unlike earlier studies we use (i) a value-added measure to pin down the effect of central exit exams on learning in the last year before the exam and (ii) separate test scores for mathematical literacy and curriculum-based knowledge. The findings indicate that central exit exams only improve curriculum-based knowledge bu...

  3. Describing an "Effective" Principal: Perceptions of the Central Office Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parylo, Oksana; Zepeda, Sally J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how district leaders of two school systems in the USA describe an effective principal. Membership categorisation analysis revealed that district leaders believed an effective principal had four major categories of characteristics: (1) documented characteristics (having a track record and being a…

  4. Effect of fluidics on corneal endothelial cell density, central corneal thickness, and central macular thickness after phacoemulsification with torsional ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeep Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the relative effects of high and low fluidic parameters on endothelial cell density (ECD, central corneal thickness (CCT, and central macular thickness (CMT after phacoemulsification with torsional ultrasound. Settings and Design: Prospective, randomized clinical trial based on a tertiary eye hospital. Subjects and Methods: The study included 65 patients in each group. Patients were randomized to either the high or the low flow group using a computerized random number table. The study was patient and examiner masked. All patients underwent phacoemulsification with torsional ultrasound. Visual acuity, ECD, CCT, and CMT were measured for all patients preoperatively at 2 weeks and 6 weeks postoperatively. Statistical Analysis Used: The Shapiro–Wilks test was used to assess the normality of the data. Mann–Whitney U-test with the P value set at 0.05 was used to compare the two groups. Results: Cumulative dissipated energy was significantly higher in the low flow group (16.44 ± 9.07 vs. 11.74 ± 6.68; P = 0.002. No statistically significant difference was noted between the two groups in the ECD, CCT, CMT, or corrected distance visual acuity at the end of 6 weeks. Conclusions: No significant difference was noted in the postoperative outcome between high and low flow groups. Parameters can be modified to suit the surgeon's preference, as both high and low flow parameters were found to have comparable postoperative outcomes.

  5. Essential role of UCP1 modulating the central effects of thyroid hormones on energy balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Crespo, Mayte; Csikasz, Robert I.; Martínez-Sánchez, Noelia; Diéguez, Carlos; Cannon, Barbara; Nedergaard, Jan; López, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Classically, metabolic effects of thyroid hormones (THs) have been considered to be peripherally mediated, i.e. different tissues in the body respond directly to thyroid hormones with an increased metabolism. An alternative view is that the metabolic effects are centrally regulated. We have examined here the degree to which prolonged, centrally infused triiodothyronine (T3) could in itself induce total body metabolic effects and the degree to which brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis was essential for such effects, by examining uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) KO mice. Methods Wildtype and UPC1 KO mice were centrally-treated with T3 by using minipumps. Metabolic measurements were analyzed by indirect calorimetry and expression analysis by RT-PCR or western blot. BAT morphology and histology were studied by immunohistochemistry. Results We found that central T3-treatment led to reduced levels of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and elevated body temperature (0.7 °C). UCP1 was essential for the T3-induced increased rate of energy expenditure, which was only observable at thermoneutrality and notably only during the active phase, for the increased body weight loss, for the increased hypothalamic levels of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and for the increased food intake induced by central T3-treatment. Prolonged central T3-treatment also led to recruitment of BAT and britening/beiging (“browning”) of inguinal white adipose tissue (iWAT). Conclusions We conclude that UCP1 is essential for mediation of the central effects of thyroid hormones on energy balance, and we suggest that similar UCP1-dependent effects may underlie central energy balance effects of other agents. PMID:27069867

  6. Land use change effects on GHG dynamics in Central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLucia, N.; Bernacchi, C. J.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.

    2012-12-01

    The need for alternative energies is accelerating land use change as native or managed ecosystems are being converted to intense agricultural crops for biofuel purposes. Agriculture represents the single largest terrestrial flux of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere resulting from nutrient applications. Livestock grazing also accounts for a significant release of methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. Together, CO2, N2O and CH4 represent the dominant greenhouse gasses (GHG) that are emitted to the atmosphere through anthropogenic influences. Significant alterations to the land surface, particularly associated with changes in nutrient application rates, ability of vegetation to uptake nutrients, or changes in the stocking density of livestock, could have a meaningful impact on GHG emissions. Therefore, understanding how these changes will affect soil GHG dynamics is essential to quantify the impact of land use change on the global climate system. Large-scale changes to land cover type in Central Florida Highlands County is currently occurring in which improved pasture (bahiagrass, Paspalum notatum L., as forage for cattle, Bos taurus L.) is being replaced by energy cane (genus Saccharum L.). Fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O), soil carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) were obtained over a complete wet-dry seasonal cycle in a grazed pasture and an energy cane plantation located in Highlands County, FL. In addition, we also investigated the biotic and environmental drivers that regulate soil GHG fluxes in these ecosystems. We predicted decreased rates of CH4 released to the atmosphere after the conversion process was completed to energy cane due to the absence of grazing cattle. We also predicted increased N2O emissions from aggressive fertilization of energycane. Using static chamber measurements, we collected gas samples from four energy cane crops at varying ages and improved pastures paired to each energy cane plot. The gas samples were analyzed using gas chromatography

  7. Effects of hyperosmolarity on human isolated central airways.

    OpenAIRE

    Jongejan, R. C.; de Jongste, J. C.; Raatgeep, R. C.; Stijnen, T; Bonta, I.L.; Kerrebijn, K. F.

    1991-01-01

    1. We studied the effect of hyperosmolarity on human isolated airways because a better understanding of the effect of hyperosmolarity on the human airway wall may improve insight into the pathophysiology of hyperosmolarity-induced bronchoconstriction in asthma. 2. In cartilaginous bronchial rings dissected from fresh human lung tissue, hyperosmolar krebs-Henseleit buffer (450 mosM, extra sodium chloride added) evoked a biphasic response: a rapid relaxation phase (peak after 5.0 +/- 0.3 min) f...

  8. Opioid and non-opioid central cardiovascular effects of ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, S; Mukherjee, D; Choudhary, A K; Sinha, J N; Gurtu, S

    1990-11-01

    The cardiovascular responses to ketamine injected intracisternally were examined in chloralose anaesthetized cats. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded at different time intervals after intracisternal injection of drug or saline vehicle. The low doses of ketamine (0.5 or 1.0 mg) elicited dose dependent increase in blood pressure and heart rate. In contrast the high dose of ketamine (4 mg), produced a fall in blood pressure and heart rate. The cardiovascular response elicited by the low dose was naloxone insensitive and completely blocked by haloperidol, but not by dopamine antagonist pimozide. The vasodepressor and bradycardiac effect of the 4 mg dose was naloxone antagonizable. These data show that excitatory cardiovascular effects of the low dose result from a naloxone resistant site while in high doses an inhibitory effect is elicited by action at naloxone sensitive opiate receptors. PMID:1965327

  9. Costs and water quality effects of wastewater treatment plant centralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macal, C.M.; Broomfield, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    The costs and water quality impacts of two regional configurations of municipal wastewater treatment plants in Northeastern Illinois are compared. In one configuration, several small treatment plants are consolidated into a smaller number of regional facilities. In the other, the smaller plants continue to operate. Costs for modifying the plants to obtain various levels of pollutant removal are estimated using a simulation model that considers the type of equipment existing at the plants and the costs of modifying that equipment to obtain a range of effluent levels for various pollutants. A dynamic water-quality/hydrology simulation model is used to determine the water quality effects of the various treatment technologies and pollutant levels. Cost and water quality data are combined and the cost-effectiveness of the two treatment configurations is compared. The regionalized treatment-plant configuration is found to be the more cost-effective.

  10. Central locus for nonspeech context effects on phonetic identification (L)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotto, Andrew J.; Sullivan, Sarah C.; Holt, Lori L.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, Holt and Lotto [Hear. Res. 167, 156-169 (2002)] reported that preceding speech sounds can influence phonetic identification of a target syllable even when the context sounds are presented to the opposite ear or when there is a long intervening silence. These results led them to conclude that phonetic context effects are mostly due to nonperipheral auditory interactions. In the present paper, similar presentation manipulations were made with nonspeech context sounds. The results agree qualitatively with the results for speech contexts. Taken together, these findings suggest that the same nonperipheral mechanisms may be responsible for effects of both speech and nonspeech context on phonetic identification.

  11. Peripheral and central locus of a nonspeech phonetic context effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sarah C.; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2002-05-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that nonspeech sounds with the appropriate spectral characteristics can affect the identification of speech sounds [Lotto and Kluender, Percept. Psychophys. 60, 602-619 (1998)]. It has been proposed that these spectral context effects are due to interactions in the peripheral auditory system. For example, they could be the result of masking at the auditory nerve or of auditory enhancement effects that have been demonstrated to be monaural [Summerfield and Assmann, Percept. Psychophys. 45, 529-536 (1989)]. To examine the locus of the context effect, synthesized syllables varying from /da/ to /ga/ were preceded by single-formant stimuli that mimicked the third formant of the syllables /al/ and /ar/. The nonspeech stimulus was presented either to the same or opposite ear as the target speech stimulus. Subjects speech identifications were shifted as a function of context in predicted directions for both presentation conditions. However, the size of the shift was smaller when the context was in the ear contralateral to the target syllable. These results agree well with similar results for speech contexts. The data suggest that the context effects occur at multiple levels of the auditory system and are not simply examples of masking or auditory enhancement.

  12. Learning and the effectiveness of central bank forward guidance

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The unconventional monetary policy of forward guidance operates through the management of expectations about future paths of interest rates. This paper examines the link between expectations formation and the effectiveness of forward guidance. A standard New Keynesian model is extended to include forward guidance shocks in the monetary policy rule. Agents form expectations about future macroeconomic variables via either the standard rational expectations hypothesis or a more plausible theory ...

  13. The Effect of Central Exit Examinations on Student Achievement: Quasi-experimental Evidence from TIMSS Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Jürges, Hendrik; Schneider, Kerstin; Büchel, Felix

    2003-01-01

    This paper makes use of the regional variation in schooling legislation within the German secondary education system to estimate the causal effect of central exit examinations on student performance. We propose a difference-in-differences framework that exploits the quasi-experimental nature of the German TIMSS middle-school sample. The estimates show that students in federal states with central exit examinations clearly outperform students in other federal states, but that only part of the d...

  14. Effect of topical dorzolamide on rabbit central corneal thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Jr. G.C.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to study the effect of dorzolamide on corneal hydration in an 18-week controlled experiment using ultrasonic pachymetry. Twenty-eight male rabbits were divided randomly into four groups. The 7 rabbits in each group received eye drops containing either 2% (w/v dorzolamide or placebo in their right eye, or in their left eye. The 2% dorzolamide rabbits were treated every 8 h. Fellow eyes are defined as eyes which did not receive either dorzolamide or placebo. The study was blind for both the person who applied the drug and the one who performed the pachymetry. The effect of treatments is reported on the basis of the percentage of pachymetric variation compared to the measurement made before drug application. There was no significant difference (P = 0.061 in pachymetric variation between dorzolamide (-4.42 ± 11.71% and placebo (2.48 ± 9.63%. However, there was a significant difference (P = 0.0034 in pachymetric variation between the dorzolamide fellow eyes (-7.56 ± 10.50% and the placebo (-4.42 ± 11.71%. In conclusion, dorzolamide did not increase the corneal thickness in rabbits.

  15. Effects of rainwater harvesting on centralized urban water supply systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandet, C.; Binning, Philip John; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen;

    2010-01-01

    , Northern France, yielded supply reliabilities close to 100% for reasonable tank sizes (0.065 m3/m2 of roof area in Dinard compared with 0.262 m3/m2 in Nice with a RWSO of 30% for a detached house). However, the collection and use of rainfall results in a permanent decrease in mains water demand leading to...... an increase in water age in the distribution network. Investigations carried on a real network showed that water age is greatly affected when rainwater supplies more than 30% of the overall water demand. In urban water utilities planning, rainwater supply systems may however be profitable for the......The potential effect of widespread rainwater harvesting practices on mains water demand and quality management are investigated for three different types of urban areas characterized by different roof area to water demand ratios. Two rainfall patterns are considered with similar average annual...

  16. THE CENTRAL DISTRIBUTION OF ADRENOMEDULLIN AND ITS EFFECTS ON BLOOD PRESSURE AND HEART RATE IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏英杰; 李倩虹; 宋良文; 赵东; 张肇康; 何瑞荣; 汤健

    1996-01-01

    The present study was designed to make certairt whether there exists adrenomedullinrat central nervous system and evaluated the hemodynamic actions of in(ADM) in the administration(ICVA) of human ADM[13-52]. By immunobistochemistry (ABC method), We tound that there was a discrete localization of ADM positive immunoreactivity in the rat central system including cerebral cortex,paravent ricular tissues, hypothalamus, cerehellla cortex, mesencephalon and medulla oblongata. By reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, rat ADM mRNA was found to be expressed in rat brain. These above results of irnmunohistochemistry and RT PCR suggest that ADM exists in the rat brain. We also found that centrally administered ADM[13-52 in a dose of 0. 4 to 3.2 nmol/kg provoked marked, prolonged and dosedeioeudent increases in mean arteriBl blood pressure (MABP) and heart rate(HR). To clarify the mechanisms of the bemudynamic changes induced by centrally administered ADM[13-52], the effect of centrally administered ADM[13-52] on renal sympathetic nerve activity(RSNA)was studied, The result showed that centrally admiaaistered ADM [13-52] (1. 6 nmol/kg) provoked a marked increase in RSNA, therefore, the increases in MABP and HR induced by centrally administered ADM[13-52]might he due to the stimulation of central sympathetic mechanism. In eddtion,we also compared the relationship of activity and structure among the different fragments of ADM. In conclusion,ADM exists in the rat brain,and it may play an important role in the central control of cardiovascular system.

  17. Nitroglycerin reduces augmentation index and central blood pressure independent of effects on cardiac preload

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mike; Saddon; Karen; McNeil; Philip; Chowienczyk

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine whether reduction in central pressure augmentation and central systolic blood pressure by nitroglycerine (NTG) results from effects on pre-load or is due to arterial dilation. Methods We compared effects of NTG with those of lower body negative pressure (LBNP). Hemodynamic measurements were made at rest,during LBNP (10,20 and 30 mmHg,each for 15 min) and after NTG (10,30 and 100 μg/min,each dose for 15 min) in ten healthy volunteers. Cardiac pre-load,stroke volume and cardiac output w...

  18. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Effects of Statins in the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia J. McFarland

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, commonly referred to as statins, are widely used in the treatment of dyslipidaemia, in addition to providing primary and secondary prevention against cardiovascular disease and stroke. Statins’ effects on the central nervous system (CNS, particularly on cognition and neurological disorders such as stroke and multiple sclerosis, have received increasing attention in recent years, both within the scientific community and in the media. Current understanding of statins’ effects is limited by a lack of mechanism-based studies, as well as the assumption that all statins have the same pharmacological effect in the central nervous system. This review aims to provide an updated discussion on the molecular mechanisms contributing to statins’ possible effects on cognitive function, neurodegenerative disease, and various neurological disorders such as stroke, epilepsy, depression and CNS cancers. Additionally, the pharmacokinetic differences between statins and how these may result in statin-specific neurological effects are also discussed.

  19. Effects of centrally acting antihypertensive drugs on the microcirculation of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estato V.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the acute effects of centrally acting antihypertensive drugs on the microcirculation of pentobarbital-anesthetized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. The effects of the sympatho-inhibitory agents clonidine and rilmenidine, known to activate both alpha2-adrenoceptors and nonadrenergic I1-imidazoline binding sites (I1BS in the central nervous system, were compared to those of dicyclopropylmethyl-(4,5-dimethyl-4,5-dihydro-3H -pyrrol-2-yl-amine hydrochloride (LNP 509, which selectively binds to the I1BS. Terminal mesenteric arterioles were observed by intravital microscopy. Activation of the central sympathetic system with L-glutamate (125 µg, ic induced marked vasoconstriction of the mesenteric microcirculation (27 ± 3%; N = 6, P < 0.05. In contrast, the marked hypotensive and bradycardic effects elicited by intracisternal injection of clonidine (1 µg, rilmenidine (7 µg and LNP 509 (60 µg were accompanied by significant increases in arteriolar diameter (12 ± 1, 25 ± 10 and 21 ± 4%, respectively; N = 6, P < 0.05. The vasodilating effects of rilmenidine and LNP 509 were two-fold higher than those of clonidine, although they induced an identical hypotensive effect. Central sympathetic inhibition elicited by baclofen (1 µg, ic, a GABA B receptor agonist, also resulted in vasodilation of the SHR microvessels. The acute administration of clonidine, rilmenidine and LNP 509 also induced a significant decrease of cardiac output, whereas a decrease in systemic vascular resistance was observed only after rilmenidine and LNP 509. We conclude that the normalization of blood pressure in SHR induced by centrally acting antihypertensive agents is paralleled by important vasodilation of the mesenteric microcirculation. This effect is more pronounced with substances acting preferentially (rilmenidine or exclusively (LNP 509 upon I1BS than with those presenting important alpha2-adrenergic activity (clonidine.

  20. Central hemodynamic effect of nirmin in patients heart failure in acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nirmin, a novel dosage form of nitroglycerin, was used to treat heart failure in 47 patients on days 1-3 after myocardial idfarction. The drug was intravenously injected at 12-400μg/min for 3-24 hours. Central hemodynamic changes were evaluated from equilibrium radionuclide ventriculographic data and pulmonary diastolic and central venous pressures. Nirmin improved the clinical status in 89.3% of the patients. Hemodynamic effects of the agent were manifested by reduced myocardial preload and its improved contractility, followed by elevated left ventricular ejection fraction and decreased hypokinesia of the myocardial affected areas

  1. An investigation on the effect of central bank money injection on creating currency crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazi Mohamadzadeh Asl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effects of different factors influencing on supplement of currency in Iran and the likelihood of currency crises. The study implements two methods of Logit and Probit to determine the likelihood of currency crises based on the historical data over the period 1989-2012. In this study, currency crisis is defined in terms of three variables of currency change on market, interest rate and central bank foreign deposits. The results of the study indicate that the ratio of government (non-government liabilities to central bank/Growth domestic product (GDP has positive (negative relationship with currency crises.

  2. Identification of regeneration-associated genes after central and peripheral nerve injury in the adult rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brook Gary A

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that neurons of the peripheral nervous system have the capacity to regenerate a severed axon leading to functional recovery, whereas neurons of the central nervous system do not regenerate successfully after injury. The underlying molecular programs initiated by axotomized peripheral and central nervous system neurons are not yet fully understood. Results To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the process of regeneration in the nervous system, differential display polymerase chain reaction has been used to identify differentially expressed genes following axotomy of peripheral and central nerve fibers. For this purpose, axotomy induced changes of regenerating facial nucleus neurons, and non-regenerating red nucleus and Clarke's nucleus neurons have been analyzed in an intra-animal side-to-side comparison. One hundred and thirty five gene fragments have been isolated, of which 69 correspond to known genes encoding for a number of different functional classes of proteins such as transcription factors, signaling molecules, homeobox-genes, receptors and proteins involved in metabolism. Sixty gene fragments correspond to genomic mouse sequences without known function. In situ-hybridization has been used to confirm differential expression and to analyze the cellular localization of these gene fragments. Twenty one genes (~15% have been demonstrated to be differentially expressed. Conclusions The detailed analysis of differentially expressed genes in different lesion paradigms provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the process of regeneration and may lead to the identification of genes which play key roles in functional repair of central nervous tissues.

  3. The subtle central effect of nutraceuticals: Is it placebo or nocebo?

    OpenAIRE

    Ali I Al-Gareeb

    2015-01-01

    Background: Herbal medicines are often perceived by the general public as a and #8220;soft and #8221; alternative to Western Medicine, but the use of these substances can be risky since they can induce nocebo effect Aim: To evaluate the nocebo effects of nigella sativa oil, garlic and CoQ10 on the integrative function of central nervous system and psychomotor performance Subjects and methods: This is a randomized, double-blind, controlled, and prospective study conducted in the Departm...

  4. A new closeness centrality measure via effective distance in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuxian; Gao, Cai; Chen, Xin; Hu, Yong; Sadiq, Rehan; Deng, Yong

    2015-03-01

    Closeness centrality (CC) measure, as a well-known global measure, is widely applied in many complex networks. However, the classical CC presents many problems for flow networks since these networks are directed and weighted. To address these issues, we propose an effective distance based closeness centrality (EDCC), which uses effective distance to replace conventional geographic distance and binary distance obtained by Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm. The proposed EDCC considers not only the global structure of the network but also the local information of nodes. And it can be well applied in directed or undirected, weighted or unweighted networks. Susceptible-Infected model is utilized to evaluate the performance by using the spreading rate and the number of infected nodes. Numerical examples simulated on four real networks are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed EDCC.

  5. Effects of atmospheric and climate change at the timberline of the Central European Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Gerhard; Matyssek, Rainer; Luzian, Roland; Zwerger, Peter; Pindur, Peter; Oberhuber, Walter; Gruber, Andreas

    2009-06-01

    This review considers potential effects of atmospheric change and climate warming within the timberline ecotone of the Central European Alps. After focusing on the impacts of ozone (O(3)) and rising atmospheric CO(2) concentration, effects of climate warming on the carbon and water balance of timberline trees and forests will be outlined towards conclusions about changes in tree growth and treeline dynamics.Presently, ambient ground-level O(3) concentrations do not exert crucial stress on adult conifers at the timberline of the Central European Alps. In response to elevated atmospheric CO(2)Larix decidua showed growth increase, whereas no such response was found in Pinus uncinata. Overall climate warming appears as the factor responsible for the observed growth stimulation of timberline trees.Increased seedling re-establishment in the Central European Alps however, resulted from invasion into potential habitats rather than upward migration due to climate change, although seedlings will only reach tree size upon successful coupling with the atmosphere and thus loosing the beneficial microclimate of low stature vegetation.In conclusion, future climate extremes are more likely than the gradual temperature increase to control treeline dynamics in the Central European Alps. PMID:21379395

  6. Effectiveness of a large mimic panel in an existing nuclear power plant central control board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We conducted the analysis of the nuclear power plant (NPP) operators' behaviors under emergency conditions by using training simulators as a joint research project by Japanese BWR groups for twelve years. In the phase-IV of this project we executed two kinds of experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of the interfaces. One was for evaluations of the interfaces such as CRTs with touch screen, a large mimic panel, and a hierarchical annunciator system introduced in the newly developed ABWR type central control board. The other was that we analyzed the operators' behaviors in emergency conditions by using the first generation BWR type central control board which was added new interfaces such as a large display screen and demarcation on the board to help operators to understand the plant. The demarcation is one of the visual interface improvements and its technique is that a line enclosing several components causes them to be perceived as a group.The result showed that both the large display panel Introduced in ABWR central control board and the large display screen in the existing BWR type central control board improved the performance of the NPP operators in the experiments. It was expected that introduction of the large mimic panel into the existing BWR type central control boards would improve operators' performance. However, in the case of actual installation of the large display board into the existing central control boards, there are spatial and hardware constraints. Therefore the size of lamps, lines connecting from symbols of the pumps or valves to the others' will have to be modified under these constraints. It is important to evaluate the displayed information on the large display board before actual installation. We made experiments to solve these problems by using TEPCO's research simulator which is added a large mimic panel. (author)

  7. Sensitization to the neuroendocrine, central monoamine and behavioural effects of murine tumor necrosis factor-alpha: peripheral and central mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayley, S; Wall, P; Anisman, H

    2002-03-01

    Systemic administration of murine tumour necrosis factor-alpha (mTNF-alpha; 0.1-2.0 microg, i.p.) dose-dependently increased plasma corticosterone and augmented monoamine utilization within the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), locus coeruleus, medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), central and medial amygdala. A time-dependent sensitization was induced in mice, wherein reexposure to mTNF-alpha 28 days (but not 1 day) following the initial cytokine treatment provoked marked signs of illness (diminished activity, ptosis, piloerection) and increased plasma corticosterone levels. Serotonin (5-HT) activity was augmented upon mTNF-alpha reexposure at the 1- or 28-day intervals in the PFC and medial amygdala, respectively. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.; 1-500 ng) mTNF-alpha did not promote illness, but modestly increased plasma corticosterone levels. Neither the illness nor the corticosterone changes were subject to a sensitization upon i.c.v. cytokine reexposure. Acute i.c.v. mTNF-alpha increased norepinephrine (NE), 5-HT and dopamine (DA) activity within the PVN and median eminence/arcuate nucleus complex (ME/ARC), and NE utilization within the central amygdala. Subsequent i.c.v. mTNF-alpha further enhanced the hypothalamic monoamine variations. Finally, systemic (i.p.) mTNF-alpha pretreatment did not proactively influence sickness or corticosterone responses upon later i.c.v. cytokine challenge, but augmented locus coeruleus NE activity and 5-HT and DA utilization within the ME/ARC. It is suggested that the sensitization with respect to sickness and corticosterone activity in response to mTNF-alpha reflect the involvement of peripheral mechanisms. Moreover, it appears that mTNF-alpha promotes central neurochemical plasticity through independent central and peripheral mechanisms. PMID:11918665

  8. Determining the Effects of Central-Peripheral interactions on the Distribution of Human Activity in Space

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, António

    2011-01-01

    Natural advantages determine where agglomerations emerge. Also, efficiency and economies of scale determine how many agglomerations subsist and how they interact, forming complex urban hierarquies. Moreover, physical characteristics influence the way humans divide land into irregular parcels we call administrative regions. If, on one hand, initial location advantages are responsible for defining where the main urban nodes will grow and subsist because of lock-in effects, central-peripheral re...

  9. The effect of emigration on unemployment: Evidence from the Central and Eastern European EU member states

    OpenAIRE

    Yana Pryymachenko; Klas Fregert; Andersson, Fredrik N. G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper contributes to the scant empirical literature on the effects of emigration on source countries’ labour markets. Using a novel dataset by Brücker et al. (2009), we investigate whether emigration from the Central and Eastern European (CEE) members of European Union (EU) during the period 2000 to 2007 has contributed to the decline in unemployment observed in these countries. We find that along with structural changes that occurred in the CEE economies during the last decade, emigrati...

  10. Effect of ectomycorrhizae on growth and establishment of sal (Shorea robusta) seedlings in central India

    OpenAIRE

    ABHISHEK PYASI; KRISHNA KANT SONI; RAM KEERTI VERMA

    2013-01-01

    Pyasi A, Soni KK, Verma RK. 2013. Effect of ectomycorrhizae on growth and establishment of sal (Shorea robusta) seedlings in central India. Nusantara Bioscience 5: 44-49. The aim of the present study was to develop ectomycorrhiza in sal sapling at outside the sal growing areas. For this purpose sal seedling were raised at Jabalpur which is around 80 km away from natural sal forest (Motinala, MP). Seed sowing was done with inoculation of ectomycorrhizal inocula prepared by isolating the fungi ...

  11. The Effect of Intravitreal Bevacizumab in Patients with Acute Central Serous Chorioretinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Ji Won; Ryu, Su Jeong; Shin, Min Cheol

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of intravitreal bevacizumab injection (IVBI) in acute central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) patients. Methods Patients with acute CSC received IVBI (1.25 mg/0.05 mL) or observation by randomization. Twelve eyes in each group completed 6 months of regular follow-up and were ultimately included in this study. Each patient was assessed using best corrected visual acuity measurements, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography at baseline and had reg...

  12. Assessment of the Central Effects of Natural Uranium via Behavioural Performances and the Cerebrospinal Fluid Metabolome

    OpenAIRE

    P. Lestaevel; Grison, S.; Favé, G.; Elie, C.; B. Dhieux; Martin, J.C.; Tack, K.; Souidi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Natural uranium (NU), a component of the earth’s crust, is not only a heavy metal but also an alpha particle emitter, with chemical and radiological toxicity. Populations may therefore be chronically exposed to NU through drinking water and food. Since the central nervous system is known to be sensitive to pollutants during its development, we assessed the effects on the behaviour and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) metabolome of rats exposed for 9 months from birth to NU via lactation and drin...

  13. Mild hypothermia as a treatment for central nervous system injuries Positive or negative effects?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rami Darwazeh; Yi Yan

    2013-01-01

    Besides local neuronal damage caused by the primary insult, central nervous system injuries may secondarily cause a progressive cascade of related events including brain edema, ischemia, oxida-tive stress, excitotoxicity, and dysregulation of calcium homeostasis. Hypothermia is a beneficial strategy in a variety of acute central nervous system injuries. Mild hypothermia can treat high intra-cranial pressure fol owing traumatic brain injuries in adults. It is a new treatment that increases sur-vival and quality of life for patients suffering from ischemic insults such as cardiac arrest, stroke, and neurogenic fever fol owing brain trauma. Therapeutic hypothermia decreases free radical produc-tion, inflammation, excitotoxicity and intracranial pressure, and improves cerebral metabolism after traumatic brain injury and cerebral ischemia, thus protecting against central nervous system dam-age. Although a series of pathological and physiological changes as wel as potential side effects are observed during hypothermia treatment, it remains a potential therapeutic strategy for central nervous system injuries and deserves further study.

  14. Activation of the central histaminergic system mediates arachidonic-acid-induced cardiovascular effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinbas, Burcin; Topuz, Bora Burak; İlhan, Tuncay; Yilmaz, Mustafa Sertac; Erdost, Hatice; Yalcin, Murat

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explain the involvement of the central histaminergic system in arachidonic acid (AA)-induced cardiovascular effects in normotensive rats using hemodynamic, immunohistochemistry, and microdialysis studies. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered AA (0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 μmol) induced dose- and time-dependent increases in mean arterial pressure and decreased heart rate in conscious normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats. Central injection of AA (0.5 μmol) also increased posterior hypothalamic extracellular histamine levels and produced strong COX-1 but not COX-2 immunoreactivity in the posterior hypothalamus of rats. Moreover, the cardiovascular effects and COX-1 immunoreactivity in the posterior hypothalamus induced by AA (0.5 μmol; i.c.v.) were almost completely blocked by the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (50 and 100 nmol; i.c.v.) and partially blocked by the H1 receptor blocker chlorpheniramine (100 nmol; i.c.v.) and the H3-H4 receptor antagonist thioperamide (50 and 100 nmol; i.c.v.). In conclusion, these results indicate that centrally administered AA induces pressor and bradycardic responses in conscious rats. Moreover, we suggest that AA may activate histaminergic neurons and increase extracellular histamine levels, particularly in the posterior hypothalamus. Acting as a neurotransmitter, histamine is potentially involved in AA-induced cardiovascular effects under normotensive conditions. PMID:25065747

  15. Central effects of Tityus serrulatus and Tityus bahiensis scorpion venoms after intraperitoneal injection in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nencioni, Ana Leonor A; Lourenço, Geane Antiques; Lebrun, Ivo; Florio, Jorge Camilo; Dorce, Valquiria A C

    2009-10-01

    A great number of studies on scorpion venoms associate their effects to the autonomic nervous system, and few data are available about their action on the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of this work was to evaluate some central effects after intraperitoneal injection of Tityus serrulatus or T. bahiensis scorpion venoms. The hippocampal concentration of some neurotransmitters and their metabolites were determined. Electroencephalographic and behavioral observations were performed, and all brains were removed for histopathological analysis of hippocampal areas. Both venoms induced electrographic and behavioral alterations despite T. bahiensis venom affects less the electrographic activity than T. serrulatus venom. Neurochemical analysis demonstrated no alteration in the extracellular levels of almost all the neurotransmitters evaluated, at least in the hippocampus, and no neuronal loss in this area was observed. Meanwhile, extracellular concentration of HVA increased up to 10 times in approximately 1/3 of the animals of both groups. Scorpion venoms seem to exert a small but important central effect. More studies in this field are necessary because they may be useful in developing new strategies to reduce the damage caused by scorpion stings. PMID:19664683

  16. Does a weekend effect in diurnal temperature range exist in the eastern and central Tibetan Plateau?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You Qinglong; Kang Shichang; Xu Yanwei; Huang Jie [Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100085 (China); Fluegel, Wolfgang-Albert [Department of Geoinformatics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Jena 07743 (Germany); Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo [Climate Research Laboratory, Barcelona Science Park, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Yan Yuping, E-mail: shichang.kang@itpcas.ac.c [National Climate Center, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2009-10-15

    The 'weekend effect' method (defined here as the average for Saturday through Monday minus the average for Wednesday through Friday) has been used to identify fingerprints of anthropogenic emissions. Based on daily maximum and minimum temperature series from the China Meteorological Administration homogenized dataset, the weekend effect in diurnal temperature range (DTR) at 71 stations with elevations above 2000 m asl in the eastern and central Tibetan Plateau (TP) during 1961-2004 is examined, and principal component analysis (PCA) is performed to cluster series into four subregions with similar weekend effect variability. The DTR demonstrates a much stronger negative weekend effect in autumn and shows larger positive values in winter, which provides a strong evidence of anthropogenic activity in this region, especially in the central TP. Analysis by topographic type and degree of urbanization shows a clear weekly cycle which cannot be explained by a microclimate effect. We hypothesize that the interaction with anthropogenic aerosols from local emissions and transported by atmospheric circulation may account for the weekly cycle in the TP. More caution should be paid to the driving mechanism of the weekend effect in the most remote and clear regions in the world.

  17. Environ centrality reveals the tendency of indirect effects to homogenize the functional importance of species in ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Fann, Sarah L.; Borrett, Stuart R.

    2011-01-01

    Ecologists and conservation biologists need to identify the relative importance of species to make sound management decisions and effectively allocate scarce resources. We introduce a new method, termed environ centrality, to determine the relative importance of a species in an ecosystem network with respect to ecosystem energy--matter exchange. We demonstrate the uniqueness of environ centrality by comparing it to other common centrality metrics and then show its ecological significance. Spe...

  18. Peripheral and central effects of intracerebroventricular microinjection of Hottentotta gentili (Pallary, 1924) (Scorpiones, Buthidae) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hidan, Moulay Abdelmonaim; Touloun, Oulaid; El Hiba, Omar; Laadraoui, Jawad; Ferehan, Hind; Boumezzough, Ali

    2016-03-01

    Central effects of scorpion venom toxins have been neglected, due both to the common belief that scorpion venoms act by targeting peripheral organs and also to the misunderstanding that these peptides do not cross the brain-blood barrier (BBB). Determining whether scorpion neurotoxicity is restricted to peripheral actions or whether a central mechanism may be partly responsible for systemic manifestations could be crucial in clinical therapy trends. The present study therefore aims to assess histopathological damages in some organs (heart, kidney, liver, and lungs) and the related biochemical impairments, together with a neurobehavioral investigation following an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v) micro-injection of Hottentotta gentili (Scorpiones, Buthidae) venom (0.47 μg/kg). I.c.v. injection of venom produced focal fragmentation of myocardial fibers, while lungs showed rupture of the alveolar structure. Concurrently, there was a significant rise in the serum enzymes levels of ASAT, ALAT, CPK and LDH. Meanwhile, we observed behavioral alterations such as a hypoactivity, and in addition the venom seems to have a marked anxiogenic-like effect. The present investigation has brought new experimental evidence of a peripheral impact of central administration of H. gentili venom, such impact was manifested by physiological and behavioral disturbances, the last of these appearing to reflect profound neuro-modulatory action of H. gentili venom. PMID:26718260

  19. Analgesic effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on central post-stroke pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sea-Hyun; Kim, Gi-Do; Kim, Kyung-Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Pain that occurs after a stroke lowers the quality of life. Such post-stroke pain is caused in part by the brain lesion itself, called central post-stroke pain. We investigated the analgesic effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in stroke patients through quantitative sensory testing. Fourteen participants with central post-stroke pain (7 female and 7 male subjects) were recruited and were allocated to either tDCS (n = 7) or sham-tDCS (n = 7) group. Their ages ranged from 45 to 55 years. tDCS was administered for 20 min at a 2-mA current intensity, with anodal stimulations were performed at primary motor cortex. The sham-tDCS group was stimulated 30-second current carrying time. Both group interventions were given for 3 days per week, for a period of 3 weeks. Subjective pain was measured using the visual analogue scale (VAS) of 0 to 10. Sensations of cold and warmth, and pain from cold and heat were quantified to examine analgesic effects. The sham-tDCS group showed no statistically significant differences in time. In contrast, tDCS group showed decreased VAS scores and skin temperature (p temperatures for the sense of cold and pain from cold increased (p heat decreased (p stroke patients with central post-stroke pain. PMID:25341455

  20. Facilitation of breathing by leptin effects in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, M; Furuya, W I; Zoccal, D B; Menani, J V; Colombari, D S A; Mulkey, D K; Colombari, E

    2016-03-15

    With the global epidemic of obesity, breathing disorders associated with excess body weight have markedly increased. Respiratory dysfunctions caused by obesity were originally attributed to mechanical factors; however, recent studies have suggested a pathophysiological component that involves the central nervous system (CNS) and hormones such as leptin produced by adipocytes as well as other cells. Leptin is suggested to stimulate breathing and leptin deficiency causes an impairment of the chemoreflex, which can be reverted by leptin therapy. This facilitation of the chemoreflex may depend on the action of leptin in the hindbrain areas involved in the respiratory control such as the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), a site that receives chemosensory afferents, and the ventral surface of the medulla that includes the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a central chemosensitive area, and the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Although the mechanisms and pathways activated by leptin to facilitate breathing are still not completely clear, evidence suggests that the facilitatory effects of leptin on breathing require the brain melanocortin system, including the POMC-MC4R pathway, a mechanism also activated by leptin to modulate blood pressure. The results of all the studies that have investigated the effect of leptin on breathing suggest that disruption of leptin signalling as caused by obesity-induced reduction of central leptin function (leptin resistance) is a relevant mechanism that may contribute to respiratory dysfunctions associated with obesity. PMID:26095748

  1. Effects of halothane, thiamylal, and ketamine on central sympathetic and vagal tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, T; Kimura, T; Furukawa, K

    1983-02-01

    The effects of increasing doses of halothane, thiamylal, and ketamine on central sympathetic tone (ST) and vagal tone (VT) in cats were studied. Compound action potentials were recorded simultaneously from the cervical sympathetic trunk and the vagus nerve. After full-wave rectification, they were integrated for continuous monitoring of the tonic levels of activity. ST and VT changed characteristically with different anesthetics. Halothane depressed ST and VT equally to approximately 70%, 60%, and 30% of the control level (70% N2O in O2) at end-tidal halothane concentrations of 0.5%, 1.0%, and 2.0%, respectively. When thiamylal was given intravenously at incremental doses (3, 6, 9, and 12 mg/kg), ST was markedly reduced to 10% of the control level. The reduction in VT was relatively small and the autonomic balance shifted in the vagodominant direction. Intravenous ketamine (2, 4, 6, and 8 mg/kg) changed neither ST nor VT significantly. Halothane and thiamylal markedly reduced central sympathetic and vagal outflows that play a role in peripheral homeostatic regulation. We suggest that these two anesthetics effect attenuated or altered autonomic regulation. Ketamine produced little change in central autonomic outflow. PMID:6829912

  2. Effect of Central Antileptin Antibody on the Onset of Female Rat Puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yanfeng

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV antileptin antibody on the onset of puberty in the female rat and the relationship between serum leptin, luteinizing hormone (LH, and body weight were investigated. Antileptin antibody (group A was infused ICV from days 23–36 in prepubertal female rats whereas the control (group B received ICV goat immunoglobulin G (IgG. In the antileptin group, mean day of vaginal opening (VO was postponed (day 34 versus day 30, . Body weight trended higher after 30 days in the antileptin group but not significantly. However, there was no difference in serum leptin and LH between the two groups on the day of VO. Serum leptin was relatively constant from day 23 through day 31 and did not correlate with LH . These studies demonstrate that central leptin promotes the onset of female rat puberty as evidenced by VO. Finally, central leptin impacts female rat pubertal onset in distinction from serum leptin and body weight.

  3. Long-term effects of cranial irradiation on the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranial irradiation and chemotherapy may have significant long-term deleterious effects on children with brain tumors. Intellectual deterioration, endocrinopathies, leukoencephalopathy, extraneural metastases, and oncogenesis may all complicate the treatment of central nervous system neoplasia. These long-term effects of therapy have important implications, as some are amenable to treatment and others may be prevented by the careful monitoring of drug and radiation administration. Until recently, the survivals of children with brain tumors were limited, so that concerns over long-term effects of therapy were unnecessary. As children with certain types of brain tumors now have a better prognosis, these long-term and possibly remediable effects have important implications. This article emphasizes radiation effects on intellect, endocrine function, and oncogenesis. Recommendations for baseline and longitudinal evaluations of children with brain tumors are suggested

  4. Effects of drugs of abuse on the central neuropeptide Y system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Joana; Martins, João; Baptista, Sofia; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Silva, Ana Paula

    2016-07-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), which is widely expressed in the central nervous system is involved in several neuropathologies including addiction. Here we comprehensively and systematically review alterations on the central NPY system induced by several drugs. We report on the effects of psychostimulants [cocaine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and nicotine], ethanol, and opioids on NPY protein levels and expression of different NPY receptors. Overall, expression and function of NPY and its receptors are changed under conditions of drug exposure, thus affecting several physiologic behaviors, such as feeding, stress and anxiety. Drugs of abuse differentially affect the components of the NPY system. For example methamphetamine and nicotine lead to a consistent increase in NPY mRNA and protein levels in different brain sites whereas ethanol and opioids decrease NPY mRNA and protein expression. Drug-induced alterations on the different NPY receptors show more complex regulation pattern. Manipulation of the NPY system can have opposing effects on reinforcing and addictive properties of drugs of abuse. NPY can produce pro-addictive effects (nicotine and heroin), but can also exert inhibitory effects on addictive behavior (AMPH, ethanol). Furthermore, NPY can act as a neuroprotective agent in chronically methamphetamine and MDMA-treated rodents. In conclusion, manipulation of the NPY system seems to be a potential target to counteract neural alterations, addiction-related behaviors and cognitive deficits induced by these drugs. PMID:25904345

  5. [Neurobiology of endocannabinoids and central effects of tetrahydrocannabinol contained in indian hemp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costentin, Jean

    2014-03-01

    Tetrahydrocannabinol, the main psychotropic component of Cannabis indica, is an addictive drug with multiple effects including both peripheral and central damages. All these effects are due to interference with endocannabinoidergic transmission. This endocannabinoid system subtly regulates many physiologicalfunctions. This regulation involves various ligands derived from arachidonic acid (anandamide, di-arachidonoylglycerol, virodhamin, noladin ether, N arachidonoyl dopamine, etc.) which stimulate two main types of receptor CB1 in the central nervous system and CB2 in the periphery. CB1 receptors are very numerous and ubiquitous in the brain. They influence various important functions (awakening, attention, delirium, hallucinations, memory, cognition, anxiety, humor stability, motor coordination, brain maturation, etc.). Far from mimicking endocannabinoids, THC caricatures their effects. It affects all brain structures, simultaneously, intensely and durably, inducing down-regulation of CB1 receptors and thereby reducing the effects of their physiological ligands. On account of its exceptional lipophilia, THC accumulates for days and even weeks in the brain. It is not a soft drug but rather a slow drug: its abuse induces long-lasting modifications and deterioration of brain function, potentially leading to various mental and psychiatric disorders. PMID:26427295

  6. Insulin hormone: Mechanism and effects on the body and relationship with central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Zuhal Altunkaynak

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is one of the most common andchronic disease all over the world. It is characterized witheither insulin deficiency or insulin resistance. Insulin is ahormone which is secreted by beta cells in the LangerhansIslets of pancreas and playing a role in carbohydratemetabolism regulation in association with glucagon. Regardingthe insulin’s effects on carbohydrates, almost inall tissues (except brain insulin increases the facilitateddiffusion of glucose into cells and shows and an effect toreduce the blood glucose levels. In other words, it haveregulator role on blood sugar level; insulin secretion isknown to be associated with an increase in the amountof energy. Insulin secretion is related with increasing glucoselevel. It has been shown that it is closely relatedwith intracellular enzymes and has a stimulating effecton transcription of glucokinase, pyruvate kinase, phosphofructokinase and fructose-2,6 biphosphatase thatare glicolytic and an inhibitory effect on transcription ofphosphophenolpyruvate carboxykinase that is gluconeogenetic.Besides being the primary regulator of carbohydratemetabolism, insulin also has an important effect onlipid and protein metabolisms that are interrelated withcarbohydrate metabolism. For the basis of diabetes effectson Central Nervous system (CNS two mechanismsare emphasized; first is the oxidative stress developeddue to metabolic changes and the second is damagesof calcium ion metabolism. In this review, it was intendedto reach detailed information by reviewing insulin’s basiceffect mechanism, its reflection on cellular level and itsrelationship with central nervous system.

  7. Novel associations between FAAH genetic variants and postoperative central opioid-related adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhasivam, S; Zhang, X; Chidambaran, V; Mavi, J; Pilipenko, V; Mersha, T B; Meller, J; Kaufman, K M; Martin, L J; McAuliffe, J

    2015-10-01

    Opioid effects are potentiated by cannabinoid agonists including anandamide, an endocannabinoid. Inter-individual variability in responses to opioids is a major clinical problem. Multiple deaths and anoxic brain injuries occur every year because of opioid-induced respiratory depression (RD) in surgical patients and drug abusers of opioids and cannabinoids. This study aimed to determine specific associations between genetic variants of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and postoperative central opioid adverse effects in children undergoing tonsillectomy. This is a prospective genotype-blinded observational study in which 259 healthy children between 6 and 15 years of age who received standard perioperative care with a standard anesthetic and an intraoperative dose of morphine were enrolled. Associations between frequent polymorphisms of FAAH and central postoperative opioid adverse effects including, RD, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and prolonged stay in Post Anesthesia Recovery Room (postoperative anesthesia care unit, PACU) due to RD and PONV were analyzed. Five specific FAAH single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) had significant associations with more than twofold increased risk for refractory PONV (adjusted PPACU stay in white children undergoing tonsillectomy. The FAAH SNP, rs324420, is a missense mutation with altered FAAH function and it is linked with other FAAH SNPs associated with PONV and RD in our cohort; association between PONV and rs324420 was confirmed in our extended cohort with additional 66 white children. Specific FAAH polymorphisms are associated with refractory PONV, opioid-related RD, and prolonged PACU stay due to opioid adverse effects in white children undergoing tonsillectomy. PMID:25558980

  8. The effects of normal aging on myelinated nerve fibers in monkey central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Peters

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of aging on myelinated nerve fibers of the central nervous system are complex. Many myelinated nerve fibers in white matter degenerate and are lost, leading to some disconnections between various parts of the central nervous system. Other myelinated nerve fibers are affected differently, because only their sheaths degenerate, leaving the axons intact. Such axons are remyelinated by a series of internodes that are much shorter than the original ones and are composed of thinner sheaths. Thus the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system, the oligodendrocytes, remain active during aging. Indeed, not only do these neuroglial cell remyelinate axons, with age they also continue to add lamellae to the myelin sheaths of intact nerve fibers, so that sheaths become thicker. It is presumed that the degeneration of myelin sheaths is due to the degeneration of the parent oligodendrocyte, and that the production of increased numbers of internodes as a consequence of remyelination requires additional oligodendrocytes. Whether there is a turnover of oligodendrocytes during life has not been studied in primates, but it has been established that over the life span of the monkey, there is a substantial increase in the numbers of oligodendrocytes. While the loss of some myelinated nerve fibers leads to some disconnections, the degeneration of other myelin sheaths and the subsequent remyelination of axons by shorter internodes slow down the rate conduction along nerve fibers. These changes affect the integrity and timing in neuronal circuits, and there is evidence that they contribute to cognitive decline.

  9. Central effects of beta-endorphins on glucose homeostasis in the conscious dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of centrally administered beta-endorphins on glucose homeostasis in the conscious dog were studied. Intracerebroventricular administration of beta-endorphin (0.2 mg/h) caused a 70% increase in plasma glucose. The mechanism of the hyperglycemia was twofold: there was an early increase in glucose production and a late inhibition of glucose clearance. These changes are explained by marked increases in plasma epinephrine (30-fold) and norepinephrine (6-fold) that occurred during infusion of beta-endorphin. Central administration of beta-endorphin also resulted in increased levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol. In addition there was an increase in plasma insulin but no increase in plasma glucagon. Intravenous administration of beta-endorphin did not alter glucose homeostasis. Intracerebroventricular administration of acetylated beta-endorphin did not perturb glucose kinetics or any of the hormones that changed during infusion of the unacetylated peptide. We conclude that beta-endorphin acts centrally to cause hyperglycemia by stimulating sympathetic outflow and the pituitary-adrenal axis. Acetylation of beta-endorphin abolishes the in vivo activity of the peptide

  10. Central and cerebrovascular effects of leg crossing in humans with sympathetic failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Mark P M; Wieling, Wouter; Colier, Willy N J M; Lenders, Jacques W M; Secher, Niels H; van Lieshout, Johannes J

    2010-01-01

    Leg crossing increases arterial pressure and combats symptomatic orthostatic hypotension in patients with sympathetic failure. This study compared the central and cerebrovascular effects of leg crossing in patients with sympathetic failure and healthy controls. We addressed the relationship between...... MCA Vmean (middle cerebral artery blood velocity; using transcranial Doppler ultrasound), frontal lobe oxygenation [O2Hb (oxyhaemoglobin)] and MAP (mean arterial pressure), CO (cardiac output) and TPR (total peripheral resistance) in six patients (aged 37-67 years; three women) and age- and gender...

  11. Ultrasound investigation central hemodynamics as a method of assessment effective analgesia in children

    OpenAIRE

    Dmytriieva, K. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Dmytriieva K. Y. Ultrasound investigation central hemodynamics as a method of assessment effective analgesia in children. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2016;6(6):207-212. eISSN 2391-8306. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.55301 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/3571   The journal has had 7 points in Ministry of Science and Higher Education parametric evaluation. Part B item 755 (23.12.2015). 755 Journal of Education, Health and Sport eISSN 239...

  12. Economic and Water Supply Effects of Ending Groundwater Overdraft in California's Central Valley

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Timothy; Chou, Heidi; Zikalala, Prudentia; Lund, Jay; Hui, Rui; Medellín–Azuara, Josué

    2016-01-01

    doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.15447/sfews.2016v14iss1art7 Surface water and groundwater management are often tightly linked, even when linkage is not intended or expected. This link is especially common in semi-arid regions, such as California. This paper summarizes a modeling study on the effects of ending long-term overdraft in California’s Central Valley, the state’s largest aquifer system. The study focuses on economic and operational aspects, such as surface water pumping ...

  13. Effect of oxygen inhalation on systemic, central, and splanchnic haemodynamics in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Becker, Povl Ulrik; Schifter, S; Abrahamsen, J; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1996-01-01

    patients with cirrhosis (n = 19). RESULTS: Spirometry was normal, but the carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (transfer factor) was significantly decreased, 18.8 ml.min-1.mmHg-1 (-32% of that predicted, p < 0.0001), and correlated significantly with the cardiac output (r = 0.78, p < 0.0005), plasma volume......BACKGROUND/AIMS: Patients with cirrhosis exhibit a hyperdynamic circulation with increased cardiac output and low arterial blood pressure. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of oxygen inhalation on systemic, central, and splanchnic haemodynamics and vasoactive systems in...

  14. Stress-induced changes in the analgesic and thermic effects of morphine administered centrally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, B D; Holtzman, S G

    1985-12-01

    Stress (e.g. restraint) potentiates analgesia and changes in body temperature induced by morphine administered systemically to rats. In order to determine if stress-induced potentiation of these effects of morphine are mediated within the central nervous system, restrained and unstressed groups of rats were injected in the lateral ventricle (i.c.v.) with graded doses of morphine, and their analgesic and body temperature responses were measured. Compared to unstressed animals, restrained rats had a greater analgesic response at each dose of morphine, characterized by an increase in both the magnitude and duration of the drug effect. The unstressed group of rats responded consistently to 1.0-100 micrograms of morphine with a 1.5-2.0 degrees C increase in core temperature. Restrained rats had either a smaller increase in body temperature or a hypothermia at these doses of morphine. Thus, restraint stress can modify the effects of morphine administered i.c.v. on analgesia and body temperature in a manner similar to that seen after systemic administration of morphine, indicating that this phenomenon is mediated centrally. PMID:4075121

  15. Effective Exchange Rates in Central and Eastern European Countries: Cyclicality and Relationship with Macroeconomic Fundamentals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavárek Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the evolution of effective exchange rates in nine Central and Eastern European countries in terms of development trends, volatility and cyclicality. Consequently, it provides direct empirical evidence on the nature of the relationship between effective exchange rates and selected macroeconomic fundamentals, addressing a key precondition of numerous exchange rate determination models and theories that attempt to explain the role of exchange rates in the economy. The results suggest that flexible exchange rate arrangements are reflected in both nominal and real effective exchange rates having higher volatility and variability. Furthermore, the results provide mixed evidence in terms of intensity, direction and cyclicality, but show a weak correlation between exchange rates and fundamentals. Sufficiently high coefficients are found only for money supply. Consequently, using fundamentals for the determination of exchange rates and using the exchange rate to explain economic development may be of limited use for the countries analyzed.

  16. Central effects of the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55212-2 on respiratory and cardiovascular regulation in anaesthetised rats

    OpenAIRE

    Pfitzer, Torsten; Niederhoffer, Nathalie; Szabo, Bela

    2004-01-01

    The primary aim was to study the central respiratory effects of cannabinoids (CB). To this end, the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55212-2 was injected into the cisterna magna of urethane-anaesthetised rats and changes in respiratory parameters were observed. The secondary aim was to observe the centrally elicited cardiovascular actions of WIN55212-2. Involvement of opioid mechanisms in the central effects of WIN55212-2 was also studied.Intracisternal (i.c.) application of WIN55212-2 (1, 3, ...

  17. Effects of caffeine on the electrophysiological, cognitive and motor responses of the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deslandes A.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is the most consumed psychoactive substance in the world. The effects of caffeine have been studied using cognitive and motor measures, quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG and event-related potentials. However, these methods are not usually employed in combination, a fact that impairs the interpretation of the results. The objective of the present study was to analyze changes in electrophysiological, cognitive and motor variables with the ingestion of caffeine, and to relate central to peripheral responses. For this purpose we recorded event-related potentials and eyes-closed, resting EEG, applied the Stroop test, and measured reaction time. Fifteen volunteers took caffeine (400 mg or placebo in a randomized, crossover, double-blind design. A significant reduction of alpha absolute power over the entire scalp and of P300 latency at the Fz electrode were observed after caffeine ingestion. These results are consistent with a stimulatory effect of caffeine, although there was no change in the attention (Stroop test or in reaction time. The qEEG seems to be the most sensitive index of the changes produced by caffeine in the central nervous system since it proved to be capable of detecting changes that were not evident in the tests of cognitive or motor performance.

  18. Combined Effect of Ethanol and Acetaminophen on the Central Nervous System of Daphnia magna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigid Bleaken

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The combined consumption of acetaminophen (APAP and ethanol (EtOH has been an issue with clinical implications. Previous findings regarding the simultaneous consumption of APAP and EtOH have reported harmful effects on the liver and stomach; however, little is known about the effects on the central nervous system (CNS. We hypothesized that EtOH and APAP will have a synergistic effect on the CNS of Daphnia magna (D. magna, causing a pronounced decrease in heart rate at a toxic dose of EtOH. To better understand the effects of the combined consumption of EtOH and APAP on the CNS, the heart rates of D. magna were measured under a dissection microscope after exposure to EtOH, APAP, or a combined EtOH-APAP solution. Interestingly, the average heart rates of D. magna exposed to the EtOH-APAP solution and D. magna exposed only to APAP were approximately the same. Although our results did not support our original hypothesis, the data demonstrated that APAP exerted a dominant effect over EtOH. APAP and EtOH are known to have inhibitory effects on the CNS. Therefore, these findings suggest that APAP and EtOH may compete against each other on similar pathways to be the substance that exerts an inhibitory effect in the CNS.

  19. Perceived Leader Effectiveness across Organizational Roles: Exploratory Evidence from Central Eurasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. FORD

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available SYMLOG methodology was used by a sample of respondents from Central Eurasia to rate their perceptions of the values shown in the behavior of leaders occupying three kinds of organizational roles: (1 chief executive officers of business enterprises, NGO’s, or key governmental agencies; (2 immediate supervisors of the respondents in their respective organizations; and (3 country leaders or Heads of State (e.g., President, Prime Minister, etc. of the respondents’ home country. Respondents were participants who took part in a two-week leadership development program in their region. Respondents also rated the leaders’ role performance and their satisfaction with the leaders. Respondents who categorized themselves as transformational leaders evaluated the supervisor role occupants as most effective while non-transformational leaders perceived the CEO role occupants to be most effective. The results are discussed in light of future needs for crosscultural leadership research.

  20. Determinants of FDI into Central and Eastern European Countries: Pull or Push Effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcak Polat

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the growing interest in foreign direct investments (FDI, substantial uncertainty still exists regarding what stimulates foreign investors to operate in a foreign market and uneven distribution of FDI across countries. Using panel data for 2001 -2012 period, the major determinants of the FDI inflows into the Central and Eastern European Countries are analysed in this study. Strong evidence are found that while EU CR indices, EU and USA real GDP growth rates and global financial crisis have power to explain FDI inflows among all other push factors, labour cost, electricity price, real exchange rate and host CR indices have strong influential on FDI as the most effective pull factors. However, study fails to find any effect of openness, tax rates on commercial profits, USA CR indices, interest rate differentials and host real GDP growth on FDI.

  1. The effects of centrally acting drugs on the EEG correlates of meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, M K; Tsoi, W F

    1992-09-01

    The present study investigated the effects of three centrally acting drugs on the significant increase in the intermediate alpha frequency of the electroencephalogram (EEG) that accompanied meditation in a male volunteer. When compared to the EEG recorded before each of the three drugs was administered, naloxone tended to enhance the increase in the power of the intermediate alpha EEG (9.4-10.4 Hz), while diazepam tended to spread the increase to the slow (7.4-9.4 Hz) alpha EEG, and flumazenil was without much effect on the overall EEG pattern. However, these EEG changes when compared to similar changes obtained with saline administration were not significantly different from the latter. Thus, it is unlikely that the EEG correlates of meditation are causally related to the rise or fall of endogenous opioid peptides or benzodiazepinelike substances in the brain. PMID:1515478

  2. Interactive effects of intracisternal oxytocin and other centrally active substances on colonic temperatures of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, G A; Caldwell, J D; Stanley, D A; Hatley, O L; Prange, A J; Pedersen, C A

    1986-05-01

    Oxytocin (OXY) administered intracisternally to adult male mice produced a significant dose-related (1-4 micrograms) increase in colonic temperatures at an ambient temperature of 25 degrees C. The maximal rise in temperature occurred 30 min after administration of the peptide. The interactive effects on colonic temperature of central OXY with equimolar amounts of neurotensin, bombesin or beta-endorphin or of 2 2 mg/kg of chlorpromazine were investigated. OXY significantly antagonized the hypothermia produced by all of these substances. Pretreatment of mice with haloperidol or naloxone failed to prevent OXY-induced hyperthermia. The hyperthermic action of OXY and the interactive effects of OXY with other peptides on thermoregulation may be physiologically significant during parturition and lactation. PMID:2941825

  3. Effects of a 60 Hz magnetic field on central cholinergic systems of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States))

    1993-03-15

    The authors studied the effects of an acute exposure to a 60 Hz magnetic field on sodium-dependent, high-affinity choline uptake in the brain of the rat. Decreases in uptake were observed in the frontal cortex and hippocampus after the animals were exposed to a magnetic field at flux densities [>=] 0.75 mT. These effects of the magnetic field were blocked by pretreating the animals with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone, but not by the peripheral opioid antagonist, naloxone methiodide. These data indicate that the magnetic-field-induced decreases in high-affinity choline uptake in the rat brain were mediated by endogenous opioids in the central nervous systems.

  4. Awareness of central luminance edge is crucial for the Craik-O’Brien-Cornsweet effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Masuda

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Craik-O’Brien-Cornsweet (COC effect demonstrates that perceived lightness depends not only on the retinal input at corresponding visual areas but also on distal retinal inputs. In the COC effect, the central edge of an opposing pair of luminance gradients (COC edge makes adjoining regions with identical luminance appear to be different. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of the effect, we examined whether the subjective awareness of the COC edge is necessary for the generation of the effect. We manipulated the visibility of the COC edge using visual backward masking and continuous flash suppression while monitoring subjective reports regarding online percepts and aftereffects of adaptation. Psychophysical results showed that the online percept of the COC effect nearly vanishes in conditions where the COC edge is rendered invisible. On the other hand, the results of adaptation experiments showed that the COC edge is still processed at the early stage even under the perceptual suppression. These results suggest that processing of the COC edge at the early stage is not sufficient for generating the COC effect, and that subjective awareness of the COC edge is necessary.

  5. Awareness of Central Luminance Edge is Crucial for the Craik-O'Brien-Cornsweet Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Ayako; Watanabe, Junji; Terao, Masahiko; Watanabe, Masataka; Yagi, Akihiro; Maruya, Kazushi

    2011-01-01

    The Craik-O'Brien-Cornsweet (COC) effect demonstrates that perceived lightness depends not only on the retinal input at corresponding visual areas but also on distal retinal inputs. In the COC effect, the central edge of an opposing pair of luminance gradients (COC edge) makes adjoining regions with identical luminance appear to be different. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of the effect, we examined whether the subjective awareness of the COC edge is necessary for the generation of the effect. We manipulated the visibility of the COC edge using visual backward masking and continuous flash suppression while monitoring subjective reports regarding online percepts and aftereffects of adaptation. Psychophysical results showed that the online percept of the COC effect nearly vanishes in conditions where the COC edge is rendered invisible. On the other hand, the results of adaptation experiments showed that the COC edge is still processed at the early stage even under the perceptual suppression. These results suggest that processing of the COC edge at the early stage is not sufficient for generating the COC effect, and that subjective awareness of the COC edge is necessary. PMID:22059072

  6. The central effect of biological Amines on immunosuppressive effect of restraint stress in rat

    OpenAIRE

    Zeraati F; Ghafghazi T.; Adib M; Rezaei A

    2000-01-01

    The effects of some histaminergic agents were evaluated on stress- induced immunosuppression in immunized nale rats. In rat immunized with sheep red blood cells ( SRBCs). Restraint stress (RS) prevented the booster-induced rise in anti-SRBC antibody titre and cell immunity response. Intracerebroventicular (I.C>V) injection of histamine (150 µg/rat) induced a similar effect with RS. Pretreatment with chlorpheniramine (50 µg/rat) reduced the inhibitory effect of Ras on immune function. Also ...

  7. The central effect of biological Amines on immunosuppressive effect of restraint stress in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeraati F

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of some histaminergic agents were evaluated on stress- induced immunosuppression in immunized nale rats. In rat immunized with sheep red blood cells ( SRBCs. Restraint stress (RS prevented the booster-induced rise in anti-SRBC antibody titre and cell immunity response. Intracerebroventicular (I.C>V injection of histamine (150 µg/rat induced a similar effect with RS. Pretreatment with chlorpheniramine (50 µg/rat reduced the inhibitory effect of Ras on immune function. Also histamine could inhibit the effect of RS on immune function. Also histamine could inhibitory the effect of chlorpheniramine when injected simultaneously. Pretreatment with ranidine (10 µg/rat had not a significant effect. Serotonin (3 µg/rat and dopamine (0.2 µg/rat could reverse the effects of chlorpheniromine when injected with chlorpheniramine (P<0.05. Epinephrine (0.2 µg/rat had not a significant effect. The results indicate that histamine mediates the immunosuppression of restraint stress by influencing the histamine H1 receptor in the brain and this effects of histamine may be modulated by serotoninergic and dopaminergic system.

  8. Effect of pertussis toxin pretreated centrally on blood glucose level induced by stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Hong-Won; Sim, Yun-Beom; Park, Soo-Hyun; Sharma, Naveen; Im, Hyun-Ju; Hong, Jae-Seung

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we examined the effect of pertussis toxin (PTX) administered centrally in a variety of stress-induced blood glucose level. Mice were exposed to stress after the pretreatment of PTX (0.05 or 0.1 µg) i.c.v. or i.t. once for 6 days. Blood glucose level was measured at 0, 30, 60 and 120 min after stress stimulation. The blood glucose level was increased in all stress groups. The blood glucose level reached at maximum level after 30 min of stress stimulation and returned to a normal level after 2 h of stress stimulation in restraint stress, physical, and emotional stress groups. The blood glucose level induced by cold-water swimming stress was gradually increased up to 1 h and returned to the normal level. The intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) or intrathecal (i.t.) pretreatment with PTX, a Gi inhibitor, alone produced a hypoglycemia and almost abolished the elevation of the blood level induced by stress stimulation. The central pretreatment with PTX caused a reduction of plasma insulin level, whereas plasma corticosterone level was further up-regulated in all stress models. Our results suggest that the hyperglycemia produced by physical stress, emotional stress, restraint stress, and the cold-water swimming stress appear to be mediated by activation of centrally located PTX-sensitive G proteins. The reduction of blood glucose level by PTX appears to due to the reduction of plasma insulin level. The reduction of blood glucose level by PTX was accompanied by the reduction of plasma insulin level. Plasma corticosterone level up-regulation by PTX in stress models may be due to a blood glucose homeostatic mechanism. PMID:27610033

  9. Central and Metabolic Effects of High Fructose Consumption: Evidence from Animal and Human Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Stoianov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fructose consumption has increased dramatically in the last 40 years, and its role in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome has been implicated by many studies. It is most often encountered in the diet as sucrose (glucose and fructose or high-fructose corn syrup (55% fructose. At high levels, dietary exposure to fructose triggers a series of metabolic changes originating in the liver, leading to hepatic steatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance, and decreased leptin sensitivity. Fructose has been identified to alter biological pathways in other tissues including the central nervous system (CNS, adipose tissue, and the gastrointestinal system. Unlike glucose, consumption of fructose produces smaller increases in the circulating satiety hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1, and does not attenuate levels of the appetite suppressing hormone ghrelin. In the brain, fructose contributes to increased food consumption by activating appetite and reward pathways, and stimulating hypothalamic AMPK activity, a nutrient-sensitive regulator of food intake. Recent studies investigating the neurophysiological factors linking fructose consumption and weight gain in humans have demonstrated differential activation of brain regions that govern appetite, motivation and reward processing. Compared to fructose, glucose ingestion produces a greater reduction of hypothalamic neuronal activity, and increases functional connectivity between the hypothalamus and other reward regions of the brain, indicating that these two sugars regulate feeding behavior through distinct neural circuits. This review article outlines the current findings in fructose-feeding studies in both human and animal models, and discusses the central effects on the CNS that may lead to increased appetite and food intake. Keywords: Fructose, Metabolic syndrome, Appetite, Central nervous system

  10. An overview on the seismic microzonation and site effect studies in Central Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Pilz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available During the past centuries, many cities in Central Asia have suffered significant damages caused by earthquakes. A crucial step towards preparedness for future events, the definition of the optimal engineering designs for civil structures and the mitigation of earthquake risks involves the accomplishment of site response studies. To accurately identify local variations of the site response at different locations within the cities, earthquakes recorded by seismic networks as well as measurements of the seismic noise can be used for estimating the resonance frequencies and for evaluating the expected level of ground motion at each site. Additionally, the measurements can help identifying site specific features like more-dimensional resonances and directional effects. This information can be complemented with array measurements of ambient seismic noise in order to estimate local shear-wave velocity profiles, an essential parameter for evaluating the dynamic properties of soil, and to characterize the corresponding sediment layers at each site. The present study gives an overview on the progressive development of the seismic zonation studies in the frame of EMCA carried out in several cities in Central Asia.

  11. The Effect of Central Amygdala Nitric Oxide in Expression Of Drug Seeking Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Rahimpour

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Previous studies shows L-arginin (nitric oxide precursor increases conditioned place preference and drug seeking behaviors whereas LG-nitro-arginine methyl ester L-NAME( as nitric oxide synthase inhibitor decreases this process. In this project, effects of intra-central amygdale bilateral injection of nitric oxide agents on drug-seeking behaviors including rearing, sniffing and compartment entrance were investigated. Method: animals were wistar male rats (200-250 g which allowed to be recovered after they’re being suffered from a surgery by strereotaxis apparatus to be cannulated in coordination of central amygdale nucleus (CeA. CPP was conducted using a five-day schedule of unbiased procedure. Findings: morphine (2.5-10 mg/kg s.c induced significant drug-seeking behaviors. Naloxone (0.1-0.4 mg/kg i.p injection pretesting (after conditioning by morphine 7.5 mg/kg decreased the expression of behaviors. When L-arginine (0.3-3 µgr/rat injected intra–CeA prior to naloxone (0.4 mg/kg, increased behaviors but L-NAME (0.3-3 µgr/rat intra–CeA injections prior to L-arginine (0.3 µgr/rat pretesting, caused significant decreasement of L-arginine response. Conclusion: NO in the CeA may play an important role in the drug seeking behaviors induced of morphine.

  12. Investigation on tsunami effects in the central Adriatic Sea during the last century - a contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maramai, A.; Graziani, L.; Tinti, S.

    2007-01-01

    In this work we present the result of a study aimed at examining the Italian earthquake sequences that occurred in the area of the central Adriatic sea with the purpose of understanding whether some of them were accompanied by tsunami effects. The motivation for this research was the update and enrichment of the Italian Tsunami Catalogue. The result was that evidence was found for two new cases of earthquake-induced tsunamis: these are the August 1916 Rimini and the October 1930 Ancona events. The bulk of the present research consisted in collecting all the available data on the earthquakes that affected the selected area in the past century and in identifying those potentially capable of generating tsunamis. During the study all the available material was gathered, which includes specific monographs and scientific papers, articles available in contemporary chronicles and in local and national newspapers. The final result of this research will improve our knowledge of the tsunamigenic activity of the central Adriatic sea and contribute to the assessment of the tsunami hazard and risk along these coasts, that especially in the peak season form one of the most densely populated areas of the Italian peninsula with flat and large beaches and water front resorts crowded of tourists.

  13. Effects of high fructose diets on central appetite signaling and cognitive function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrien eLowette

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of fructose has increased tremendously over the last five decades, which is to a large extent due to the development of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS, a commercial sugar additive that contains high amounts of free fructose. HFCS is often added to processed food and beverages partly because it is a powerful sweetener but even more so because the production is cheap. Although fructose in combination with fiber, vitamins and minerals, as present in fruits, is a healthy source of energy, isolated fructose, in processed food products has been associated with several health disorders such as insulin resistance and hypertension. Apart from its metabolic consequences, a growing body of literature suggests that free fructose can also affect neuronal systems. High fructose intake may on the one hand affect central appetite regulation by altering specific components of the endocannabinoid system. On the other hand it appears to impact on cognitive function by affecting phosphorylation levels of insulin receptor, synapsin 1 and synaptophysin. The present report reviews the recent evidence showing a negative effect of free fructose consumption on central appetite control, as well as cognitive function.

  14. Analysis of source spectra, attenuation, and site effects from central and eastern United States earthquakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindley, G.

    1998-02-01

    This report describes the results from three studies of source spectra, attenuation, and site effects of central and eastern United States earthquakes. In the first study source parameter estimates taken from 27 previous studies were combined to test the assumption that the earthquake stress drop is roughly a constant, independent of earthquake size. 200 estimates of stress drop and seismic moment from eastern North American earthquakes were combined. It was found that the estimated stress drop from the 27 studies increases approximately as the square-root of the seismic moment, from about 3 bars at 10{sup 20} dyne-cm to 690 bars at 10{sup 25} dyne-cm. These results do not support the assumption of a constant stress drop when estimating ground motion parameters from eastern North American earthquakes. In the second study, broadband seismograms recorded by the United States National Seismograph Network and cooperating stations have been analysed to determine Q{sub Lg} as a function of frequency in five regions: the northeastern US, southeastern US, central US, northern Basin and Range, and California and western Nevada. In the third study, using spectral analysis, estimates have been made for the anelastic attenuation of four regional phases, and estimates have been made for the source parameters of 27 earthquakes, including the M{sub b} 5.6, 14 April, 1995, West Texas earthquake.

  15. Analysis of source spectra, attenuation, and site effects from central and eastern United States earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the results from three studies of source spectra, attenuation, and site effects of central and eastern United States earthquakes. In the first study source parameter estimates taken from 27 previous studies were combined to test the assumption that the earthquake stress drop is roughly a constant, independent of earthquake size. 200 estimates of stress drop and seismic moment from eastern North American earthquakes were combined. It was found that the estimated stress drop from the 27 studies increases approximately as the square-root of the seismic moment, from about 3 bars at 1020 dyne-cm to 690 bars at 1025 dyne-cm. These results do not support the assumption of a constant stress drop when estimating ground motion parameters from eastern North American earthquakes. In the second study, broadband seismograms recorded by the United States National Seismograph Network and cooperating stations have been analysed to determine QLg as a function of frequency in five regions: the northeastern US, southeastern US, central US, northern Basin and Range, and California and western Nevada. In the third study, using spectral analysis, estimates have been made for the anelastic attenuation of four regional phases, and estimates have been made for the source parameters of 27 earthquakes, including the Mb 5.6, 14 April, 1995, West Texas earthquake

  16. Investigation on tsunami effects in the central Adriatic Sea during the last century – a contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Maramai

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present the result of a study aimed at examining the Italian earthquake sequences that occurred in the area of the central Adriatic sea with the purpose of understanding whether some of them were accompanied by tsunami effects. The motivation for this research was the update and enrichment of the Italian Tsunami Catalogue. The result was that evidence was found for two new cases of earthquake-induced tsunamis: these are the August 1916 Rimini and the October 1930 Ancona events. The bulk of the present research consisted in collecting all the available data on the earthquakes that affected the selected area in the past century and in identifying those potentially capable of generating tsunamis. During the study all the available material was gathered, which includes specific monographs and scientific papers, articles available in contemporary chronicles and in local and national newspapers. The final result of this research will improve our knowledge of the tsunamigenic activity of the central Adriatic sea and contribute to the assessment of the tsunami hazard and risk along these coasts, that especially in the peak season form one of the most densely populated areas of the Italian peninsula with flat and large beaches and water front resorts crowded of tourists.

  17. Effects of fumaric acids on cuprizone induced central nervous system de- and remyelination in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius Moharregh-Khiabani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fumaric acid esters (FAE are a group of compounds which are currently under investigation as an oral treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. One of the suggested modes of action is the potential of FAE to exert a neuroprotective effect. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have investigated the impact of monomethylfumarate (MMF and dimethylfumaric acid (DMF on de- and remyelination using the toxic cuprizone model where the blood-brain-barrier remains intact and only scattered T-cells and peripheral macrophages are found in the central nervous system (CNS, thus excluding the influence of immunomodulatory effects on peripheral immune cells. FAE showed marginally accelerated remyelination in the corpus callosum compared to controls. However, we found no differences for demyelination and glial reactions in vivo and no cytoprotective effect on oligodendroglial cells in vitro. In contrast, DMF had a significant inhibitory effect on lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced nitric oxide burst in microglia and induced apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. CONCLUSIONS: These results contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of action of fumaric acids. Our data suggest that fumarates have no or only little direct protective effects on oligodendrocytes in this toxic model and may act rather indirectly via the modulation of immune cells.

  18. Effects of Chronic Central Arginine Vasopressin (AVP on Maternal Behavior in Chronically Stressed Rat Dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin C. Nephew

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Exposure of mothers to chronic stressors during pregnancy or the postpartum period often leads to the development of depression, anxiety, or other related mood disorders. The adverse effects of mood disorders are often mediated through maternal behavior and recent work has identified arginine vasopressin (AVP as a key neuropeptide hormone in the expression of maternal behavior in both rats and humans. Using an established rodent model that elicits behavioral and physiological responses similar to human mood disorders, this study tested the effectiveness of chronic AVP infusion as a novel treatment for the adverse effects of exposure to chronic social stress during lactation in rats. During early (day 3 and mid (day 10 lactation, AVP treatment significantly decreased the latency to initiate nursing and time spent retrieving pups, and increased pup grooming and total maternal care (sum of pup grooming and nursing. AVP treatment was also effective in decreasing maternal aggression and the average duration of aggressive bouts on day 3 of lactation. Central AVP may be an effective target for the development of treatments for enhancing maternal behavior in individuals exposed to chronic social stress.

  19. PK20, a new opioid-neurotensin hybrid peptide that exhibits central and peripheral antinociceptive effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuda Yuko

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical treatment of various types of pain relies upon the use of opioid analgesics. However most of them produce, in addition to the analgesic effect, several side effects such as the development of dependence and addiction as well as sedation, dysphoria, and constipation. One solution to these problems are chimeric compounds in which the opioid pharmacophore is hybridized with another type of compound to incease antinociceptive effects. Neurotensin-induced antinociception is not mediated through the opioid system. Therefore, hybridizing neurotensin with opioid elements may result in a potent synergistic antinociceptor. Results Using the known structure-activity relationships of neurotensin we have synthesized a new chimeric opioid-neurotensin compound PK20 which is characterized by a very strong antinociceptive potency. The observation that the opioid antagonist naltrexone did not completely reverse the antinociceptive effect, indicates the partial involvement of the nonopioid component in PK20 in the produced analgesia. Conclusions The opioid-neurotensin hybrid analogue PK20, in which opioid and neurotensin pharmacophores overlap partially, expresses high antinociceptive tail-flick effects after central as well as peripheral applications.

  20. The effects of centrally injected arachidonic acid on respiratory system: Involvement of cyclooxygenase to thromboxane signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkan, Leman Gizem; Guvenc, Gokcen; Altinbas, Burcin; Niaz, Nasir; Yalcin, Murat

    2016-05-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is a polyunsaturated fatty acid that is present in the phospholipids of the cell membranes of the body and is abundant in the brain. Exogenously administered AA has been shown to affect brain metabolism and to exhibit cardiovascular and neuroendocrine actions. However, little is known regarding its respiratory actions and/or central mechanism of its respiratory effects. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the possible effects of centrally injected AA on respiratory system and the mediation of the central cyclooxygenase (COX) to thromboxane A2 (TXA2) signaling pathway on AA-induced respiratory effects in anaesthetized rats. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of AA induced dose- and time-dependent increase in tidal volume, respiratory rates and respiratory minute ventilation and also caused an increase in partial oxygen pressure (pO2) and decrease in partial carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2) in male anaesthetized Spraque Dawley rats. I.c.v. pretreatment with ibuprofen, a non-selective COX inhibitor, completely blocked the hyperventilation and blood gases changes induced by AA. In addition, central pretreatment with different doses of furegrelate, a TXA2 synthesis inhibitor, also partially prevented AA-evoked hyperventilation and blood gases effects. These data explicitly show that centrally administered AA induces hyperventilation with increasing pO2 and decreasing pCO2 levels which are mediated by the activation of central COX to TXA2 signaling pathway. PMID:26767978

  1. Antidepressant-like effect of centrally acting non-narcotic antitussive caramiphen in a forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Miki, Risa; Shima, Eriko; Honda, Sokichi; Soeda, Fumio; Shirasaki, Tetsuya; Takahama, Kazuo

    2010-09-13

    Recently, we reported that a centrally acting non-narcotic antitussive (cough suppressant drug), tipepidine produces an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test in rats. Because pharmacological properties of tipepidine apparently differ from those of typical antidepressants developed to date, we speculated that caramiphen, another centrally acting antitussive, has an antidepressant-like effect. That effect of caramiphen was studied in rats using the forced swimming test. Caramiphen at 20 and 40mg/kg i.p. significantly reduced immobility. At 40mg/kg i.p., it increased climbing behavior. Even at 40mg/kg, this drug had no effect on locomotor activity. Results suggest that a centrally acting antitussive possessing inhibition of GIRK channels has an antidepressant-like effect. PMID:20621160

  2. Spatial and Temporal Trends of Snowfall in Central New York - A Lake Effect Dominated Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnett, Justin Joseph

    Central New York is located in one of the snowiest regions in the United States, with the city of Syracuse, New York the snowiest metropolis in the nation. Snowfall in the region generally begins in mid-November and lasts until late-March. Snow accumulation occurs from a multitude of conditions: frontal systems, mid-latitude cyclones, Nor'easters, and most notably lake-effect storms. Lake effect snowfall (LES) is a difficult parameter to forecast due to the isolated and highly variable nature of the storm. Consequently, studies have attempted to determine changes in snowfall for lake-effect dominated regions. Annual snowfall patterns are of particular concern as seasonal snowfall totals are vital for water resources, winter businesses, agriculture, government and state agencies, and much more. Through the use of snowfall, temperature, precipitation, and location data from the National Weather Service's Cooperative Observer Program (COOP), spatial and temporal changes in snowfall for Central New York were determined. In order to determine climatic changes in snowfall, statistical analyses were performed (i.e. least squares estimation, correlations, principal component analyses, etc.) and spatial maps analyzed. Once snowfall trends were determined, factors influencing the trends were examined. Long-term snowfall trends for CNY were positive for original stations (˜0.46 +/- 0.20 in. yr -1) and homogenously filtered stations (0.23 +/- 0.20 in. yr -1). However, snowfall trends for shorter time-increments within the long-term period were not consistent, as positive, negative, and neutral trends were calculated. Regional differences in snowfall trends were observed for CNY as typical lake-effect areas (northern counties, the Tug Hill Plateau and the Southern Hills) experienced larger snowfall trends than areas less dominated by LES. Typical lake-effect months (December - February) experienced the greatest snowfall trend in CNY compared to other winter months. The

  3. Evaluation of the acute cardiac and central nervous system effects of the fluorocarbon trifluoromethane in baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branch, C.A.; Goldberg, D.A.; Ewing, J.R.; Butt, S.S.; Gayner, J. [Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States); Fagan, S.C. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The gaseous fluorocarbon trifluoromethane has recently been investigated for its potential as an in vivo gaseous indicator for nuclear magnetic resonance studies of brain perfusion. Trifluoromethane may also have significant value as a replacement for chlorofluorocarbon fire retardants. Because of possible species-specific cardiotoxic and anesthetic properties, the toxicological evaluation of trifluoromethane in primates (Papio anubis) is necessary prior to its evaluation in humans. We report the acute cardiac and central nervous system effects of trifluoromethane in eight anesthetized baboons. A dose-response effect was established for respiratory rate, electroencephalogram, and cardiac sinus rate, which exhibited a stepwise decrease from 10% trifluoromethane. No spontaneous arrhythmias were noted, and arterial blood pressure remained unchanged at any inspired level. Intravenous epinephrine infusions (1 {mu}g/kg) induced transient cardiac arrhythmia in 1 animal only at 70% FC-23 (v/v) trifluoromethane. Trifluoromethane appears to induce mild dose-related physiological changes at inspired levels of 30% or more, indicative of an anesthetic effect. These data suggest that trifluoromethane may be safe to use in humans, without significant adverse acute effects, at an inspired level of 30%. 23 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. [Cannabis: Effects in the Central Nervous System. Therapeutic, societal and legal consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Olmos, Víctor Manuel; Parra-Bernal, Marisela C

    2016-01-01

    The consumption of marijuana extracted from Cannabis sativa and indica plants involves an important cultural impact in Mexico. Their psychological stimulatory effect is widely recognized; their biochemical and molecular components interact with CB1 and CB2 (endocannabinoid system) receptors in various central nervous system structures (CNS) and immune cells. The psychoactive element Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) can be reproduced synthetically. Systematic reviews show evidence of therapeutic effectiveness of therapeutic marijuana only for certain symptoms of multiple sclerosis (spasticity, spasms and pain), despite attempts for its widespread use, including refractory childhood epilepsy. Evidence indicates significant adverse effects of smoked marijuana on the structure, functioning and brain connectivity. Cannabis exposure during pregnancy affects fetal brain development, potentially leading to later behavioral problems in children. Neuropsychological tests and advanced imaging techniques show involvement in the learning process in adolescents with substance use. Also, marijuana increases the cognitive impairment in patients with multiple sclerosis. Social and ethical consequences to legally free marijuana for recreational use may be deleterious transcendentally. The medicinal or psychoactive cannabinol no addictive effect requires controlled proven efficacy and safety before regulatory approval studies. PMID:27428345

  5. Neuritogenesis: A model for space radiation effects on the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, M. E.; Broglio, T. M.; Worgul, B. V.; Benton, E. V.

    1994-10-01

    Pivotal to the astronauts' functional integrity and survival during long space flights are the strategies to deal with space radiations. The majority of the cellular studies in this area emphasize simple endpoints such as growth related events which, although useful to understand the nature of primary cell injury, have poor predictive value for extrapolation to more complex tissues such as the central nervous system (CNS). In order to assess the radiation damage on neural cell populations, we developed an in vitro model in which neuronal differentiation, neurite extension, and synaptogenesis occur under controlled conditions. The model exploits chick embryo neural explants to study the effects of radiations on neuritogenesis. In addition, neurobiological problems associated with long-term space flights are discussed.

  6. Effects of low-dose prenatal irradiation on the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scientists are in general agreement about the effects of prenatal irradiation, including those affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Differing concepts and research approaches have resulted in some uncertainties about some quantitative relationships, underlying interpretations, and conclusions. Examples of uncertainties include the existence of a threshold, the quantitative relationships between prenatal radiation doses and resulting physical and functional lesions, and processes by which lesions originate and develop. A workshop was convened in which scientists with varying backgrounds and viewpoints discussed these relationships and explored ways in which various disciplines could coordinate concepts and methodologies to suggest research directions for resolving uncertainties. This Workshop Report summarizes, in an extended fashion, salient features of the presentations on the current status of our knowledge about the radiobiology and neuroscience of prenatal irradiation and the relationships between them

  7. Effect of volume expansion on systemic hemodynamics and central and arterial blood volume in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Bendtsen, F; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Systemic vasodilatation in cirrhosis may lead to hemodynamic alterations with reduced effective blood volume and decreased arterial blood pressure. This study investigates the response of acute volume expansion on hemodynamics and regional blood volumes in patients with cirrhosis...... and in controls. METHODS: Thirty-nine patients with cirrhosis (12 patients with Child-Turcotte class A, 14 with class B, and 13 with class C) and 6 controls were studied. During hepatic vein catheterization, cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance, central and arterial blood volume, noncentral...... change was found in patients with either class B or class C. Conversely, the noncentral blood volume increased in patients with class B and C. In both patients and controls, the cardiac output increased and the systemic vascular resistance decreased, whereas the mean arterial blood pressure did not...

  8. Multiple hemodynamic effects of endogenous hydrogen sulfide on central nervous system in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Yong-sheng; WU Sheng-ying; WANG Xing-jun; YU Fang; ZHAO Jing; TANG Chao-shu; OUYANG Jing-ping; GENG Bin

    2011-01-01

    Background Endogenous hydrogen sulfide is a new neuromodulator which takes part in the regulation of central nervous system physiology and diseases.Whether endogenous hydrogen sulfide in the central nervous system regulates cardiovascular activity is not known.In the present study,we observed the hemodynamic changes of hydrogen sulfide or its precursor by intracerebroventricular injection,and investigate the possible roles of endogenous digitalis like factors and sympathetic activity in the regulation.Methods Ninety-four Sprague-Dawley rats underwent a right cerebroventricular puncture,then the hydrogen sulfide saturation buffer or its precursor injected by intrcerebroventricular catheter.A heperin-filled catheter was inserted into the right femoral artery or into the left ventricle,and changes of blood pressure or cardiac function recorded by a Powerlab/4S instrument.Phentolamine or metoprolol were pre-injected to observe the possible role in autonomic nerve activity.After rats were sacrificed,plasma was collected and endogenous digitalis-like factors were measured with a commercial radioimmunoassay kit.The aortic,cardiac sarcolemmal vesicles were isolated and the activity of Na+-K+-ATPase was measured as ouabain-sensitive ATP hydrolysis under maximal velocity conditions by measuring the release of inorganic phosphate from ATP.Unpaired Student's ttest for two groups or analysis of variances (ANOVA) for multiple groups were used to compare the differences of the changes.Results Intracerebroventricular injection of hydrogen sulfide induced a transient hypotension,then dramatic hypertenive effects in a dose-dependent manner.Bolus injection of L-cysteine or beta-mercaptopyruvate also increased mean arterial pressure (P <0.01),whereas hydroxylamine-a cystathionine beta synthase inhibitor decreased the arterial pressure (P <0.01).Hydrogen sulfide and L-cysteine increased mean arterial pressure,left ventricular develop pressure and left-ventricle maximal rate of

  9. Effect of ectomycorrhizae on growth and establishment of sal (Shorea robusta seedlings in central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABHISHEK PYASI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Pyasi A, Soni KK, Verma RK. 2013. Effect of ectomycorrhizae on growth and establishment of sal (Shorea robusta seedlings in central India. Nusantara Bioscience 5: 44-49. The aim of the present study was to develop ectomycorrhiza in sal sapling at outside the sal growing areas. For this purpose sal seedling were raised at Jabalpur which is around 80 km away from natural sal forest (Motinala, MP. Seed sowing was done with inoculation of ectomycorrhizal inocula prepared by isolating the fungi from surface sterilised young basidiocarp of Lycoperdon compactum and Russula michiganensis. The inocula of ectomycorrhizal fungus were prepared in wheat grains treated with gypsum. The synthesis of ectomycorrhiza was observed in the sapling planted in the experimental field at Jabalpur with production of basidiocarp of Lycoperdon compactum near saplings. The mycorrhized saplings also showed higher growth indices.

  10. Collective effects in Au(100-800 AMeV) + Au semi-central collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work has been carried out in the framework of the experimental program of the FOPI collaboration. It is devoted to a systematic study of the different forms of collective expansion of nuclear matter in semi-central Au+Au collisions at incident energies ranging from 100 AMeV to 800 AMeV. The aim is to investigate the influence of compressional effects, momentum dependence of the nuclear interaction and nucleon-nucleon cross section on the observed phenomena. Important changes in the reaction mechanisms are evidenced, in particular at low incident energies where one observes, on the one hand, a transition from an enhanced in-plane emission to a preferential out-of-plane emission pattern and, on the other hand, a strong reduction of the directed in-plane component. Experimental results are compared to the predictions of the Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) model for different parametrizations of the nuclear interaction. (author)

  11. Primary angiitis of the central nervous system with diffuse cerebral mass effect and giant cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, J A

    2012-02-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS), also called primary CNS vasculitis, is an idiopathic inflammatory condition affecting only intracranial and spinal cord vessels, particularly medium-sized and smaller arteries and arterioles. Angiography and histopathology typically do not reveal evidence of systemic vasculitis.(1,2) Histopathology usually reveals granulomatous inflammation affecting arterioles and small arteries of the parenchyma and\\/or leptomeninges, similar to that seen in Takayasu\\'s or giant cell arteritis.(1-3) We report a patient with biopsy-proven PACNS with giant cells and cerebral mass effect on MRI. Magnetic resonance angiography and cerebral angiography appeared normal and there was no evidence of extracranial vasculitis.

  12. Are the Intraday Effects of Central Bank Intervention on Exchange Rate Spreads Asymmetric and State Dependent?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fatum, Rasmus; Pedersen, Jesper; Sørensen, Peter Norman

    This paper investigates the intraday effects of unannounced foreign exchange intervention on bid-ask exchange rate spreads using official intraday intervention data provided by the Danish central bank. Our starting point is a simple theoretical model of the bid-ask spread which we use to formulate...... testable hypotheses regarding how unannounced intervention purchases and intervention sales influence the market asymmetrically. To test these hypotheses we estimate weighted least squares (WLS) time-series models of the intraday bid-ask spread. Our main result is that intervention purchases and sales both...... exert a significant influence on the exchange rate spread, but in opposite directions: intervention purchases of the smaller currency, on average, reduce the spread while intervention sales, on average, increase the spread. We also show that intervention only affects the exchange rate spread when...

  13. Electroporation Transfection as an Effective Tool to Trace Transplanted NSCs in Adult Central Nervous System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周畅; 温哲钘; 王志萍; 郭行; 史冬梅; 左焕琮; 谢佐平

    2004-01-01

    Neural stem cells, which are clonogenic cells with self-renewal and multilineage differentiation properties, are currently considered as powerful candidates for cell replacement therapy in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. A key issue is whether stem cells can survive, migrate and differentiate following transplantation into the adult central nervous system. This research shows that enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) plasmid electroporation transfected neural stem cells can functionally differentiate in vitro and that most of the EGFP-positive cells can survive and migrate towards the damaged areas when transplanted into the brain of a Parkinson's disease model rat. The results suggest an effective and maneuverable tracing tool to detect whether transplanted neural stem and progenitor cells function in the adult brain in vivo.

  14. Effects of low-dose prenatal irradiation on the central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    Scientists are in general agreement about the effects of prenatal irradiation, including those affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Differing concepts and research approaches have resulted in some uncertainties about some quantitative relationships, underlying interpretations, and conclusions. Examples of uncertainties include the existence of a threshold, the quantitative relationships between prenatal radiation doses and resulting physical and functional lesions, and processes by which lesions originate and develop. A workshop was convened in which scientists with varying backgrounds and viewpoints discussed these relationships and explored ways in which various disciplines could coordinate concepts and methodologies to suggest research directions for resolving uncertainties. This Workshop Report summarizes, in an extended fashion, salient features of the presentations on the current status of our knowledge about the radiobiology and neuroscience of prenatal irradiation and the relationships between them.

  15. In Vitro Evaluation of Access Cavity Location Effect on Fracture Resistance of Maxillary Central Endodontically Treated Teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Shirinzad, M.; Z. Khamverdi; S. Ghorbani

    2014-01-01

    Introduction & Objective: Preparation of access cavity to root canal is a critical phase in endo-dontic treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of access cavity loca-tion (labial or palatal) on fracture resistance of endodontically treated maxillary central teeth. Materials & Methods: In this experimental laboratorial study, 84 intact human maxillary central incisors with similar dimensions were selected. The teeth were divided into 4 test groups as follows: Group 1 : ...

  16. Modeling the Effects of Harvest Alternatives on Mitigating Oak Decline in a Central Hardwood Forest Landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen J Wang

    Full Text Available Oak decline is a process induced by complex interactions of predisposing factors, inciting factors, and contributing factors operating at tree, stand, and landscape scales. It has greatly altered species composition and stand structure in affected areas. Thinning, clearcutting, and group selection are widely adopted harvest alternatives for reducing forest vulnerability to oak decline by removing susceptible species and declining trees. However, the long-term, landscape-scale effects of these different harvest alternatives are not well studied because of the limited availability of experimental data. In this study, we applied a forest landscape model in combination with field studies to evaluate the effects of the three harvest alternatives on mitigating oak decline in a Central Hardwood Forest landscape. Results showed that the potential oak decline in high risk sites decreased strongly in the next five decades irrespective of harvest alternatives. This is because oak decline is a natural process and forest succession (e.g., high tree mortality resulting from intense competition would eventually lead to the decrease in oak decline in this area. However, forest harvesting did play a role in mitigating oak decline and the effectiveness varied among the three harvest alternatives. The group selection and clearcutting alternatives were most effective in mitigating oak decline in the short and medium terms, respectively. The long-term effects of the three harvest alternatives on mitigating oak decline became less discernible as the role of succession increased. The thinning alternative had the highest biomass retention over time, followed by the group selection and clearcutting alternatives. The group selection alternative that balanced treatment effects and retaining biomass was the most viable alternative for managing oak decline. Insights from this study may be useful in developing effective and informed forest harvesting plans for managing oak

  17. SPIDER - X. Environmental effects in central and satellite early-type galaxies through the stellar fossil record

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Barbera, F.; Pasquali, A.; Ferreras, I.; Gallazzi, A.; de Carvalho, R. R.; de la Rosa, I. G.

    2014-12-01

    A detailed analysis of how environment affects the star formation history of early-type galaxies (ETGs) is undertaken via high signal-to-noise ratio stacked spectra obtained from a sample of 20 977 ETGs (morphologically selected) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-based SPIDER survey. Two major parameters are considered for the study: the central velocity dispersion (σ), which relates to local drivers of star formation, and the mass of the host halo, which relates to environment-related effects. In addition, we separate the sample between centrals (the most massive galaxy in a halo) and satellites. We derive trends of age, metallicity, and [α/Fe] enhancement, with σ. We confirm that the major driver of stellar population properties in ETGs is velocity dispersion, with a second-order effect associated with the central/satellite nature of the galaxy. No environmental dependence is detected for satellite ETGs, except at low σ - where satellites in groups or in the outskirts of clusters tend to be younger than those in the central regions of clusters. In contrast, the trends for centrals show a significant dependence on halo mass. Central ETGs in groups (i.e. with a halo mass >1012.5 M⊙) have younger ages, lower [α/Fe], and higher internal reddening, than `isolated' systems (i.e. centrals residing in low-mass, <1012.5 M⊙, haloes). Our findings imply that central ETGs in groups formed their stellar component over longer time scales than `isolated' centrals, mainly because of gas-rich interactions with their companion galaxies.

  18. Antidiabetic Effect of Galantamine: Novel Effect for a Known Centrally Acting Drug.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mennatallah A Ali

    Full Text Available The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is one of the putative biochemical pathways that link diabetes with Alzheimer disease. Hence, we aimed to verify the potential antidiabetic effect of galantamine, unveil the possible mechanisms and evaluate its interaction with vildagliptin. The n5-STZ rat model was adopted and the diabetic animals were treated with galantamine and/or vildagliptin for 4 weeks. Galantamine lowered the n5-STZ-induced elevation in body weight, food/water intake, serum levels of glucose, fructosamine, and ALT/AST, as well as AChE in the tested organs. Moreover, it modulated successfully the lipid profile assessed in serum, liver, and muscle, and increased serum insulin level, as well as % β-cell function, in a pattern similar to that of vildagliptin. Additionally, galantamine confirmed its antioxidant (Nrf2, TAC, MDA, anti-inflammatory (NF-κB, TNF-α, visfatin, adiponectin and anti-apoptotic (caspase-3, cytochrome c capabilities by altering the n5-STZ effect on all the aforementioned parameters. On the molecular level, galantamine/vildagliptin have improved the insulin (p-insulin receptor, p-Akt, GLUT4/GLUT2 and Wnt/β-catenin (p-GSK-3β, β-catenin signaling pathways. On almost all parameters, the galantamine effects surpassed that of vildagliptin, while the combination regimen showed the best effects. The present results clearly proved that galantamine modulated glucose/lipid profile possibly through its anti-oxidant, -apoptotic, -inflammatory and -cholinesterase properties. These effects could be attributed partly to the enhancement of insulin and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. Galantamine can be strongly considered as a potential antidiabetic agent and as an add-on therapy with other oral antidiabetics.

  19. Antidiabetic Effect of Galantamine: Novel Effect for a Known Centrally Acting Drug

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Mennatallah A.; EL-Abhar, Hanan S.; Kamel, Maher A.; Attia, Ahmed S.

    2015-01-01

    The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is one of the putative biochemical pathways that link diabetes with Alzheimer disease. Hence, we aimed to verify the potential antidiabetic effect of galantamine, unveil the possible mechanisms and evaluate its interaction with vildagliptin. The n5-STZ rat model was adopted and the diabetic animals were treated with galantamine and/or vildagliptin for 4 weeks. Galantamine lowered the n5-STZ-induced elevation in body weight, food/water intake, serum le...

  20. Effects of Retama raetam (Forssk. Webb & Berthel. (Fabaceae on the central nervous system in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Tubuly Rida A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Retama raetam (Forssk. Webb & Berthel. (Fabaceae, commonly known as ‘raetam’ or ‘broom bush’, is a desert shrub that grows abundantly in North-African countries, Palestine and Syria. Traditionally, this plant has been used as an abortifacient, a purgative and a vermifuge. In the present study, the effect of the methanol (MeOH extract of the aerial parts of R. raetam on the central nervous system (CNS has been evaluated using a mice model. In the photoelectrical cell test, the extract of R. raetam (ERR at a dose of 125 mg/kg body weight did not exhibit any effect on the spontaneous motor activity in mice. At a dose of 250 mg/kg body weight, ERR increased ambulatory movement, but had no effect on the non-ambulatory movement, while a dose of 375 mg/kg body weight decreased both ambulatory and non-ambulatory movements. The effect of ERR on the anxiety levels and behaviors of mice was investigated using the elevated plus-maze test. At doses of 125, 250 and 375 mg/kg body weight, ERR decreased anxiety levels without showing an effect on the total activity; it did not affect anxiety levels but increased the total activity; it increased anxiety levels and decreased the total activity, respectively. In the diazepam-induced sleep test, ERR increased the onset of sleep without affecting the duration of sleep at the dose of 250 mg/kg body weight. The dose of 375 mg/kg body weight decreased the onset of sleep while increasing the duration of sleep. ERR did not exhibit any effect on the diazepam-induced sleep in the presence of flumazenil or picrotoxin.

  1. Effects of Betel chewing on the central and autonomic nervous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, N S

    2001-01-01

    Betel chewing has been claimed to produce a sense of well-being, euphoria, heightened alertness, sweating, salivation, a hot sensation in the body and increased capacity to work. Betel chewing also leads to habituation, addiction and withdrawal. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects remain poorly understood. Arecoline, the major alkaloid of Areca nut, has been extensively studied, and several effects of betel chewing are thought to be related to the actions of this parasympathomimetic constituent. However, betel chewing may produce complex reactions and interactions. In the presence of lime, arecoline and guvacoline in Areca nut are hydrolyzed into arecaidine and guvacine, respectively, which are strong inhibitors of GABA uptake. Piper betle flower or leaf contains aromatic phenolic compounds which have been found to stimulate the release of catecholamines in vitro. Thus, betel chewing may affect parasympathetic, GABAnergic and sympathetic functions. Betel chewing produces an increase in heart rate, blood pressure, sweating and body temperature. In addition, EEG shows widespread cortical desynchronization indicating a state of arousal. In autonomic function tests, both the sympathetic skin response and RR interval variation are affected. Betel chewing also increases plasma concentrations of norepinephrine and epinephrine. These results suggest that betel chewing mainly affects the central and autonomic nervous systems. Future studies should investigate both the acute and chronic effects of betel chewing. Such studies may further elucidate the psychoactive mechanisms responsible for the undiminished popularity of betel chewing since antiquity. PMID:11385294

  2. Synergistic effects of hypoxia and increasing CO2 on benthic invertebrates of the central Chilean coast

    KAUST Repository

    Steckbauer, Alexandra

    2015-07-10

    Ocean acidification (OA) and hypoxic events are an increasing worldwide problem, but the synergetic effects of these factors are seldom explored. However, this synergetic occurrence of stressors is prevalent. The coastline of Chile not only suffers from coastal hypoxia but the cold, oxygen-poor waters in upwelling events are also supersaturated in CO2, a study site to explore the combined effect of OA and hypoxia. We experimentally evaluated the metabolic response of different invertebrate species (2 anthozoans, 9 molluscs, 4 crustaceans, 2 echinoderms) of the coastline of central Chile (33°30′S, 71°37′W) to hypoxia and OA within predicted levels and in a full factorial design. Organisms were exposed to 4 different treatments (ambient, low oxygen, high CO2, and the combination of low oxygen and high CO2) and metabolism was measured after 3 and 6 days. We show that the combination of hypoxia and increased pCO2 reduces the respiration significantly, compared to a single stressor. The evaluation of synergistic pressures, a more realistic scenario than single stressors, is crucial to evaluate the effect of future changes for coastal species and our results provide the first insight on what might happen in the next 100 years.

  3. Re-evaluation of the effectiveness of the central A/M Area recovery well network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A groundwater recovery well network has been operating in the central portion of the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) since 1985 to retrieve chlorinated volatile organic solvents. In 1986, a groundwater modeling study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the recovery well network that included planned recovery wells (RWM 1 through 11) and process water wells (S. S. Papadopulous, 1986). Since the original modeling study, use of some of the process wells has discontinued and some pumping rates at other wells have changed. Also, the understanding of the hydrologic system in the A/M Area has improved because additional monitoring wells have been installed in the area. As a result, an updated groundwater flow model (Beaudoin et al., 1991) for the area was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the existing recovery network. The results of this study indicate that the estimated effectiveness of the recovery well has not changed dramatically since the original groundwater modeling study. However, slight differences do exist between the original study and this study because the recent model more accurately reflects the A/M Area subsurface hydrologic system

  4. Grazing effects of the periwinkle Echinolittorina peruviana at a central Peruvian high rocky intertidal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Fernando J.; Firstater, Fausto N.; Fanjul, Eugenia; Bazterrica, M. Cielo; Lomovasky, Betina J.; Tarazona, Juan; Iribarne, Oscar O.

    2008-03-01

    Echinolittorina peruviana is the most common gastropod in the high intertidal zone of Peru, representing more than 80% of the individuals present at that zone. Experimental removal of snails was used to evaluate their effects on (a) abundance of epilithic biofilm, (b) barnacle recruitment, and (c) abundance of macroalgae under “normal” conditions of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Experiments were carried out from October 2005 to April 2007 at two intertidal levels of a semi-protected rocky shore of central Peru. Results demonstrated that E. peruviana is able to control biofilm abundance and barnacle recruitment at both heights investigated, with marked effects in the lower zone. Erect macroalgae ( Ulva spp. and Gelidium spp.) were less affected by grazing; but negative effects were observed on macroalgal crusts. Season and physical stress seem to play a more important role in the abundance of macroalgae in the high intertidal. Our results are similar to those reported elsewhere for high shore littorinids and represent baseline data to understand how the role of intertidal consumers will vary under the cold (La Niña) and warm (El Niño) phases of ENSO on these shores.

  5. A review of ozone-induced effects on the forests of central Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first report on oxidant-induced plant damage in the Valley of Mexico was presented over 30 years ago. Ozone is known to occur in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area and elsewhere as the cause of chlorotic mottling on pine needles that are 2 years old or older as observed in 1976 on Pinus hartwegii and Pinus leiophylla. Visible evidences for the negative effects of ozone on the vegetation of central Mexico include foliar injury expressed as chlorotic mottling and premature defoliation on pines, a general decline of sacred fir, visible symptoms on native forest broadleaved species (e.g. Mexican black cherry). Recent investigations have also indicated that indirect effects are occurring such as limited root colonization by symbiotic fungi on ozone-damaged P. hartwegii trees and a negative influence of the pollutant on the natural regeneration of this species. The negative ozone-induced effects on the vegetation will most likely continue to increase. - Ozone induced symptoms, poor tree regeneration and limited root colonization by mycorrhiza fungi observed in the valley of Mexico

  6. Landscape context moderates edge effects: Nesting success of wood thrushes in Central New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, M.J.L.; Donovan, T.M.

    2004-01-01

    Despite two decades of research into the effects of habitat fragmentation and edges on nesting birds, critical information about how edges affect the success of natural nests of Neotropical migratory songbirds breeding in heterogeneous landscapes is still missing. We studied abundance and nesting success in Wood Thrushes (Hylocichla mustelina) breeding across a heterogeneous landscape in central New York from 1998 to 2000 to test the hypothesis that edge effects on nesting passerines are stronger in fragmented than contiguous landscapes. We monitored nests to estimate nesting success in edge and interior habitats in both fragmented and contiguously forested landscapes. In contiguous landscapes, daily survival rate did not differ between edge nests (0.963) and interior nests (0.968) (??2 = 0.19, p = 0.66). In contrast, in fragmented landscapes, daily survival estimates were higher in interior (0.971) than edge (0.953) nests (??2 = 3.1, p = 0.08). Our study supports the hypothesis that landscape composition moderates edge effects on actual nests of birds but does not determine the mechanisms causing these patterns.

  7. The effects of acute morphine treatment on the incorporation of [3H]L-lysine by normal and regenerating facial nucleus neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of morphine on the incorporation of [3H]L-lysine into proteins of facial nucleus neurons was examined by light microscopic radioautography. Silver grains present within various compartments of normal and regenerating (3-, 7-. 14- and 21 days post-axotomy) neurons from saline-treated Wistar rats were compared with the amount present in similar cells from animals receiving 40 mg/kg morphine sulfate i.v. At 14- and 21-days post-axotomy, regenerating neurons were larger and the grain count in the emulsion over these cells was greater than that observed in normal (unoperated) neurons. In normal facial neurons, the accumulation of lysine into the nucleus and nucleolus was significantly lower 60 min after morphine adminstration. However, morphine's inhibition of lysine incorporation was even more pronounced in regenerating neurons. In these cells, nuclear lysine uptake was depressed at 3 and 7 days, while maximum inhibition of cytoplasmic incorporation occurred at 14-days post-axotomy. Morphine adminstration decreased nucleolar lysine incorporation at all survival intervals. (Auth.)

  8. Differential effects of opiates on the incorporation of [14C] thiamine in the central nervous system of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, A L; Vadlamani, N L; Pontani, R B

    1977-03-15

    Opiate agonist (morphine), pure antagonist (naloxone), mixed agonist-antagonist (nalorphine) and analgesically inactive enantiomorph (dextrorphan) produced differential stereoselective effects on the incorporation of [14C] thiamine in the central nervous system of the rats. The possible role of thiamine in opiate effects and its implications are discussed. PMID:858372

  9. The Effects of Values, Work Centrality, and Organizational Commitment on Organizational Citizenship Behaviors: Evidence from Turkish SMEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucanok, Basak; Karabati, Serdar

    2013-01-01

    Organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) are voluntary contributions of employees not explicitly recognized by the formal reward system and are ultimately critical for sustaining organizational effectiveness (Organ, 1988). The current study aims to investigate the effects of values, work centrality, and organizational commitment on…

  10. Effects of physical exercise on central nervous system functions: a review of brain region specific adaptations

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Julie A; Corrigan, Frances; Baune, Bernhard T

    2015-01-01

    Pathologies of central nervous system (CNS) functions are involved in prevalent conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, depression, and Parkinson’s disease. Notable pathologies include dysfunctions of circadian rhythm, central metabolism, cardiovascular function, central stress responses, and movement mediated by the basal ganglia. Although evidence suggests exercise may benefit these conditions, the neurobiological mechanisms of exercise in specific brain regions involved in these important ...

  11. Central additive effect of Ginkgo biloba and Rhodiola rosea on psychomotor vigilance task and short-term working memory accuracy

    OpenAIRE

    Hayder M. Al-kuraishy

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aim: The present study investigates the effect of combined treatment with Ginkgo biloba and/or rhodiola rosea on psychomotor vigilance task and short-term working memory accuracy. Subjects and Methods: A total number of 112 volunteers was enrolled to study the effect of Ginkgo biloba and rhodiola rosea on psychomotor vigilance task and short-term working memory accuracy as compared to placebo effects,the central cognitive effect was assessed by Critical flicker-fusion frequency (...

  12. Effect of intervention treatment from different stages on prognosis in children with central coordination disturbance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Chen; Wei Zhao; Yunhe Wang; Yan Zhu; Lixian Gu; Qing Han

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Central coordination disturbance is regarded as the early-stage symptom of brain injury-induced cerebral palsy. This disease manifests itself as motor disorder, abnormal attitudinal reflex and muscular tension. Early intervention may improve its prognosis.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of intervention treatment from different stages on the prognosis of central coordination disturbance following brain injury in children patients.DESIGN: A contrast observation experiment.SETTING: Department of Neurology and Rehabilitation, Urumqi Children's Hospital.PARTICIPANTS: Totally 151 children who were diagnosed as central coordination disturbance from January 2002 to December 2003 in the Department of Neurology and Rehabilitation of Urumqi Children's Hospital were recruited. All the children patients, including 101 male and 50 female, aged from 3 months to 1 year old, met the diagnosis criteria of central coordination disturbance from Vojta. They were divided into slight,moderate and severe abnormity according to Vojta attitudinal reflex. All 151 patients were divided into 2 groups according to their age at diagnosis: 3-6 months old group (n=74), 62 severe, 10 moderate and 2 slight; 7-12 months old group (n=77), 66 severe, 7 moderate and 4 slight. All the relatives of children patients were informed of the experiment.METHODS: ①) Both groups received physical training (PT) as the main treatment; Hand training was given if necessary. All of the patients received additional hyperbaric oxygen therapy, bioelectric therapy, scalp acupuncture, drug treatment and family training. The importance of integration of hospital and family based rehabilitation was stressed. Those who did not catch up with the normal development or had abnormal reflexes continued to receive treatment. ② Around the age of 2 years old, all children did a final evaluation using Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID). Mental development index (MDI) and physical development index (PDI) were

  13. Evaluation of central nervous system effects of Citrus limon essential oil in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidianne Mayra Lopes Campêlo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS depressant and anticonvulsant activities of Citrus limon (L. Osbeck, Rutaceae, essential oil (EO were investigated in animal models. The EO (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg injected by oral route (p.o. in mice caused a significant decrease in the motor activity of animals when compared with the control group, up to thirty days after the administration and the dose of 150 mg/kg significantly reduced the remaining time of the animals on the Rota-rod apparatus. Additionally, C. limon essential oil was also capable to promote an increase of latency for development of convulsions induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ. The administration of FLU (10 mg/kg, i.p., GABA A-benzodiazepine (GABA-BZD receptor antagonist, antagonized the effect of C. limon essential oil at higher dose. This C. limon essential oil was also capable to promote an increase of latency for development of convulsions induced by picrotoxin (PIC at higher dose. In the same way, the anticonvulsant effect of the EO was affected by pretreatment with flumazenil, a selective antagonist of benzodiazepine site of GABA A receptor. These results suggest a possible CNS depressant and anticonvulsant activities in mice that needs further investigation.

  14. Surface Mining and Reclamation Effects on Flood Response of Watersheds in the Central Appalachian Plateau Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, J. R.; Lookingbill, T. R.; McCormick, B.; Townsend, P. A.; Eshleman, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    Surface mining of coal and subsequent reclamation represent the dominant land use change in the central Appalachian Plateau (CAP) region of the United States. Hydrologic impacts of surface mining have been studied at the plot scale, but effects at broader scales have not been explored adequately. Broad-scale classification of reclaimed sites is difficult because standing vegetation makes them nearly indistinguishable from alternate land uses. We used a land cover data set that accurately maps surface mines for a 187-km2 watershed within the CAP. These land cover data, as well as plot-level data from within the watershed, are used with HSPF (Hydrologic Simulation Program-Fortran) to estimate changes in flood response as a function of increased mining. Results show that the rate at which flood magnitude increases due to increased mining is linear, with greater rates observed for less frequent return intervals. These findings indicate that mine reclamation leaves the landscape in a condition more similar to urban areas rather than does simple deforestation, and call into question the effectiveness of reclamation in terms of returning mined areas to the hydrological state that existed before mining.

  15. Assessment of the Central Effects of Natural Uranium via Behavioural Performances and the Cerebrospinal Fluid Metabolome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestaevel, P.; Grison, S.; Favé, G.; Elie, C.; Dhieux, B.; Martin, J. C.; Tack, K.; Souidi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Natural uranium (NU), a component of the earth's crust, is not only a heavy metal but also an alpha particle emitter, with chemical and radiological toxicity. Populations may therefore be chronically exposed to NU through drinking water and food. Since the central nervous system is known to be sensitive to pollutants during its development, we assessed the effects on the behaviour and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) metabolome of rats exposed for 9 months from birth to NU via lactation and drinking water (1.5, 10, or 40 mg·L−1 for male rats and 40 mg·L−1 for female rats). Medium-term memory decreased in comparison to controls in male rats exposed to 1.5, 10, or 40 mg·L−1 NU. In male rats, spatial working memory and anxiety- and depressive-like behaviour were only altered by exposure to 40 mg·L−1 NU and any significant effect was observed on locomotor activity. In female rats exposed to NU, only locomotor activity was significantly increased in comparison with controls. LC-MS metabolomics of CSF discriminated the fingerprints of the male and/or female NU-exposed and control groups. This study suggests that exposure to environmental doses of NU from development to adulthood can have an impact on rat brain function. PMID:27247806

  16. Effect of Three Centaurea Species Collected from Central Anatolia Region of Turkey on Human Melanoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Alessandra; Cardile, Venera; Graziano, Adriana C E; Rigano, Daniela; Aktumsek, Abdurrahman; Zengin, Gokhan; Senatore, Felice

    2016-03-01

    Centaurea is the largest genus within the Asteraceae family. Many members of this genus are used in traditional folk medicine, such as Centaurea pulchella used to treat skin problems such as to resolve the abscess. Although biological activities of many Centaurea species have been investigated in different countries and Turkey, cytotoxic effect of C. patula, C. pulchella and C. tchihatcheffii has not been studied yet. Melanoma is one of the most invasive and deadly forms of skin cancer. Therefore, in an ongoing effort to identify new natural anticancer products for the treatment and/or prevention of melanoma cancer, the present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of these Centaurea species, collected from Central Anatolia region of Turkey on cell growth and death in human melanoma cell line, A375.The results revealed that all extracts were able to inhibit, after 48 h of treatment, the growth of cancer cells, that could be related to an overall action of the phenolic compounds present. In fact, C. pulchella, with the highest level of phenolics, showed a major activity followed by C. patula and C. tchihatcheffii. Our data also demonstrate that these natural products induce apoptotic cell death. In conclusion, the study of plant extracts for their cytotoxic and apoptotic properties has shown that medicinal herbs from Centaurea species might have also importance in the prevention and treatment of melanoma. PMID:27169173

  17. The effects of node exclusion on the centrality measures in graph models of interacting economic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Marco Antonio Leonel; Yoneyama, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    This work concerns the study of the effects felt by a network as a whole when a specific node is perturbed. Many real world systems can be described by network models in which the interactions of the various agents can be represented as an edge of a graph. With a graph model in hand, it is possible to evaluate the effect of deleting some of its edges on the architecture and values of nodes of the network. Eventually a node may end up isolated from the rest of the network and an interesting problem is to have a quantitative measure of the impact of such an event. For instance, in the field of finance, the network models are very popular and the proposed methodology allows to carry out "what if" tests in terms of weakening the links between the economic agents, represented as nodes. The two main concepts employed in the proposed methodology are (i) the vibrational IC-Information Centrality, which can provide a measure of the relative importance of a particular node in a network and (ii) autocatalytic networks that can indicate the evolutionary trends of the network. Although these concepts were originally proposed in the context of other fields of knowledge, they were also found to be useful in analyzing financial networks. In order to illustrate the applicability of the proposed methodology, a case of study using the actual data comprising stock market indices of 12 countries is presented.

  18. Central histaminergic system interplay with suppressive effects of immune challenge on food intake in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendehdel, M; Baghbanzadeh, A; Aghelkohan, P; Hassanpour, S

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the interaction of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and histaminergic systems on appetite regulation in broilers. Effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of α-fluoromethylhistidine (α-FMH, histidine decarboxylase inhibitor), chlorpheniramine (histamine H1 receptor antagonist), famotidine (histamine H2 receptor antagonist) and thioperamide (histamine H3 receptor antagonist) on LPS-induced hypophagia in broilers were studied. A total of 128 broilers were randomly allocated into 4 experiments (4 groups and 8 replications in each experiment). A cannula was surgically implanted into the lateral ventricle. In Experiment 1, broilers were ICV injected with LPS (20 ng) prior to α-FMH (250 nmol). In Experiment 2, chickens were ICV injected with LPS followed by chlorpheniramine (300 nmol). In Experiment 3, broilers were ICV injected with famotidine (82 nmol) after LPS (20 ng). In Experiment 4, ICV injection of LPS was followed by thioperamide (300 nmol). Then, cumulative food intake was recorded until 4 h post-injection. According to the results, LPS significantly decreased food intake. Chlorpheniramine significantly amplified food intake, and LPS-induced hypophagia was lessened by injection of chlorpheniramine. α-FMH, famotidine and thioperamide had no effect on LPS-induced hypophagia. These results suggest that there is an interaction between central LPS and the histaminergic system where LPS-induced hypophagia is mediated by H1 histamine receptors in 3 h food-deprived broilers. PMID:26924422

  19. Health Effects of High Radon Environments in Central Europe: Another Test for the LNT Hypothesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Among the various "natural laboratories" of high natural or technical enhanced natural radiation environments in the world such as Kerala (India), Brazil, Ramsar (Iran), etc., the areas in and around the Central European Ore Mountains (Erzgebirge) in the southern parts of former East Germany, but also including parts of Thuringia, northern Bohemia (now Czech Republic), and northeastern Bavaria, are still relatively little known internationally.Although this area played a central role in the history of radioactivity and radiation effects on humans over centuries, most of the valuable earlier results have not been published in English or quotable according to the current rules in the scientific literature and therefore are not generally known internationally. During the years 1945 to 1989, this area was one of the world's most important uranium mining areas, providing the former Soviet Union with 300,000 tons of uranium for its military programs. Most data related to health effects of radon and other carcinogenic agents on miners and residents became available only during the years after German reunification. Many of the studies are still unpublished, or more or less internal reports.By now, substantial studies have been performed on the previously unavailable data about the miners and the population, providing valuable insights that are, to a large degree, in disagreement with the opinion of various international bodies assuming an increase of lung cancer risk in the order of 10% for each 100 Bq/m(3) (or doubling for 1000 Bq/m(3)), even for small residential radon concentrations. At the same time, other studies focusing on never-smokers show little or no effects of residential radon exposures. Experiments in medical clinics using radon on a large scale as a therapeutic against various rheumatic and arthritic disease demonstrated in randomized double-blind studies the effectiveness of such treatments.The main purpose of this review is to critically examine, including

  20. Differential effects of two fermentable carbohydrates on central appetite regulation and body composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulika Arora

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is rising at an alarming rate globally. Different fermentable carbohydrates have been shown to reduce obesity. The aim of the present study was to investigate if two different fermentable carbohydrates (inulin and β-glucan exert similar effects on body composition and central appetite regulation in high fat fed mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty six C57BL/6 male mice were randomized and maintained for 8 weeks on a high fat diet containing 0% (w/w fermentable carbohydrate, 10% (w/w inulin or 10% (w/w β-glucan individually. Fecal and cecal microbial changes were measured using fluorescent in situ hybridization, fecal metabolic profiling was obtained by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1H NMR, colonic short chain fatty acids were measured by gas chromatography, body composition and hypothalamic neuronal activation were measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and manganese enhanced MRI (MEMRI, respectively, PYY (peptide YY concentration was determined by radioimmunoassay, adipocyte cell size and number were also measured. Both inulin and β-glucan fed groups revealed significantly lower cumulative body weight gain compared with high fat controls. Energy intake was significantly lower in β-glucan than inulin fed mice, with the latter having the greatest effect on total adipose tissue content. Both groups also showed an increase in the numbers of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus-Enterococcus in cecal contents as well as feces. β-Glucan appeared to have marked effects on suppressing MEMRI associated neuronal signals in the arcuate nucleus, ventromedial hypothalamus, paraventricular nucleus, periventricular nucleus and the nucleus of the tractus solitarius, suggesting a satiated state. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although both fermentable carbohydrates are protective against increased body weight gain, the lower body fat content induced by inulin may be metabolically advantageous. β-Glucan appears to suppress

  1. Neuroprotective effects of Nigella sativa extracts during germination on central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Hayatul; Ahmad, Iffat Zareen; Salman, Mohammad Tariq

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nigella sativa Linn. which has many acclaimed medicinal properties is an indigenous herbaceous plant and belongs to the Ranunculaceae family, which grows in countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea, Pakistan and India. Objective: This study was designed to investigate the effects of N. sativa seed extracts of different germination phases on the central nervous system (CNS) responses in experimental animals. Materials and Methods: Anxiolytic, locomotor activity of extracts (1 g/kg of body weight) was evaluated in both stressed and unstressed animal models and antiepileptic effect was evaluated by maximal electroshock seizure model keeping diazepam (20 mg/kg) as a positive control. Antidepressant effect was evaluated by forced swim test and tail suspension test keeping imipramine (15 mg/kg) as a positive control. Results: All tested extracts of N. sativa during different phases of germination (especially 5th day germination phase) showed significant (P < 0.001) anxiolytic effect in comparison to control. Diazepam reduced locomotor activity in control (unstressed) rats but did not show affect in stressed rats while N. sativa extracts from germination phases significantly (P < 0.001) reduced locomotor activity in unstressed as well as stressed animals. All the extracts of N. sativa from different germination phases exhibited significant (P < 0.001) reduction in various phases of epileptic seizure on comparison with the reference standard (diazepam). During antidepressant test, N. sativa extracts exhibited a slight reduction in the immobility of rats. Conclusion: During germination, especially in 5th day germination extract, N. sativa showed significant CNS depressant activity as compared to whole seeds that possibly may be due higher content of secondary metabolites produced during germination. PMID:26109765

  2. Effects of long-term pioglitazone treatment on peripheral and central markers of aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M Blalock

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thiazolidinediones (TZDs activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma and are used clinically to help restore peripheral insulin sensitivity in Type 2 diabetes (T2DM. Interestingly, long-term treatment of mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD with TZDs also has been shown to reduce several well-established brain biomarkers of AD including inflammation, oxidative stress and Abeta accumulation. While TZD's actions in AD models help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying their potentially beneficial effects in AD patients, little is known about the functional consequences of TZDs in animal models of normal aging. Because aging is a common risk factor for both AD and T2DM, we investigated whether the TZD, pioglitazone could alter brain aging under non-pathological conditions. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used the F344 rat model of aging, and monitored behavioral, electrophysiological, and molecular variables to assess the effects of pioglitazone (PIO-Actos(R a TZD on several peripheral (blood and liver and central (hippocampal biomarkers of aging. Starting at 3 months or 17 months of age, male rats were treated for 4-5 months with either a control or a PIO-containing diet (final dose approximately 2.3 mg/kg body weight/day. A significant reduction in the Ca(2+-dependent afterhyperpolarization was seen in the aged animals, with no significant change in long-term potentiation maintenance or learning and memory performance. Blood insulin levels were unchanged with age, but significantly reduced by PIO. Finally, a combination of microarray analyses on hippocampal tissue and serum-based multiplex cytokine assays revealed that age-dependent inflammatory increases were not reversed by PIO. CONCLUSIONS: While current research efforts continue to identify the underlying processes responsible for the progressive decline in cognitive function seen during normal aging, available medical treatments are still very limited

  3. Effective radium concentration across the Main Central Thrust in the Nepal Himalayas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective radium concentration (EC(Ra)) of 622 rock samples from 6 different sites in the Nepal Himalayas was measured in the laboratory using radon accumulation experiments. These sites, located from Lower Dolpo in Western Nepal to Eastern Nepal, are divided into 9 transects which cut across the Main Central Thrust zone (MCT zone) separating low-grade metamorphic Lesser Himalayan Sequence (LHS) units to the south and higher-grade metamorphic Greater Himalayan Sequence (GHS) units to the north. This boundary remains difficult to define and is the subject of numerous debates. EC(Ra) values range from 0.03 ± 0.03 to 251.6 ± 4.0 Bq kg-1, and appear to be representative of the formation and clearly related to the local lithology. For example, for the Upper Trisuli and Langtang Valleys site in Central Nepal, the most studied place with 350 available EC(Ra) values, LHS rocks are characterized by a mean value of 5.3 ± 1.3 Bq kg-1 while GHS rocks of Formations I and II show significantly lower values with a mean value of 0.69 ± 0.11 Bq kg-1, thus leading to a LHS/GHS EC(Ra) ratio of 7.8 ± 2.2. This behavior was systematically confirmed by other transects (ratio of 7.9 ± 2.2 in all other sites), with a threshold ECRa value, separating LHS from GHS, of 0.8 Bq kg-1, thus bringing forward a novel method to characterize, within the MCT shear zone, which rocks belong to the GHS and LHS units. In addition, Ulleri augen gneiss, belonging to LHS rocks, occurred in several transects and were characterized by high EC(Ra) values (17.9 ± 4.3 Bq kg-1), easy to distinguish from the GHS gneisses, characterized by low EC(Ra) values at the bottom of the GHS, thus providing a further argument to locate the MCT. The measurement of EC(Ra) data, thus, provides a cost-effective method which can be compared with neodymium isotopic anomalies or estimates of the peak metamorphic temperature. This study, therefore, shows that the measurements of EC(Ra) provides additional information to

  4. Neutron-skin effect and centrality dependence of high-$p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ observables in nuclear collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Helenius, Ilkka; Eskola, Kari J

    2016-01-01

    We report on our studies of the neutron-skin effects in high-$p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ observables at the LHC. We study the impact of the neutron-skin effect on the centrality dependence of inclusive direct photon, high-$p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ hadron and $W^{\\pm}$ production in nuclear collisions at the LHC. The neutron-skin effect refers to the observation that in spherical heavy nuclei, the tail of the neutron distribution extends farther than the distribution of protons, which can affect observables sensitive to electroweak phenomena in very peripheral collisions. We quantify this effect for direct photons, charged hadrons and W bosons as a function of the collision centrality. In the case of direct photons we find that it will be difficult to resolve the neutron-skin effect, given the uncertainties in the nuclear PDFs and their spatial dependence. With charged hadrons and W's, however, up to 20~\\% unambiguous effects are expected for most peripheral collisions.

  5. Evidence Report: Risk of Acute and Late Central Nervous System Effects from Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Simonsen, Lisa; Huff, Janice L.

    2016-01-01

    Possible acute and late risks to the central nervous system (CNS) from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) are concerns for human exploration of space. Acute CNS risks may include: altered cognitive function, reduced motor function, and behavioral changes, all of which may affect performance and human health. Late CNS risks may include neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia and premature aging. Although detrimental CNS changes are observed in humans treated with high-dose radiation (e.g., gamma rays and 9 protons) for cancer and are supported by experimental evidence showing neurocognitive and behavioral effects in animal models, the significance of these results on the morbidity to astronauts has not been elucidated. There is a lack of human epidemiology data on which to base CNS risk estimates; therefore, risk projection based on scaling to human data, as done for cancer risk, is not possible for CNS risks. Research specific to the spaceflight environment using animal and cell models must be compiled to quantify the magnitude of CNS changes in order to estimate this risk and to establish validity of the current permissible exposure limits (PELs). In addition, the impact of radiation exposure in combination with individual sensitivity or other space flight factors, as well as assessment of the need for biological/pharmaceutical countermeasures, will be considered after further definition of CNS risk occurs.

  6. Effect of mental fatigue on the central nervous system: an electroencephalography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Masaaki

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatigue can be classified as mental and physical depending on its cause, and each type of fatigue has a multi-factorial nature. We examined the effect of mental fatigue on the central nervous system using electroencephalography (EEG in eighteen healthy male volunteers. Methods After enrollment, subjects were randomly assigned to two groups in a single-blinded, crossover fashion to perform two types of mental fatigue-inducing experiments. Each experiment consisted of four 30-min fatigue-inducing 0- or 2-back test sessions and two evaluation sessions performed just before and after the fatigue-inducing sessions. During the evaluation session, the participants were assessed using EEG. Eleven electrodes were attached to the head skin, from positions F3, Fz, F4, C3, Cz, C4, P3, Pz, P4, O1, and O2. Results In the 2-back test, the beta power density on the Pz electrode and the alpha power densities on the P3 and O2 electrodes were decreased, and the theta power density on the Cz electrode was increased after the fatigue-inducing mental task sessions. In the 0-back test, no electrodes were altered after the fatigue-inducing sessions. Conclusions Different types of mental fatigue produced different kinds of alterations of the spontaneous EEG variables. Our findings provide new perspectives on the neural mechanisms underlying mental fatigue.

  7. A novel SOD1-ALS mutation separates central and peripheral effects of mutant SOD1 toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Peter I; Mcgoldrick, Philip; Saccon, Rachele A; Weber, William; Fratta, Pietro; West, Steven J; Zhu, Ning; Carter, Sarah; Phatak, Vinaya; Stewart, Michelle; Simon, Michelle; Kumar, Saumya; Heise, Ines; Bros-Facer, Virginie; Dick, James; Corrochano, Silvia; Stanford, Macdonnell J; Luong, Tu Vinh; Nolan, Patrick M; Meyer, Timothy; Brandner, Sebastian; Bennett, David L H; Ozdinler, P Hande; Greensmith, Linda; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham

    2015-04-01

    Transgenic mouse models expressing mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) have been critical in furthering our understanding of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, such models generally overexpress the mutant protein, which may give rise to phenotypes not directly relevant to the disorder. Here, we have analysed a novel mouse model that has a point mutation in the endogenous mouse Sod1 gene; this mutation is identical to a pathological change in human familial ALS (fALS) which results in a D83G change in SOD1 protein. Homozgous Sod1(D83G/D83G) mice develop progressive degeneration of lower (LMN) and upper motor neurons, likely due to the same unknown toxic gain of function as occurs in human fALS cases, but intriguingly LMN cell death appears to stop in early adulthood and the mice do not become paralyzed. The D83 residue coordinates zinc binding, and the D83G mutation results in loss of dismutase activity and SOD1 protein instability. As a result, Sod1(D83G/D83G) mice also phenocopy the distal axonopathy and hepatocellular carcinoma found in Sod1 null mice (Sod1(-/-)). These unique mice allow us to further our understanding of ALS by separating the central motor neuron body degeneration and the peripheral effects from a fALS mutation expressed at endogenous levels. PMID:25468678

  8. The effects of centrally administered fluorocitrate via inhibiting glial cells on working memory in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Although prefrontal and hippocampal neurons are critical for spatial working memory,the function of glial cells in spatial working memory remains uncertain.In this study we investigated the function of glial cells in rats’ working memory.The glial cells of rat brain were inhibited by intracerebroventricular(icv) injection of fluorocitrate(FC).The effects of FC on the glial cells were examined by using electroencephalogram(EEG) recordings and delayed spatial alternation tasks.After icv injection of 10 μL of 0.5 nmol/L or 5 nmol/L FC,the EEG power spectrum recorded from the hippocampus increased,but the power spectrum for the prefrontal cortex did not change,and working memory was unaffected.Following an icv injection of 10 μL of 20 nmol/L FC,the EEG power spectra in both the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus increased,and working memory improved.The icv injection of 10 μL of 50 nmol/L FC,the EEG power spectra in both the prefrontal cortex and in the hippocampus decreased,and working memory was impaired.These results suggest that spatial working memory is affected by centrally administered FC,but only if there are changes in the EEG power spectrum in the prefrontal cortex.Presumably,the prefrontal glial cells relate to the working memory.

  9. Effects of maize cultivation on nitrogen and phosphorus loadings to drainage channels in Central Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, Fabio; Nájera, Francisco; Casanova, Manuel; Tapia, Yasna; Singh, Ranvir; do Salazar, Osval

    2015-11-01

    There are concerns about the impact of maize cultivation with high applications of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) on water quality in surface waters in Mediterranean Central Chile. This study estimated the contribution of N and P from maize fields to nearby drainage channels and evaluated the effects in water quality. An N and P budget was drawn up for three fields managed with a maize-fallow system, El Maitén (20.7 ha), El Naranjal (14.9 ha) and El Caleuche (4.2 ha), and water quality variables (pH, EC, dissolved oxygen, total solids, turbidity, NO3-N, NH4-N, PO4(3-), COD, total N, total P and sulphate) were monitored in nearby drainage channels. The N and P balances for the three fields indicated a high risk of N and P non-point source pollution, with fertiliser management, soil texture and climate factors determining the temporal variations in water quality parameters. Elevated levels of NH4-N and PO4(3-) in the drainage channels were usually observed during the winter period, while NO3- concentrations did not show a clear tendency. The results suggest that excessive slurry application during winter represents a very high risk of N and P runoff to drainage channels. Overall, great emphasis must be placed on good agronomic management of fields neighbouring drainage channels, including accurately calculating N and P fertiliser rates and establishing mitigation measures. PMID:26490735

  10. Effect of traditional gold mining to surface water quality in Murung Raya District, Central Kalimantan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.Wilopo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available There are many locations for traditional gold mining in Indonesia. One of these is in Murung Raya District, Central Kalimantan Province. Mining activities involving the application of traditional gold processing technology have a high potential to pollute the environment, especially surface water. Therefore, this study aims to determine the impact of gold mining and processing on surface water quality around the mine site. Based on the results of field surveys and laboratory analysis, our data shows that the concentration of mercury (Hg and Cyanide (CN has reached 0.3 mg/L and 1.9 mg/L, respectively, in surface water. These values exceed the drinking water quality standards of Indonesia and WHO. Many people who live in the mining area use surface water for daily purposes including drinking, cooking, bathing and washing. This scenario is very dangerous because the effect of surface water contamination on human health cannot be immediately recognized or diagnosed. In our opinion the dissemination of knowledge regarding the treatment of gold mining wastewater is urgently required so that the quality of wastewater can be improved before it is discharged into the environment

  11. Effect of traditional gold mining to surface water quality in Murung Raya District, Central Kalimantan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.Wilopo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available There are many locations for traditional gold mining in Indonesia. One of these is in Murung Raya District, Central Kalimantan Province. Mining activities involving the application of traditional gold processing technology have a high potential to pollute the environment, especially surface water. Therefore, this study aims to determine the impact of gold mining and processing on surface water quality around the mine site. Based on the results of field surveys and laboratory analysis, our data shows that the concentration of mercury (Hg and Cyanide (CN has reached 0.3 mg/L and 1.9 mg/L, respectively, in surface water. These values exceed the drinking water quality standards of Indonesia and WHO. Many people who live in the mining area use surface water for daily purposes including drinking, cooking, bathing and washing. This scenario is very dangerous because the effect of surface water contamination on human health cannot be immediately recognized or diagnosed. In our opinion the dissemination of knowledge regarding the treatment of gold mining wastewater is urgently required so that the quality of wastewater can be improved before it is discharged into the environment.

  12. SYNERGISTIC EFFECTS OF TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT IN CENTRAL BANKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoica Luburić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on two very important and current approaches to management: Total Quality Management (TQM and Operational Risk Management (ORM. As a paradigm of business success, TQM provides the key assumptions for survival, development and success of an organisation, regardless of any limitations whatsoever. ORM, on the other hand, is predetermined to be an irreplaceable managerial tool that enables organisations to survive in any environment. In times of accelerated political, economic and technological changes, frequent natural disasters, acts of terrorism and other external events, a successful risk management has been gaining importance and becomes one of the key competitive advantages of an organisation. The ultimate objective is to make TQM and ORM, as two rather compatible and complementary approaches to risk management, harmonized, efficient and functional in order to get their synergistic effects in an organisation in full swing and practice. Various organisations, and thus central banks as conservative institutions, have an innovative opportunity to timely minimize their operational risk through preventive, comprehensive and synergistic operation of TQM and ORM and thus significantly contribute to improving their business performance.

  13. NASA Models of Space Radiation Induced Cancer, Circulatory Disease, and Central Nervous System Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Chappell, Lori J.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.

    2013-01-01

    The risks of late effects from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) are potentially a limitation to long-term space travel. The late effects of highest concern have significant lethality including cancer, effects to the central nervous system (CNS), and circulatory diseases (CD). For cancer and CD the use of age and gender specific models with uncertainty assessments based on human epidemiology data for low LET radiation combined with relative biological effectiveness factors (RBEs) and dose- and dose-rate reduction effectiveness factors (DDREF) to extrapolate these results to space radiation exposures is considered the current "state-of-the-art". The revised NASA Space Risk Model (NSRM-2014) is based on recent radio-epidemiology data for cancer and CD, however a key feature of the NSRM-2014 is the formulation of particle fluence and track structure based radiation quality factors for solid cancer and leukemia risk estimates, which are distinct from the ICRP quality factors, and shown to lead to smaller uncertainties in risk estimates. Many persons exposed to radiation on earth as well as astronauts are life-time never-smokers, which is estimated to significantly modify radiation cancer and CD risk estimates. A key feature of the NASA radiation protection model is the classification of radiation workers by smoking history in setting dose limits. Possible qualitative differences between GCR and low LET radiation increase uncertainties and are not included in previous risk estimates. Two important qualitative differences are emerging from research studies. The first is the increased lethality of tumors observed in animal models compared to low LET radiation or background tumors. The second are Non- Targeted Effects (NTE), which include bystander effects and genomic instability, which has been observed in cell and animal models of cancer risks. NTE's could lead to significant changes in RBE and DDREF estimates for GCR particles, and the potential

  14. Effect of scopolamine on central DAT and D2 receptor in morphine dependent rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effect of scopolamine (Sco) on central dopamine transporter (DAT) and D2 receptor in morphine (Mor) dependent rats. Methods: Chronic Mor exposure was induced by repeated Mor (20 mg·kg-1·d-1, i.p.) treatment for 8 d. Conditioned place preference test was used to evaluate the drug seeking behavior. Biodistribution of the imaging agents 125I-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl) tropane (β-CIT) and 125I-3-iodo-2-hydroxy-6-methoxy-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl] benzamide (IBZM) were used to evaluate the central DAT and D2 receptor during chronic Mor exposure. Results: For the Mor plus pretreating with Sco (Mor+Sco) rats, the time for the rats entering C2 from C1 was (1.72 ± 0.69) min in the first day, with little difference from the control and Mor group (P>0.05), and (1.12 ± 0.33) min for the 8th day, still longer than that of the Mor group (t=5.171, P125I-β- CIT %ID/g in striatum (ST) and nucleus accumbens (NAC) for Mor + Sco group were 3.307 ± 0.189 and 1.577 ± 0.401 respectively, higher than those of the control group (2.431 ± 0.104, 1.441 ± 0.043, t was 4.151 and 5.416 respectively, P125I-IBZM %ID/g in ST, NAC, hippocampus (HIP) and frontal cortex (FC) for Mor + Sco group were 0.589 ± 0.081, 0.683 ± 0.046, 0.175 ± 0.039 and 0.257 ± 0.034 lower than that of the control rats (0.735 ± 0.096, 0.709 ± 0.098, 0.281 ± 0.038, 0.289 ± 0.020, t was 7.841, 6.170, 5.446 and 4.337 respectively, P2 receptor induced by Mor to some extent

  15. Pregabalin and placebo responders show different effects on central pain processing in chronic pancreatitis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouwense SA

    2015-07-01

    -generating study provides the first evidence that pain relief with pregabalin is associated with anti-hyperalgesic effects and increased endogenous inhibitory modulation. No such effects were observed in patients experiencing pain relief with the placebo treatment. The mechanisms underlying analgesic response to placebo vs drug treatments are different and, together with their interactions, deserve further study.Keywords: chronic pancreatitis, pregabalin, placebo, chronic pain treatment, quantitative sensory testing, central sensitization

  16. Effects of an Auditory Lateralization Training in Children Suspected to Central Auditory Processing Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Yones; Moosavi, Abdollah; Bakhshi, Enayatollah; Sadjedi, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Central auditory processing disorder [(C)APD] refers to a deficit in auditory stimuli processing in nervous system that is not due to higher-order language or cognitive factors. One of the problems in children with (C)APD is spatial difficulties which have been overlooked despite their significance. Localization is an auditory ability to detect sound sources in space and can help to differentiate between the desired speech from other simultaneous sound sources. Aim of this research was investigating effects of an auditory lateralization training on speech perception in presence of noise/competing signals in children suspected to (C)APD. Subjects and Methods In this analytical interventional study, 60 children suspected to (C)APD were selected based on multiple auditory processing assessment subtests. They were randomly divided into two groups: control (mean age 9.07) and training groups (mean age 9.00). Training program consisted of detection and pointing to sound sources delivered with interaural time differences under headphones for 12 formal sessions (6 weeks). Spatial word recognition score (WRS) and monaural selective auditory attention test (mSAAT) were used to follow the auditory lateralization training effects. Results This study showed that in the training group, mSAAT score and spatial WRS in noise (p value≤0.001) improved significantly after the auditory lateralization training. Conclusions We used auditory lateralization training for 6 weeks and showed that auditory lateralization can improve speech understanding in noise significantly. The generalization of this results needs further researches.

  17. EFFECTS OF CIRCUMNUCLEAR DISK GAS EVOLUTION ON THE SPIN OF CENTRAL BLACK HOLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maio, Umberto [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching b. Muenchen (Germany); Dotti, Massimo [Department of Physics of the University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Petkova, Margarita [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85741 Garching b. Muenchen (Germany); Perego, Albino [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Volonteri, Marta [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2013-04-10

    Mass and spin are the only two parameters needed to completely characterize black holes (BHs) in general relativity. However, the interaction between BHs and their environment is where complexity lies, as the relevant physical processes occur over a large range of scales. That is particularly relevant in the case of supermassive black holes (SMBHs), hosted in galaxy centers, and surrounded by swirling gas and various generations of stars. These compete with the SMBH for gas consumption and affect both dynamics and thermodynamics of the gas itself. How the behavior of such a fiery environment influences the angular momentum of the gas accreted onto SMBHs, and, hence, BH spins, is uncertain. We explore the interaction between SMBHs and their environment via first three-dimensional sub-parsec resolution simulations (ranging from {approx}0.1 pc to {approx}1 kpc scales) that study the evolution of the SMBH spin by including the effects of star formation, stellar feedback, radiative transfer, and metal pollution according to the proper stellar yields and lifetimes. This approach is crucial in investigating the impact of star formation processes and feedback effects on the angular momentum of the material that could accrete on the central hole. We find that star formation and feedback mechanisms can locally inject significant amounts of entropy in the surrounding medium, and impact the inflow inclination angles and Eddington fractions. As a consequence, the resulting trends show upper-intermediate equilibrium values for the spin parameter of a {approx_equal} 0.6-0.9, corresponding to radiative efficiencies {epsilon} {approx_equal} 9%-15%. These results suggest that star formation feedback taking place in the circumnuclear disk during the infall alone cannot induce very strong chaotic trends in the gas flow, quite independently from the different numerical parameters.

  18. Effects of adenosine metabolism in astrocytes on central nervous system oxygen toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-liang; Zhang, Ya-nan; Wang, Zhong-zhuang; Xu, Wei-gang; Li, Run-ping; Zhang, Jun-dong

    2016-03-15

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is widely used in military operations, especially underwater missions. However, prolonged and continuous inhalation of HBO can cause central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT), which greatly limits HBO's application. The regulation of astrocytes to the metabolism of adenosine is involved in epilepsy. In our study, we aimed to observe the effects of HBO exposure on the metabolism of adenosine in the brain. Furthermore, we aimed to confirm the possible mechanism underlying adenosine's mediation of the CNS-OT. Firstly, anesthetized rats exposed to 5 atm absolute HBO for 80 min. The concentrations of extracellular adenosine, ATP, ADP, and AMP were detected. Secondly, free-moving rats were exposed to HBO at the same pressure for 20 min, and the activities of 5'-nucleotidase and ADK in brain tissues were measured. For the mechanism studies, we observed the effects of a series of different doses of drugs related to adenosine metabolism on the latency of CNS-OT. Results showed HBO exposure could increase adenosine content by inhibiting ADK activity and improving 5'-nucleotidase activity. And adenosine metabolism during HBO exposure may be a protective response against HBO-induced CNS-OT. Moreover, the improvement of adenosine concentration, activation of adenosine A1R, or suppression of ADK and adenosine A2AR, which are involved in the prevention of HBO-induced CNS-OT. This is the first study to demonstrate HBO exposure regulated adenosine metabolism in the brain. Adenosine metabolism and adenosine receptors are related to HBO-induced CNS-OT development. These results will provide new potential targets for the termination or the attenuation of CNS-OT. PMID:26806404

  19. Meta-analysis and review: effectiveness, safety, and central port design of the intraocular collamer lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize relevant data from publications appearing in the peer-reviewed scientific literature over the past decade since US Food and Drug Administration approval of the implantable collamer lens (ICL), and, in particular, to review studies relating to sizing methodology, safety, and effectiveness, as well as more recent studies reporting clinical outcomes of the V4c Visian ICL with KS Aquaport, VICMO. A literature search was conducted using two databases, PubMed.gov and Science.gov, to identify all articles published after 2005 related to the Visian ICL (STAAR Surgical, Inc.). Articles were examined for their relevance to sizing methodology, clinical safety, and effectiveness, and the references cited in each article were also searched for additional relevant publications. The literature review revealed that all currently reported methods of determining the best-fit size of the ICL achieve similarly satisfactory results in terms of vault, the safe distance between the crystalline lens and the ICL. Specifically, meta-analysis demonstrated that sulcus-to-sulcus and white-to-white measurement-based sizing methods do not result in clinically meaningful nor statistically significant differences in vault (two-sample two-sided t-test using pooled mean and standard deviations; t (2,594)=1.33; P=0.18). The reported rates of complications related to vault are very low, except in two case series where additional risk factors such as higher levels of myopia and older age impacted the incidence of cataract. On the basis of preclinical studies and initial clinical reports, with up to 5 years of follow-up, the new VICMO central port design holds promise for further reduction of complications. Given its safety record and the significant improvement in vision and quality of life that the ICL makes possible, the benefits of ICL implantation outweigh the risks. PMID:27354760

  20. Effects of Different Treatments of Pasture Restoration on Soil Trace Gas Emissions in the Cerrados of Central Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planted pastures ( mainly Brachiaria spp) are the most extensive land use in the cerrado (savannas of central Brazil) with an area of approximately 50 x 10(6) ha. The objective of the study was to assess the effects of pasture restoration on the N dynamics ( net N mineralization/...

  1. Effects of Bifenox, DCPA, and Napropamide on Ectomycorrhizal Development of Conifer Seedlings in Central and Northern Rocky Mountain Nurseries

    OpenAIRE

    United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service

    1985-01-01

    Postseeding and postgermination treatments with three weed control herbicides (Bifenox, DCPA, Napropamide) at two rates of application caused little reduction of ectomycorrhizal development on 1- and 2-year-old conifer seedlings in Central or Northern Rocky Mountain nurseries. In many cases, herbicide treatment increased ectomycorrhizal development, particularly with DCPA. In general, herbicide treatment effects on ectomycorrhizal development were species and nursery specific.

  2. 75 FR 51058 - The Effects of Mountaintop Mines and Valley Fills on Aquatic Ecosystems of the Central...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... 12, 2010 (75 FR 18499). By following the link below, reviewers may download the initial data and EPA... Federal Register Notice (75 FR 30393). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For information on submitting... AGENCY The Effects of Mountaintop Mines and Valley Fills on Aquatic Ecosystems of the Central...

  3. Stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose uptake by muscle involves the central nervous system in insulin-sensitive mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coomans, C.P.; Biermasz, N.R.; Geerling, J.J.; Guigas, B.; Rensen, P.C.N.; Havekes, L.M.; Romijn, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Insulin inhibits endogenous glucose production (EGP) and stimulates glucose uptake in peripheral tissues. Hypothalamic insulin signaling is required for the inhibitory effects of insulin on EGP. We examined the contribution of central insulin signaling on circulating insulin-stimulated t

  4. Comment on `Effective polar potential in the central force Schr\\"{o}dinger equation'

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, Francisco M

    2010-01-01

    We analyze a recent pedagogical proposal for an alternative treatment of the angular part of the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation with a central potential. We show that the authors' arguments are unclear, unconvincing and misleading.

  5. Comment on `Effective polar potential in the central force Schr\\"odinger equation'

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, Francisco M.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze a recent pedagogical proposal for an alternative treatment of the angular part of the Schr\\"odinger equation with a central potential. We show that the authors' arguments are unclear, unconvincing and misleading.

  6. Effect of insulin-induced hypoglycaemia on the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vivi Flou Hjorth; Bøgh, I. B.; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    normoglycaemia. Brain glucose concentrations, being approximately 15-20% of the blood glucose concentration in humans, are rigorously maintained during hypoglycaemia through adaptions such as increased cerebral glucose transport, decreased cerebral glucose utilisation and, possibly, by using central nervous...

  7. Benidipine has effects similar to losartan on the central blood pressure and arterial stiffness in mild to moderate essential hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sang-Hyun Ihm; Hui-Kyung Jeon; Shung Chull Chae; Do-Sun Lim; Kee-Sik Kim; Dong-Ju Choi; Jong-Won Ha

    2013-01-01

    Background Central blood pressure (BP) is pathophysiologically more important than peripheral BP for the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease.Arterial stiffness is also a good predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.The effects of benidipine,a unique dual L-/T-type calcium channel blocker,on central BP have not been reported.This study aimed to compare the effect of benidipine and losartan on the central BP and arterial stiffness in mild to moderate essential hypertensives.Methods This 24 weeks,multi-center,open label,randomized,active drug comparative,parallel group study was designed as a non-inferiority study.The eligible patients (n=200) were randomly assigned to receive benidipine (n=101)or losartan (n=99).Radial artery applanation tonometry and pulse wave analysis were used to measure the central BP,pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (Alx).We also measured the metabolic and inflammatory markers.Results After 24 weeks,the central BP decreased significantly from baseline by (16.8+14.0/10.5+9.2) mmHg (1mmHg =0.133 kPa) (systolic/diastolic BP; P <0.001) in benidipine group and (18.9+14.7/12.1+10.2) mmHg (P <0.001)in losartan group respectively.Both benidipine and losartan groups significantly lowered peripheral BP (P <0.001) and Alx (P <0.05),but there were no significant differences between the two groups.The mean aortic,brachial and femoral PWV did not change in both groups after 24-week treatment.There were no significant changes of the blood metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers in each group.Conclusion Benidipine is as effective as losartan in lowering the central and peripheral BP,and improving arterial stiffness.

  8. Does one word fit all? The asymmetric effects of central banks' communication policy

    OpenAIRE

    Bennani, Hamza

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an extension of Morris and Shin's (2002) model (Morris, S., Shin, H. S. (2002). Social value of public information. The American Economic Review, 92(5), 1521-1534.). It considers an "interpretation bias" of the public signal sent by central banks such as the ECB or the FED. It is shown that such a bias is detrimental and should be considered when central banks implement their communication policy.

  9. Services trade within Central and Eastern Europe region: determinants, barriers, effects

    OpenAIRE

    Nela Popescu

    2007-01-01

    Under central planning, services industries were generally neglected. Marxist thinking emphasized the importance of tangible (material) inputs as determinants of economic development, and classified employment in the services sector as unproductive. Since 1990, the services sector has grown rapidly in the countries of Central-Eastern Europe Region. Foreign investment, especially foreign direct investment (FDI), has played an important role in this process. But there are some important differe...

  10. Acute effects of haemodialysis on central venous and arterial pressure characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Thalhammer, Christoph; Segerer, Stephan; Augustoni, Marlene; Jacomella, Vincenzo; Clemens, Robert K; Wüthrich, Rudolf P.; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice R; Husmann, Marc

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hemodynamic stability of patients during dialysis sessions is of pivotal importance in daily practice and accurate determination of dry weight (DW) remains a challenge. Little information is available about central venous and aortic pressure during dialysis. In this pilot study we used a new non-invasive technique to describe the changes in central venous pressure (CVP) during dialysis. METHODS An ultrasound-assisted silicon-based pressure-manometer was used at the contralateral...

  11. The Central Reinforcing Properties of Ethanol Are Mediated by Endogenous Opioid Systems: Effects of Mu and Kappa Opioid Antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman E. Spear

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous opioid systems are implicated in the reinforcing effects of ethanol and may play a substantial role in modulating the central reinforcing effects of ethanol early in ontogeny. This possibility was explored in the present study through the use of an olfactory conditioning paradigm with centrally administered ethanol serving as an unconditioned stimulus (US. In Experiment 1, newborn rat pups were treated with either a selective mu antagonist CTOP or kappa selective antagonist nor-BNI prior to olfactory conditioning. Experiment 2 tested the effectiveness of an alternative, shorter-duration kappa opioid antagonist GNTI in altering ethanol reinforcement. Experiment 3 investigated whether the effectiveness of pharmacological blockade of opioid receptors was due to the disruption of learning per se using an olfactory aversive conditioning paradigm with intraoral quinine serving as a US. Central administration of either mu or kappa opioid antagonists prior to conditioning disrupted the reinforcing effects of ethanol in newborn rats. The kappa opioid antagonist GNTI was as effective as nor-BNI. These effects of opioid antagonists on ethanol reinforcement are unlikely to be due to a disruption of all types of conditioning, since CTOP did not affect aversive reinforcement to intraoral infusions of quinine. The present results support the hypothesis that in newborn rats, the reinforcing properties of ethanol are mediated by the endogenous activity at mu and kappa opioid receptors.

  12. The Central Reinforcing Properties of Ethanol Are Mediated by Endogenous Opioid Systems: Effects of Mu and Kappa Opioid Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Varlinskaya, Elena I.; Spear, Norman E.

    2010-01-01

    Endogenous opioid systems are implicated in the reinforcing effects of ethanol and may play a substantial role in modulating the central reinforcing effects of ethanol early in ontogeny. This possibility was explored in the present study through the use of an olfactory conditioning paradigm with centrally administered ethanol serving as an unconditioned stimulus (US). In Experiment 1, newborn rat pups were treated with either a selective mu antagonist CTOP or kappa selective antagonist nor-BNI prior to olfactory conditioning. Experiment 2 tested the effectiveness of an alternative, shorter-duration kappa opioid antagonist GNTI in altering ethanol reinforcement. Experiment 3 investigated whether the effectiveness of pharmacological blockade of opioid receptors was due to the disruption of learning per se using an olfactory aversive conditioning paradigm with intraoral quinine serving as a US. Central administration of either mu or kappa opioid antagonists prior to conditioning disrupted the reinforcing effects of ethanol in newborn rats. The kappa opioid antagonist GNTI was as effective as nor-BNI. These effects of opioid antagonists on ethanol reinforcement are unlikely to be due to a disruption of all types of conditioning, since CTOP did not affect aversive reinforcement to intraoral infusions of quinine. The present results support the hypothesis that in newborn rats, the reinforcing properties of ethanol are mediated by the endogenous activity at mu and kappa opioid receptors. PMID:22267966

  13. Effects of wildlife and cattle on tick abundance in central Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesing, Felicia; Allan, Brian F; Young, Truman P; Ostfeld, Richard S

    2013-09-01

    In African savannas, large mammals, both wild and domestic, support an abundant and diverse population of tick ectoparasites. Because of the density of ticks and the many pathogens that they vector, cattle in East Africa are often treated with acaricides. While acaricides are known to be effective at reducing tick burdens on cattle, their effects on the overall abundance and community composition of ticks in savanna ecosystems are less well understood. It is also not known how well tick populations can be maintained in the absence of large mammals. We evaluated the effects of wildlife and of acaricide-treated cattle on host-seeking tick populations in a long-term, exclusion experiment in central Kenya. Over seven years, we sampled larval, nymphal, and adult ticks monthly on replicated treatment plots that controlled for the presence of cattle and for the presence of two guilds of large wild mammals: megaherbivores (giraffes and elephants) and all other large wild herbivores (> 15 kg). Two species of ticks were found in this habitat; across all surveys, 93% were Rhipicephalus pulchellus and 7% were R. praetextatus. The presence of acaricide-treated cattle dramatically reduced the abundance of host-seeking nymphal and adult ticks but did not affect the abundance of host-seeking larval ticks. The abundance of larval ticks was determined by the presence of large wild mammals, which appear to import gravid female ticks into the experimental plots. On plots with no large mammals, either wild or domestic, larval and nymphal ticks were rare. Adult R. pulchellus were most abundant in plots that allowed wildlife but excluded cattle. Adult R. praetextatus were relatively abundant in plots without any large mammals. These differences suggest that these ticks utilize different members of the host community. The reduction in ticks that results from the presence of acaricide-treated cattle has potential health benefits for humans and wildlife, but these benefits must be weighed

  14. Synergistic effects of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha: central monoamine, corticosterone, and behavioral variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brebner, K; Hayley, S; Zacharko, R; Merali, Z; Anisman, H

    2000-06-01

    The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) influence neuroendocrine activity, promote central neurotransmitter alterations, and induce a constellation of symptoms collectively referred to as sickness behaviors. These cytokines may also elicit anxiety and anhedonia, and have been associated with psychological disturbances in humans. In the present investigation, systemic IL-1beta and TNF-alpha dose-dependently and synergistically disrupted consumption of a highly palatable food source (chocolate milk), possibly reflecting anorexia or anhedonia engendered by the treatments. As well, these cytokines synergistically increased plasma corticosterone levels. Although IL-1beta and TNF-alpha provoked variations of amine turnover in the hypothalamus, locus coeruleus, and central amygdala, synergistic effects were not evident in this respect. Nevertheless, in view of the central amine variations induced by the cytokines, it is suggested that immune activation may come to influence complex behavioral processes, as well as affective state. PMID:10788757

  15. Central Interleukin-1 (IL1) Signaling is Required For Pharmacological, but not Physiological, Effects of Leptin on Energy Balance

    OpenAIRE

    Wisse, Brent E.; Ogimoto, Kayoko; Morton, Gregory J.; Williams, Diana L.; Schwartz, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    Hypothalamic IL1 is suggested to be a critical mediator of the central effects of the adipocyte hormone leptin on energy balance. We hypothesized that IL1 receptor signaling is required for exogenously administered leptin to cause anorexia and weight loss, but not for physiological effects of endogenous leptin signaling on energy balance. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether chronic hypothalamic over-expression of an IL1 receptor antagonist (AdV-IL1ra) alters food intake and weigh...

  16. In situ effects of simulated overfishing and eutrophication on settlement of benthic coral reef invertebrates in the Central Red Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Jessen; Voolstra, Christian R.; Christian Wild

    2014-01-01

    In the Central Red Sea, healthy coral reefs meet intense coastal development, but data on the effects of related stressors for reef functioning are lacking. This in situ study therefore investigated the independent and combined effects of simulated overfishing through predator/grazer exclusion and simulated eutrophication through fertilizer addition on settlement of reef associated invertebrates on light-exposed and -shaded tiles over 4 months. At the end of the study period invertebrates had...

  17. Independence Centrality as a Moderator of the Effects of Spousal Support on Patient Well-Being and Physical Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martire, Lynn M.; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Schulz, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Objective In this study, we examined whether the benefits of spousal assistance for patient well-being and physical functioning depend on the fit between amount of assistance provided and the personal importance of completing activities independently. Methods Individuals with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee were assessed for independence centrality, depressive symptoms, self-efficacy for managing pain, and physical functioning (N = 159 to 230). Spouses reported the amount of support provided with daily tasks. Results As predicted, moderation analyses indicated that spousal support was associated with greater self-efficacy for managing pain in patients with low independence centrality, but was not associated with self-efficacy in patients with high independence centrality. Also consistent with our hypotheses, spousal support was associated with greater depressive symptoms and slower walk time in patients with high independence centrality, but there were no effects of spouse support on these outcomes for patients with low independence centrality. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate the implications of miscarried spousal support for patient well-being and physical functioning, and they suggest a means of tailoring couple-oriented interventions for chronic illness. PMID:21534676

  18. [An experimental study of the effects of ketamine on the central sympathetic system, respiration and circulation (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, G; Tauberger, G; Schulte am Esch, J

    1981-06-01

    Cats were given basal anaesthesia (nitrous oxide-oxygen) with artificial ventilation. They were then injected intravenously with 5 mg/kilogram bodyweight of ketamine. The injection was followed by a marked ketamine. The injection was followed by a marked reduction in both the tone of the central sympathetic system and the activity of the phrenic nerve which lasted for 10 minutes and 30 minutes respectively. Doses of 10 mg/kilogram bodyweight caused a longer lasting and more pronounced lowering of sympathetic activity while phrenic activity was approximately the same as with the smaller dosage. Injection of 2.5 mg/kilogram bodyweight reduced the sympathetic tone only if it was accompanied by asphyxia (central stimulation). Administration of 5 mg and of 10 mg/kilogram bodyweight was followed by a fall in blood pressure by 15-45 per cent up to 2 minutes after the injection. The heart rate at rest was unaffected but in the presence of asphyxia there was a dose-dependent reduction in the expected bradycardia. Ketamine also induced definite central inhibition thereby preventing the circulatory activation which occurs when the drug is used for anaesthetic purposes. The observation that the bradycardic effect arising from central stimulation was weakened suggests a reduction of central vagal activity. PMID:7258572

  19. Visualization of radiation effects on the central nervous system; Visualisierung von Strahlenfolgen am Zentralnervensystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essig, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Abteilung Neuroradiologie, Erlangen (Germany); Dinkel, J. [Massachussetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston (United States); Zamecnik, C. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Abteilung Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    Therapy-related side effects, which are detectable with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at high sensitivity, are one of the most frequent causes of morbidity in cancer patients. They can be observed in the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases as well as in systemic therapy, including whole brain irradiation and chemotherapy and are more often seen due to the better overall survival. This review describes the most frequent acute and chronic therapy-related changes in the CNS and the imaging findings. Acute changes are often reversible while chronic changes can be observed up to several years after treatment. The differentiation of treatment-related from tumor-related changes might be very difficult, although modern imaging modalities such as MR spectroscopy or MR perfusion measurements supply helpful differential diagnostic information. (orig.) [German] Eine der wesentlichen Gruende fuer die Morbiditaet bei Tumorpatienten ist das haeufige Auftreten von Nebenwirkungen am Zentralnervensystem (ZNS). Diese werden mit der Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) sehr sensitiv erfasst und finden sich sowohl bei Therapien von ZNS-Tumoren als auch bei systemischen Therapieansaetzen wie der Ganzkoerperbestrahlung oder der Chemotherapie von Tumoren des Koerperstamms. Durch die deutliche Verlaengerung der Ueberlebenszeit von Tumorpatienten werden sie auch haeufiger beobachtet. Die Arbeit beschreibt die haeufigsten akuten und chronischen Veraenderungen am ZNS und deren bildmorphologische Korrelate. Akute Veraenderungen sind oft reversibel, chronische Veraenderungen koennen bis zu mehrere Jahre nach Abschluss der Therapie beobachtet werden. Therapiebedingte Veraenderungen sind sehr schwer von tumorbedingten Veraenderungen abgrenzbar, wobei moderne Bildgebungsverfahren wie die MR-Spektroskopie und die MR-Perfusion wichtige differenzialdiagnostische Beitraege liefern. (orig.)

  20. Effects of the 2003 European heatwave on the Central Mediterranean Sea surface layer: a numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Olita

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of anomalous weather conditions on the sea surface layer over the Central Mediterranean were studied with an eddy resolving regional ocean model by performing a 5-year long simulation from 2000 to 2004. The focus was on surface heat fluxes, temperature and dynamics. The analysis of the time series of the selected variables permitted us to identify and quantify the anomalies of the analysed parameters. In order to separate the part of variability not related to the annual cycle and to locate the anomalies in the time-frequency domain, we performed a wavelet analysis of anomalies time series. We found the strongest anomalous event was the overheating affecting the sea surface in the summer of 2003. This anomaly was strictly related to a strong increase of air temperature, a decrease of both wind stress and upward heat fluxes in all their components. The simulated monthly averages of the sea surface temperature were in a good agreement with the remotely-sensed data, although the ocean regional model tended to underestimate the extreme events. We also found, on the basis of the long-wave period of the observed anomaly, this event was not limited to the few summer months, but it was probably part of a longer signal, which also includes negative perturbations of the involved variables. The atmospheric parameters responsible for the overheating of the sea surface also influenced the regional surface and sub-surface dynamics, especially in the Atlantic Ionian Stream and the African Modified Atlantic Water current, in which flows seem to be deeply modified in that period.

  1. Effects of wildfire on soil organic carbon export by runoff in Central Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, M. E.; Faria, S. R.; Campos, I.; Caria, M. M. P. F.; Ferreira, R. S. V.; Machado, A. I.; Martins, M. A. S.; Pinto, R.; Prats, S. A.; Esteves, V. I.; Keizer, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    Forest fires, a frequent and recurrent phenomenon in Mediterranean ecosystems, have several ecological and environmental impacts caused in part by short- and medium-term effects on soil physical and chemical characteristics as well as on organic matter (OM) composition, properties and dynamics and hence upon microbial populations. This negatively affects soil health and quality, and enhances the occurrence of erosive processes and the loss of a non-renewable natural resource such is the soil. Due to the large C pool present in soils, even small changes in soil OM may have a significant effect on biogeochemical cycles and on global climate. Even though some authors consider that organic C mobilized by erosion processes may be protected from mineralization, the general tendency is to consider that soil erosion exposes OM to mineralization processes and represents the main factor of C losses from the planet's surface. Whilst it is well documented that wildfires can have major impacts on hydrological and erosion processes, the associated transport of organic matter has received considerably less research attention. The FIRECNUTS project (PTDC/AGR-CFL/104559/2008) addresses this research gap by studying, among others, the export of organic carbon in a recently burnt forest area of 250 ha in north-central Portugal (Sever do Vouga). To this end, five slopes with contrasting forest types (eucalypt vs. Maritime Pine plantations) and geologies (schist vs. granite) are being monitored for sediment losses since a wildfire that occurred in July 2010. For reference, also a neighboring, long-unburnt eucalypt plantation is being monitored. The sediments collected by sediment fences were measured and collected at monthly intervals during the first 6 or 12 months after fire. The total carbon content of the sediment samples was measured using a Shimazdu TOC analyzer. Preliminary results revealed marked differences in organic carbon concentrations between the two burnt eucalypt stands

  2. Land use change effects on trace gas fluxes in the forest margins of Central Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldkamp, Edzo; Purbopuspito, Joko; Corre, Marife D.; Brumme, Rainer; Murdiyarso, Daniel

    2008-06-01

    Land use changes and land use intensification are considered important processes contributing to the increasing concentrations of the greenhouse gases nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) and of nitric oxide (NO), a precursor of ozone. Studies on the effects of land use changes and land use intensification on soil trace gas emissions were mostly conducted in Latin America and only very few in Asia. Here we present results from Central Sulawesi where profound changes in land use and cultivation practices take place: traditional agricultural practices like shifting cultivation and slash-and-burn agriculture are replaced by permanent cultivation systems and introduction of income-generating cash crops like cacao. Our results showed that N2O emissions were higher from cacao agroforestry (35 ± 10 μg N m-2 h-1) than maize (9 ± 2 μg N m-2 h-1), whereas intermediate rates were observed from secondary forests (25 ± 11 μg N m-2 h-1). NO emissions did not differ among land use systems, ranging from 12 ± 2 μg N m-2 h-1 for cacao agroforestry and secondary forest to 18 ± 2 μg N m-2 h-1 for maize. CH4 uptake was higher for maize (-30 ± 4 μg C m-2 h-1) than cacao agroforestry (-18 ± 2 μg C m-2 h-1) and intermediate rates were measured from secondary forests (-25 ± 4 μg C m-2 h-1). Combining these data with results from other studies in this area, we present chronosequence effects of land use change on trace gas emissions from natural forest, through maize cultivation, to cacao agroforestry (with or without fertilizer). Compared to the original forests, this typical land use change in the study area clearly led to higher N2O emissions and lower CH4 uptake with age of cacao agroforestry systems. We conclude that this common land use sequence in the area combined with the increasing use of fertilizer will strongly increase soil trace gas emissions. We suggest that the future hot spot regions of high N2O (and to a lesser extend NO) emissions in the tropics are those

  3. Smoke aerosol and its radiative effects during extreme fire event over Central Russia in summer 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Chubarova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Different microphysical, optical and radiative properties of aerosol were analyzed during the severe fires in summer 2010 over Central Russia using ground measurements at two AERONET sites in Moscow (Meteorological Observatory of Moscow State University – MSU MO and Zvenigorod (Moscow Region and radiative measurements at the MSU MO. Volume aerosol size distribution in smoke conditions had a bimodal character with the significant prevalence of fine mode particles, for which effective radius was shifted to higher values (reff-fine = 0.24 μm against approximately 0.15 μm in typical conditions. For smoke aerosol, the imaginary part of refractive index (REFI in the visible spectral region was lower than that for typical aerosol (REFIλ =675 nm = 0.006 against REFIλ =675 nm = 0.01, while single scattering albedo (SSA was significantly higher (SSAλ =675 nm = 0.95 against SSAλ =675 nm ~ 0.9. Extremely high aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm (AOT500 was observed on 6–8 August reaching the absolute maximum on 7 August in Moscow (AOT500 = 6.4 and at Zvenigorod (AOT500 = 5.9. A dramatic attenuation of solar irradiance at ground was also recorded. Maximum irradiance loss had reached 64% for global shortwave irradiance, 91% for UV radiation 300–380 nm, and 97% for erythemally-weighted UV irradiance at relatively high solar elevation 47°. Significant spectral dependence in attenuation of solar irradiance in smoky conditions was mainly explained by higher AOT and smaller SSA in UV (0.8–0.9 compared with SSA in the visible region of spectrum. The assessments of radiative forcing effect (RFE at the TOA indicated a significant cooling of the smoky atmosphere. Instant RFE reached −167 Wm−2 at AOT500 = 6.4, climatological RFE calculated with August 2010 monthly mean AOT was about −65 Wm−2, compared with −20 Wm−2 for typical aerosol according to

  4. Meta-analysis and review: effectiveness, safety, and central port design of the intraocular collamer lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Packer M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mark Packer Mark Packer MD Consulting, Inc., Boulder, CO, USA Abstract: The purpose of this review is to summarize relevant data from publications appearing in the peer-reviewed scientific literature over the past decade since US Food and Drug Administration approval of the implantable collamer lens (ICL, and, in particular, to review studies relating to sizing methodology, safety, and effectiveness, as well as more recent studies reporting clinical outcomes of the V4c Visian ICL with KS Aquaport, VICMO. A literature search was conducted using two databases, PubMed.gov and Science.gov, to identify all articles published after 2005 related to the Visian ICL (STAAR Surgical, Inc.. Articles were examined for their relevance to sizing methodology, clinical safety, and effectiveness, and the references cited in each article were also searched for additional relevant publications. The literature review revealed that all currently reported methods of determining the best-fit size of the ICL achieve similarly satisfactory results in terms of vault, the safe distance between the crystalline lens and the ICL. Specifically, meta-analysis demonstrated that sulcus-to-sulcus and white-to-white measurement-based sizing methods do not result in clinically meaningful nor statistically significant differences in vault (two-sample two-sided t-test using pooled mean and standard deviations; t (2,594=1.33; P=0.18. The reported rates of complications related to vault are very low, except in two case series where additional risk factors such as higher levels of myopia and older age impacted the incidence of cataract. On the basis of preclinical studies and initial clinical reports, with up to 5 years of follow-up, the new VICMO central port design holds promise for further reduction of complications. Given its safety record and the significant improvement in vision and quality of life that the ICL makes possible, the benefits of ICL implantation outweigh the risks

  5. Central atom/substituent effects onmagnetothermal properties of metal porphyrins in aqueous suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomova, T.N., E-mail: tnl@isc-ras.ru; Korolev, V.V.; Zakharov, A.G.

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • Magnetothermal properties of Mn/Ln(III) porphyrins were obtained by microcalorimetry. • (AcO)GdTPP shows giant magnetocaloric effect compared to La{sub 0.8}Ag{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3}. • Mn porphyrins’ heat capacities depend on induction with a maximum at 0.25–0.35 T. • Dependences of MCE on molecules structure were determined for the first time. • We explored the prospects of using metal porphyrin magnetothermal properties for various applications. - Abstract: Magnetothermal properties of (X)Mn{sup III}P and (X)Ln{sup III}P, where X = chloro-, bromo-, acetate-ligand; Ln = Eu, Gd, Tm and P = (2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octaethylporphyrinato)-, (5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrinato)- or (2,3,7,8,12,13,17, 18-octa-para-tert-butylphenyltetraazaporphyrinato)-ligand, as 6% water suspensions were determined by the microcalorimetric method at 298–353 K in a magnetic induction of 0–1.0 T. High-disperse complex particles were found to have paramagnetic properties. It was established that positive MCE increases with an increase in magnetic induction at all temperatures and decreases with an increase in temperature at all magnetic inductions; in the case of (Cl)GdTPP actually MCE does not depend on temperature. Dependences of specific heat capacity and that of the change in enthalpy and magnetic entropy of the studied complexes on magnetic induction were explored. The first of these dependencies has a maximum at 0.25–0.35 T at all temperatures. Heat capacity of the lanthanide complexes slightly increases with an increase in temperature; a magnetic component of heat capacity takes place only in (AcO)GdTPP at temperatures above 298 K. The regularities of the influence of central atom, acidoligand and a macrocycle composition in porphyrin complexes on their magnetothermal properties were established. Both a macrocycle composition in the case of manganese complexes and an acidoligand variation in the case of lanthanide complexes are bigger than the other

  6. Effect of insulin-induced hypoglycaemia on the central nervous system: evidence from experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, V F H; Bøgh, I B; Lykkesfeldt, J

    2014-03-01

    Insulin-induced hypoglycaemia (IIH) is a major acute complication in type 1 as well as in type 2 diabetes, particularly during intensive insulin therapy. The brain plays a central role in the counter-regulatory response by eliciting parasympathetic and sympathetic hormone responses to restore normoglycaemia. Brain glucose concentrations, being approximately 15-20% of the blood glucose concentration in humans, are rigorously maintained during hypoglycaemia through adaptions such as increased cerebral glucose transport, decreased cerebral glucose utilisation and, possibly, by using central nervous system glycogen as a glucose reserve. However, during sustained hypoglycaemia, the brain cannot maintain a sufficient glucose influx and, as the cerebral hypoglycaemia becomes severe, electroencephalogram changes, oxidative stress and regional neuronal death ensues. With particular focus on evidence from experimental studies on nondiabetic IIH, this review outlines the central mechanisms behind the counter-regulatory response to IIH, as well as cerebral adaption to avoid sequelae of cerebral neuroglycopaenia, including seizures and coma. PMID:24428753

  7. Involvement of the histaminergic system in the resuscitating effect of centrally acting leptin in haemorrhagic shock in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochem, J; Altinbas, B; Yalcin, M; Ottani, A; Giuliani, D; Savci, V; Kasperska-Zajac, A; Guarini, S

    2016-02-01

    Leptin, acting centrally as a neuromodulator, induces the activation of the sympathetic nervous system, which may lead to a pressor action in normotensive animals. In haemorrhagic shock, leptin administered intracerebroventricularly (icv.) evokes the resuscitating effect, with long-lasting rises in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR), subsequent increase in peripheral blood flows, and a 100% survival at 2 h. Since leptin is able to activate histaminergic neurons, and centrally acting histamine also induces the resuscitating effect with the activation of the sympathetic nervous system, in the present study, we investigated an involvement of the histaminergic system in leptin-evoked cardiovascular effects in haemorrhagic shock. The model of irreversible haemorrhagic shock, with MAP decreased to and stabilised at 20 - 25 mmHg, has been used. Leptin (20 μg) given icv. at 5 min of critical hypotension evoked 181.5% increase in extracellular hypothalamic histamine concentration during the first 10 min after injection. Rises in MAP, HR and renal, mesenteric and hindquarters blood flows induced by leptin were inhibited by icv. pre-treatment with histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (50 nmol). In contrast, there was no effect of H2, H3 and H4 receptor antagonists ranitidine (25 nmol), VUF 5681 (25 nmol) and JNJ 10191584 (25 nmol), respectively. In conclusion, the histaminergic system is involved in centrally-acting leptin-induced resuscitating effect in haemorrhagic shock in rats. PMID:27010896

  8. Estimation of topographical effects at Narni ridge (Central Italy): comparisons between experimental results and numerical modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Lovati, S.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Milano-Pavia, Milano, Italia; Bakavoli, M.; International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (IIEES), Tehran, Iran; Massa, M.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Milano-Pavia, Milano, Italia; Ferretti, G.; Università degli studi di Genova (Dip.Te.Ris.), sezione di Geofisica; Pacor, F.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Milano-Pavia, Milano, Italia; Paolucci, R.; Dipartimento di Ingegneria Strutturale, Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy; Haghshenas, E.; International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology; Kamalian, M.; International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (IIEES), Tehran, Iran

    2011-01-01

    In the present work the seismic site response of Narni ridge (central Italy) is evaluated by comparing experimental results and numerical simulations. The inhabited village of Narni is located in the central Italian Apennines at the top of a steep massive limestone ridge. From March to September 2009 the site was instrumented with 10 weak-motion stations, 3 of which located at the base of the ridge and 7 at the top. The velocimetric network recorded 642 events of ML up to 5.3 and hypocentr...

  9. Chemical evidences of the effects of global change in high elevation lakes in Central Himalaya, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartari, Gianni; Lami, Andrea; Rogora, Michela; Salerno, Franco

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that the lakes integrate the pressure of their surrounding terrestrial environment and the climatic variability. Both the water column and sediments are capable to accumulate signals of global change, such as warming of the deep layers or mutation of diverse biological records (e.g., fossil diatoms) and the nutrient loads variability affecting the trophic state. Typically, the biological responses to climate change have been studied in several types of lakes, while documented changes in water chemistry are much rare. A long term study of 20 high altitude lakes located in central southern Himalaya (Mt Everest) conducted since the 90s has highlighted a general change in the chemical composition of the lake water: a substantial rise in the ionic content was observed, particularly pronounced in the case of sulphate. In a couple of these lakes, monitored on an annual basis, the sulphate concentrations increased over 4-fold. A change in the composition of atmospheric wet deposition, as well as a possible influence of decrease in seasonal snow cover duration, which could have exposed larger basin surfaces to alteration processes, were excluded. The chemical changes proved to be mainly related to the sulphide oxidation processes occurring in the bedrocks or the hydrographic basins. In particular, the oxidation processes, considered as the main factor causing the sulphate increase, occurred in subglacial environments characterized by higher glacier velocities causing higher glacier shrinkage. Associated to this mechanism, the exposure of fresh mineral surfaces to the atmosphere may have contributed also to increases in the alkalinity of lakes. Weakened monsoon of the past two decades may have partially contributed to the solute enrichment of the lakes through runoff waters. The almost synchronous response of the lakes studied, which differs in terms of the presence of glaciers in their basins, highlights the fact that the increasing ionic content of lake

  10. Effects of wildfire on soil water repellency in pine and eucalypt forest in central Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Sílvia; Eufemia Varela, María.; Keizer, Jan Jacob

    2010-05-01

    Soil water repellency is a naturally occurring phenomenon that can be intensified by soil heating during fires. Fire-induced or -enhanced water repellency, together with the loss of plant cover, is widely regarded as a key factor in increased surface runoff and accelerated erosion in recently burnt areas. The present study is part of the EROSFIRE-II project, whose main aim is to assess and predict post-wildfire hydrological and erosion processes at multiple spatial scales, ranging from micro-plot (Maritime Pine and eucalypt stands The objectives are: (i) to clarify the role of wildfire, by comparing recently burnt and adjacent long unburned stands; (ii) to determine the temporal patterns in repellency, through monthly measurements during the first year following the wildfire, and relate them to soil moisture variations in particular. The Colmeal study area is located in the Lousã mountain range in central Portugal. The wildfire occurred in August 2008 and consumed a total area of about 70 ha. Within the burnt area, two slopes were selected with the same parent material (schist) but different forest types (Pinus pinaster and Eucaliptus globulus). In addition, two similar but long unburned slopes were selected in the immediate surroundings. For a period of 10 months, starting November 2008, water repellency and moisture content of the 0-5 cm topsoil layer were measured in the field at monthly intervals. Repellency was measured using the ‘Molarity of an Ethanol Droplet' (MED) test, soil moisture content using a DECAGON EC5 sensor. The results revealed a very strong repellency (ethanol classes 6-7) at all four sites during the first sampling period in November 2008, suggesting that the immediate wildfire effects were minor for both forest types. In the subsequent 5 to 6 months, however, there was a definite tendency for higher ethanol classes at the recently burnt than the adjacent unburned sites. Especially in the case of the pine stands, this tendency was inverted

  11. The effect of handedness on the shape of the central sulcus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhong Yi; Klöppel, Stefan; Rivière, Denis;

    2012-01-01

    dextrals than in sinistrals. Sinistrals forced to write with their non-preferred right hand display a pattern of central sulcus size asymmetry which is typical of dextrals, yet forced dextrality does not shift the handedness-specific location of the "hand knob". Hence, cortical morphology in adults holds...

  12. Phylogenetic diversity of central-European urban plant communities: effects of alien species and habitat types

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čeplová, N.; Lososová, Z.; Zelený, D.; Chytrý, M.; Danihelka, Jiří; Fajmon, K.; Láníková, Deana; Preislerová, Z.; Řehořek, V.; Tichý, L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 1 (2015), s. 1-16. ISSN 0032-7786 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36079G Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : archaeophytes * biological invasions * Central Europe Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 4.104, year: 2014

  13. Atmospheric black carbon and warming effects influenced by the source and absorption enhancement in central Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nordmann, S.; Cheng, Y.F.; Carmichael, G.R.; Yu, M.; Denier Van Der Gon, H.A.C.; Zhang, Q.; Saide, P.E.; Pöschl, U.; Su, H.; Birmili, W.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2014-01-01

    Particles containing black carbon (BC), a strong absorbing substance, exert a rather uncertain direct and indirect radiative forcing in the atmosphere. To investigate the mass concentration and absorption properties of BC particles over central Europe, the model WRF-Chem was used at a resolution of

  14. Effect of habitat characteristics on mesocarnivore occurrence in urban environment in the Central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červinka, J.; Drahníková, L.; Kreisinger, J.; Šálek, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 4 (2014), s. 893-909. ISSN 1083-8155 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Carnivores * occurrence * Habitat characteristics * GIS * Urban environment * Central Europe Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.685, year: 2014

  15. Wildfire effects on soil lipid composition in burnt eucalypt stands, in north-central Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Sílvia; De la Rosa, José Maria; Knicker, Heike; González-Pérez, José A.; González-Vila, Francisco J.; Keizer, Jan Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Wildfires can induce profound changes in the quality and quantity of soil organic matter (SOM) pools. Early detection of fire impacts on SOM pools is relevant for taking decision and planning of post-fire restoration actions, since SOM plays a key role in post-fire erosion risk and the recovery of fire-affected ecosystems. This work focuses on wildfire effects on the composition of lipids in the topsoil of eucalypt plantations, one of the prevailing and, at the same time, most fire-prone forest types in north-central Portugal. To this end, two neighbouring eucalypt plantations were sampled at 5 occasions with roughly 6-monthly intervals, starting immediately after a wildfire in August 2010 till August 2012. One of the study sites was located within the 2010-bunrt area and the other just outside it. The air-dry soil samples were treated with a dichloromethane-methanol (3:1) mixture for Soxhlet extraction of the SOM's labile lipid fraction, as this fraction is particularly prone to undergo rapid and significant alterations by fire-induced heating. In turn, these alterations have elevated potential to be used as markers of direct fire effects on soil properties in general and, at the same time, as indicators of the recovery process during the so-called window-of-disturbance. The lipid compositions of the samples were determined by GC-MS. The preliminary results of this study indicated that the soil lipid fraction of the upper soil layer (0-2 cm depth) decreased sharply due to the wildfire, and that this effect lasted for more than 24 months. Its contents in the different sampling periods varied between 2.4 and 5.7 % at the long-unburnt site as compared to 0.9 - 1.1 % at the burnt site. The main differences between the burnt and unburnt samples were found in the distribution patterns of alkyl compounds. Without exception, an accumulation of low molecular weight homologues was observed in the burnt samples, suggesting that fire led to thermal breakdown and cracking of

  16. A comparative cytological and morphometric analysis of vacuolation in central tissue of the effective and ineffective pea (Pisum sativum L. root nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Borucki

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Vacuoles play very important physiological roles in plant cells. Pea root nodules, which exhibit distinct zonation (meristematic zone and central tissue zones, may serve as a good experimental model for the investigations of vacuole development and its importance to cell and tissue functioning. Moreover, the nodule central tissue is composed of both infected and uninfected cells which play different physiological roles and differ in the level of vacuolation. Cytological observations revealed that central vacuoles of the infected cells of the effective nodules expand toward cell walls. Thus only thin layers of the cytoplasm separate each central vacuole from plasma membrane and cell wall. This finding is discussed from the viewpoint of improved exchange of solutes and water between the central vacuole and apoplast of the infected cell. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the vacuoles of infected cells within a fragment of effective nodule central tissue, showed their spatial arrangement. Possible advantages coming from the spatial arrangement of vacuoles within the central tissue are discussed. A comparative study of the central tissue (bacteroidal tissue and meristem vacuolation of the effective and ineffective pea root nodules is also presented. Morphometric measurements revealed that the effective nodule central tissue was more vacuolated than the ineffective one. It was proved that maturation of the infected cells involves dynamic changes in their vacuolation. Having numerous fixing nitrogen bacteroids, the infected cells of effective central tissue were less vacuolated than uninfected cells. On the other hand, both infected and uninfected cells of the effective central tissue showed a much higher level of vacuolation in nitrogen-fixing zone than cells of the same type in ineffective tissue. These results indicate that vacuolation is an important factor in development and functioning of pea root nodule central tissue.

  17. The central melanocortin system affects the hypothalamo-pituitary thyroid axis and may mediate the effect of leptin

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, M. S.; Small, C J; Stanley, S. A.; Morgan, D. G. A.; Seal, L.J.; Kong, W.M.; Edwards, C M B; Abusnana, S.; Sunter, D.; Ghatei, M. A.; Bloom, S R

    2000-01-01

    Prolonged fasting is associated with a downregulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary thyroid (H-P-T) axis, which is reversed by administration of leptin. The hypothalamic melanocortin system regulates energy balance and mediates a number of central effects of leptin. In this study, we show that hypothalamic melanocortins can stimulate the thyroid axis and that their antagonist, agouti-related peptide (Agrp), can inhibit it. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of Agrp (83-132) decreased...

  18. Effects of terrace construction on runoff and erosion in a recently burnt forest area in north-central Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    M.A.S. Martins; D. Serpa; A.I. Machado; R.F.H. de Lenne; A.G.v.d. Linden; S.R. Faria; R.S.V. Ferreira; I. Skulska; S.A. Prats; M.E.T. Varela; J.J. Keizer

    2013-01-01

    In present-day Portugal, wildfires are a common phenomenon that, on average, affects some 100.000 ha of forest lands each year. Fires can markedly increase runoff generation and the associated sediment transport, nevertheless the magnitude of these impacts strongly depends on post-fire forestry management practices. This study evaluates the effect of terrace construction on runoff and erosion at micro-plot and catchment scale, six months after a wildfire in a forest area in north central Port...

  19. Effects of Nutrient Enrichment on Decomposition and Fungal Colonization of Sweet Chestnut Leaves in an Iberian Stream (Central Portugal)

    OpenAIRE

    Abelho, Manuela; Graça, M.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract This study assessed the effect of nutrient enrichment on rates of decomposition, ergosterol concentrations (as a measure of fungal biomass), and rates of fungal sporulation of sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa Miller) leaves in a 3rd order stream (Central Portugal), with medium to high background values of nutrients. Coarse and fine mesh leaf bags were attached to nutrient diffusing substrata containing NaNO3, KH2PO4, both nutrients, or no additions. Leaf breakdown rates were similar...

  20. Central nervous system site of action for the respiratory depressant effect of diacetylmorphine (heroin) in the cat.

    OpenAIRE

    Taveira da Silva, A M; J.D Souza; Quest, J A; Pagani, F D; Moerschbaecher, J M; Buller, A; Hamosh, P; Gillis, R A

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to identify central nervous system sites involved in the respiratory depressant effect of drugs that stimulate opioid receptors. Diacetylmorphine (heroin) was administered into several cerebroventricular regions of chloralose-anesthetized cats, while monitoring pulmonary ventilation with a Fleisch pneumotachograph. Administration of heroin (17, 50, 150, and 450 micrograms) into the forebrain ventricles, which was restricted to these ventricles, resulted in no sign...

  1. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Sewer Mining versus Centralized Wastewater Treatment: Case Study of Arga River Basin (Spain)

    OpenAIRE

    González Viar, Marta; Díez Montero, Rubén; Molinos Senante, María; De Florio, Loredana; Esteban García, Ana Lorena; Sala Garrido, Ramón; Hernández Sancho, Francesc; Tejero Monzón, Juan Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT:In the context of the EU Water Framework Directive, a Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (CEA) was performed to compare centralized and decentralized wastewater treatment strategies aimed to improve the ecological status of a Spanish river. The implementation of several hybrid membrane bioreactors within the urban framework for sewer mining (SM) was compared with the more common wastewater treatment plant enlargement option. The assessment ranked 6 alternatives based on 12 potential scenari...

  2. The effects of propranolol or atenolol on the cardiovascular responses to central hypovolaemia in Europeans and Bengalees.

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, M A; Bennett, T.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of single oral doses of propranolol (80 mg), or atenolol (100 mg) on resting heart rate, blood pressure, forearm blood flow and forearm vascular resistance and on responses to central hypovolaemia, were compared with those of placebo in nine healthy European and nine healthy Bengalee volunteers, in a double-blind, three-period, cross-over study. 2. Atenolol induced a significant reduction in resting systolic blood pressure (SBP) in Europeans but not in Bengalees, although the b...

  3. BFKL effects and central rapidity dependence in Mueller-Navelet jet production at 13 TeV LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Celiberto, Francesco Giovanni; Murdaca, Beatrice; Papa, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    A study of the production of Mueller-Navelet jets at 13 TeV LHC is presented, including BFKL resummation effects and investigating three different variants of the BLM scale optimization method. It is shown how the cross section and the azimuthal observables are affected by the exclusion of the events where, for a given rapidity interval between the two jets, one of these is produced in the central region.

  4. Coping with inadequacy: understanding the effects of central teacher recruitment in six ward secondary schools in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Mafuru, Wilhelm Leonard

    2011-01-01

    Decentralization by devolution is the means to transfer the responsibilities for service provision to the grassroots levels in Tanzania. The aim of this policy is to deal with the stagnation in the development of, among other things, secondary education. Despite this policy, Tanzania still provides a strong top-down influence on education. This study is about the effects of the central influence on the recruitment of teachers in secondary education. For this research, six ward secondary schoo...

  5. The Possible Effects of Some Mineral Nutrients and Industrial Chemical Effuents on Wild Plants in Central Sudan

    OpenAIRE

    Hayati, Attayeb A. [الطيب أحمد المصطفى حياتي; Abd-Elrhman, Fatima M. [فاطمة محمد عبد الرحمن

    2006-01-01

    The effects of some mineral nutrients and industrial chemical effluents from a textile factory and tanning activities on the growth and distribution of Typha angustata, Cyperus laevigatus. Paspalum viginatum, Cassia senna and Xanthium brasilicum at Al-Bagair Industrial Area, in central Sudan, were investigated. Three sites were selected for this study namely: the "Textile site", the main site in this study, represented by the area affected by disposals of chemical effluents from a textile fac...

  6. CENTRAL ANTINOCICEPTIVE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT EXTRACTS OF SARACA ASOCA SEEDS ASSESSED USING HOTPLATE AND TAIL IMMERSION METHODS

    OpenAIRE

    Mradu Gupta; Saumyakanti Sasmal; Arup Mukherjee Gupta

    2013-01-01

    The stem bark of Ashoka (Saraca asoca) plant has been traditionally used for a number of therapeutic purposes including anti-inflammatory activities. It has been described in ancient Ayurvedic texts as an analgesic also but rampant use of its stem bark has affected the plant population although its seeds are available in plenty. This research effort aims to examine the central analgesic effect of acetone, methanol and aqueous extracts of the powder of Asoka seeds to validate its antinocicepti...

  7. Biofilm Formation by Gram-Negative Bacteria on Central Venous Catheter Connectors: Effect of Conditioning Films in a Laboratory Model

    OpenAIRE

    Murga, R.; Miller, J.M.; Donlan, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    Human blood components have been shown to enhance biofilm formation by gram-positive bacteria. We investigated the effect of human blood on biofilm formation on the inner lumen of needleless central venous catheter connectors by several gram-negative bacteria, specifically Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Pantoea agglomerans. Results suggest that a conditioning film of blood components promotes biofilm formation by these organisms in an in vitro system.

  8. Effect of central ventilation and air conditioner system on the concentration and health risk from airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinze LV; Lizhong Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Central ventilation and air conditioner systems are widely utilized nowadays in public places for air exchange and temperature control,which significantly influences the transfer of pollutants between indoors and outdoors.To study the effect of central ventilation and air conditioner systems on the concentration and health risk from airborne pollutants,a spatial and temporal survey was carried out using polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as agent pollutants.During the period when the central ventilation system operated without air conditioning (AC-off period),concentrations of 2-4 ring PAHs in the model supermarket were dominated by outdoor levels,due to the good linearity between indoor air and outdoor air (rp > 0.769,p < 0.05),and the slopes (1.2-4.54) indicated that ventilating like the model supermarket increased the potential health risks from low molecular weight PAHs.During the period when the central ventilation and air conditioner systems were working simultaneously (AC-on period),although the total levels of PAHs were increased,the concentrations and percentage of the particulate PAHs indoors declined significantly.The BaP equivalency (BaPeq concentration indicated that utilization of air conditioning reduced the health risks from PAHs in the model supermarket.

  9. Effect of selenium vitamin E supplement on the performance of sheep in Central Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element in animal nutrition involved in the defense against the toxicity of reactive oxygen species and the oxidation state of cells, where its deprivation reduces activities of the Se-dependent enzymes. The signs in animals depend upon vitamin E status and appear only when both nutrients are limiting where they vary according to species. Estimating actual selenium intake is often difficult due to the specific housing and feeding conditions of sheep husbandry, which is mostly in extensive system in most part of the world and in Iran as well. Indirect indices such as Se concentration in blood, glutathione peroxidase activity and production are used to evaluate Se status. Correct levels of selenium supplementation at different growth stages of sheep are essential to maximize productivity, but few studies have been conducted to determine the composition of mineral supplements for sheep in Iran. This study was designed to monitor the health status of sheep grazing in a dry land zone and to test the response of ewes to selenium vitamin E injection. Three flocks each with 120 sheep, representative as sheep husbandry system of a district zone in Markazi province in central Iran, were considered. Sheep keeping in this area is mostly based on the extensive system depends on poor rangeland, crop residues and stubbles with supplement feeding of barley grain during cool winter when the ewes are at late stage of pregnancy. In each of the selected flock, 60 ewes were identified and divided in two groups including 1) control and 2) treatment, where the ewes in treatment group received selenium-vitamin E (each dose contained 0.5 mg sodium selenate and 50 mg vitamin E) supplement by subcutaneous injections. Each ewe injected by one dose of the supplement 2 weeks before mating and again 2 weeks before lambing. Blood samples were collected, one month post injection that was occurrence to autumn and spring seasons, and analysed for glutathione

  10. THE EFFECTS OF RACKET INERTIA TENSOR ON ELBOW LOADINGS AND RACKET BEHAVIOR FOR CENTRAL AND ECCENTRIC IMPACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Nesbit

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the inertia tensors of tennis rackets and their influence on the elbow swing torques in a forehand motion, the loadings transmitted to the elbow from central and eccentric impacts, and the racket acceleration responses from central and eccentric impacts. Inertia tensors of various rackets with similar mass and mass center location were determined by an inertia pendulum and were found to vary considerably in all three orthogonal directions. Tennis swing mechanics and impact analyses were performed using a computer model comprised of a full-body model of a human, a parametric model of the racket, and an impact function. The swing mechanics analysis of a forehand motion determined that inertia values had a moderate linear effect on the pronation-supination elbow torques required to twist the racket, and a minor effect on the flexion-extension and valgus-varus torques. The impact analysis found that mass center inertia values had a considerable effect on the transmitted torques for both longitudinal and latitudinal eccentric impacts and significantly affected all elbow torque components. Racket acceleration responses to central and eccentric impacts were measured experimentally and found to be notably sensitive to impact location and mass center inertia values

  11. Effect of a botanical composition, UP446, on respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous systems in beagle dogs and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young Chul; Jia, Qi

    2016-06-01

    Extensive safety evaluation of UP446, a botanical composition comprised of standardized extracts from roots of Scutellaria baicalensis and heartwoods of Acacia catechu, has been reported previously. Here we carried out additional studies to assess the effect of UP446 on respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous (CNS) systems. A Functional observational battery (FOB) and whole body plethysmography system in rats and implanted telemetry in dogs were utilized to evaluate the potential CNS, respiratory and cardiovascular toxicity, respectively. UP446 was administered orally at dose levels of 800, 2000 and 5000 mg/kg to SpragueDawley rats and at 4 ascending dose levels (0, 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg) to beagle dogs. No abnormal effects were observed on the cage side, open field, hand held, and sensori-motor observations suggestive of toxicity in respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous (CNS) systems. Rectal temperatures were comparable for each treatment groups. Similarly, respiratory rate, tidal volume and minute volume were unaffected by any of the treatment groups. No UP446 related changes were observed on blood pressure, heart rate and electrocardiogram in beagle dogs at dose levels of 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg. Some minor incidental, non-dose correlated changes were observed in the FOB assessment. These data suggest that UP446 has minimal or no pharmaco-toxicological effect on the respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous systems. PMID:27012374

  12. Cardiovascular effects of the intracerebroventricular injection of adrenomedullin: roles of the peripheral vasopressin and central cholinergic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective was to investigate in conscious Sprague-Dawley (6-8 weeks, 250-300 g) female rats (N = 7 in each group) the effects of intracerebroventricularly (icv) injected adrenomedullin (ADM) on blood pressure and heart rate (HR), and to determine if ADM and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors, peripheral V1 receptors or the central cholinergic system play roles in these cardiovascular effects. Blood pressure and HR were observed before and for 30 min following drug injections. The following results were obtained: 1) icv ADM (750 ng/10 µL) caused an increase in both blood pressure and HR (ΔMAP = 11.8 ± 2.3 mmHg and ΔHR = 39.7 ± 4.8 bpm). 2) Pretreatment with a CGRP receptor antagonist (CGRP8-37) and ADM receptor antagonist (ADM22-52) blocked the effect of central ADM on blood pressure and HR. 3) The nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (25 µg/10 µL, icv) and the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (5 µg/10 µL, icv) prevented the stimulating effect of ADM on blood pressure. The effect of ADM on HR was blocked only by atropine (5 µg/10 µL, icv). 4) The V1 receptor antagonist [β-mercapto-β-β-cyclopentamethylenepropionyl1, O-me-Tyr2,Arg8]-vasopressin (V2255; 10 µg/kg), that was applied intravenously, prevented the effect of ADM on blood pressure and HR. This is the first study reporting the role of specific ADM and CGRP receptors, especially the role of nicotinic and muscarinic central cholinergic receptors and the role of peripheral V1 receptors in the increasing effects of icv ADM on blood pressure and HR

  13. Cardiovascular effects of the intracerebroventricular injection of adrenomedullin: roles of the peripheral vasopressin and central cholinergic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cam-Etoz, B.; Isbil-Buyukcoskun, N.; Ozluk, K. [Department of Physiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle/Bursa (Turkey)

    2012-03-02

    Our objective was to investigate in conscious Sprague-Dawley (6-8 weeks, 250-300 g) female rats (N = 7 in each group) the effects of intracerebroventricularly (icv) injected adrenomedullin (ADM) on blood pressure and heart rate (HR), and to determine if ADM and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors, peripheral V{sub 1} receptors or the central cholinergic system play roles in these cardiovascular effects. Blood pressure and HR were observed before and for 30 min following drug injections. The following results were obtained: 1) icv ADM (750 ng/10 µL) caused an increase in both blood pressure and HR (ΔMAP = 11.8 ± 2.3 mmHg and ΔHR = 39.7 ± 4.8 bpm). 2) Pretreatment with a CGRP receptor antagonist (CGRP{sub 8-37}) and ADM receptor antagonist (ADM{sub 22-52}) blocked the effect of central ADM on blood pressure and HR. 3) The nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (25 µg/10 µL, icv) and the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (5 µg/10 µL, icv) prevented the stimulating effect of ADM on blood pressure. The effect of ADM on HR was blocked only by atropine (5 µg/10 µL, icv). 4) The V{sub 1} receptor antagonist [β-mercapto-β-β-cyclopentamethylenepropionyl{sup 1}, O-me-Tyr{sup 2},Arg{sup 8}]-vasopressin (V2255; 10 µg/kg), that was applied intravenously, prevented the effect of ADM on blood pressure and HR. This is the first study reporting the role of specific ADM and CGRP receptors, especially the role of nicotinic and muscarinic central cholinergic receptors and the role of peripheral V{sub 1} receptors in the increasing effects of icv ADM on blood pressure and HR.

  14. Cardiovascular effects of the intracerebroventricular injection of adrenomedullin: roles of the peripheral vasopressin and central cholinergic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Cam-Etoz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to investigate in conscious Sprague-Dawley (6-8 weeks, 250-300 g female rats (N = 7 in each group the effects of intracerebroventricularly (icv injected adrenomedullin (ADM on blood pressure and heart rate (HR, and to determine if ADM and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP receptors, peripheral V1 receptors or the central cholinergic system play roles in these cardiovascular effects. Blood pressure and HR were observed before and for 30 min following drug injections. The following results were obtained: 1 icv ADM (750 ng/10 µL caused an increase in both blood pressure and HR (DMAP = 11.8 ± 2.3 mmHg and ΔHR = 39.7 ± 4.8 bpm. 2 Pretreatment with a CGRP receptor antagonist (CGRP8-37 and ADM receptor antagonist (ADM22-52 blocked the effect of central ADM on blood pressure and HR. 3 The nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (25 µg/10 µL, icv and the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (5 µg/10 µL, icv prevented the stimulating effect of ADM on blood pressure. The effect of ADM on HR was blocked only by atropine (5 µg/10 µL, icv. 4 The V1 receptor antagonist [β-mercapto-β-β-cyclopentamethylenepropionyl¹, O-me-Tyr²,Arg8]-vasopressin (V2255; 10 µg/kg, that was applied intravenously, prevented the effect of ADM on blood pressure and HR. This is the first study reporting the role of specific ADM and CGRP receptors, especially the role of nicotinic and muscarinic central cholinergic receptors and the role of peripheral V1 receptors in the increasing effects of icv ADM on blood pressure and HR.

  15. Memory in myasthenia gravis: neuropsychological tests of central cholinergic function before and after effective immunologic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennerster, A; Palace, J; Warburton, D; Oxbury, S; Newsom-Davis, J

    1996-04-01

    There are reports of central cholinergic deficits in myasthenia gravis (MG) describing impaired performance on a variety of tests of memory with varying benefits from plasmapheresis. We tested 11 patients with symptomatic MG at the start of a trial of immunosuppressive treatment (prednisolone plus azathioprine or placebo) and again when in remission. The tests included the Logical Memory and Design Reproduction parts of the Wechsler Memory Scale, the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Peterson-Peterson task, and an auditory vigilance task. Muscle strength improved significantly over the period of treatment, but overall performance on tests of memory or attention did not. These results fail to substantiate reports of functionally significant and reversible central deficits in myasthenia gravis. PMID:8780106

  16. Effect of Central Metal on Nonlinear Optical Properties of Porphyrins and Their Graphene Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Jian-Cai; Zhao, Li-Yun; Zhang, Yu-Jin; Ma, Hong

    2016-09-01

    The nonlinear optical properties of a series of newly synthesized porphyrins with different central metals and their covalently linked graphene composites are theoretically studied by numerically solving the rate equations and field intensity equation. Calculated results show that all the studied compounds are promising candidates for optical limiters, and graphene-porphyrin composites are expected to be preferable optical limiters because of their excellent nonlinear absorption abilities. In addition, the central metal in the porphyrin is found to be crucial to the optical power limiting and two-photon absorption performances of the compounds. Our results reproduce the experimental measurements. Additionally, special emphasis is placed on the factors that can affect the nonlinear optical properties of the compounds, indicating that one can create favorable nonlinear optical properties of the compounds by changing either the parameters of the absorber, including the concentration and thickness, or the pulse duration.

  17. Effects of Genetic Loci Associated with Central Obesity on Adipocyte Lipolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Strawbridge, Rona J; Laumen, Helmut; Hamsten, Anders; Breier, Michaela; Grallert, Harald; Hauner, Hans; Arner, Peter; Dahlman, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Numerous genetic loci have been associated with measures of central fat accumulation, such as waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index (WHRadjBMI). However the mechanisms by which genetic variations influence obesity remain largely elusive. Lipolysis is a key process for regulation of lipid storage in adipocytes, thus is implicated in obesity and its metabolic complications. Here, genetic variants at 36 WHRadjBMI-associated loci were examined for their influence on abdominal...

  18. The effect of TNFα on food intake and central insulin sensitivity in rats

    OpenAIRE

    de Kloet, Annette D.; Pacheco-López, Gustavo; Langhans, Wolfgang; Brown, Lynda M

    2010-01-01

    Circulating and tissue levels of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) are elevated in obesity. TNFα interferes with insulin signaling in many tissues and also plays a causal role in the anorexia that accompanies severe challenges to the immune system. The interactions between TNFα and insulin in the control of eating are less well known. The present study evaluated the role of TNFα in the central nervous system control of food intake by insulin in adult male Long Evans ...

  19. Toxic effects of mercury on the cardiovascular and central nervous systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bruna Fernandes Azevedo; Lorena Barros Furieri; Franck Maciel Peçanha; Giulia Alessandra Wiggers; Paula Frizera Vassallo; Maylla Ronacher Simões; Jonaina Fiorim; Priscila Rossi de Batista; Mirian Fioresi; Luciana Rossoni; Ivanita Stefanon; María Jesus Alonso; Mercedes Salaices; Dalton Valentim Vassallo

    2012-01-01

    Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. This exposure is more common than expected, and the health consequences of such exposure remain unclear. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities, and now, exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Many studies show that high exposure to mercury induces changes in the central nervous system, potentially resulting in irritab...

  20. Effects of chronic central leptin infusion on proopiomelanocortin and neurotensin gene expression in the rat hypothalamus

    OpenAIRE

    Sahu, Abhiram

    2008-01-01

    Leptin signaling in the hypothalamus is critical for normal food intake and body weight regulation. While hyperleptinemia in obese people suggests a state of leptin resistance, the mechanism is not clearly understood. In a rat model of central leptin infusion in which animals develop resistance to the satiety action of leptin, orexigenic peptide producing neuropeptide Y neurons in the hypothalamus develop leptin resistance. However, it is still unknown if increased hypothalamic leptin tone ca...

  1. Effect of 56Fe resonance scattering in the central flux of ZPR6-7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The result obtained in early calculations, where a depletion was observed due to the 56Fe resonance scattering (28,8 KeV), in the central flux calculated for the ZPR6-7 critical assembly, when the scheme of ETOE-MC**2-UNIMUG calculation is used, and the out of appearance of these depletion, when the scheme of NJOY-ANISIN calculation is used, is explained. (M.C.K.)

  2. Direct Central Nervous System Effect of Alcohol Alters Synthesis and Degradation of Skeletal Muscle Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Pruznak, Anne M; Nystrom, Jay; Lang, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Alcohol can directly impair protein synthesis in cultured myocytes as well as in in situ perfused skeletal muscle. However, alcohol in the general circulation diffuses rapidly into the central nervous system (CNS). Therefore, this study determined whether localized elevation of alcohol within the CNS is capable of decreasing muscle protein synthesis. Methods: Conscious unstrained male rats received a continuous intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of ethanol and skeletal muscle protei...

  3. An overview on the seismic microzonation and site effect studies in Central Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Pilz; Tanatkan Abakanov; Kanatbek Abdrakhmatov; Dino Bindi; Tobias Boxberger; Bolot Moldobekov; Sagynbek Orunbaev; Natalya Silacheva; Shahid Ullah; Sheyshenaly Usupaev; Pulat Yasunov; Stefano Parolai

    2015-01-01

    During the past centuries, many cities in Central Asia have suffered significant damages caused by earthquakes. A crucial step towards preparedness for future events, the definition of the optimal engineering designs for civil structures and the mitigation of earthquake risks involves the accomplishment of site response studies. To accurately identify local variations of the site response at different locations within the cities, earthquakes recorded by seismic networks as well as measurement...

  4. Respiratory control in the newborn : Central chemosensitivity, neuropeptides and nicotinic effects

    OpenAIRE

    Wickström, Ronny

    2002-01-01

    Breathing is regulated by a complex network of neurons located mainly in the brainstem. For the newborn, it is critical for survival that a continuous respiration is established after birth. However, the regulation of respiration also undergoes maturation in the postnatal period. This thesis focuses on some of the systems modulating respiration that may be of great importance for the newborn: central (C02) chemosensitivity and the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and galanin ...

  5. Effect of traditional gold mining to surface water quality in Murung Raya District, Central Kalimantan Province

    OpenAIRE

    W.Wilopo; R.Resili; D.P.E. Putra

    2013-01-01

    There are many locations for traditional gold mining in Indonesia. One of these is in Murung Raya District, Central Kalimantan Province. Mining activities involving the application of traditional gold processing technology have a high potential to pollute the environment, especially surface water. Therefore, this study aims to determine the impact of gold mining and processing on surface water quality around the mine site. Based on the results of field surveys and laboratory analysis, our dat...

  6. Cost-Effective Water Quality Management Strategies in Central and Eastern Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Somlyody, L.; Paulsen, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    Many countries in Central and Eastern Europe will be formulating new environmental regulations within the next few years. Among the many topics which these are likely to address is the development of control policies for waste-water dischargers, including municipal sewage treatment plants. In Western Europe and North America, standards have relied heavily upon so-called "best available technology" control policies, which require dischargers to use treatment processes that reduce emissions of ...

  7. Effect of weather conditions on early potato yields in east-central Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Rymuza

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This work is based on data on monthly air temperature and precipitation and early potato yields in 2000-2013 obtained from seven COBORU (Research Centre for Cultivar Testing stations in east-central Poland. The relationships between potato yields and average monthly air temperatures and monthly precipitation of the growing season were studied with step-wise multiple regression followed by polynomial regression. Precipitation affected early potato yields more than temperature, particularly in June and July

  8. Effect of weather conditions on early potato yields in east-central Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Rymuza; Elżbieta Radzka; Tomasz Lenartowicz

    2015-01-01

    This work is based on data on monthly air temperature and precipitation and early potato yields in 2000-2013 obtained from seven COBORU (Research Centre for Cultivar Testing) stations in east-central Poland. The relationships between potato yields and average monthly air temperatures and monthly precipitation of the growing season were studied with step-wise multiple regression followed by polynomial regression. Precipitation affected early potato yields more than temperature, particularly in...

  9. Central modulators of human pain: Effects of oxytocin, exam stress, breathing exercises and transcranial magnetic stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Zunhammer, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The available means to control human pain are insufficient, novel mechanisms of pain modulation must be explored and understood. This cumulative dissertation comprises four studies, which explored potential means to modulate pain in the central nervous system. An overview on the current understanding of pain, its basic mechanisms, and its known modulators is provided. Study 1 tested if a high intranasal dose of the neuro-hypophyseal hormone oxytocin affected perception and processing of therm...

  10. Effect of two successive wildfires in Pinus halepensis stands of central Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Goudelis, G.; P. Ganatsas; T. Tsitsoni; Y. Spanos; E. Daskalakou

    2008-01-01

    We estimated differences, five years after a wildfire, in soil and vegetation between Pinus halepensis stands that were once burnt (1998) and stands that were burnt twice in a short time interval (1995 and 1998), in the area of Penteli, central Greece. The parameters monitored were the physical and chemical attributes of upper soil layer and the vegetation composition, density and height. The results showed that five years after the wildfire, soil pH did not differ be...

  11. On the Effect of Random Norming on the Rate of Convergence in the Central Limit Theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Peter

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that "studentizing," i.e., normalizing by the sample standard deviation rather than the population standard deviation, can improve the rate of convergence in the central limit theorem. This provides concise confirmation of one feature of the folklore that a studentized sum is in some sense more robust than a normed sum. The case of infinite population standard deviation is also examined.

  12. Fiscal Seigniorage "Laffer-curve effect" on Central Bank Autonomy in India.

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Lekha

    2015-01-01

    It is often emphasised that seigniorage financing of public sector deficits is technically a "free lunch" if the economy has not attained the full employment levels. However, conservative macroeconomic policies in many emerging and developing economies, especially in the last two decades, have moved away from seigniorage financing to debt financing of deficits to give greater autonomy to the central banks. Against this backdrop, the paper analyses the fiscal and monetary policy co-ordination ...

  13. The Side Effects of Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone Analog (Diphereline) in Treatment of Idiopathic Central Precocious Puberty

    OpenAIRE

    Zohreh Karamizadeh; Mahmoodreza Tabebordbar; Forough Saki; Hamdollah Karamifar; Gholamhossein Amirhakimi

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of central precocious puberty (CPP) is the administration of GnRH analogs. Metabolic syndrome comprised metabolic disturbances that confer increased risk of (CVD) diabetes mellitus (DM) and cardiovascular disease. This study is a longitudinal prospective study in pediatric endocrinology clinic. 30 non-obese children with idiopathic CPP were involved. Total body weight, height, blood pressure, BMI and waist circumference of the patients along with their triglyceride (TG), total chole...

  14. Drought effects on soil carbon dioxide production in two ecosystems in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Straaten, Oliver

    2010-05-01

    Drought response on soil CO2 production dynamics were examined in two tropical ecosystems in central Sulawesi, Indonesia. Large-scale throughfall displacement roofs were built in a cacao (Theobroma cacao) / Gliricidia sepium agroforestry plantation (560 m.a.s.l.) and in a sub-montane tropical rainforest (1050 m.a.s.l.) to simulate drought conditions. At each site, ecosystem drought responses from three roof plots were compared to three undisturbed control plots. Soil CO2 production was measured spatially at the soil surface and vertically within the soil profile to 2.5 m depth every two weeks. 1. The cacao / Gliricidia ecosystem exhibited a mild drought response. Here, soil CO2 production decreased by 13% in comparison to the control plots during the 13 month induced drought. The mild drought response is attributed to two reasons. First, soil CO2 efflux exhibited an inverse parabolic relationship with soil moisture (R2 = 0.32): soil CO2 efflux peaked at intermediate moisture conditions, but was low when soil conditions became dry (in the induced drought plots), and when the soil became water saturated (in the control plots). This means that respiration differences between control and roof plots may have been masked when soil moisture conditions were saturated in the control and concurrently dry in roof plots. Secondly, the shallow rooted cacao understory grown next to the deeper rooted Gliricidia overstory created a favourable set of site conditions that enabled the ecosystem to mitigate serious drought stress. The experiment had a CO2 neutral effect overall: emissions were initially reduced during the induced drought period but rebounded and surpassed the control during the five month rewetting phase, thus compensating for earlier declines. 2. In contrast, the sub-montane tropical rainforest experienced a severe decrease in soil CO2 production. Here, soil CO2 efflux decreased by an average of 39% in comparison to the control during the 24 month induced drought

  15. CENTRAL ANTINOCICEPTIVE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT EXTRACTS OF SARACA ASOCA SEEDS ASSESSED USING HOTPLATE AND TAIL IMMERSION METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mradu Gupta

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The stem bark of Ashoka (Saraca asoca plant has been traditionally used for a number of therapeutic purposes including anti-inflammatory activities. It has been described in ancient Ayurvedic texts as an analgesic also but rampant use of its stem bark has affected the plant population although its seeds are available in plenty. This research effort aims to examine the central analgesic effect of acetone, methanol and aqueous extracts of the powder of Asoka seeds to validate its antinociceptive properties described in the literature. Apart from the standard pharmacognosy and phyto-chemical examination, acute toxicity studies were carried out on all the extracts before assessing the central analgesic effect using the standard techniques of hot plate and tail immersion methods. Morphine Sulphate was used as the standard drug in both these cases. During phytochemical analysis, flavonoids, polyphenols, tannins and saponins were found in the plant extracts while no significant morbidity or any mortality was noticed during the toxicity studies. All the extracts exhibited significant central analgesic effect at doses of 300 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg as compared to the control group, the antinociceptive efficacy being greater at the higher drug dose. The highest analgesic effect was observed in case of aqueous extract, followed by acetone extract and the lowest in case of methanol extract. The therapeutic efficacy at higher dosage of aqueous extract was comparable to but lower compared to the standard drug. However, the analgesic effect of the drug extracts persisted for a longer time than the standard drug, validating its comparable and sustained analgesic effect.

  16. SPIDER X - Environmental effects in central and satellite early-type galaxies through the stellar fossil record

    CERN Document Server

    La Barbera, F; Ferreras, I; Gallazzi, A; de Carvalho, R R; de la Rosa, I G

    2014-01-01

    A detailed analysis of how environment affects the star formation history of early-type galaxies (ETGs) is undertaken via high signal to noise ratio stacked spectra obtained from a sample of 20,977 ETGs (morphologically selected) from the SDSS-based SPIDER survey. Two major parameters are considered for the study: the central velocity dispersion (sigma), which relates to local drivers of star formation, and the mass of the host halo, which relates to environment-related effects. In addition, we separate the sample between centrals (the most massive galaxy in a halo) and satellites. We derive trends of age, metallicity, and [alpha/Fe] enhancement, with sigma. We confirm that the major driver of stellar population properties in ETGs is velocity dispersion, with a second-order effect associated to the central/satellite nature of the galaxy. No environmental dependence is detected for satellite ETGs, except at low sigma - where satellites in groups or in the outskirts of clusters tend to be younger than those in ...

  17. The Cost-Saving Effect of a Centralized Unit for Anticancer Drugs Processing at the Oncology Department of Tirana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artan Shkoza

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide increase in cancer prevalence has led to a substantial cost rising in Medical Oncology. Of particular importance are highly expensive drugs used to treat various types of cancers in developing countries like Albania. Hence, pharmacoeconomics may play an important role in reducing the drug wastage and financial burden placed on patients, family and society in general; of course, without adversely impacting patient’s health outcomes. Our aim was to calculate cost-savings effect of a centralized unit, which allows residual amounts of unused drugs to be reused by patients whose treatments are elaborated in the same working day. We calculated in a comprehensive manner the number of saved vials (flasks for seven drugs generated from residual amounts of the same working day and, converted them into cost-saving monetary value. We did not take into account prescribed drug dosages that fitted exactly with doses contained in a vial. Over a six month period, there were: a total of 6558 prescriptions for a total of 1180 patients, a total of 1524 saved vials and, a total cost-saving of 134, 348 (•. The saved value represents 6.2 percent of the cytostatic drugs budget for 2005. Our experience confirms the economic benefit of waste reduction and cost-savings effect due to a centralized unit of anticancer drug processing. The centralized unit increases also the drug traceability from preparation to patient.

  18. Late effects of radiation on survivors of Shintoku Women's High School students exposed at the Central Telephone Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cohort study was made on late radiation effects, particularly on the incidence of breast cancer, in A-bomb survivors of Shintoku Women's High School students exposed at the central telephone office. Fifty-six percent of the students died at the central telephone office. Cytogenetical and physical examinations estimated that the survivors had been exposed to approximately 400 rad. The incidence of breast cancer was 24.9 times higher in the A-bomb survivors than in the control group. Data obtained support the previous reports describing the relationship between breast cancer and exposure to the A-bombing, and suggest that breast cancer occurs more frequently among A-bomb survivors exposed during puberty. (Namekawa, K.)

  19. Lycopersicon esculentum lectin: an effective and versatile endothelial marker of normal and tumoral blood vessels in the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mazzetti

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The binding of Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEA to the vascular endothelium was studied in the central nervous system of rat, mouse and guinea pig at different developmental ages, and in a gliosarcoma model. Our observations showed that LEA consistently stained the entire vascular tree in the spinal cord and in the brain of all animal species at all developmental ages investigated. In the tumor model, the staining of the vascular network was very reproducible, enabled an easy identification of vascular profiles and displayed a higher efficiency when compared to two other commonly used vascular marker (EHS laminin and PECAM-1. Moreover, our results showed that LEA staining was comparable in both vibratome and paraffin sections and could be easily combined with other markers in double labeling experiments. These observations indicate that LEA staining may represent an effective and versatile endothelial marker for the study of the vasculature of the central nervous system in different animal species and experimental conditions.

  20. Socioeconomic effects of power marketing alternatives for the Central Valley and Washoe Projects: 2005 regional econmic impact analysis using IMPLAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) was founded by the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 to market and transmit federal hydroelectric power in 15 western states outside the Pacific Northwest, which is served by the Bonneville Power Administration. Western is divided into four independent Customer Service Regions including the Sierra Nevada Region (Sierra Nevada), the focus of this report. The Central Valley Project (CVP) and the Washoe Project provide the primary power resources marketed by Sierra Nevada. Sierra Nevada also purchases and markets power generated by the Bonneville Power Administration, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG ampersand E), and various power pools. Sierra Nevada currently markets approximately 1,480 megawatts of power to 77 customers in northern and central California. These customers include investor-owned utilities, public utilities, government agencies, military bases, and irrigation districts. Methods and conclusions from an economic analysis are summarized concerning distributional effects of alternative actions that Sierra Nevada could take with it's new marketing plan

  1. Antibacterial Activity, Antioxidant Effect and Chemical Composition of Propolis from the Región del Maule, Central Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nélida Nina

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Propolis is commercialized in Chile as an antimicrobial agent. It is obtained mainly from central and southern Chile, but is used for the same purposes regardless of its origin. To compare the antimicrobial effect, the total phenolic (TP, the total flavonoid (TF content and the phenolic composition, 19 samples were collected in the main production centers in the Región del Maule, Chile. Samples were extracted with MeOH and assessed for antimicrobial activity against Gram (+ and Gram (− bacteria. TP and TF content, antioxidant activity by the DPPH, FRAP and TEAC methods were also determined. Sample composition was assessed by HPLD-DAD-ESI-MS/MS. Differential compounds in the samples were isolated and characterized. The antimicrobial effect of the samples showed MICs ranging from 31.5 to > 1000 µg/mL. Propolis from the central valley was more effective as antibacterial than those from the coastal area or Andean slopes. The samples considered of interest (MIC ≤ 62.5 µg/mL showed effect on Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas sp., Yersinia enterocolitica and Salmonella enteritidis. Two new diarylheptanoids, a diterpene, the flavonoids pinocembrin and chrysin were isolated and elucidated by spectroscopic and spectrometric means. Some 29 compounds were dereplicated by HPLC-MS and tentatively identified, including nine flavones/flavonol derivatives, one flavanone, eight dihydroflavonols and nine phenyl-propanoids. Propolis from the Región del Maule showed large variation in antimicrobial effect, antioxidant activity and composition. So far the presence of diarylheptanoids in samples from the coastal area of central Chile can be considered as a marker of a new type of propolis.

  2. INVESTMENT CASH FLOW SENSITIVITY AND EFFECT OF MANAGERS’ OWNERSHIP: DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CENTRAL OWNED AND PRIVATE OWNED COMPANIES IN CHINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyao Ding

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on panel data of the listed companies in China’s stock market A during a period of year 2007-2010, we made an empirical study on what drives the investment cash flow sensitivity and the effect of management’s ownership and both their differences between the central state owned companies and the non-state owned companies as well. The sensitivity of investment to internal cash flow in China’s central state-owned companies can be explained by “hypothesis of free cash flow”. It is the cost of agency that causes over-investment behaviors, and the management’s ownership appears significant enhancement effect rather than entrenchment effect. However, the sensitivity of investment to internal cash flow in China’s non-state owned companies supports the explanation of “hypothesis of financial constraints”. Asymmetrical information causes under-investment behaviors of the firms. In the mean while, the entrenchment effect of manages’ ownership dominates the enhancement effect in non-state owned companies.

  3. Origin of haze in the central United States and its effect on solar irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The depletion by atmospheric haze of solar irradiation at the earth's surface in the central United States is estimated and some aspects of the origin of the haze investigated. Observed optical properties of the haze are reviewed and their relation to visual range measurements demonstrated. An approximate radiative transfer model relates visual range and mixing-height observations to solar irradiance at the ground, and the relation is validated against detailed irradiance observations on two days, and against observed monthly and annual irradiation at one station. Statistics of irradiation depletion are computed for 24 stations. The annual average depletion is approx.7.5%

  4. Evaluation of central nervous system effects of Citrus limon essential oil in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Lidianne Mayra Lopes Campêlo; Sidney Gonçalo Lima; Chistiane Mendes Feitosa; Rivelilson Mendes de Freitas

    2011-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) depressant and anticonvulsant activities of Citrus limon (L.) Osbeck, Rutaceae, essential oil (EO) were investigated in animal models. The EO (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg) injected by oral route (p.o.) in mice caused a significant decrease in the motor activity of animals when compared with the control group, up to thirty days after the administration and the dose of 150 mg/kg significantly reduced the remaining time of the animals on the Rota-rod apparatus. Additio...

  5. Assessment of Effectiveness of Percutaneous Adhesiolysis in Managing Chronic Low Back Pain Secondary to Lumbar Central Spinal Canal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmaiah Manchikanti, Kimberly A. Cash, Carla D. McManus, Vidyasagar Pampati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic persistent low back and lower extremity pain secondary to central spinal stenosis is common and disabling. Lumbar surgical interventions with decompression or fusion are most commonly performed to manage severe spinal stenosis. However, epidural injections are also frequently performed in managing central spinal stenosis. After failure of epidural steroid injections, the next sequential step is percutaneous adhesiolysis and hypertonic saline neurolysis with a targeted delivery. The literature on the effectiveness of percutaneous adhesiolysis in managing central spinal stenosis after failure of epidural injections has not been widely studied.Study Design: A prospective evaluation.Setting: An interventional pain management practice, a specialty referral center, a private practice setting in the United States.Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis in patients with chronic low back and lower extremity pain with lumbar central spinal stenosis.Methods: Seventy patients were recruited. The initial phase of the study was randomized, double-blind with a comparison of percutaneous adhesiolysis with caudal epidural injections. The 25 patients from the adhesiolysis group continued with follow-up, along with 45 additional patients, leading to a total of 70 patients. All patients received percutaneous adhesiolysis and appropriate placement of the Racz catheter, followed by an injection of 5 mL of 2% preservative-free lidocaine with subsequent monitoring in the recovery room. In the recovery room, each patient also received 6 mL of 10% hypertonic sodium chloride solution, and 6 mg of non-particulate betamethasone, followed by an injection of 1 mL of sodium chloride solution and removal of the catheter.Outcomes Assessment: Multiple outcome measures were utilized including the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS, the Oswestry Disability Index 2.0 (ODI, employment status, and opioid intake with assessment at 3, 6

  6. Separating temporal and topological effects in walk-based network centrality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Ewan R.; Charlton, Nathaniel

    2016-07-01

    The recently introduced concept of dynamic communicability is a valuable tool for ranking the importance of nodes in a temporal network. Two metrics, broadcast score and receive score, were introduced to measure the centrality of a node with respect to a model of contagion based on time-respecting walks. This article examines the temporal and structural factors influencing these metrics by considering a versatile stochastic temporal network model. We analytically derive formulas to accurately predict the expectation of the broadcast and receive scores when one or more columns in a temporal edge-list are shuffled. These methods are then applied to two publicly available data sets and we quantify how much the centrality of each individual depends on structural or temporal influences. From our analysis, we highlight two practical contributions: a way to control for temporal variation when computing dynamic communicability and the conclusion that the broadcast and receive scores can, under a range of circumstances, be replaced by the row and column sums of the matrix exponential of a weighted adjacency matrix given by the data.

  7. Climate Variability and Water-Regulation Effects on Surface Water and Groundwater Interactions in California's Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Arriola, F.; Dettinger, M. D.; Hanson, R. T.; Faunt, C.; Cayan, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    California's Central Valley is one of the most important agricultural areas in the world and is highly dependent on the availability and management of surface water and groundwater. As such, it is a valuable large-scale system for investigating the interaction of climate variability and water-resource management on surface-water and groundwater interactions. In the Central Valley, multiple tools are available to allow scientists to understand these interactions. However, the full effect of human activities on the interactions occurring along the Aquifer-Soil-Plant-Atmosphere continuum remains uncertain. Two models were linked to investigate how non-regulated (natural conditions) and regulated (releases from dams) surface-water inflows from the surrounding contributing drainage areas to the alluvial plains of the Central Valley affects the valley's surface-water supply and groundwater pumpage under different climate conditions. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) macroscale (surface) hydrologic model was used to estimate the non-regulated streamflow. The U.S. Geological Survey's recently developed Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM) was used to route both the regulated and non-regulated streamflow to the Central Valley and simulate the resulting hydrologic system. The CVHM was developed using MODFLOW's Farm Process (MF-FMP) in order to simulate agricultural water demand, surface-water deliveries, groundwater pumpage, and return flows in 21 water-balance subregions. As such, the CVHM simulates conjunctive use of water, providing a broad perspective on changes in the water systems of the Valley. Inflows from the contributing mountain watersheds are simulated in CVHM using the streamflow-routing package for the 1961-2003 time period. In order to analyze the affect of climate variability, dry and wet years were identified from below the 10th and above the 90th percentiles, respectively, in a multi-decadal time series (1961-2003) of surface-water inflows. The

  8. Dose- and time-response effects of pantethine on open-field behavior, and on central neurotransmission in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vécsei, L; Widerlöv, E; Ekman, R; Alling, C

    1990-01-01

    In this study the dose- and time-related effects of pantethine on open-field behavior and central neurotransmissions were investigated in rats. Pantethine administered in low doses (0.48-0.96 mM/kg SC) only marginally influenced the activity of the animals, but induced a significant decrease of hypothalamic noradrenaline level without influencing the concentrations of dopamine and DOPAC. Injected in higher doses (1.95-3.90 mM/kg SC), the compound produced a marked depression of both open-field activity and noradrenaline levels, but increased the concentrations of dopamine and DOPAC in the hypothalamus. Twelve hr after the administration of the substance, its effect was attenuated, and 24 hr after the treatment neither the behavioral nor the monoamine parameters differed significantly from the control values. Concerning the somatostatin, pantethine administered in high doses (1.95-3.90 mM/kg SC) decreased the striatal concentration of somatostatin 4 hr after the injection, and this effect was attenuated 24 hr after the treatment. These data suggest that the pantethine-induced behavioral changes are correlated with its effect on central catecholaminergic and somatostatinergic transmission. PMID:1969162

  9. Implementation of central venous catheter bundle in an intensive care unit in Kuwait: Effect on central line-associated bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Mona F; Jamal, Wafaa; Al Mousa, Haifa; Rotimi, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSIs) is an important healthcare-associated infection in the critical care units. It causes substantial morbidity, mortality and incurs high costs. The use of central venous line (CVL) insertion bundle has been shown to decrease the incidence of CLABSIs. Our aim was to study the impact of CVL insertion bundle on incidence of CLABSI and study the causative microbial agents in an intensive care unit in Kuwait. Surveillance for CLABSI was conducted by trained infection control team using National Health Safety Network (NHSN) case definitions and device days measurement methods. During the intervention period, nursing staff used central line care bundle consisting of (1) hand hygiene by inserter (2) maximal barrier precautions upon insertion by the physician inserting the catheter and sterile drape from head to toe to the patient (3) use of a 2% chlorohexidine gluconate (CHG) in 70% ethanol scrub for the insertion site (4) optimum catheter site selection. (5) Examination of the daily necessity of the central line. During the pre-intervention period, there were 5367 documented catheter-days and 80 CLABSIs, for an incidence density of 14.9 CLABSIs per 1000 catheter-days. After implementation of the interventions, there were 5052 catheter-days and 56 CLABSIs, for an incidence density of 11.08 per 1000 catheter-days. The reduction in the CLABSI/1000 catheter days was not statistically significant (P=0.0859). This study demonstrates that implementation of a central venous catheter post-insertion care bundle was associated with a reduction in CLABSI in an intensive care area setting. PMID:26138518

  10. Effectiveness and Tradeoffs between Portfolios of Adaptation Strategies Addressing Future Climate and Socioeconomic Uncertainties in California's Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, M. K.; Van Lienden, B.; Das, T.; Munevar, A.; Young, C. A.; Flores-Lopez, F.; Huntington, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Central Valley of California is one of the major agricultural areas in the United States. The Central Valley Project (CVP) is operated by the Bureau of Reclamation to serve multiple purposes including generating approximately 4.3 million gigawatt hours of hydropower and providing, on average, 5 million acre-feet of water per year to irrigate approximately 3 million acres of land in the Sacramento, San Joaquin, and Tulare Lake basins, 600,000 acre-feet per year of water for urban users, and 800,000 acre-feet of annual supplies for environmental purposes. The development of effective adaptation and mitigation strategies requires assessing multiple risks including potential climate changes as well as uncertainties in future socioeconomic conditions. In this study, a scenario-based analytical approach was employed by combining three potential 21st century socioeconomic futures with six representative climate and sea level change projections developed using a transient hybrid delta ensemble method from an archive of 112 bias corrected spatially downscaled CMIP3 global climate model simulations to form 18 future socioeconomic-climate scenarios. To better simulate the effects of climate changes on agricultural water demands, analyses of historical agricultural meteorological station records were employed to develop estimates of future changes in solar radiation and atmospheric humidity from the GCM simulated temperature and precipitation. Projected changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide were computed directly by weighting SRES emissions scenarios included in each representative climate projection. These results were used as inputs to a calibrated crop water use, growth and yield model to simulate the effects of climate changes on the evapotranspiration and yields of major crops grown in the Central Valley. Existing hydrologic, reservoir operations, water quality, hydropower, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and both urban and agricultural economic models were integrated

  11. Toxic Effects of Mercury on the Cardiovascular and Central Nervous Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Fernandes Azevedo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. This exposure is more common than expected, and the health consequences of such exposure remain unclear. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities, and now, exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Many studies show that high exposure to mercury induces changes in the central nervous system, potentially resulting in irritability, fatigue, behavioral changes, tremors, headaches, hearing and cognitive loss, dysarthria, incoordination, hallucinations, and death. In the cardiovascular system, mercury induces hypertension in humans and animals that has wide-ranging consequences, including alterations in endothelial function. The results described in this paper indicate that mercury exposure, even at low doses, affects endothelial and cardiovascular function. As a result, the reference values defining the limits for the absence of danger should be reduced.

  12. Contrasting Effects of Central Pacific and Eastern Pacific El Nino on Stratospheric Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkel, Chaim I.; Hurwitz, Margaret M.; Oman, Luke D.; Waugh, Darryn W.

    2013-01-01

    Targeted experiments with a comprehensive chemistry-climate model are used to demonstrate that seasonality and the location of the peak warming of sea surface temperatures dictate the response of stratospheric water vapor to El Nino. In spring, El Nino events in which sea surface temperature anomalies peak in the eastern Pacific lead to a warming at the tropopause above the warm pool region, and subsequently to more stratospheric water vapor (consistent with previous work). However, in fall and in early winter, and also during El Nino events in which the sea surface temperature anomaly is found mainly in the central Pacific, the response is qualitatively different: temperature changes in the warm pool region are nonuniform and less water vapor enters the stratosphere. The difference in water vapor in the lower stratosphere between the two variants of El Nino approaches 0.3 ppmv, while the difference between the winter and spring responses exceeds 0.5 ppmv.

  13. Effective components of Chinese herbs reduce central nervous system function decline induced by iron overload

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-hui Dong; Cong Liu; Jiang-tao Bai; Wei-na Kong; Xiao-ping He; Peng Yan; Tie-mei Shao; Wen-guo Yu; Xi-qing Chai; Yan-hua Wu

    2015-01-01

    Abnormally increased levels of iron in the brain trigger cascade ampliifcation in Alzheimer’s dis-ease patients, resulting in neuronal death. This study investigated whether components extracted from the Chinese herbs epimedium herb, milkvetch root and kudzuvine root could relieve the abnormal expression of iron metabolism-related protein in Alzheimer’s disease patients. An APPswe/PS1ΔE9 double transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease was used. The intragas-tric administration of compounds from epimedium herb, milkvetch root and kudzuvine root improved pathological alterations such as neuronal edema, increased the number of neurons, downregulated divalent metal transporter 1 expression, upregulated ferroportin 1 expression, and inhibited iron overload in the cerebral cortex of mice with Alzheimer’s disease. These com-pounds reduced iron overload-induced impairment of the central nervous system, indicating a new strategy for developing novel drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

  14. The Effect of Central Baryonic Cores in Dark Halos on the Evaluation of Strong Lensing Probabilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Wang

    2004-01-01

    We present an estimate of the strong lensing probability by dark halos, with emphasis on the role of the baryonic matter arising purely from radiative cooling. We treat the contribution of the cooled baryons optimistically with all the cooled baryons confined within a central core, and including no feedback process from stellar evolution. Our two-component model provides a strong lensing probability that is in good agreement with the observed distribution of multiple images of quasars, provided that the cooled baryons are deposited within a spherical region of radius of 0.1 times the virial radius and follow an isothermal profile. It is pointed out that strong lensing may be used as an additional probe of baryon physics in dark halos though this may meanwhile complicate the test of the inner density profiles of dark matter in halos using the observed strong lensing probability.

  15. Effective components of Chinese herbs reduce central nervous system function decline induced by iron overload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-hui Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormally increased levels of iron in the brain trigger cascade amplification in Alzheimer′s disease patients, resulting in neuronal death. This study investigated whether components extracted from the Chinese herbs epimedium herb, milkvetch root and kudzuvine root could relieve the abnormal expression of iron metabolism-related protein in Alzheimer′s disease patients. An APP swe/PS1ΔE9 double transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer′s disease was used. The intragastric administration of compounds from epimedium herb, milkvetch root and kudzuvine root improved pathological alterations such as neuronal edema, increased the number of neurons, downregulated divalent metal transporter 1 expression, upregulated ferroportin 1 expression, and inhibited iron overload in the cerebral cortex of mice with Alzheimer′s disease. These compounds reduced iron overload-induced impairment of the central nervous system, indicating a new strategy for developing novel drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer′s disease.

  16. Central mechanisms mediating the hypophagic effects of oleoylethanolamide and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamines: different lipid signals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele eRomano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The spread of ‘obesity epidemic’ and the poor efficacy of many anti-obesity therapies in the long-term highlight the need to develop novel efficacious therapy. This necessity stimulates a large research effort to find novel mechanisms controlling feeding and energy balance. Among these mechanisms a great deal of attention has been attracted by a family of phospholipid-derived signaling molecules that play an important role in the regulation of food-intake. They include N-acylethanolamines (NAEs and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamines (NAPEs. NAPEs have been considered for a long time simply as phospholipid precursors of the lipid mediator NAEs, but increasing body of evidence suggest a role in many physiological processes including the regulation of feeding behavior. Several observations demonstrated that among NAEs, oleoylethanolamide (OEA acts as a satiety signal, which is generated in the intestine, upon the ingestion of fat, and signals to the central nervous system. At this level different neuronal pathways, including oxytocinergic, noradrenergic, and histaminergic neurons, seem to mediate its hypophagic action. Similarly to NAEs, NAPEs (with particular reference to the N16:0 species levels were shown to be regulated by the fed state and this finding was initially interpreted as fluctuations of NAE precursors. However, the observation that exogenously administered NAPEs are able to inhibit food intake, not only in normal rats and mice but also in mice lacking the enzyme that converts NAPEs into NAEs, supported the hypothesis of a role of NAPE in the regulation of feeding behavior. Indirect observations suggest that the hypophagic action of NAPEs might involve central mechanisms, although the molecular target remains unknown. The present paper reviews the role that OEA and NAPEs play in the mechanisms that control food intake, further supporting this group of phospholipids as optimal candidate for the development of novel anti

  17. Central mechanisms mediating the hypophagic effects of oleoylethanolamide and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamines: different lipid signals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Adele; Tempesta, Bianca; Provensi, Gustavo; Passani, Maria B; Gaetani, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    The spread of "obesity epidemic" and the poor efficacy of many anti-obesity therapies in the long-term highlight the need to develop novel efficacious therapy. This necessity stimulates a large research effort to find novel mechanisms controlling feeding and energy balance. Among these mechanisms a great deal of attention has been attracted by a family of phospholipid-derived signaling molecules that play an important role in the regulation of food-intake. They include N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamines (NAPEs). NAPEs have been considered for a long time simply as phospholipid precursors of the lipid mediator NAEs, but increasing body of evidence suggest a role in many physiological processes including the regulation of feeding behavior. Several observations demonstrated that among NAEs, oleoylethanolamide (OEA) acts as a satiety signal, which is generated in the intestine, upon the ingestion of fat, and signals to the central nervous system. At this level different neuronal pathways, including oxytocinergic, noradrenergic, and histaminergic neurons, seem to mediate its hypophagic action. Similarly to NAEs, NAPE (with particular reference to the N16:0 species) levels were shown to be regulated by the fed state and this finding was initially interpreted as fluctuations of NAE precursors. However, the observation that exogenously administered NAPEs are able to inhibit food intake, not only in normal rats and mice but also in mice lacking the enzyme that converts NAPEs into NAEs, supported the hypothesis of a role of NAPE in the regulation of feeding behavior. Indirect observations suggest that the hypophagic action of NAPEs might involve central mechanisms, although the molecular target remains unknown. The present paper reviews the role that OEA and NAPEs play in the mechanisms that control food intake, further supporting this group of phospholipids as optimal candidate for the development of novel anti-obesity treatments. PMID:26167152

  18. Climate change and its effect on reference crop evapotranspiration in central and western Inner Mongolia during 1961-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Di; Liu, Yaling; Pan, Zhihua; An, Pingli; Wang, Liwei; Dong, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingting; Pan, Xuebiao; Zhao, Peiyi

    2013-12-01

    Water resource is one of the major constraints to agricultural production in central and western Inner Mongolia, where are characteristic by arid and semi-arid climate. Reference crop evapotranspiration ( ET 0) is an important part of water cycle in agricultural ecosystem, which has a direct effect on crop growth and yield. The implications of climate change on ET 0 are of high importance for agriculture regarding water management and irrigation scheduling. The aim of this study was to analyze the variations in climate and its effect on ET 0 in central and western Inner Mongolia over the period 1961 to 2009. For this purpose, data in ten meteorological stations across study area were collected and the FAO Penman-Monteith 56 method was used. Results showed that the average temperature, maximum temperature and minimum temperature increased by 0.49°C, 0.31°C and 0.70°C per decade during 1961-2009, respectively. In comparison, the daily temperature range decreased by 0.38°C per decade. The air relative humidity, sunshine hour, and 10-m wind speed decreased generally by 0.58%, 40.11 h, and 0.35 m/s per decade, respectively. Annual mean ET 0 decreased significantly at a rate of 12.2 mm per decade over the periods, this was mainly due to the decrease in wind speed in the study area. The decrease in wind speed may balance the effect of the increase in air temperature on ET 0. Variations in spatial distribution of ET 0 and its main controlling factor were also detected among ten stations. Our results suggested that spatial and temporal distribution of ET 0 should be considered regarding the optimization of water resource management for agriculture in central and western Inner Mongolia under foreseen climate change.

  19. Central additive effect of Ginkgo biloba and rhodiola rosea on psychomotor vigilance task and short-term working memory accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hayder M. al-kuraishy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim: The present study investigates the effect of combined treatment with Ginkgo biloba and/or rhodiola rosea on psychomotor vigilance task and short-term working memory accuracy. Subjects and Methods: A total number of 112 volunteers was enrolled to study the effect of Ginkgo biloba and rhodiola rosea on psychomotor vigilance task and short-term working memory accuracy as compared to placebo effects,the central cognitive effect was assessed by Critical flicker-fusion frequency (CFFF, Psychomotor vigilance Task (PVT and computerized N-back test. Results: Placebo produced no significant effects on all neurocognitive tests measure p>0.05 in normal healthy volunteers, Ginkgo biloba or Rhodiola rosea improve psychomotor vigilance task and low to moderate working memory accuracy, The combined effect of Rhodiola rosea and Ginkgo biloba leading to more significant effect on psychomotor vigilance task, all levels of short term working memory accuracy and critical fusion versus flicker p<0.01, more than of Ginkgo biloba or Rhodiola rosea when they used alone. Conclusion: The combined effect of Rhodiola rosea and Ginkgo biloba leading to more significant effect on cognitive function than either Ginkgo biloba or Rhodiola rosea when they used alone. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2016; 5(1.000: 7-13

  20. Analysis and core-life calculation of 3 MW Triga Mark II research reactor including effects of central thimble modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal objective of this study was to formulate an effective optimal fuel management strategy for TRIGA MARK II research reactor at AERE, Savar. The core management study has been performed by utilizing four basic types of information calculated for the reactor: criticality, power peaking, neutron flux and burnup calculation. Reshuffling at 20,000 MWh step gives the longest core life of the reactor which is 64500 MWh. Central thimble modification altered the shape of the flux which increased the core reactivity by c 12 and the core-life by 500 MWh. Besides, the study gives valuable insight into the behaviour of the reactor

  1. Effects of pulsatile electrical stimulation of the round window on central hyperactivity after cochlear trauma in guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulders, W H A M; Spencer, T C; Robertson, D

    2016-05-01

    Partial hearing loss induced by acoustic trauma has been shown in animal models to result in an increased spontaneous firing rate in central auditory structures. This so-called hyperactivity has been suggested to be involved in the generation of tinnitus, a phantom auditory sensation. Although there is no universal cure for tinnitus, electrical stimulation of the cochlea, as achieved by a cochlear implant, can result in significant reduction of the tinnitus percept. However, the mechanism by which this tinnitus suppression occurs is as yet unknown and furthermore cochlear implantation may not be an optimal treatment option for tinnitus sufferers who are not profoundly deaf. A better understanding of the mechanism of tinnitus suppression by electrical stimulation of the cochlea, may lead to the development of more specialised devices for those for whom a cochlear implant is not appropriate. This study aimed to investigate the effects of electrical stimulation in the form of brief biphasic shocks delivered to the round window of the cochlea on the spontaneous firing rates of hyperactive inferior colliculus neurons following acoustic trauma in guinea pigs. Effects during the stimulation itself included both inhibition and excitation but spontaneous firing was suppressed for up to hundreds of ms after the cessation of the shock train in all sampled hyperactive neurons. Pharmacological block of olivocochlear efferent action on outer hair cells did not eliminate the prolonged suppression observed in inferior colliculus neurons, and it is therefore likely that activation of the afferent pathways is responsible for the central effects observed. PMID:26970475

  2. Effects of sciatic nerve transection on glucose uptake in the presence and absence of lactate in the frog dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigon, F; Horst, A; Kucharski, L C; Silva, R S M; Faccioni-Heuser, M C; Partata, W A

    2014-08-01

    Frogs have been used as an alternative model to study pain mechanisms because the simplicity of their nervous tissue and the phylogenetic aspect of this question. One of these models is the sciatic nerve transection (SNT), which mimics the clinical symptoms of "phantom limb", a condition that arises in humans after amputation or transverse spinal lesions. In mammals, the SNT increases glucose metabolism in the central nervous system, and the lactate generated appears to serve as an energy source for nerve cells. An answerable question is whether there is elevated glucose uptake in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after peripheral axotomy. As glucose is the major energy substrate for frog nervous tissue, and these animals accumulate lactic acid under some conditions, bullfrogs Lithobates catesbeianus were used to demonstrate the effect of SNT on DRG and spinal cord 1-[14C] 2-deoxy-D-glucose (14C-2-DG) uptake in the presence and absence of lactate. We also investigated the effect of this condition on the formation of 14CO2 from 14C-glucose and 14C-L-lactate, and plasmatic glucose and lactate levels. The 3-O-[14C] methyl-D-glucose (14C-3-OMG) uptake was used to demonstrate the steady-state tissue/medium glucose distribution ratio under these conditions. Three days after SNT, 14C-2-DG uptake increased, but 14C-3-OMG uptake remained steady. The increase in 14C-2-DG uptake was lower when lactate was added to the incubation medium. No change was found in glucose and lactate oxidation after SNT, but lactate and glucose levels in the blood were reduced. Thus, our results showed that SNT increased the glucose metabolism in the frog DRG and spinal cord. The effect of lactate on this uptake suggests that glucose is used in glycolytic pathways after SNT. PMID:25627385

  3. Effects of the Temporal Variability of Evapotranspiration on Hydrologic Simulation in Central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.

    2007-01-01

    The transient response of a hydrologic system can be of concern to water-resource managers, because it is often extreme relatively short-lived events, such as floods or droughts, that profoundly influence the management of the resource. The water available to a hydrologic system for stream flow and aquifer recharge is determined by the difference of precipitation and evapotranspiration (ET). As such, temporal variations in precipitation and ET determine the degree of influence each has on the transient response of the hydrologic system. Meteorological, ET, and hydrologic data collected from 1993 to 2003 and spanning 1- to 3 2/3 -year periods were used to develop a hydrologic model for each of five sites in central Florida. The sensitivities of simulated water levels and flows to simple approximations of ET were quantified and the adequacy of each ET approximation was assessed. ET was approximated by computing potential ET, using the Hargreaves and Priestley-Taylor equations, and applying vegetation coefficients to adjust the potential ET values to actual ET. The Hargreaves and Priestley-Taylor ET approximations were used in the calibrated hydrologic models while leaving all other model characteristics and parameter values unchanged. Two primary factors that influence how the temporal variability of ET affects hydrologic simulation in central Florida were identified: (1) stochastic character of precipitation and ET and (2) the ability of the local hydrologic system to attenuate variability in input stresses. Differences in the stochastic character of precipitation and ET, both the central location and spread of the data, result in substantial influence of precipitation on the quantity and timing of water available to the hydrologic system and a relatively small influence of ET. The temporal variability of ET was considerably less than that of precipitation at each site over a wide range of time scales (from daily to annual). However, when precipitation and ET are of

  4. Selective adenosine A2A receptor agonists and antagonists protect against spinal cord injury through peripheral and central effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito Emanuela

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Permanent functional deficits following spinal cord injury (SCI arise both from mechanical injury and from secondary tissue reactions involving inflammation. Enhanced release of adenosine and glutamate soon after SCI represents a component in the sequelae that may be responsible for resulting functional deficits. The role of adenosine A2A receptor in central ischemia/trauma is still to be elucidated. In our previous studies we have demonstrated that the adenosine A2A receptor-selective agonist CGS21680, systemically administered after SCI, protects from tissue damage, locomotor dysfunction and different inflammatory readouts. In this work we studied the effect of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261, systemically administered after SCI, on the same parameters. We investigated the hypothesis that the main action mechanism of agonists and antagonists is at peripheral or central sites. Methods Spinal trauma was induced by extradural compression of SC exposed via a four-level T5-T8 laminectomy in mouse. Three drug-dosing protocols were utilized: a short-term systemic administration by intraperitoneal injection, a chronic administration via osmotic minipump, and direct injection into the spinal cord. Results SCH58261, systemically administered (0.01 mg/kg intraperitoneal. 1, 6 and 10 hours after SCI, reduced demyelination and levels of TNF-α, Fas-L, PAR, Bax expression and activation of JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK 24 hours after SCI. Chronic SCH58261 administration, by mini-osmotic pump delivery for 10 days, improved the neurological deficit up to 10 days after SCI. Adenosine A2A receptors are physiologically expressed in the spinal cord by astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes. Soon after SCI (24 hours, these receptors showed enhanced expression in neurons. Both the A2A agonist and antagonist, administered intraperitoneally, reduced expression of the A2A receptor, ruling out the possibility that the

  5. Scale-dependent effects of a heterogeneous landscape on genetic differentiation in the Central American squirrel monkey (Saimiri oerstedii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E Blair

    Full Text Available Landscape genetic studies offer a fine-scale understanding of how habitat heterogeneity influences population genetic structure. We examined population genetic structure and conducted a landscape genetic analysis for the endangered Central American Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri oerstedii that lives in the fragmented, human-modified habitats of the Central Pacific region of Costa Rica. We analyzed non-invasively collected fecal samples from 244 individuals from 14 groups for 16 microsatellite markers. We found two geographically separate genetic clusters in the Central Pacific region with evidence of recent gene flow among them. We also found significant differentiation among groups of S. o. citrinellus using pairwise F(ST comparisons. These groups are in fragments of secondary forest separated by unsuitable "matrix" habitats such as cattle pasture, commercial African oil palm plantations, and human residential areas. We used an individual-based landscape genetic approach to measure spatial patterns of genetic variance while taking into account landscape heterogeneity. We found that large, commercial oil palm plantations represent moderate barriers to gene flow between populations, but cattle pastures, rivers, and residential areas do not. However, the influence of oil palm plantations on genetic variance was diminished when we restricted analyses to within population pairs, suggesting that their effect is scale-dependent and manifests during longer dispersal events among populations. We show that when landscape genetic methods are applied rigorously and at the right scale, they are sensitive enough to track population processes even in species with long, overlapping generations such as primates. Thus landscape genetic approaches are extremely valuable for the conservation management of a diverse array of endangered species in heterogeneous, human-modified habitats. Our results also stress the importance of explicitly considering the heterogeneity of

  6. Effects of Sweet Bee Venom on the Central Nervous System in Rats -using the Functional Observational Battery-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joong Chul An

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was performed to analyse the effects of Sweet Bee Venom(Sweet BV-pure melittin, the major component of honey bee venom on the central nervous system in rats. Methods: All experiments were conducted at Biotoxtech Company, a non-clinical studies authorized institution, under the regulations of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP. Male rats of 5 weeks old were chosen for this study and after confirming condition of rats was stable, Sweet BV was administered in thigh muscle of rats. And checked the effects of Sweet BV on the central nervous system using the functional observational battery (FOB, which is a neuro-toxicity screening assay composed of 30 descriptive, scalar, binary, and continuous endpoints. And home cage observations, home cage removal and handling, open field activity, sensorimotor reflex test/physiological measurements were conducted. Results: 1. In the home cage observation, there was not observed any abnormal signs in rats. 2. In the observation of open field activity, the reduction of number of unit areas crossed and rearing count was observed caused by Sweet BV treatment. 3. In the observation of handling reactivity, there was not observed any abnormal signs in rats. 4. In the observation of sensorimotor reflex tests/physiological measurements, there was not observed any neurotoxic signs in rats. 5. In the measurement of rectal temperature, treatment of Sweet BV did not showed great influences in the body temperature of rats. Conclusions: Above findings suggest that Sweet BV is relatively safe treatment in the central nervous system. But in the using of over dose, Sweet BV may the cause of local pain and disturbance of movement. Further studies on the subject should be conducted to yield more concrete evidences.

  7. Late effects of ionising radiation on the central nervous system of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis investigated the role of neuroglial cells in the pathogenesis of delayed radionecrosis of the rat central nervous system (CNS) for up to one year after irradiation. The observed radiation induced changes in the cell kinetics of the subependymal plate of the brain were considered to be important in the development of white matter necrosis. White matter necrosis was apparent in the dorsal, ventral and lateral columns of the cervical cord but in the lumbar cord necrosis was only observed in the nerve bundles of the nerve roots. The glial cell population of the cervical cord was not static and a loss of oligodendrocytes appeared to be important in the development of white matter necrosis. Schwann cells also appeared to be involved in the development of nerve root necrosis of the lumbar cord. It is concluded that a gradual loss of radiation damaged, slowly turning-over supporting cells is the mechanism resulting in the development of late radiation necrosis in the mammalian CNS. The applications of these findings are considered. (UK)

  8. Current climate change effects on the ground thermal regime in Central Yakutia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stepan Varlamov; Yuri Skachkov; Pavel Skryabin

    2014-01-01

    The-evolution-of-ground-thermal-state-has-been-studied-to-assess-impacts-of-current-climatic-warming-on-permafrost-in-Central-Yakutia.-The-analysis-of-long-term-data-of-regional-weather-stations-has-revealed-one-of-the-highest-increasing-trends-in-mean-annual-air-temperature-in-northern-Russia.-A-forecast-of-surface-air-temperature-fluctuations-has-been-made-by-applying-a-frequency-analysis-method.-Monitoring-of-ground-thermal-conditions-allows-us-to-identify-inter-annual-and-long-term-variability-among-a-wide-range-of-natural-conditions.-Experimental-research-has-indicated-a-long-term-dynamics-of-ground-thermal-state-evolution:-ground-temperatures-at-the-depth-of-zero-annual-amplitude-and-seasonally-thawed-layer-depth.-Long-term-variability-of-thaw-depth-shows-near-zero-to-weak-positive-trends-in-small-valleys-in-contrast-to-weak-negative-trends-on-slopes.-With-significant-climatic-warming,-the-thermal-state-of-near-surface-layers-of-permafrost-demonstrates-steadiness.-Anthropogenic-impacts-on-ground-thermal-regime-in-various-terrain-types-have-been-qualitatively-evaluated.-Clear-cutting,-ground-cover-stripping,-and-post-fire-deforestation-in-inter-alas-type-terrains-result-in-a-significant-increase-of-temperature-and-seasonal-ground-thaw-depth,-as-well-as-adverse-cryogenic-processes.-The-dynamics-of-mean-annual-ground-temperature-in-slash-and-burn-sites-have-been-evaluated-in-reference-to-stages-of-successive-vegetation-recovery.

  9. Stability of slim accretion discs - effects of central mass and viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slim accretion discs have a total luminosity of the order L/LE = m ∝ 1, where LE is the Eddington luminosity and m = M/Mc, where Mc is a critical accretion rate, related to the Teddington one. The local stability properties of such discs are examined, in the three-dimensional parameter space spanned by the (α, μ, m) axes, where α and μ are two viscosity parameters, and m = M/Msun the central mass. We suggest that various types of observed quasi-periodic behaviour may be connected with slim disc instabilities. If this turns out to be correct, the so-called normal and horizontal branch oscillations could be due to unstable thermal and acoustic modes, respectively. It is subsequently shown that some of the observed short-term (quasi-periodic) variability in active galactic nuclei may also originate from short-wavelength acoustic modes in the innermost region of the disc. Consequently, observational characteristics, in connection with stability theory, may yield estimates of basic accretion parameters. In the case of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 6814, this process seems to favour (α, μ, m, m) ≅ (0.5, 0, 106, 10-2). We finally conclude that this line of work may provide additional evidence for both accretion discs and black holes, in various compact sources. (orig.)

  10. The effects of delivery type and gender on intraocular pressure and central corneal thickness in newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Gursel Ozkurt

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To analyze intraocular pressure (IOP and central corneal thickness (CCT in newborns during the first 12 h of life. Methods: Forty-three newborns born by vaginal delivery (VD and 30 newborns born by cesarean section (CS were evaluated. IOP and CCT were measured using Tono-Pen and handheld pachymeter, respectively, at both the 5th minute after delivery and at the 12th h of life. Results: The mean IOP for the VD group was significantly higher than that of the CS group at both the 5th minute and 12th h (p =0.042 and p =0.018, respectively. In both groups, the IOP decreased by the 12th h, but the decrease was only significant for the CS group (p =0.020. The decrease in CCT over the 12 h was significant for both groups (p <0.001. In the VD and CS groups, the IOP values of the males were significantly higher than those of the females at the fifth minute only (p =0.024 and p =0.043, respectively. No other values were significantly different between the genders. Conclusions: Newborn IOP is affected by the mode of delivery and gender. A higher IOP was found in vaginally delivered newborns than in CS newborns for at least 12 h postpartum. CCT showed a significant decline within 12 h. Male newborns have significantly higher IOP values in the first minutes of life.

  11. Effect of two successive wildfires in Pinus halepensis stands of central Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Spanos

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We estimated differences, five years after a wildfire, in soil and vegetation between Pinus halepensis stands that were once burnt (1998 and stands that were burnt twice in a short time interval (1995 and 1998, in the area of Penteli, central Greece. The parameters monitored were the physical and chemical attributes of upper soil layer and the vegetation composition, density and height. The results showed that five years after the wildfire, soil pH did not differ between areas burnt once and twice, while the organic matter was higher in the once-burnt areas. The vegetation composition was similar in the two areas and the dominant species were those pre-existing the fire. On the contrary, vegetation density was considerably lower in the twice-burnt areas. The height of woody species oscillated in the same levels in the two areas. The plant community was composed mainly by resprouting species, like Quercus coccifera, Pistacia lentiscus, or Phillyrea latifolia, and less individuals from seed-regenerated species, like Pinus halepensis, Cistus monspeliensis, and C. creticus. It is suggested that the recurrence of wildfire affected negatively the ecosystem attributes, and contributed to the increased risk of degradation.

  12. Disentangling the relative effects of bushmeat availability on human nutrition in central Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, John E.; Olivero, Jesús; Real, Raimundo; Farfán, Miguel A.; Márquez, Ana L.; Vargas, J. Mario; Ziegler, Stefan; Wegmann, Martin; Brown, David; Margetts, Barrie; Nasi, Robert

    2015-02-01

    We studied links between human malnutrition and wild meat availability within the Rainforest Biotic Zone in central Africa. We distinguished two distinct hunted mammalian diversity distributions, one in the rainforest areas (Deep Rainforest Diversity, DRD) containing taxa of lower hunting sustainability, the other in the northern rainforest-savanna mosaic, with species of greater hunting potential (Marginal Rainforest Diversity, MRD). Wild meat availability, assessed by standing crop mammalian biomass, was greater in MRD than in DRD areas. Predicted bushmeat extraction was also higher in MRD areas. Despite this, stunting of children, a measure of human malnutrition, was greater in MRD areas. Structural equation modeling identified that, in MRD areas, mammal diversity fell away from urban areas, but proximity to these positively influenced higher stunting incidence. In DRD areas, remoteness and distance from dense human settlements and infrastructures explained lower stunting levels. Moreover, stunting was higher away from protected areas. Our results suggest that in MRD areas, forest wildlife rational use for better human nutrition is possible. By contrast, the relatively low human populations in DRD areas currently offer abundant opportunities for the continued protection of more vulnerable mammals and allow dietary needs of local populations to be met.

  13. Nonperturbative and spin effects in the central exclusive production of tensor \\chi_c(2^+) meson

    CERN Document Server

    Pasechnik, R S; Teryaev, O V

    2009-01-01

    We discuss central exclusive production (CEP) of the tensor $\\chi_c(2^{+})$ meson in proton-(anti)proton collisions at Tevatron, RHIC and LHC energies. The amplitude for the process is derived within the $k_t$-factorisation approach. Differential and total cross sections are calculated for several unintegrated gluon distributions (UGDFs). We compare exclusive production of all charmonium states $\\chi_c(0^+), \\chi_c(1^+)$ and $\\chi_c(2^+)$. Good description of the recent Tevatron data is achieved both with Martin-Ryskin phenomenological UGDF and UGDF based on unified BFKL-DGLAP approach. Unlike for Higgs production, the main contribution to the diffractive amplitude of heavy quarkonia comes from nonperturbative region of gluon transverse momenta $Q_{\\perp}<1 \\GeV$. At $y \\approx$ 0, we predict the contribution of $\\chi_c(1^+,2^+)$ to the $J/\\Psi + \\gamma$ channel to be larger than that of the $\\chi_c(0^+)$ one. This is partially due to a significant contribution from lower polarization states $\\lambda=0$ fo...

  14. Effects of stressors and immune activating agents on peripheral and central cytokines in mouse strains that differ in stressor responsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Julie; Hayley, Shawn; Poulter, Michael O; Anisman, Hymie

    2011-03-01

    The impact of inflammatory immune activation on behavioral and physiological processes varies with antecedent stressor experiences. We assessed whether immune activation would differentially influence such outcomes as a function of stressor reactivity related to genetic differences. To this end, we assessed the influence of a social stressor (exposure to a dominant mouse) in combination with an acute immune challenge on behavior and on peripheral and central cytokines in stressor-reactive BALB/cByJ mice and the less reactive C57BL/6ByJ strain. As C57BL/6ByJ and BALB/cByJ mice are highly T helper type-1 (Th1) and Th2 responsive, respectively, the stressor effects were assessed in response to different challenges, namely the viral analogue poly I:C and the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The stressor enhanced the effects of LPS on sickness behaviors and plasma corticosterone particularly in BALB/cByJ mice, whereas the effects of poly I:C, which primarily affects Th1 processes, were not augmented by the stressor. As well, the stressor increased circulating cytokines in LPS treated C57BL/6ByJ mice, whereas the effects of poly I:C were diminished. Finally, like circulating cytokines, mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines within the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus varied with the mouse strain and with the stressor experience, and with the specific cytokine considered. Together, the experiments indicated that the impact of stressors vary with the nature of the immune challenge to which animals had been exposed. Moreover, given the diversity of the stressor effects on central and peripheral processes, it seems likely that the cytokine changes, HPA activity and sickness operate through independent mechanisms. PMID:21093579

  15. The Effects of Lamotrigine on Pain, Sleep, and Mood in Refractory Form of Central Post-Stroke Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Petramfar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Central post-stroke pain (CPSP is a distressingpain syndrome, sometimes become refractory to the conventionalpain managements. Anticonvulsants have been used toalleviate different central pains. Lamotrigine is a novel anticonvulsantand its proper dosage and its efficacy have notbeen well studied yet. The aim of this study was to evaluatethe effect of 100 mg lamotrigine on refractory form of CPSP.Methods: The medical files of 17 patients with CPSP who hadnot responded to the other drugs and were treated with lamotriginewere studied. Using Brief Pain Inventory, pain, sleepand mood were assessed before, and after 8 and 24 weeks oftreatment.Results: After 24 weeks, 70.5 % of the patients responded tolamotrigine, and there was an improvement of 2.41 in themean score of average pain (P=0.001.Conclusion: Lamotrigine 100 mg daily was effective in thetreatment of refractory CPSP, and might be prescribed beforeplanning for more aggressive surgical managements.Iran J Med Sci 2010; 35(4: 299-303.

  16. In situ effects of simulated overfishing and eutrophication on settlement of benthic coral reef invertebrates in the Central Red Sea.

    KAUST Repository

    Jessen, Christian

    2014-04-08

    In the Central Red Sea, healthy coral reefs meet intense coastal development, but data on the effects of related stressors for reef functioning are lacking. This in situ study therefore investigated the independent and combined effects of simulated overfishing through predator/grazer exclusion and simulated eutrophication through fertilizer addition on settlement of reef associated invertebrates on light-exposed and -shaded tiles over 4 months. At the end of the study period invertebrates had almost exclusively colonized shaded tiles. Algae were superior settling competitors on light-exposed tiles. On the shaded tiles, simulated overfishing prevented settlement of hard corals, but significantly increased settlement of polychaetes, while simulated eutrophication only significantly decreased hard coral settlement relative to controls. The combined treatment significantly increased settlement of bryozoans and bivalves compared to controls and individual manipulations, but significantly decreased polychaetes compared to simulated overfishing. These results suggest settlement of polychaetes and hard corals as potential bioindicators for overfishing and eutrophication, respectively, and settlement of bivalves and bryozoans for a combination of both. Therefore, if the investigated stressors are not controlled, phase shifts from dominance by hard corals to that by other invertebrates may occur at shaded reef locations in the Central Red Sea.

  17. In situ effects of simulated overfishing and eutrophication on settlement of benthic coral reef invertebrates in the Central Red Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Jessen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the Central Red Sea, healthy coral reefs meet intense coastal development, but data on the effects of related stressors for reef functioning are lacking. This in situ study therefore investigated the independent and combined effects of simulated overfishing through predator/grazer exclusion and simulated eutrophication through fertilizer addition on settlement of reef associated invertebrates on light-exposed and -shaded tiles over 4 months. At the end of the study period invertebrates had almost exclusively colonized shaded tiles. Algae were superior settling competitors on light-exposed tiles. On the shaded tiles, simulated overfishing prevented settlement of hard corals, but significantly increased settlement of polychaetes, while simulated eutrophication only significantly decreased hard coral settlement relative to controls. The combined treatment significantly increased settlement of bryozoans and bivalves compared to controls and individual manipulations, but significantly decreased polychaetes compared to simulated overfishing. These results suggest settlement of polychaetes and hard corals as potential bioindicators for overfishing and eutrophication, respectively, and settlement of bivalves and bryozoans for a combination of both. Therefore, if the investigated stressors are not controlled, phase shifts from dominance by hard corals to that by other invertebrates may occur at shaded reef locations in the Central Red Sea.

  18. Central nervous system effects of haloperidol on THC in healthy male volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem-Moolenaar, Marieke; te Beek, Erik T; de Kam, Marieke L; Franson, Kari L; Kahn, René S; Hijman, Ron; Touw, Daan; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the hypothesis that haloperidol would lead to an amelioration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-induced 'psychotomimetic' effects was investigated. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, partial three-way crossover ascending dose study the effects of THC, haloperidol and their combinat

  19. Effects of legumes, fallow and wheat on subsequent wheat production in Central Anatolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen (N) and water are the main limiting factors for good wheat production in the Central Anatolia Region of Turkey. A traditional wheat-fallow cropping system is used by the majority of the farmers in the region. Inserting legumes in the rotation would, however, improve the soil fertility primarily through symbiotic N2-fixation. The main objectives of the present study were: a) to determine the N2-fixation capacity of lentil, vetch, chickpea and fodderpea in a legume-wheat rotation by using the A-value method of the 15N technique; b) to assess the amount of carry-over of N to wheat from the previous legume; c) to assess the water contribution of fallow, wheat and legumes to the following wheat under rainfed conditions by using 15N and neutron probe techniques. In order to achieve these goals field experiments were conducted in two years (1992 and 1993) at three different locations, Ankara, Eskishir and Konya. In 1992, for each experimental layout there were 7 treatments at each site consisting of 4 legume plots, 2 wheat plots and 1 fallow plot. Only the legume plots received labelled (15NH4)2SO4 fertilizer for their isotope sub-plots. In 1993, winter wheat (Gerek-79) was sown to all plots and the 15N labelled fertilizer was applied on the opposite sites of the 1992 experimental plots. These results make us to suggest a lentil-wheat rotation at Ankara and Eskisehir and a chickpea-wheat rotation at Konya. Meanwhile, the evaluation of the soil moisture balance at both Eskisehir and Ankara indicates that the winter lentil-wheat rotation should be preferred in these areas, due to more efficient use of water by the wheat crop after this rotation. 15 refs, 1 fig., 5 tabs

  20. [On factors that effect the variability of central mechanisms of bilingualism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruchinina, O V; Gal'perina, E I; Kats, E É; Shepoval'nikov, A N

    2012-01-01

    The article discusses the probable role of many factors that determine the individual variety of neurophysiological mechanisms, which provide the opportunity to learn and free use two or more languages. The formation of a speech functions is affected by both the general factors for bilinguals and monolinguals, as well as the specific characteristic of the situation of bilingualism. The general factors include genetic and environmental impact of explaining the diversity of individual options for the development of morphofunctional organization of speech functions. A bilinguals, obviously, have even more wide variance of the central maintenance of speech activity, due to the combination of different conditions that influence the language environment, which include the age of the second language acquisition, the language proficiency, linguistic closeness of the languages, the method of their acquisition, intensity of use and the scope of application of each of the languages. The influence of these factors can mediates in different ways by the individual characteristics of the bilingual's brain. Being exposed to two languages from the first days of life, the child uses for the development of speech skills of the unique features of the brain, which are available only in the initial stages of postnatal ontogenesis. In older age mastering a second language requires much more effort, when, as maturation, the brain acquires new additional possibilities, but permanently lose that special "bonus", which nature gives a small child only in the first months of life. Large individual variability patterns of activation of the cortex when verbal activity in late bilingual" compared with the "early", allows to assume, that the brain of "late bilingual", mastering a new language, forced to operate a large number of backup mechanisms, and this is reflected in the increase of variation in the cerebral processes, responsible for providing of speech functions. In addition, there is

  1. Delayed Effects of Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Germ Cell Tumor Patients With Central Nervous System Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Central nervous system (CNS) metastases are uncommon in patients with germ cell tumors, with an incidence of 2-3%. CNS metastases have been managed with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and concomitant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy. Our previous study did not observe serious CNS toxicity (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 1991;22:17-22). We now report on 5 patients who developed delayed significant CNS toxicity. Patients and Methods: We observed 5 patients with delayed CNS toxicity. The initial diagnosis was between 1981 and 2003. All patients had poor-risk disease according to the International Germ Cell Consensus Collaborative Group criteria. Of the 5 patients, 3 had CNS metastases at diagnosis and 2 developed relapses with CNS metastases. These 5 patients underwent WBRT to 4,000-5,000 cGy in 18-28 fractions concurrently with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Results: All 5 patients developed delayed symptoms consistent with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. The symptoms included seizures, hemiparesis, cranial neuropathy, headaches, blindness, dementia, and ataxia. The median time from WBRT to CNS symptoms was 72 months (range, 9-228). Head imaging revealed multiple abnormalities consistent with gliosis and diffuse cerebral atrophy. Of the 5 patients, 3 had progressive and 2 stable symptoms. Treatment with surgery and/or steroids had modest benefit. The progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy resulted in significant debility in all 5 patients, resulting in death (3 patients), loss of work, steroid-induced morbidity, and recurrent hospitalizations. Conclusion: Whole brain radiotherapy is not innocuous in young patients with germ cell tumors and can cause late CNS toxicity

  2. Late effects of ionizing radiations on central nervous system, spinal cord and peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the lack of characteristic features, demyelination is the dominant feature of radiation induced late effects observed in cerebral nervous system and spinal cord. Acute, subacute and chronic changes are described in terms of pathological, clinical and radiological observations. Brain necrosis in adults is rarely noted below 60 Gy in conventional fractionation, while imaging changes are observed with lower doses. The most widely observed dose limit for the spinal cord is 45 Gy, in absence of dose modifying chemotherapy. Tumor progression may be hard to distinguish from radio-chemotherapy effects. The potential protective role of hyperfractionation is not yet clearly established. Peripheral nerves late effects, although rare, are described. (authors)

  3. Effects legumes, Fallow and wheat on subsequent wheat production in Central Anatolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to determine the Nsub2-fixation capacities of lentil, vetch, chickpea and fodderpea in a legume-wheat rotation by using the A-value method of N15 technique, and to assess the amount of carry-over of N to wheat from the previous legume as well as water contribution of fallow, wheat and legumes to the following wheat under rainfed Central Anatolia conditions field experiments were conducted in 1992 and 1993 at three different provinces using completely randomized block design with 5 replications. Results we obtained showed that %Ndff values among legumesdid not differ significantly neither within or between locations. Legumesvaried significantly (P<0.05) in their %Ndfa values at each location and highest values of %Ndfa were obtained at Eskisehir. In general, %Ndfa varied from59-84, and 36-85 for chickpea,lentils and vetchs. The evaluation of the yield and N data obtained in 1993 indicated that lentil (winter or summer) -wheat rotation at Ankara and Eskisehir conditions and chickpea-wheat rotation at Konya conditions should be prefered, due to the higher seed and total yields, higher N yields and higher %NUE values obtained from these rotations in comparison to the others. In order to estimate the carry-over of nitrogen from legumes to the succeeding wheat crop, % nitrogen derived from unknown (%Ndfu) were also calculated. Highest amount of carry-over from the legumesto the succeeding wheat were 31.1 kgN/ha from summer lentil at Ankara; 16.9 kgN/ha from summer lentil at Eskisehir; and 8.0 kgN/ha from chickpea at Konya. These results obtined showed that a lentil-wheat rotation at Ankara and Eskisehir and a chickpea-wheat rotation at Konya. Mean while, the evaluation of the soil and WUE data at both Eskisehir and Ankara indicated that winter lentil-wheat rotation should be prefered in these areas due to more efficient use of water by wheat crop after this rotation system

  4. Biodiversity effects and rates of spread of nonnative eucalypt woodlands in central California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fork, Susanne; Woolfolk, Andrea; Akhavan, Antonia; Van Dyke, Eric; Murphy, Shirley; Candiloro, Bree; Newberry, Todd; Schreibman, Sondra; Salisbury, Joshua; Wasson, Kerstin

    2015-12-01

    Woodlands comprised of planted, nonnative trees are increasing in extent globally, while native woodlands continue to decline due to human activities. The ecological impacts of planted woodlands may include changes to the communities of understory plants and animals found among these nonnative trees relative to native woodlands, as well as invasion of adjacent habitat areas through spread beyond the originally planted areas. Eucalypts (Eucalyptus spp.) are among the most widely planted trees worldwide, and are very common in California, USA. The goals of our investigation were to compare the biological communities of nonnative eucalypt woodlands to native oak woodlands in coastal central California, and to examine whether planted eucalypt groves have increased in size over the past decades. We assessed site and habitat attributes and characterized biological communities using understory plant, ground-dwelling arthropod, amphibian, and bird communities as indicators. Degree of difference between native and nonnative woodlands depended on the indicator used. Eucalypts had significantly greater canopy height and cover, and significantly lower cover by perennial plants and species richness of arthropods than oaks. Community composition of arthropods also differed significantly between eucalypts and oaks. Eucalypts had marginally significantly deeper litter depth, lower abundance of native plants with ranges limited to western North America, and lower abundance of amphibians. In contrast to these differences, eucalypt and oak groves had very similar bird community composition, species richness, and abundance. We found no evidence of "invasional meltdown," documenting similar abundance and richness of nonnatives in eucalypt vs. oak woodlands. Our time-series analysis revealed that planted eucalypt groves increased 271% in size, on average, over six decades, invading adjacent areas. Our results inform science-based management of California woodlands, revealing that while

  5. Effect of Nelumbo nucifera Petal Extracts on Lipase, Adipogenesis, Adipolysis, and Central Receptors of Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekaran Chinampudur Velusami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available N. nucifera is one among the important medicinal plants assessed for its antiobesity action in various preclinical models. The present study was aimed at investigating the antiobesity effect of methanol and successive water extracts of petals of N. nucifera by studying its effect on adipogenesis, adipolysis, lipase, serotonin (5-HT2C, cannabinoid (CNR2, melanocyte concentrating hormone (MCHR1, and melanocortin (MC4R receptors. Both methanol and successive water extracts of N. nucifera petals had an effect on inhibition of lipid storage in adipocytes and on increasing lipolysis. N. nucifera petal methanol extract exhibited the concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on lipase activity with an IC50 value of 47 µg/mL. N. nucifera petal extracts showed evident agonist and antagonist activity towards 5-HT2C and CNR2 receptors, respectively, while it showed no effect towards MCHR1 and MC4R receptors. Overall, methanol extract of N. nucifera petals showed better activity than successive water extract.

  6. Effects of new roads on environmental resource use in the Central Himalaya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlery, Lindy Callen; Nielsen, Martin Reinhardt; Meilby, Henrik;

    2016-01-01

    construction), annual increment and annual wood extraction. Results show that the new road had significant positive effects on absolute household environmental income, but negative effects on reliance as other income options became available. Wood product extraction levels remained below increment levels......Construction of roads into remote rural areas can improve livelihoods by reducing transportation costs, but may also have negative environmental impacts, such as increased deforestation. However, evidence of the effect of rural roads on household environmental income and reliance, as well as local...... level forest stand conservation is limited. This study, conducted in Mustang District in Nepal, contributes to answering the following questions: (i) what are the impacts of the establishment of rural roads on household environmental income and reliance; (ii) what are the determinants of environmental...

  7. An animal model to study toxicity of central nervous system therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Effects on behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central nervous system prophylactic therapy used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia can reduce intelligence quotient scores and impair memory and attention in children. Cranial irradiation, intrathecal methotrexate, and steroids are commonly utilized in acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy. How they induce neurotoxicity is unknown. This study employs an animal model to explore the induction of neurotoxicity. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at 17 and 18 days of age were administered 18 mg/kg prednisolone, 2 mg/kg methotrexate, and 1000 cGy cranial irradiation. Another 18-day-old group was administered 1000 cGy cranial irradiation but no drugs. Matching controls received saline and/or a sham exposure to radiation. All animals at 6 weeks and 4 months of age were tested for alterations in spontaneous behavior. A computer pattern recognition system automatically recorded and classified individual behavioral acts displayed during exploration of a novel environment. Measures of behavioral initiations, total time, and time structure were used to compare treated and control animals. A permanent sex-specific change in the time structure of behavior was induced by the prednisolone, methotrexate, and radiation treatment but not by radiation alone. Unlike hyperactivity, the effect consisted of abnormal clustering and dispersion of acts in a pattern indicative of disrupted development of sexually dimorphic behavior. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an animal model delineating the agent/agents responsible for the neurotoxicity of central nervous system prophylactic therapy

  8. The antalgic effects of non-invasive physical modalities on central post-stroke pain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Chung; Chuang, Yu-Fen; Huang, Andrew Chih-Wei; Chen, Chih-Kuang; Chang, Ya-Ju

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study systematically reviewed the antalgic effects of non-invasive physical modalities (NIPMs) on central post-stroke pain (CPSP). [Subjects and Methods] Clinical studies were sought on September 2015 in 10 electronic databases, including Medline and Scopus. The searching strings were "central pain and stroke" and "treatment, and physical or non-pharmacological". The inclusion and exclusion criteria were set for screening the clinical articles by two reviewers. Pain scores on visual analog scale in an article were used as the outcome measure for resulting judgment. The NIPMs intervention summarized from the eligible articles was rated from Levels A to C according to Evidence Classification Scheme for Therapeutic Interventions. [Results] Over 1200 articles were identified in the initial searches and 85 studies were retrieved. Sixteen studies were eligible and judged. Caloric vestibular stimulation (n=3), heterotopic noxious conditioning stimulation (n=1), and transcutaneous electrical stimulation (n=1) were rated below Level C. Transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS; n=2) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS; n=9) were rated as Level B. [Conclusion] The findings suggest that TMS and TDCS were better than other treatments for CPSP relief but the studies were of insufficient quality. PMID:27190485

  9. An animal model to study toxicity of central nervous system therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Effects on behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullenix, P.J.; Kernan, W.J.; Tassinari, M.S.; Schunior, A.; Waber, D.P.; Howes, A.; Tarbell, N.J. (Forsyth Research Institute, Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-10-15

    Central nervous system prophylactic therapy used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia can reduce intelligence quotient scores and impair memory and attention in children. Cranial irradiation, intrathecal methotrexate, and steroids are commonly utilized in acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy. How they induce neurotoxicity is unknown. This study employs an animal model to explore the induction of neurotoxicity. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at 17 and 18 days of age were administered 18 mg/kg prednisolone, 2 mg/kg methotrexate, and 1000 cGy cranial irradiation. Another 18-day-old group was administered 1000 cGy cranial irradiation but no drugs. Matching controls received saline and/or a sham exposure to radiation. All animals at 6 weeks and 4 months of age were tested for alterations in spontaneous behavior. A computer pattern recognition system automatically recorded and classified individual behavioral acts displayed during exploration of a novel environment. Measures of behavioral initiations, total time, and time structure were used to compare treated and control animals. A permanent sex-specific change in the time structure of behavior was induced by the prednisolone, methotrexate, and radiation treatment but not by radiation alone. Unlike hyperactivity, the effect consisted of abnormal clustering and dispersion of acts in a pattern indicative of disrupted development of sexually dimorphic behavior. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an animal model delineating the agent/agents responsible for the neurotoxicity of central nervous system prophylactic therapy.

  10. Socioeconomic effects of power marketing alternatives for the Central Valley and Washoe Projects: 2005 regional econmic impact analysis using IMPLAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, D.M.; Godoy-Kain, P.; Gu, A.Y.; Ulibarri, C.A.

    1996-11-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) was founded by the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 to market and transmit federal hydroelectric power in 15 western states outside the Pacific Northwest, which is served by the Bonneville Power Administration. Western is divided into four independent Customer Service Regions including the Sierra Nevada Region (Sierra Nevada), the focus of this report. The Central Valley Project (CVP) and the Washoe Project provide the primary power resources marketed by Sierra Nevada. Sierra Nevada also purchases and markets power generated by the Bonneville Power Administration, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E), and various power pools. Sierra Nevada currently markets approximately 1,480 megawatts of power to 77 customers in northern and central California. These customers include investor-owned utilities, public utilities, government agencies, military bases, and irrigation districts. Methods and conclusions from an economic analysis are summarized concerning distributional effects of alternative actions that Sierra Nevada could take with it`s new marketing plan.

  11. The antalgic effects of non-invasive physical modalities on central post-stroke pain: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Chung; Chuang, Yu-Fen; Huang, Andrew Chih-Wei; Chen, Chih-Kuang; Chang, Ya-Ju

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study systematically reviewed the antalgic effects of non-invasive physical modalities (NIPMs) on central post-stroke pain (CPSP). [Subjects and Methods] Clinical studies were sought on September 2015 in 10 electronic databases, including Medline and Scopus. The searching strings were “central pain and stroke” and “treatment, and physical or non-pharmacological”. The inclusion and exclusion criteria were set for screening the clinical articles by two reviewers. Pain scores on visual analog scale in an article were used as the outcome measure for resulting judgment. The NIPMs intervention summarized from the eligible articles was rated from Levels A to C according to Evidence Classification Scheme for Therapeutic Interventions. [Results] Over 1200 articles were identified in the initial searches and 85 studies were retrieved. Sixteen studies were eligible and judged. Caloric vestibular stimulation (n=3), heterotopic noxious conditioning stimulation (n=1), and transcutaneous electrical stimulation (n=1) were rated below Level C. Transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS; n=2) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS; n=9) were rated as Level B. [Conclusion] The findings suggest that TMS and TDCS were better than other treatments for CPSP relief but the studies were of insufficient quality.

  12. Effects of central metal on electronic structure, magnetic properties, infrared and Raman spectra of double-decker phthalocyanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Oku, Takeo

    2016-09-01

    The effects of the central metal in double-decker metal phthalocyanine on the electronic structure, magnetic properties, and infrared and Raman spectra of the complex were investigated. Electron density distributions were delocalized on the phthalocyanine rings. The narrow energy gap and infrared peaks observed in the ultra-violet-visible-near infrared spectra of the systems were attributed to phthalocyanine ring-ring interactions the between overlapping π-orbitals on each ring. The chemical shift behavior of the phthalocyanine rings was separated by the deformation of their structure owing to nuclear magnetic interaction of the nuclear quadrupole interaction as determined by the electronic field gradient and asymmetric parameters. The magnetic parameters of principle g-tensors were dependent on the perturbation of the crystal field by the hybridization of the d-spin in the central metal conjugated with nitrogen ligands. In the case of the vanadyl system, the IR vibration modes were shifted by the soft vibration mode for resolving the symmetrical structure. Inactive Raman vibration modes arose from no-polarization on the phthalocyanine rings. Double-decker metal phthalocyanines have great advantages for the control of the magnetic mechanism for quantum spin entanglement in the relaxation process.

  13. The effect of participatory community communication on HIV preventive behaviors among ethnic minority youth in central Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Huy V

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Vietnam, socially marginalized groups such as ethnic minorities in mountainous areas are often difficult to engage in HIV research and prevention programs. This intervention study aimed to estimate the effect of participatory community communication (PCC on changing HIV preventive ideation and behavior among ethnic minority youth in a rural district from central Vietnam. Methods In a cross-sectional survey after the PCC intervention, using a structured questionnaire, 800 ethnic minority youth were approached for face-to-face interviews. Propensity score matching (PSM technique was then utilized to match these participants into two groups-intervention and control-for estimating the effect of the PCC. Results HIV preventive knowledge and ideation tended to increase as the level of recall changed accordingly. The campaign had a significant indirect effect on condom use through its effect on ideation or perceptions. When intervention and control group statistically equivalently reached in terms of individual and social characteristics by PSM, proportions of displaying HIV preventive knowledge, ideation and condom use were significantly higher in intervention group than in matched control counterparts, accounting for net differences of 7.4%, 12.7% and 5%, respectively, and can be translated into the number of 210; 361 and 142 ethnic minority youth in the population. Conclusions The study informs public health implications both theoretically and practically to guide effective HIV control programs for marginalized communities in resources-constrained settings like rural Vietnam and similar contexts of developing countries.

  14. Effects of chronic furosemide on central neural hyperactivity and cochlear thresholds after cochlear trauma in guinea pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelmina eMulders

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Increased neuronal spontaneous firing rates have been observed throughout the central auditory system after trauma to the cochlea and this hyperactivity is believed to be associated with the phantom perception of tinnitus. Previously we have shown in an animal model of hearing loss, that an acute injection with furosemide can significantly decrease hyperactivity after cochlear trauma and eliminate behavioural evidence of tinnitus of early onset. However, furosemide also has the potential to affect cochlear thresholds. In this paper we measured the effects of a chronic (daily injections for 7 days furosemide treatment on the spontaneous firing rate of inferior colliculus neurons and on cochlear thresholds in order to establish whether a beneficial effect on hyperactivity can be obtained without causing additional hearing loss. Guinea pigs were exposed to a 10 kHz, 124dB, 2 hour acoustic trauma, and after 5 days of recovery, were given daily i.p. injections of 80mg/kg furosemide or an equivalent amount of saline. The activity of single IC neurons was recorded 24 hours following the last injection. The furosemide treatment had no effect on cochlear thresholds compared to saline injections but did result in significant reductions in spontaneous firing rates recorded in inferior colliculus. These results that suggest a long term beneficial effect of furosemide on hyperactivity after cochlear trauma may be achievable without detrimental effects on hearing, which is important when considering therapeutic potential.

  15. Effect of aerobic exercise on insulin resistance and central adiposity disappeared after the discontinuation of intervention in overweight women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shenglong Le; Lijuan Mao; Dajiang Lu; Yifan Yang; Xiao Tan; Petri Wiklund; Sulin Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to assess whether the benefits of exercise on central adiposity and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) are maintained after discontinuation of intervention in the overweight/obese (OWOB) women. Methods: The study subjects were from 2 independent studies with similar aerobic exercise (AE) intervention programs. In study I, 15 OWOB postmenopausal women with pre-diabetes (body mass index, BMI=24–33 kg/m2, aged 52–65 years) completed an 8-month exercise intervention and were followed for 2 years after the intervention. In study II, 12 OWOB (BMI=25–35 kg/m2, aged 30–50 years) premenopausal women participated in a 6-week AE and were followed for 4 years after the intervention. The exercise program consisted of progressive AE with intensity of 60%–75%of initial fitness level, 30–60 min/time and 3–5 times/week. Fat mass (FM) was assessed by Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA Prodigy;study I) or bioelectrical impedance device (Inbody 720;study II). Plasma glucose and insulin were assessed by chemiluminescent immunoassay and HOMA-IR was calculated. Results: Both 8-month and 6-week moderate AE were effective in reducing HOMA-IR (−18.9%, p=0.012 and−26.7%, p=0.046, respectively), and 8-month AE reduced FM at upper abdominal region (−6.2%, p=0.021). However, these improvements were not maintained in either study at the follow-up. Conclusion: The AE program used in these studies was effective to reduce insulin resistance and/or FM in central body region among overweight and obese women. However, when exercise intervention was discontinued, the beneficial effects following both short-and long-term intervention disappeared. Thus maintaining exercise seems to be required if one wants to reap the benefits of exercise in the long-term.

  16. Dose-response characteristics of ketamine effect on locomotion, cognitive function and central neuronal activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imre, G; Fokkema, DS; Den Boer, JA; Ter Horst, GJ

    2006-01-01

    The present dose-response study sought to determine the effects of subanesthetic dosages (4-16 mg/kg) of ketamine on locomotion, sensorimotor gating (PP1), working memory, as well as c-fos expression in various limbic regions implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. In addition, we examined

  17. Central resistance to the inhibitory effects of leptin on stimulated insulin secretion with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzumdar, Radhika H; Ma, Xiaohui; Yang, Xiaoman; Atzmon, Gil; Barzilai, Nir

    2006-09-01

    Aging is associated with resistance to the effects of leptin on food intake and energy homeostasis. We examined if old rats were resistant to the effects of leptin on glucose stimulated insulin secretion. When leptin was infused intravenously (0.5 microg/kg/min) under hyperglycemic clamp conditions (11 mM) in young (n=5) and old rats (n=10, 5 ad libitum fed and five with surgical removal of visceral fat), glucose stimulated insulin secretion was significantly decreased by 44% in the young rats, but not in old rats (31.8+/-2.8 to 17.9+/-1.0 versus 33.7+/-1.4 versus 31.0+/-1.7 and 24.7+/-1.6 versus 21.0+/-2.8 in young versus old versus old VF- respectively, p<0.01). To identify if the resistance to leptin is secondary to impaired transport across the blood brain barrier (BBB), we infused leptin into the third ventricle (intra-cerebro ventricular, ICV). ICV infusion of leptin elicited a partial effect on glucose stimulated insulin secretion in the old (25.7+/-2.5 to 15.4+/-2.4 versus 24.4+/-2.4 to 19.0+/-2.0 in young versus old, respectively) suggesting that part of the leptin resistance was beyond the BBB. Resistance to the effects of leptin on insulin secretion in aging may protect against the onset of diabetes in old subjects. PMID:16122839

  18. Effects of Communication Competence and Social Network Centralities on Learner Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Il-Hyun; Kang, Stephanie; Yoon, Meehyun

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative learning has become a dominant learning apparatus for higher level learning objectives. Much of the psychological and social mechanisms operating under this complex group activity, however, is not yet well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of college students' communication competence and…

  19. Effects of peripheral and central bombesin on feeding behavior of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, J; Kulkosky, P J; Smith, G P

    1981-01-01

    Intraperitoneal injections of tetradecapeptide bombesin (BBS) produced large, dose-related suppressions of liquid and solid food intake in rats, with threshold doses of 1--2 micrograms-kg-1. The feeding-associated behaviors of rats receiving BBS by this route at a test meal were normally sequenced, and several other observations suggested that the effect of BBS was specific and not due to malaise. The structurally related amphibian peptide litorin and the structurally related mammalian gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) produced similar suppressions of food intake. The satiety effect of BBS administered intraperitoneally did not require the accumulation of food in the gut, the presence of intact adrenals, the abdominal vagus, or the release of cholecystokinin. When BBS and cholecystokinin were administered simultaneous, the suppressive effects on food intake were additive. Lateral cerebroventricular injections of BBS also produced large, dose-related suppressions of food intake, with a threshold dose of 100 ng per rat. The effect by this route, however, was not behaviorally specific: BBS produced equivalent inhibitions of food and water intake at every point on the dose-response curve, and produced a marked increase in grooming which dominated the behavioral display. Thus, (1) peripheral BBS is a putative satiety signal in the rat; (2) the class (endocrine, paracrine, or neural) and mechanism of this satiety action is not established; and (3) the differences in specificity and behavior following intraperitoneal and cerebroventricular routes indicate that peripheral BBS does not act solely via the cerebrospinal fluid to elicity satiety. PMID:6283491

  20. Effects of new roads on environmental resource use in the Central Himalaya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlery, Lindy Callen; Nielsen, Martin Reinhardt; Meilby, Henrik;

    2016-01-01

    Construction of roads into remote rural areas can improve livelihoods by reducing transportation costs, but may also have negative environmental impacts, such as increased deforestation. However, evidence of the effect of rural roads on household environmental income and reliance, as well as local...

  1. Poultry Litter Application Time Effect on Nutrient Availability and Corn Yield In Central Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the growing interest in poultry litter use as nutrient sources, knowledge of whether application time is consequential to production is pertinent. This study investigated the effects of fall and spring application of two rates (9 and 18 mega grams per ha) of poultry litter and a 19-19-19 NPK b...

  2. EFFECTS OF TRIMETHYLTIN ON DOPAMINERGIC AND SEROTONERGIC FUNCTION IN THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of trimethyltin (TMT) administration on regional concentrations of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), and their metabolites were determined. Acute administration of 3 or 7 mg/kg TMT (as the chloride) to adult male Long-Evans rats caused alterations in both dopaminergic ...

  3. Effects of romurtide on granulocytopenia due to radiation therapy for central nervous system tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preventive effect of romurtide [MDP-Lys(L18)] on leukocytopenia and thrombocytopenia due to radiotherapy was investigated in 20 patients with cerebral or spinal tumors. Complete blood counts and serum levels of cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin-1β, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, were also examined. Clinical efficacy was judged by whether radiotherapy could be administered without interruption or suspension. Radiotherapy was completed in 17 cases. On the basis of increased serum TNFα levels after romurtide injection, romurtide may enhance TNFα production. However, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-1β were not detected in serum even after romurtide injection. The results indicate that romurtide has a preventive effect on leukocytopenia and can induce production of oncocytotoxic cytokines. (author)

  4. Effects of Supermarkets on Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Small-Scale Farmers in Central Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Riungu, Claris Karimi

    2011-01-01

    Supermarkets have been spreading very rapidly in developing countries for the past decade. Kenya is the second advanced country in terms of presence of supermarkets, after South Africa. Supermarkets in Kenya have been increasing tremendously since 2003 and thus competition has increased. Growth in supermarket business has involved increase in the variety of products offered for sale, including agricultural produce. The effect of supermarkets on small-scale farmers has not been assessed. The m...

  5. Effects of New Roads on Environmental Resource Use in the Central Himalaya

    OpenAIRE

    Lindy Charlery; Nielsen, Martin R.; Henrik Meilby; Carsten Smith-Hall

    2016-01-01

    Construction of roads into remote rural areas can improve livelihoods by reducing transportation costs, but may also have negative environmental impacts, such as increased deforestation. However, evidence of the effect of rural roads on household environmental income and reliance, as well as local level forest stand conservation is limited. This study, conducted in Mustang District in Nepal, contributes to answering the following questions: (i) what are the impacts of the establishment of rur...

  6. Topographic Effects in Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis: The Case of Narni, Central Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Barani, Simone; Università Genova; Massa, Marco; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Milano-Pavia, Milano, Italia; Lovati, Sara; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Milano-Pavia, Milano, Italia; Ferretti, Gabriele; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Milano-Pavia, Milano, Italia

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a probabilistic method for estimating the ground motion hazard at sites presenting topographic irregularities. This method is applicable to topographic crests or ridges which may affect site response, producing 2D (or 3D) amplification effects. The method is based on a set of 2D numerical analyses that are carried out using multiple accelerograms from worldwide weak and strong earthquakes recorded on rock. Numerical analyses are performed to compute site-specif...

  7. Targeting Conservation Activities: Cost-effective Wetlands Restoration in the Central Valley of California

    OpenAIRE

    Newbold, Stephen C.

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation is about the public benefits that wetlands can provide and how those benefits depend on where wetlands are located in the landscape. The two broad objectives of the research were (1) to further our understanding of the role that landscape configuration plays in the provision of ecosystem services from wetlands, and (2) to enhance our practical ability to account for spatial effects and tradeoffs between competing environmental goals when evaluating, designing, and implement...

  8. Effect of Sulfonylureas Administered Centrally on the Blood Glucose Level in Immobilization Stress Model

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Naveen; Sim, Yun-Beom; Park, Soo-hyun; Lim, Su-Min; Kim, Sung-Su; Jung, Jun-Sub; Hong, Jae-Seung; Suh, Hong-Won

    2015-01-01

    Sulfonylureas are widely used as an antidiabetic drug. In the present study, the effects of sulfonylurea administered supraspinally on immobilization stress-induced blood glucose level were studied in ICR mice. Mice were once enforced into immobilization stress for 30 min and returned to the cage. The blood glucose level was measured 30, 60, and 120 min after immobilization stress initiation. We found that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection with 30 µg of glyburide, glipizide, glimepir...

  9. Effect of Central Antileptin Antibody on the Onset of Female Rat Puberty

    OpenAIRE

    Ruimin Chen; Gail J. Mick; Rongxian Xu; Daoxin Zheng; Yanfeng Fan; Xiangquan Lin; McCormick, Kenneth L.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV) antileptin antibody on the onset of puberty in the female rat and the relationship between serum leptin, luteinizing hormone (LH), and body weight were investigated. Antileptin antibody (group A) was infused ICV from days 23–36 in prepubertal female rats whereas the control (group B) received ICV goat immunoglobulin G (IgG). In the antileptin group, mean day of vaginal opening (VO) was postponed (day 34 versus day 30, P<.01 ). Body weig...

  10. Effects of New Roads on Environmental Resource Use in the Central Himalaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindy Charlery

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Construction of roads into remote rural areas can improve livelihoods by reducing transportation costs, but may also have negative environmental impacts, such as increased deforestation. However, evidence of the effect of rural roads on household environmental income and reliance, as well as local level forest stand conservation is limited. This study, conducted in Mustang District in Nepal, contributes to answering the following questions: (i what are the impacts of the establishment of rural roads on household environmental income and reliance; (ii what are the determinants of environmental income and reliance, and how are they affected by road establishment; and (iii what are the short-term impacts of the construction of a rural road on local forest conservation? Following the Poverty Environment Network (PEN methodology, income data from 176 randomly-sampled households were collected in 2006 from two similar Himalayan villages, Lete and Lulang, and again in 2012 after a new road was constructed in 2008 in Lete. Forest strata data were collected in Lete through permanent sample plots (n = 59 measured in 2005 and 2010 and used to estimate stock change (before and after road construction, annual increment and annual wood extraction. Results show that the new road had significant positive effects on absolute household environmental income, but negative effects on reliance as other income options became available. Wood product extraction levels remained below increment levels, indicating that the road did not (yet have negative implications for local forest conservation.

  11. On the Effects of Central Japan Expressway's Commuter Toll Discount Policy in Nagoya Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING Jiangqian; Ryosuke Ando

    2007-01-01

    Road pricing policies have two equally important objectives that have to be considered: the optimal use of the road network and the fiscal sustainability for the management of the network. The aim of this work is to examine the effects on these two objectives of a recent pricing policy implemented in Japan's expressway networks. Recently the Nippon (Japan) Expressway Companies (NEXCO, operators of Japan's nation wide expressway network) have implemented several toll discount policies for users equipped with electronic toll collectors (ETCs). One of the policies is the commuter discount policy that discounts 50% for a journey on the NEXCO expressway no longer than 100 km during the commuting peak hours. This paper examines its effect on congestion reduction in the road network of Nagoya area and its influence on the use of expressways operated by another major local public expressway company in Nagoya. The congestion easing effect of this policy is compared with a potential marginal cost pricing scheme. These observations suggest that policy coordination regarding toll levels is needed for expressway corporations and transportation authorities for improving transportation efficiency of utilization of the whole network.

  12. Different central effects of needle rotation in false and real acupoints on functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observed the cerebral activation patterns under different acupuncture stimuli by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Methods: The cortical activation patterns on fMRI during stimulation of two real (LIV3 and GB40) and one sham acupoints were investigated in 13 healthy subjects, they were punctured in a randomized fashion and for the subjects blinded order employing a) rotating and b) non-rotating methods using a blocked paradigm on a 1.5 T scanner. Results: Only during stimulation of the real acupoints, differential effects were observed, namely on LIV3 an increase of activation within both parietal cortices Brodmann's area (BA) 40, right frontal cortices BA47 and BA10, right thalamus, and left cerebellum; on GB40 an increase of activation within both parietal BA40, right parietal BA2, left frontal BA9, 10, 44, left insula cortices BA13, left temporal cortices BA22, right temporal BA42, right putamen, and left cerebellum. When doing the same contrast in the sham point, there were no suprathreshold voxels. The rotating needle strengthened the effects of acupuncture (the so-called De-Qi) only in real acupoints. Conclusion: Acupuncture seems to result in specific cerebral activation patterns which might explain its therapeutic effects in specific subjects. (author)

  13. Neuroimaging and Neuromonitoring Effects of Electro and Manual Acupuncture on the Central Nervous System: A Literature Review and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffold, Brigitte Elisabeth; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Litscher, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the different effects of manual and electroacupuncture on the central nervous system in studies with different neuroimaging interventions. The Database PubMed was searched from 1/1/2000 to 1/6/2014 with restriction to human studies in English language. Data collection for functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) studies was restricted to the period from 1/1/2010 to 1/6/2014 due to a recently published review which included all published randomized and nonrandomized controlled clinical studies as well as observational studies with control groups, no blinding required. Only studies comparing manual or electroacupuncture with sham acupuncture were eligible. All participants were healthy adult men and women. A majority of 25 studies compared manual versus sham, a minority of 7 trials compared electro versus sham and only 1 study compared electro versus manual acupuncture. In 29 out of 33 studies verum acupuncture results were found to present either more or different modulation effects on neurological components measured by neuroimaging and neuromonitoring methods than sham acupuncture. Only four studies reported no effects of verum in comparison to sham acupuncture. Evaluation of the very heterogeneous results shows evidence that verum acupuncture elicits more modulation effects on neurological components than sham acupuncture. PMID:26339269

  14. Libidibia ferrea Mature Seeds Promote Antinociceptive Effect by Peripheral and Central Pathway: Possible Involvement of Opioid and Cholinergic Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Armando Sawada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Libidibia ferrea (LF is a medicinal plant that holds many pharmacological properties. We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF, partially elucidating their mechanisms. Histochemical tests and Gas chromatography of the LPLF were performed to characterize its fatty acids. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, formalin-induced pain, and hot-plate test in mice were employed in the study. In all experiments, aqueous extract or LPLF was administered systemically at the doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg. LF aqueous seed extract and LPLF demonstrated a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all tests indicating both peripheral anti-inflammatory and central analgesia properties. Also, the use of atropine (5 mg/kg, naloxone (5 mg/kg in the abdominal writhing test was able to reverse the antinociceptive effect of the LPLF, indicating that at least one of LF lipids components is responsible for the dose related antinociceptive action in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. Together, the present results suggested that Libidibia ferrea induced antinociceptive activity is possibly related to its ability to inhibit opioid, cholinergic receptors, and cyclooxygenase-2 pathway, since its main component, linoleic acid, has been demonstrated to produce such effect in previous studies.

  15. Libidibia ferrea Mature Seeds Promote Antinociceptive Effect by Peripheral and Central Pathway: Possible Involvement of Opioid and Cholinergic Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Luis Armando; Monteiro, Vanessa Sâmia da Conçeição; Rabelo, Guilherme Rodrigues; Dias, Germana Bueno; Da Cunha, Maura; do Nascimento, José Luiz Martins; Bastos, Gilmara de Nazareth Tavares

    2014-01-01

    Libidibia ferrea (LF) is a medicinal plant that holds many pharmacological properties. We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF), partially elucidating their mechanisms. Histochemical tests and Gas chromatography of the LPLF were performed to characterize its fatty acids. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, formalin-induced pain, and hot-plate test in mice were employed in the study. In all experiments, aqueous extract or LPLF was administered systemically at the doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg. LF aqueous seed extract and LPLF demonstrated a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all tests indicating both peripheral anti-inflammatory and central analgesia properties. Also, the use of atropine (5 mg/kg), naloxone (5 mg/kg) in the abdominal writhing test was able to reverse the antinociceptive effect of the LPLF, indicating that at least one of LF lipids components is responsible for the dose related antinociceptive action in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. Together, the present results suggested that Libidibia ferrea induced antinociceptive activity is possibly related to its ability to inhibit opioid, cholinergic receptors, and cyclooxygenase-2 pathway, since its main component, linoleic acid, has been demonstrated to produce such effect in previous studies. PMID:24860820

  16. Effects of terrace construction on runoff and erosion in a recently burnt forest area in north-central Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.S. Martins

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In present-day Portugal, wildfires are a common phenomenon that, on average, affects some 100.000 ha of forest lands each year. Fires can markedly increase runoff generation and the associated sediment transport, nevertheless the magnitude of these impacts strongly depends on post-fire forestry management practices. This study evaluates the effect of terrace construction on runoff and erosion at micro-plot and catchment scale, six months after a wildfire in a forest area in north central Portugal. At the micro-plot scale, there was a clear trend for greater runoff volumes and sediment losses after the construction of terraces. In addition, pre-terracing sediment losses showed a visible relationship with rainfall amounts unlike post-terracing losses. At the catchment scale, an increase in sediment losses was observed after terracing consistently with micro-plot data.

  17. Management effectiveness and land cover change in dynamic cultural landscapes-assessing a central European biosphere reserve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohnesorge, B.; Plieninger, Tobias; Hostert, P.

    2013-01-01

    assess the effectiveness of Central European reserves in meeting their land cover related management goals. Based on digital biotope maps, we defined and assessed land cover change processes that were relevant to the reserve management's goals over a period of 13 years. We then compared these changes in...... approximately 85% across all zones-differences in land cover changes can be more prominent across zones inside the reserve than between the areas inside and outside of it. The reserve as a whole performed better than the surrounding reference area when using land cover related management goals as a benchmark...... the reserve's core, buffer, and transition zones and in a surrounding reference area by means of a geographical information system. (Un-)desirable key processes related to management aims were defined and compared for the various zones. We found that-despite an overall land cover persistence of...

  18. An Investigation of the Effects of Maternal Separation and Novelty on Central Mechanisms Mediating Pituitary-Adrenal Activity in Infant Guinea Pigs (Cavia porcellus)

    OpenAIRE

    Maken, Deborah S.; Weinberg, Joanne; Cool, David R.; Hennessy, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    In mammalian species in which the young exhibit a strong filial attachment (e.g., monkeys, guinea pigs), numerous studies have shown that even brief separation from the attachment figure potently elevates circulating concentrations of glucocorticoids and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). However, effects of separation on central regulation of this stress response are not known. Therefore, we investigated central mechanisms mediating pituitary-adrenal activation during maternal separation an...

  19. Experimental animal studies on effects of hyperthermia on the central nervous system: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: From the experimental studies reported in the literature it may be concluded that the maximum tolerable heat dose in CNS is 42oC to 42.5oC for 40 to 60 min or 43oC for 10 to 30 min. This in spite of diversity in animal species studied, as well as the different endpoints for assessment of effects, the different parts of CNS treated, differences in procedures used for anesthesia, thermometry and heating techniques applied. The effects of hyperthermia are expressed immediately or within a few days after treatment and heat injury to neural tissue apparently results in neurological abnormalities which, unless lethal, are transient in most cases. Histological studies show irreversible lesions after high heat dose, characterized by coagulation necrosis. Thermal injury to normal neural tissue is repaired by fibrotic or gliotic scarring. Surviving neuronal elements my be responsible for functional recovery from heat injury, which is, however, dependent on the injured volume and anatomical site of the lesion. Hence, the data indicate a correlation between the exposed volume and toxicity of the heat treatment. The relatively high heat dose tolerated in interstitial heating can be ascribed to this volume effect, since the heated volume of normal neural tissue generally was small and not responsible for vital functions. Late effects, many months after treatment have not been reported. The spinal cord data on maximum tolerable heat dose, point in the same direction as the data on the brain. All studies show that, as with brain, the spinal cord is sensitive to heat. The maximum tolerated heat dose of the cervical part after local hyperthermia lies in the range of 40-60 min at 42-42.5oC, or less than 30 min at 43oC. No late effects were reported. The observations on neurology and heat sensitivity of the spinal cord in mice are very similar to those of the rat. There is good evidence indicating that white matter is more heat resistant than grey matter as data on the rat

  20. Effect of TENS on pain in relation to central sensitization in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beckwée David

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central sensitization has recently been documented in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OAk. So far, the presence of central sensitization has not been considered as a confounding factor in studies assessing the pain inhibitory effect of tens on osteoarthritis of the knee. The purpose of this study is to explore the pain inhibitory effect of burst tens in OAk patients and to explore the prognostic value of central sensitization on the pain inhibitory effect of tens in OAk patients. Methods Patients with knee pain due to OAk will be recruited through advertisements in local media. Temporal summation, before and after a heterotopic noxious conditioning stimulation, will be measured. In addition, pain on a numeric rating score, WOMAC subscores for pain and function and global perceived effect will be assessed. Patients will be randomly allocated to one of two treatment groups (tens, sham tens. Follow-up measurements will be scheduled after a period of 6 and 12 weeks. Discussion Tens influences pain through the electrical stimulation of low-threshold A-beta cutaneous fibers. The responsiveness of central pain-signaling neurons of centrally sensitized OAk patients may be augmented to the input of these electrical stimuli. This would encompass an adverse therapy effect of tens. To increase treatment effectiveness it might be interesting to identify a subgroup of symptomatic OAk patients, i.e., non-sensitized patients, who are likely to benefit from burst tens. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01390285

  1. Differential Effects of Pesticide Applications on Liriomyza huidobrensis (Diptera: Agromyzidae) and its Parasitoids on Pea in Central Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guantai, M M; Ogol, C P K O; Salifu, D; Kasina, J M; Akutse, K S; Fiaboe, K K M

    2015-04-01

    Three Liriomyza species [Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard), Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), and Liriomyza sativae Blanchard] have been reported as the most important leafminer pests in vegetable production systems in Africa. In Kenya, farmers rely on indiscriminate synthetic insecticides use. On-farm field investigations were set up at three different locations (Sagana, Kabaru, and Naromoru) in central Kenya to determine the effect of pesticide application on the abundance of leafminers and their parasitoids under three management practices, namely: farmer practice (FP), reduced pesticide use (RP), and a control with no use of pesticides (CO). In addition, laboratory experiments were designed to test the effect of commonly used pesticides in pea production systems in central Kenya--Dimethoate, Dynamec, Thunder, Cyclone, Bestox, Folicur, Milraz, and Bulldock--on L. huidobrensis and two of its parasitoids, Diglyphus isaea Walker and Phaedrotoma scabriventris Nixon. The mean numbers of leafminer flies in control treatment were higher than in RP and FP in both first and second seasons across all sites, but RP and FP did not differ significantly. Parasitoid numbers were very low and there was no much variation between treatments at each location in both first and second seasons. No significant differences were observed between the three management practices with regards to the yield measurements. In the laboratory, the estimated LD50 values for L. huidobrensis larvae were all more than two times higher than the recommended dosages, while the LD50 of adults were below the recommended dosages. The estimated LD50 values for the parasitoids were much lower than recommended dosages for all pesticides except Thunder. This study, therefore, demonstrates that the pesticides currently used do not control the Liriomyza leafminer larvae that constitute the most destructive stage of the pest, but are rather detrimental to their parasitoids. In addition, the current low level of

  2. The subtle central effect of nutraceuticals: Is it placebo or nocebo?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali I. Al-Gareeb

    2015-09-01

    Subjects and methods: This is a randomized, double-blind, controlled, and prospective study conducted in the Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Al-Mustansiriya University, Baghdad, Iraq during February 2013. One hundred sixty medical students participated in the study were randomly assigned equally to one of the following groups: Group A: received single dose of nigella sativa oil (500 ml capsule;Group B: received single dose of garlic (500 mg capsule; Group C: received single dose of Coq10 (120 mg capsule and; Group D: received single dose of matching oral placebo (300mg starchc capsule. For all participants, reaction time and flicker fusion threshold were measured by the Leeds psychomotor performance test battery before and after 3 hours of taking the drugs Results: Neither placebo nor nutraceuticals exerted significant effect on total reaction time. Although the recognition reaction time is insignificantly reduced by 2.77% (placebo, 5.83% (Nigella savita, 7.21% (Garlic and 12.64% (CoQ10 from the pretreatment values, they are adversely affect the motor reaction time to reach the significant level in subjects pretreated with Garlic (p=0.02. Conclusion: Nutraceuticals are not free from nocebo effect on psychomotor performance. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2015; 4(3.000: 221-223

  3. Prediction of solar induced currents and effects on power transmission systems in central Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, W. R.; Boerner, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    The auroral-electrojet zone covers three quarters of Manitoba and consequently, solar storms strongly affect transmission lines. Harmonics are generated at transformers due to the saturation of their cores by induced currents, and the level of harmonics produced may cause malfunction of control relays, and yield unacceptable distortions in normal ac waveforms. The expected effects of long ac transmission systems were studied with emphasis on a 500 kv line to be built from Winnipeg to Minneapolis-St. Paul. Spectral analysis of induced current records from Manitoba Hydro's LaVerendrye station and magnetograms from IMS stations in Manitoba were used along with results of Campbell's work on the Alaskan pipeline induction problem (1978) in order to predict periodic and surge currents. It is concluded that the surge currents will produce significant levels of harmonics and corresponding operating problems during magnetic storms.

  4. THE EFFECT OF BUSINESS FIRMS’ INTERNATIONAL ACTIVITIES ON THE FIRM PERFORMANCE: A CENTRAL BLACK SEA REGION CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkut ALTINDAG

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of business firms carrying on business in Central Black Sea Region of Turkey on the performance of these firms. Especially how it affected SMEs (Small and Medium Sized Enterprises was analyzed. When particularly considering the effects of business that have SME quality on economy of Turkey, such kind of researches are noticed to have a basis in recent years. The research depended upon the data obtained from enterprises through original qualified questionnaire. The questionnaire question forms were scaled benefiting from the studies in the literature based upon international activities and business performance measurement. For all variables, the scales in the literature were taken and included into research questionnaire. The questionnaires were performed to SMEs and large-scale enterprises. In the research factor analysis, correlation and regression analysis were included as analysis methods. According to the obtained results, it was determined that international activities had a positive effect on the performance of enterprises. The results were interpreted, and various suggestions were offered to academicians, and administrators.

  5. The effect of precipitation and temperature anomalies for the Central-European forests based on Collection 6 MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Anikó; Marjanović, Hrvoje; Dobor, Laura; Barcza, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    Forest phenology and productivity is intimately linked with the actual weather conditions, and in the long term with the local climate. Our current understanding on the environmental control on spring leaf-out and autumn senescence is incomplete. Causes of the interannual variability of tree growth and forest carbon balance are not well understood as well. Satellite remote sensing provides a feasible way to monitor and study the changes of forest functioning in general and to understand its relationship with the climate fluctuations. In the presented study the latest version (Collection 6) of the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) products calculated from measurements of the MODIS sensor onboard the NASA Terra and Aqua satellites are used to characterize forest activity and its interannual variability in Central Europe (Hungary and Croatia). The applied EVI and NDVI dataset is part of the MOD13 product of NASA and covers the 2000-2015 time period. The newest, Collection 6 dataset is free from the sensor degradation effect (that was present in previous versions) which can contribute to the better characterization of the changes in forest phenology. Using the FORESEE climatological database the effects of drought is studied on the NDVI and EVI variations. Possible lagged effect of severe drought on NDVI variability during the consecutive years is studied at the selected sites. Drivers of forest phenology are studied in terms of linear relationships between temperature and onset/offset of the growing season.

  6. Threshold Effect of Capital Structure on Firm Value: Evidence from Seafood Processing Enterprises in the South Central Region of Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thanh Cuong

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether there is an optimal capital structure at which point firm is able to maximize its value. An advanced panel threshold regression model is applied to test the panel threshold effect of capital structure on firm value among 90 unlisted Seafood Processing Enterprises in the South Central region of Vietnam (SEASCRs during 2005–2011 period. In this study, I use BVE and ROE as surrogate for firm value and debt ratio (TD/TA as surrogate for capital structure and as the threshold variable. The empirical results strongly indicate that triple threshold effect exists between debt ratio and firm value when BVE is selected to proxy firm value. However, when ROE is selected to proxy firm value, the result shows that there exists double thresholds effect between debt ratio and firm value. From these results, I may conclude that the relationship between capital structure and firm value has a nonlinear relationship represents an convex Parapol shape. In addition, the findings suggest implications for SEASCRs on flexible usage of financial leverage. Specifically, SEASCRs should not use loans over 57.39%. To ensure and enhance the Firm value, the scope of the optimal debt ratio should be less than 57.39%.

  7. Delayed effects of neutron irradiation on central nervous system microvasculature in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathologic examination of a series of 14 patients with malignant gliomas treated with BNCT showed well demarcated zones of radiation damage characterized by coagulation necrosis. Beam attenuation was correlated with edema, loss of parenchymal elements, demyelination, leukocytosis, and peripheral gliosis. Vascular disturbances consisted of endothelial swelling, medial and adventitial proliferation, fibrin impregnation, frequent thrombosis, and perivascular inflammation. Radiation changes appeared to be acute and delayed. The outcome of the patients in this series was not significantly different from the natural course of the disease, even though two of the patients had no residual tumor detected at the time of autopsy. The intensity of the vascular changes raised a suspicion that boron may have sequestered in vessel walls, resulting in selectively high doses of radiation to these structures (Asbury et al., 1972), or that there may have been high blood concentrations of boron at the time of treatment. The potential limiting effects of a vascular ischemic reaction in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) prompted the following study to investigate the delayed response of microvascular structures in a rat model currently being used for pre-clinical investigations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  8. Territorial dynamics and boundary effects in a protected area of the Central Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heras, Paloma; Fernández-Sañudo, Paloma; López-Estébanez, Nieves; Roldán, María

    2011-03-01

    We analysed the main changes in land use over a 21 year period within the perimeter of a Protected Natural Area (PNA) and outside this perimeter. The area is characterised by its Mediterranean mid-mountain landscape and its piedmont, which extends almost as far as the city of Madrid. We employed cartography of land use and plant formation from 1980 and 2001. We identified land uses and their changes in this time period in order to determine the principal territorial dynamics (scrub encroachment, urban development, forest encroachment, new pastures and new crops). Subsequently, we performed a comparative analysis between the changes inside and those outside the protected area. The results show that there is a boundary effect between the protected area and the surrounding zone, which is more notable in the areas where urban development has intensified. This kind of research serves to establish whether or not a PNA contributes to protecting and conserving natural resources as compared to what occurs in the unprotected surrounding area, which tends to be subjected to more aggressive dynamics.

  9. Possible effects of a change in climate on the forests of Central Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes of climate greatly affect soil management and civilisation. The one in the offing, in contrast to those of the past, is set off by man himself. The high speed of change indicated here is especially problematic, because the speed of vegetation adaptation can probably not keep up with it. The processes in the offing can above all be attributed to a considerable CO2-increase in the earth's atmosphere. The temperature rise predicted by numerous climatologists and the different meteorological effects resulting from it may have considerably impact on various plant species and plant communities. This applies especially to species and phytozoenoses which are already today found in ecologically marginal spheres. Using several examples, transformations of tree-species ranges and competitive conditions between tree species caused by climate changes are illustrated in connection with some methodological relevancies. Based on the climate changes predicted by meteorologists the attempt is made to derive some preliminary conclusions for forest management. Suggestions are made on choice of tree species, forest restoration, stand treatment, and forest protection. Concluding and referring to numerous literature citations, measures to reduce further CO2-emissions and to withdraw carbon from the atmosphere are briefly discussed. (orig./MG)

  10. Dual aminergic regulation of central beta adrenoceptors. Effect of atypical antidepressants and 5-hydroxytryptophan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonlinear regression analysis of agonist competition binding curves reveals that the [3H]-dihydroalprenolol-labeled receptor population with low affinity for isoproterenol is increased by p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) and this increase is abolished by 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) in vivo. Desipramine (DMI) decreased the beta adrenoceptor population with high agonist affinity to the same degree in PCPA-treated animals as in control animals, thus explaining the reported discrepancy between beta adrenoceptor number and responsiveness of the beta adrenoceptor-coupled adenylate cyclase system. Mianserin also selectively reduced the beta adrenoceptor population with high agonist affinity in membrane preparations of normal animals, whereas fluoxetine selectively abolished the upregulation of the low affinity sites in reserpinized animals and had no effect on either receptor population from brain of normal animals. The results emphasize the importance of nonlinear regression analysis of agonist competition binding for the interpretation of drug action and encourage the pursuit of the molecular neurobiology of the serotonin (5-HT)/norepinephrine (NE) link in brain

  11. Effects of different forms of central nervous system prophylaxis on neuropsychologic function in childhood leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of the late effects on intellectual and neuropsychologic function of three different CNS prophylaxis regimens was conducted in 104 patients treated for childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Of the children studied, 33 were randomized to treatment with intrathecal (IT) methotrexate alone, 36 to IT methotrexate plus 2,400 rad cranial irradiation, and 35 to IT methotrexate plus intravenous intermediate dose methotrexate. All patients were in their first (complete) continuous remission, were a minimum of one year post-CNS prophylaxis and had no evidence of CNS disease at the time of evaluation. In contrast to the other two treatment groups, children whose CNS prophylaxis included cranial irradiation attained significantly lower mean Full Scale IQs, performed more poorly on the Wide Range Achievement Test, a measure of school abilities, and exhibited a greater number of difficulties on a variety of other neuropsychologic measures. The poorer performance of the irradiated group was independent of sex of the patient, time since treatment and age at diagnosis. These data suggest that the addition of 2,400 rad cranial irradiation to CNS prophylaxis in ALL puts these children at greater risk for mild global loss in intellectual and neuropsychologic ability

  12. Effect of Ambient Gasess on Respiration of Soil Supporting Four Crops in Central Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Ali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted at four localities (Maseef, Naseem, Oleya and Industrial City in Riyadh city, KSA to determine the effect of increased tropospheric gases on responses of in situ soil respiration (Rs of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Giza 68, broad bean (Vicia faba L. cv. Lara, kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Giza 3 and pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Perfection rhizosphere soil. These plants were grown to a full-season in pots to recieve four air quality localities treatments. Daily mean of O3, SO2, NO2 and CO2 concentrations were recorded by portable gas analyzers in the center of studied localities. The Rs values were measured monthly before seed germination, during all growth stages and after harvesting (October, December, February, April and June at three times during the day (morning, noon and afternoon for each stage. The maximum values recorded for O3 in mid June, 2007 were 39, 77, 95 and 166 nL L-1, in Maseef, Naseem, Olea and Industrial City localities, respectively. Significant decreases in Rs were observed for all polluted localities in compared Maseef site (less polluted. The greatest decreases in Rs were found at Industrial City followed by Naseem and Oleya. More reductions in Rs were observed for the Industrial City treatments during flowering and grainfill stages, while normal respiration at Maseef area was recorded. This study concluded that O3 injury can reduce the Rs by decreasing the activities and reactions in soil supporting plants.

  13. The effect of post-core and ferrule on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated maxillary central incisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sendhilnathan Dakshinamurthy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the effect of post reinforcement, post type and ferrule on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated maxillary central incisors. Materials and Methods: Sixty central incisor teeth were selected and grouped into six groups, viz. A, B, C, D, E, and F, each consisting of 10 specimens. Group A specimens were not subjected to any restorative treatment. Group B specimens were endodontically treated and crowned. Specimens of groups C and D were restored with custom cast post and core. Specimens of groups E and F were treated with prefabricated titanium post and composite core. Specimens of groups C and E were restored with porcelain-fused metal (PFM crown having 2 mm ferrule. Specimens of groups D and F were restored with PFM crown having no ferrule. All the specimens were subjected to load (newton, N on the lingual surface at a 135° angle to the long axis with a universal testing machine until it fractured. The fracture load and mode of fracture of each specimen were noted. One-way analysis of variance with Tukey honestly significant difference procedure was employed to identify the significant difference among the groups at 5% level (P < 0.05. Results: There were significant differences among the six groups studied (P < 0.0001. The highest fracture strength was recorded with specimen of group C (1376.7 N. There were significant differences between groups A and D versus groups B, E, and F. There were no significant differences between groups B, E, and F. Cervical root fracture was the predominant mode of failure in all the groups except group A. Conclusion: The results showed that endodontically treated teeth restored with custom cast post core were as strong as the untreated group. Teeth restored with custom cast post core were better resistant to fracture than teeth restored with prefabricated titanium post and composite core. Ferrule is more important in custom cast post core than in prefabricated post and composite core.

  14. The effects of forest structure on occurrence and abundance of three owl species (Aves: Strigidae in the Central Amazon forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obed G. Barros

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated how forest structure affects the occurrence and abundance of three owl species: the crested owl Lophostrix cristata Daudin, 1800, the Amazon pygmy owl Glaucidium hardyi Vielliard, 1990, and the tawny-bellied screech owl Megascops watsonii Cassin, 1849. We surveyed the owls mostly between 07:00 and 11:00 pm from July 2001 to April 2002, in eighteen 8 km transects along trails at the Ducke Reserve, Manaus, Central Amazon, Brazil. We staked out 50 x 50 m plots where the presence and absence of the owls were recorded. We compared some components of the forest structure between plots where owls were present and plots where they were absent. The spatial variation in these components were related to the occurrence and abundance of the owls using models of multiple logistic and multiple linear regressions analysis, respectively. Lophostrix cristata is rare in many other areas of the Amazon forest, but it was the most abundant in our study area. Lophostrix cristata and G. hardyi were more concentrated along the uplands (central plateau, which divide the reserve into two drainage water-basins. Megascops watsonii was distributed mainly in the southeastern part of the reserve. Glaucidium hardyi was more often found in areas with larger canopy openness. In areas with higher abundance of snags, there was significantly higher occurrence of L. cristata and M. watsonii. Megascops watsonii was also more abundant in areas with higher abundance of forest trees and in areas bearing shallower leaf litter on the forest floor. This study is the first to analyze at large spatial scale the effects of forest structure on neotropical forest top predator nocturnal birds. The results indicate that forest structure can affect the occurrence and abundance of owls in the Amazon forest.

  15. Surface mining and reclamation effects on flood response of watersheds in the central Appalachian Plateau region - article no. W04407

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, J.R.; Lookingbill, T.R.; McCormick, B.; Townsend, P.A.; Eshleman, K.N. [University of Maryland, Frostburg, MD (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Surface mining of coal and subsequent reclamation represent the dominant land use change in the central Appalachian Plateau (CAP) region of the United States. Hydrologic impacts of surface mining have been studied at the plot scale, but effects at broader scales have not been explored adequately. Broad-scale classification of reclaimed sites is difficult because standing vegetation makes them nearly indistinguishable from alternate land uses. We used a land cover data set that accurately maps surface mines for a 187-km{sup 2} watershed within the CAP. These land cover data, as well as plot-level data from within the watershed, are used with HSPF (Hydrologic Simulation Program-Fortran) to estimate changes in flood response as a function of increased mining. Results show that the rate at which flood magnitude increases due to increased mining is linear, with greater rates observed for less frequent return intervals. These findings indicate that mine reclamation leaves the landscape in a condition more similar to urban areas rather than does simple deforestation, and call into question the effectiveness of reclamation in terms of returning mined areas to the hydrological state that existed before mining.

  16. Effects of Cognitive Training on Resting-State Functional Connectivity of Default Mode, Salience, and Central Executive Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Weifang; Cao, Xinyi; Hou, Changyue; Li, Ting; Cheng, Yan; Jiang, Lijuan; Luo, Cheng; Li, Chunbo; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have documented that aging can disrupt certain higher cognitive systems such as the default mode network (DMN), the salience network and the central executive network (CEN). The effect of cognitive training on higher cognitive systems remains unclear. This study used a 1-year longitudinal design to explore the cognitive training effect on three higher cognitive networks in healthy older adults. The community-living healthy older adults were divided into two groups: the multi-domain cognitive training group (24 sessions of cognitive training over a 3-months period) and the wait-list control group. All subjects underwent cognitive measurements and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning at baseline and at 1 year after the training ended. We examined training-related changes in functional connectivity (FC) within and between three networks. Compared with the baseline, we observed maintained or increased FC within all three networks after training. The scans after training also showed maintained anti-correlation of FC between the DMN and CEN compared to the baseline. These findings demonstrated that cognitive training maintained or improved the functional integration within networks and the coupling between the DMN and CEN in older adults. Our findings suggested that multi-domain cognitive training can mitigate the aging-related dysfunction of higher cognitive networks.

  17. Analysis of Effects of 2003 and Full-Allocation Withdrawals in Critical Area 1, East-Central New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, Frederick J.

    2009-01-01

    Critical Area 1 in east-central New Jersey was mandated in the early 1980s to address large drawdowns caused by increases in groundwater withdrawals. The aquifers involved include the Englishtown aquifer system, Wenonah-Mount Laurel aquifer, and the Upper and Middle Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifers. Groundwater levels recovered as a result of mandated cutbacks in withdrawals that began in the late 1980s. Subsequent increased demand for water has necessitated an analysis to determine the effects of full-allocation withdrawals, which supplements an optimization analysis done previously. A steady-state regional groundwater flow model is used to evaluate the effects of 2003 withdrawals and full-allocation withdrawals (7.3 million gallons per day greater than for 2003) on simulated water-levels. Simulation results indicate that the range of available withdrawals greater than full-allocation withdrawals is likely between 0 and 12 million gallons per day. The estimated range of available withdrawals is based on: (1) an examination of hydraulic-heads resulting from each of the two simulations, (2) an examination of differences in heads between these two simulations, (3) a comparison of simulated heads from each of the two simulations with the estimated location of salty groundwater, and (4) a comparison of simulated 2003 water levels to observed 2003 water levels. The results of the simulations also indicate that obtaining most of the available water would require varying the distribution of withdrawals and (or) relaxing the mandated hydrologic constraints used to protect the water supply.

  18. Neurotoxic Effects of Platinum Compounds: Studies in vivo on Intracellular Calcium Homeostasis in the Immature Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziella Bernocchi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Platinum compounds cause significant clinical neurotoxicity. Several studies highlight neurological complications especially in paediatric oncology patients with Central Nervous System (CNS and non-CNS malignancies. To understand the toxicity mechanisms of platinum drugs at cellular and molecular levels in the immature brain, which appears more vulnerable to injury than in the adult one, we compared the effects in vivo of the most used platinum compounds, i.e., cisdichlorodiammineplatinum (cisplatin, cisPt, and the new [Pt(O,O′-acac(γ-acac(DMS] (PtAcacDMS. As models of developing brain areas, we have chosen the cerebellum and hippocampus dentate gyrus. Both areas show the neurogenesis events, from proliferation to differentiation and synaptogenesis, and therefore allow comparing the action of platinum compounds with DNA and non-DNA targets. Here, we focused on the changes in the intracellular calcium homeostasis within CNS architecture, using two immunohistochemical markers, the calcium buffer protein Calbindin and Plasma Membrane Calcium ATPase. From the comparison of the cisPt and PtAcacDMS effects, it emerges how essential the equilibrium and synergy between CB and PMCA1 is or how important the presence of at least one of them is to warrant the morphology and function of nervous tissue and limit neuroarchitecture damages, depending on the peculiar and intrinsic properties of the developing CNS areas.

  19. The effect of quinidine, a strong P-glycoprotein inhibitor, on the pharmacokinetics and central nervous system distribution of naloxegol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Khanh; She, Fahua; Zhou, Diansong; Butler, Kathleen; Al-Huniti, Nidal; Sostek, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Naloxegol is a PEGylated, oral, peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonist approved in the United States for treatment of opioid-induced constipation in patients with noncancer pain. Naloxegol is metabolized by CYP3A, and its properties as a substrate for the P-glycoprotein (PGP) transporter limit its central nervous system (CNS) permeability. This double-blind, randomized, 2-part, crossover study in healthy volunteers evaluated the effect of quinidine (600 mg PO), a CYP3A/PGP transporter inhibitor, on the pharmacokinetics and CNS distribution of naloxegol (25 mg PO). In addition, the effects of quinidine on morphine (5 mg/70 kg IV)-induced miosis and exposure to naloxegol were assessed. Coadministration of quinidine and naloxegol increased naloxegol's AUC 1.4-fold and Cmax 2.5-fold but did not antagonize morphine-induced miosis, suggesting that PGP inhibition does not increase the CNS penetration of naloxegol. Naloxegol pharmacokinetics was unaltered by coadministration of morphine and either quinidine or placebo; conversely, pharmacokinetics of morphine and its metabolites (in the presence of quinidine) were unaltered by coadministration of naloxegol. Naloxegol was safe and well tolerated, alone or in combination with quinidine, morphine, or both. The observed increase in exposure to naloxegol in the presence of quinidine is primarily attributed to quinidine's properties as a weak CYP3A inhibitor. PMID:26248047

  20. Effects of mercury deposition and coniferous forests on the mercury contamination of fish in the South Central United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenner, Ray W; Chumchal, Matthew M; Jones, Christina M; Lehmann, Christopher M B; Gay, David A; Donato, David I

    2013-02-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal that is found in aquatic food webs and is hazardous to human and wildlife health. We examined the relationship between Hg deposition, land coverage by coniferous and deciduous forests, and average Hg concentrations in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)-equivalent fish (LMBE) in 14 ecoregions located within all or part of six states in the South Central U.S. In 11 ecoregions, the average Hg concentrations in 35.6-cm total length LMBE were above 300 ng/g, the threshold concentration of Hg recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for the issuance of fish consumption advisories. Percent land coverage by coniferous forests within ecoregions had a significant linear relationship with average Hg concentrations in LMBE while percent land coverage by deciduous forests did not. Eighty percent of the variance in average Hg concentrations in LMBE between ecoregions could be accounted for by estimated Hg deposition after adjusting for the effects of coniferous forests. Here we show for the first time that fish from ecoregions with high atmospheric Hg pollution and coniferous forest coverage pose a significant hazard to human health. Our study suggests that models that use Hg deposition to predict Hg concentrations in fish could be improved by including the effects of coniferous forests on Hg deposition. PMID:23286301

  1. Glutamate metabolism of astrocytes during hyperbaric oxygen exposure and its effects on central nervous system oxygen toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Liang; Li, Dan; Wang, Zhong-Zhuang; Xu, Wei-Gang; Li, Run-Ping; Zhang, Jun-Dong

    2016-01-20

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) has been used widely in many underwater missions and clinical work. However, exposure to extremely high oxygen pressure may cause central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT). The regulation of astrocyte glutamate metabolism is closely related to epilepsy. This study aimed to observe the effects of HBO exposure on glutamate metabolism in astrocytes and confirm the role of glutamate metabolism in CNS-OT. Anesthetized rats were exposed to 5 atmosphere absolute HBO for 80 min and microdialysis samples of brain interstitial fluid were continuously collected. Extracellular glutamate and glutamine concentrations were also detected. Freely moving rats were exposed to HBO of the same pressure for 20 min and glutamine synthetase (GS) activity in brain tissues was measured. Finally, we observed the effects of different doses of drugs related to glutamate metabolism on the latency of CNS-OT. Results showed that HBO exposure significantly increased glutamate content, whereas glutamine content was significantly reduced. Moreover, HBO exposure significantly reduced GS activity. Glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) selective antagonist ceftriaxone prolonged CNS-OT latency, whereas GLT-1 selective inhibitor dihydrokainate shortened CNS-OT latency. In summary, HBO exposure improved glutamate concentration and reduced glutamine concentration by inhibition of GS activity. GLT-1 activation also participated in the prevention of HBO-induced CNS-OT. Our research will provide a potential new target to terminate or attenuate CNS-OT. PMID:26619231

  2. Landscape Effects of Land Consolidation Projects in Central China——A Case Study of Tianmen City, Hubei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Xiaokun; DAI Bing; CHEN Baiming

    2008-01-01

    The goal of land consolidation in China is still to develop agricultural production. The study of landscapeeffects of land consolidation projects (LCPs) faces many difficulties because of the lack of government's interest anddata. This paper, taking Tianmen City of Hubei Province in Central China as an example, presents a methodology foranalyzing landscape effects of LCPs by GIS and Fragstats3.3. It describes landscape effects with indexes of PatchDensity (PD), Largest Patch Index (LPI), Landscape Shape Index (LSI), Interspersion and Juxtaposition Index (IJI),Aggregation Index (AI), and Shannon's Diversity Index (SHDI), showing more regular shape, simpler structure andless habitat diversity after LCPs. It computes ten landscape indexes of four categories of patches including CultivatedLand, Road, Water Channel, and River and Pond. The indexes show that 1) cultivated land becomes more fragmentalin patch area, less irregular in patch shape and more concentrated in block; 2) the transport capacity of roads and irri-gation and drainage capacity of water channels have been improved; 3) the landscape change of river and pond can besummarized as decreasing scale, more regular shape, reducing connectivity and diversity of the class. LCPs can facili-tate agricultural production as well as protect cultivated land and food security. However, it is doubted that the increaseof cultivated land from LCPs results from the reducing in landscape diversity of water area.

  3. Effects of cognitive training on resting-state functional connectivity of default mode, salience and central executive networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifang eCao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies have documented that ageing can disrupt certain higher cognitive systems such as the default mode network (DMN, the salience network (SN and the central executive network (CEN. The effect of cognitive training on higher cognitive systems remains unclear. This study used a one-year longitudinal design to explore the cognitive training effect on three higher cognitive networks in healthy older adults. The community-living healthy older adults were divided into two groups: the multi-domain cognitive training group (24 sessions of cognitive training over a three-month period and the wait-list control group. All subjects underwent cognitive measurements and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI scanning at baseline and at one year after the training ended. We examined training-related changes in functional connectivity (FC within and between three networks. Compared with the baseline, we observed maintained or increased FC within all three networks after training. The scans after training also showed maintained anti-correlation of FC between the DMN and CEN compared to the baseline. These findings demonstrated that cognitive training maintained or improved the functional integration within networks and the coupling between the DMN and CEN in older adults. Our findings suggested that multi-domain cognitive training can mitigate the ageing-related dysfunction of higher cognitive networks.

  4. Spinal central effects of peripherally applied botulinum neurotoxin A in comparison between its subtypes A1 and A2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetaka eKoizumi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Because of its unique ability to exert long-lasting synaptic transmission blockade, botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A is used to treat a wide variety of disorders involving peripheral nerve terminal hyperexcitability. However, it has been a matter of debate whether this toxin has central or peripheral sites of action. We employed a rat model in which BoNT/A1 or BoNT/A2 was unilaterally injected into the gastrocnemius muscle. On time-course measurements of compound muscle action potential (CMAP amplitudes after injection of BoNT/A1 or BoNT/A2 at doses ranging from 1.7 U to 13.6 U, CMAP amplitude for the ipsilateral hind leg was markedly decreased on the 1st day, and this muscle flaccidity persisted up to the 14th day. Of note, both BoNT/A1 and BoNT/A2 administrations also resulted in decreased CMAP amplitudes for the contralateral leg in a dose-dependent manner ranging from 1.7 to 13.6 U, and this muscle flaccidity increased until the 4th day and then slowly recovered. Immunohistochemical results revealed that BoNT/A-cleaved SNAP-25 (synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa appeared in the bilateral ventral and dorsal horns 4 days after injection of BoNT/A1 (10 U or BoNT/A2 (10 U, although there seemed to be a wider spread of BoNT/A-cleaved SNAP-25 associated with BoNT/A1 than BoNT/A2 in the contralateral spinal cord. This suggests that the catalytically active BoNT/A1 and BoNT/A2 were axonally transported via peripheral motor and sensory nerves to the spinal cord, where they spread through a transcytosis (cell-to-cell trafficking mechanism. Our results provide evidence for the central effects of intramuscularly administered BoNT/A1 and BoNT/A2 in the spinal cord, and a new insight into the clinical effects of peripheral BoNT/A applications.

  5. Weekly periodicities of aerosol optical thickness over Central Europe – evidence of an anthropogenic direct aerosol effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Vogel

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Statistical analyses of data from 14 ground-based sun photometer stations all over Central Europe are presented. All stations are part of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET, and only data of the highest data quality level 2.0 had been applied. The averages by weekday of aerosol optical thickness (AOT at a wavelength of 440 nm of 12 of the 14 stations show a weekly periodicity with lowest values on Sunday and Monday, but greatest values from Wednesday until Saturday, that is significant at least on a 90% level. The stations in Germany and in Greater Paris show weekly cycles with ranges of about 20% on average. In Northern Italy and Switzerland this range is about 10% on average. The corresponding weekly cycle of anthropogenic gaseous and particulate emissions leads us to the conclusion of the anthropogenic origin of the weekly AOT cycle. Since these AOT patterns are derived from the reduction of the direct sun radiation by the columnar atmospheric aerosol, this result represents strong evidence for an anthropogenic direct aerosol effect on shortwave radiation. Furthermore, this study makes a first contribution to the understanding and explanation of recently observed weekly periodicities in meteorological variables as temperature in Germany.

  6. ADAPTABILITY, FERTILIZER EFFECT AND NUTRITION CONTENT OF VARIOUS BROCCOLI CULTIVAR (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica INTRODUCED IN KOPANG, CENTRAL LOMBOK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaenul Gafari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed to determine adaptability of eight introduced broccoli cultivars in the tropical climate, the effect of fertilizers, as well as determine the content of vitamin A, C and fiber owned by the cultivar. This research was using randomized complete block design ( RCBD with two factors. The first factorsare different broccoli cultivars namely Broccoli 'Lucky', Broccoli 'B - 106', Broccoli 'B-116', Broccoli 'B-112', Broccoli 'Green 2109' F1, Broccoli 'Green calabrase' and Broccoli 'Green Magic 'and Broccoli' Mujur'as a control. The second factors fertilizer of ZA, manure and urea. This research was performed in Kopang, Central Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara, for seven months from December 2014 to Juni 2015.Analysis of the nutrient content was done at the Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, University of Mataram, Lombok. Parameters observed in this research were plant height, number and weight of leaves, and quality of curd. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA if significantly different then tested further by Duncan's Multiple Range Test (DMRT at 5% level. The results showed all the cultivars able to adapt. Broccoli 'B-106' is a cultivar that has the quality and quantity of curd most excellent and able to adapt to high temperatures. ZA fertilizer application will produce curd weight and diameter greater than that ofmanure or urea. The research also showed that cultivar B-112 has the highest content of vitamin A, B-116 has the highest vitamin C and Green 2109F1 has the highest fibers.

  7. The Effects of Detritus Input on Soil Organic Matter Content and Carbon Dioxide Emission in a Central European Deciduous Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FEKETE, István

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A major objective of our research was to survey soil biological activity and organic mattercontent reduction in a Central European oak forest during treatments of various detritus inputs within theSíkfkút DIRT (Detritus Input and Removal Treatments Project. Beside the control, three detritusremoval and two detritus duplication treatments were applied. Our examinations have proven that soilorganic matter content declined relatively fast in detritus removal treatments. The reduction wasespecially remarkable in root detritus removal treatments, where – due to the lack of transpiration – soilswere moister during the whole year than in the other treatments. The higher moisture content, despite ofthe reduction of detritus input, produced an intense soil respiration. This can be explained by the fact thatdecomposing organisms have increased the use of soil organic matter. Detritus input reduction had asignificantly greater effect on soil respiration and organic matter content than detritus input duplicationof the same extent. The latter did not cause any significant change compared to the control.

  8. Effects of steroids therapy and ACTH therapy on the central nervous system evaluated by CT. Nephrotic syndrome and infantile spasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xano, E.; Yamashita, F.; Aoki, N.i; Matsuishi, T. (Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine); Yamamoto, M.

    1981-05-01

    CT scanning revealed cerebral atrophy of various degrees in 12 of 15 cases of nephrotic syndrome in which ACTH therapy was given and also in all the 8 cases of infantile spasms in which ACTH therapy was given. CT findings of cerebral atrophy were analysed by computor and expressed in terms of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-space/intracranial space ratio (%). The ratio was 6.6 +- 3.9% in nephrotic syndrome, 16.4 +- 7.8% in infantile spasms, and 1.6 +- 0.8% in control, showing statistically significant differences among them. Abnormal CT findings of 12 cases of nephrotic syndrome returned to normal after withdrawal of steroids in 9 cases (75%). CT findings in 8 cases of infantile spasms also improved in all the cases after withdrawal of ACTH therapy. The results suggested that cerebral atrophy on CT scan is a reversible change. However, the effect of steroids and ACTH on the central nervous system is not sufficiently known yet. We should be very careful about long-term administration of great amount of steroids or ACTH to infants and children.

  9. The effect of working memory load on semantic illusions: what the phonological loop and central executive have to contribute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Anke Caroline

    2012-01-01

    When asked how many animals of each kind Moses took on the Ark, most people respond with "two" despite the substituted name (Moses for Noah) in the question. Possible explanations for semantic illusions appear to be related to processing limitations such as those of working memory. Indeed, individual working memory capacity has an impact upon how sentences containing substitutions are processed. This experiment examined further the role of working memory in the occurrence of semantic illusions using a dual-task working memory load approach. Participants verified statements while engaging in either articulatory suppression or random number generation. Secondary task type had a significant effect on semantic illusion rate, but only when comparing the control condition to the two dual-task conditions. Furthermore, secondary task performance in the random number generation condition declined, suggesting a tradeoff between tasks. Response time analyses also showed a different pattern of processing across the conditions. The findings suggest that the phonological loop plays a role in representing semantic illusion sentences coherently and in monitoring for details, while the role of the central executive is to assist gist-processing of sentences. This usually efficient strategy leads to error in the case of semantic illusions. PMID:22897231

  10. Effect of Noise on the Decoherence of a Central Electron Spin Coupled to an Antiferromagnetic Spin Bath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. Fouokeng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the influence of a two-state autocorrelated noise on the decoherence and on the tunneling Landau-Zener (LZ transitions during a two-level crossing of a central electron spin (CES coupled to a one dimensional anisotropic-antiferomagnetic spin, driven by a time-dependent global external magnetic field. The energy splitting of the coupled spin system is found through an approach that computes the noise-averaged frequency. At low magnetic field intensity, the decoherence (or entangled state of a coupled spin system is dominated by the noise intensity. The effects of the magnetic field pulse and the spin gap antiferromagnetic material used suggest to us that they may be used as tools for the direct observation of the tunneling splitting through the LZ transitions in the sudden limit. We found that the dynamical frequencies display basin-like behavior decay with time, with the birth of entanglement, while the LZ transition probability shows Gaussian shape.

  11. Centralization and political accountability

    OpenAIRE

    Hindriks, Jean; Lockwood, Ben

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we abstract from the usual gains and costs of decentralization (e.g. preference matching, spillovers and economies of scale). Instead we compare the political accountability of decentralized governments relative to centralized ones when there is a risk of "bad" governance. We study both the selection and incentive effects of accountability. A key aspect of centralization is to make the politician answerable to multiple constituencies subject to a common budget constraint. Our ma...

  12. Effects of nomegestrol acetate administration on central and peripheral beta-endorphin and allopregnanolone in ovx rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Elena; Pluchino, Nicola; Begliuomini, Silvia; Ninni, Filippo; Freschi, Letizia; Centofanti, Manolo; Casarosa, Elena; Luisi, Stefano; Valentino, Valeria; Luisi, Michele; Genazzani, Andrea Riccardo

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of nomegestrol acetate (NOMAc) on the central nervous system by analyzing the neurosteroid allopregnanolone and the opioid beta-endorphin (beta-endorphin). 104 Wistar female rats were used in this study; one group of fertile and one group of ovariectomized rats were used as control. The others were ovariectomized and they underwent a 2-week oral treatment of NOMAc (0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1mg/kg/day), alone or with 0.05 mg/kg/day of estradiol valerate (E2V). Allopregnanolone and beta-endorphin were assessed in different brain areas and in circulation. Ovariectomy decreased allopregnanolone anywhere except in the adrenal gland and E2V reversed the effects of ovariectomy. 0.5 and 1mg/kg/day of NOMAc increased allopregnanolone levels in hippocampus. Combined administration of 1mg/kg/day of NOMAc plus E2V induced a further increase of allopregnanolone levels in hippocampus, hypothalamus, and anterior pituitary. NOMAc (1mg/kg/day) decreased the adrenal content of allopregnanolone, both by itself and associated with E2V. NOMAc increased hippocampal and hypothalamic content of beta-endorphin at the highest doses, and it increased positively E2V action, at 1mg/kg/day, also in anterior pituitary and plasma. These findings reinforce the clinical data regarding the capability of NOMAc to modulate the pathways involved in mood and behaviour. In fact, due to the NOMAc action on hippocampus, hypothalamus, and anterior pituitary, our results highlight the selectivity of NOMAc on part of the limbic system and the anterior pituitary, regarding both allopregnanolone and beta-endorphin. PMID:18420401

  13. The acute effect of maximal exercise on central and peripheral arterial stiffness indices and hemodynamics in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Xavier; Fernhall, Bo; Santos, Diana A; Pinto, Rita; Pimenta, Nuno M; Sardinha, Luís B; Santa-Clara, Helena

    2016-03-01

    This study compared the effects of a bout of maximal running exercise on arterial stiffness in children and adults. Right carotid blood pressure and artery stiffness indices measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), compliance and distensibility coefficients, stiffness index α and β (echo-tracking), contralateral carotid blood pressure, and upper and lower limb and central/aortic PWV (applanation tonometry) were taken at rest and 10 min after a bout of maximal treadmill running in 34 children (7.38 ± 0.38 years) and 45 young adults (25.22 ± 0.91 years) having similar aerobic potential. Two-by-two repeated measures analysis of variance and analysis of covariance were used to detect differences with exercise between groups. Carotid pulse pressure (PP; η(2) = 0.394) increased more in adults after exercise (p < 0.05). Compliance (η(2) = 0.385) decreased in particular in adults and in those with high changes in distending pressure, similarly to stiffness index α and β. Carotid PWV increased more in adults and was related to local changes in PP but not mean arterial pressure (MAP). Stiffness in the lower limbs decreased (η(2) = 0.115) but apparently only in those with small MAP changes (η(2) = 0.111). No significant exercise or group interaction effects were found when variables were adjusted to height. An acute bout of maximal exercise can alter arterial stiffness and hemodynamics in the carotid artery and within the active muscle beds. Arterial stiffness and hemodynamic response to metabolic demands during exercise in children simply reflect their smaller body size and may not indicate a particular physiological difference compared with adults. PMID:26842667

  14. Aerosol chemical characterization and role of carbonaceous aerosol on radiative effect over Varanasi in central Indo-Gangetic Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S.; Dumka, U. C.; Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Ram, Kirpa; Panicker, A. S.; Srivastava, M. K.; Tiwari, Shani; Attri, S. D.; Soni, V. K.; Pandey, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the chemical composition of PM10 aerosols at Varanasi, in the central Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) during April to July 2011, with emphasis on examining the contribution of elemental carbon (EC) to the estimates of direct aerosol radiative effect (DARE). PM10 samples are analysed for carbonaceous aerosols (Organic Carbon, OC and EC) and water-soluble ionic species (WSIS: Cl-, SO42-, NO3-, PO42- NH4+, Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) and several diagnostic ratios (OC/EC, K+/EC, etc) have been also used for studying the aerosol sources at Varanasi. PM10 mass concentration varies between 53 and 310 μg m-3 (mean of 168 ± 73 μg m-3), which is much higher than the National and International air quality standards. The OC mass concentration varies from 6 μg m-3 to 24 μg m-3 (mean of 12 ± 5 μg m-3; 7% of PM10 mass), whereas EC ranges between 1.0 and 14.3 μg m-3 (4.4 ± 3.9 μg m-3; ˜3% of PM10 mass). The relative low OC/EC of 3.9 ± 2.0 and strong correlation (R2 = 0.82) between them suggest the dominance of primary carbonaceous aerosols. The contribution of WSIS to PM10 is found to be ˜12%, out of which ˜57% and 43% are anions and cations, respectively. The composite DARE estimates via SBDART model reveal significant radiative effect and atmospheric heating rates (0.9-2.3 K day-1). Although the EC contributes only ˜3% to the PM10 mass, its contribution to the surface and atmospheric forcing is significantly high (37-63% and 54-77%, respectively), thus playing a major role in climate implications over Varanasi.

  15. Effects of mycoplasmal upper respiratory tract disease on morbidity and mortality of gopher tortoises in northern and central Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berish, Joan E Diemer; Wendland, Lori D; Kiltie, Richard A; Garrison, Elina P; Gates, Cyndi A

    2010-07-01

    Gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) populations on four tracts of public lands in northern and central Florida were studied from 1998 to 2001 to assess the effects of mycoplasmal upper respiratory tract disease (URTD). Adult gopher tortoises (n=205) were marked for identification, serum and nasal flush samples were obtained for mycoplasmal diagnostic assays, and clinical signs of URTD (nasal discharge, ocular discharge, palpebral edema, and conjunctivitis) were evaluated. A subset of tortoises (n=68) was radio-instrumented to facilitate repeated sampling and document potential mortality. Presence of serum antibody to Mycoplasma agassizii was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and mollicutes species were detected in nasal flushes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Antibody prevalence varied among sites and years but was highest in 1998, exceeding 70% at two sites. Only 11 tortoises (5%) were positive by PCR, and three species (M. agassizii, M. testudineum, and a nonpathogenic Acholeplasma) were identified in nasal flush specimens. Nasal discharge, though rare (6% of tortoises), was significantly correlated with higher ELISA ratios, study site, and positive PCR status. Mortality events (n=11) occurred on two of the three M. agassizii-positive sites; no mortality was observed on the M. agassizii-negative control site. However, none of the tested variables (ELISA result, study site, year, sex, presence of clinical signs, or carapace length) showed significant ability to predict the odds of death. Mycoplasmal URTD is believed to be a chronic disease with high morbidity but low mortality, and follow-up studies are needed to detect long-term effects. PMID:20688675

  16. Effects on Peripheral and Central Blood Pressure of Cocoa With Natural or High-Dose Theobromine A Randomized, Double-Blind Crossover Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van den Bogaard; R. Draijer; B.E. Westerhof; A.H. van den Meiracker; G.A. van Montfrans; B.J.H. van den Born

    2010-01-01

    Flavanol-rich cocoa products have been reported to lower blood pressure. It has been suggested that theobromine is partially responsible for this effect. We tested whether consumption of flavanol-rich cocoa drinks with natural or added theobromine could lower peripheral and central blood pressure. I

  17. Effects on peripheral and central blood pressure of cocoa with natural or high-dose theobromine: A randomized, double-blind crossover trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van den Bogaard (Bas); R. Draijer (Richard); B.E. Westerhof (Berend); A.H. van den Meiracker (Anton); G.A. van Montfrans (Gert); B.J.H. van den Born

    2010-01-01

    textabstractFlavanol-rich cocoa products have been reported to lower blood pressure. It has been suggested that theobromine is partially responsible for this effect. We tested whether consumption of flavanol-rich cocoa drinks with natural or added theobromine could lower peripheral and central blood

  18. Effect of an Educational Intervention Related to Health and Nutrition on Pregnant Women in the Villages of Central Java Province, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaya-Erhardt, Maria; Muslimatun, Siti; Erhardt, Juergen G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of a health and nutrition educational intervention on maternal knowledge, attitudes and practices. Design: Pre- and post-test design using structured interviews of pregnant women. Setting: Thirty-nine villages in Central Java Province, Indonesia. Method: Pregnant women (N = 252) at 12-20 weeks of gestation were…

  19. Periodicity analysis of δ18O in precipitation over Central Europe: Time-frequency considerations of the isotopic 'temperature' effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamalikis, V.; Argiriou, A. A.; Dotsika, E.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper the periodic patterns of the isotopic composition of precipitation (δ18O) for 22 stations located around Central Europe are investigated through sinusoidal models and wavelet analysis over a 23 years period (1980/01-2002/12). The seasonal distribution of δ18O follows the temporal variability of air temperature providing seasonal amplitudes ranging from 0.94‰ to 4.47‰; the monthly isotopic maximum is observed in July. The isotopic amplitude reflects the geographical dependencies of the isotopic composition of precipitation providing higher values when moving inland. In order to describe the dominant oscillation modes included in δ18O time series, the Morlet Continuous Wavelet Transform is evaluated. The main periodicity is represented at 12-months (annual periodicity) where the wavelet power is mainly concentrated. Stations (i.e. Cuxhaven, Trier, etc.) with limited seasonal isotopic effect provide sparse wavelet power areas at the annual periodicity mode explaining the fact that precipitation has a complex isotopic fingerprint that cannot be examined solely by the seasonality effect. Since temperature is the main contributor of the isotopic variability in mid-latitudes, the isotope-temperature effect is also investigated. The isotope-temperature slope ranges from 0.11‰/°C to 0.47‰/°C with steeper values observed at the southernmost stations of the study area. Bivariate wavelet analysis is applied in order to determine the correlation and the slope of the δ18O - temperature relationship over the time-frequency plane. High coherencies are detected at the annual periodicity mode. The time-frequency slope is calculated at the annual periodicity mode ranging from 0.45‰/°C to 0.83‰/°C with higher values at stations that show a more distinguishable seasonal isotopic behavior. Generally the slope fluctuates around a mean value but in certain cases (sites with low seasonal effect) abrupt slope changes are derived and the slope becomes

  20. The Effects of Work Values and Work Centrality on Job Satisfaction. A study with older spanish workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Orgambídez-Ramos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Since workforces are ageing throughout Europe, interest in the role of age in the workplace is increasing. Older workers with high work centrality are more likely to negotiate a relational contract and express higher levels of job satisfaction than older workers with low work centrality (Armstrong-Stassen and Schlosser, 2008. This study examines the role of work centrality and valued work outcomes as antecedents of job satisfaction. A cross sectional study using questionnaires was conducted. The sample consisted of 203 Spanish employees (M age = 55.78, SD = 3.01. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses have revealed that job satisfaction was significantly predicted by needed income and work centrality. When work is not an important part of older workers’ lives, they will prefer extrinsic outcomes and will not invest in the relationship with their organization (Grant & Wade-Benzoni, 2009. Implications for research and theory are explored in the conclusion.

  1. The effect of semi-permanent eddies on the distribution of mesozooplankton in the central Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, V.

    species richness diminished with the dwindling dissolved oxygen concentrations north of 15N. It is inferred that in the intensely stratified surface waters of the central BoB, cold-core eddies are important for promoting considerable biological production...

  2. Protective Effects of Breast Milk on Central Nervous System and the Incidence of Febrile Convulsion in Breast-Fed Children

    OpenAIRE

    A Tayarani Bathayi; KH Farivar

    1999-01-01

    It is known that central nervous system is well protected in breast-fed children, recognized in decreased incidence of multiple sclerosis, infectious and malignant diseases of the central nervous system, sudden infant death syndrome, 5th day convulsion, and botulism as well as an increase in IQ rates. In this retrospective study we have found also an indirect correlation between in incidence of febrile convulsion and length of breast-feeding. Among 270 cases of febrile convulsion 144 (53.3%) ...

  3. Qualitative approach to residual hazard from the 2013 flood effects in the Garonne River (Val d'Aran, Central Pyrenees)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Silvestre, Marta; Victoriano-Lamariano, Ane; Furdada-Bellavista, Gloria

    2015-04-01

    The Val d'Aran is a region located in the central, axial part of the Pyrenees. The Garona River, the main river that drains it, produces relatively frequent flood events. The last significant flood occurred in June 2013 and it caused extensive damages, as well as a large impact on the media. Based on the 2013 flood effects, a qualitative approach to the residual hazard was performed in order to understand the characteristics of the main zones that were affected and, therefore, may be affected in the future. Two representative sectors along the Garona River were chosen for the study: Arties-Vielha and Era Bordeta-Les stretches. The qualitative approach to the residual hazard has been performed considering that the study of the landforms and the flood effects can give orientation to identify the major flood prone areas. The residual hazard is considered as the hazard that remains even when effective mitigation measures to minimize flood processes are in place. The geomorphology in quasi-natural conditions provides information about the natural dynamic of the river. The geomorphology was studied by analysing the landforms from the 1956 aerial pictures that indicate fluvial processes of the area in quasi-natural conditions. Comparing the effects and flooded areas with the fluvial geomorphology and ancient maps, the most significant flood prone areas can be predicted for future episodes. Administration agencies (CHE, ACA) considered the return-period of this flood lower than 50 years. For this low to medium frequency event, two main types of flood effects were identified: erosions and overflows. Erosions were much more significant than overflows. Regarding to erosions, different cases were found: 1) anthropically narrowed channel stretches recovered their original width; 2) the erosions along the river coincided mostly with landfills that nowadays occupy the floodplain; 3) anthropically deviated stretches recovered their natural paths. Furthermore, these erosions caused

  4. Dynamic Changes in Local Protein Synthetic Machinery in Regenerating Central Nervous System Axons after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Rahul; Farrell, Kaitlin; McMullen, Mary-Katharine; Twiss, Jeffery L.; Houle, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Intra-axonal localization of mRNAs and protein synthesis machinery (PSM) endows neurons with the capacity to generate proteins locally, allowing precise spatiotemporal regulation of the axonal response to extracellular stimuli. A number of studies suggest that this local translation is a promising target to enhance the regenerative capacity of damaged axons. Using a model of central nervous system (CNS) axons regenerating into intraspinal peripheral nerve grafts (PNGs) we established that adult regenerating CNS axons contain several different mRNAs and protein synthetic machinery (PSM) components in vivo. After lower thoracic level spinal cord transection, ascending sensory axons regenerate into intraspinal PNGs but axon growth is stalled when they reach the distal end of the PNG (3 versus 7 weeks after grafting, resp.). By immunofluorescence with optical sectioning of axons by confocal microscopy, the total and phosphorylated forms of PSMs are significantly lower in stalled compared with actively regenerating axons. Reinjury of these stalled axons increased axonal localization of the PSM proteins, indicative of possible priming for a subcellular response to axotomy. These results suggest that axons downregulate protein synthetic capacity as they cease growing, yet they retain the ability to upregulate PSM after a second injury.

  5. Appetite-suppressing effects and interactions of centrally administered corticotropin-releasing factor, urotensin I and serotonin in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    OpenAIRE

    NicholasJ.Bernier; DavidA.Lovejoy

    2013-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), urotensin I (UI) and serotonin (5-HT) are generally recognized as key regulators of the anorexigenic stress response in vertebrates, yet the proximal effects and potential interactions of these central messengers on food intake in salmonids are not known. Moreover, no study to date in fishes has compared the appetite-suppressing effects of CRF and UI using species-specific peptides. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to 1) assess the individua...

  6. Inactivation of the central nucleus of the amygdala reduces the effect of punishment on cocaine self-administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, YueQiang; Steketee, Jeffery D; Sun, WenLin

    2012-03-01

    Continued cocaine use despite the negative consequences is a hallmark of cocaine addiction. One such consequence is punishment, which is often used by society to curb cocaine use. Unfortunately, we know little about the mechanism involved in regulation by punishment of cocaine use. The fact that cocaine addicts continue to use cocaine despite potentially severe punishment suggests that the mechanism may be impaired. Such impairment is expected to critically contribute to compulsive cocaine use. This study was aimed at testing the hypothesis that the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeN) plays a critical role in such regulation. To this end, rats were trained to press a lever to self-administer cocaine under a chained schedule: a response on one lever (cocaine-seeking lever) led to access to the other lever (cocaine-taking lever), on which a response was reinforced by cocaine and cues. Thereafter, responses on the seeking lever were punished by footshock with a probability of 0.5. Cocaine self-administration (SA) was significantly suppressed by punishment in an intensity-dependent manner. Interestingly, rats trained with daily 6-h (extended access) but not 2-h (limited access) sessions showed resistance to the lower intensity of punishment. Inactivation of the CeN induced a robust anti-punishment effect in both groups. These data provided evidence that the CeN is a critical neural substrate involved in regulation by punishment of cocaine SA. Rats with a history of extended cocaine SA appeared to be less sensitive to punishment. The decreased sensitivity could result from the neuroplastic changes induced by extended cocaine SA in the CeN. PMID:22304754

  7. Effects of partial throughfall exclusion on the phenology of Coussarea racemosa (Rubiaceae) in an east-central Amazon rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brando, Paulo; Ray, David; Nepstad, Daniel; Cardinot, Gina; Curran, Lisa M; Oliveira, Rafael

    2006-11-01

    Severe droughts may alter the reproductive phenology of tropical tree species, but our understanding of these effects has been hampered by confounded variation in drought, light and other factors during natural drought events. We used a large-scale experimental reduction of throughfall in an eastern-central Amazon forest to study the phenological response to drought of an abundant subcanopy tree, Coussarea racemosa. We hypothesized that drought would alter the production and the timing of reproduction, as well as the number of viable fruits. The study system comprised two 1-ha plots in the Tapajos National Forest, Para, Brazil: a dry plot where 50% of incoming precipitation (80% throughfall) was diverted from the soil during the six-month wet season beginning in January 2000, and a wet plot that received natural rainfall inputs. Fruit production of C. racemosa was quantified every 15 days using 100 litter traps (0.5 m(2)) in each plot. The production of new leaves and flowers was recorded monthly for C. racemosa individuals. Soil water, pre-dawn leaf water potential and solar radiation were measured to help interpret phenological patterns. Over the approximately 3.5-year period (April 2000 through December 2003), total fruit production remained similar between plots, declining by 12%. In 2003, production was four times higher in both plots than in previous years. In the dry plot, fruit fall shifted 40 and 60 days later into the dry season in 2002 and 2003, respectively. Total fruit fall dry mass production was variable across the study period. Foliage and flower production coincided with peak irradiance early in the dry season until delays in flowering appeared in the dry plot in 2002 and 2003. Plant water stress, through its influence on leaf developmental processes and, perhaps, inhibition of photosynthesis, appears to have altered both the timing of fruit fall and the quality and number of seeds produced. PMID:16955290

  8. Examining effects of anticipated stigma, centrality, salience, internalization, and outness on psychological distress for people with concealable stigmatized identities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M Quinn

    Full Text Available Understanding how stigmatized identities contribute to increased rates of depression and anxiety is critical to stigma reduction and mental health treatment. There has been little research testing multiple aspects of stigmatized identities simultaneously. In the current study, we collected data from a diverse, urban, adult community sample of people with a concealed stigmatized identity (CSI. We targeted 5 specific CSIs--mental illness, substance abuse, experience of domestic violence, experience of sexual assault, and experience of childhood abuse--that have been shown to put people at risk for increased psychological distress. We collected measures of the anticipation of being devalued by others if the identity became known (anticipated stigma, the level of defining oneself by the stigmatized identity (centrality, the frequency of thinking about the identity (salience, the extent of agreement with negative stereotypes about the identity (internalized stigma, and extent to which other people currently know about the identity (outness. Results showed that greater anticipated stigma, greater identity salience, and lower levels of outness each uniquely and significantly predicted variance in increased psychological distress (a composite of depression and anxiety. In examining communalities and differences across the five identities, we found that mean levels of the stigma variables differed across the identities, with people with substance abuse and mental illness reporting greater anticipated and internalized stigma. However, the prediction pattern of the variables for psychological distress was similar across the substance abuse, mental illness, domestic violence, and childhood abuse identities (but not sexual assault. Understanding which components of stigmatized identities predict distress can lead to more effective treatment for people experiencing psychological distress.

  9. The effectiveness of water-treatment systems for arsenic used in 11 homes in Southwestern and Central Ohio, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mary Ann; Ekberg, Mike

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Miami Conservancy District investigated the effectiveness of methods used to remove arsenic from drinking water at 11 homes in southwestern and central Ohio. The untreated (raw) ground-water had arsenic concentrations of 7.7–382 micrograms per liter (µg/L), and the median concentration was 30 µg/L. The pH was neutral to slightly alkaline, and redox conditions were strongly reducing, as indicated by high concentrations of iron. The predominant arsenic species was arsenite (As3+), which is difficult to treat because it exists in water as an uncharged compound (H3AsO3).The water-treatment systems included (1) seven single-tap reverse-osmosis systems, (2) two whole-house oxidation/filtration systems, and (3) two systems that included wholehouse anion exchange and single-tap reverse osmosis. All but one system included pretreatment by a water softener, and two systems included preoxidation to convert arsenite (As3+) to arsenate (As5+) before treatment by anion exchange.None of the treatment systems removed all of the arsenic from the drinking water. About one-half of the systems decreased the arsenic concentration to less than the maximum contamination level of 10 µg/L. The effectiveness of the systems varied widely; the percentage of arsenic removed ranged from 2 to 90 percent, and the median was 65 percent.At some sites, the low effectiveness of arsenic removal may have been related to system maintenance and(or) operation issues. At two sites, homeowners acknowledged that the treatment systems had not been maintained for several years. At two other sites, the treatment systems were being maintained, but the water-quality data indicated that one of the components was not working, unbeknownst to the homeowner. EPA research at a small number of sites in Ohio indicated that operation and maintenance of some arsenic-treatment systems was not always simple.Another factor that affected system effectiveness was the quality of

  10. Europa central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel BARTOSEK

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available La investigación francesa continúa interesándose por Europa Central. Desde luego, hay límites a este interés en el ambiente general de mi nueva patria: en la ignorancia, producto del largo desinterés de Francia por este espacio después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, y en el comportamiento y la reflexión de la clase política y de los medios de comunicación (una anécdota para ilustrar este ambiente: durante la preparación de nuestro coloquio «Refugiados e inmigrantes de Europa Central en el movimiento antifascista y la Resistencia en Francia, 1933-1945», celebrado en París en octubre de 1986, el problema de la definición fue planteado concreta y «prácticamente». ¡Y hubo entonces un historiador eminente, para quién Alemania no formaría parte de Europa Central!.

  11. On the effect of operation of the hydropower plant on the water quality of Rapel reservoir, central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossel, V.; De La Fuente, A.

    2013-12-01

    Eutrophication of lakes and reservoirs is a common problem in systems with high incoming loads of nutrients. The consequent algae bloom related to the eutrophication alters the water quality and generates an incompatibility with the tourist and recreational activities. This study is focused on Rapel reservoir: an old, dentritic and monomictic reservoir, located in central Chile (34°S, 71.6°W), that has experienced numerous algae bloom events in the past years produced by high loads of nutrients, sediments and metals. This reservoir was originally constructed in 1968 for hydropower generation without environmental restrictions on its operation. Rapel is part of Chile's Central Interconnected System (SIC), and is controlled by an independent system operator (ISO) that decides the optimal allocation of water by minimizing the SIC's operation cost. As a result of this framework, Rapel reservoir operates based on a hydropeaking scheme, thus producing energy few hours a day while zero outflows are observed the remaining hours, impacting on Rapel river located downstream the reservoir. However, previous research showed that this hydropeaking has important effects on the hydrodynamic of the reservoir as well. Particularly, it enhances vertical mixing nears the dam, and reduces horizontal dispersion. Furthermore, hydropeaking defines the outflows water temperature, and the temperature profile near the dam. As a consequence of this role of hydropeaking on the hydrodynamics and mixing of Rapel reservoir, it is expected to be a link between hydropeaking and water quality. The aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of the operation of hydropower plant on the water quality of Rapel reservoir, for which the reservoir system is modeled using the three dimensional hydrodynamic and water quality model ELCOM-CAEDYM. Field data to validate the results and to define boundary and initial conditions are available for the austral summer period of 2009-2010. Different scenarios of

  12. Effect of anthropogenic sulphate aerosol in China on the drought in the western-to-central US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Sang-Wook; Park, Rokjin J.; Kim, Minjoong J.; Jeong, Jaein I.; Song, Chang-Keun

    2015-09-01

    In recent decades, droughts have occurred in the western-to-central United States (US), significantly affecting food production, water supplies, ecosystem health, and the propagation of vector-borne diseases. Previous studies have suggested natural sea surface temperature (SST) forcing in the Pacific as the main driver of precipitation deficits in the US. Here, we show that the aerosol forcing in China, which has been known to alter the regional hydrological cycle in East Asia, may also contribute to reducing the precipitation in the western-to-central US through atmospheric teleconnections across the Pacific. Our model experiments show some indications that both the SST forcing and the increase in regional sulphate forcing in China play a similar role in modulating the western-to-central US precipitation, especially its long-term variation. This result indicates that regional air quality regulations in China have important implications for hydrological cycles in East Asia, as well as in the US.

  13. Ground-motion amplification at the Colle di Roio ridge, Central Italy: a combined effect of stratigraphy and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailemikael, S.; Lenti, L.; Martino, S.; Paciello, A.; Rossi, D.; Scarascia Mugnozza, G.

    2016-04-01

    Following the Mw 6.3 L'Aquila Earthquake of 6th April, 2009, the Colle di Roio village, central Italy, suffered severe building damages. The village is located on top of an elongated carbonate ridge characterized by a complex subsurface structure, a condition prone to seismic amplification due to topographic and stratigraphic effects. We address the role of the subsurface structure and topography in the ground-motion amplification observed at the ridge top. To characterize the subsurface structure of the ridge we performed geological investigations and ambient vibration measurements in single-station as well as 2D-array configuration. Geological investigations pointed out that the ridge top is characterized by the presence of fractured rock material as a consequence of its anticlinal fold structure. Horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio processing of ambient vibration records (HVSR) showed a broad peak in the HVSR functions in the frequency range 4-6 Hz and 2D-array data demonstrated that locally the subsurface structure at the ridge top cannot be considered homogeneous. In summer 2009, we further installed one accelerometric station on the ridge top to experimentally evaluate the site amplification. By means of Horizontal-to-Vertical spectral ratio analysis of a sample of 18 weak-motion records (H/V), we found that ground-motion amplification occurs in a narrow frequency range centred around 4 Hz with mean ratio amplitude of 6. We also analysed the dependence of seismic amplification on the azimuth by calculating H/V ratios for horizontal components rotated into a range of azimuths. This analysis showed that the higher level of horizontal amplification occurs in the direction perpendicular to the ridge trending direction. With the aim of evaluating the contribution of the topography and the local subsurface structure on the observed seismic amplification, we performed 2D finite difference modelling of wave propagation through the ridge, adopting both homogeneous

  14. Ground-motion amplification at the Colle di Roio ridge, central Italy: a combined effect of stratigraphy and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailemikael, S.; Lenti, L.; Martino, S.; Paciello, A.; Rossi, D.; Mugnozza, G. Scarascia

    2016-07-01

    Following the Mw 6.3 L'Aquila Earthquake of 2009 April 6, the Colle di Roio village, central Italy, suffered severe building damages. The village is located on top of an elongated carbonate ridge characterized by a complex subsurface structure, a condition prone to seismic amplification due to topographic and stratigraphic effects. We address the role of the subsurface structure and topography in the ground-motion amplification observed at the ridge top. To characterize the subsurface structure of the ridge we performed geological investigations and ambient vibration measurements in single-station as well as 2-D-array configuration. Geological investigations pointed out that the ridge top is characterized by the presence of fractured rock material as a consequence of its anticlinal fold structure. Horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) processing of ambient vibration records showed a broad peak in the HVSR functions in the frequency range 4-6 Hz and 2-D-array data demonstrated that locally the subsurface structure at the ridge top cannot be considered homogeneous. In summer 2009, we further installed one accelerometric station on the ridge top to experimentally evaluate the site amplification. By means of HVSR analysis of a sample of 18 weak-motion records (H/V), we found that ground-motion amplification occurs in a narrow frequency range centred around 4 Hz with mean ratio amplitude of 6. We also analysed the dependence of seismic amplification on the azimuth by calculating H/V ratios for horizontal components rotated into a range of azimuths. This analysis showed that the higher level of horizontal amplification occurs in the direction perpendicular to the ridge trending direction. With the aim of evaluating the contribution of the topography and the local subsurface structure on the observed seismic amplification, we performed 2-D finite-difference modelling of wave propagation through the ridge, adopting both homogeneous and heterogeneous models. We were

  15. Experimental determination of short- and long-wave dust radiative effects in the Central Mediterranean and comparison with model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, S.; Burlizzi, P.; Perrone, M. R.

    2016-05-01

    Downward and upward irradiance measurements, in the short-wave (SW) and long-wave (LW) spectral range, have been used in combination with simultaneous aerosol optical depths (AODs) to experimentally determine the instantaneous and clear-sky aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing (DRF) at the surface, during a desert dust outbreak which affected the Central Mediterranean from 9 to 13 July 2012. AODs were retrieved from AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) sun/sky photometer measurements collocated in space and time. The importance of downward and upward radiative flux measurements to properly account for both the surface albedo dependence on the solar zenith angle, and the land surface temperature (TLS) has been highlighted. Measured radiative fluxes were in reasonable agreement with the CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) and AERONET corresponding ones collocated in space and time. SW and LW downward fluxes at the surface decreased up to 9% and increased up to 13%, respectively, as a consequence of a factor 5 increase of the AOD at 675 nm (AOD675). This is due to the cooling and warming effect of desert dust in the SW and LW spectral range, respectively. In fact, we have also found that the TLS increased at a rate of about 250 K per unit increase of the AOD675. The aerosol DRF at the surface varied from - 8 to - 74 W m- 2 and from + 1.2 to + 9.6 W m- 2 in the SW and LW spectral domains, respectively. In particular, we have found that the LW-DRF on average offsets 14% of the related SW component. It is shown that a two-stream radiative transfer model can reproduce the experimental findings at the surface by replacing the refractive indices typical of dust particles with the ones obtained for a mixture made of dust and soot particles. The dust contamination by anthropogenic particles during its transport to the monitoring site located several hundred kilometers away from the source region was responsible for this last result. We have also found by model

  16. Effect of beta-1-blocker, nebivolol, on central aortic pressure and arterial stiffness in patients with essential hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Soanker

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Nebivolol 5 mg demonstrated antihypertensive efficacy in patients with essential hypertension by reducing not only peripheral brachial pressures, but also significantly reducing central aortic pressures, augmentation index, and carotid femoral pulse wave velocity, which is the marker of arterial stiffness.

  17. Specific interaction of central nervous system myelin basic protein with lipids effects of basic protein on glucose leakage from liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gould, R.M.; London, Y.

    1972-01-01

    The leakage from liposomes preloaded with glucose was continuously monitored in a Perkin-Elmer Model 356 dual beam spectrophotometer using an enzyme-linked assay system. The central nervous system myelin basic protein (A1 protein) caused a 3–4-fold increase in the rate of leakage from liposomes prep

  18. Effect of genotype and dietary protein level on growth performance and carcass characteristics of fattening pigs in central Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, K.T.; Nghia, D.H.; Ngoan, L.D.; Hendriks, W.H.; Peet-Schwering, van der C.M.C.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the optimum dietary crude protein level in a typical diet for fattening pigs fed ad libitum under normal climate conditions in Central Vietnam. One hundred and ninety two gilts of Mong Cai local breed (MC), F1 Large White??Mong Cai and F2 crossbreds of (Landrace??Mong C

  19. The effect of an acute increase in central blood volume on the response of cerebral blood flow to acute hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Hirasawa, Ai; Sugawara, Jun; Nakahara, Hidehiro; Ueda, Shinya; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Miyamoto, Tadayoshi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the response of cerebral blood flow to an acute change in perfusion pressure is modified by an acute increase in central blood volume. Nine young, healthy subjects voluntarily participated in this study. To measure dynamic cerebral autoregulation during normocapnic and hypercapnic (5%) conditions, the change in middle cerebral artery mean blood flow velocity was analyzed during acute hypotension caused by two methods: 1) thigh-cuff occlusion release (without change in central blood volume); and 2) during the recovery phase immediately following release of lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -50 mmHg) that initiated an acute increase in central blood volume. In the thigh-cuff occlusion release protocol, as expected, hypercapnia decreased the rate of regulation, as an index of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (0.236 ± 0.018 and 0.167 ± 0.025 s(-1), P = 0.024). Compared with the cuff-occlusion release, the acute increase in central blood volume (relative to the LBNP condition) with LBNP release attenuated dynamic cerebral autoregulation (P = 0.009). Therefore, the hypercapnia-induced attenuation of dynamic cerebral autoregulation was not observed in the LBNP release protocol (P = 0.574). These findings suggest that an acute change in systemic blood distribution modifies dynamic cerebral autoregulation during acute hypotension. PMID:26159757

  20. 75 FR 18499 - The Effects of Mountaintop Mines and Valley Fills on Aquatic Ecosystems of the Central...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ... available science. The draft documents are available via the Internet on NCEA's home page under the Recent... Benchmark for Conductivity in Central Appalachian Streams'' are available primarily via the Internet on the... docket and made available on the Internet. If you submit an electronic comment, EPA recommends that...

  1. 75 FR 30393 - The Effects of Mountaintop Mines and Valley Fills on Aquatic Ecosystems of the Central...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... documents are available via the Internet on NCEA's home page under the Recent Additions and Publications... Central Appalachian Streams'' are available primarily via the Internet on the National Center for... included as part of the comment that is placed in the public docket and made available on the Internet....

  2. Effectiveness and durability of Interceptor® long-lasting insecticidal nets in a malaria endemic area of central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatt Rajendra M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the present study, Interceptor®, long-lasting polyester net, 75 denier and bursting strength of minimum 250 kPa coated with alpha-cypermethrin @ 200 mg/m2 was evaluated for its efficacy in reducing the mosquito density, blood feeding inhibition and malaria incidence in a tribal dominated malaria endemic area in Chhattisgarh state, central India. Its durability, washing practices and usage pattern by the community was also assessed up to a period of three years. Methods The study was carried out in two phases. In the first phase (September 2006 to August 2007, 16 malaria endemic villages in district Kanker were randomized into three groups, viz. Interceptor net (LN, untreated polyester net (100 denier and without net. Malaria cases were detected by undertaking fortnightly surveillance by home visits and treated as per the national drug policy. Mosquito collections were made by hand catch and pyrethrum space spray methods from human dwellings once every month. Slide positivity rate (SPR and malaria incidence per 1000 population (PI were compared between the three study arms to assess the impact of use of Interceptor nets. Simultaneously, wash resistance studies were carried out in the laboratory by doing cone bioassays on Interceptor LNs washed up to 20 times. Activities undertaken in second Phase (April 2008 to October 2009 after an interval of about 18 months post-net distribution included questionnaire based surveys at every six months, i.e. 18, 24, 30 and 36 months to observe durability, usage pattern of LNs and washing practices by the community. After 36 months of field use, 30 nets were retrieved and sampled destructively for chemical analysis. Results Interceptor nets were found effective in reducing the density, parity rate and blood feeding success rate of main malaria vector Anopheles culicifacies as compared to that in untreated net and no net villages. SPR in LN villages was 3.7% as compared to 6

  3. Exercise training augments the peripheral insulin-sensitizing effects of pioglitazone in HIV-infected adults with insulin resistance and central adiposity

    OpenAIRE

    Yarasheski, Kevin E.; Cade, W. Todd; Overton, E Turner; Mondy, Kristin E.; HUBERT, Sara; Laciny, Erin; Bopp, Coco; Lassa-Claxton, Sherry; Reeds, Dominic N.

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence and incidence of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) are higher in people treated for human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV) infection than in the general population. Identifying safe and effective interventions is a high priority. We evaluated whether the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist pioglitazone with exercise training improves central and peripheral insulin sensitivity more than pioglitazone alone in HIV-infected adults with insulin resi...

  4. In-Situ Effects of Simulated Overfishing and Eutrophication on Benthic Coral Reef Algae Growth, Succession, and Composition in the Central Red Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Jessen; Cornelia Roder; Javier Felipe Villa Lizcano; Voolstra, Christian R.; Christian Wild

    2013-01-01

    Overfishing and land-derived eutrophication are major local threats to coral reefs and may affect benthic communities, moving them from coral dominated reefs to algal dominated ones. The Central Red Sea is a highly under-investigated area, where healthy coral reefs are contending against intense coastal development. This in-situ study investigated both the independent and combined effects of manipulated inorganic nutrient enrichment (simulation of eutrophication) and herbivore exclosure (simu...

  5. Peningkatan Efektivitas Mesin Extruder Matador EX 920 Dengan Metode Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) Di PT. Central Proteina Prima Tbk

    OpenAIRE

    Sianturi, Jost Irianto

    2011-01-01

    PT. Central Proteina Prima Tbk merupakan perusahaan yang bergerak dalam pengolahan pakan ternak ikan, yang tidak terlepas dari masalah yang berhubungan dengan efektivitas mesin/peralatan yang diakibatkan oleh six big losses. Pada mesin Extruder Matador ini masalah yang sering terjadi adalah menurunnya kemampuan kerja dari mesin diakibatkan oleh terjadinya kegosongan pakan yang menjadi kerak-kerak pada permukaan plat-plat sehingga mengakibatkan menurunnya efisiensi kerja mesi...

  6. CONSOLIDATED (CENTRAL) PUBLIC PROCUREMENT AS EFFECTIVE TOOL FOR THE COUNTY MANAGEMENT FOR RATIONALIZATION OF COSTS OF REGIONAL UNITS

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Lukic; Izabela Belic; Davor Vlaovic

    2015-01-01

    Public procurement (PP) is a very important segment of the economy of each country, including the Republic of Croatia, especially if you take into account the fact that its value on an annual basis is between 10 and 15% of GDP, respectively 30 and 45 billion Croatian kuna. Legal requirements for implementation of the procedure of unified or central procurement is given in Article 8 of the Public Procurement Act, which stipulates that entities may purchase goods, works and / or services from o...

  7. Interaction Between the Central and Peripheral Effects of Insulin in Controlling Hepatic Glucose Metabolism in the Conscious Dog

    OpenAIRE

    Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Kraft, Guillaume; Smith, Marta S.; Farmer, Ben; Neal, Doss; Williams, Phillip E.; Lautz, Margaret; Farmer, Tiffany; Donahue, E. Patrick; Cherrington, Alan D.; Edgerton, Dale S.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of hypothalamic insulin action to the regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism in the presence of a normal liver/brain insulin ratio (3:1) is unknown. Thus, we assessed the role of central insulin action in the response of the liver to normal physiologic hyperinsulinemia over 4 h. Using a pancreatic clamp, hepatic portal vein insulin delivery was increased three- or eightfold in the conscious dog. Insulin action was studied in the presence or absence of intracerebroventricularl...

  8. Effects of biomarkers of oxidative stress damage on prevalence and severity of visual disability among black Central Africans

    OpenAIRE

    Longo-Mbenza, B; Muaka, M. Mvitu; Yokobo, E. Cibanda; Phemba, I. Longo; Mokondjimobe, E.; Gombet, T.; Ndembe, D. Kibokela; Mona, D. Tulomba; Masamba, S. Wayiza

    2012-01-01

    Background Because of the demographic transition, lifestyle changes, urbanization, and nutrition transition, Central Africans are at higher risk of ocular diseases associated with oxidative stress and visual disability. This study aimed to estimate the normal values of oxidant status defined by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL), 8-Isoprostane and 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and to determine their pathogenic role in the prevalence and the severity of visual disability among these...

  9. Estrogen receptor beta activation prevents glucocorticoid receptor-dependent effects of the central nucleus of the amygdala on behavior and neuroendocrine function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Michael J; Foradori, Chad D; Handa, Robert J

    2010-06-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression have formidable economic and societal impacts. A dysregulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis leading to elevated endogenous glucocorticoid levels is often associated with such disorders. Chronically high glucocorticoid levels may act upon the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) to alter normally adaptive responses into those that are maladaptive and detrimental. In addition to glucocorticoids, other steroid hormones such as estradiol and androgens can also modify hormonal and behavioral responses to threatening stimuli. In particular, estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta) agonists have been shown to be anxiolytic. Consequently, these experiments addressed the hypothesis that the selective stimulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in the CeA would increase anxiety-like behaviors and HPA axis reactivity to stress, and further, that an ERbeta agonist could modulate these effects. Young adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized and bilaterally implanted via stereotaxic surgery with a wax pellet containing the selective GR agonist RU28362 or a blank pellet, to a region just dorsal to the CeA. Four days later, animals were administered the ERbeta agonist S-DPN or vehicle (with four daily sc injections). Anxiety-type behaviors were measured using the elevated plus maze (EPM). Central RU28362 implants caused significantly higher anxiety-type behaviors in the EPM and greater plasma CORT levels than controls given a blank central implant. Moreover, S-DPN treated animals, regardless of type of central implant, displayed significantly lower anxiety-type behaviors and post-EPM plasma CORT levels than vehicle treated controls or vehicle treated animals implanted with RU28362. These results indicate that selective activation of GR within the CeA is anxiogenic, and peripheral administration of an ERbeta agonist can overcome this effect. These data suggest that estradiol signaling via ERbeta

  10. An assessment of the effects on seabirds of a possible oil exploration at the shelf outside Central Norway out to 1o East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives the results of an assessment of the effects on seabirds of possible petroleum exploration at the shelf outside Central-Norway out to 1o East. By combining oil spill simulations with the valued ecosystem components, i.e. seabirds, their distribution, and their vulnerability indexes, the relative index values for the direct effects of oil spills were calculated. For the purpose, the analysis system SIMPACT was used. On the basis of these results and other relevant considerations, recommendations for limiting a possible drilling activity are given. 85 refs., 49 figs., 9 tabs

  11. On Monetary Transmission Effect of Agricultural Central Bank Lending%支农再贷款的货币政策传导效应分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程璐

    2012-01-01

    Agricultural central bank lending is not only a monetary instrument but an essential tool to transmit monetary policy effect. Since the introduction of agricultural central bank lending, it played an important role to adjust economic structure, increase credit into rural economy, and improve rural financial services. This article takes the Shaanxi as an example, analyzes the monetary transmission effect of agricultural central bank lending for supporting agriculture and puts forward policy suggestion.%支农再贷款作为中央银行的货币政策工具,是传导货币政策效应的重要手段。人民银行自开办支农再贷款业务以来,对调整经济结构、引导县域法人金融机构加大对"三农"薄弱环节的信贷投放、促进改善农村金融服务等方面起到了积极的作用。本文以陕西省为例,就支农再贷款的货币政策传导效应进行分析,并提出有关政策建议。

  12. The Effect of a Single Session of Whole-Body Vibration Training in Recreationally Active Men on the Excitability of the Central and Peripheral Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chmielewska Daria

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Vibration training has become a popular method used in professional sports and recreation. In this study, we examined the effect of whole-body vibration training on the central nervous system and muscle excitability in a group of 28 active men. Subjects were assigned randomly to one of two experimental groups with different variables of vibrations. The chronaximetry method was used to evaluate the effect of a single session of whole-body vibration training on the excitability of the rectus femoris and brachioradialis muscles. The examination of the fusing and flickering frequencies of the light stimulus was performed. An increase in the excitability of the quadriceps femoris muscle due to low intensity vibrations (20 Hz frequency, 2 mm amplitude was noted, and a return to the initial values was observed 30 min after the application of vibration. High intensity vibrations (60 Hz frequency, 4 mm amplitude caused elongations of the chronaxy time; however, these differences were not statistically significant. Neither a low intensity vibration amplitude of 2 mm (frequency of 20 Hz nor a high intensity vibration amplitude of 4 mm (frequency of 60 Hz caused a change in the excitability of the central nervous system, as revealed by the average frequency of the fusing and flickering of the light stimulus. A single session of high intensity whole-body vibration did not significantly decrease the excitability of the peripheral nervous system while the central nervous system did not seem to be affected.

  13. Effects of Land Use Change on Eco-environment in Hilly Area of Central Sichuan Basin--A Case Study of Yanting County, Sichuan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Huai-liang; Zhu Bo; Chen Guo-jie; Gao Mei-rong

    2003-01-01

    With the artificial alder and cypress mixed forest being planted, there has been a marked land use change since 1970s' in Hilly Area of Central Sichuan Basin, China. Data from meteorological observations or posts operated over long time, measurement and calculation of NPP (net primary production) and biomass of biological community, and analysis of soil organic matter content show that the artificial alder and cypress mixed forest has outstanding eco-environmental effect: adjusting local climate, raising soil fertility, alleviating menace of drought, and raising NPP and biomass of biological community. It is very beneficial for improving ecological environment to afforest artificial alder and cypress mixed forest in populous Hilly Area of Central Sichuan Basin, China.

  14. Effects of Land Use Change on Eco-environment in Hilly Area of Central Sichuan Basin——A Case Study of Yanting County, Sichuan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LuoHuai-liang; ZhuBo; ChenGuo-jie; GaoMei-rong

    2003-01-01

    With the artificial alder and cypress mixed forest being planted, there has been a marked land use change since 1970s' in Hilly Area of Central Sichuan Basin, China. Data from meteorological observations or posts operated over long time, measurement and calculation of NPP (net primary production) and biornass of biological community, and analysis of soil organic matter content show that the artificial alder and cypress mixed forest has outstanding eco-environmental effect: adjusting local climate, raising soil fertility, alleviating menace of drought, and raising NPP and biornass of biological community. It is very beneficial for improving ecological environment to afforest artificial alder and cypress mixed forest in populous Hilly Area of Central Sichuan Basin, China.

  15. The effect of central and planar chirality on the electrochemical and chiral sensing properties of ferrocenyl urea H-bonding receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulas, Andrea; Willener, Yasmine; Carr-Smith, James; Joly, Kevin M; Male, Louise; Moody, Christopher J; Horswell, Sarah L; Nguyen, Huy V; Tucker, James H R

    2015-04-28

    A new series of chiral ureas containing one or two redox-active ferrocene units was synthesised and studied in order to investigate the effect of planar chirality and central chirality on electrochemical chiral sensing. Binding of chiral carboxylate anions in organic solvents through H-bond formation caused a negative shift in the potentials of the ferrocene/ferrocenium (Fc/Fc(+)) couples of the receptors, demonstrating their use as electrochemical sensors in solution. While the presence of two ferrocene units gave no marked improvement in the chiral sensing capabilities of these systems, the introduction of planar chirality, in addition to central chirality, switched the enantiomeric binding preference of the system and also caused an interesting change in the appearance of some voltammograms, with unusual two-wave behaviour observed upon binding a protected prolinate guest. PMID:25791522

  16. Effects of design on cost of flat-plate solar photovoltaic arrays for terrestrial central station power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, P.; Stolte, W.

    1978-01-01

    The paper examines the impact of module and array designs on the balance-of-plant costs for flat-plate terrestrial central station power applications. Consideration is given to the following types of arrays: horizontal, tandem, augmented, tilt adjusted, and E-W tracking. The life-cycle cost of a 20-year plant life serves as the costing criteria for making design and cost tradeoffs. A tailored code of accounts is developed for determining consistent photovoltaic power plant costs and providing credible photovoltaic system cost baselines for flat-plate module and array designs by costing several varying array design approaches.

  17. Comparison of radial flow effects on partitions of multifragmenting sources formed in symmetric and asymmetric central collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Frankland J.D.; Gruyer D.; Bonnet E.; Chbihi A.

    2015-01-01

    The role of collective radial expansion in determining multifragmentation partition properties has previously been explored by comparing different-sized sources of the same excitation energy per nucleon formed by very different reaction mechanisms: excited quasi-projectiles from semi-peripheral Au+Au collisions and quasi-fused sources from central Xe+Sn collisions. New data has been obtained with INDRA on 181Ta+66Zn collisions in order to allow comparison of Xe+Sn data with quasi-fused system...

  18. Effects of distributed and centralized stormwater best management practices and land cover on urban stream hydrology at the catchment scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loperfido, J. V.; Noe, Gregory B.; Jarnagin, S. Taylor; Hogan, Dianna M.

    2014-11-01

    Urban stormwater runoff remains an important issue that causes local and regional-scale water quantity and quality issues. Stormwater best management practices (BMPs) have been widely used to mitigate runoff issues, traditionally in a centralized manner; however, problems associated with urban hydrology have remained. An emerging trend is implementation of BMPs in a distributed manner (multi-BMP treatment trains located on the landscape and integrated with urban design), but little catchment-scale performance of these systems have been reported to date. Here, stream hydrologic data (March, 2011-September, 2012) are evaluated in four catchments located in the Chesapeake Bay watershed: one utilizing distributed stormwater BMPs, two utilizing centralized stormwater BMPs, and a forested catchment serving as a reference. Among urban catchments with similar land cover, geology and BMP design standards (i.e. 100-year event), but contrasting placement of stormwater BMPs, distributed BMPs resulted in: significantly greater estimated baseflow, a higher minimum precipitation threshold for stream response and maximum discharge increases, better maximum discharge control for small precipitation events, and reduced runoff volume during an extreme (1000-year) precipitation event compared to centralized BMPs. For all catchments, greater forest land cover and less impervious cover appeared to be more important drivers than stormwater BMP spatial pattern, and caused lower total, stormflow, and baseflow runoff volume; lower maximum discharge during typical precipitation events; and lower runoff volume during an extreme precipitation event. Analysis of hydrologic field data in this study suggests that both the spatial distribution of stormwater BMPs and land cover are important for management of urban stormwater runoff. In particular, catchment-wide application of distributed BMPs improved stream hydrology compared to centralized BMPs, but not enough to fully replicate forested

  19. NucleoRed - Computerized system for increasing the effectiveness of the technical administrative conduct of the Laguna Verde Central

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The on-line systems for the management of the Laguna Verde Central (CLV) have had the challenge to evolve from the PC's of first generation until emigrate to the new Internet technologies, so that they allow to the diverse work groups to have the computer tool that allows them to gather the necessary data and to carry out efficiently the analysis of their results. To confront the previous challenge, in the CLV it has been developed and implemented the Nucleo Red that is an on-line system with the objective of providing in it lines strategic information for the Technician-administrative management of the plant in the nuclear context. The Nucleo Red is the computational tool that reflects the technical administrative processes implemented by personnel of the different Operative departments, it seeks to cooperate to the reliable and efficient operation of the first nucleo electric central of Mexico, with technology and Mexican personnel the one which already it had received international recognitions. The perspective of this computer system is to continue inside the process of continuous improvement and that although it was designed for a nucleo electric plant it can also be taken to the conventional plants of generation of electric power, so that this technology can be taken advantage of in other non nuclear facilities. The objective of the present work, is to show the new modules that have been developed in the Nucleo Red, its operation in general, and the benefits that it presents its use. (Author)

  20. Microbial challenge promotes the regenerative process of the injured central nervous system of the medicinal leech by inducing the synthesis of antimicrobial peptides in neurons and microglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schikorski, David; Cuvillier-Hot, Virginie; Leippe, Matthias; Boidin-Wichlacz, Céline; Slomianny, Christian; Macagno, Eduardo; Salzet, Michel; Tasiemski, Aurélie

    2010-01-01

    Following trauma, the central nervous system (CNS) of the medicinal leech, unlike the mammalian CNS, has a strong capacity to regenerate neurites and synaptic connections that restore normal function. Here, we show that this regenerative process is enhanced by a controlled bacterial infection, suggesting that induction of regeneration of normal CNS function may depend critically upon the co-initiation of an immune response. We explore the interaction between the activation of a neuroimmune response and the process of regeneration by assaying the potential roles of two newly characterized antimicrobial peptides. Our data provide evidence that microbial components differentially induce the transcription, by microglial cells, of both antimicrobial peptide genes, the products of which accumulate rapidly at sites in the CNS undergoing regeneration following axotomy. Using a preparation of leech CNS depleted of microglial cells, we also demonstrate the production of antimicrobial peptides by neurons. Interestingly, in addition to exerting antibacterial properties, both peptides act as promoters of the regenerative process of axotomized leech CNS. These data are the first to report the neuronal synthesis of antimicrobial peptides and their participation in the immune response and the regeneration of the CNS. Thus, the leech CNS appears as an excellent model for studying the implication of immune molecules in neural repair. PMID:18606660

  1. Effects of tillage and nitrogen fertilizers on CH4 and CO2 emissions and soil organic carbon in paddy fields of central China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cheng-Fang

    Full Text Available Quantifying carbon (C sequestration in paddy soils is necessary to help better understand the effect of agricultural practices on the C cycle. The objective of the present study was to assess the effects of tillage practices [conventional tillage (CT and no-tillage (NT] and the application of nitrogen (N fertilizer (0 and 210 kg N ha(-1 on fluxes of CH(4 and CO(2, and soil organic C (SOC sequestration during the 2009 and 2010 rice growing seasons in central China. Application of N fertilizer significantly increased CH(4 emissions by 13%-66% and SOC by 21%-94% irrespective of soil sampling depths, but had no effect on CO(2 emissions in either year. Tillage significantly affected CH(4 and CO(2 emissions, where NT significantly decreased CH(4 emissions by 10%-36% but increased CO(2 emissions by 22%-40% in both years. The effects of tillage on the SOC varied with the depth of soil sampling. NT significantly increased the SOC by 7%-48% in the 0-5 cm layer compared with CT. However, there was no significant difference in the SOC between NT and CT across the entire 0-20 cm layer. Hence, our results suggest that the potential of SOC sequestration in NT paddy fields may be overestimated in central China if only surface soil samples are considered.

  2. Effects of tillage and nitrogen fertilizers on CH4 and CO2 emissions and soil organic carbon in paddy fields of central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng-Fang, Li; Dan-Na, Zhou; Zhi-Kui, Kou; Zhi-Sheng, Zhang; Jin-Ping, Wang; Ming-Li, Cai; Cou-Gui, Cao

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying carbon (C) sequestration in paddy soils is necessary to help better understand the effect of agricultural practices on the C cycle. The objective of the present study was to assess the effects of tillage practices [conventional tillage (CT) and no-tillage (NT)] and the application of nitrogen (N) fertilizer (0 and 210 kg N ha(-1)) on fluxes of CH(4) and CO(2), and soil organic C (SOC) sequestration during the 2009 and 2010 rice growing seasons in central China. Application of N fertilizer significantly increased CH(4) emissions by 13%-66% and SOC by 21%-94% irrespective of soil sampling depths, but had no effect on CO(2) emissions in either year. Tillage significantly affected CH(4) and CO(2) emissions, where NT significantly decreased CH(4) emissions by 10%-36% but increased CO(2) emissions by 22%-40% in both years. The effects of tillage on the SOC varied with the depth of soil sampling. NT significantly increased the SOC by 7%-48% in the 0-5 cm layer compared with CT. However, there was no significant difference in the SOC between NT and CT across the entire 0-20 cm layer. Hence, our results suggest that the potential of SOC sequestration in NT paddy fields may be overestimated in central China if only surface soil samples are considered. PMID:22574109

  3. Proopiomelanocortin but not vasopressin or renin-angiotensin system induces resuscitative effects of central 5-HT1A activation in haemorrhagic shock in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowa, P; Adamczyk-Sowa, M; Zwirska-Korczala, K; Pierzchala, K; Adamczyk, D; Paluch, Z; Misiolek, M

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectory mechanisms: vasopressin, renin-angiotensin system and proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides (POMC), partaking in the effects of serotonin through central serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A) receptors in haemorrhagic shock in rats. The study was conducted on male Wistar rats. All experimental procedures were carried out under full anaesthesia. The principal experiment included a 2 hour observation period in haemorrhagic shock. Drugs used - a selective 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT (5 μg/5 μl); V1a receptor antagonist [β-mercapto-β, β-cyclo-pentamethylenepropionyl(1),O-me-Tyr(2),Arg(8)]AVP (10 μg/kg); angiotensin type I receptor antagonist (AT1) ZD7155 (0.5 mg/kg, i.v.); angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor captopril (30 mg/kg, i.v.); melanocortin type 4 (MC4) receptor antagonist HS014 (5 μg, i.c.v.). There was no influence of ZD715, captopril or blocking of the V1a receptors on changes in the heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), peripheral blood flow or resistance caused by the central stimulation of 5-HT1A receptors (P≥0.05). However, selective blocking of central MC4 receptors caused a slight, but significant decrease in HR and MAP (Pvasopressin systems do not participate in these actions. PMID:25371525

  4. Evaluation of the effects of plant-derived essential oils on central nervous system function using discrete shuttle-type conditioned avoidance response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezu, Toyoshi

    2012-06-01

    Although plant-derived essential oils (EOs) have been used to treat various mental disorders, their central nervous system (CNS) acting effects have not been clarified. The present study compared the effects of 20 kinds of EOs with the effects of already-known CNS acting drugs to examine whether the EOs exhibited CNS stimulant-like effects, CNS depressant-like effects, or neither. All agents were tested using a discrete shuttle-type conditioned avoidance task in mice. Essential oils of peppermint and chamomile exhibited CNS stimulant-like effects; that is, they increased the response rate (number of shuttlings/min) of the avoidance response. Linden also increased the response rate, however, the effect was not dose-dependent. In contrast, EOs of orange, grapefruit, and cypress exhibited CNS depressant-like effects; that is, they decreased the response rate of the avoidance response. Essential oils of eucalyptus and rose decreased the avoidance rate (number of avoidance responses/number of avoidance trials) without affecting the response rate, indicating that they may exhibit some CNS acting effects. Essential oils of 12 other plants, including juniper, patchouli, geranium, jasmine, clary sage, neroli, lavender, lemon, ylang-ylang, niaouli, vetivert and frankincense had no effect on the avoidance response in mice. PMID:22086772

  5. Comparison of radial flow effects on partitions of multifragmenting sources formed in symmetric and asymmetric central collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frankland J.D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of collective radial expansion in determining multifragmentation partition properties has previously been explored by comparing different-sized sources of the same excitation energy per nucleon formed by very different reaction mechanisms: excited quasi-projectiles from semi-peripheral Au+Au collisions and quasi-fused sources from central Xe+Sn collisions. New data has been obtained with INDRA on 181Ta+66Zn collisions in order to allow comparison of Xe+Sn data with quasi-fused systems having the same mass, charge and excitation energy per nucleon formed in mass-asymmetric reactions, for which a smaller initial compression is expected. Preliminary results confirm that, ceteris paribus, smaller radial flow leads to less fragments with more asymmetric partitions.

  6. Identification of forest cover changes by landsat MSS data and environmental effects of such changes in Central South Sri Lanka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, L. (Chiba University, Chiba (Japan). Remote Sensing and Image Research Center); Tsuchiya, K. (Teikyo University, Tokyo (Japan). School of Science and Engineering); Toyota, H. (Seikei University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1992-08-25

    Based on Landsat MSS data of 1977 and 1987 together with in situ surveys, landcover and landuse maps are made for central southern part of Sri Lanka then the change of landcover and deforestation on 10 years period is estimated. The change amounts to a 16% decrease in evergreen forests, a 39% increase in scrublands and a 63% decrease in open water areas. Data of 30 years monthly and annual mean precipitation and air temperature are collected from the surrounding observing stations. Analyses of these data indicate a complicated distribution pattern including a fairly large variability and little variability in case of precipitation, while in case of air temperature 5 years moving average of the annual air temperature indicates a steady increase. The composite analyses based on Landsat MSS data together with the local environmental data suggest that there is a connection between deforestation and micro level climatological and environmental changes. 12 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. The Effects of Post Diameter on Stress Distribution in Maxillary Central Incisor, A Three Dimensional Finite Element Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Monzavi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Currently there are three recognized theories about the diameter of prepared dowel space in endodontically treated teeth. Diameter of the dowel is commonly contributed to the root fracture.Purpose: This study used a 3 dimensional (3D finite element method to predict stress distribution in endodontically treated central maxillary tooth with cast post and core with various post diameter according to three philosophies about post diameter (Conservational,Proportional, Preservational.Materials and Methods: In this study three 3D models of central maxillary incisors with different post diameter were created and depend on the size of post called narrow, medium and thick model with post diameter of 1.1mm, 1.7 mm and 2.6 mm of in (CEJrespectively. A load of 100 N was applied to cingulum fossa from lingual direction with 45-degree angle to long axis of tooth and maximum tensile, compressive and Von Misses stresses and their distribution in dentin and post was studied.Results: The post in narrow, medium and thick models produced a similar magnitude of tensile, compressive and Von Misses stresses in dentin. Stress distribution was also similar in all models. Peak stresses in dentin were slightly decreased when post diameter increased from narrow to thick model. In all models peak tensile stresses in dentin occurred in the coronally one third of the lingual surface of the root, whereas peak compressive stresseswere evident in the coronal one third of the facial surface of the root.Conclusion: There were not significant differences stress distribution pattern and magnitude in dentin between the three theories of post diameter.

  8. Neuronal activation in the central nervous system of rats in the initial stage of chronic kidney disease-modulatory effects of losartan and moxonidine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklós Palkovits

    Full Text Available The effect of mild chronic renal failure (CRF induced by 4/6-nephrectomy (4/6NX on central neuronal activations was investigated by c-Fos immunohistochemistry staining and compared to sham-operated rats. In the 4/6 NX rats also the effect of the angiotensin receptor blocker, losartan, and the central sympatholyticum moxonidine was studied for two months. In serial brain sections Fos-immunoreactive neurons were localized and classified semiquantitatively. In 37 brain areas/nuclei several neurons with different functional properties were strongly affected in 4/6NX. It elicited a moderate to high Fos-activity in areas responsible for the monoaminergic innervation of the cerebral cortex, the limbic system, the thalamus and hypothalamus (e.g. noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus, serotonergic neurons in dorsal raphe, histaminergic neurons in the tuberomamillary nucleus. Other monoaminergic cell groups (A5 noradrenaline, C1 adrenaline, medullary raphe serotonin neurons and neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (innervating the sympathetic preganglionic neurons and affecting the peripheral sympathetic outflow did not show Fos-activity. Stress- and pain-sensitive cortical/subcortical areas, neurons in the limbic system, the hypothalamus and the circumventricular organs were also affected by 4/6NX. Administration of losartan and more strongly moxonidine modulated most effects and particularly inhibited Fos-activity in locus coeruleus neurons. In conclusion, 4/6NX elicits high activity in central sympathetic, stress- and pain-related brain areas as well as in the limbic system, which can be ameliorated by losartan and particularly by moxonidine. These changes indicate a high sensitivity of CNS in initial stages of CKD which could be causative in clinical disturbances.

  9. A study on the effective factors of mortalities with unknown causes among one month old infants of Tehran and Central provinces

    OpenAIRE

    Moshkani Z

    1998-01-01

    In this work, the net effect of birth type (one or more children), the number of previous dead children, the mother tongue, mother's age at infant birth, number of deliveries, consanguineous marriages, and the father's education on the mortality of one-month-old infants in families of residents of Tehran and the Central Province is studied. The data referred to in this study was taken from a survey conducted by the Department of Vital Statistics in 1991. Applying multiple logistic r...

  10. Effects on peripheral and central blood pressure of cocoa with natural or high-dose theobromine: A randomized, double-blind crossover trial

    OpenAIRE

    Bogaard, Bas; Draijer, Richard; Westerhof, Berend; Meiracker, Anton; Montfrans, Gert; Born, B.J.H.

    2010-01-01

    textabstractFlavanol-rich cocoa products have been reported to lower blood pressure. It has been suggested that theobromine is partially responsible for this effect. We tested whether consumption of flavanol-rich cocoa drinks with natural or added theobromine could lower peripheral and central blood pressure. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled 3-period crossover trial we assigned 42 healthy individuals (age 62±4.5 years; 32 men) with office blood pressure of 130 to 159 mm Hg/85 to 99 mm Hg...

  11. Evidence for Inhibitory Effects of Flupirtine, a Centrally Acting Analgesic, on Delayed Rectifier K+ Currents in Motor Neuron-Like Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng-Nan Wu; Ming-Chun Hsu; Yu-Kai Liao; Fang-Tzu Wu; Yuh-Jyh Jong; Yi-Ching Lo

    2012-01-01

    Flupirtine (Flu), a triaminopyridine derivative, is a centrally acting, non-opiate analgesic agent. In this study, effects of Flu on K+ currents were explored in two types of motor neuron-like cells. Cell exposure to Flu decreased the amplitude of delayed rectifier K+ current (I K(DR)) with a concomitant raise in current inactivation in NSC-34 neuronal cells. The dissociation constant for Flu-mediated increase of I K(DR) inactivation rate was about 9.8  μ M. Neither linopirdine (10  μ M), NMD...

  12. The effects of normal and therapeutic baths on the central vascular organs of persons with healthy hearts, as measured by X-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, G.; Ekert, FR.

    1988-01-01

    According to current information, baths have a four-fold effect on the circulation: (1) Dilation or constriction is produced in the area of the blood vessels in the skin as a result of thermal, chemical or mechanical stimuli; (2) This reaction in the dermal vascular system produces a further effect on the central vessels in the extremities, the area of the splanchnicus, and other body cavities; (3) The reflect transposition of other organ systems, i.e., the respiratory organs, has a reaction on the circulation; and (4) The water pressure of the bath has a hydrostatic effect, i.e., on the one hand it empties peripheral veins more rapidly, and on the other it increases the intra-abdominal pressure and this reduces once again the circulation in the area of the splanchnicus.

  13. Effects of Drought and Water Resource Management on Biophysical and Sociocultural Ecosystem Services in South-Central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, J.; Castro, A.; Vaughn, C.; Atkinson, C.

    2014-12-01

    South-Central United States is one of the fastest growing regions in the nation; however, it is experiencing water supply limitations. In response, multiple interests have focused on the Kiamichi River watershed in southeast Oklahoma as a future inter-basin water supply. The Kiamichi River provides many ecosystem services, including freshwater provision to 19 cities/towns, outdoor recreation hub for the South-Central U.S., cultural capital of the Choctaw Indian Nation, and a national biodiversity hotspot. With multiple recent stressors, these ecosystem services are highly threatened. Here we present how drought and water management have impacted these benefits over the past 20 years. First, we assessed the river's sensitivity to drought (which is cyclical) and water regulation (which has increased over the past three decades). Second, we analyzed how these hydrologic changes have impacted freshwater habitat, focusing on mussels because of their sensitivity to flow alterations and because they provide additional ecosystem services such as biofiltration, nutrient recycling/storage, and cultural resources. Third, we performed a sociocultural valuation for a suite of ecosystem services provided by the Kiamichi River watershed, including 505 interviews of five different ecosystem services beneficiary (ESB) groups. We obtained ESB perceptions on how ecosystem services changed with different flow conditions and water management strategies. Analyses revealed that increased regulation (fewer dam releases) has caused the Kiamichi River to have long no flow periods during droughts (e.g. 176 days with no flow in 2006). These long dry periods have been the main culprit for a 60% decline in mussel biomass over the past 20 years, and subsequent large losses in biofiltration and nutrient recycling. Interestingly, ESBs perceived similar losses of ecosystem services. Without being provided any information on flow, more than half of the ESBs believed that water supply, freshwater

  14. Hydrology of Alkali Creek and Castle Valley Ridge coal-lease tracts, central Utah, and potential effects of coal mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, R.L.; Baskin, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Alkali Creek coal-lease tract includes about 2,150 acres in the Book Cliffs coal field in central Utah, and the Castle Valley Ridge coal-lease tract includes about 3,360 acres in the Wasatch Plateau coal field, also in central Utah. Both the Alkali Creek and Castle Valley Ridge coal-lease tracts are near areas where coal is currently (1987) mined by underground methods from the Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation. The Alkali Creek and Castle Valley Ridge areas have intermittent streams in which flow after snowmelt runoff is locally sustained into midsummer by springflow. The only perennial stream is South Fork Corner Canyon Creek in the Castle Valley Ridge area. Peak flow in both areas generally is from snowmelt runoff; however, peak flow from thunderstorm runoff in the Alkali Creek area can exceed that from snowmelt runoff. Estimated annual source-area sediment yield was 0.5 acre-ft/sq mi in the Alkali Creek lease tract and it was 0.3 acre-ft/sq mi in the Castle Valley Ridge lease tract. Groundwater in the Alkali Creek area occurs in perched aquifers in the Flagstaff Limestone and in other formations above the coal-bearing Blackhawk Formation. The principal source of recharge to the aquifers is snowmelt on outcrops. Faults may be major conduits and control the movement of groundwater. Groundwater discharges at formation contacts, between zones of differing permeability within a formation, near faults and into mines. Water sampled from 13 springs in the Alkali Creek area contained dissolved solids at concentrations ranging from 273 to 5,210 mg/L. Water sampled from 17 springs in the Castle Valley Ridge area contained dissolved solids at concentrations ranging from 208 to 579 mg/L. The composition of water from a recently abandoned part of an active mine the Wasatch Plateau closely resembles that of water discharging from a nearby mine that has been abandoned for more than 30 years. Mining of the Alkali Creek and Castle Valley Ridge coal-lease tracts likely will

  15. Effects of X-radiation on the spinal cord: an experimental study of the morphological changes in central nerve fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The morphological changes in central nerve fibres after irradiation have been studied in the spinal cord of young adult rats exposed to 100 to 6000 rad doses of 250 kV x-rays using the technique of single fibre teasing as well as conventional light and electronmicroscopic examination of cord sections. Two groups of degenerative changes were found in myelinated fibres. The first consisted of breakdown of paranodal myelin and nodal widening. These changes were found as early as two weeks after exposure to 500 to 6000 rad doses and increased in frequency with dose and time in the first two months after irradiation. Paranodal myelin breakdown was less frequent after two months but nodal widening was more prominent. Increasing numbers of thinly myelinated fibres were found after three months suggsting that paranodal demyelination was followed by remyelination. This early group of changes confined to the myelin sheath provides a possible pathological basis for the self-limited sensory syndrome which sometimes occurs within a few weeks or months of irradiation of the spinal cord in man. The second type of change which was also first detected as early as two weeks after irradiation and which appears to be unrelated to the first, consisted of random Wallerian-type degeneration of fibres of all calibres in the spinal white matter. The number of affected fibres was initially small but increased with time and there was no clear dose relationship. (author)

  16. Spatio-temporal variation in the hydrochemistry of Tawa River, Central India: effect of natural and anthropogenic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehto, Ashwini; Chakrapani, G J

    2013-12-01

    Tawa River is the biggest left bank tributary of the Narmada, the largest west-flowing river of the Indian peninsula. Central India enjoys a tropical climate, is highly urbanized, and the river flow is mostly controlled by monsoon; a large part of the population depend on rivers for their livelihood. Spatial and temporal variations in the hydrochemistry of the Tawa River were studied based on seasonal sampling along the course of the river and its tributaries. The study is important because not much data exist on small size rivers and the river processes spell out correctly in smaller basins. The monsoon season accounts for more than 70% of river water flow. The basin is characterized by silicate lithology; however, water chemistry is controlled by carbonate-rich soils and other weathering products of the silicate rocks, as indicated by the high (Ca + Mg)/(Na + K) ratios (>3.8). The values of the Na-normalized ratios of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and HCO₃(-) suggest that both the carbonate and silicate lithology contribute to the hydrochemistry. On average, 42% of HCO₃(-) in the Tawa River water is contributed by silicate weathering and 58% from carbonate lithology. The water remains undersaturated with respect to calcite during the monsoon and post-monsoon seasons and supersaturated during the pre-monsoon season. A significant influence of mining in the basin and other industrial units is observed in water chemical composition. PMID:23761165

  17. Effectiveness of Behavior Change Communications for Reducing Transmission Risks Among People Living with HIV in 6 Countries in Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Lung; Nieto-Andrade, Benjamin; DiVincenzo, Allison; Rivas, Jorge; Firestone, Rebecca; Wheeler, Jennifer; Lungo, Sussy

    2015-07-01

    This first region-wide study (N = 2,818) aims to estimate prevalence of HIV-related risks (sexual behavior, HIV disclosure, number of sex partners, violence) and factors associated with these risks as well as evaluate a behavior change communications program targeted to PLHIV in 6 countries in Central America. After 2 years, the program achieved moderate coverage, with 21 % of the sample reporting exposure to interpersonal communications (IPC) and 52 % to mass media program components. The odds of condom use, HIV disclosure, and participation in a self-help group increased by 1.4-1.8 times with exposure to mass media. Exposure to IPC increased odds of condom use by 2.7 and participation in self-help groups by 4.4 times. In addition, being in HIV care or taking ART was associated with condom use and HIV-status disclosure. About 30 % experienced physical or sexual violence, and those who did were 4 times less likely to use condoms. Findings suggest that behavioral interventions for PLHIV can reduce HIV-transmission risks and increase access to care. PMID:25284460

  18. Effects of solar UVB radiation on growth, flowering and yield of central and southern European maize cultivars (Zea mays L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different cultivars of maize (Zea mays L.) originating from Central and South Europe were grown from June to September 1994 for 16 weeks in two greenhouses covered with different UVB-absorbing (280-320 nm) plastic foils. Using the ambient UVB radiation level of a southern location (Portugal, 38.7oN) in one of the greenhouses as an enhanced radiation compared to the reduced radiation in the second greenhouse, an increase of about 12% of UVB was simulated. Six of the eight cultivars examined showed significant reductions in height of up to 18.9% at all developmental stages under increased UVB. In contrast to this, the fresh and dry weight as well as the leaf area was reduced under UVB only at early developmental stages, but with ongoing development the UVB stressed plants caught up. The total content of absorbing compounds of the maize cultivars was completely unaffected by UVB. A flowering delay up to a maximum of 5 days was observed under higher UVB in several cultivars. Probably due to this delay in the cob development the yield decreased to 27.7% under higher UVB at the first harvest after 12 and 14 weeks, whereas at the second harvest after 14 and 16 weeks yield reduction levelled off. (Author)

  19. Synthesis of fluorine substituted hydroxyapatite nanopowders and application of the central composite design for determination of its antimicrobial effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanić, Vojislav; Dimitrijević, Suzana; Antonović, Dušan G.; Jokić, Bojan M.; Zec, Slavica P.; Tanasković, Sladjana T.; Raičević, Slavica

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biomaterials based on fluorine substituted hydroxyapatite are potentially attractive for orthopedic and dental implant applications. The new synthesis of fluorine substituted hydroxyapatite samples were done by neutralization, which consists of adding the solution of HF and H3PO4 in suspension of Ca(OH)2. Characterization studies from XRD, SEM and FTIR spectra showed that crystals are obtained with apatite structure and those particles of all samples are nano size, with an average length of 80 nm and about 15-25 nm in diameter. The central composite design was used in order to determine the optimal conditions for the antimicrobial activity of the synthesized samples. In order to evaluate the influence of operating parameters on the percent of viable cell reduction of Streptococcus mutans, three independent variables were chosen: exposure time, pH of saline and floride concentration in apatite samples. The experimental and predicted antimicrobial activities were in close agreement. Antimicrobial activity of the samples increases with the increase of fluoride concentration and the decreased pH of saline. The maximum antimicrobial activity was achieved at the initial pH of 4.

  20. The effect of locations of central metro stations on real estate values. A case study of Thessaloniki, Greece.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agapi Xifilidou

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Almost all of the most populated cities in the world have invested heavily on high capacity urban public transit systems. Apart from the direct economic benefits –travel time reduction, environmental benefits, some indirect benefits are the increase in real estate values (residential and commercial, improved accessibility and possible land use changes towards the development of an area. This study investigates the impact of the future central metro stations of Thessaloniki on real estate values. Real estate values can increase up to 11,3% at a distance shorter than 50 m and gradually decrease up to -14% for a distance greater than 500 m. A hedonic analysis is presented so as to determine the influence of metro stations to 52 commercial properties. The results of the investigation indicate that the changes in market are not necessarily connected or totally attributed to the construction of the metro stations. Instead interesting results show that in some cases common belief about the impact of urban public transit systems can be slightly different.

  1. Immunostimulatory effect of thalidomide in normal C57BL/6 mice is compatible with stimulation of a highly connected central immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arala-Chaves, M; Vilanova, M; Ribeiro, A; Pinto, J

    1994-11-01

    Although thalidomide has been used with success in the treatment of increasing numbers of autoimmune diseases, the therapeutic effects have not been satisfactorily explained so far. We describe here some findings that may contribute to a better understanding of the immunomodulatory effects of this drug. Several immunological changes were observed after treating C57BL/6 mice with 3 mg of thalidomide. The numbers of natural IgM PFC against sheep red blood cells were increased in the spleen, and occasionally a dramatic oscillatory increase in the numbers of non-specific splenic IgM and IgG PFC was observed in these mice. However, these oscillatory increases were progressively lower, after two and three treatments with thalidomide at 20-day intervals. Furthermore, the absolute numbers of splenic CD5+ B and CD5- B lymphocytes were increased whereas depletion of CD4+ CD8+ cells in the thymus and of lymphoid cells in the bone marrow was seen after a single treatment with 3 mg of thalidomide. Taken together, these results suggest that thalidomide stimulates both peripheral and central immune systems and consequently enhances the connectivity of the central immune system. PMID:7526443

  2. The Effect of Nd: YAG Laser Capsulotomy on Visual Acuity, Intraocular Pressure, Central Corneal Thickness, and Refractive Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihat Polat

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the changes in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, intraocular pressure (IOP, central corneal thickness (CCT, and spherical equivalent (SE before and after Nd: YAG laser capsulotomy. Materials and Methods: This study included 68 patients (40 men, 28 women who had posterior capsule opacification. The subjects underwent Nd: YAG laser capsulotomy with a minimal energy and shooting number. BCVA, IOP, CCT, and SE were measured before and 1 week, 1 and 3 months after laser capsulotomy. The post-treatment measurements were compared with the pre-treatment ones statistically. Results: There were statistically significant differences between pre- and post-laser BCVA values at 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months (p0.05. There were statistically significant differences between pre- and post-laser SE values at 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months (p<0.001. The SE value at 1 week was not statistically significantly different from those at 1 and 3 months (p=0.068 and p=0.541, respectively. There were statistically significant differences between pre- and post-laser CCT values at 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months (p<0.001, however, no statistically significant differences were found between the CCT measurement at 1 week and those at 1 and 3 months (p=0.296 and p=0.304, respectively. There were statistically significant differences between pre- and post-laser IOP values at 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months (p<0.001, while there were no statistically significant differences between IOP measurements at 1 week and those at 1 and 3 months (p=0.438 and p=0.664, respectively. Conclusion: Substantial changes were observed, especially at first postoperative week, for BCVA, IOP, CCT, and SE in patients with posterior capsule opacification who underwent Nd: YAG laser capsulotomy. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 275-9

  3. Differential effects of interleukin-17 receptor signaling on innate and adaptive immunity during central nervous system bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidlak Debbie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although IL-17A (commonly referred to as IL-17 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS autoimmune disease, its role during CNS bacterial infections remains unclear. To evaluate the broader impact of IL-17 family members in the context of CNS infection, we utilized IL-17 receptor (IL-17R knockout (KO mice that lack the ability to respond to IL-17, IL-17F and IL-17E (IL-25. In this article, we demonstrate that IL-17R signaling regulates bacterial clearance as well as natural killer T (NKT cell and gamma-delta (γδ T cell infiltrates during Staphylococcus aureus-induced brain abscess formation. Specifically, when compared with wild-type (WT animals, IL-17R KO mice exhibited elevated bacterial burdens at days 7 and 14 following S. aureus infection. Additionally, IL-17R KO animals displayed elevated neutrophil chemokine production, revealing the ability to compensate for the lack of IL-17R activity. Despite these differences, innate immune cell recruitment into brain abscesses was similar in IL-17R KO and WT mice, whereas IL-17R signaling exerted a greater influence on adaptive immune cell recruitment. In particular, γδ T cell influx was increased in IL-17R KO mice at day 7 post-infection. In addition, NK1.1high infiltrates were absent in brain abscesses of IL-17R KO animals and, surprisingly, were rarely detected in the livers of uninfected IL-17R KO mice. Although IL-17 is a key regulator of neutrophils in other infection models, our data implicate an important role for IL-17R signaling in regulating adaptive immunity during CNS bacterial infection.

  4. Effects of Spider Venom Toxin PWTX-I (6-Hydroxytrypargine on the Central Nervous System of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario S. Palma

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The 6-hydroxytrypargine (6-HT is an alkaloidal toxin of the group of tetrahydro-b-carbolines (THbC isolated from the venom of the colonial spider Parawixia bistriata. These alkaloids are reversible inhibitors of the monoamine-oxidase enzyme (MAO, with hallucinogenic, tremorigenic and anxiolytic properties. The toxin 6-HT was the first THbC chemically reported in the venom of spiders; however, it was not functionally well characterized up to now. The action of 6-HT was investigated by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. and intravenous (i.v. applications of the toxin in adult male Wistar rats, followed by the monitoring of the expression of fos-protein, combined with the use of double labeling immunehistochemistry protocols for the detection of some nervous receptors and enzymes related to the metabolism of neurotransmitters in the central nervous system (CNS. We also investigated the epileptiform activity in presence of this toxin. The assays were carried out in normal hippocampal neurons and also in a model of chronic epilepsy obtained by the use of neurons incubated in free-magnesium artificial cerebro-spinal fluid (ACSF. Trypargine, a well known THbC toxin, was used as standard compound for comparative purposes. Fos-immunoreactive cells (fos-ir were observed in hypothalamic and thalamic areas, while the double-labeling identified nervous receptors of the sub-types rGlu2/3 and NMR1, and orexinergic neurons. The 6-HT was administrated by perfusion and ejection in “brain slices” of hippocampus, inducing epileptic activity after its administration; the toxin was not able to block the epileptogenic crisis observed in the chronic model of the epilepsy, suggesting that 6-HT did not block the overactive GluRs responsible for this epileptic activity.

  5. Evaluation of Dynamical Downscaling Resolution Effect on Wind Energy Forecast Value for a Wind Farm in Central Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosgaard, Martin; Hahmann, Andrea; Skov Nielsen, Torben; Giebel, Gregor; Ejnar Sørensen, Poul; Madsen, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    For any energy system relying on wind power, accurate forecasts of wind fluctuations are essential for efficient integration into the power grid. Increased forecast precision allows end-users to plan day-ahead operation with reduced risk of penalties which in turn supports the feasibility of wind energy. This study aims to quantify value added to wind energy forecasts in the 12-48 hour leadtime by downscaling global numerical weather prediction (NWP) data using a limited-area NWP model. The accuracy of statistical wind power forecasting tools depends strongly on this NWP input. Typical performance metrics are mean absolute error or root mean square error for predicted- against observed wind power production, and these metrics are closely related to wind speed forecast bias and correlation with observations. Wind speed bias can be handled in the statistical wind power forecasting model, though it is entirely up to it's NWP input to describe the wind speed correlation correctly. The basis of comparison for forecasts is data from the Stor-Rotliden wind farm in central Sweden. The surrounding forest adds to the forecasting challenge, thus motivating the downscaling experiment as the potential for wind power forecast improvement is higher in complex terrain. The 40 Vestas V90 turbines were erected in 2009 and correspond to 78MWe installed electrical capacity. Forecasts from global and limited-area NWP models, together covering five different horizontal computational grid spacings of ~50km down to ~1km, are studied for a yearlong, continuous time period. The preliminary results shown quantify forecast strengths and weaknesses for each NWP model resolution.

  6. Effects of fire management on the richness and abundance of central North American grassland land snail faunas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nekola, J. C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The land snail faunas from 72 upland and lowland grassland sites from central North America were analyzed. Sixteen of these had been exposed to fire management within the last 15 years, while the remainder had not. A total of 91,074 individuals in 72 different species were observed. Richness was reduced by approximately 30% on burned sites, while abundance was reduced by 50-90%. One-way ANOVA of all sites (using management type as the independent variable, a full 2-way ANOVA (using management and grassland type of all sites, and a 2-way ANOVA limited to 26 sites paired according to their habitat type and geographic location, demonstrated in all cases a highly significant (up to p < 0.0005 reduction in richness and abundance on fire managed sites. Contingency table analysis of individual species demonstrated that 44% experienced a significant reduction in abundance on fire-managed sites. Only six species positively responded to fire. Comparisons of fire response to the general ecological preferences of these species demonstrated that fully 72% of turf-specialists were negatively impacted by fire, while 67% of duff-specialists demonstrated no significant response. These differences were highly significant (p = 0.0006. Thus, frequent use of fire management represents a significant threat to the health and diversity of North American grassland land snail communities. Protecting this fauna will require the preservation of site organic litter layers, which will require the increase of fire return intervals to 15+ years in conjunction with use of more diversified methods to remove woody and invasive plants.

  7. Differential effects of naloxone on rewarding electrical stimulation of the central nucleus of the amygdala and parabrachial complex in a place preference study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüera, Antonio D R; García, Raquel; Puerto, Amadeo

    2016-06-01

    The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is considered to be involved in different affective, sensory, regulatory, and acquisition processes. This study analyzed whether electrical stimulation of the PB-CeA system induces preferences in a concurrent place preference (cPP) task, as observed after stimulation of the parabrachial-insular cortex (PB-IC) axis. It also examined whether the rewarding effects are naloxone-dependent. The results show that electrical stimulation of the CeA and external lateral parabrachial subnucleus (LPBe) induces consistent preference behaviors in a cPP task. However, subcutaneous administration of an opiate antagonist (naloxone; 4mg/ml/kg) blocked the rewarding effect of the parabrachial stimulation but not that of the amygdala stimulation. These results are interpreted in the context of multiple brain reward systems that appear to differ both anatomically and neurochemically, notably with respect to the opiate system. PMID:27173444

  8. Effects of treatment with β-blocker and aldosterone antagonist on central and peripheral haemodynamics and oxygenation in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Christine; Hobolth, Lise; Krag, Aleksander;

    2011-01-01

    Patients with cirrhosis often exhibit abnormalities in cardiovascular regulation and oxygenation. Many of these patients are treated with β-blockers and aldosterone antagonists that may influence the regulation of systemic haemodynamics, but the specific effects on systemic haemodynamics and...

  9. Effects of physostigmine on local cerebral glucose utilization in the central components of the rat visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünwald, F; Crane, A; Mende, M; Suda, S; Kennedy, C; Pettigrew, K D; Biersack, H J; Sokoloff, L; Kuschinsky, W

    1993-11-26

    The effects of intravenous administration of physostigmine at doses of 0.03, 0.095, or 0.3 mg/kg on local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) were determined in 3 structures of the visual system of the rat brain by means of the quantitative 2-[14C]deoxyglucose method. LCGU was increased in the superior colliculus (superficial gray layer), but unchanged in the visual cortex and the lateral geniculate body. To determine whether the observed effect of physostigmine on the superior colliculus depended on input from the retina, the highest dose of physostigmine was administered to rats which had previously been enucleated bilaterally. Enucleation decreased LCGU in the superior colliculus of the animals not treated with physostigmine and blocked the effect of physostigmine on LCGU. The effect of physostigmine in the superior colliculus appears, therefore, to depend on input from the retina. PMID:8295735

  10. Effects of prescribed fires on young valley oak trees at a research restoration site in the Central Valley of California

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, K A; Veblen, Kari E.; T. P. YOUNG; Berry, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Woodland restoration sites planted with Quercus lobata (valley oak) often have serious invasions of nonnative annual grasses and thistles. Although prescribed fire can effectively control these exotics, restoration managers may be reluctant to use fire if it causes substantial mortality of recently planted saplings. We studied the effects of prescribed fires on the survival and subsequent growth of 5- and 6-year-old valley oak saplings at a research field near Davis, California. One set of bl...

  11. Central Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Central Pain Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Central Pain Syndrome? Central pain syndrome is a neurological condition ...

  12. Modelling the effects of land use changes on the streamflow of a peri-urban catchment in central Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hävermark, Saga; Santos Ferreira, Carla Sofia; Kalantari, Zahra; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano

    2016-04-01

    Many river basis around the world are rapidly changing together with societal development. Such developments may involve changes in land use, which in turn affect the surrounding environment in various ways. Since the start of industrialisation, the urban areas have extended worldwide. Urbanization can influence hydrological processes by decreasing evapotranspiration, infiltration and groundwater recharge as well as increasing runoff and overland flow. It is therefore of uttermost importance to understand the relationship between land use and hydrology. Although several studies have been investigating the impacts of urbanization on streamflow over the last decades, less is known on how urbanization affects hydrological processes in peri-urban areas, characterized by a complex mosaic of different land uses. This study aimed to model the impact of land use changes, specifically urbanization and commercial forest plantation, on the hydrological responses of the small Ribeira dos Covões peri-urban catchment (6,2 km2) located in central Portugal. The catchment has undergone rapid land use changes between 1958 and 2012 associated with the conversion of agricultural fields (cover area decreased from 48% to 4%) into woodland and urban areas, which increased from 44% to 56% and from 8% to 40%, respectively. For the study, the fully-distributed, physically-based modelling system MIKE SHE was used. The model was designed to examine both how past land use changes might have affected the streamflow and to investigate the impacts on hydrology of possible future scenarios, including a 50 %, 60 % and 70 % urban cover. To this end, a variety of data including daily rainfall since 1958 and forward, daily potential evapotranspiration from 2009 to 2013, monthly temperature averages from 1971 to 2013, land use for the years 1958, 1973, 1979, 1990, 1995, 2002, 2007 and 2012, streamflow from the hydrological years 2008 to 2013, catchment topography and soil types were used. The model

  13. Effects of the aqueous extract from Hyptis pectinata leaves on rodent central nervous system Efeitos do extrato aquoso das folhas da Hyptis pectinata sobre o sistema nervoso central de roedores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexsandro X. Bueno

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the aqueous extract (AE from Hyptis pectinata leaves was studied on rodent central nervous system (CNS. Pharmacological screening, open field, forced swimming, apomorphine-induced hypothermia, elevated plus maze and thiopental-induced sleep tests were used in male and female Swiss mice and Wistar rats. The AE was admnistered orally in single doses 30 minutes before each test. In the screening test the AE (400 mg/kg, p.o., n =3 decreased the frequency of grooming behavior. In the open field test it decreased the amount of time rats spent grooming (AE400: 51.3 ± 8.8, q = 5.513, P Neste trabalho foram estudados os efeitos do extrato aquoso (EA obtido das folhas da Hyptis pectinata sobre o sistema nervoso central de roedores. Os seguintes modelos experimentais foram utilizados em camundongos, machos e fêmeas, da linhagem Wistar: "screening" farmacológico, campo aberto, nado forçado, hipotermia induzida por apomorfina, labirinto em cruz elevado e tempo de sono induzido por tiopental. O extrato foi administrado por via oral em dose única, 30 minutos antes de cada teste. No "screening" farmacológico o EA (400 mg/kg, p.o., n = 3 diminuiu a freqüência do comportamento de auto-limpeza. No teste do campo aberto o EA diminuiu o tempo gasto em auto-limpeza (AE400: 51,3 ± 8,8, q = 5,513, P < 0.01, n = 10 de maneira similar ao diazepam (control: 107,3 ± 14,2; diazepam: 15,4 ± 4,3, q = 9,049, P < 0.001, n = 10. No teste do nado forçado o EA (400 mg/kg diminuiu o tempo de imobilidade (con: 181,3 ± 7,2 s; imip: 91,6 ± 8,9 s, q = 7,958, P < 0,001; AE400: 111,6 ± 14,5 s, q = 6,193, P < 0,001, n = 9 indicando um possível efeito antidepressivo. Isto foi confirmado no modelo de hipotermia induzida pela apomorfina onde o EA (200 mg/kg antagonizou o efeito da apomorfina (AE200: -0,27 ºC, q = 5,588, P < 0,001, n = 10 de maneira similar à imipramina (5 mg/kg (control: -1,08 ºC; imipramine: 0,02 ºC, q = 7,589, P < 0,001, n = 10. Nenhum

  14. A cross sectional study of oral submucous fibrosis in central India and the effect of local triamcinolone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameer, N T; Shukla, Rakesh Kumar

    2012-09-01

    The use of processed arecanut is on the increase. In the impending danger of increased occurrence of oral submucous fibrosis and subsequent oral cancer following this habit is colossal. So an attempt is made to clinically evaluate the condition and to evaluate the effect of triamcinolone on this condition. Using the clinical data collected from the patients presenting in the ENT OPD of NSCB Medical College Hospital, Jabalpur, a cross sectional study was done and the effect of intralesional triamcinolone on this condition is noted by biweekly submucosal injections of 40 mg triamcinolone for 12 weeks and followed up for 1 year. The effect of therapy was evaluated subjectively by improvement in symptoms and objectively by increase in mouth opening. The age of occurrence and sex predilection also showed a significant change with more young males being affected by the condition. There was no significant correlation between effect of triamcinolone therapy and duration of addiction but a significant correlation (P effect in the initial stages of the disease. The fact that more youngsters are being affected needs serious consideration. PMID:23998027

  15. The effect of body position and axial load on spinal canal morphology: an MRI study of central spinal stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Rasmus; Jensen, Tue Secher; Pope, Malcolm;

    2007-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A method comparison study. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of body position and axial load of the lumbar spine on disc height, lumbar lordosis, and dural sac cross-sectional area (DCSA). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: The effects of flexion and extension on spinal canal diameters...... position with applied axial loading. Disc height, lumbar lordosis, and DCSA were measured and the different positions were compared. RESULTS: In section 1, the only significant difference between positions was a reduced lumbar lordosis during standing when compared with lying (P = 0.04), most probably a...... and DCSA are well documented. However, the effects of axial loading, achieved by upright standing or by a compression device, are still unclear. METHODS: Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis were examined in 2 separate studies, including 16 and 20 patients, respectively. In section 1, magnetic...

  16. Analyses on the Effectiveness of EVA Implementation in Central Enterprises%中央企业实施EVA的有效性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘地海

    2012-01-01

    以2011年中央企业EVA前30家中的28家作为研究对象,采用灰色关联度方法研究了EVAR与资产报酬率(RTAR)、总资产净利润率(ROA)、总资产净利润率(ROA)、净资产收益率(ROE)、投入资本回报率(ROIC)、可持续增长率(SGR)和资本积累率(RCA)等传统会计指标的关联度,结论表明中央企业实施EVA的有效性。%In this study ,28 of first 30 central enterprises in EVA implementation in 2011 are used as subjects of study. Meanwhile, Grey Correlation Degree method is applied to the research on association degrees of accounting indexes such as the association degrees between EVAR and RTAR, as well as ROA, ROE, ROIC, SGR, RCA and so on. It is concluded that there is the effectiveness in the EVA implementation of central enterprises.

  17. Effect of environmental forcing on the biomass, production and growth rate of size-fractionated phytoplankton in the central Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huete-Ortega, María; Calvo-Díaz, Alejandra; Graña, Rocío; Mouriño-Carballido, Beatriz; Marañón, Emilio

    2011-11-01

    To ascertain the response of phytoplankton size classes to changes in environmental forcing, we determined size-fractionated biomass, carbon fixation and growth (production/biomass) rates in surface waters along the central Atlantic Ocean (26°N-5°S). As a result of the enhanced input of nutrients into the euphotic layer and the higher water column stability found at the equatorial upwelling, we observed increases not only in phytoplankton biomass and primary production, but also in turnover rates, suggesting nutrient limitation of phytoplankton physiology in the oligotrophic central Atlantic. The phytoplankton groups analysed (pico-, small nano-, large nano- and micro-phytoplankton) showed different responses to the equatorial environmental forcing, in terms of carbon biomass, primary production and growth rate. Large nano- and micro-phytoplankton consistently showed higher growth rates and carbon fixation to chl a ratios than smaller phytoplankton. We observed a higher stimulating effect of increased nitrate supply on the small phytoplankton growth rates. This observation can be explained by the dynamics of the equatorial upwelling, where the continuous but small nutrient input into the euphotic layer provide a competitive advantage for smaller cells adapted to oligotrophic conditions. The size-fractionated approach shown here reveals important group-specific differences in the response to environmental forcing, which cannot be appreciated in bulk measurements of the whole community.

  18. Effects of projected climate (2011–50) on karst hydrology and species vulnerability—Edwards aquifer, south-central Texas, and Madison aquifer, western South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Barbara J.; Stamm, John F.; Poteet, Mary F.; Symstad, Amy J.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Long, Andrew J.; Norton, Parker A.

    2014-01-01

    Karst aquifers—formed by the dissolution of soluble rocks such as limestone—are critical groundwater resources in North America, and karst springs, caves, and streams provide habitat for unique flora and fauna. Springflow and groundwater levels in karst terrane can change greatly over short time scales, and therefore are likely to respond rapidly to climate change. How might the biological communities and ecosystems associated with karst respond to climate change and accompanying changes in groundwater levels and springflow? Sites in two central U.S. regions—the Balcones Escarpment of south-central Texas and the Black Hills of western South Dakota (fig. 1)—were selected to study climate change and its potential effects on the local karst hydrology and ecosystem. The ecosystems associated with the Edwards aquifer (Balcones Escarpment region) and Madison aquifer (Black Hills region) support federally listed endangered and threatened species and numerous State-listed species of concern, including amphibians, birds, insects, and plants. Full results are provided in Stamm and others (2014), and are summarized in this fact sheet.

  19. Dose and Volume of the Irradiated Main Bronchi and Related Side Effects in the Treatment of Central Lung Tumors With Stereotactic Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijm, Marloes; Schillemans, W; Aerts, Joachim G; Heijmen, B; Nuyttens, Joost J

    2016-04-01

    High radiation dose to the main bronchi can result in stenosis, occlusion or fistula formation, and death. Only 8 articles have reported side effects to the main bronchi from stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), mostly with only one symptomatic complication per article. Therefore, we calculated the dose to the bronchial structures, such as trachea; mainstem bronchi; intermediate bronchus; upper-, middle-, and lower-lobe bronchus; and the segmental bronchi in 134 patients with central tumors and calculated the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for each of these structures, with toxicity determination based upon computed tomography imaging. No side effects were found in the trachea, and only stenosis occurred in the main bronchus and bronchus intermedius. Higher grades of side effects, such as occlusion and atelectasis, were only seen in the upper-, middle-, and lower bronchi and the segmental bronchi. When 0.5cc of a segmental bronchi was irradiated to 50Gy in 5 fractions, it was about 50% likely to be occluded radiographically. For grade 1 radiographically evident side effects, the 50% risk level for a 5-fraction Dmax was 55Gy for mid-bronchi and 65Gy for mainstem bronchi. To assure the relationship between clinical toxicity and side effects to the bronchi, further investigation is needed. PMID:27000511

  20. In-Situ Effects of Simulated Overfishing and Eutrophication on Benthic Coral Reef Algae Growth, Succession, and Composition in the Central Red Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Jessen

    Full Text Available Overfishing and land-derived eutrophication are major local threats to coral reefs and may affect benthic communities, moving them from coral dominated reefs to algal dominated ones. The Central Red Sea is a highly under-investigated area, where healthy coral reefs are contending against intense coastal development. This in-situ study investigated both the independent and combined effects of manipulated inorganic nutrient enrichment (simulation of eutrophication and herbivore exclosure (simulation of overfishing on benthic algae development. Light-exposed and shaded terracotta tiles were positioned at an offshore patch reef close to Thuwal, Saudi Arabia and sampled over a period of 4 months. Findings revealed that nutrient enrichment alone affected neither algal dry mass nor algae-derived C or N production. In contrast, herbivore exclusion significantly increased algal dry mass up to 300-fold, and in conjunction with nutrient enrichment, this total increased to 500-fold. Though the increase in dry mass led to a 7 and 8-fold increase in organic C and N content, respectively, the algal C/N ratio (18±1 was significantly lowered in the combined treatment relative to controls (26±2. Furthermore, exclusion of herbivores significantly increased the relative abundance of filamentous algae on the light-exposed tiles and reduced crustose coralline algae and non-coralline red crusts on the shaded tiles. The combination of the herbivore exclusion and nutrient enrichment treatments pronounced these effects. The results of our study suggest that herbivore reduction, particularly when coupled with nutrient enrichment, favors non-calcifying, filamentous algae growth with high biomass production, which thoroughly outcompetes the encrusting (calcifying algae that dominates in undisturbed conditions. These results suggest that the healthy reefs of the Central Red Sea may experience rapid shifts in benthic community composition with ensuing effects for

  1. In-Situ Effects of Simulated Overfishing and Eutrophication on Benthic Coral Reef Algae Growth, Succession, and Composition in the Central Red Sea.

    KAUST Repository

    Jessen, Christian

    2013-06-19

    Overfishing and land-derived eutrophication are major local threats to coral reefs and may affect benthic communities, moving them from coral dominated reefs to algal dominated ones. The Central Red Sea is a highly under-investigated area, where healthy coral reefs are contending against intense coastal development. This in-situ study investigated both the independent and combined effects of manipulated inorganic nutrient enrichment (simulation of eutrophication) and herbivore exclosure (simulation of overfishing) on benthic algae development. Light-exposed and shaded terracotta tiles were positioned at an offshore patch reef close to Thuwal, Saudi Arabia and sampled over a period of 4 months. Findings revealed that nutrient enrichment alone affected neither algal dry mass nor algae-derived C or N production. In contrast, herbivore exclusion significantly increased algal dry mass up to 300-fold, and in conjunction with nutrient enrichment, this total increased to 500-fold. Though the increase in dry mass led to a 7 and 8-fold increase in organic C and N content, respectively, the algal C/N ratio (18±1) was significantly lowered in the combined treatment relative to controls (26±2). Furthermore, exclusion of herbivores significantly increased the relative abundance of filamentous algae on the light-exposed tiles and reduced crustose coralline algae and non-coralline red crusts on the shaded tiles. The combination of the herbivore exclusion and nutrient enrichment treatments pronounced these effects. The results of our study suggest that herbivore reduction, particularly when coupled with nutrient enrichment, favors non-calcifying, filamentous algae growth with high biomass production, which thoroughly outcompetes the encrusting (calcifying) algae that dominates in undisturbed conditions. These results suggest that the healthy reefs of the Central Red Sea may experience rapid shifts in benthic community composition with ensuing effects for biogeochemical cycles if

  2. Specification of electron beam quality from ionization distribution in central axis and a study about heterogenity effects in these distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some parameters on physical and terapeutic properties of the electron beams generated by ''nevratron XII'' accelerator of the Hospital of Medicine in Ribeirao Preto - USP, Brasil are evaluated. The effects from heterogenities into an irradiated mean, called ''phantom'' or simulator are studied. (M.J.C.)

  3. Edge effect of low-traffic forest roads on bird communities in secondary production forests in central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šálek, M.; Svobodová, Jana; Zasadil, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 7 (2010), s. 1113-1124. ISSN 0921-2973 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : Biodiversity * Bird assemblages * Czech Republic * Edge effect * Habitat fragmentation * Landscape structure * Point count method Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.200, year: 2010

  4. Effect of direct seeding mulch-based systems on soil carbon storage and macrofauna in central Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchart, E.; Bernoux, M.; Sarda, X.; Feller, C. [Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement, Montpellier (France); Siqueira Neto, M.; Cerri, C.C.; Piccolo, M. [CENA-USP, Piracicaba (Brazil). Lab. Biogeoquimica Ambiental; Douzet, J.M. [CIRAD, Antsirabe (Madagascar); Scopel, E. [CIRAD-CA, Planaltina (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    Soils represent a large carbon pool, approximately 1500 Gt, equivalent to almost three times the quantity stored in terrestrial biomass and twice the amount stored in the atmosphere. The management and maintenance of soil carbon is therefore an integral part of the global carbon cycle. Land use change, inappropriate agricultural practices and climate change can all lead to a net release of C from soils to the atmosphere, exacerbating the problems of greenhouse gas release. Any modification of land-use or land management can induce variations in soil carbon stocks, even in agricultural systems that are perceived to be in a steady state. These modifications also alter soil macrofauna that is known to affect soil carbon dynamics. Direct seeding Mulch-based Cropping (DMC) systems with two crops per year without soil tillage have widely been adopted over the last 10 to 15 years in the Cerrado (central region) of Brazil. They are replacing the traditional soybean monocropping with fallow under conventional tillage (CT). Th e objective of this study was to examine how DMC practices affect soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics and macrofauna (Rio Verde, Goias State). The approach was to determine soil C stocks and macrofauna in five fi elds under DMC aged 1, 5, 7, 11 and 13 years. In order to compare DMC systems with the native system of the region and previous land-use, a situation under native Cerrado (tree-savanna like vegetation) and a field conducted traditionally (CT) were also studied. Soil C stocks were calculated for the 0-10 and 0-40 cm soil depth and also for the fi rst 400 kg m{sup -2} of soil to compare the same amount of soil and to suppress the potential artefact of soil compaction when sample is based on fix layer depth. Soil macrofauna was hand-sorted from soil monoliths (30 cm depth, TSBF method). In our study, the annual rate of carbon storage was equal to ca. 1.6 MgC ha{sup -1}, which is in the range of values measured for DMC in different areas of Brazil

  5. CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BERGMAN, T. B.; STEFANSKI, L. D.; SEELEY, P. N.; ZINSLI, L. C.; CUSACK, L. J.

    2012-09-19

    THE CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DEVELOP AN OPTIMAL SEQUENCE OF REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTING THE CERCLA DECISION ON THE CENTRAL PLATEAU. THE STUDY DEFINES A SEQUENCE OF ACTIVITIES THAT RESULT IN AN EFFECTIVE USE OF RESOURCES FROM A STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE WHEN CONSIDERING EQUIPMENT PROCUREMENT AND STAGING, WORKFORCE MOBILIZATION/DEMOBILIZATION, WORKFORCE LEVELING, WORKFORCE SKILL-MIX, AND OTHER REMEDIATION/DISPOSITION PROJECT EXECUTION PARAMETERS.

  6. Eutrophication, pollution and fragmentation: effects on the parasite communities in roach and perch in four lakes in central Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtonen, E T; Holmes, J C; Koskivaara, M

    1997-09-01

    Parasite communities in the four study lakes reflected the influences of habitat fragmentation, pollution and eutrophication. Discriminant analysis of communities at the individual host level reveal two major axes. One, characterized by reduced numbers of digeneans and myxosporeans and increased numbers of acanthocephalans and monogeneans, contrasts communities in a lake affected by chemical pollution from a pulp mill with two eutrophic, less polluted lakes. Changes in the density of intermediate hosts, direct effects on ectoparasites and impaired immune systems were regarded as important mechanisms. The second contrasts communities in an oligotrophic, unpolluted lake with the two eutrophic lakes, and was more complex, reflecting habitat fragmentation, and pollution or eutrophication, probably mediated by the same mechanisms as above. Monitoring easily seen discriminating parasites following 8 years of reduced pollutant loading showed some, but not all, of the effects of pollution could be reserved in a relatively short time. PMID:9802072

  7. The effect of seasonality on fish species composition and abundance in Rungan river floodplain, Palangkaraya, Central Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAMBANG SULISTIYARTO

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Tropical floodplain rivers are home to the largest fraction of freshwater fish diversity and as such should be a focal point of fish conservation efforts. The aim of this study was to inventory of the fish fauna and analyzing the effect of seasonality on fish species composition and abundance in the Rungan river floodplain at Palangkaraya Municipality. The results of this study provide background data for conserving fish resources. Fishes were sampled at monthly intervals between May 2005 and April 2006 with gillnets of standardized dimensions with several mesh sizes. These were carried out at three stations with different habitat type, includes forested swamp, opened swamp, and river. A total of 4278 fishes were collected consisting of 50 species and 19 families. Seasonality effects on fish species composition and abundance in forested swamp and river. Fish species composition and abundance in opened swamp tend not to drive by seasonality.

  8. Brain somatostatin receptor 2 mediates the dipsogenic effect of central somatostatin and cortistatin in rats: role in drinking behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Karasawa, Hiroshi; Yakabi, Seiichi; Wang, Lixin; Stengel, Andreas; Rivier, Jean; Taché, Yvette

    2014-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular injection of stable somatostatin (SST) agonists stimulates food and water intake in rats. We investigated the receptor subtype(s) involved in the dipsogenic effect of intracerebroventricular injection of SST agonists, mechanisms of action, and role. In nonfasted and non-water-deprived male rats with chronic intracerebroventricular cannula, intake of water without food or food without water was monitored separately to avoid any interactions compared with intracerebroven...

  9. Effect of nutrient availability on understory algae during El Niño conditions at Central Pacific Baja California

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Carmona, Gustavo; Riosmena Rodríguez, Rafael; Serviere Zaragoza, Elisa; Ponce Díaz, Germán

    2011-01-01

    An experimental study of the effect of artificial nutrient supply on understory algae was made during 1997 El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) at the Mexican Pacific coast of Baja California. Twelve quadrats of 1 m2 were placed on the sea bed. Six quadrats were used as controls, and six were treatments with added artificial nutrients. Nutrients were supplied using polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipes filled with slow-release inorganic fertilizer. The algae species composition and cover in each quad...

  10. Studies on the subcommissural organ area in the rat: the effects aldosterone infused into the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D-aldosterone (5 ng/μl/hr) was infused for six days into the area of the subcommissural organ (SCO) of conscious rats to test the hypothesis that the SCO and the adrenal zona glomerulosa are related functionally in a negative feedback manner. Aldosterone increased urinary sodium loss and the sodium/potassium ratio. These effects still occurred when cannulae were displaced caudally up to 1 mm from the targeted SCO area. Aldosterone decreased the cross-sectional area of the adrenal medulla without affecting chromaffin cell density. Adrenal content of corticosterone was increased. These effects were highly dependent upon proper cannula placement and were not observed when the tip of the cannula was not in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid of the pineal recess over the rostral two-thirds of the SCO. Aldosterone infused intracerebroventricularly (ivt) into a lateral ventricle had no effect on sodium excretion, adrenal corticosterone concentration or adrenal morphology. After the infusion of radiolabelled aldosterone into the SCO area, the majority of the radioactivity was restricted to an area about 1-2 mm in diameter from the SCO. Iron-dextran injected intraperiotoneally did not accumulate in the SCO; therefore, the blood-brain barrier is intact. It is concluded that the effects of aldosterone were dependent upon the area of the brain in which it was infused. Aldosterone increased sodium excretion by an action in the SCO and/or adjacent structures. A relationship between mineralocorticoids and the adrenal modulla mediated by the SCO is also postulated. With regard to the blood-brain and brain-CSF barriers, the SCO more closely resembles general brain tissue than other circumventricular organs

  11. Central Effect of Exogenous Histamine on Pain Induced by Sub-Plantar Injection of Formalin in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Esmaeal Tamaddonfard

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of normal saline (control), histamine, mepyramine (a histamine H1-receptor antagonist) and ranitidine (a histamine H2-receptor antagonist) were investigated on the formalin-induced pain in rabbits. Subcutaneous (SC) injection of a formalin (100 μl, 5%) solution into the ventral surface of the right hind paw was performed, and the time durations spent licking and biting the injected paw were measured in 10 min bl...

  12. The effects of bromazepam over the central and frontal areas during a motor task: an EEG study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzete Fortunato

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the influence of bromazepam while executing a motor task. Specifically, we intend to analyze the changes in alpha absolute power under two experimental conditions, bromazepam and placebo. We also included analyses of theta and beta frequencies. We collected electroencephalographic data before, during, and after motor task execution. We used a Two Way ANOVA to investigate the condition (PL × Br6 mg and moment (pre and post variables for the following electrodes: Fp1, Fp2, F7, F3, Fz, F4, F8, C3, CZ and C4. We found a main effect for condition on the electrodes FP1, F7, F3, Fz, F4, C3 and CZ, for alpha and beta bands. For beta band we also found a main effect for condition on the electrodes Fp2, F8 and C4; for theta band we identified a main effect for condition on C3, Cz and C4 electrodes. This finding suggests that the motor task did not have any influence on the electrocortical activity in alpha, and that the existing modifications were a consequence due merely to the drug use. Despite its anxiolytic and sedative action, bromazepam did not show any significant changes when the individuals executed a finger extension motor task.

  13. Effect of A Nitrogen-Fixing Actinorhizal Shrub on Herbaceous Vegetation in A Mixed Conifer Forest of Central Himalaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Bargali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we examined the effect of a nitrogen-fixing shrub Coriaria nepalensis Wall on herb species composition, diversity and biomass. The effect was measured in terms of species richness, diversity and biomass of herb species in three sites varying in Coriaria density viz. site 1 (low Coriaria density; 20 ha-1, site-2 (medium Coriaria density; 120 ha-1 and site-3 (high Coriaria density 190 ha-1. Species richness was minimum at Site-1 (16 species, and maximum at site-2 (27 species. G. aparine dominated site-1 and Arthraxon sp dominated site-2 and 3. The individual herb density ranged between 0.40 - 42.40 m-2, and total herb density ranged between 138- 170.4 m-2 and was maximum at site-2. Value for species richness (27 and Shannon Index (3.72 was highest for medium Coriaria density site and lowest for low Coriaria density site. Simpson Index ranged between 0.11 and 0.14 and was lowest for site-2(medium Coriaria density indicating that at this the dominance was shared by many species. Along the gradient of Coriaria density, maximum biomass was recorded at site-3 with highest Coriaria density and lowest at site-2 with medium Coriaria density. This may be due to the symbiotic nitrogen fixing ability of Coriaria that improve the habitat quality. The facilitative effect of C. nepalensis in terms of soil amelioration and herb growth can be used to regenerate degraded forest ecosystems.

  14. A study on the effective factors of mortalities with unknown causes among one month old infants of Tehran and Central provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshkani Z

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the net effect of birth type (one or more children, the number of previous dead children, the mother tongue, mother's age at infant birth, number of deliveries, consanguineous marriages, and the father's education on the mortality of one-month-old infants in families of residents of Tehran and the Central Province is studied. The data referred to in this study was taken from a survey conducted by the Department of Vital Statistics in 1991. Applying multiple logistic regreession to analyze the data I removed the effect of a number of variables to conclude that the consanguineous marriage is significantly effective by itself and in interaction with the number of previous dead children. The odds ratio among consanguine parents for those who had one previous dead child to those without a previous dead child is 5.45. This ratio for non-consanguineous parents is 4.96. Thus the significant effect of consanguinity is proven.

  15. The Effects of Gravitation on the Inter-Media Agenda-Setting Central Process: The Case of the Murder of Hrant Dink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem YAŞIN

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available While the first level agenda setting researches focus on the transfer of issue salience from the media to public agenda, second level agenda setting researches interest in the attributes emphasized in the news and their affect on the public agenda. Some of these researches tends to analysis the media agenda. Influences of the news media on each other are studied by the inter-media agenda setting researches at at both the first and second levels. The same researches examine also the effects of different types of media on each other. However there is the problem of lack of a systematic theoretical model. This is caused by the differentiation in the aims of researchers and in their research objects. The other problem in the inter-media agenda setting researches is that there is no research on the agenda setting effects of the newspapers which have different ideological and political identities. This research aims to scrutinize the inter-media agenda-setting effects among various newspapers that have got different points of view. The research is designed to test the central gravitation effects of the mainstream news papers. Here the Murder of Hrant Dink is selected as a case study.

  16. A cost-effective structure of a centralized-light-source WDM-PON utilizing inverse-duobinary-RZ downstream and DPSK upstream

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Long-Quan; Qiao Yao-Jun; Ji Yue-Feng

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,we propose a new structure of a centralized-light-source wavelength division multiplexed passive optical network (WDM-PON) utilizing inverse-duobinary-return-to-zero (inverse-duobinary-RZ) downstream and DPSK upstream.It reuses downstream light for the upstream modulation,which retrenches lasers assembled at each optical network unit (ONU),and ultimately cuts down the cost of ONUs a great deal.Meanwhile,a 50-km-reach WDM-PON experiment with 10-Gb/s inverse-duobinary-RZ downstream and 6-Gb/s DPSK upstream is demonstrated here.It is revealed to be a novel cost-effective alternative for the next generation access network.

  17. RADIOIMMUNOTOXICOLOGICAL EFFECT OF ENRICHED URANIUM ON CENTRAL AND PERIPHERAL IMMUNE CELLS AND THE PROTECTIVE ACTION OF IL—1 AND IL—2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱寿彭; 赖冠华; 等

    1994-01-01

    Accumulation of enriched 235U-UO2F2 in the body had injurious effects on the immune function of central and peripheral immune cells.After an intravenous injection of 235U-UO2F2,the spontaneous 3H-TdR incorporation in thymocytes and bone marrow cells decreased.with the thymocytes damaged more markedly.The proliferation ability of spleen T and B lymphocytes were both inhibited,with B lymphocytes inhibited more severely.In spleen B lymphocytes the IL-1 production and IL-2 consumption were diminshed.The inhibition of spleen B lymphocyte proliferation by 235U-UO2F2 was partially restored by adding exogenous IL-1 or IL-2 to the cultured lymphocytes obtained from 235U injected mice.

  18. Modelling radionuclide behaviour in deep lakes of the Italian Alpine region: Seasonality effects and comparison with deep volcanic lakes of Central Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report describes the results of research carried out following the Chernobyl accident to analyse the behaviour of radionuclides in some Italian lakes. The following lacustrine systems were examined: volcanic lakes Bolsena, Bracciano and Vico (central Italy) and lake Como (north Italy) whose drainage area is located in the Alpine region. The average residence times of 137Cs in water of volcanic lakes are much higher than the radionuclide residence time in lake Como. As quantitative analyses can show, the differences between the mean water retention times of the examined lakes do not suffice to explain this occurrence. Some peculiar seasonal effects (thermal stratification of water and ice/snow melting in lake drainage area) and high sedimentation rates are responsible of 137Cs efficient removal from water of lake Como

  19. The long-term therapeutic effect of central lumbar intervertebral disc herniation: a comparison between microendoscopy discectomy and percutaneous lumbar discectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the indications, long-term outcomes and complications of microendoscopy discectomy (MED) and percutaneous lumbar discectomy (PLD) in treating central lumbar intervertebral disc herniation, and to compare the advantages of the two procedures. Methods: During the period from Jan. 2001 to March 2002 surgical procedure was carried out in sixty-three patients with single central lumbar disc herniation. The surgeries included MED (n=23) and PLD (n=40). The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. The lesion site, the operation time, the blood loss in operation, the time staying in bed, the hospitalization cost and the postoperative hospitalization days were recorded. Oswestry disability index (ODI) and MacNab score were determined. Statistical analysis was performed by using pair sample t-test, κ-test and Fisher exact test. All patients were followed up. Results: A mean follow-up time was (5.1±0.6) years for patients receiving MED and (6.6±0.7) years for patients receiving PLD. The ODI and MacNab scores of patients receiving MED were better than these of patients receiving PLD. The hospitalization cost and the postoperative hospitalization days of MED group was higher and longer than these of PLD group, the differences between the two groups were statistically significant. The occurrence of long-term complication in MED group was 3.49%, while no complication was seen in PLD group. Conclusion: For the treatment of central lumbar intervertebral disc herniation, both MED and PLD are safe and minimally-invasive procedures with satisfactory long-term effectiveness, and the patients recover from clinical symptoms quickly. The PLD has used more common than MED. The performance of MED needs more skill and experience. Therefore, an interventional radiologist has to follow a relatively long learning curve in order to get the sufficient training and practice before he or she can master the technique of MED with full confidence. However, the long

  20. To centralize or not to centralize?

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Andrew; Kunisch, Sven; Müller-Stewens, Günter

    2011-01-01

    The CEO's dilemma-were the gains of centralization worth the pain it could cause?-is a perennial one. Business leaders dating back at least to Alfred Sloan, who laid out GM's influential philosophy of decentralization in a series of memos during the 1920s, have recognized that badly judged centralization can stifle initiative, constrain the ability to tailor products and services locally, and burden business divisions with high costs and poor service.1 Insufficient centralization can deny bus...

  1. The effects of a glycine reuptake inhibitor R231857 on the central nervous system and on scopolamine-induced impairments in cognitive and psychomotor function in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem-Moolenaar, M; Zoethout, R W M; de Boer, P; Schmidt, M; de Kam, M L; Cohen, A F; Franson, K L; van Gerven, J M A

    2010-11-01

    The effects of the selective inhibitor of the glycine transporter 1, R231857, in development for schizophrenia, on the central nervous system (CNS) were investigated in healthy males in the absence and presence of scopolamine. This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-period crossover ascending dose study. Pharmacokinetics, body sway, saccadic and smooth pursuit eye movements, pupillometry, pharmacoelectroencephalogram (EEG), Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) for alertness, mood, calmness and psychedelic effects, adaptive tracking, finger tapping, Stroop test, Visual and Verbal Learning Task (VVLT) and hormone levels were assessed. R231857 was administered alone and together with scopolamine to investigate the potential reversal of anticholinergic CNS impairment by the glycine reuptake inhibitor. Forty-two of the 45 included subjects completed the study. Scopolamine significantly affected almost every CNS parameter measured in this study. R231857 alone showed some pharmacodynamic changes compared with placebo. Although these effects might be an indication that R231857 penetrated the CNS, they were not consistent or dose-related. R231857 had some small effects on scopolamine-induced CNS-impairment, which were also not clearly dependent on dose. Scopolamine proved to be an accurate, reproducible and safe model to induce CNS impairment by an anticholinergic mechanism. R231857 lacked consistent dose-related effects in this study, probably because CNS concentrations were too low to produce significant/ reproducible CNS-effects or to affect the scopolamine challenge in healthy volunteers. The effects of higher doses in healthy volunteers and the clinical efficacy in patients remain to be established. PMID:19648218

  2. Effect of Chlorophyll-a Spatial Distribution on Upper Ocean Temperature in the Central and Eastern Equatorial Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Pengfei; LIU Hailong; ZHANG Xuehong

    2008-01-01

    Effect of the spatial distributions of chlorophyll-a concentration on upper ocean temperature and currents in the equatorial Pacific is investigated through a set of numerical experiments by using an ocean general circulation model. This study indicates that enhanced meridional gradient of chlorophylloa between the equator and off-equatorial regions can strengthen zonal circulation and lead to a decrease in equatorial sea surface temperature (SST). However, the circulation changes by themselves are not effective enough to affect SST in the equatorial cold tongue (CT) region. The comparison between the experiments indicates that the CT SST are more sensitive to chlorophyll-a distribution away from the equator. The off-equatorial chlorophyll-a traps more solar radiation in the mixed layer, therefore, the temperature in the thermocline decreases. The cold water can then be transported to the equator by the meridional circulation within the mixed layer. Furthermore, the relation among CT SST, the surface heat flux, and the equatorial upwelling are discussed. The study implies the simulation biases of temperature on the equator are not only related to the local ocean dynamics but also related to some deficiency in simulating off-equatorial processes.

  3. Effect of Secondary Cooling Conditions on Solidification Structure and Central Macrosegregation in Continuously Cast High-Carbon Rectangular Billet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jie; Chen, Weiqing

    2015-10-01

    Solidification structures of high carbon rectangular billet with a size of 180 mm × 240 mm in different secondary cooling conditions were simulated using cellular automaton-finite element (CAFE) coupling model. The adequacy of the model was compared with the simulated and the actual macrostructures of 82B steel. Effects of the secondary cooling water intensity on solidification structures including the equiaxed grain ratio and the equiaxed grain compactness were discussed. It was shown that the equiaxed grain ratio and the equiaxed grain compactness changed in the opposite direction at different secondary cooling water intensities. Increasing the secondary cooling water intensity from 0.9 or 1.1 to 1.3 L/kg could improve the equiaxed grain compactness and decrease the equiaxed grain ratio. Besides, the industrial test was conducted to investigate the effect of different secondary cooling water intensities on the center carbon macrosegregation of 82B steel. The optimum secondary cooling water intensity was 0.9 L/kg, while the center carbon segregation degree was 1.10. The relationship between solidification structure and center carbon segregation was discussed based on the simulation results and the industrial test.

  4. Effect of almond shell biochar addition on the hydro-physical properties of an arable Central Valley soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, V.; Ghezzehei, T. A.

    2014-12-01

    Biochar is composed of any carbonaceous matter pyrolyzed under low oxygen exposure. Its use as a soil amendment to address soil infertility has been accelerated by studies reporting positive effects of enhanced nutrient retention, cation exchange capacity, microbial activity, and vegetative growth over time. Biochar has also been considered as a carbon sequestration method because of its reported environmental persistence. While the aforementioned effects are positive benefits of biochar's use, its impact on soil physical properties and water flow are equally important in maintaining soil fertility. This study aims to show how soil physical and hydraulic properties change over time with biochar addition. To address these aims, we conducted a 9 week microcosm incubation experiment with local arable loamy sand soils amended with biochar. Biochar was created from locally collected almond shells and differs by pyrolysis temperatures (350°C, 700°C) and size (impact biochar addition on soil physical and hydraulic properties. Furthermore, it provides insight into whether or not converting local agricultural waste into biochar for soil use will be beneficial, especially in agricultural systems undergoing climate stress.

  5. Prevalence and distribution of gastrointestinal helminths and their effects on weight gain in free-range chickens in Central Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiri, I K; Phiri, A M; Ziela, M; Chota, A; Masuku, M; Monrad, J

    2007-05-01

    Examination of helminths from gastrointestinal tracts of 125 free-range chickens in Zambia revealed a 95.2% prevalence rate. The species and their prevalences were: Allodapa suctoria (85.6%), Tetrameres americana (80.8%), Ascaridia galli (28.8%), Gonglonema ingluvicola (50.4%), Raillietina spp. (81.6%) and Heterakis gallinarum (32.8%). No trematodes or Syngamus trachea were found. Mixed infections accounted for 88.2% as compared to 7.2% of single infections. Effects of helminthoses on weight gain were investigated in 100 growing chickens randomly assigned to treatment (levamisole) and untreated control groups. There was a significant mean (+/- SEM) weight gain (grams) of 812.8 +/- 51.4 in the treatment group and 623 +/- 57.4 in the control group (p < 0.01). The mean (+/- SEM) worm burdens from the control group and the treatment group were 96.3 +/- 5.61 and 22.05 +/- 2.61, respectively. These results confirm the higher risk of helminth infections in free-range systems and may explain the deleterious effects in chickens. PMID:17847826

  6. Effects of Adaptogens on the Central Nervous System and the Molecular Mechanisms Associated with Their Stress—Protective Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Wikman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptogens were initially defined as substances that enhance the “state of nonspecific resistance” in stress, a physiological condition that is linked with various disorders of the neuroendocrine-immune system. Studies on animals and isolated neuronal cells have revealed that adaptogens exhibit neuroprotective, anti-fatigue, antidepressive, anxiolytic, nootropic and CNS stimulating activity. In addition, a number of clinical trials demonstrate that adaptogens exert an anti-fatigue effect that increases mental work capacity against a background of stress and fatigue, particularly in tolerance to mental exhaustion and enhanced attention. Indeed, recent pharmacological studies of a number of adaptogens have provided a rationale for these effects also at the molecular level. It was discovered that the stress—protective activity of adaptogens was associated with regulation of homeostasis via several mechanisms of action, which was linked with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the regulation of key mediators of stress response, such as molecular chaperons (e.g., HSP70, stress-activated c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase 1 (JNK1, Forkhead box O (FOXO transcription factor DAF-16, cortisol and nitric oxide.

  7. Soil CO2 efflux in central Amazonia: environmental and methodological effects Efluxo de CO2 do solo na Amazônia central: efeitos ambiental e metodológico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício B. Zanchi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil respiration plays a significant role in the carbon cycle of Amazonian rainforests. Measurements of soil respiration have only been carried out in few places in the Amazon. This study investigated the effects of the method of ring insertion in the soil as well as of rainfall and spatial distribution on CO2 emission in the central Amazon region. The ring insertion effect increased the soil emission about 13-20% for sandy and loamy soils during the firsts 4-7 hours, respectively. After rainfall events below 2 mm, the soil respiration did not change, but for rainfall greater than 3 mm, after 2 hours there was a decrease in soil temperature and respiration of about 10-34% for the loamy and sand soils, with emissions returning to normal after around 15-18 hours. The size of the measurement areas and the spatial distribution of soil respiration were better estimated using the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM data. The Campina reserve is a mosaic of bare soil, stunted heath forest-SHF and tall heath forest-THF. The estimated total average CO2 emissions from the area was 3.08±0.8 µmol CO2 m-2 s-1. The Cuieiras reserve is another mosaic of plateau, slope, Campinarana and riparian forests and the total average emission from the area was 3.82±0.76 µmol CO2 m-2 s-1. We also found that the main control factor of the soil respiration was soil temperature, with 90% explained by regression analysis. Automated soil respiration datasets are a good tool to improve the technique and increase the reliability of measurements to allow a better understanding of all possible factors driven by soil respiration processes.Respiração do solo possui um importante papel no ciclo do carbono em florestas tropicais Amazônicas. Entretanto poucas medidas de respiração do solo foram feitas. Neste estudo são apontados os efeitos na metodologia de instalação dos anéis no solo, bem como os efeitos da precipitação e a distribuição espacial da emissão de CO2

  8. The effect of central contracts on the stability and performance of the England Test cricket team. [El efecto de contratos centrales sobre la estabilidad y el desempeño del equipo inglés de Test cricket].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Bullough

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1999 the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB decided to implement central contracts for elite player management to give them control over a group of players to represent the England national team in Test cricket. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact that this change in policy has had on the stability and performance of the England Test team, and discuss implications thereof. Using a sample of 13 seasons pre-central contracts (1987-1999 and 13 seasons post-central contracts (2000-2012, the results, from secondary analysis of England’s Test match scorecards from both sample periods, allowed investigation of team performance and stability. To gain a greater understanding of how central contracts impacted on the England Test side, eight interviews were also organised with key stakeholders in English cricket. The results showed that both the stability and performance of the England Test side improved considerably in the sample period post-central contracts (2000-2012 with a much greater consistency of selection (fewer changes per match alongside an improvement in England’s on-field performance (better win ratio and points per match. The paper identifies two key challenges facing the current player management system in England from domestic and external sources. Resumen En 1999 El Consejo de Cricket en Inglaterra y Gales (ECB – England and Wales Cricket Board decidió implementar contratos centrales para la dirección de jugadores de élite, con el fin de darle control sobre el grupo de jugadores que representan el equipo nacional de Inglaterra de Test cricket. El objetivo de este artículo es investigar el impacto que este cambio ha tenido sobre la estabilidad y el desempeño del equipo inglés de Test cricket y considerar sus implicaciones. Tras emplear una muestra de 13 temporadas antes de la firma de los contratos centrales (entre 1987 y 1999 y otras 13 temporadas después de su implementación (entre 2000 y 2012, los

  9. Insulin potentiates the therapeutic effect of memantine against central STZ-induced spatial learning and memory deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahramian, Abbas; Rastegar, Karim; Namavar, Mohammad Reza; Moosavi, Maryam

    2016-09-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder. Memantine has been approved for moderate to severe AD, but evidence indicates that it does not modify disease progression. Recently insulin has been found to exert some beneficial effects on cognition. This study aimed to compare the protective effects of memantine and insulin in an animal model of memory deficit. It also evaluated the effects of combination therapy of these drugs. Adult male Sprague-Dawely rats approximately 8-10 weeks old were used. The canules were implanted bilaterally into lateral ventricles. STZ was administered on days 1 and 3 (3mg/kg in divided doses) and Memantine (5 or 10mg/kg/ip) or/and Insulin (3 or 6mU/icv) were started from day 4 and continued till day 13. The animal's learning and memory capability was assessed on days 14-16 using Morris water maze. On day 17 a visible platform test was done to assess the animals' visuomotor ability. After completion of behavioral studies the brain sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin for routine histological evaluation. The results show that memantine in doses 5 and 10mg/kg improved memory at day 3 of training and memantine 5mg/kg was more potent than memantine 10mg/kg. Insulin in dose 3mU, but not 6 mU, reversed STZ-induced memory deficit from day 2 of training. When insulin was added to memantine, it increased the potency of memantine 5mg/kg in preventing a memory deficit, but surprisingly was not successful in impeding STZ-induced amnesia, in combination with memantine 10mg/kg. This research work revealed that insulin act more efficiently than memantine in reversing STZ-induced memory impairment. Additionally combination of insulin and memantine seems to act better than memantine alone, providing that a dose adjustment has been done. This study suggests considering the combination therapy of memantine and insulin in dementia and AD. PMID:27233828

  10. Investigation on seasonal variations of aerosol properties and its influence on radiative effect over an urban location in central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Subin; Gharai, Biswadip; Niranjan, K.; Rao, P. V. N.

    2016-05-01

    Aerosol plays an important role in modulating solar radiation, which are of great concern in perspective of regional climate change. The study analysed the physical and optical properties of aerosols over an urban area and estimated radiative effect using three years in-situ data from sunphotometer, aethalometer and nephelometer as input to radiative transfer model. Aerosols properties indicate the dominance of fine mode aerosols over the study area. However presence of coarse mode aerosols is also found during pre-monsoon [March-April-May]. Daily mean aerosol optical depth showed a minimum during winter [Dec-Jan-Feb] (0.45-0.52) and a maximum during pre-monsoon (0.6-0.7), while single scattering albedo (ω) attains its maximum (0.78 ± 0.05) in winter and minimum (0.67 ± 0.06) during pre-monsoon and asymmetry factor varied in the range between 0.48 ± 0.02 to 0.53 ± 0.04. Episodic events of dust storm and biomass burning are identified by analyzing intrinsic aerosol optical properties like scattering Ångström exponent (SAE) and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) during the study periods and it has been observed that during dust storm events ω is lower (∼0.77) than that of during biomass burning (∼0.81). The aerosol direct radiative effect at top of the atmosphere during winter is -11.72 ± 3.5 Wm-2, while during pre-monsoon; it is -5.5 ± 2.5 Wm-2, which can be due to observed lower values of ω during pre-monsoon. A large positive enhancement of atmospheric effect of ∼50.53 Wm-2 is observed during pre-monsoon compared to winter. Due to high aerosol loading in pre-monsoon, a twofold negative surface forcing is also observed in comparison to winter.

  11. Long-lasting beneficial effects of central serotonin receptor 7 stimulation in female mice modeling Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Bianca; Chiodi, Valentina; Adriani, Walter; Lacivita, Enza; Mallozzi, Cinzia; Leopoldo, Marcello; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Fuso, Andrea; Laviola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by severe behavioral and physiological symptoms. Mutations in the methyl CpG binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) cause more than 95% of classic cases, and currently there is no cure for this devastating disorder. Recently we have demonstrated that specific behavioral and brain molecular alterations can be rescued in MeCP2-308 male mice, a RTT mouse model, by pharmacological stimulation of the brain serotonin receptor 7 (5-HT7R). This member of the serotonin receptor family-crucially involved in the regulation of brain structural plasticity and cognitive processes-can be stimulated by systemic repeated treatment with LP-211, a brain-penetrant selective 5-HT7R agonist. The present study extends previous findings by demonstrating that the LP-211 treatment (0.25 mg/kg, once per day for 7 days) rescues RTT-related phenotypic alterations, motor coordination (Dowel test), spatial reference memory (Barnes maze test) and synaptic plasticity (hippocampal long-term-potentiation) in MeCP2-308 heterozygous female mice, the genetic and hormonal milieu that resembles that of RTT patients. LP-211 also restores the activation of the ribosomal protein (rp) S6, the downstream target of mTOR and S6 kinase, in the hippocampus of RTT female mice. Notably, the beneficial effects on neurobehavioral and molecular parameters of a seven-day long treatment with LP-211 were evident up to 2 months after the last injection, thus suggesting long-lasting effects on RTT-related impairments. Taken together with our previous study, these results provide compelling preclinical evidence of the potential therapeutic value for RTT of a pharmacological approach targeting the brain 5-HT7R. PMID:25926782

  12. Long-lasting beneficial effects of central serotonin receptor 7 stimulation in female mice modeling Rett syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca eDe Filippis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RTT is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by severe behavioral and physiological symptoms. Mutations in the methyl CpG binding protein 2 gene (MECP2 cause more than 95% of classic cases, and currently there is no cure for this devastating disorder. Recently we have demonstrated that specific behavioral and brain molecular alterations can be rescued in MeCP2-308 male mice, a RTT mouse model, by pharmacological stimulation of the brain serotonin receptor 7 (5-HT7R. This member of the serotonin receptor family – crucially involved in the regulation of brain structural plasticity and cognitive processes – can be stimulated by systemic repeated treatment with LP-211, a brain-penetrant selective 5-HT7R agonist. The present study extends previous findings by demonstrating that the LP-211 treatment (0.25 mg/kg, once per day for 7 days rescues RTT-related phenotypic alterations, motor coordination (Dowel test, spatial reference memory (Barnes maze test and synaptic plasticity (hippocampal long-term-potentiation in MeCP2-308 heterozygous female mice, the genetic and hormonal milieu that resembles that of RTT patients. LP-211 also restores the activation of the ribosomal protein S6, the downstream target of mTOR and S6 kinase, in the hippocampus of RTT female mice. Notably, the beneficial effects on neurobehavioral and molecular parameters of a seven-day long treatment with LP-211 were evident up to two months after the last injection, thus suggesting long-lasting effects on RTT-related impairments. Taken together with our previous study, these results provide compelling preclinical evidence of the potential therapeutic value for RTT of a pharmacological approach targeting the brain 5-HT7R.

  13. Baseline water quality and preliminary effects of artificial recharge on ground water, south-central Kansas, 1995-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Andrew C.; Christensen, Victoria G.; Ross, Heather C.

    1999-01-01

    sites after recharge began, although concentrations remained within the range of baseline values in the Equus Beds aquifer and are considerably less than U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water criteria. However, a substantial quantity of water has not been recharged at the Sedgwick site to determine the overall effects of artificial recharge on aquifer quality. Continued monitoring is necessary to determine long-term effects at both sites. Major ion and trace element concentrations in source water and receiving water were analyzed to determine the compatibility of recharge and receiving ground water for artificial recharge. Stiff diagrams of major ions were used to show the similarity or differences between source surface water and receiving ground water. The water from both sources, for the most part, was chemically compatible to the receiving aquifer water at both recharge sites. It may be possible to decrease the monitoring frequency at the Halstead recharge site because water-quality changes in receiving water at this site are very gradual. However, real-time water-quality monitoring of surrogates needs to be site specific for the determination of chloride and atrazine. Real-time water-quality monitoring potentially can be used to more effectively manage the artificial recharge process, enabling project officials to respond more rapidly to changes in water quality.

  14. The effect of hypocaloric diet enriched in legumes with or without L- arginine and selenium on anthropometric measures in central obese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Alizadeh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identifying new ways to decrease adiposity will be very valuable for health. The aim of this study was to find out whether L- Arginine (Arg and selenium alone or together can increase the effect of hypocaloric diet enriched in legumes (HDEL on anthropometric measures in healthy obese women. Methods: This randomized, double- blind, placebo- controlled trial was undertaken in 84 healthy premenopausal women with central obesity. After 2 weeks of run- in on an isocaloric diet, participants were randomly considered to eat HDEL, Arg (5 g/d and HDEL, selenium (200 μg/d and HDEL or Arg, selenium and HDEL for 6 weeks. The following variables were assessed before intervention and 3 and 6 weeks after it: weight, waist circumference, hip circumference, waist to hip ratio (WHR, body mass index (BMI, and fasting nitrite/nitrate (NOx concentrations. Other variables (arm, thigh, calf and breast circumferences, subscapular, triceps, biceps and suprailiac skinfold thicknesses, sum of skinfold thicknesses (SSF, body density (D and estimated percent of body fat (EPF were assessed before and after intervention. Results: HDEL showed a significant effect in reduction of waist, hip, arm, thigh, calf and breast circumferences, triceps, biceps, subscapular and suprailiac skinfold thicknesses, WHR, SSF, D and EPF. HDEL + Arg + selenium significantly reduced suprailiac skinfold thicknesses; and there was no significant effect of HDEL, Arg, selenium and Arg plus selenium on weight, BMI and fasting NOx . Conclusions: The study indicates that HDEL + Arg + selenium reduce suprailiac skinfold thicknesses which represents the abdominal obesity reduction.

  15. An empirical study on the relationship between effective organizational communication and the performance of central office staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Monavvarian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Inter-organizational communication plays an important role in promoting strategic collaboration among firms. It can improve productivity and increases collaboration among employees. In this paper, we present an empirical study to measure the role of inter-organizational communication on efficiency among administration employees who work for one the oldest banks in Iran, Bank Melli Iran. The study uses 380 full time employees who work for 28 different administration divisions of this bank. The survey uses a questionnaire consists of 19 questions about inter-organizational communication and 25 questions about efficiency of employees. The reliability of the survey has been approved using an initial survey and Cronbach alpha was calculated as 0.87, which is well above the minimum acceptable level. The result of our survey confirms there is a meaningful relationship between inter-organizational communication and efficiency of all administration employees who work for this bank. There is also a meaningful relationship between age and efficiency and the maximum efficiency belongs to people aged 31 to 40. According to our survey, men have more inter-organizational efficiency than women do. The result of our survey also confirms that positivism impacts more than other factors on efficiency. Among five effective factors, empathy has the most impact and responsiveness 6 efficiency dimensions.

  16. Neuroprotective effects of the catalytic subunit of telomerase: A potential therapeutic target in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Giraldo, Yeimy; Forero, Diego A; Echeverria, Valentina; Gonzalez, Janneth; Ávila-Rodriguez, Marco; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Barreto, George E

    2016-07-01

    Senescence plays an important role in neurodegenerative diseases and involves key molecular changes induced by several mechanisms such as oxidative stress, telomere shortening and DNA damage. Potential therapeutic strategies directed to counteract these molecular changes are of great interest for the prevention of the neurodegenerative process. Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein composed of a catalytic subunit (TERT) and a RNA subunit (TERC). It is known that the telomerase is involved in the maintenance of telomere length and is a highly expressed protein in embryonic stages and decreases in adult cells. In the last decade, a growing number of studies have shown that TERT has neuroprotective effects in cellular and animal models after a brain injury. Significantly, differences in TERT expression between controls and patients with major depressive disorder have been observed. More recently, TERT has been associated with the decrease in reactive oxygen species and DNA protection in mitochondria of neurons. In this review, we highlight the role of TERT in some neurodegenerative disorders and discuss some studies focusing on this protein as a potential target for neuroprotective therapies. PMID:27095058

  17. Histamine in the central nervous system: characterization of release and effects of other neurotransmitters on the activity of histaminergic neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of endogenous histamine and the involvement of adrenergic, dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurons in the modulation of histamine release was investigated by the push-pull technique. The posterior hypothalamus of conscious rats was superfused through a push-pull cannula with artificial cerebrospinal fluid containing neuroactive compounds. Histamine was determined radioenzymatically or by HPLC with fluorimetric detection. Experiments with depolarizing, channel-blocking and enzyme-inhibiting agents proved the neuronal origin of the histamine analysed. Superfusion with agonists and antagonists of α-adrenoceptors led to the conclusion that under in vivo conditions the neuronal histamine released is modulated by noradrenergic α2-adrenoceptors in a negative way, but not by β-adrenoceptors. Findings with dopaminergic agents suggested that dopaminergic neurons of the hypothalamus influence the release of histamine in a dual way: D2-heteroreceptors stimulate, D3-heteroreceptors inhibit the release. The anterior and medial hypothalamus possess glutamate-heteroreceptors, which modulate the histamine release in a positive way. We further studied the influence of the GABA- and NO-system on the manifestation of genetic hypertension and connections to the histaminergic system. The chronical activation of both systems led to distinct effects on blood pressure and histamine contents of main brain areas of normo- and hypertensive rats (WKY, SHR). However, a primary contribution of both systems to the manifestation of hypertension must be excluded. (author)

  18. Modelling the effects of atmospheric sulphur and nitrogen deposition on selected lakes and streams of the Central Alps (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rogora

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic model MAGIC was calibrated and applied to selected sites in north-western Italy (3 rivers, 10 alpine lakes to predict the future response of surface water to different scenarios of atmospheric deposition of S and N compounds. Results at the study sites suggest that several factors other than atmospheric deposition may influence the long-term changes in surface water chemistry. At present the lumped approach of dynamic models such as MAGIC cannot represent all the processes occurring at the catchment scale. Climate warming in particular and its effects on surface water chemistry proved to be important in the study area. Furthermore the river catchments considered here showed clear signs of N saturation. This condition and the increasing concentrations of NO3 in river water were simulated using N dynamics recently included in MAGIC. The modelling performed in this study represents the first application of MAGIC to Italian sites. The results show that inclusion of other factors specific to the Mediterranean area, such as dust deposition and climate change, may improve the fit to observed data and the reliability of the model forecast. Despite these limitations, the model captured well the main trends in chemical data in both rivers and lakes. The outputs clearly demonstrate the benefits of achieving the emission reductions in both S and N compounds as agreed under the Gothenburg Protocol rather than making no further emission reductions. It was also clear that, besides the substantial reduction of SO4 deposition from the peak levels of the 1980s, N deposition must also be reduced in the near future to protect freshwaters from further acidification. Keywords: MAGIC, northern Italy, acidification, recovery, nitrogen saturation

  19. Rapid effects of estrogen on G protein-coupled receptor activation of potassium channels in the central nervous system (CNS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Martin J; Qiu, Jian; Wagner, Edward J; Rønnekleiv, Oline K

    2002-12-01

    Estrogen rapidly alters the excitability of hypothalamic neurons that are involved in regulating numerous homeostatic functions including reproduction, stress responses, feeding and motivated behaviors. Some of the neurons include neurosecretory neurons such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and dopamine neurons, and local circuitry neurons such as proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons. We have elucidated several non-genomic pathways through which the steroid alters synaptic responses in these hypothalamic neurons. We have examined the modulation by estrogen of the coupling of various receptor systems to inwardly-rectifying and small-conductance, Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK) channels using intracellular sharp-electrode and whole-cell recording techniques in hypothalamic slices from ovariectomized female guinea pigs. Estrogen rapidly uncouples mu-opioid receptors from G protein-gated inwardly-rectifying K(+) (GIRK) channels in POMC neurons and GABA(B) receptors from GIRK channels in dopamine neurons as manifested by a reduction in the potency of mu-opioid and GABA(B) receptor agonists to hyperpolarize their respective cells. This effect is blocked by inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC). In addition, after 24h following steroid administration in vivo, the GABA(B)/GIRK channel uncoupling observed in GABAergic neurons of the preoptic area is associated with reduced agonist efficacy. Conversely, estrogen enhances the efficacy of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor agonists to inhibit apamin-sensitive SK currents in these preoptic GABAergic neurons, and does so in both a rapid and sustained fashion. Finally, we observed a direct, steroid-induced hyperpolarization of GnRH neurons. These findings indicate a richly complex yet coordinated steroid modulation of K(+) channel activity in hypothalamic (POMC, dopamine, GABA, GnRH) neurons that are involved in regulating numerous homeostatic functions. PMID:12650715

  20. Comparison of the effects of intravitreal bevacizumab and triamcinolone acetonide in the treatment of macular edema secondary to central retinal vein occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Demir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the effects of intravitrealbevacizumab (IVB and intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (IVT in the treatment of macular edema (ME secondary to central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO. Materials and Methods: There were 20 patients treated with IVB (1.25 mg/0.05 mL and 16 treated with IVT (4 mg/0.1 mL. The two groups were compared with regard to best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, central macular thickness (CMT on optical coherence tomography (OCT, slit-lamp biomicroscopy and fundus fluorescein angiography results, intraocular pressure (IOP, numbers of injections, and adverse events. Results: The mean follow-up times in the IVB and IVT groups were 17.45±8.1 months (range: 8-33 months and 19.94±10.59 months (range: 6-40 months, respectively (P = 0.431. Visual acuity increased and CMT decreased significantly within both groups, but no differences were observed between the groups (P = 0.718. The percentages of patients with increased IOP and iatrogenic cataracts were significantly higher in the IVT group than in the IVB group. Conclusions: Treatment with IVB and IVT both resulted in significant improvement in visual acuity and a decrease in CMT in patients with ME secondary to non-ischemic CRVO, with no difference between the two treatments. The incidence of adverse events, however, was significantly greater in the IVT group than in the IVB group. IVB may be preferred over IVT for the treatment of ME in patients with non-ischemic CRVO.