WorldWideScience

Sample records for central andes northern

  1. Regional distance shear-coupled PL propagation within the northern Altiplano, central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Jennifer L.; Beck, Susan L.; Zandt, George

    1999-12-01

    Properties of the shear-coupled P wavetrain (SPL) from regional earthquakes provide important information about the structure of the crust and upper mantle. We investigate broad-band seismic data from intermediate-depth earthquakes and develop a grid search technique using synthetic seismograms to study the sensitivity of SPL and to model the crustal structure of the northern Altiplano, central Andes. Waveforms from an earthquake that occurred on 1994 December 12 within the Nazca slab beneath the Altiplano display a clear SPL wavetrain at the temporary stations deployed during the BANJO and SEDA experiments. We relocate this event and determine the moment tensor by inverting the complete long-period waveforms. With these source parameters fixed, we perform sensitivity analyses using a reflectivity technique to compute synthetic seismograms at a distance of 313 km (BANJO station 2, SALI). We find that, at this distance, the long-period SPL wavetrain is sensitive to the following model parameters, in order of decreasing sensitivity: crustal VP/VS, mantle VP/VS, average crustal velocity, crustal thickness, focal depth, distance (location), crustal Qα and Qβ, and mantle velocity. We develop a grid search method to investigate the four parameters of the crust/upper mantle model to which the synthetic seismograms are most sensitive at SALI (crustal VP/VS, mantle VP/VS, average crustal velocity, crustal thickness). Trade-offs exist among all four of the model parameters, resulting in a range of acceptable crustal models that provide excellent fits between the data and synthetic seismograms in the passband of 15-100 s at a single station. However, by using data at a range of distances (150-450 km) we find that the model that provides the best overall fit between the data and synthetic seismograms, and thus best approximates the average characteristics of the crust and upper mantle structure of the northern Altiplano, is characterized by an average crustal velocity of 6

  2. Wide-Angle Seismic Experiment Across the Oeste Fault Zone, Central Andes, Northern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Yáñez, G. A.; Vera, E. E.; Sepúlveda, J.

    2008-12-01

    From December 6-21, 2007, we conducted a 3-component, radio-telemetric, seismic survey along a ~ 15-km wide E-W transect in the Central Andes, at a latitude of ~ 22.41° S, centered north of the city of Calama (68.9° W), Chile. The study area is sandwiched between the Central Depression in the west and the Andean Western Cordillera of Chile. Recording stations, nominally spaced at intervals of either 125 or 250 m collected up to 3.5 s of refracted seismic arrivals at maximum source-receiver offsets exceeding 15 km. Ten shothole sources, spaced 2-6 km apart focused energy on the shallow (0-3 km), crustal, Paleogene-age structures. Preliminary, tomographic inversions of refracted first arrivals show the top of a shallow ( 600 km), strike-slip fault zone known as the Oeste fault. Turning ray densities suggest the base of the overlying velocity gradient unit (VP, 2-4 km/s) dips inwardly from both east and west directions toward the Oeste fault to depths of almost 1 km. Plate reorganization commencing at least by the latter half of the Oligocene led from oblique to more orthogonal convergence between the South American and the Nazca (Farallon) Plates. We interpret previously mapped, older, minor faults as being generated within the right-lateral, orogen-parallel, Oeste strike-slip fault zone, and postdated by Neogene, N-S striking thrust faults. In this context we also interpret that the spatial distribution of velocity units requires an period of extensional activity that may (1) postdate the transpressional strike slip fault activity of the Neogene, (2) be related to a later releasing bend through the translation and interaction of rigid blocks hidden at depth or even (3) be the consequence of inelastic failure from the result of flexural loading.

  3. Paleomagnetism in the Precordillera of northern Chile (22°30'S): implications for the history of tectonic rotations in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoza, Rubén; Tomlinson, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Widespread clockwise rotations in Mesozoic and Lower Tertiary rocks of northern Chile have been interpreted as the sum of two rotational events separated in time: an early rotation related to local deformation plus a late rotation related to wholesale rotation of northern Chile linked to Late Cenozoic oroclinal bending in the Central Andes. In this paper we report new paleomagnetic data from Cretaceous, upper Oligocene and Miocene sedimentary rocks in the Precordillera of northern Chile. The results suggest that all these rocks acquired their remanence at or close to the time of deposition. The lack of rotation in undeformed lower Miocene strata clearly indicates that clockwise rotations found in underlying, faulted and folded Cretaceous rocks were completed before the Late Cenozoic. Results from nearby localities in deformed upper Oligocene strata would argue for little (˜5°) rotation since the late Oligocene. Data from widely separated Miocene localities covering an area of about 5000 km 2 in the Calama basin strongly suggest that northern Chile did not undergo significant wholesale rotation during the Late Cenozoic. This, together with previous paleomagnetic evidence against Neogene rigid-body-like rotation of the southern Peruvian forearc, suggests that the curved shape of the Central Andean forearc was not significantly enhanced during the Late Cenozoic. By inference, all of the rotation in most Mesozoic and Lower Tertiary rocks of northern Chile was accomplished in the Cretaceous and/or Early Cenozoic, when the locus of deformation in the Central Andes was localized in the present forearc region.

  4. Cenozoic uplift of the Central Andes in northern Chile and Bolivia - reconciling paleoaltimetry with the geological evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    The Cenozoic geological evolution of the Central Andes, along two transects between ~17.5°S and 21°S, is compared with paleo-topography, determined from published paleo-altimetry studies. Surface and rock uplift are quantified using simple 2-D models of crustal shortening and thickening, together with estimates of sedimentation, erosion and magmatic addition. Prior to ~25 Ma, during a phase of amagmatic flat-slab subduction, thick skinned crustal shortening and thickening was focused in the Eastern and Western Cordilleras, separated by a broad basin up to 300 km wide and close to sea level, which today comprises the high Altiplano. Surface topography in the Eastern Cordillera appears to be ~1 km lower than anticipated from crustal thickening, which may be due to the pull-down effect of the subducted slab, coupled to the overlying lithosphere by a cold mantle wedge. Oligocene steepening of the subducted slab is indicated by the initiation of the volcanic arc at ~27 - 25 Ma, and widespread mafic volcanism in the Altiplano between 25 and 20 Ma. This may have resulted in detachment of mantle lithosphere and possibly dense lower crust, triggering 1 - 1.5 km of rapid uplift (over Altiplano and western margin of the Eastern Cordillera and establishing the present day lithospheric structure beneath the high Andes. Since ~25 Ma, surface uplift has been the direct result of crustal shortening and thickening, locally modified by the effects of erosion, sedimentation and magmatic addition from the mantle. The rate of crustal shortening and thickening varies with location and time, with two episodes of rapid shortening in the Altiplano, lasting < 5 Myrs, that are superimposed on a long term history of ductile shortening in the lower crust, driven by underthrusting of the Brazilian Shield on the eastern margin.

  5. Tectonic styles and crustal shortening of the Central Andes "Pampean" flat-slab segment in northern Chile (27-29°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Fernando; Arriagada, César; Peña, Matías; Deckart, Katja; Charrier, Reynaldo

    2016-01-01

    The Andean orogenic belt, located in the Central Andes "Pampean flat-slab" segment in northern Chile (27-29°S), is composed of two major tectonic regions: the Coastal Cordillera and the Frontal Cordillera. To understand their internal tectonic styles, history of growth and the shortening absorbed by the upper crustal structure of this segment, we combined regional geological mapping data, new ages obtained from radiometric U-Pb dating, and a semibalanced and restored cross-section 225.18 km in length. The results as shown in the previous Mesozoic extensional fault systems, established in northern Chile by the Gondwana breakup, have played a fundamental role in the orogenic buildup. The central structure is characterized by an asymmetric basin (Upper Cretaceous-Paleocene) confined by a doubly vergent fault system composed of inverted faults related to the edges of the Mesozoic Chañarcillo and Lautaro Basins. The U-Pb geochronological data obtained from synorogenic volcano-sedimentary deposits and the angular unconformities recorded between the Cenozoic geological units have revealed that the compressive deformation in this segment started at around ~ 80 Ma by tectonic inversion in the eastern Coastal Cordillera and western Frontal Cordillera, however, the presence of Paleocene and Miocene synorogenic successions at the footwall of the basement reverse faults of the Frontal Cordillera suggests a migration of Andean deformation from the west to the east during the Paleocene-Miocene by propagation of ramps involving inherited basement highs. The pre-compression restoration makes it possible to estimate 40.94 km of minimum shortening, concentrated by inversion anticlines and fault-controlled basement highs across the Frontal Cordillera.

  6. 40Ar/39Ar ages from blueschists of the Jambaló region, Central Cordillera of Colombia : implications on the styles of accretion in the Northern Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Bustamante, A.; Juliani, C.; C. M. Hall; Essene, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the first argon dating of blueschists from the Jambaló area (Cauca Department) in the Central Cordillera of the Colombian Andes. Step-heating 40Ar/39Ar spectra were obtained for mica from several lenses of blueschists including greenschist facies rocks. The blueschists are mainly constituted of preserved lenticular cores in strongly mylonitic rocks, which resulted from retrometamorphic processes that affected the high pressure rocks during their exhumation. The majority of...

  7. LANDSAT imagery of the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komer, C. A.; Morgan, P.

    1986-01-01

    The central Andes of South America extend from approximately 14 deg. S to 28 deg. S as an unbroken chain of mountains and volcanoes over 2000 km long. It is here that the Nazca plate dives under the South American plate at angles varying from 10 deg to 30 deg. Very little is known about the volcanoes comprising this classic, subduction-type plate margin. A catalogue of the volcanoes in the central Andes is being prepared by Dr. P.W. Francis and Dr. C.A. Wood at the NASA Lunar and Planetary Institute. At present, more than 800 volcanoes of Cenozoic age have been recognized in the chain, with an estimated 75-80 major, active Quarternary volcanoes. Approximately one hundred 1536 x 1536 pixel color composite Optronics positives were produced from six full LANDSAT Thermatic Mapper scenes and three partial TM scenes. These positives cover a large portion of the central Andes. The positives were produced from LANDSAT data using the VAX imaging package, LIPS. The scenes were first transferred from magnetic tape to disk. The LIPS package was then used to select volcanically interesting areas which were then electronically enhanced. Finally, the selected areas were transferred back to tape and printed on the Optronics equipment. The pictures are color composites using LANDSAT TM bands 7,4, and 2 in the red, green, and blue filters, respectively.

  8. Seismological Parameters in the Northern Andes, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobiesiak, M.; Palme de Osechas, C.; Choy, J. E.; Morandi S., M. T.; Campo, M.; Granado Ruiz, C.

    2001-12-01

    Venezuelas tectonic setting as part of the plate boundary between the Caribbean and the South American plate causes two major seismologically active fault systems: the roughly west - east trending strike slip fault system along the coast with numerous sub-parallel faults and the Bocono fault system, which dominates the Venezuelan southwest - northeast striking Andes. The main Bocono fault reaches a total length of about 500 km and has a width of approximately 100 km between the southern and northern baseline of the mountain slopes which are marked by inverse faults. This is believed to be due to strain partitioning, a concept which seems to apply as well to the Bocono fault system. The whole fault system is characterized by a high seismicity rate of small scale and intermediate event magnitudes ranging from 1.5 to 6.3 in the last fifty years. In this study we would like to present an investigation on 39 focal mechanism solutions and a b-value mapping of the Andean region with the main goal to throw light on the stess and strain situation. For recompiling the focal memchanisms calculated from first motion polarities, various sources had to been used: seismograms from stations of the local and regional networks of the Seismological Center of ULA, the national seismic network operated by FUNVISIS, the seismic network Lago Maracaibo of PDVSA and the local seismic network of DESURCA. For the b-value mapping we used the two catalogues of ULA and DESURCA of which the last one registered more than 6500 events from 1994 to 1999. The set of focal mechanism solutions studied showed normal, strike slip, and reverse faulting mechanisms concentrated in distinct areas of the Bocono fault system and thus resulting in a zonation also supported by the determinations of the azimuths of the maximum horizontal stress SHmax. This hypothesis of the zonation of the Andes region is strongly supported by the results of the b-value mapping. The zonation as seen in the varying major stress

  9. Cenozoic foreland-basin evolution in the northern Andes : insights from thermochronology and basin analysis in the Eastern Cordillera, Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Parra, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    The modern foreland basin straddling the eastern margin of the Andean orogen is the prime example of a retro-arc foreland basin system adjacent to a subduction orogen. While widely studied in the central and southern Andes, the spatial and temporal evolution of the Cenozoic foreland basin system in the northern Andes has received considerably less attention. This is in part due to the complex geodynamic boundary conditions, such as the oblique subduction and accretion of the Caribbean plates ...

  10. The Amazon-Laurentian connection as viewed from the Middle Proterozoic rocks in the central Andes, western Bolivia and northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosdal, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Middle Proterozoic rocks underlying the Andes in western Bolivia, western Argentina, and northern Chile and Early Proterozoic rocks of the Arequipa massif in southern Peru?? from the Arequipa-Antofalla craton. These rocks are discontinuously exposed beneath Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks, but abundant crystalline clasts in Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the western altiplano allow indirect samples of the craton. Near Berenguela, western Bolivia, the Oligocene and Miocene Mauri Formation contains boulders of granodiorite augen gneiss (1171??20 Ma and 1158??12 Ma; U-Pb zircon), quartzose gneiss and granofels that are inferred to have arkosic protoliths (1100 Ma source region; U-Pb zircon), quartzofeldspathic and mafic orthogneisses that have amphibolite- and granulite-facies metamorphic mineral assemblages (???1080 Ma metamorphism; U-Pb zircon), and undeformed granitic rocks of Phanerozoic(?) age. The Middle Proterozoic crystalline rocks from Berenguela and elsewhere in western Bolivia and from the Middle Proterozoic Bele??n Schist in northern Chile generally have present-day low 206Pb/204Pb ( 15.57), and elevated 208Pb/204Pb (37.2 to 50.7) indicative of high time-averaged Th/U values. The Middle Proterozoic rocks in general have higher presentday 206Pb/204Pb values than those of the Early Proterozoic rocks of the Arequipa massif (206Pb/204Pb between 16.1 and 17.1) but lower than rocks of the southern Arequipa-Antofalla craton (206Pb/204Pb> 18.5), a difference inferred to reflect Grenvillian granulite metamorphism. The Pb isotopic compositions for the various Proterozoic rocks lie on common Pb isotopic growth curves, implying that Pb incorporated in rocks composing the Arequipa-Antofalla craton was extracted from a similar evolving Pb isotopic reservoir. Evidently, the craton has been a coherent terrane since the Middle Proterozoic. Moreover, the Pb isotopic compositions for the Arequipa-Antofalla craton overlap those of the Amazon craton, thereby supporting a link

  11. A Regional GIS of the Central Andes, South America - Integration of Satellite and Geophysical Data Sets

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, K; F. K. List;  

    1996-01-01

    The Central Andes of northern Chile, southwestern Bolivia and northwestern Argentina are studied by a research project supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (SFB 267). The main topics of these geological and geophysical investigations are the orogeny of the Andean mountains and the crustal development at an active continental margin. The "Andean GIS" is designed as a tool for data collection, management, overview, analysis and mapping. The integration of different data supports the...

  12. Glacial areas, lakes areas, and snowlines from 1975-2012: Status of the Cordillera Vilcanota, including the Quelccaya Ice Cap, northern central Andes, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanshaw, Maiana Natania

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes of southern Peru have received limited attention compared to glaciers in other regions (both near and far), yet remain of vital importance to agriculture, fresh water, and hydropower supplies of downstream communities. Little is known about recent glacial-area changes and how the glaciers in this region respond to climate changes, and, ultimately, how these changes will affect lake and water supplies. To remedy this, we have used 144 multi-spectral satellite images spanning almost four decades, from 1975-2012, to obtain glacial and lake-area outlines for the understudied Cordillera Vilcanota region, including the Quelccaya Ice Cap. In a second step, we have estimated the snowline altitude of the Quelccaya Ice Cap using spectral unmixing methods. We have made the following four key observations: First, since 1988 glacial areas throughout the Cordillera Vilcanota have been declining at a rate of 5.46 +/- 1.70 km2/yr (22-year average, 1988-2010, with 95 % confidence interval). The Quelccaya Ica Cap, specifically, has been declining at a rate of 0.67 +/- 0.18 km2/yr since 1980 (31-year average, 1980-2011, also with 95 % confidence interval); Second, decline rates for individual glacierized regions have been accelerating during the past decade (2000-2011) as compared to the preceding decade (1990-2000); Third, the snowline of the Quelccaya Ice Cap is retreating to higher elevations as glacial areas decrease, by a total of almost 300 m between its lowest recorded elevation in 1989 and its highest in 1998; and fourth, as glacial regions have decreased, 61 % of lakes connected to glacial watersheds have shown a roughly synchronous increase in lake area, while 84 % of lakes not connected to glacial watersheds have remained stable or have declined in area. Our new and detailed data on glacial and lake areas over 37 years provide an important spatiotemporal assessment of climate variability in this area. These data can be integrated into further

  13. Glacial areas, lake areas, and snow lines from 1975 to 2012: status of the Cordillera Vilcanota, including the Quelccaya Ice Cap, northern central Andes, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanshaw, M. N.; Bookhagen, B.

    2014-03-01

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes of southern Peru have received limited attention compared to glaciers in other regions (both near and far), yet remain of vital importance to agriculture, fresh water, and hydropower supplies of downstream communities. Little is known about recent glacial-area changes and how the glaciers in this region respond to climate changes, and, ultimately, how these changes will affect lake and water supplies. To remedy this, we have used 158 multi-spectral satellite images spanning almost 4 decades, from 1975 to 2012, to obtain glacial- and lake-area outlines for the understudied Cordillera Vilcanota region, including the Quelccaya Ice Cap. Additionally, we have estimated the snow-line altitude of the Quelccaya Ice Cap using spectral unmixing methods. We have made the following four key observations: first, since 1988 glacial areas throughout the Cordillera Vilcanota (1988 glacial area: 361 km2) have been declining at a rate of 3.99 ± 1.15 km2 yr-1 (22 year average, 1988-2010, with 95% confidence interval (CI), n = 8 images). Since 1980, the Quelccaya Ice Cap (1980 glacial area: 63.1 km2) has been declining at a rate of 0.57 ± 0.10 km2 yr-1 (30 year average, 1980-2010, with 95% CI, n = 14). Second, decline rates for individual glacierized regions have been accelerating during the past decade (2000-2010) as compared to the preceding decade (1988-1999) with an average increase from 37.5 to 42.3 × 10-3 km2 yr-1 km-2 (13%). Third, glaciers with lower median elevations are declining at higher rates than those with higher median elevations. Specifically, glaciers with median elevations around 5200 m a.s.l. are retreating to higher elevations at a rate of ~1 m yr-1 faster than glaciers with median elevations around 5400 m a.s.l. Fourth, as glacial regions have decreased, 77% of lakes connected to glacial watersheds have either remained stable or shown a roughly synchronous increase in lake area, while 42% of lakes not connected to glacial

  14. An elusive new species of Marsupial Frog (Anura: Hemiphractidae: Gastrotheca from the Andes of northern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Duellman

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A new species of marsupial frog, genus Gastrotheca, is described from high-elevation grasslands in the Andes in Región Amazonas in northernPeru, where even calling males are well hidden in deep moss. The new species is distinguished from all congeners by its unique color pattern that includes a narrow, blackbordered, yellow middorsal stripe. The species apparently belongs to the Gastrotheca plumbea Group, which ranges in the Andes from northern Colombia to northern Peru.

  15. Evolution of crustal thickening in the central Andes, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, Nathan; McQuarrie, Nadine; Ryan, Jamie; Karimi, Bobak; Beck, Susan; Zandt, George

    2015-09-01

    Paleoelevation histories from the central Andes in Bolivia have suggested that the geodynamic evolution of the region has been punctuated by periods of large-scale lithospheric removal that drive rapid increases in elevation at the surface. Here, we evaluate viable times and locations of material loss using a map-view reconstruction of the Bolivian orocline displacement field to forward-model predicted crustal thicknesses. Two volumetric models are presented that test assumed pre-deformation crustal thicknesses of 35 km and 40 km. Both models predict that modern crustal thicknesses were achieved first in the northern Eastern Cordillera (EC) by 30-20 Ma but remained below modern in the southern EC until ≤10 Ma. The Altiplano is predicted to have achieved modern crustal thickness after 10 Ma but only with a pre-deformation thickness of 50 km, including 10 km of sediment. At the final stage, the models predict 8-25% regional excess crustal volume compared to modern thickness, largely concentrated in the northern EC. The excess predicted volume from 20 to 0 Ma can be accounted for by: 1) crustal flow to the WC and/or Peru, 2) localized removal of the lower crust, or 3) a combination of the two. Only models with initial crustal thicknesses >35 km predict excess volumes sufficient to account for potential crustal thickness deficits in Peru and allow for lower crustal loss. However, both initial thickness models predict that modern crustal thicknesses were achieved over the same time periods that paleoelevation histories indicate the development of modern elevations. Localized removal of lower crust is only necessary in the northern EC where crustal thickness exceeds modern by 20 Ma, prior to paleoelevation estimates of modern elevations by 15 Ma. In the Altiplano, crustal thicknesses match modern values at 10 Ma and can only exceed modern values by 5 Ma, post-dating when modern elevations were thought to have been established. Collectively, these models predict that

  16. Late Mesozoic to Paleogene stratigraphy of the Salar de Atacama Basin, Antofagasta, Northern Chile: Implications for the tectonic evolution of the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpodozis, Constantino; Arriagada, César; Basso, Matilde; Roperch, Pierrick; Cobbold, Peter; Reich, Martin

    2005-04-01

    The Salar de Atacama basin, the largest "pre-Andean" basin in Northern Chile, was formed in the early Late Cretaceous as a consequence of the tectonic closure and inversion of the Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Tarapacá back arc basin. Inversion led to uplift of the Cordillera de Domeyko (CD), a thick-skinned basement range bounded by a system of reverse faults and blind thrusts with alternating vergence along strike. The almost 6000-m-thick, upper Cretaceous to lower Paleocene sequences (Purilactis Group) infilling the Salar de Atacama basin reflects rapid local subsidence to the east of the CD. Its oldest outcropping unit (Tonel Formation) comprises more than 1000 m of continental red sandstones and evaporites, which began to accumulate as syntectonic growth strata during the initial stages of CD uplift. Tonel strata are capped by almost 3000 m of sandstones and conglomerates of western provenance, representing the sedimentary response to renewed pulses of tectonic shortening, which were deposited in alluvial fan, fluvial and eolian settings together with minor lacustrine mudstone (Purilactis Formation). These are covered by 500 m of coarse, proximal alluvial fan conglomerates (Barros Arana Formation). The top of the Purilactis Group consists of Maastrichtian-Danian alkaline lava and minor welded tuffs and red beds (Cerro Totola Formation: 70-64 Ma K/Ar) deposited during an interval of tectonic quiescence when the El Molino-Yacoraite Late Cretaceous sea covered large tracts of the nearby Altiplano-Puna domain. Limestones interbedded with the Totola volcanics indicate that this marine incursion advanced westwards to reach the eastern CD slope. CD shortening in the Late Cretaceous was accompanied by volcanism and continental sedimentation in fault bounded basins associated to strike slip along the north Chilean magmatic arc to the west of the CD domain, indicating that oblique plate convergence prevailed during the Late Cretaceous. Oblique convergence seems to have

  17. Land Use Change and Hydrologic Processes in High-Elevation Tropical Watersheds of the Northern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, W. A.; Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Covino, T. P.; Peña, C.

    2013-12-01

    The humid tropics cover one-fifth of the Earth's land surface and generate the greatest amount of runoff of any biome globally, but remain poorly understood and understudied. Humid tropical regions of the northern and central Andes have experienced greater anthropogenic land-use/land-cover (LULC) change than nearly any other high mountain system in the world. Vast expanses of this region are currently undergoing rapid transformation to farmland for production of potatoes and pasture for cattle grazing. Although the humid tropics have some of the highest runoff ratios, precipitation, and largest river flows in the world, there is a lack of scientific literature that addresses hydrologic processes in these regions and very few field observations are available to inform management strategies to ensure the sustainability of water resources of present and future generations. We seek to improve understanding of hydrologic processes and feedbacks in the humid tropics using existing and new information from two high-elevation watersheds that span a LULC gradient in the Andes Mountains of Colombia. One site is located in the preserved Chingaza Natural National Park in Central Colombia (undisturbed). The second site is located ~60 km to the northwest and has experienced considerable LULC change over the last 40 years. Combined, these watersheds deliver over 80% of the water resources to Bogotá and neighboring communities. These watersheds have similar climatological characteristics (including annual precipitation), but have strong differences in LULC which result in substantial differences in hydrologic response and streamflow dynamics. We present an overview of many of the pressing issues and effects that land degradation and climate change are posing to the long-term sustainability of water resources in the northern Andes. Our overarching goal is to provide process-based knowledge that will be useful to prevent, mitigate, or respond to future water crises along the Andean

  18. Surface control on contrasts in deformation between eastern and western margins of the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlunegger, F.; Norton, K. P.

    2012-04-01

    enhanced orographic rainfall, which promotes thrusting and internal shortening. A fault-scale coupled erosion-deformation model also shows that low erosion rates and steep topographic angles would have forced a migration of deformation from the Western Escarpment to the eastern side. These findings illustrate the strong control of orographic precipitation on the deformation of the Central Andes. Kober, F. et al. Denudation rates and topography-driven rainfall threshold in northern Chile: multiple cosmogenic nuclide data and sediment budgets. Geomorphology 83, 97-120 (2007). Norton, K. & Schlunegger, F. Migrating deformation in the Central Andes from enhanced orographic rainfall. Nat. Commun. 2, 584 (2011). Safran, E. B et al. Erosion rates driven by channel network incision in the Bolivian Andes. Earth Surf. Process Landforms 30, 1007-1024 (2005).

  19. Crustal-thickness variations in the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Susan L.; Zandt, George; Myers, Stephen C.; Wallace, Terry C.; Silver, Paul G.; Drake, Lawrence

    1996-05-01

    We estimated the crustal thickness along an east-west transect across the Andes at lat 20°S and along a north-south transect along the eastern edge of the Altiplano from data recorded on two arrays of portable broadband seismic stations (BANJO and SEDA). Waveforms of deep regional events in the downgoing Nazca slab and teleseismic earthquakes were processed to isolate the P-to-S converted phases from the Moho in order to compute the crustal thickness. We found crustal-thickness variations of nearly 40 km across the Andes. Maximum crustal thicknesses of 70 74 km under the Western Cordillera and the Eastern Cordillera thin to 32 38 km 200 km east of the Andes in the Chaco Plain. The central Altiplano at 20°S has crustal thicknesses of 60 to 65 km. The crust also appears to thicken from north (16°S, 55 60 km) to south (20°S, 70 74 km) along the Eastern Cordillera. The Subandean zone crust has intermediate thicknesses of 43 to 47 km. Crustal-thickness predictions for the Andes based on Airy-type isostatic behavior show remarkable overall correlation with observed crustal thickness in the regions of high elevation. In contrast, at the boundary between the Eastern Cordillera and the Subandean zone and in the Chaco Plain, the crust is thinner than predicted, suggesting that the crust in these regions is supported in part by the flexural rigidity of a strong lithosphere. With additional constraints, we conclude that the observation of Airy-type isostasy is consistent with thickening associated with compressional shortening of a weak lithosphere squeezed between the stronger lithosphere of the subducting Nazca plate and the cratonic lithosphere of the Brazilian craton.

  20. The largest holocene eruption of the Central Andes found

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez-Turiel, J. L.; J. Saavedra; Perez-Torrado, J. F.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Carracedo, Juan Carlos; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J. I.; Esteban, G.

    2013-01-01

    We present new data and interpretation about a major eruption -spreading 110 km3 ashes over 440.000 km2- long thought to have occurred around 4200 years ago in the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex (CBVC) in NW Argentina. This eruption may be the biggest during the past five millennia in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes, and possibly one of the largest Holocene eruptions in the world. The environmental effects of this voluminous eruption are still noticeable, as evidenced by the high conte...

  1. Giant evaporite belts of the Neogene central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Ricardo N.; Jordan, Teresa E.; Tabbutt, Kenneth T.; Vandervoort, Dirk S.

    1991-04-01

    Large volumes of continental evaporites accumulated within the central Andes during Neogene uplift of the Altiplano-Puna plateau and development of the Andean volcanic arc. Halite and gypsum are dominant minerals, along with local and economically important borates. Playa conditions have existed since ca. 15 Ma; halite and borate deposition has occurred for the past 7 to 8 m.y. Evaporites formed in salar environments (e.g., playa lakes) and are characterized by complex mineral assemblages, occurrence, zonation, and geochemistry. Evaporite deposition was controlled by volcanism, geothermal activity, closed drainage, and climate. These Andean deposits, and their controls, differ from evaporites in other continental and marine environments.

  2. Salar de Atacama basin: A record of compressional tectonics in the central Andes since the mid-Cretaceous

    OpenAIRE

    ARRIAGADA, César; Cobbold, Peter,; Roperch, Pierrick

    2006-01-01

    19 p.; International audience; The Salar de Atacama basin lies in the inner fore arc of northern Chile. Topographically and structurally, it is a first-order feature of the central Andes. The sedimentary fill of the basin constrains the timing and extent of crustal deformation since the mid-Cretaceous. We have studied good exposures along the western edge of the basin and have correlated them with seismic reflection sections and data from an exploration well. Throughout most of its history, t...

  3. Albedo changes, Milankovitch forcing, and late quaternary climate changes in the central Andes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kull, C.; Grosjean, M. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Geography

    1998-11-01

    Late quaternary humidity changes resulted in substantial modifications of the land surface characteristics in the Altiplano of the Atacama desert, central Andes. Reconstructions of surface albedo, top-of-atmosphere (TOA) albedo, and shortwave net radiation in the Andes of northern Chile for 20,14,10,7 and 0 ka suggest that surface and TOA albedo increased substantially during periods of relatively humid environmental conditions (i.e., with large palaeolakes, glaciers and dense vegetation). The decrease of summer shortwave net radiation and seasonality during the late-glacial/early Holocene humid phase (14 to 10 ka) due to Earth`s surface and atmospheric characteristics added to the effect of orbitally driven negative deviations of southern Hemisphere austral summer insolation and minimum seasonality at 20 S. Therefore, in situ radiative forcing is, in contrast to the Northern Hemisphere tropics, not a suitable explanation for enhanced convective precipitation and, ultimately, humid climatic conditions. Our results suggest that late Quaternary humidity changes on the Altiplano reflect a collective response to (1) environmental changes in the source area of the moisture (e.g., reexpansion of the rain forest and increased release of latent heat over Amazonia and the Chaco, warm sea surface temperatures in the E Pacific) and, (2) large-scale circulation patterns and wave structures in the upper troposphere (strength and position of the Bolivian high, divergent flow stimulating convection over the Altiplano), or that they even reflect a response to (3) interhemispherical teleconnections. (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 45 refs.

  4. Prediction of extreme floods in the Central Andes by means of Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boers, Niklas; Bookhagen, Bodo; Barbosa, Henrique; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen; Marengo, Jose

    2014-05-01

    Based on a non-linear synchronisation measure and complex network theory, we present a novel framework for the prediction of extreme events of spatially embedded, interrelated time series. This method is general in the sense that it can be applied to any type of spatially sampled time series with significant interrelations, ranging from climate observables to biological or stock market data. In this presentation, we apply our method to extreme rainfall in South America and show how this leads to the prediction of more than 60% (90% during El Niño conditions) of extreme rainfall events in the eastern Central Andes of Bolivia and northern Argentina, with only 1% false alarms. From paleoclimatic to decadal time scales, the Central Andes continue to be subject to pronounced changes in climatic conditions. In particular, our and past work shows that frequency as well as magnitudes of extreme rainfall events have increased significantly during past decades, calling for a better understanding of the involved climatic mechanisms. Due to their large spatial extend and occurrence at high elevations, these extreme events often lead to severe floods and landslides with disastrous socioeconomic impacts. They regularly affect tens of thousands of people and produce estimated costs of the order of several hundred million USD. Alongside with the societal value of predicting natural hazards, our study provides insights into the responsible climatic features and suggests interactions between Rossby waves in polar regions and large scale (sub-)tropical moisture transport as a driver of subseasonal variability of the South American monsoon system. Predictable extreme events result from the propagation of extreme rainfall from the region of Buenos Aires towards the Central Andes given characteristic atmospheric conditions. Our results indicate that the role of frontal systems originating from Rossby waves in polar latitudes is much more dominant for controlling extreme rainfall in

  5. The Bolivian Orocline and its implications for the origin of the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriagada, C.

    2015-12-01

    The tectonic evolution of the Central Andes includes a complex combination of thrusting, wrenching and block rotation leading progressively to the curvature of the orogenic system of the South American continental margin at 18ºS (Bolivian Orocline). Tectonic deformation in the Bolivian Orocline cannot be realistically restored using information from balanced cross sections alone, as the deformation includes an important component of block rotation, associated to counterclockwise block rotation in southern Peru and clockwise rotation in northern Chile. Recent work shows that block rotations in the forearc are essentially pre-early Miocene, predating the onset of Neogene shortening in the Sub Andean zone. Most rotations in the forearc of northern Chile where acquired through a single tectonic event during the Paleogene-early Miocene which probably coincides with the Eocene orogen-wide Incaic event which affected large regions of the central Andes between ca. 50 and 40 Ma. Results from 2D restoration experiments support the hypothesis of the Paleogene formation of the Bolivian Orocline, as a consequence of differential shortening, concentrated in the Eastern Cordillera of Bolivia, southern Peru and northwestern Argentina. Within the southern central Andes four additional curvatures including striking changes in the pattern of rotations have been discovered. From north to south these are the Antofagasta-Calama Lineament, Vallenar, Maipo and Arauco oroclines. However, an important part of rotation needs to be balanced, in the forearc region, by two major conjugate oblique shear zones (Abancay Deflection and Antofagasta-Calama Lineament). These structural features are probably related to inherited lithospheric discontinuities associated with the accretion of basement terranes which could be responsible for producing and delimitating significant and abrupt changes in the magnitude of the Central Andean Rotation Pattern along the margin. While shortening and crustal

  6. Reconstruction of Late Cretaceous Magmatic Arcs in the Northern Andes: Single Versus Multiple Arc Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, A.; Jaramillo, J. S.; Leon, S.; Hincapie, S.; Mejia, D.; Patino, A. M.; Vanegas, J.; Zapata, S.; Valencia, V.; Jimenez, G.; Monsalve, G.

    2014-12-01

    Although magmatic rocks are major tracers of the geological evolution of convergent margins, pre-collisional events such as subduction erosion, collisional thrusting or late collisional strike slip segmentation may difficult the recognizing of multiple arc systems and therefore the existence of paleogeographic scenarios with multiple subduction systems. New field, U-Pb geochronology and whole rock geochemistry constraints from the northwestern segment of the Central Cordillera in the states of Antioquia and Caldas (Colombia) are used to understand the nature of the Late Cretaceous arc magmatism and evaluate the existence of single or multiple Pacific and Caribbean arc systems in the growth of the Northwestern Andes. The new results integrated with additional field and published information is used to suggest the existence of at least three different magmatic arcs. (1) An Eastern Continental arc built within a well defined Permian to Triassic continental crust that record a protracted 90-70 Ma magmatic evolution, (2) a 90-80 arc formed within attenuated continental crust and associated oceanic crust, (3) 90-88 Ma arc formed over a Late Cretaceous plateau crust. The eastern arcs were formed as part of double eastern vergent subduction system, where the most outboard arc represent a fringing arc formed over detached fragments of continental crust, whereas the easternmost continental arc growth by the closure an subduction of and older and broad Triassic to Early Jurassic back-arc ocean. Its closure also end up in ophiolite emplacement. The third allochtonous oceanic arc was formed over the Caribbean plateau crust and was accreted to the continental margin in the Late Cretaceous. Ongoing paleomagnetic, deformational, gravimetric and basin analysis will be integrate to test this model and understand the complex Late Cretaceous tectonic evolution of the Northern Andes.

  7. Stable isotope evidence for multiple pulses of rapid surface uplift in the Central Andes, Bolivia

    OpenAIRE

    Leier, Andrew; McQuarrie, Nadine; Garzione, Carmala; Eiler, John

    2013-01-01

    Paleoelevation histories from mountain belts like the Central Andes of Bolivia provide important constraints on the timing and geodynamic mechanisms associated with surface uplift. We present new oxygen and carbon isotope data (δ^(18)O, δ^(13)C, and Δ_(47)) from Oligocene–Miocene strata exposed in the Eastern Cordillera of the Bolivian Central Andes in order to reconstruct both the deformation and paleoelevation history of the region prior to late Miocene time. Paleosol carbonate in strata >2...

  8. Paleomagnetism of Permian and Triassic rock, central Chilean Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Randall D.; Kent, Dennis V.; Mpodozis, Constantino; Davidson, John

    The first paleomagnetic data from Permian and Triassic formations west of the Andean divide are presented. Four formations of Permian or Triassic age in the central Chilean Andes have been investigated: two are located in the coastal ranges, and two are in the main cordillera. Of the formations in the main cordillera (Pastos Blancos and Matahuaico formations), only the Pastos Blancos Formation has yielded characteristic directions. While a fold test is absent, magnetizations are most likely secondary and yield pre-tilt corrected concordant inclinations, but yield declinations discordant 30° clockwise in comparison to the South American apparent polar wander path. Both formations from the coastal ranges (Cifuncho and Pichidangui formations) yielded stable directions. Postfolding magnetizations in the Cifuncho Formation also show declinations discordant 30° clockwise and concordant inclinations. The Pichidangui Formation has two stable components: one of postfolding age is concordant to apparent polar wander path data, and one of probable prefolding (Late Triassic) age is concordant in declination, but discordant in inclination. Further work is needed to better define the prefolding magnetizations in the Pichidangui Formation, but at present these preliminary results are the first paleomagnetic signs of displaced terranes along the Pacific margin of Chile. If correct, the results suggest that the Pichidangui Formation was some 15° of latitude farther south during the Late Triassic and had likely moved northward to its present latitudinal position with respect to cratonic South America by Middle to Late Jurassic.

  9. The nature of orogenic crust in the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Susan L.; Zandt, George

    2002-10-01

    The central Andes (16°-22°S) are part of an active continental margin mountain belt and the result of shortening of the weak western edge of South America between the strong lithospheres of the subducting Nazca plate and the underthrusting Brazilian shield. We have combined receiver function and surface wave dispersion results from the BANJO-SEDA project with other geophysical studies to characterize the nature of the continental crust and mantle lithospheric structure. The major results are as follows: (1) The crust supporting the high elevations is thick and has a felsic to intermediate bulk composition. (2) The relatively strong Brazilian lithosphere is underthrusting as far west (65.5°W) as the high elevations of the western part of the Eastern Cordillera (EC) but does not underthrust the entire Altiplano. (3) The subcrustal lithosphere is delaminating piecemeal under the Altiplano-EC boundary but is not completely removed beneath the central Altiplano. The Altiplano crust is characterized by a brittle upper crust decoupled from a very weak lower crust that is dominated by ductile deformation, leading to lower crustal flow and flat topography. In contrast, in the high-relief, inland-sloping regions of the EC and sub-Andean zone, the upper crust is still strongly coupled across the basal thrust of the fold-thrust belt to the underthrusting Brazilian Shield lithosphere. Subcrustal shortening between the Altiplano and Brazilian lithosphere appears to be accommodated by delamination near the Altiplano-EC boundary. Our study suggests that orogenic reworking may be an important part of the "felsification" of continental crust.

  10. The Continental Distillery: Building Thick Continental Crust in the Central Andes (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Long, M. D.; Tavera, H.; Minaya, E.; Biryol, C. B.; Bishop, B.; Eakin, C. M.; Franca, G.; Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Kumar, A.; Ryan, J. C.; Scire, A. C.; Ward, K. M.; Young, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of stable continental crust and the associated development and destruction of mantle lithospheric roots is central to our understanding of plate tectonics, both at its inception and as an ongoing process today. Subduction zones play an important role in the creation and refinement of continental crust, and also serve as a possible mechanism for the removal of residual mantle material. The central Andes provide an intriguing laboratory for the study of these processes. Up to 400 km wide, 1500 km long, and with an average elevation of 4 km, the Altiplano Plateau is the largest orogen on earth associated with an ocean-continent subduction zone. This is much larger than adjacent 'normal' sections of the Andes, raising the question of why this portion of South American crust became so much more substantial than surrounding areas. Over the past several years, new seismic data have made it possible for us to develop a more complete picture of the lithospheric and asthenospheric processes involved in the development of the Altiplano Plateau and the adjacent narrower orogen further to the north. The 'Central Andean Uplift and the Geodynamics of High Topography' (CAUGHT) comprises in part a broadband deployment of 50 stations across the northern flank of the Altiplano Plateau in southern Peru and northern Bolivia. The adjacent 'PerU Lithosphere and Slab Experiment' (PULSE) includes 40 broadband stations that cover the region directly north of the CAUGHT deployment, encompassing the northern edge of the Altiplano, the transition to 'normal' width orogen, and the transition in slab geometry from normal to flat from south to north across the study area. Uplift of the Altiplano Plateau is likely due to some combination shortening, isostasy due to lithospheric destruction or changes in crustal density, magmatic addition to the crust, and/or flow within the thickened crust. Our studies indicate pervasive low velocities across the Altiplano consistent with a

  11. The Bolivian and Maipo Oroclines: Two first scale structural features of the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriagada, C. A.

    2013-05-01

    Two remarkable curvatures of the orogenic system of the Central Andes are the Bolivian and the Maipo Oroclines. While the former has been widely studied, the latter in central Chile, where few, geographically restricted, paleomagnetic studies have been carried out, knowledge about vertical-axis rotations is scarce. Here we show the results of the paleomagnetic studies carried out in the last years along the Central Andes within the Bolivian and Maipo Oroclines. Along-strike variations in horizontal shortening in the back- arc provided an efficient mechanism to explain the Bolivian Orocline and block rotations of the forearc region in northern Chile and southern Peru. As a first approximation, it appears reasonable that the arcuate shape of the Maipo Orocline could be accompanied by a significant pattern of rotations about a vertical axis in the forearc region and by a progressive decrease of crustal shortening and the resulting topography from north to south in the back-arc region. Furthermore, although the Maipo Orocline is located more than 1000 km south of the axial zone of the Central Andes, south of 30, clockwise rotations of up to 20 could have occurred during the evolution of the Bolivian Orocline. While the northern segment of the Maipo orocline corresponds with the ongoing subduction of the Pampean flat slab segment which proceeds nearly horizontally beneath the South American lithosphere, the southern segment coincides with the normal subduction segment developed to the south of 33S. The Maipo Orocline is thought to be result of collision of the Challenger Fracture Zone and Juan Fernández Ridge with the continent since 25 Ma. The southern flank of the Maipo Orocline can be traced along strike to around 38S. North of 33S, previous studies show no evidence for significant tectonic rotations. In contrary, south of 33S, both in the Coastal Cordillera and High Andes, clockwise block rotations have been observed and attributed to in situ block rotations in

  12. Stratigraphic and Petrological Constraints of Cretaceous Subduction Initiation and Arc-Continent Collision in the Northern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, S.; Cardona, A.; Mejia, D.; Parra, M.

    2014-12-01

    Middle to Late-Cretaceous orogenic events in the northern Andes have been commonly reconstructed from the analysis of inland basins or the integration of regional scale thermochronological, geochronological and geochemical datasets from the accreted blocks. In contrast, limited studies have been developed on the stratigraphic and deformational record of magmatic and sedimentary sequences exposed near the suture zones. New field and petrologic data are used to characterize an ophiolite type sequence that outcrops in the western flank from the northwestern segment of the Central Cordillera of Colombia. Stratigraphic analysis indicate the existence of Albian-Aptian deep marine pelitic sequence interbedded with minor chert and thin quartz sandstone beds that apparently change to a volcanic dominate stratigraphy. Deformed ophiolite-like mafic and ultramafic plutonic rocks and isolated pillow lavas are also exposed to the east in fault contact with the pelitic sequence. The pelitic and interlayered volcanic rocks represent the growth of an extensional Early-Cretaceous basin that followed a Late-Jurassic magmatic quiescence in the Northern Andes. The volcano-sedimentary record is probably related to the growth of a fore-arc basin in a new subduction zone that extends until the Late Cretaceous. The deformation and obduction of the ophiolitic association and the fore-arc basin were probably triggered by the Late Cretaceous collision with an allocthonous plateau-arc associated to the migration of the Caribbean plate.

  13. Grenvillian remnants in the Northern Andes: Rodinian and Phanerozoic paleogeographic perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, A.; Chew, D.; Valencia, V. A.; Bayona, G.; Mišković, A.; Ibañez-Mejía, M.

    2010-01-01

    Grenvillian crust is encountered in several basement inliers in the northern Andes of Colombia, Ecuador and Peru and is also represented as a major detrital or inherited component within Neoproterozoic to Paleozoic sedimentary and magmatic rocks. This review of the tectonic and geochronological record of the Grenvillian belt in the northern Andes suggests that these crustal segments probably formed on an active continental margin in which associated arc and back-arc magmatism evolved from ca. 1.25 to 1.16 Ga, possibly extending to as young as 1.08 Ga. The lithostratigraphic and tectonic history of the Grenvillian belt in the northern Andes differs from that of the Sunsas belt on the southwest Amazonian Craton and from the Grenvillian belt of Eastern Laurentia. It is considered that this belt, along with similar terranes of Grenvillian age in Middle America and Mexico define a separate composite orogen which formed on the northwestern margin of the Amazonian Craton. Microcontinent accretion and interaction with the Sveconorwegian province on Baltica is a feasible tectonic scenario, in line with recent paleogeographic reconstructions of the Rodinian supercontinent. Although Phanerozoic tectonics may have redistributed some of these terranes, they are still viewed as para-autocthonous domains that remained in proximity to the margin of Amazonia. Paleogeographic data derived from Phanerozoic rocks suggest that some of the Colombian Grenvillian fragments were connected to northernmost Peru and Ecuador until the Mesozoic, whereas the Mexican terranes where attached to the Colombian margin until Pangea fragmentation in Late Triassic times.

  14. Phylogenetic relationships between telmatobiinids (Anura, Ceratophryidae, Telmatobiinae) of central Andes based on morphology of larval and adult stages

    OpenAIRE

    César Aguilar; Niels Valencia

    2011-01-01

    Batrachophrynus and Telmatobius are the two genus of Telmatobiinae from the central Andes. Both genera have species with adaptations for life at high altitude in the Andes, with aquatic or semi-aquatic habits in creeks, lagoons and lakes. The objective of this study is to evaluate the phylogenetic relationships between Batrachophrynus and 13 species of Telmatobius from the central Andes using larval and adult morphology including diagnostic characters for Batrachophrynus and Telmatobius, and ...

  15. Preliminary Results From the CAUGHT Experiment: Investigation of the North Central Andes Subsurface Using Receiver Functions and Ambient Noise Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. C.; Ward, K. M.; Porter, R. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2011-12-01

    Altiplano and portions of the Eastern Cordillera, and at approximately 40 under the sub-Andes and westernmost edge of the Beni basin. Unlike previous studies farther south, we do not see an increased crustal thickness beneath the Eastern Cordillera. The CAUGHT station coverage is also ideal for Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT) to investigate the seismic shear wave velocities in the upper crust (McQuarrie, N., Barnes, J., and Ehlers, T.A., 2008, Geometric, kinematic and erosional history of the central Andean Plateau (15-17°S), northern Bolivia: Tectonics, v. 27, TC3007, doi:10.1029/2006TC002054.

  16. The Largest Holocene Eruption of the Central Andes Found

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Turiel, J.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Saavedra, J.; Perez-Torrado, F.; Carracedo, J.; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J.; Esteban, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present new data and interpretation about a major eruption -spreading ˜110 km3 ashes over 440.000 km2- long thought to have occurred around 4200 years ago in the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex (CBVC) in NW Argentina. This eruption may be the biggest during the past five millennia in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes, and possibly one of the largest Holocene eruptions in the world. The environmental effects of this voluminous eruption are still noticeable, as evidenced by the high content of arsenic and other trace elements in the groundwaters of the Chacopampean Plain. The recognition of this significant volcanic event may shed new light on interpretations of critical changes observed in the mid-Holocene paleontological and archaeological records, and offers researchers an excellent, extensive regional chronostratigraphic marker for reconstructing mid-Holocene geological history over a wide geographical area of South America. More than 100 ashes were sampled in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay during different field campaigns. Ash samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), grain size distributions laser diffraction, and geochemically by electron microprobe (EMPA) and laser ablation-HR-ICP-MS. New and published 14C ages were calibrated to calendar years BP. The age of the most recent CBVC eruption is 4407-4093 cal y BP, indirectly dated by 14C of associated organic sediment within the lower part of a proximal fall deposit of this event (26°53'16.05"S-67°44'48.68"W). This is the youngest record of a major volcanic event in the Southern Puna. This age is consistent with other radiocarbon dates of organic matter in palaeosols underlying or overlying distal ash fall deposits. Based on their products, all of rhyolitic composition, we have distinguished 8 main episodes during the evolution of the most recent CBVC eruption: 1) the eruption began with a white rhyolite lava dome extrusion; 2) followed by a Plinian

  17. Evolución tectónica, paleogeográfica y metalogénica durante el Cenozoico en los Andes de Chile norte y central e implicaciones para las regiones adyacentes de Bolivia y Argentina Tectonic, paleogeographic, and metallogenic evolution during the Cenozoic in the Andes of Central and Northern Chile and implication for the adjacent regions of Bolivia and Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Charrier

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available La orogenia incaica dio origen a un importante relieve en el Eoceno Medio, el que se concentró en el ámbito del arco magmático precedente, la Cordillera Incaica. Este relieve positivo de orientación NNE se extendió desde el sur de Perú hasta la región central de Chile y separó dos dominios paleogeográficos que tuvieron evoluciones diferentes durante el resto del Cenozoico. El dominio occidental se caracterizó por el predominio de procesos de erosión y sedimentación. En el dominio oriental también existieron importantes episodios de erosión que originaron depósitos que se encuentran en la vertiente oriental de la cadena en la actualidad y presentan una cronología comparable con la de los depósitos del dominio occidental. Sin embargo, la evolución se caracterizó por presentar, a partir del Eoceno Tardío, diferencias al norte y sur de los ~27ºS. Al norte de esa latitud, en el ámbito del Altiplano-Puna, el arco magmático se mantuvo aproximadamente en la misma posición, coincidente con la del arco actual, y estuvo bordeado por una cuenca de antepaís de retroarco; mientras que, al sur de ~27ºS, se desarrollaron sucesivos arcos magmáticos con una marcada migración hacia el este. El arco magmático del Eoceno Tardío al Oligoceno Tardío - Mioceno Temprano se caracterizó por el desarrollo de una amplia cuenca extensional de intra-arco, la cuenca de Abanico. En esta cuenca se acumularon hasta 3.000 m de rocas volcánicas, volcaniclásticas y, subordinadamente, sedimentarias. A partir del límite oligoceno-mioceno, tuvo lugar un nuevo evento compresivo a lo largo de todo el orógeno que rejuveneció el núcleo de la Cordillera Incaica e invirtió la cuenca de Abanico permitiendo la generación de abundantes depósitos sintectónicos a ambos lados de los nuevos relieves. El inicio de este evento coincide con la orogenia pehuenche, los pulsos compresivos se mantuvieron hasta el Plioceno Temprano. En el Mioceno Temprano a Medio

  18. Deformation, deposition, and surface uplift in the hinterland of the Central Andes, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leier, A.; McQuarrie, N.; Garzione, C. N.; Eiler, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Paleoelevation histories from mountain belts like the Central Andes of Bolivia provide important constraints on the timing and geodynamic mechanisms associated with surface uplift. New stable isotope data from paleosol carbonate nodules in the Altiplano and Eastern Cordillera of the Central Andes of Bolivia indicate a previously undocumented episode of surface uplift occurred in the region between ca. 24 and 17 Ma. Oxygen isotope and clumped-isotope thermometry values from paleosol carbonate in strata >24 Ma suggest paleoelevations as low as sea-level. Paleosol carbonate in strata ca. 17 Ma have oxygen isotope and clumped-isotope thermometry values, which using modern lapse rates, indicate an increase in elevation of approximately 3 km. Relatively undeformed Oligocene and Miocene strata overlap faulted Paleozoic rocks of the Bolivian Eastern Cordillera, indicating deposition and surface uplift post-dated and was decoupled from upper crustal deformation. Together, geological data from the area record an initial period of deformation and exhumation, a subsequent period of sediment deposition and overlap, and then an episode of surface uplift that was not accompanied by upper crustal deformation. We propose accommodation for the Oligocene-Miocene strata was associated with mantle and lowermost crustal processes, and the subsequent increase in surface elevation was an isostatic response to removal of dense material through delamination or drip. Combined with existing data sets in the Central Andes, these new data suggest multiple, regionally-variable, and diachronous periods of surface uplift occurred within the Central Andes during the Cenozoic Era.

  19. Interseismic coupling and seismic potential along the Central Andes subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlieh, Mohamed; Perfettini, Hugo; Tavera, Hernando; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Remy, Dominique; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu; Rolandone, FréDéRique; Bondoux, Francis; Gabalda, Germinal; Bonvalot, Sylvain

    2011-12-01

    We use about two decades of geodetic measurements to characterize interseismic strain build up along the Central Andes subduction zone from Lima, Peru, to Antofagasta, Chile. These measurements are modeled assuming a 3-plate model (Nazca, Andean sliver and South America Craton) and spatially varying interseismic coupling (ISC) on the Nazca megathrust interface. We also determine slip models of the 1996 Mw = 7.7 Nazca, the 2001 Mw = 8.4 Arequipa, the 2007 Mw = 8.0 Pisco and the Mw = 7.7 Tocopilla earthquakes. We find that the data require a highly heterogeneous ISC pattern and that, overall, areas with large seismic slip coincide with areas which remain locked in the interseismic period (with high ISC). Offshore Lima where the ISC is high, a Mw˜8.6-8.8 earthquake occurred in 1746. This area ruptured again in a sequence of four Mw˜8.0 earthquakes in 1940, 1966, 1974 and 2007 but these events released only a small fraction of the elastic strain which has built up since 1746 so that enough elastic strain might be available there to generate a Mw > 8.5 earthquake. The region where the Nazca ridge subducts appears to be mostly creeping aseismically in the interseismic period (low ISC) and seems to act as a permanent barrier as no large earthquake ruptured through it in the last 500 years. In southern Peru, ISC is relatively high and the deficit of moment accumulated since the Mw˜8.8 earthquake of 1868 is equivalent to a magnitude Mw˜8.4 earthquake. Two asperities separated by a subtle aseismic creeping patch are revealed there. This aseismic patch may arrest some rupture as happened during the 2001 Arequipa earthquake, but the larger earthquakes of 1604 and 1868 were able to rupture through it. In northern Chile, ISC is very high and the rupture of the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake has released only 4% of the elastic strain that has accumulated since 1877. The deficit of moment which has accumulated there is equivalent to a magnitude Mw˜8.7 earthquake. This study thus

  20. Temperature and Rainfall Variability in the Northern Andes Over the Past Two Millennia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, T. M.; Bixler, C. W.; Mora, A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies of tropical glaciers have shown that most are retreating rapidly, with some of the most dramatic changes occurring since the mid-1970s, most likely as a result of increasing global temperatures. However, a longer-term perspective is needed to place these changes in the context of natural climate variability. To better understand the climatological factors driving long-term variations in the mass balance of tropical glaciers, we reconstructed changes in precipitation and temperature in the northern tropical Andes using variations in the hydrogen isotope composition of sedimentary leaf waxes and branched GDGT distributions in a high-resolution varved sediment record from Lago Chingaza, Colombia. Br-GDGT derived temperatures are significantly correlated with instrumental temperature data and indicate that recent warming in the northern tropical Andes is unprecedented over the past two millennia. Furthermore, the magnitude of warming since the Little Ice Age is substantially larger than suggested by high latitude temperature reconstructions. Hydrogen isotope data indicated that colder conditions during the Little Ice Age were accompanied by a decrease in rainfall, likely associated with a southward shift in the position of the ITCZ. Over the past few centuries, warmer temperatures were accompanied by an increase in rainfall and a northward expansion of the tropical rainbelt. Together, these data suggest that the dominant control on the retreat of Andean glaciers has been the unprecedented rate and magnitude of recent warming.

  1. Chemical Mineralogy, Geochemical Characterization and Petrography of the Cambumbia Stock, Northern Andes, South America, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Lequerica, Salvador; María Jaramillo Mejía, José; Concha Perdomo, Ana Elena; Jimenez Quintero, Camilo

    2013-04-01

    The Cambumbia Stock is located on the western flank of the Central Cordillera of the northern Andes, South America. The goals of this study were to characterize the mineral chemistry, the geochemical composition and the petrography of the Cambumbia igneous body and to establish its petrogenesis. We collected 41 samples, selected 28 for thin section petrographic analysis, 14 for whole rock elementary chemical determination by ICP-MS and 4 for chemical mineralogy by LA-ICP(JEOL JXA-8200). Petrographically the samples were classified as 30 % hornblende-gabbro, 30% pyroxene-gabbros, 10% diorites, 10% olivine-gabbro, 7% gabbronorites, 7% tonalities and 3% norite, 3% wehrlite, the rock varies from medium to coarse hipidiomorfic and holocristaline texture, with local microporfiritic texture. Spot elemental chemical analysis of the some minerals in 4 samples show the range of the major elemental composition is plagioclase (labradorite), clinopyroxene (augite), horblende (magnesiohornblende), olivine (fayalite())Chemical mineralogy shows the variety of minerals in this rock, essential minerals correspond to bytownite, augite, magnesio-honblende, fallaite and titanite. We conclude base on the SiO2 Vs Total Alkalis graph that the samples correspond to the sub-alkaline series with low K content, mainly in the calc-alkaline series. By using the SiO2 vs TiO2, Th/Yb vs Ta/Yb and Zr/117-Th-Nb/16 diagrams it was determined that these rocks were generated in two geotectonic environments: one type MOR (extension) and other island arc (subduction, compression). Recently, a U/Pb age was obtained by the Universidad de Caldas in zircon in 2009 (not published data), yielded an age of 233.41 ± 3.4 Ma (Carnian - Upper Triassic). Petrographic geochemical and geochronology comparisons between the rocks of Cambumbia Stock and Diorite and Gabbro El Pueblito (located about 25 km to the north-west) and with U/Pb age 231 ± 8 may postulate a possible genetic link between them. These ages are

  2. Reconstruction of cryospheric changes in the Maipo and Juncal river basins, central Andes of Chile: an integrative geomorphological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaumer, Samuel U.; García, Juan L.; Gómez, Gabriel; Vega, Rodrigo M.; Gärtner-Roer, Isabelle; Salzmann, Nadine

    2016-04-01

    glaciers diminished in thickness without significant retreat of the glacier front. Another geomorphological feature identified is the separation of ice facies, from dynamically flowing ice with an active ice front, to dead ice covered by debris. In parallel, paraglacial processes affect the morphology of the moraines. The central Andes are a climatically very sensitive zone between the southern humid and northern arid Andes, embracing a key location for uncovering past migration of the southern westerlies, the main driver of local climate variability. Understanding ice variability in the semi-arid Andes of Chile during past centuries (i.e., pre-instrumental time) can provide the urgent climate background context before the 20th/21st-century global warming and from here to assess local atmosphere-cryosphere linkages. This multifarious, patrimonial natural heritage and geological archive in the central Andes is nowadays not only threatened by climatic change but also human activities (e.g., mining).

  3. Morphologic evolution of the Central Andes of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Laura; Pfiffner, O. Adrian

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the morphology of the Andes of Peru and its evolution based on the geometry of river channels, their bedrock profiles, stream gradient indices and the relation between thrust faults and morphology. The rivers of the Pacific Basin incised Mesozoic sediments of the Marañon thrust belt, Cenozoic volcanics and the granitic rocks of the Coastal Batholith. They are mainly bedrock channels with convex upward shapes and show signs of active ongoing incision. The changes in lithology do not correlate with breaks in slope of the channels (or knick points) such that the high gradient indices (K) with values between 2,000-3,000 and higher than 3,000 suggest that incision is controlled by tectonic activity. Our analysis reveals that many of the ranges of the Western Cordillera were uplifted to the actual elevations where peaks reach to 6,000 m above sea level by thrusting along steeply dipping faults. We correlate this uplift with the Quechua Phase of Neogene age documented for the Subandean thrust belt. The rivers of the Amazonas Basin have steep slopes and high gradient indices of 2,000-3,000 and locally more than 3,000 in those segments where the rivers flow over the crystalline basement of the Eastern Cordillera affected by vertical faulting. Gradient indices decrease to 1,000-2,000 within the east-vergent thrust belt of the Subandean Zone. Here a correlation between breaks in river channel slopes and location of thrust faults can be established, suggesting that the young, Quechua Phase thrust faults of the Subandean thrust belt, which involve Neogene sediments, influenced the channel geometry. In the eastern lowlands, these rivers become meandering and flow parallel to anticlines that formed in the hanging wall of Quechua Phase thrust faults, suggesting that the river courses were actively displaced outward into the foreland.

  4. An InSAR-based survey of volcanic deformation in the central Andes

    OpenAIRE

    M. E. Pritchard; Simons, M.

    2004-01-01

    We extend an earlier interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) survey covering about 900 remote volcanos of the central Andes (14°–27°S) between the years 1992 and 2002. Our survey reveals broad (10s of km), roughly axisymmetric deformation at 4 volcanic centers: two stratovolcanoes are inflating (Uturuncu, Bolivia, and Hualca Hualca, Peru); another source of inflation on the border between Chile and Argentina is not obviously associated with a volcanic edifice (here called Lazufre); a...

  5. Estimation of slip scenarios of mega-thrust earthquakes and strong motion simulations for Central Andes, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, N.; Tavera, H.; Aguilar, Z.; Chlieh, M.; Calderon, D.; Sekiguchi, T.; Nakai, S.; Yamazaki, F.

    2012-12-01

    all scenario slips for central Andes, and for an average soil condition, exhibit similar amplitudes and attenuation characteristics with distance as the PGA and PGV values observed during the 2010 Maule (Mw 8.8), and 2011 Tohoku-oki (Mw 9.0) earthquakes. Our results clearly indicate that the simulated ground motions for scenarios with deep rupture nucleations (~40 km) are consistently smaller than the ground motions obtained for shallower rupture nucleations. We also performed strong ground motion simulations in metropolitan Lima by using the aforementioned slip scenarios, and incorporating site amplifications obtained from several microtremors array surveys conducted at representative geotechnical zones in this city. Our simulated PGA and PGV in Lima reach values of 1000 cm/s^2 and 80 cm/s. Our results show that the largest values of PGA (at Puente Piedra district, Northern Lima) are related with short period site effects, whereas the largest values of PGV are related with large site amplifications for periods from 1s to 1.5s (at Callao, Villa el Salvador and La Molina districts). Our results also indicate that the simulated PGA and PGV in central Lima (Parque de la Reserva) are in average 2~3 times larger than the values recorded by a strong motion instrument installed at this location, during the 1974 (Mw8.0) and 1966 (Mw8.0) earthquakes off-shore Lima.

  6. CENOZOIC EXHUMATION OF THE ANTIOQUEÑO PLATEAU, NORTHERN ANDES, COLOMBIA, FROM APATITE LOW-TEMPERATURE THERMOCHRONOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo-Moreno, S. A.; Foster, D. A.; O'Sullivan, P. B.; Donelick, R.; Stockli, D. F.

    2009-12-01

    The Antioqueño plateau (AP), in the northernmost Cordillera Central, Colombia, is the most extensive and best preserved relict surface in the Northern Andes. Apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) and fission track (AFT) results from twenty two samples, collected from paleocrustal depths along two vertical profiles in canyons dissecting the AP, constrain Cenozoic erosional exhumation of this segment of the Andean range. The two profiles exhibit excellent reproducibility of AHe and AFT data. Helium ages increase with elevation from ~22-49 Ma. A marked inflection point in the AHe age-elevation plots at 25 Ma defines the bottom of the post-Oligocene He partial retention zone (PRZ). Virtually invariant ages at ~25 Ma record onset of rapid exhumation in the AP. A more subtle slope change in the PRZ at ~43 Ma is interpreted as a minor exhumation pulse. AFT better defines timing and intensity of Eocene exhumation. AFT ages for both profiles vary from ~30-49 Ma and are consistently older than AHe ages. AFT data display invariant ages (±2σ) between 1500-2400 m elevations while confined track length data exhibit uni-modal distributions with a mean track length of ~14.2 μm. Both facts indicate rapid cooling. This is further supported by virtually concordant AFT and AHe ages for both profiles between 1500 to 2200 m implying that rocks were exhumed from temperatures >120°C to below AHe closure temperature 60°C. Assuming a geothermal gradient of ~25°C/km this corresponds to exhumation rates in the order of 0.5 mm/y, comparable in intensity to the Miocene pulse defined by AHe. Integrated thermal modeling show an episode of rapid cooling at ~43-49 Ma. AFT profiles show an apparent inflection point at ~1400 m, which defines the upper boundary of an apatite partial annealing zone (PAZ) exhumed during the 43-49 Ma cooling event. The position of the PAZ and PRZ relative to the present erosional surface point to average erosion rates of ~0.03 mm/yr, which constitute very low denudation rates

  7. Controls on continental strain partitioning above an oblique subduction zone, Northern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Jorina M.; Whipp, David M., Jr.

    2016-04-01

    Strain partitioning is a common process at obliquely convergent plate margins dividing oblique convergence into margin-normal slip on the plate-bounding fault and horizontal shearing on a strike-slip system parallel to the subduction margin. In subduction zones, strain partitioning in the upper continental plate is mainly controlled by the shear forces acting on the plate interface and the strength of the continental crust. The plate interface forces are influenced by the subducting plate dip angle and the obliquity angle between the normal to the plate margin and the convergence velocity vector, and the crustal strength of the continent is strongly affected by the presence or absence of a volcanic arc, with the presence of the volcanic arcs being common at steep subduction zones. Along the ˜7000 km western margin of South America the convergence obliquity, subduction dip angles and presence of a volcanic arc all vary, but strain partitioning is only observed along parts of it. This raises the questions, to what extent do subduction zone characteristics control strain partitioning in the overriding continental plate, and which factors have the largest influence? We address these questions using lithospheric-scale 3D numerical geodynamic experiments to investigate the influence of subduction dip angle, convergence obliquity, and weaknesses in the crust owing to the volcanic arc on strain partitioning behavior. We base the model design on the Northern Volcanic Zone of the Andes (5° N - 2° S), characterized by steep subduction (˜ 35°), a convergence obliquity between 31° -45° and extensive arc volcanism, and where strain partitioning is observed. The numerical modelling software (DOUAR) solves the Stokes flow and heat transfer equations for a viscous-plastic creeping flow to calculate velocity fields, thermal evolution, rock uplift and strain rates in a 1600 km x 1600 km box with depth 160 km. Subduction geometry and material properties are based on a

  8. Active orogeny of the south-central Andes studied with GPS geodesy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kendrick

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We present GPS measurements of the crustal velocity field in the southern Central Andes between the Santa Cruz corner and the Malargüe fold and thrust belt, and model this interseismic velocity field as the combination of an ephemeral, elastic signal associated with locking of the main plate boundary, and a steady and non-reversing component of displacement associated with localized backarc convergence and growth of the mountain belt. We find that this second component, i.e. the ongoing and permanent displacement of the forearc and the high Andes relative to the craton, can be modeled very well as a steady clockwise rotation of an Andean microplate about a pole located in southern Argentina. Near the Malargüe Basin, this microplate (or block is moving nearly parallel to the strike of the orogen, transporting material towards the bend in the central Andes. Farther north, in the southern limb of the Central Andes, the motion of this same crustal block is directed nearly perpendicular to the strike of the mountain belt. Our results suggest that permanent deformation rates in the backarc range from a maximum of ~ 6-7 mm/yr in the Bolivian Subandes to less than ~ 3 mm/yr in the Argentine Precordillera and Malargue fold and thrust belt. It is likely that most active backarc deformation is accruing in a narrow zone (~ 50 km wide associated with the backarc boundary (usually defined as the thrust front though at this stage it is impossible to distinguish whether specific backarc structures are actively accruing strain.

  9. Facing unprecedented drying of the Central Andes? Precipitation variability over the period AD 1000-2100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukom, Raphael; Rohrer, Mario; Calanca, Pierluigi; Salzmann, Nadine; Huggel, Christian; Acuña, Delia; Christie, Duncan A.; Morales, Mariano S.

    2015-08-01

    Projected future trends in water availability are associated with large uncertainties in many regions of the globe. In mountain areas with complex topography, climate models have often limited capabilities to adequately simulate the precipitation variability on small spatial scales. Also, their validation is hampered by typically very low station density. In the Central Andes of South America, a semi-arid high-mountain region with strong seasonality, zonal wind in the upper troposphere is a good proxy for interannual precipitation variability. Here, we combine instrumental measurements, reanalysis and paleoclimate data, and a 57-member ensemble of CMIP5 model simulations to assess changes in Central Andes precipitation over the period AD 1000-2100. This new database allows us to put future projections of precipitation into a previously missing multi-centennial and pre-industrial context. Our results confirm the relationship between regional summer precipitation and 200 hPa zonal wind in the Central Andes, with stronger Westerly winds leading to decreased precipitation. The period of instrumental coverage (1965-2010) is slightly dryer compared to pre-industrial times as represented by control simulations, simulations from the past Millennium, ice core data from Quelccaya ice cap and a tree-ring based precipitation reconstruction. The model ensemble identifies a clear reduction in precipitation already in the early 21st century: the 10 year running mean model uncertainty range (ensemble 16-84% spread) is continuously above the pre-industrial mean after AD 2023 (AD 2028) until the end of the 21st century in the RCP2.6 (RCP8.5) emission scenario. Average precipitation over AD 2071-2100 is outside the range of natural pre-industrial variability in 47 of the 57 model simulations for both emission scenarios. The ensemble median fraction of dry years (defined by the 5th percentile in pre-industrial conditions) is projected to increase by a factor of 4 until 2071-2100 in

  10. Tomographic imaging of the Nazca slab and surrounding mantle in the mantle transition zone beneath the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scire, A. C.; Biryol, C. B.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Wagner, L. S.; Long, M. D.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2013-12-01

    anomaly is observed in the sub-slab mantle in the MTZ at the northern end of our study region near 10°S. Since both hot thermal anomalies and anomalous hydration of the MTZ would result in decreased seismic velocities, it is not possible to distinguish between these two causes from seismic velocity anomalies alone. Our images of the MTZ beneath the central Andes indicate that the MTZ is not homogeneous and there is along-strike variation in both the structure of the subducting slab and in the sub-slab mantle.

  11. The role of the Antofagasta-Calama Lineament in ore deposit deformation in the Andes of northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Carlos; Ramírez, Luis E.; Townley, Brian; Solari, Marcelo; Guerra, Nelson

    2007-02-01

    During the Late Jurassic-Early Oligocene interval, widespread hydrothermal copper mineralization events occurred in association with the geological evolution of the southern segment of the central Andes, giving rise to four NS-trending metallogenic belts of eastward-decreasing age: Late Jurassic, Early Cretaceous, Late Paleocene-Early Eocene, and Late Eocene-Early Oligocene. The Antofagasta-Calama Lineament (ACL) consists of an important dextral strike-slip NE-trending fault system. Deformation along the ACL system is evidenced by a right-lateral displacement of the Late Paleocene-Early Eocene metallogenic belts. Furthermore, clockwise rotation of the Early Cretaceous Mantos Blancos copper deposit and the Late Paleocene Lomas Bayas porphyry copper occurred. In the Late Eocene-Early Oligocene metallogenic belt, a sigmoidal deflection and a clockwise rotation is observed in the ACL. The ACL is thought to have controlled the emplacement of Early Oligocene porphyry copper deposits (34-37 Ma; Toki, Genoveva, Quetena, and Opache), whereas it deflected the Late Eocene porphyry copper belt (41-44 Ma; Esperanza, Telégrafo, Centinela, and Polo Sur ore deposits). These observations suggest that right-lateral displacement of the ACL was active during the Early Oligocene. We propose that the described structural features need to be considered in future exploration programs within this extensively gravel-covered region of northern Chile.

  12. Revisiting mountain-building in the Andes of Central Chile: constraints from structural geology and thermochronology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesner, M.; Lacassin, R.; Simoes, M.; Armijo, R.; Carrizo, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Andes, one of the most significant reliefs on Earth, is the case example of a subduction-type mountain belt. In central Chile and western Argentina, the particular east-vergent structure of the Aconcagua fold-and-thrust belt (AFTB) is found atop a huge basement high with elevations > 4000 m, the Frontal Cordillera. Classical conceptual models consider the Andes as an east-vergent orogen, opposite to the Nazca subduction, and describe the exhumation of the Frontal Cordillera as an eastward in-sequence event that occurred late in the andean deformation (by ~10My). An alternative model recently challenged this view by proposing that the Andes have mainly a primary westward vergence. Within this scheme, the exhumation of the Frontal Cordillera would have begun earlier, by ~25My, synchronous with formation of the AFTB on the western side of the basement high. Here we test these two models by revisiting structural cross-sections of the Andes at the latitude of Santiago de Chile and of the Aconcagua (~33°S). We provide thermochronological constraints on the timing of exhumation of the Frontal Cordillera by (U-Th)/He dating on apatites retrieved from paleozoic granitoids along a 2,3km high nearly vertical section in the core of the basement high. Preliminary results suggest that the Frontal Cordillera exhumation was not a late event and likely began around 25 Ma. Therefore it appears to be synchronous with deformation within the AFTB and the westernmost fold-and-thrust belt at this latitude. We discuss these results and their implications while building a crustal-scale cross section of the range at the latitude of Santiago de Chile.

  13. Interseismic coupling and seismic potential along the Central Andes subduction zone

    OpenAIRE

    Chlieh, Mohamed; Perfettini, Hugo; Tavera, Hernando; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Remy, Dominique; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu; Rolandone, Frédérique; Bondoux, Francis; Gabalda, Germinal; Bonvalot, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    We use about two decades of geodetic measurements to characterize interseismic strain build up along the Central Andes subduction zone from Lima, Peru, to Antofagasta, Chile. These measurements are modeled assuming a 3-plate model (Nazca, Andean sliver and South America Craton) and spatially varying interseismic coupling (ISC) on the Nazca megathrust interface. We also determine slip models of the 1996 M(w) = 7.7 Nazca, the 2001 M(w) = 8.4 Arequipa, the 2007 M(w) = 8.0 Pisco and the M(w) = 7....

  14. Late Pleistocene glaciations of the arid subtropical Andes and new results from the Chajnantor Plateau, northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Dylan J.; Cesta, Jason M.; Galewsky, Joseph; Sagredo, Esteban

    2015-11-01

    The spatiotemporal pattern of glaciation along the Andes Mountains is an important proxy record reflecting the varying influence of global and regional circulation features on South American climate. However, the timing and extent of glaciation in key parts of the orogen, particularly the deglaciated arid Andes, are poorly constrained. We present new cosmogenic 10Be and 36Cl exposure ages for glacial features on and near the Chajnantor Plateau (23 °S). The new dates, although scattered due to cosmogenic inheritance, imply that the most recent extensive glacial occupation ended before or during the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). We discuss this new record in the context of published glacial chronologies from glacial features in Peru, Bolivia, and northern Chile rescaled using the latest cosmogenic 10Be production rate calibration for the tropical Andes. The results imply regionally synchronous moraine stabilization ca. 25-40 ka, 15-17 ka, and 12-14 ka, with the youngest of these moraines absent in records south of ˜20 °S, including in our new Chajnantor area chronology. This spatial pattern implicates easterly moisture in generating sufficient snowfall to glaciate the driest parts of the Andes, while allowing a role for westerly moisture, possibly modulated by the migration of the Southern Westerly Wind belt, in the regions near and south of the Atacama Desert.

  15. Active orogeny of the south-central Andes studied with GPS geodesy Orogenia activa de los Andes centro-australes estudiada mediante geodesia de GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kendrick

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We present GPS measurements of the crustal velocity field in the southern Central Andes between the Santa Cruz corner and the Malargüe fold and thrust belt, and model this interseismic velocity field as the combination of an ephemeral, elastic signal associated with locking of the main plate boundary, and a steady and non-reversing component of displacement associated with localized backarc convergence and growth of the mountain belt. We find that this second component, i.e. the ongoing and permanent displacement of the forearc and the high Andes relative to the craton, can be modeled very well as a steady clockwise rotation of an Andean microplate about a pole located in southern Argentina. Near the Malargüe Basin, this microplate (or block is moving nearly parallel to the strike of the orogen, transporting material towards the bend in the central Andes. Farther north, in the southern limb of the Central Andes, the motion of this same crustal block is directed nearly perpendicular to the strike of the mountain belt. Our results suggest that permanent deformation rates in the backarc range from a maximum of ~ 6-7 mm/yr in the Bolivian Subandes to less than ~ 3 mm/yr in the Argentine Precordillera and Malargue fold and thrust belt. It is likely that most active backarc deformation is accruing in a narrow zone (~ 50 km wide associated with the backarc boundary (usually defined as the thrust front though at this stage it is impossible to distinguish whether specific backarc structures are actively accruing strain.Se presentan mediciones GPS del campo de velocidad en los Andes centro-australes entre el extremo norte de Santa Cruz y la faja plegada de Malargüe. Se modela el campo de velocidad intersísmico como la combinación de una señal elástico/efímera asociada con el anclaje del límite principal de placas, y una componente constante, no reversible de desplazamiento asociada con una convergencia localizada en el retroarco y crecimiento del

  16. Calculated WIMP signals at the ANDES laboratory: comparison with northern and southern located dark matter detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Civitarese, O; Mosquera, M E

    2016-01-01

    Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMP) are possible components of the Universe's Dark Matter. The detection of WIMP is signalled by the recoil of the atomic nuclei which form a detector. CoGeNT at the Soudan Underground Laboratory (SUL) and DAMA at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) have reported data on annual modulation of signals attributed to WIMP. Both experiments are located in laboratories of the northern hemisphere. Dark matter detectors are planned to operate (or already operate) in laboratories of the southern hemisphere, like SABRE at Stawell Underground Physics Laboratory (SUPL) in Australia, and DM-ICE in the South Pole. In this work we have analysed the dependence of diurnal and annual modulation of signals, pertaining to the detection of WIMP, on the coordinates of the laboratory, for experiments which may be performed in the planned new underground facility ANDES (Agua Negra Deep Experimental Site), to be built in San Juan, Argentina. We made predictions for NaI and Ge-type de...

  17. Bird conservation would complement landslide prevention in the Central Andes of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Ocampo-Peñuela

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Conservation and restoration priorities often focus on separate ecosystem problems. Inspired by the November 11th (2011 landslide event near Manizales, and the current poor results of Colombia’s Article 111 of Law 99 of 1993 as a conservation measure in this country, we set out to prioritize conservation and restoration areas where landslide prevention would complement bird conservation in the Central Andes. This area is one of the most biodiverse places on Earth, but also one of the most threatened. Using the case of the Rio Blanco Reserve, near Manizales, we identified areas for conservation where endemic and small-range bird diversity was high, and where landslide risk was also high. We further prioritized restoration areas by overlapping these conservation priorities with a forest cover map. Restoring forests in bare areas of high landslide risk and important bird diversity yields benefits for both biodiversity and people. We developed a simple landslide susceptibility model using slope, forest cover, aspect, and stream proximity. Using publicly available bird range maps, refined by elevation, we mapped concentrations of endemic and small-range bird species. We identified 1.54 km2 of potential restoration areas in the Rio Blanco Reserve, and 886 km2 in the Central Andes region. By prioritizing these areas, we facilitate the application of Article 111 which requires local and regional governments to invest in land purchases for the conservation of watersheds.

  18. Constraints on sediment transfer from the Andes to the coast of northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnie, Steven; Liermann, Ariane; Dunai, Tibor; Dewald, Alfred; Heinze, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    While rates of denudation have been suggested as having the potential to link tectonic processes with climate in many settings, the roles that sediment transport must also play have been largely neglected. It is the transport, or not, of eroded material, not necessarily the rate at which that material is produced which is the critical factor in many models of tectonic-climatic interactions. The notable lack of sediment in sections of the Peru-Chile trench has been implicated as a key control of subduction zone processes and consequently Andean mountain building, but little empirical data on sediment transport in the region exists. Here, we present the initial results of a study aiming to constrain the westward transfer of sediment from the Andes Mountains to the Pacific Coast of northern Chile by using in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides. Fluvial sediments were collected at the mouths of several large catchments between 19° S and 26° S, where they drain into the Pacific, and also from upstream locations within each catchment. Sample sites were selected in order to investigate the cosmogenic nuclide derived basin-averaged denudation rates of the western flank of the Andes, and to compare this with the cosmogenic nuclide concentrations of fluvial sediments further downstream where the catchments exit to the coast. A simplistic interpretation of the cosmogenic 10Be concentrations as denudation rates gives results varying between ~10 and 300 m/Myr. We would expect the most rapid erosion to occur on the steeper, wetter western Andean flank and for slower erosion to be recorded from the more gentle sloping, hyperarid/arid regions between the foothills of the Andes and the Pacific coast. This pattern is observed in some basins but in others the nuclide concentrations imply the opposite, with several-fold higher erosion rates measured for the large catchments sampled at the coast in comparison to their mountainous Andean headwaters. One explanation for this unusual

  19. The Glacier Inventory of the Central Andes of Argentina (31°-35°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri Hidalgo, L.; Zalazar, L.; Castro, M.; Pitte, P.; Masiokas, M. H.; Ruiz, L.; Villalba, R.; Delgado, S.; Gimenez, M.; Gargantini, H.

    2015-12-01

    The National Law for protection of glaciers in Argentina envisages the development of a National Inventory of Glaciers. All glaciers and periglacial landforms which are important as strategic water resource must be properly identified and mapped. Here we present a detailed and complete glacier and rock glacier inventory of the Central Andes of Argentina between 31° and 35°S. This semi-arid region contains some of the highest mountains of South America and concentrates the second most glacierized area in Argentina after the Patagonian Andes. To develop the inventory, we used remotely sensed data and related techniques complemented with field surveys. Clean ice and perennial snowfields were identified applying an automatic extraction method on medium spatial-resolution images. Debris-covered and rock glaciers were manually digitized on higher spatial-resolution images. With minor modifications, the present digital inventory is consistent with GLIMS standards. For each glacier, we derived 38 database fields, adding five specific attributes for rock glaciers, which are not included in the original GLIMS database. In total we identified 8069 glaciers covering an area of 1768 km2. Debris-covered ice and rock glaciers represent 57% of the total inventoried area. In this region, rock glaciers are a common feature in the arid landscape and constitute an important water reserve at regional scale. Many glaciers were characterized by gradual transition from debris-covered glaciers, in the upper part, to rock glaciers, in the lower sector. The remaining 43% includes clean ice glaciers and permanent snowfields. These are mostly mountain and valley-type glaciers with medium-to-small sizes. This detailed inventory constitutes a valuable contribution to the ongoing global efforts (e.g. WGI, RGI and GLIMS) to map the world's glaciers. It is also the base for ongoing glaciological, climatological and hydrological studies in this portion of southern Andes.

  20. Phylogenetic relationships between telmatobiinids (Anura, Ceratophryidae, Telmatobiinae of central Andes based on morphology of larval and adult stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Aguilar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Batrachophrynus and Telmatobius are the two genus of Telmatobiinae from the central Andes. Both genera have species with adaptations for life at high altitude in the Andes, with aquatic or semi-aquatic habits in creeks, lagoons and lakes. The objective of this study is to evaluate the phylogenetic relationships between Batrachophrynus and 13 species of Telmatobius from the central Andes using larval and adult morphology including diagnostic characters for Batrachophrynus and Telmatobius, and putative sinapomorphies for Telmatobius. The phylogenetic analysis showed 20 parsimonious trees with 56 steps length. The results of this study hypothesize that the species assigned to Batrachophrynus form a monophyletic group nested within Telmatobius. In this study, most of the synapomorphies that support Telmatobius (including Batrachophrynus come from larval morphology and these sinapomorphies will probably support the whole genus.

  1. Intraseasonal variability of organized convective systems in the Central Andes: Relationship to Regional Dynamical Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, K. I.; Slayback, D. A.; Nicholls, S.; Yager, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Andes extend from the west coast of Colombia (10N) to the southern tip of Chile (53S). In southern Peru and Bolivia, the Central Andes is split into separate eastern and western cordilleras, with a high plateau (≥ 3000 m), the Altiplano, between them. Because 90% of the Earth's tropical mountain glaciers are located in the Central Andes, our study focuses on this region, defining its zonal extent as 7S-21S and the meridional extent as the terrain 1000 m and greater. Although intense convection occurs during the wet season in the Altiplano, it is not included in the lists of regions with frequent or the most intense convection. The scarcity of in-situ observations with sufficient density and temporal resolution to resolve individual storms or even mesoscale-organized cloud systems and documented biases in microwave-based rainfall products in poorly gauged mountainous regions have impeded the development of an extensive literature on convection and convective systems in this region. With the tropical glaciers receding at unprecedented rates, leaving seasonal precipitation as an increasingly important input to the water balance in alpine valley ecosystems and streams, understanding the nature and characteristics of the seasonal precipitation becomes increasingly important for the rural economies in this region. Previous work in analyzing precipitation in the Central Andes has emphasized interannual variability with respect to ENSO, this is the first study to focus on shorter scale variability with respect to organized convection. The present study took advantage of the University of Utah's Precipitation Features database compiled from 14 years of TRMM observations (1998-2012), supplemented by field observations of rainfall and streamflow, historical gauge data, and long-term WRF-simulations, to analyze the intraseasonal variability of precipitating systems and their relationship regional dynamical features such as the Bolivian High. Through time series and

  2. What controls millennial-scale denudation rates across the Central Andes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Gerold; Korup, Oliver; Schlunegger, Fritz; Kober, Florian

    2015-04-01

    Sustainable planning of erosion control measures in the Central Andes requires robust knowledge about natural denudation rates. We explore a large dataset combining new and published 10Be (and 26Al) catchment-wide denudation rates from a swath at 17 to 19° S spanning the Western Cordillera that rises from sea level to 5500 m elevation; the Altiplano at ~4000 m; the Eastern Cordillera with elevations up to 6500 m; the Interandean Zone; the Subandean Zone; and the Chaco Plain at 300 m. The selected catchments span a large spread regarding morphometric and climate properties where mean slope angles range from 1 to 31°, and mean precipitation from 100 to 3900 mm/a. The denudation rates (0.0036 to 1.93 mm/a) are averaged over millennia, and reveal two to three magnitudes difference across the Central Andes. The regional distribution of denudation rates clearly demonstrates a more complex interaction of geomorphological, geological and meteorological parameters with the dominant geomorphological processes. In order to elucidate the key controls on denudation, we use multivariate statistics such as principal component analysis in order to remove potentially redundant predictors of denudation in the studied catchments. These predictors include catchment elevation, topographic relief, hillslope inclination, mean precipitation, tree cover, specific stream power, channel steepness indices, sinuosity, drainage density and hypsometric index that we derived from the SRTM 90 m Digital Elevation Database, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data, and the Terra MODIS Vegetation Continuous Fields dataset. Additionally, the rock strength index (PLI) was estimated based on geological units. Preliminary results allow distinguishing five different longitudinal domains of denudation on the basis of climatic regime, hillslope steepness, and the degree of accumulated crustal deformation. We find that the pattern of 10Be catchment-wide denudation rates in the Central Andes

  3. Subduction Zone Science - Examples of Seismic Images of the Central Andes and Subducting Nazca Slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Scire, A. C.; Ward, K. M.; Portner, D. E.; Bishop, B.; Ryan, J. C.; Wagner, L. S.; Long, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Subduction has shaped large regions of the Earth and constitute over 55,000 km of convergent plate margin today. The subducting slabs descend from the surface into the lower mantle and impacts earthquake occurrence, surface uplift, arc volcanism and mantle convection as well as many other processes. The subduction of the Nazca plate beneath the South America plate is one example and constitutes the largest present day ocean-continent convergent margin system and has built the Andes, one of the largest actively growing mountain ranges on Earth. This active margin is characterized by along-strike variations in arc magmatism, upper crustal shortening, crustal thickness, and slab geometry that make it an ideal region to study the relationship between the subducting slab, the mantle wedge, and the overriding plate. After 20 years of portable seismic deployments in the Central Andes seismologists have combined data sets and used multiple techniques to generate seismic images spanning ~3000 km of the South American subduction zone to ~800 km depth with unprecedented resolution. For example, using teleseismic P- waves we have imaged the Nazca slab penetrating through the mantle transition zone (MTZ) and into the uppermost lower mantle. Our tomographic images show that there is significant along-strike variation in the morphology of the Nazca slab in the upper mantle, MTZ, and the lower mantle, including possible tears, folding, and internal deformation. Receiver function studies and surface wave tomography have revealed major changes in lithospheric properties in the Andes. Improved seismic images allow us to more completely evaluate tectonic processes in the formation and uplift of the Andes including: (1) overthickened continental crust driven by crustal shortening, (2) changes in slab dip and coupling with the overlying plate (3) localized lithospheric foundering, and (4) large-scale mantle and crustal melting leading to magmatic addition and/or crustal flow. Although

  4. Pre-collisional extensional tectonics in convergent continental margins: the cretaceous evolution of the central cordillera of the Colombian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Zapata Henao, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: The Cretaceous tectonic evolution of the Northern Andes continental margin is characterized by continuous convergence that allowed the formation of continental volcanic arcs, back arc basins, extensional divergent tectonics and accretion of exotic terranes. Such a record, particularly the extensional phases, is commonly hidden by the overimposition of deformational events associated with evolution of the subduction configuration, collision of exotic terranes and strike slip fragment...

  5. Landsat Thematic Mapper observations of debris avalanche deposits in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, P. W.; Wells, G. L.

    1988-01-01

    Remote sensing with the Landsat Thematic Mapper of debris avalanche deposits in the Central Andes between 18 and 27 deg S revealed, for the first time, the presence of 28 breached volcanic cones and 11 major volcanic debris avalanche deposits, several of which cover areas in excess of 100 sq km. It is concluded that such avalanche deposits are normal products of the evolution of large composite volcanoes, comparable with lava and pyroclastic flow deposits. A statistical survey of 578 composite volcanoes in the same area indicated that a majority of cones which achieve edifice heights between 2000 and 3000 m may undergo sector collapse. The paper describes morphological criteria for identifying breached composite cones and volcanic debris avalanches using orbital images.

  6. Comment on “Human impacts on headwater fluvial systems in the northern and central Andes” (Carol P. Harden, Geomorphology 79, 249 263)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buytaert, Wouter; De Bièvre, Bert; Celleri, Rolando; Cisneros, Felipe; Wyseure, Guido; Deckers, Seppe

    2008-04-01

    The high altitude grasslands of the tropical Andes, known as páramo, are a very fragile and unique ecosystem. Despite increasing human activities, many of its geomorphological and hydrological processes are still very poorly understood. We therefore welcome the paper of Harden [Harden, C.P., 2006. Human impacts on headwater fluvial systems in the northern and central Andes. Geomorphology 79, 249-263.] about "Human impacts on headwater fluvial systems in the northern and central Andes" as a valuable contribution to a better understanding of this complex ecosystem. However, in view of the available literature, we would like to complement the interpretation of the presented results and discuss some of the claims made in the paper.

  7. Detrital Zircon Provenance Record of Pre-Andean to Modern Tectonics in the Northern Andes: Examples from Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, S. W. M.; Jackson, L. J.; Horton, B. K.

    2015-12-01

    Detrital zircon U-Pb age distributions from modern rivers and Mesozoic-Cenozoic basin fill in the northern Andes provide insights into pre-Andean, Andean, and active uplift and exhumation of distinctive sediment source regions. Diagnostic age signatures enable straightforward discrimination of competing sediment sources within the Andean magmatic arc (Western Cordillera-Central Cordillera), retroarc fold-thrust belt (Eastern Cordillera-Subandean Zone), and Amazonian craton (composed of several basement provinces). More complex, however, are the mid/late Cenozoic provenance records generated by recycling of basin fill originally deposited during early/mid Mesozoic extension, late Mesozoic thermal subsidence, and early Cenozoic shortening. Although subject to time-transgressive trends, regionally significant provenance patterns in Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia reveal: (1) Triassic-Jurassic growth of extensional subbasins fed by local block uplifts (with commonly unimodal 300­-150 Ma age peaks); (2) Cretaceous deposition in an extensive postrift setting fed by principally cratonic sources (with common 1800-900 Ma ages); and (3) Cenozoic growth of a broad flexural basin fed initially fed by magmatic-arc rocks (100-0 Ma), then later dominance by thrust-belt sedimentary rocks with progressively greater degrees of basin recycling (yielding diverse and variable age populations from the aforementioned source regions). U-Pb results from modern rivers and smaller subbasins prove useful in evaluating source-to-sink relationships, downstream mixing relationships, hinterland-foreland basin connectivity, paleodrainage integration, and tectonic/paleotopographic reconstructions. Most but not all of the elevated intermontane basins in the modern hinterland of the northern Andes contain provenance records consistent with genesis in a broader foreland basin developed at low elevation. Downstream variations within modern axial rivers and Cenozoic axial basins inform predictive models of

  8. Tectonic and lithological controls on denudation rates in the central Bolivian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kober, F.; Zeilinger, G.; Hippe, K.; Marc, O.; Lendzioch, T.; Grischott, R.; Christl, M.; Kubik, P. W.; Zola, R.

    2015-08-01

    The topographic signature of a mountain belt depends on the interplay of tectonic, climatic and erosional processes, whose relative importance changes over times, while quantifying these processes and their rates at specific times remains a challenge. The eastern Andes of central Bolivia offer a natural laboratory in which such interplay has been debated. Here, we investigate the Rio Grande catchment which crosses orthogonally the eastern Andes orogen from the Eastern Cordillera into the Subandean Zone, exhibiting a catchment relief of up to 5000 m. Despite an enhanced tectonic activity in the Subandes, local relief, mean and modal slopes and channel steepness indices are largely similar compared to the Eastern Cordillera and the intervening Interandean Zone. Nevertheless, a dataset of 57 new cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al catchment wide denudation rates from the Rio Grande catchment reveals up to one order of magnitude higher denudation rates in the Subandean Zone (mean 0.8 mm/yr) compared to the upstream physiographic regions. We infer that tectonic activity in the thrusting dominated Subandean belt causes higher denudation rates based on cumulative rock uplift investigations and due to the absence of a pronounced climate gradient. Furthermore, the lower rock strength of the Subandean sedimentary units correlates with mean slopes similar to the ones of the Eastern Cordillera and Interandean Zone, highlighting the fact, that lithology and rock strength can control high denudation rates at low slopes. Low denudation rates measured at the outlet of the Rio Grande catchment (Abapo) are interpreted to be a result of a biased cosmogenic nuclide mixing that is dominated by headwater signals from the Eastern Cordillera and the Interandean zone and limited catchment sediment connectivity in the lower river reaches. Therefore, comparisons of short- (i.e., sediment yield) and millennial denudation rates require caution when postulating tectonic and/or climatic forcing without

  9. Parasite loads and altitudinal distribution of Liolaemus lizards in the central Chilean Andes Cargas parasitarias y distribución de lagartijas Liolaemus en los Andes de Chile central

    OpenAIRE

    JOHN H. CAROTHERS; Jaksic, Fabián M

    2001-01-01

    This study compared the distributions of ten species of Liolaemus lizards in the central Chilean Andes to the distributions of four types of parasites: malaria-causing Plasmodium, gut nematodes, ticks, and mites. We wanted to see if parasite numbers might be a factor in determining distributional limits of the lizards. We found that there was no evidence of malarial infestation of the lizards, that ticks were almost absent, that more often than not mite numbers decreased at the distributional...

  10. Timing of Accretion and Mountain-Building in The Northern Andes of Colombia through Low-Temperature Thermochonology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinasco, C. J.; Restrepo-Moreno, S. A.; Marín, M. I.; Botero, M.; Bermudez, M. A.; Min, K. K.; Foster, D. A.; Noriega, S., Sr.; Montoya, E., Sr.; Londoño, L., Sr.; Bernet, M.

    2015-12-01

    Orogenic configuration of the Northern Andes is closely associated to accretional processes since the Upper Cretaceous. In Colombia, the regional boundary between a Paleozoic continental domain to the east and Cretaceous accreted terrenes to the west is well exposed in several E-W sections near Medellin City and along the Cauca River, which occupies a major depression located between the Central and Western cordilleras. The area is dominated by the N-S trending Romeral Fault System (RFS) that can be traced to southern Ecuador. Relationships between the RFS and W-SW verging thrust system are unknown, although they represent key components of a transpressional orogeny. To understand timing of accretion and associated mountain building processes, we performed (U-Th)/He and fission track dating on samples derived from vertical profiles in cordilleran massifs. Samples were collected along four vertical profiles on two distinct litho-tectonic units: (1) three vertical profiles in the older eastern realm corresponding to metamorphic basement rocks of the Paleozoic Paleo-continental margin and associated Cretaceous intrusives, and (2) one vertical profile in the Mande batholith, Eocene in age at the eastern portion of the Panama Chocó Block (PCB) . The resulting zircon (U-Th)/He (ZHe) ages show a clear contrast between the ancient eastern realm (~50-60 Ma) and the Mande Batholith (~30-40 Ma). Apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) ages also show a strong contrast with 23-42 Ma for the eastern realm and a well defined cluster at ~4 Ma for the Mande Batholith. These preliminary results suggest distinctive cooling histories for the two litho-tectonic blocks. The Mande batholith (western block) records both the late Eocene and Pliocene events whereas the ancient eastern block does not preserve any of these events. The Paleocene events recorded by the eastern block are probably related to the Laramic orogenetic phase. Finally, elevation-invariable ZHe ages from the ancient eastern block

  11. The Iconography of Painted Ceramics from the Northern Andes Title: La iconografía de la cerámica pintada del norte de los Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Felipe Cárdenas-Arroyo

    1998-01-01

    Felipe Cárdenas-Arroyo, arqueólogo colombiano de la Universidad de Los Andes en Bogotá, erudito de CASVA, especialista en momificación pre-hispánica de huesos humanos.Abstract: Felipe Cárdenas-Arroyo, Colombian archaeologist from the University of Los Andes in Bogotá, CASVA scholar, specialist in pre-Hispanic mummification and human bone.

  12. Geodetic observations of megathrust earthquakes and backarc wedge deformation across the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J. R.; Brooks, B. A.; Foster, J. H.; Bevis, M. G.; Echalar, A.; Caccamise, D.; Heck, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    High-precision Global Positioning System (GPS) data offer an opportunity to investigate active orogenic wedges yet surface velocity fields are available for only a few examples worldwide. More observations are needed to link deformation processes across multiple timescales and to better understand strain accumulation and release in active wedge settings. Here we present a new GPS velocity field for the central Andes and the backarc orogenic wedge comprising the southern Subandes of Bolivia (SSA), a region previously thought to be mostly isolated from the plate boundary earthquake cycle. The time span of our observations (2000 to mid-2014) includes two megathrust earthquakes along the Chile trench that affected the SSA. The 2007 Mw 7.7 Tocopilla, Chile earthquake resulted in a regional postseismic decrease in the eastward component of horizontal surface velocities. Preliminary analysis of the deformation field from the April 01 2014 Mw 8.2 Pisagua, Chile earthquake also indicates a postseismic signal extending into the SSA. We create an interseismic velocity field for the SSA by correcting campaign GPS site velocities for the seasonal cycles estimated from continuous GPS site time series. We remove the effects of both megathrust events by estimating coseismic steps and fitting linear and logarithmic functions to the postseismic GPS site motions. The velocity estimates at most locations increase after correcting for the transients. This finding suggests that forces leading to shortening and earthquakes in the backarc wedge are not as temporally consistent as previously considered.

  13. The Basement of the Central Andes: The Arequipa and Related Terranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Victor A.

    2008-05-01

    The basement of the Central Andes provides insights for the dispersal of Rodinia, the reconstruction of Gondwana, and the dynamics of terrane accretion along the Pacific. The Paleoproterozoic Arequipa terrane was trapped during collision between Laurentia and Amazonia in the Mesoproterozoic. Ultrahigh-temperature metamorphism correlates with the collapse of the Sunsás-Grenville orogen after 1000 Ma and is related to slab break-off and dispersal of Rodinia. The Antofalla terrane separated in the Neoproterozoic, forming the Puncoviscana basin. Its closure was coeval with the collision of the eastern Sierras Pampeanas. The rift-drift transitions of the early Paleozoic clastic platform showed a gradual younging to the north, in agreement with counterclockwise rotation based on paleomagnetic data of Antofalla. North of Arequipa arc magmatism and high-grade metamorphism are linked to collision of the Paracas terrane in the Ordovician, during the Famatinian orogeny in the Sierras Pampeanas. The early Paleozoic history of the Arequipa massif is explained by a backarc, which further south changed to open oceanic conditions and subsequent collision. The Antofalla terrane reaccreted to the continental margin by the late Ordovician. These accretions and subsequent separations during the Mesoproterozoic, Neoproterozoic early Cambrian, and late Cambrian middle Ordovician are explained by changes in absolute motion of the Gondwana supercontinent during plate global reorganization.

  14. A GIS-based Spatial Analysis of Volcanoes in the Central Andes: Insights Into Factors Controlling Volcano Spacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savant, S. S.; de Silva, S. L.

    2005-12-01

    Volcano spacing has received little attention since the mid-70's when studies undertaken by Vogt (1974; EPSL) and then Marsh (1979; J Geol) suggested a regular spacing of volcanoes in arcs that ranged from 50 to 75 km for different arcs. The spacing was thought to be influenced by the thickness of the lithosphere or gravitational (Rayleigh-Taylor) instabilities related to source layer thickness and viscosity respectively. We have revisited these ideas through a detailed study of volcano distribution in the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ) of the Andes where volcano spacing was thought to be around 70 km. The CVZ was selected as it is the type example of continental arc volcanism, built on an extremely thick crust of up to 70 km. The availability of a comprehensive dataset describing the relative age, location, and geomorphic characteristics of each volcano (Volcanoes of the Central Andes, de Silva and Francis, 1990, Springer Verlag) made this a compelling case study. The ready availability of ARC GIS Geographic Information Systems software and the geospatial analysis tools therein, allowed a comprehensive spatial analysis of the volcanoes to be conducted. Of the 1,118 volcanoes of ages from 23Ma to active in the CVZ, we focused on the 106 active and potentially active large composite volcanoes that define the modern arc. These volcanoes are related in time and thus to a consistent set of tectonic factors. The frequency distribution of inter-volcano distances shows a peak frequency in the 10 - 30 km range (71%) with subordinate between 40-80 km (19%) and 80 - 120 km (10%). The characteristic spacing is thus much smaller than the characteristic spacing of 70 km found previously and is consistent with Baker (1974; EPSL). The primary cause appears to be clustering of volcanoes into groups. The density of volcanoes is variable along the arc with regularly spaced clusters of two to three volcanoes in northern and southern parts of the arc (13 r°S to 19 r°S and 24 r° to 27

  15. Future runoff from glacierized catchments in the Central Andes could substantially decrease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Marlene; Schauwecker, Simone; Huggel, Christian; Salzmann, Nadine; Drenkhan, Fabian; Frey, Holger; Giráldez, Claudia; Gurgiser, Wolfgang; Kaser, Georg; Suarez, Wilson; García Hernández, Javier; Fluixá-Sanmartín, Javier; Ayros, Edwin; Rohrer, Mario

    2016-04-01

    In Peru, about 50% of the energy is produced from hydropower plants. An important amount of this energy is produced with water from glaciated catchments. In these catchments river streamflow is furthermore needed for other socio-economic activities such as agriculture. However, the amount and seasonality of water from glacial melt is expected to undergo strong changes. As glaciers are projected to further decline with continued warming, runoff will become more and more sensitive to possible changes in precipitation patterns. Moreover, as stated by a recent study (Neukom et al., 2015), wet season precipitation sums in the Central Andes could decrease up to 19-33 % by the end of the 21st century compared to present-day conditions. Here, we investigate future runoff availability for selected glacierized catchments in the Peruvian Andes. In a first step, we apply a simplified energy balance and runoff model (ITGG-2.0-R) for current conditions. Thereafter, we model future runoff for different climate scenarios, including the possibility of strongly reduced precipitation. Preliminary findings indicate (i) changes in the seasonal distribution of runoff and (ii) significant reductions of the annual runoff in future for the mentioned scenario with significant precipitation decreases. During early phases of glacier recession, melt leads to increased runoff - respectively compensates for the precipitation reduction in the corresponding scenario - depending on the fraction of catchment glaciation. Glaciers are acting as natural water reservoirs and may buffer the decreasing precipitation in glacierized catchments for a limited period. However, strongly reduced precipitation will have noticeable consequences on runoff, particularly when glacier melt contribution gets smaller and finally is completely missing. This will have consequences on the water availability for hydropower production, agriculture, mining and other water uses. Critical conditions may emerge in particular

  16. The paradigm of paraglacial megafans of the San Juan river basin, Central Andes, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvires, Graciela M.

    2014-11-01

    The spatial distribution and several morphometric characteristics of the Quaternary alluvial fans of the San Juan River, in the province of San Juan, at the Central and Western part of Argentina, have been studied to classify them as paraglacial megafans, as well to ratify its depositional environmental conditions. The high sedimentary load exported by San Juan river from the Central Andes to the foreland depressions is estimated about 3,682,200 hm3. The large alluvial fans of Ullum-Zonda and Tulum valleys were deposited into deep tectonic depressions, during the Upper Pleistocene deglaciation stages. The outcome of collecting remotely sensed data, map and DEM data, geophysical data and much fieldwork gave access to morphometric, morphographic and morphogenetic data of these alluvial fans. The main drainage network was mapped on processed images using QGis (vers.2.0.1). Several fan morphometric parameters were measured, such as the size, the shape, the thickness, the surface areas and the sedimentary volume of exported load. The analyzed fans were accumulated in deep tectonic depressions, where the alluvium fill reaches 700 to 1200 m thick. Such fans do not reach the large size that other world megafans have, and this is due to tectonic obstacles, although the sedimentary fill average volume surpasses 514,000 hm3. The author proposes to consider Ullum-Zonda and Tulum alluvial fans as paraglacial megafans. According to the stratigraphic relationships of the tropical South American Rivers, the author considers that the San Juan paraglacial megafans would have occurred in the period before 24 ka BP , possibly corresponding to Middle Pleniglacial (ca 65-24ka BP). They record colder and more humid conditions compared with the present arid and dry conditions.

  17. The origin of the Loncopué Trough in the retroarc of the Southern Central Andes from field, geophysical and geochemical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Vera, E. A.; Sellés, D.; Folguera, A.; Gímenez, M.; Ruíz, F.; Orts, D.; Zamora Valcarce, G.; Martínez, P.; Bechis, F.; Ramos, V. A.

    2014-12-01

    This work analyzes through field, geophysical, geochemical and geochronological data, a particular setting of the Southern Andes in which an extensional system is flanking the mountain front. This setting is represented by the Loncopué Trough, whose origin is discussed for this part of the Andes. This work reconstructs 3-dimensionally the structure of this basin and its evolution through time, since Jurassic times as a series of isolated depocenters, to Late Cretaceous-Eocene times with the construction of a positive relief that subsequently was relaxed through two extensional stages during the late Oligocene-early Miocene and the Pliocene-Quaternary respectively. The last episode of extension is characterized by an initial stage with a series of caldera-collapses in the latest Pliocene-early Quaternary. This passed to a stage of development of a broad basaltic plateau in pre- and inter-glacial times, circumscribed with new radiometric data to the Pleistocene. Quaternary products in northern and central Loncopué Trough have chemical relations that are intermediate between the arc front and the southern Loncopué Trough volcanic rocks studied in previous works. Thus, retroarc eruptions would be part of an extended arc configuration that goes from typical arc series in the northern part of the trough to within-plate series in the south. Low elastic thicknesses computed from gravity data in this work correlate with the area of retroarc volcanic activity. Magnetic data have allowed determining the Curie isotherm, showing two areas of relatively abnormal heat flow, one along the Loncopué Trough itself and the other in the foreland zone. This scenario is discussed through three main hypotheses: an occurrence linked to a slab-steepening after a shallow subduction in the area; co-seismic crustal stretching linked to giant earthquakes in the subduction zone; and, finally slab-tearing associated with asthenospheric upwelling.

  18. Tectonomagmatic characteristics of the back-arc portion of the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro Fault Zone, Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acocella, V.; Gioncada, A.; Omarini, R.; Riller, U.; Mazzuoli, R.; Vezzoli, L.

    2011-06-01

    Post-20 Ma magmatism in the Central Andes is either localized in the magmatic arc or distributed east of it, on the Altiplano-Puna Plateau. Here there is a distinct concentration of magmatic centers on NW-SE trending lineaments, such as the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro (COT), that extends into the Eastern Cordillera to the east of the Puna. Understanding the possible genetic relationship between prominent structures and magmatic centers on these lineaments is important to elucidate the tectonomagmatic evolution of the Central Andes. We investigated the back-arc area of the COT using remote sensing, geological, structural, and petrochemical data. Our study demonstrates that this portion of the COT consists of NW-SE striking faults, formed under overall left-lateral transtension that decreases in activity toward the COT termini. Deformation on the COT occurred during and after activity of prominent N-S striking transpressive fault systems and is coeval with magmatism, which is focused on the central COT. The most evolved magmatic rocks, with an upper crustal imprint, are exposed on the central COT, whereas more primitive, mantle-derived mafic to moderately evolved magmatic rocks, are found toward the COT termini. This points to a genetic relationship between upper crustal deformation and magmatic activity that led to enhanced magma storage in the central COT. COT magmas may result either from slab steepening or episodic delamination of the asthenospheric mantle.

  19. Pucarilla-Cerro Tipillas volcanic complex: the oldest recognized caldera in the southeastern portion of central volcanic zone of Central Andes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman, Silvina; Petrinovic, Ivan [CONICET -IBIGEO. Museo de Cs. Naturales, Universidad de Salta, Mendoza 2 (4400), Salta (Argentina)], E-mail: guzmansilvina@gmail.com

    2008-10-01

    We recognize the most eastern and oldest collapse caldera structure in the southern portion of the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes. A description of Middle-Upper Miocene successions related to explosive- effusive events is presented. The location of this centre close to Cerro Galn Caldera attests a recurrence in the volcanism between 12 and 2 Ma in this portion of the Altiplano - Puna Plateau.

  20. Assessment of Paleozoic terrane accretion along the southern central Andes using detrital zircon geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, R.; Horton, B. K.; Fuentes, F.; Fosdick, J. C.; Capaldi, T.; Stockli, D. F.; Alvarado, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    Two distinct Paleozoic terranes known as Cuyania and Chilenia occupy the southern central Andes of Argentina and Chile. Because the proposed terrane boundaries coincide with major structural elements of the modern Andean system at 30-36°S, it is important to understand their origins and potential role in guiding later Andean deformation. The Cuyania terrane of western Argentina encompasses the Precordillera (PC) and a thick-skinned thrust block of the western Sierras Pampeanas, persisting southward to the San Rafael Basin (SRB). Although recently challenged, Cuyania has been long considered a piece of southern Laurentia that rifted away during the early Cambrian and collided with the Argentine margin during the Ordovician. Chilenia is situated west of Cuyania and includes the Frontal Cordillera (FC) and Andean magmatic arc. This less-studied terrane was potentially accreted during an enigmatic Devonian orogenic event. We present new detrital zircon U-Pb age data from siliciclastic sedimentary rocks that span the entire Paleozoic to Triassic from the FC, PC, and SRB. Cambrian rocks of the PC exhibit similar zircon age distributions with prominent ~1.4 and subordinate ~1.1 Ga populations, which are distinct from other Paleozoic strata. Plutonic rocks with these ages are common in southern Laurentia, whereas ~1.4 Ga zircons are uncommon in South American age distributions. This supports a Laurentian origin for Cuyania in isolation from Argentina during the Cambrian. Upper Paleozoic strata from the PC, FC, and SRB all yield similar age data suggesting shared provenance across the proposed Cuyania-Chilenia suture. Age distributions also notably lack Devonian-age grains. The regional paucity of Devonian plutonic rocks and detrital zircon casts doubt on a possible arc system between these terranes at this time, a key requisite for the mid-Paleozoic transfer and accretion of Chilenia to the Argentine margin. Collectively, these data question the precise boundaries of the

  1. Giant magmatic water reservoir beneath Uturuncu volcano and Altiplano-Puna region (Central Andes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumonier, Mickael; Gaillard, Fabrice; Muir, Duncan; Blundy, Jon; Unsworth, Martyn

    2016-04-01

    Volcanism at continental arcs is the surface manifestation of long-lived crustal magmatic processes whereby mantle-derived hydrous basalt magma differentiates to more silica-rich magmas by a combination of crystallization and crustal melting. What erupts is just a fraction of the total volume of magma produced by these processes; the unerupted, plutonic residues solidify and are inaccessible to direct study until millions of years of uplift and erosion bring them to the surface. In contrast, geophysical surveys, using electromagnetic and seismic waves, can provide real-time images of subduction zone magmatic systems. Several such studies have revealed that arc volcanoes are underlain by large partially molten regions at depths of >10 km, the largest known example being the Altiplano-Puna magma body (APMB) in central Andes. Interpreting such geophysical images in terms of amount, composition and distribution of partial melts is limited by our lack of knowledge of the physical properties of silicate melts at elevated pressures and temperatures. Here we present high-pressure, in situ experimental data showing that the electrical conductivity of andesitic melts is primarily controlled by their dissolved water contents. Linking our new measurements to petrological constraints from andesites erupted on the Altiplano, we show that the APMB is composed of 10-20% of an andesitic melt containing 8-10 wt% dissolved water. This implies that the APMB is a giant water anomaly in the global subduction system, with a total mass of dissolved magmatic water about half of the water contained within the Adriatic Sea. In addition to the controls on the physical properties of the melts, the abundance of dissolved water governs the structural levels of magma ponding, equivalent to the depth of water saturation, where degassing and crystallisation promote partial melting and weakening of the upper crust. Unexpectedly, very high concentrations of water in andesite magmas shall impede their

  2. Multi-sensor geophysical constraints on crustal melt in the central Andes: the PLUTONS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Comeau, M. J.; West, M. E.; Christensen, D. H.; Mcfarlin, H. L.; Farrell, A. K.; Del Potro, R.; Gottsmann, J.; McNutt, S. R.; Michelfelder, G.; Diez, M.; Elliott, J.; Henderson, S. T.; Keyson, L.; Delgado, F.; Unsworth, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The central Andes is a key global location to quantify storage, transport, and volumes of magma in the Earth's crust as it is home to the world's largest zone of partial melt (the Altiplano-Puna Magma or Mush Body, APMB) as well as the more recently documented Southern Puna Magma Body (SPMB). We describe results from the recently completed international PLUTONS project that focused inter-disciplinary study on two sites of large-scale surface uplift that presumably represent ongoing magmatic intrusions in the mid to upper crust - Uturuncu, Bolivia (in the center of the APMB) and Lazufre on the Chile-Argentina border (on the edge of the SPMB). In particular, a suite of geophysical techniques (seismology, gravity, surface deformation, and electro-magnetic methods) have been used to infer the current subsurface distribution and quantity of partial melts in combination with geochemical and lab studies on samples from the area. Both Uturuncu and Lazufre show separate geophysical anomalies in the upper and mid/lower crust (e.g., low seismic velocity, low resistivity, etc.) indicating multiple distinct reservoirs of magma and/or hydrothermal fluids with different properties. The characteristics of the geophysical anomalies differ somewhat depending on the technique used - reflecting the different sensitivity of each method to subsurface melt of different compositions, connectivity, and volatile content. For example, the depth to the top of the APMB is shallower in a joint ambient noise tomography and receiver function analysis compared to a 3D magnetotelluric inversion. One possibility is that the seismic methods are detecting brines above the APMB that do not have a large electromagnetic signature. Comparison of the geophysical measurements with laboratory experiments at the APMB indicate a minimum of 4-25% melt averaged over the region is needed -- higher melt volumes are permitted by the gravity and MT data and may exist in small regions. However, bulk melt values above

  3. A paleolimnological perspective on industrial-era metal pollution in the central Andes, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Colin A; Abbott, Mark B

    2008-04-15

    To date, few studies have investigated the environmental legacy associated with industrialization in the South American Andes. Here, we present an environmental archive of industrial pollution from (210)Pb-dated lake cores recovered from Laguna Chipian, located near the Cerro de Pasco metallurgical region and Laguna Pirhuacocha, located near the Morococha mining region and the La Oroya smelting complex. At Laguna Chipian, trace metal concentrations increase beginning ~1900 AD, coincident with the construction of the central Peruvian railway, and the rapid industrial development of the Cerro de Pasco region. Trace metal concentrations and fluxes peak during the 1950s before subsequently declining up-core (though remaining well above background levels). While Colonial mining and smelting operations are known to have occurred at Cerro de Pasco since at least 1630 AD, our sediment record preserves no associated metal deposition. Based on our (14)C and (210)Pb data, we suggest that this is due to a depositional hiatus, rather than a lack of regional Colonial pollution. At Laguna Pirhuacocha, industrial trace metal deposition first begins ~1925 AD, rapidly increasing after ~1950 AD and peaking during either the 1970s or 1990s. Trace metal concentrations from these lakes are comparable to some of the most polluted lakes in North America and Europe. There appears to be little diagenetic alteration of the trace metal record at either lake, the exception being arsenic (As) accumulation at Laguna Pirhuacocha. There, a correlation between As and the redox-sensitive element manganese (Mn) suggests that the sedimentary As burden is undergoing diagenetic migration towards the sediment-water interface. This mobility has contributed to surface sediment As concentrations in excess of 1100 microg g(-1). The results presented here chronicle a rapidly changing Andean environment, and highlight a need for future research in the rate and magnitude of atmospheric metal pollution. PMID

  4. A paleolimnological perspective on industrial-era metal pollution in the central Andes, Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To date, few studies have investigated the environmental legacy associated with industrialization in the South American Andes. Here, we present an environmental archive of industrial pollution from 210Pb-dated lake cores recovered from Laguna Chipian, located near the Cerro de Pasco metallurgical region and Laguna Pirhuacocha, located near the Morococha mining region and the La Oroya smelting complex. At Laguna Chipian, trace metal concentrations increase beginning ∼ 1900 AD, coincident with the construction of the central Peruvian railway, and the rapid industrial development of the Cerro de Pasco region. Trace metal concentrations and fluxes peak during the 1950s before subsequently declining up-core (though remaining well above background levels). While Colonial mining and smelting operations are known to have occurred at Cerro de Pasco since at least 1630 AD, our sediment record preserves no associated metal deposition. Based on our 14C and 210Pb data, we suggest that this is due to a depositional hiatus, rather than a lack of regional Colonial pollution. At Laguna Pirhuacocha, industrial trace metal deposition first begins ∼ 1925 AD, rapidly increasing after ∼ 1950 AD and peaking during either the 1970s or 1990s. Trace metal concentrations from these lakes are comparable to some of the most polluted lakes in North America and Europe. There appears to be little diagenetic alteration of the trace metal record at either lake, the exception being arsenic (As) accumulation at Laguna Pirhuacocha. There, a correlation between As and the redox-sensitive element manganese (Mn) suggests that the sedimentary As burden is undergoing diagenetic migration towards the sediment-water interface. This mobility has contributed to surface sediment As concentrations in excess of 1100 μg g-1. The results presented here chronicle a rapidly changing Andean environment, and highlight a need for future research in the rate and magnitude of atmospheric metal pollution

  5. A paleolimnological perspective on industrial-era metal pollution in the central Andes, Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, Colin A. [Department of Geology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E3 (Canada)], E-mail: cacooke@ualberta.ca; Abbott, Mark B. [Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E3 (Canada); Section of Anthropology, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, PA 15206 (United States)

    2008-04-15

    To date, few studies have investigated the environmental legacy associated with industrialization in the South American Andes. Here, we present an environmental archive of industrial pollution from {sup 210}Pb-dated lake cores recovered from Laguna Chipian, located near the Cerro de Pasco metallurgical region and Laguna Pirhuacocha, located near the Morococha mining region and the La Oroya smelting complex. At Laguna Chipian, trace metal concentrations increase beginning {approx} 1900 AD, coincident with the construction of the central Peruvian railway, and the rapid industrial development of the Cerro de Pasco region. Trace metal concentrations and fluxes peak during the 1950s before subsequently declining up-core (though remaining well above background levels). While Colonial mining and smelting operations are known to have occurred at Cerro de Pasco since at least 1630 AD, our sediment record preserves no associated metal deposition. Based on our {sup 14}C and {sup 210}Pb data, we suggest that this is due to a depositional hiatus, rather than a lack of regional Colonial pollution. At Laguna Pirhuacocha, industrial trace metal deposition first begins {approx} 1925 AD, rapidly increasing after {approx} 1950 AD and peaking during either the 1970s or 1990s. Trace metal concentrations from these lakes are comparable to some of the most polluted lakes in North America and Europe. There appears to be little diagenetic alteration of the trace metal record at either lake, the exception being arsenic (As) accumulation at Laguna Pirhuacocha. There, a correlation between As and the redox-sensitive element manganese (Mn) suggests that the sedimentary As burden is undergoing diagenetic migration towards the sediment-water interface. This mobility has contributed to surface sediment As concentrations in excess of 1100 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The results presented here chronicle a rapidly changing Andean environment, and highlight a need for future research in the rate and magnitude

  6. A paleolimnological perspective on industrial-era metal pollution in the central Andes, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Colin A; Abbott, Mark B

    2008-04-15

    To date, few studies have investigated the environmental legacy associated with industrialization in the South American Andes. Here, we present an environmental archive of industrial pollution from (210)Pb-dated lake cores recovered from Laguna Chipian, located near the Cerro de Pasco metallurgical region and Laguna Pirhuacocha, located near the Morococha mining region and the La Oroya smelting complex. At Laguna Chipian, trace metal concentrations increase beginning ~1900 AD, coincident with the construction of the central Peruvian railway, and the rapid industrial development of the Cerro de Pasco region. Trace metal concentrations and fluxes peak during the 1950s before subsequently declining up-core (though remaining well above background levels). While Colonial mining and smelting operations are known to have occurred at Cerro de Pasco since at least 1630 AD, our sediment record preserves no associated metal deposition. Based on our (14)C and (210)Pb data, we suggest that this is due to a depositional hiatus, rather than a lack of regional Colonial pollution. At Laguna Pirhuacocha, industrial trace metal deposition first begins ~1925 AD, rapidly increasing after ~1950 AD and peaking during either the 1970s or 1990s. Trace metal concentrations from these lakes are comparable to some of the most polluted lakes in North America and Europe. There appears to be little diagenetic alteration of the trace metal record at either lake, the exception being arsenic (As) accumulation at Laguna Pirhuacocha. There, a correlation between As and the redox-sensitive element manganese (Mn) suggests that the sedimentary As burden is undergoing diagenetic migration towards the sediment-water interface. This mobility has contributed to surface sediment As concentrations in excess of 1100 microg g(-1). The results presented here chronicle a rapidly changing Andean environment, and highlight a need for future research in the rate and magnitude of atmospheric metal pollution.

  7. Drought increases the freezing resistance of high-elevation plants of the Central Chilean Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Almeida, Angela; Reyes-Bahamonde, Claudia; Cavieres, Lohengrin A

    2016-08-01

    Freezing temperatures and summer droughts shape plant life in Mediterranean high-elevation habitats. Thus, the impacts of climate change on plant survival for these species could be quite different to those from mesic mountains. We exposed 12 alpine species to experimental irrigation and warming in the Central Chilean Andes to assess whether irrigation decreases freezing resistance, irrigation influences freezing resistance when plants are exposed to warming, and to assess the relative importance of irrigation and temperature in controlling plant freezing resistance. Freezing resistance was determined as the freezing temperature that produced 50 % photoinactivation [lethal temperature (LT50)] and the freezing point (FP). In seven out of 12 high-Andean species, LT50 of drought-exposed plants was on average 3.5 K lower than that of irrigated plants. In contrast, most species did not show differences in FP. Warming changed the effect of irrigation on LT50. Depending on species, warming was found to have (1) no effect, (2) to increase, or (3) to decrease the irrigation effect on LT50. However, the effect size of irrigation on LT50 was greater than that of warming for almost all species. The effect of irrigation on FP was slightly changed by warming and was sometimes in disagreement with LT50 responses. Our data show that drought increases the freezing resistance of high-Andean plant species as a general plant response. Although freezing resistance increases depended on species-specific traits, our results show that warmer and moister growing seasons due to climate change will seriously threaten plant survival and persistence of these and other alpine species in dry mountains. PMID:27053321

  8. Variation of the upper mantle velocity structure along the central-south Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaofeng; Sandvol, Eric; Shen, Yang; Gao, Haiying

    2014-05-01

    Variations in the subduction angle of the Nazca plate beneath the South American plate has lead to different modes of deformation and volcanism along the Andean active margin. The volcanic gap between the central and southern Andean volcanic zones is correlated with the Pampean flat-slab subduction zone, where the subducting Nazca slab changes from a 30-degree dipping slab beneath the Puna plateau to a horizontal slab beneath the Sierras Pampeanas, and then to a 30-degree dipping slab beneath the south Andes from north to south. The Pampean flat-slab subduction correlates spatially with the track of the Juan Fernandez Ridge, and is associated with the inboard migration of crustal deformation. A major Pliocene delamination event beneath the southern Puna plateau has previously been inferred from geochemical and geological and preliminary geophysical data. The mechanisms for the transition between dipping- and flat-subduction slab and the mountain building process of the central Andean plateau are key issues to understanding the Andean-type orogenic process. We use a new frequency-time normalization approach with non-linear stacking to extract very-broadband (up to 300 second) empirical Green's functions (EGFs) from continuous seismic records. The long-period EGFs provide the deeper depth-sensitivity needed to constrain the mantle structure. The broadband waveform data are from 393 portable stations of four temporary networks: PUNA, SIEMBRA, CHARGE, RAMP, East Sierras Pampeanas, BANJO/SEDA, REFUCA, ANCORP, and 31 permanent stations accessed from both the IRIS DMC and GFZ GEOFON DMC. A finite difference waveform propagation method is used to generate synthetic seismograms from 3-D velocity model. We use 3-D traveltime sensitivity kernels, and traveltime residuals measurement by waveform cross-correlation to directly invert the upper mantle shear-wave velocity structure. The preliminary model shows strong along-strike velocity variations within in the mantle wedge and

  9. Controls on the isotopic composition of surface water and precipitation in the Northern Andes, Colombian Eastern Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, Joel E.; Mora, Andrés; Horton, Brian K.; Nie, Junsheng

    2009-12-01

    Empirical datasets provide the constraints on the variability and causes of variability in stable isotope compositions (δD or δ 18O) of surface water and precipitation that are essential not only for models of modern and past climate but also for investigations of paleoelevation. This study presents stable isotope data for 76 samples from four elevation transects and three IAEA GNIP stations in the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia and the northern Andean foreland. These data are largely consistent with theories of stable isotope variability developed based on a global dataset. On a monthly basis, the precipitation-amount effect exerts the dominant control on δD p and δ 18O p values at the IAEA GNIP stations. At the Bogotá station (2547 m), the δD p and δ 18O p values vary seasonally, with isotopic minima correlating with maxima in precipitation-amount. Although surface water samples from Eastern Cordilleran streams and rivers fall on the Global Meteoric Water Line, samples from three of four lakes (2842-3459 m) have evaporatively elevated δD sw and δ 18O sw values. The IAEA GNIP station data averaged over multiple years, combined with stream and river water data, define vertical lapse rates of -1.8‰ km -1 for Δδ 18O and -14.6‰ km -1 for ΔδD, and are a close fit to a common thermodynamically based Rayleigh distillation model. Elevation uncertainties for these relationships are also evaluated. Comparison of this Colombian dataset with the elevation uncertainties generated by the thermodynamically based model shows that the model underestimates uncertainty at high Δδ 18O and ΔδD values while overestimating it for low Δδ 18O and ΔδD values. This study presents an independent, empirical assessment of stable isotope-based elevation uncertainties for the northern Andes based on a dataset of sufficient size to ensure statistical integrity. These vertical lapse rates and associated uncertainties form the basis for stable isotope paleoelevation studies

  10. New and Evolving Seismic Images of the Central Andes and Subducting Nazca Slab: 20 Years of Portable Seismology Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Beno Gutenberg first identified a seismic low velocity zone in the upper mantle that we now refer to as the asthenosphere that is still the focus of many studies in active tectonic regions. The upper-most mantle is very heterogeneous and occupies the depth range where much of the tectonic action occurs especially in subduction zones and convergent margins. The central South American convergent margin is the result of the subduction of the Nazca Plate beneath the South American Plate and includes the Andes, one of the largest actively growing mountain ranges on Earth. The South American subduction zone has two regions of "flat" subduction in Peru and central Chile and Argentina separated by a segment of "normal" subduction and an active magmatic arc. The central Andean plateau has an average elevation of 3-4 km and some of the thickest crust on Earth with deformation reaching ~800 km inland. This active margin is characterized by along-strike variations in magmatism, upper crustal shortening, crustal thickness, and slab geometry that make it an ideal region to study the relationship between the subducting slab, the mantle wedge, and the overriding plate. After 20 years of portable seismic deployments in the Central Andes seismologists have generated unprecedented seismic images spanning ~3000 km of the Andean lithosphere, the subducting Nazca slab, and the surrounding mantle. Seismic travel-time, ambient noise and earthquake surface-wave tomography, receiver function imaging, and joint receiver function - surface wave dispersion inversions have produced along strike images of the Central Andes from the surface to a depth of ~700 km. These new images were made possible by PI-driven portable broadband seismic deployments and data sharing by many international groups. I will highlight images of along-strike variations in crustal properties and thickness, mantle lithospheric structure, and slab geometry. These seismic images allow us to more completely evaluate the role

  11. Dreyfusia nordmannianae in Northern and Central Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Hans Peter; Havill, N.P.; Akbulut, S.;

    2013-01-01

    , with the purpose of selecting agents for classical biological control in Europe. The literature review suggested that the most promising agent was the Chamaemyiidae fly, Leucopis hennigrata. A new survey in D. nordmannianae's area of origin – Turkey, Georgia and Russia – showed that L. hennigrata was present...... in all localities. It was particularly abundant in Turkey, where its impact on populations of D. nordmannianae appears to be high. Its use as a biological control agent is discussed, as well as other biological control strategies......The silver fir woolly adelgid, Dreyfusia nordmannianae, is the most severe pest occurring on Abies nordmanniana in Central and Northern Europe. The adelgid is particularly damaging to trees in Christmas tree plantations. Dreyfusia nordmannianae is native to the Caucasus region and alien to Europe...

  12. Stress patterns of the Plio-Quaternary brittle deformation along the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro Fault, Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, F.; Tibaldi, A.; Waite, G. P.; Corazzato, C.; Bonali, F.; Nardin, A.

    2012-04-01

    Understanding the geometry and kinematics of the major structures of an orogen is essential to elucidate its style of deformation, as well as its tectonic evolution. We describe the temporal and spatial changes in the state of stress of the trans-orogen area of the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro (COT) Fault Zone in the Central Andes, at about 24° S within the northern portion of the Puna Plateau between the Argentina-Chile border. The importance of the COT derives principally from the Quaternary-Holocene activity recognized on some segments, which may shed new light on its possible control on Quaternary volcanism and on the seismic hazard assessment of the area. Field geological surveys along with kinematic analysis and numerical inversion of ~ 280 new fault-slip measurements have revealed that this portion of the COT consists mainly of NW-SE striking faults, which have been reactivated under three different kinematic regimes: 1) a Miocene transpressional phase with the maximum principal stress (σ1) chiefly trending NW-SE; 2) an extensional phase that started by 9 Ma, with a horizontal NW-SE-trending minimum principal stress (σ3) - permutations between σ2 and σ3 axes have been recognized at three sites - and 3) a left-lateral strike-slip phase with an ~ ENE-WSW σ1 and a ~ NNW-SSE σ3 dating to the late Pliocene-Quaternary. Spatially, in the Quaternary, the left-lateral component decreases toward the westernmost tip of the COT, where it transitions to extension; this produced to a N-S horst and graben structure. Hence, even if trascurrence is still active in the eastern portion of the COT, as focal mechanisms of crustal earthquakes indicate, our study demonstrates that extension is becoming the predominant structural style of deformation, at least in the western region. These major temporal and spatial changes in the tectonic regimes are attributed in part to changes in the magnitude of the boundary forces due to subduction processes. The overall perpendicular

  13. A NEW LOCALITY OF THE HOODED ANTPITTA (GRALLARICULA CUCULLATA: GRALLARIDAE FOR THE COLOMBIAN CENTRAL ANDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OSCAR HUMBERTO MARÍN GÓMEZ

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a new locality record of the Hooded Anpitta (Grallariculla cucullata, a threatened species inhabiting montane cloud forests of the Colombian and Venezuelan Andes. This is the first record for Quindío department. We present capture-rate data at this site that suggests a resident, relatively large population. 

  14. The Under-side of the Andes: Using Receiver Functions to Map the North Central Andean Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Central Andean Uplift and Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project is an interdisciplinary project to investigate connections between lithospheric removal, crustal shortening and surface uplift in the northern Bolivia and southern Peru region of the South American Andean orogen. The central Andes are defined by six major tectonomorphic provinces; the forearc, the volcanically active Western Cordillera (WC, ~6 km elevation), the internally drained Altiplano (~4 km elevation), an inactive fold and thrust belt in the Eastern Cordillera (EC, ~6 km elevation), a lower elevation active fold and thrust belt in the Subandean (SA) zone and the Beni, a foreland basin. Forty seismic stations installed for the CAUGHT project were deployed between 13° and 18° S latitude, covering the transition zone where the Altiplano region pinches out in southern Peru, in an effort to better constrain the changing character of the crust and mantle lithosphere. Geologic studies across the northern Bolivian portion of the eastern Andean margin (15-17° S) have documented a total of 275 km of upper crustal shortening (McQuarrie et al, Tectonics, v27, 2008), which may be associated with crustal thickening and/or the removal of lithospheric material as a thickened lithosphere root becomes unstable. For this receiver function (converted wave) study, we have little coverage in the forearc and foreland, ~75 km spacing in most of the array, and a relatively dense ~20 km spaced profile along the Charaña-La Paz-Yucumo transect, the eastern portion of which is nearly coincident with the balanced cross-section of McQuarrie et al. (2008). Using the first year of available data, more than 1200 receiver functions have been calculated using an iterative deconvolution method, and stacked using the common conversion point (CCP) method, along profiles parallel to and nearly coincident to those used for the geologic shortening estimates. We identified arrivals for the Moho and generated a 3D map of

  15. An InSAR-based survey of volcanic deformation in the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Simons, M.

    2004-02-01

    We extend an earlier interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) survey covering about 900 remote volcanos of the central Andes (14°-27°S) between the years 1992 and 2002. Our survey reveals broad (10s of km), roughly axisymmetric deformation at 4 volcanic centers: two stratovolcanoes are inflating (Uturuncu, Bolivia, and Hualca Hualca, Peru); another source of inflation on the border between Chile and Argentina is not obviously associated with a volcanic edifice (here called Lazufre); and a caldera (Cerro Blanco, also called Robledo) in northwest Argentina is subsiding. We explore the range of source depths and volumes allowed by our observations, using spherical, ellipsoidal and crack-like source geometries. We further examine the effects of local topography upon the deformation field and invert for a spherical point-source in both elastic half-space and layered-space crustal models. We use a global search algorithm, with gradient search methods used to further constrain best-fitting models. Inferred source depths are model-dependent, with differences in the assumed source geometry generating a larger range of accepted depths than variations in elastic structure. Source depths relative to sea level are: 8-18 km at Hualca Hualca; 12-25 km for Uturuncu; 5-13 km for Lazufre, and 5-10 km at Cerro Blanco. Deformation at all four volcanoes seems to be time-dependent, and only Uturuncu and Cerro Blanco were deforming during the entire time period of observation. Inflation at Hualca Hualca stopped in 1997, perhaps related to a large eruption of nearby Sabancaya volcano in May 1997, although there is no obvious relation between the rate of deformation and the eruptions of Sabancaya. We do not observe any deformation associated with eruptions of Lascar, Chile, at 16 other volcanoes that had recent small eruptions or fumarolic activity, or associated with a short-lived thermal anomaly at Chiliques volcano. We posit a hydrothermal system at Cerro Blanco to explain the

  16. Broadband regional waveform modeling to investigate crustal structure and tectonics of the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Jennifer Lyn

    We use broadband regional waveform modeling of earthquakes in the central Andes to determine seismic properties of the Altiplano crust. Properties of the shear-coupled P-wavetrain (SPL ) from intermediate-depth events provide particularly important information about the structure of the crust. We utilize broadband seismic data recorded at the BANJO and SEDA stations, and synthetic seismograms computed with a reflectivity technique to study the sensitivity of SPL to crustal and upper mantle parameters at regional distances. We find that the long-period SPL-wavetrain is most sensitive to crustal and mantle Poisson's ratios, average crustal velocity, and crustal thickness. A comprehensive grid search method developed to investigate these four parameters suggests that although trade-offs exist between model parameters, models of the Altiplano which provide the best fit between the data and synthetic seismograms are characterized by low Poisson's ratios, low average crustal velocity and thick crust. We apply our grid search technique and sensitivity analysis results to model the full waveforms from 6 intermediate-depth and 2 shallow-focus earthquakes recorded at regional distances by BANJO and SEDA stations. Results suggest that the Altiplano crust is much thicker (55--65 km) and slower (5.75--6.25 km/s) than global average values. Low crustal and mantle Poisson's ratios together with the lack of evidence for a high-velocity lower crust suggests a bulk felsic crustal composition, resulting in an overall weak crust. Our results favor a model of crustal thickening involving large-scale tectonic shortening of a predominantly felsic crust. To better understand the mechanics of earthquake rupture along the South American subduction zone, we have analyzed broadband teleseismic P-waves and utilize single- and multi-station inversion techniques to constrain source characteristics for the 12 November 1996 Peru subduction zone earthquake. Aftershock locations, intensity reports

  17. Andes 1997 Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Central Andes gravity data (6,151 records) were compiled by Professor Gotze and the MIGRA Group. This data base was received in April, 1997. Principal gravity...

  18. Boron isotope composition of geothermal fluids and borate minerals from salar deposits (central Andes/NW Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasemann, Simone A.; Meixner, Anette; Erzinger, Jörg; Viramonte, José G.; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Franz, Gerhard

    2004-06-01

    We have measured the boron concentration and isotope composition of regionally expansive borate deposits and geothermal fluids from the Cenozoic geothermal system of the Argentine Puna Plateau in the central Andes. The borate minerals borax, colemanite, hydroboracite, inderite, inyoite, kernite, teruggite, tincalconite, and ulexite span a wide range of δ11B values from -29.5 to -0.3‰, whereas fluids cover a range from -18.3 to 0.7‰. The data from recent coexisting borate minerals and fluids allow for the calculation of the isotope composition of the ancient mineralizing fluids and thus for the constraint of the isotope composition of the source rocks sampled by the fluids. The boron isotope composition of ancient mineralizing fluids appears uniform throughout the section of precipitates at a given locality and similar to values obtained from recent thermal fluids. These findings support models that suggest uniform and stable climatic, magmatic, and tectonic conditions during the past 8 million years in this part of the central Andes. Boron in fluids is derived from different sources, depending on the drainage system and local country rocks. One significant boron source is the Paleozoic basement, which has a whole-rock isotopic composition of δ11B=-8.9±2.2‰ (1 SD); another important boron contribution comes from Neogene-Pleistocene ignimbrites ( δ11B=-3.8±2.8‰, 1 SD). Cenozoic andesites and Mesozoic limestones ( δ11B≤+8‰) provide a potential third boron source.

  19. Exhumation history of the Northern Andes from the Cenozoic syn-tectonic sedimentary fill of the Middle Magdalena Valley Basin, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, C. J.; Caballero, V. M.; Horton, B. K.; Mora, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Central Cordillera and the Eastern Cordillera of the northern Andes form the western and eastern flanks of the Colombian Middle Magdalena Valley Basin, respectively. Previous estimates of the timing of onset of exhumation of the two cordilleras vary, and although some recent studies have been in agreement, more work is needed to develop a clear picture. The spatial and chronological distribution of deformation has direct implications for the shortening history of the greater South American Andean margin, as well as for improving predictions of the rapid, lateral facies changes associated with the varying nearby sediment sources. Field-based analyses of the basin fill using paleocurrent measurements of trough-cross-beds, clast imbrication and flute casts, not only provide new insights into the tectonic history, but directly complement recent detrital zircon U-Pb work completed in the MMVB. Between the lower and upper Paleocene strata, the paleocurrent direction shifts from northward to eastward, indicating that uplift of the Central Cordillera was underway by the mid-Paleocene and consistent with the shift from a cratonic to Central Cordilleran sediment source observed in the detrital zircon record. This paleocurrent shift occurs coevally with a shift from delta to fluvial facies. An eastward paleoflow in upper Eocene through lowest Oligocene strata indicate a continuing influence of the Central Cordillera. Paleocurrent directions in the lower Oligocene deposits are highly variable, and, beginning in the middle Oligocene strata, show a switch to a dominantly westward orientation that continues through the Neogene. As the orientation changes, deposits show an increase in energy from muddy, meandering river deposits, to coarser, braided channel facies. We attribute this switch, from eastward to westward paleocurrent orientations, to the onset of exhumation of the Eastern Cordillera. The results of a current, detailed sandstone petrographic study combined with

  20. The Structure of the Crust and Uppermost Mantle Beneath the Central Andes from Ambient Noise Tomography: Imaging the Neogene to Modern Batholith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, K. M.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Porter, R. C.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Central Andes of southern Peru, Bolivia, and northern Chile (between ~10°S and ~35°S) comprise the largest orogenic plateau in the world associated with abundant arc volcanism, the Central Andean Plateau (CAP). The goal of this continental-scale Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT) project is to incorporate broadband seismic data from ~20 seismic networks deployed incrementally in the Central and Southern Andes from May 1994 through March 2012, to image the vertically polarized shear-wave velocity (Vsv) structure of the CAP. First-order correlations with our shallow results (~5 km) and the morphotectonic provinces as well as subtler geological features indicate our results are robust. Our major results include mapping a pervasive mid-crustal low-velocity zone (images do not resolve a high conductivity anomaly across our low-velocity zone as expected in the presence of aqueous fluids or large interconnected zones of partial melt. Therefore, we dismiss them as likely explanations for our imaged low-velocity body outside of the APVC location. Working under the hypothesis that voluminous ignimbrites are the surface expression of batholith formation at depth as exemplified by the APVC, we combine our results with the locations of known Neogene ignimbrite eruptive centers and negative isostatic residual gravity anomalies and suggest the 3.25 km/s shear-wave velocity contour at 15 km depth generally outlines the extent of a Neogene to modern batholith, with isolated pockets of partial melt where velocities dip below 3.0 km/s. A velocity of 3.25 km/s at this pressure and temperature regime is too low for an isotropic granitic composition and must be explained without invoking significant partial melt. Previous work in Tibet, a region with thick crust analogous to the CAP, suggests a zone of mid-crustal radial anisotropy may separate horizontally and vertically polarized shear-wave velocities by as much as 20%. The effective isotropic shear velocity may be ~10% faster than

  1. Climatic and paleoclimatic forcing of erosion in the southern Central Andes and the northwestern Himalaya (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookhagen, B.; Strecker, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    The windward flanks of the tectonically active southern Central Andes and the NW Himalaya are characterized by steep climatic, tectonic, and topographic gradients. The first windward topographic rise of these mountain ranges constitutes a significant orographic barrier resulting in high orographic rainfall causing some of the wettest places on Earth. However, the higher-elevation areas of the windward flanks of both regions become progressively drier, until arid conditions are attained in the orogen interiors (i.e., the Altiplano-Puna and Tibet plateaus). Both areas have experienced significant paleoclimatic changes with deeper penetration of moisture into the orogen and thus an orogenward shift of the climate gradient. Some of the world's largest rivers with high sediment loads emerge from these mountain belts, and understanding the relation between climate and erosion is key in predicting mass fluxes, assessing the impacts of climate variability, and long-term climate forcing of erosion on landscape evolution. Here, we quantify the impact of the climatic gradients and their spatial shifts during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. We rely on sedimentary archives, digital topography, and cosmogenic inventories of river sands (10Be) and bedrock-erosion rates (10Be and 26Al) from the Puna Plateau in NW Argentina and the interior of the western Himalaya in NW India. We make three key observations that underline the importance of present-day climatic parameters and paleoclimatic changes on the effiency of surface processes in both areas: (1) First-order spatial erosion patterns follow the climatic gradient and catchment-mean erosion rates vary by three orders of magnitude from the wet mountain fronts to the dry orogen interior. In NW Argentina, our measurements represent the fluvial transport rates and indicate very low fluvial activity in the interior of the Puna Plateau during the Late Pleistocene; (2) the spatial distribution of erosion rates can be explained by a

  2. Altitudinal vegetation belts in the high-Andes of central Chile (33°S Pisos altitudinales de vegetación en los Andes de Chile central (33°S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohengrin A. Cavieres

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The limits of alpine vegetation belts have been established mainly based on physiognomic criteria. However, a more objective approach for fixing limits of vegetation belts are methods based on species composition and relative abundance of each species. While these methods are more time consuming, they are more detailed and permit the detection of physical factors affecting the limits of vegetation belts. In this paper we: 1 describe the altitudinal changes of vegetation above timberline, 2 compare vegetation belts defined with physiognomy and two floristic methods (a qualitative one based on altitudinal changes in species composition, and a quantitative one based on changes in dominant species; and 3 detect some environmental factors responsible for the altitudinal distribution of alpine vegetation between 2100 and 3700 masl in the Andes of Santiago, central Chile (33°S. There was a complete agreement between the different methods in delimiting the subalpine belt. However, in the lower alpine belt (the cushion's belt floristic methods subdivided it in 2-3 sub-belts. In the floristic methods, elevations 3500-3700 that formed the higher alpine belt segregated in separate ways because they have no species in common. Physiognomic descriptions lose relevant information about species distribution, especially at higher elevations. Mean annual temperature and nitrogen content of soil are the main environmental factors affecting the altitudinal limits of vegetation belts in the central Chilean AndesLa delimitación de los pisos altitudinales de vegetación andina se ha basado principalmente en criterios fisionómicos. Sin embargo, un criterio más objetivo para la delimitación es usar métodos basados en la composición y abundancia relativa de las especies presentes. Mientras estos métodos requieren de un mayor esfuerzo de muestreo, son más detallados y permiten detectar factores físicos involucrados en la delimitación altitudinal de la vegetaci

  3. Estructura litosférica de los Andes centrales a partirde un modelo gravimétrico 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia B. Prezzi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A través del modelado directode la anomalía de Bouguer se desarrolló un modelo de densidades en 3D de lacorteza continental, la placa subducida y el manto superior, para los AndesCentrales entre los 20-29°S y los 74-61°O. El objetivo de este trabajo escontribuir a un mejor conocimiento de la estructura litosférica, integrando lainformación disponible (geofísica, geológica, petrológica y geoquímica en unúnico modelo. La geometría del modelo está definida y limitada por la ubicaciónde hipocentros, líneas sísmicas de reflexión y refracción, tomografías deatenuación y de tiempos de arribo, estudios magnetotelúricos, modelos térmicosy secciones estructurales balanceadas. Las densidades asignadas a losdiferentes cuerpos fueron calculadas a partir de datos petrológicos ygeoquímicos, estimando las condiciones de presión y temperatura. El modeloconsiste de 31 planos verticales E-O paralelos, donde la corteza continentalestá compuesta por distintos cuerpos que representan a las diferentes unidadesmorfotectónicas de los Andes Centrales. Se generaron mapas isocóricos del techode la placa subducida, del Moho continental y del techo de la astenósferadebajo de Sudamérica. Se calculó la anomalía residual mediante la sustracciónde los efectos gravimétricos de la placa subducida modelada y del Moho modeladode la anomalía de Bouguer. Este estudio demuestra como el modelado gravimétrico3D, integrando información geofísica, geológica y petrológica, puede contribuiral mejor conocimiento de la estructura litosférica de los Andes Centrales.

  4. VIOLENCIA POLÍTICA, ASISTENCIA MILITAR DE ESTADOS UNIDOS Y PRODUCCIÓN DE COCA EN LOS ANDES CENTRALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés Arce

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available ¿Tiene la violencia política un impacto significativo sobre la producción de drogas en los Andes Centrales? ¿Disminuye la ayuda militar estadounidense la oferta de drogas ilícitas que se origina en los Andes Centrales? ¿Qué otros factores ayudan a explicar dicha producción? ¿Tiene la lucha estadounidense contra el narcotráfico las mismas consecuencias en cada país? Este trabajo evalúa de manera empírica los efectos de la violencia política y la ayuda exterior de Estados Unidos (EE.UU. en los tres países productores de droga más prolíficos de América Latina: Colombia, Bolivia y Perú. Los resultados guardan relación directa con la literatura existente que recalca los obstáculos que los gobiernos enfrentan cuando pretenden regular los mercados de bienes de contrabando. Un análisis comparativo de la política antidrogas de EE.UU. aclara los éxitos y las limitaciones de la estrategia que actualmente se lleva a cabo, particularmente en Colombia, donde la violencia política ha facilitado el fortalecimiento del narcotráfico a nivel internacionalWhat is the effect of political violence on the production of coca in the Central Andes? Does U.S. military aid reduce the amount of drugs that originate from this region? What other factors help explain the production of coca? Are the effects of U.S. military aid the same across the Andean nations? This paper tests the effects of political violence and U.S. military aid in the drug producing nations of Colombia, Bolivia and Peru. Our results are consistent with existing literature that emphasizes the obstacles that governments face as they attempt to suppress markets for prohibited goods. Our comparative analysis sheds new light on the limitations of the current U.S. policy, particularly in Colombia, where political violence has strengthened the global drug trade

  5. Cold episodes in the Peruvian Central Andes: Composites, Types, and their Impacts over South America (1958-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulca, J. C.; Vuille, M. F.; Roundy, P. E.; Trasmonte, G.; Silva, Y.; Takahashi, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Mantaro basin (MB) is located in the central Peruvian Andes. Occasionally, cold episodes are observed during austral summer (January-March), that strongly damage crops. However, little is known about the causes and impacts of such cold episodes. The main goal of this study is thus to characterize cold episodes in the MB and assess their large-scale circulation and teleconnections over South America (SA) during austral summer. To identify cold events in the MB daily minimum temperature (Tmin) for the period 1958-2014 from Huayao station, located within the MB was used. A cold episode is defined when daily minimum temperature drops below its 10-percentile for at least one day. Additionally, to study the sensitivity between physical mechanisms associated with cold episodes and temperature, cold episodes are classified in three groups: Weak cold episodes (7.5 ≤ Tmin ≤ 10 percentile), strong cold episodes (Tmin ≤ 2.5 percentile), but excluding the 9 coldest events (Tmin ≤ 0 ͦ C), henceforth referred to as extraordinary cold episodes. Several gridded reanalysis were used to characterize the large-scale circulation, cloud cover and rainfall over SA associated with these events. Weak and strong cold episodes in the MB are mainly associated with a weakening of the Bolivian High-Nordeste Low system by tropical-extratropical interactions. Both types of cold episodes are associated with westerly wind anomalies at mid- and upper-tropospheric levels aloft the Peruvian Central Andes, which inhibit the influx of humid air masses from the lowlands to the east and hence limit the development of cloud cover (e.g., positive OLR anomalies over MB). The resulting clear sky conditions cause nighttime temperatures to drop, leading to cold extremes below 10-percentile. Simultaneously, northeastern Brazil (NEB) registers negative OLR anomalies, strong convection and enhanced cloud cover because displacement of the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ) toward the northeast of

  6. Spatiotemporal variability of modern precipitation δ18O in the central Andes and implications for paleoclimate and paleoaltimetry estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorella, Richard P.; Poulsen, Christopher J.; Pillco Zolá, Ramiro S.; Barnes, Jason B.; Tabor, Clay R.; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the patterns of rainfall isotopic composition in the central Andes is hindered by sparse observations. Despite limited observational data, stable isotope tracers have been commonly used to constrain modern-to-ancient Andean atmospheric processes, as well as to reconstruct paleoclimate and paleoaltimetry histories. Here, we present isotopic compositions of precipitation (δ18Op and δDp) from 11 micrometeorological stations located throughout the Bolivian Altiplano and along its eastern flank at ~21.5°S. We collected and isotopically analyzed 293 monthly bulk precipitation samples (August 2008 to April 2013). δ18Op values ranged from -28.0‰ to 9.6‰, with prominent seasonal cycles expressed at all stations. We observed a strong relationship between the δ18Op and elevation, though it varies widely in time and space. Constraints on air sourcing estimated from atmospheric back trajectory calculations indicate that continental-scale climate dynamics control the interannual variability in δ18Op, with upwind precipitation anomalies having the largest effect. The impact of precipitation anomalies in distant air source regions to the central Andes is in turn modulated by the Bolivian High. The importance of the Bolivian High is most clearly observed on the southern Bolivian Altiplano. However, monthly variability among Altiplano stations can exceed 10‰ in δ18Op on the plateau and cannot be explained by elevation or source variability, indicating a nontrivial role for local scale effects on short timescales. The strong influence of atmospheric circulation on central Andean δ18Op requires that paleoclimate and paleoaltimetry studies consider the role of South American atmospheric paleocirculation in their interpretation of stable isotopic values as proxies.

  7. Space geodetic observations of nazca-south america convergence across the central andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norabuena; Leffler-Griffin; Mao; Dixon; Stein; Sacks; Ocola; Ellis

    1998-01-16

    Space geodetic data recorded rates and directions of motion across the convergent boundary zone between the oceanic Nazca and continental South American plates in Peru and Bolivia. Roughly half of the overall convergence, about 30 to 40 millimeters per year, accumulated on the locked plate interface and can be released in future earthquakes. About 10 to 15 millimeters per year of crustal shortening occurred inland at the sub-Andean foreland fold and thrust belt, indicating that the Andes are continuing to build. Little (5 to 10 millimeters per year) along-trench motion of coastal forearc slivers was observed, despite the oblique convergence.

  8. Reverse Faulting as a Crucial Mechanism for Magma Ascent in Compressional Volcanic Arcs: Field Examples from the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, F. A.; Gonzalez, G.; Cembrano, J. M.; Veloso, E. E.

    2010-12-01

    The nature of crustal deformation in active arcs and the feedback mechanisms between tectonics and magma transport constitute fundamental problems in the understanding of volcanic systems. Additionally, for geothermal energy exploration, a better understanding of how crustal architecture and stress field controls fluid ascent and heat transfer from deep levels to the surface is crucial. The Central Andes volcanic belt is an excellent, modern example of such systems but, the scarcity of good outcrops has limited our ability to define the relations between structure and volcanism. In the Salar de Atacama Basin of northern Chile, there are good exposures of folded and faulted Neogene units (continental sediments, volcanic rocks and ignimbrites) and reverse faults spatially and temporally related to volcanic edifices. The subsurface of the study area has been interpreted by previous authors as a thin-skinned, 6-8 km-deep, east-vergent compressional belt. We carried out structural mapping, Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) analyses, strain tensor analyses and fault-related fold kinematic modelling to assess the causal relationship between compressional deformation and magmatism in this region. Field observations indicate that the structures deformed progressively Oligocene-Miocene continental sedimentary units, the upper sedimentary infill of the Salar de Atacama basin (Pliocene-Present), and Pliocene-Pleistocene Ignimbrites. The topographic expression of the compressional belt corresponds to a set of subparallel, asymmetric, fault-related-folds, which can be seen in the field as prominent NS-trending ridges with heights ranging between 50 and 400 m. Furthermore, we found evidence of a ~100 km-long structure along the active magmatic arc, so-called Miscanti Fault. This fault represents the easternmost expression of the above mentioned compressional belt. Pleistocene-Holocene monogenetic cones and strato-volcanoes are located either at the hinge zone of fault

  9. Tectonique Cénozoïque du Haut Plateau de la Puna, Nord Ouest Argentin, Andes Centrales.

    OpenAIRE

    Coutand, Isabelle

    1999-01-01

    Mémoires de Géosciences Rennes, n° 92, 381 p., ISBN: 2-905532-91-2 Les Andes Centrales sont l'exemple type d'une chaîne se développant le long d'une marge active en contexte non collisionel et résultent de la subduction légèrement oblique (-N75°E) de la plaque océanique Nazca sous le continent sud-américain. Elles sont caractérisées par la présence du haut plateau de l'Altiplano-Puna s'étendant depuis le Pérou au Nord jusqu'en Argentine au Sud et présentant une altitude moyenne avoisinant ...

  10. Early last glacial maximum in the Southern Central Andes reveals northward shift of the westerlies at ~39 ka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zech

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The latitudinal position of the southern westerlies has been suggested to be a key parameter for the climate on Earth. According to the general notion, the southern westerlies were shifted equatorward during the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM: ~24–18 ka, resulting in reduced deep ocean ventilation, accumulation of "old dissolved carbon", and low atmospheric CO2 concentrations. In order to test this notion, we applied surface exposure dating on moraines in the Southern Central Andes, where glacial mass balances are particularly sensitive to changes in precipitation, i.e. to the latitudinal position of the westerlies. Our results provide robust evidence that the maximum glaciation occurred already at ~39 ka, significantly predating the global LGM. This questions the role of the westerlies for atmospheric CO2, and it highlights our limited understanding of the forcings of atmospheric circulation.

  11. Early last glacial maximum in the southern Central Andes reveals northward shift of the westerlies at ~39 ka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zech

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The latitudinal position of the southern westerlies has been suggested to be a key parameter for the climate on Earth. According to the general notion, the southern westerlies were shifted equatorward during the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM: ~24–18 ka, resulting in reduced deep ocean ventilation, accumulation of old dissolved carbon, and low atmospheric CO2 concentrations. In order to test this notion, we applied surface exposure dating on moraines in the southern Central Andes, where glacial mass balances are particularly sensitive to changes in precipitation, i.e. to the latitudinal position of the westerlies. Our results provide robust evidence that the maximum glaciation occurred already at ~39 ka, significantly predating the global LGM. This questions the role of the westerlies for atmospheric CO2, and it highlights our limited understanding of the forcings of atmospheric circulation.

  12. Investigating links between climate and orography in the central Andes: Coupling erosion and precipitation using a physical-statistical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Lauren E. L.; Barros, Ana P.

    2014-06-01

    Prior studies evaluated the interplay between climate and orography by investigating the sensitivity of relief to precipitation using the stream power erosion law (SPEL) for specified erosion rates. Here we address the inverse problem, inferring realistic spatial distributions of erosion rates for present-day topography and contemporaneous climate forcing. In the central Andes, similarities in the altitudinal distribution and density of first-order stream outlets and precipitation suggest a direct link between climate and fluvial erosion. Erosion rates are estimated with a Bayesian physical-statistical model based on the SPEL applied at spatial scales that capture joint hydrogeomorphic and hydrometeorological patterns within five river basins and one intermontane basin in Peru and Bolivia. Topographic slope and area data were generated from a high-resolution (˜90 m) digital elevation map, and mean annual precipitation was derived from 14 years of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission 3B42v.7 product and adjusted with rain gauge data. Estimated decadal-scale erosion rates vary between 0.68 and 11.59 mm/yr, with basin averages of 2.1-8.5 mm/yr. Even accounting for uncertainty in precipitation and simplifying assumptions, these values are 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than most millennial and million year timescale estimates in the central Andes, using various geological dating techniques (e.g., thermochronology and cosmogenic nuclides), but they are consistent with other decadal-scale estimates using landslide mapping and sediment flux observations. The results also reveal a pattern of spatially dependent erosion consistent with basin hypsometry. The modeling framework provides a means of remotely estimating erosion rates and associated uncertainties under current climate conditions over large regions. 2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  13. GOCE satellite derived gravity and gravity gradient corrected for topographic effect in the South Central Andes region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Orlando; Gimenez, Mario; Braitenberg, Carla; Folguera, Andres

    2012-08-01

    Global gravity field models, derived from satellite measurements integrated with terrestrial observations, provide a model of the Earth's gravity field with high spatial resolution and accuracy. The Earth Gravity Model EGM08, a spherical harmonic expansion of the geopotential up to degree and order 2159, has been used to calculate two functionals of the geopotential: the gravity anomaly and the vertical gravity gradient applied to the South Central Andes area. The satellite-only field of the highest resolution has been developed with the observations of satellite GOCE, up to degree and order 250. The topographic effect, a fundamental quantity for the downward continuation and validation of satellite gravity gradiometry data, was calculated from a digital elevation model which was converted into a set of tesseroids. This data is used to calculate the anomalous potential and vertical gravity gradient. In the Southern Central Andes region the geological structures are very complex, but not well resolved. The processing and interpreting of the gravity anomaly and vertical gradients allow the comparison with geological maps and known tectonic structures. Using this as a basis, a few features can be clearly depicted as the contact between Pacific oceanic crust and the Andean fold and thrust belt, the seamount chains over the Oceanic Nazca Plate, and the Famatinian and Pampean Ranges. Moreover the contact between the Rio de la Plata craton and the Pampia Terrain is of great interest, since it represents a boundary that has not been clearly defined until now. Another great lineament, the Valle Fertil-Desaguadero mega-lineament, an expression of the contact between Cuyania and Pampia terranes, can also be clearly depicted. The authors attempt to demonstrate that the new gravity fields can be used for identifying geological features, and therefore serve as useful innovative tools in geophysical exploration.

  14. Constraining age and rate of deformation in the northern Bolivian Andes from cross sections, cooling ages, and thermokinematic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, N.; Ehlers, T. A.; Rak, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    A critical component in assessing the viability of proposed plate tectonic or geodynamic processes in regions of convergence is the expected or predicted age and rate of deformation in the overriding plate. Commonly, age of deformation is inferred through geochronology of foreland basin and wedge-top sedimentary rocks and bedrock thermochronometer cooling signals. In Bolivia the original pulse of deformation of the fold-thrust belt is argue to be as young as 38-25 Ma based on the age of synorogenic strata or as old as 65-45 Ma due to proposed foreland basin rocks deposited in the Bolivian Altiplano. The large discrepancies in proposed age, rate and magnitude of deformation through the Bolivian Andes limit our ability to relate age and rate of shortening to internal geodynamic or external plate tectonic processes. We evaluate permissible ranges in age of initiation and rate of deformation through a forward kinematic model of the northern Bolivian fold-thrust belt. Each step of deformation accounts for isostatic loading from thrust faults and subsequent erosional of structural highs. The kinematic model predicts an evolution of flexural basins into which synorogenic sediments are deposited allowing us to fully integrate age of exhumation and deposition to age and magnitude of deformation. By assigning an age to each deformation step, we create a range of velocity vectors that are input into the thermokinematic model Pecube, which predicts thermochronometer cooling histories based on kinematics, topography, thermal parameters and shortening rates. We match the pattern of predicted ages with the across strike pattern of measured zircon fission track, apatite fission track and apatite (U-Th)/ He cooling ages. The sensitivity of modeled thermochronologic data to the age at which deformation initiates indicate that northern Bolivian EC started deforming at 50 Ma and may have begun as early as 55 Ma. The acceptable velocity envelope for the modeled section permits either a

  15. [Diversity and dynamics of a high sub-Andean forest from Northern Andes, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Jesús Oswaldo Velásquez; Maniguaje, Nancy Lorena; Duque, Alvaro Javier

    2012-06-01

    The sub-Andean forests are characterized by a high biodiversity, but little is known about their natural dynamics. In order to generate new information, this study assessed two permanent plots of one hectare each, in the Northern Andean area of the Western Cordillera, Colombia. Methodology included the evaluation of diversity patterns, above ground biomass (AGB) dynamics, and mortality and recruitment rates. Besides, we used the Fisher's Alpha index to calculate species diversity. Forest dynamics and AGB were evaluated in both plots by means of three censuses carried out within a nine years period. In total, we found 1 664 individuals with diameter at breast height (DBH)> or =10cm belonging to 222 species, 113 genera and 60 families. Mean species richness was of 156 species/ha and a mean Fisher's Alpha index of 56.2/ha. The mortality rate was 0.88% and recruitment was 1.16%, which did not allow to lay any external effect of global warming or climate change on individual forest dynamics. However, the mean AGB was 243.44+/-9.82t/ha, with an annual average increase of 2.9t/ha, a higher value than the one reported in other studies of high sub-Andean forests, which suggests that equilibrium in terms of the AGB have not yet been reached. Besides, according to field observations, a recovery process, from a disturbance that occurred in the past, might be on his way.

  16. Sediment yield along the Andes: continental budget, regional variations, and comparisons with other basins from orogenic mountain belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latrubesse, Edgardo M.; Restrepo, Juan D.

    2014-07-01

    We assess the sediment yield at 119 gauging stations distributed from Colombia to Patagonia, covering the different morphotectonic and morphoclimatic settings of the Andes. The most productive areas are the Meta River basin within the northern Andes and the Bolivian and northern Argentina-Chaco systems, which produce an average of 3345, 4909 and 2654 t km2 y- 1 of sediment, respectively. The rivers of the northern and central Andes (excluding the Pacific watersheds of Peru, northern Chile, and central Argentina) have a weighted mean sediment yield of 2045 t km- 2 y- 1 and produce 2.25 GTy- 1 of total sediment. A major constraint estimating the Andean continental budget of sediment yield lies in the lack of gauging data for the Peruvian region. Using the available gauge stations, the regional sediment yield appears underestimated. Assuming a higher value of sediment yield for the Peruvian Andes, the total budget for the whole central Andes could range between 2.57 GT y- 1 and 3.44 GT y- 1. A minimum of ~ 0.55 GT y- 1 and a probable maximum of ~ 1.74 GT y- 1 of sediment are deposited in the intramontane and surrounding proximal sedimentary basins. The magnitude of sediment yield in the Andes is comparable to other rivers draining orogenic belts around the world.

  17. A Late-Glacial/Holocene Pollen Record from the Eastern Andes of Northern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Barbara C. S.; Rodbell, Donald T.

    1995-09-01

    A pollen and sediment record of a core 4.2-m-long from Laguna Baja (7°42' S, 77°32' W, 3575 m) in the Cordillera Oriental of northern Peru suggests several episodes of major vegetational and climatic change over the past 13,000 yr. The oldest pollen assemblage consists of a mixture of paramo elements (tropical alpine vegetation), including high percentages of Poaceae (40%) that decline upward, moist montane forest (Compositae and Polylepis), and wet montane forest (e.g., Hedyosmum and Podocarpaceae). Organic carbon content range from 60%), with high percentages of Jamesonia, a fern characteristic of paramo and decreasing values of Plantago tubulosa and the wet montane forest elements Hedyosmum and Podocarpaceae. Charcoal percentages are at a maximum during this period, magnetic susceptibility and sand percentages are high, and percentages of organic matter are low. Several explanations for these changes are possible, including a reduction in temperature and moisture, more frequent periods of aridity with increased fires, or natural succession. The Holocene record begins with pronounced increases in organic carbon and pollen of wet montane forest, primarily Hedyosmum , Podacarpaceae, and Urticales. High values of Podocarpaceae pollen (>35%) and a decline in charcoal suggest temperature and moisture levels above modern-day values. Wet montane forest pollen remain high and charcoal values are low from about 10,000 to 6000 yr B.P., suggesting that warm and moist conditions prevailed for about 4000 yr. Subsequently Podocarpaceae and Urticales decline, and for a brief time Alnus is prominent in the pollen record. Following the Alnus maximum at about 5000 yr B.P., Poaceae, Ambrosia and Chenopodiaceae/Amaranthaceae become frequent. Increased paramo and disturbance indicator pollen suggest increased anthropogenic activities in this region from the middle Holocene to the present.

  18. Eruptive history of Chimborazo volcano (Ecuador): A large, ice-capped and hazardous compound volcano in the Northern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaniego, Pablo; Barba, Diego; Robin, Claude; Fornari, Michel; Bernard, Benjamin

    2012-04-01

    New fieldwork, radiometric and whole-rock chemical data permit the reconstruction of the main eruptive stages of the Chimborazo compound volcano, the highest summit of the Northern Andes. Chimborazo is composed of three successive edifices. The Basal Edifice (CH-I) was active from ~ 120 to 60 ka and resulted in a large, mostly effusive edifice which was built up during two stages of cone-building, terminating with the formation of a dome complex. This edifice was affected by a huge sector collapse around 65-60 ka which produced a major debris avalanche that spread out into the Riobamba basin, covering about 280 km2 with an average thickness of 40 m and a total volume of ~ 10-12 km3. After the emplacement of the Riobamba debris avalanche, eruptive activity resumed at the eastern outlet of the avalanche scar and was responsible for the construction of a less voluminous, Intermediary Edifice (CH-II), whose current remnants are the Politécnica and Martínez peaks. This edifice developed from 60 to 35 ka. Lastly, eruptive activity shifted to the west, leading to the construction of the morphologically well-preserved Young Cone (CH-III) which currently forms the highest summit (Whymper). The average eruptive rate of Chimborazo volcano is 0.5-0.7 km3/ka. However, looking at the three successive edifices individually, we estimate that there has been a progressive decrease in magma output rate from the Basal Edifice (0.7-1.0 km3/ka), through the Intermediary Edifice (0.4-0.7 km3/ka) to the Young Cone (~ 0.1 km3/ka). However, during the main cone-building stages, the peak eruption rates are markedly higher, indicating significant variations in the magma output rate during the lifespan of this arc volcano. During the Holocene, the Chimborazo eruptive activity consisted of small-volume explosive events that occurred at quite regular intervals, between about 8000 and 1000 yr ago. Since the last eruption occurred between the early part of the 5th century and the end of the 7th

  19. Parasite loads and altitudinal distribution of Liolaemus lizards in the central Chilean Andes Cargas parasitarias y distribución de lagartijas Liolaemus en los Andes de Chile central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOHN H. CAROTHERS

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the distributions of ten species of Liolaemus lizards in the central Chilean Andes to the distributions of four types of parasites: malaria-causing Plasmodium, gut nematodes, ticks, and mites. We wanted to see if parasite numbers might be a factor in determining distributional limits of the lizards. We found that there was no evidence of malarial infestation of the lizards, that ticks were almost absent, that more often than not mite numbers decreased at the distributional limits of the lizards, and that gut nematodes confined to the herbivorous lizards in our sample may well be beneficial rather than detrimental. Rather than parasitism, other biotic interactions (e.g., predation or competition are more likely candidates as factors influencing lizard elevational distributions, as are abiotic characteristics such as microhabitat availabilities and thermal factorsEste estudio compara las distribuciones de diez especies de lagartijas Liolaemus en los Andes de Chile central, con las distribuciones de cuatro tipos de parásitos: Plasmodium causantes de malaria, nemátodos intestinales, garrapatas y ácaros. Quisimos verificar si los números de parásitos pudieran ser un factor determinante de los límites de distribución de las lagartijas. Encontramos que no había evidencia de infestación por malaria en las lagartijas; que las garrapatas estaban casi ausentes; que los números de ácaros más a menudo decrecían que aumentaban en los límites distribucionales de las lagartijas; y que los nemátodos intestinales confinados a las lagartijas herbívoras en nuestra muestra bien podían ser beneficiosos antes que dañinos. Más bien que parasitismo, otras interacciones bióticas (e.g., depredación o competencia son candidatos más probables como factores que influyen las distribuciones altitudinales de las lagartijas, además de características abióticas tales como la disponibilidad de microhábitats y los factores térmicos

  20. Provenance through the limit: integrated provenance from the Devonian sedimentary and basement rocks from the northern segment of the Eastern Cordillera of the Colombian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Agustin; Valencia, Victor; Lotero, Andrea; Villafañez, Yohana; Augustsson, Carita; Bayona, German; Ibañez, Mauricio

    2013-04-01

    The provenance record of sedimentary rocks is sometimes the only available archive of the geological evolution in continuously active continental margins where continuous exhumation, erosion and along strike fragmentation of continental margins destroy geological evidences. New integrated provenance constraints from segmented exposures of Devonian rocks of the northern segment of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia are used to reconstruct overimposed Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic paleogeographic scenarios of the northern Andes. Sandstones from deltaic to platform environments are characterized by very high quartz contents, stable to ultrastable heavy minerals and mostly angular fragments. U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology reveals prominent Silurian to Ordovician and Mesoproterozoic (Grenvillian) age populations with minor Devonian zircons. Tourmaline geochemistry and detrital quarz characterization suggest prominent low grade metamorphic sources. These provenance fingerprints can be related to the erosion of the older metasedimentary basement exposed in the same region and record the transition from a terrane collisional event to the formation of a new subduction zone before the final Late Paleozoic events that end in the agglutination of Pangea. The U-Pb detrital record of the Devonian and basement rocks of the Eastern Cordillera are also comparable with Early to Middle Paleozic Paleozoic rocks form the Northern segment of the eastern Peruvian Andes re-inforcing the view of along strike terrane thousand of kilometer transport along the Mesozoic proto-Andean margin. Petrographic and heavy mineral petrofacies and stratigraphic correlation between Devonian localities are also used as piercing points to document Cenozoic ten of kilometers strike slip displacements along the northern termination of the Eastern Cordillera.

  1. Snakes of an urban-rural landscape in the central Andes of Colombia: species composition, distribution, and natural history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Andrés Rojas-Morales

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available From 2005 to 2011, I studied the composition, distribution and natural history of an Andean urban-rural snake assemblage at the Cordillera Central of Colombia, based on three data sources: (1 examination of specimens in the MHN-UC [Museo de Historia Natural, Universidad de Caldas], (2 incidental encounters by author, and (3 collection of data by other researchers. Additionally, I provide natural history notes for the species involved. A total of 14 species, including two subspecies of snakes, belonging to 12 genera and four families, have been found in the studied area (municipality of Manizales, Caldas. Taking into account this total, 10 had atleast one record in the urban area, 13 in the rural area and 14 in forested areas. Only Liophis epinephelus bimaculatus was found exclusively in forest environment. Three species (21.4% are apparently endemic to the region, six species (42.8% correspond to afauna representative of the Tropical–Andean range of South America, four species (28.5% are distributed from Central America to the tropical Andes, and only one species is widely distributed in the whole continent. The snake assemblage in Manizales is mostly terrestrial, and in general, the species tend to be more active in the rainy periods of the year (mainly from October–December, and most of them may occasionally be found in urban areas, mainly close to areas of vegetation such as crops and pastures.

  2. Bimodal volcanism in a tectonic transfer zone: Evidence for tectonically controlled magmatism in the southern Central Andes, NW Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrinovic, I. A.; Riller, U.; Brod, J. A.; Alvarado, G.; Arnosio, M.

    2006-04-01

    This field-based and analytical laboratory study focuses on the genetic relationship between bimodal volcanic centres and fault types of an important tectonic transfer zone in the southern Central Andes, the NW-SE striking Calama-Olacapato-Toro (COT) volcanic belt. More specifically, tectono-magmatic relationships are examined for the 0.55 Ma Tocomar, the 0.78 Ma San Jerónimo and the 0.45 Ma Negro de Chorrillos volcanic centres in the Tocomar area (66°30 W-24°15 S). Structures of the COT volcanic belt, notably NW-SE striking strike-slip faults and NE-SW trending normal faults, accommodated differential shortening between major N-S striking thrust faults on the Puna Plateau. We present evidence that bimodal volcanism was contemporaneous with activity of these fault types in the COT volcanic belt, whereby eruption and composition of the volcanic rocks in the Tocomar and San Jerónimo-Negro de Chorrillos areas appear to have been controlled by the kinematics of individual faults. More specifically, rhyolitic centres such as the Tocomar are associated with normal faults, whereas shoshonitic-andesitic monogenetic volcanoes, e.g., the San Jerónimo and Negro de Chorrillos centres, formed at strike-slip dominated faults. Thus, the eruption of higher viscous rhyolite magmas appears to have been facilitated in tectonic settings characterized by horizontal dilation whereas ascent and effusive volcanic activity of less viscous and hot basaltic andesites to shoshonites were controlled by subvertical strike-slip faults. While the Tocomar rhyolites are interpreted to be derived from an anatectic crustal source, geochemical characteristics of the San Jerónimo and Negro de Chorrillos shoshonitic andesites are in agreement with a deeper source. This suggests that the composition of erupted volcanic rocks as well as their spatial distribution in the Tocomar area is controlled by the activity of specific fault types. Such volcano-tectonic relationships are also evident from older

  3. Compositional variations of ignimbrite magmas in the Central Andes over the past 26 Ma - A multivariate statistical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandmeier, M.; Wörner, G.

    2016-10-01

    Multivariate statistical and geospatial analyses based on a compilation of 890 geochemical and ~ 1200 geochronological data for 194 mapped ignimbrites from the Central Andes document the compositional and temporal patterns of large-volume ignimbrites (so-called "ignimbrite flare-ups") during Neogene times. Rapid advances in computational science during the past decade led to a growing pool of algorithms for multivariate statistics for large datasets with many predictor variables. This study applies cluster analysis (CA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) on log-ratio transformed data with the aim of (1) testing a tool for ignimbrite correlation and (2) distinguishing compositional groups that reflect different processes and sources of ignimbrite magmatism during the geodynamic evolution of the Central Andes. CA on major and trace elements allows grouping of ignimbrites according to their geochemical characteristics into rhyolitic and dacitic "end-members" and to differentiate characteristic trace element signatures with respect to Eu anomaly, depletions in middle and heavy rare earth elements (REE) and variable enrichments in light REE. To highlight these distinct compositional signatures, we applied LDA to selected ignimbrites for which comprehensive datasets were available. In comparison to traditional geochemical parameters we found that the advantage of multivariate statistics is their capability of dealing with large datasets and many variables (elements) and to take advantage of this n-dimensional space to detect subtle compositional differences contained in the data. The most important predictors for discriminating ignimbrites are La, Yb, Eu, Al2O3, K2O, P2O5, MgO, FeOt, and TiO2. However, other REE such as Gd, Pr, Tm, Sm, Dy and Er also contribute to the discrimination functions. Significant compositional differences were found between (1) the older (> 13 Ma) large-volume plateau-forming ignimbrites in northernmost Chile and southern Peru and (2) the

  4. Space-time variations of stresses in the Miocene-Quaternary along the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro Fault Zone, Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, F.; Tibaldi, A.; Bonali, F. L.; Corazzato, C.

    2013-05-01

    We describe the temporal and spatial changes in the tectonic state of stress occurred during the Miocene-Quaternary in the trans-orogen area of the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro (COT) fault zone in the Central Andes, at about 24°S within the northern portion of the Puna Plateau. This work sheds new light on the complexity of stress pattern distribution in general, and contributes to the analysis of the relationships between tectonics and volcanism, and of the seismic hazard of the area. Field geological surveys, along with kinematic analysis and numerical inversion of ~ 140 new fault-slip measurements, have revealed that this portion of the COT zone, previously considered a continuous, long-lived lineament, in reality has been subjected to three different kinematic regimes: 1) a Miocene transpressional phase with the maximum principal stress (σ1) chiefly trending NNE-SSW; 2) an extensional phase that started by 9 Ma, with a horizontal NW-SE-trending minimum principal stress (σ3), and 3) a left-lateral strike-slip phase with a horizontal ~ E-W σ1 and ~ N-S σ3 dating to the late Pliocene-Quaternary, which decreases toward the westernmost part of the studied zone, where it transitions to extension producing a N-S-trending graben structure. Hence, even if transcurrence is still active in the eastern portion of the COT, as focal mechanisms of crustal earthquakes indicate, our study demonstrates that extension is becoming the predominant structural style of deformation, at least in the western region. The major changes in the tectonic regimes are attributed to changes in the magnitude of the boundary forces due to subduction processes, whereas gravitational effect of a thickened crust might be responsible for the overall orogen-perpendicular extension.

  5. A multi-institutional and interdisciplinary approach to the assessment of vulnerability and adaptation to climate change in the Peruvian Central Andes: problems and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Martínez

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A local integrated assessment of the vulnerability and adaptation to climate change in the Mantaro River Basin, located in Peruvian Central Andes, was developed between years 2003 to 2005. In this paper we present some lessons learned during the development of this study, emphasizing the multi-institutional and interdisciplinary efforts, briefly showing the methodological aspects, and pointing out the main problems found.

  6. Pluri-decadal (1955–2014) evolution of glacier–rock glacier transitional landforms in the central Andes of Chile (30–33° S)

    OpenAIRE

    Monnier, S.; C. Kinnard

    2016-01-01

    This study deals with relationships between debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers in the central Andes of Chile. Three glacier–rock glacier transitional landforms are investigated over the last decades in order to highlight and question the significance of their landscape evolution and dynamics. We use series of historical air photos and Geoeye satellite images together with common remote sensing operations including imagery orthorectification, digital elevation model generation, an...

  7. Elevation-dependent changes in n-alkane δD and soil GDGTs across the South Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Moreno, Vanesa; Rohrmann, Alexander; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Sachse, Dirk; Tofelde, Stefanie; Niedermeyer, Eva M.; Strecker, Manfred R.; Mulch, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    Surface uplift of large plateaus may significantly influence regional climate and more specifically precipitation patterns and temperature, sometimes complicating paleoaltimetry interpretations. Thus, understanding the topographic evolution of tectonically active mountain belts benefits from continued development of reliable proxies to reduce uncertainties in paleoaltimetry reconstructions. Lipid biomarker-based proxies provide a novel approach to stable isotope paleoaltimetry and complement authigenic or pedogenic mineral proxy materials, in particular outside semi-arid climate zones where soil carbonates are not abundant but (soil) organic matter has a high preservation potential. Here we present δD values of soil-derived n-alkanes and mean annual air temperature (MAT) estimates based on branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGT) distributions to assess their potential for paleoelevation reconstructions in the southern central Andes. We analyzed soil samples across two environmental and hydrological gradients that include a hillslope (26-28°S) and a valley (22-24°S) transect on the windward flanks of Central Andean Eastern Cordillera in NW Argentina. Our results show that present-day n-alkane δD values and brGDGT-based MAT estimates are both linearly related with elevation and in good agreement with present-day climate conditions. Soil n-alkanes show a δD lapse rate (Δ (δD)) of - 1.64 ‰ / 100 m (R2 = 0.91, p < 0.01) at the hillslope transect, within the range of δD lapse rates from precipitation and surface waters in other tropical regions in the Andes like the Eastern Cordillera in Colombia and Bolivia and the Equatorial and Peruvian Andes. BrGDGT-derived soil temperatures are similar to monitored winter temperatures in the region and show a lapse rate of ΔT = - 0.51 °C / 100 m (R2 = 0.91, p < 0.01), comparable with lapse rates from in situ soil temperature measurements, satellite-derived land-surface temperatures at this transect, and

  8. The Geographic Distribution of a Tropical Montane Bird Is Limited by a Tree: Acorn Woodpeckers (Melanerpes formicivorus and Colombian Oaks (Quercus humboldtii in the Northern Andes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin G Freeman

    Full Text Available Species distributions are limited by a complex array of abiotic and biotic factors. In general, abiotic (climatic factors are thought to explain species' broad geographic distributions, while biotic factors regulate species' abundance patterns at local scales. We used species distribution models to test the hypothesis that a biotic interaction with a tree, the Colombian oak (Quercus humboldtii, limits the broad-scale distribution of the Acorn Woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus in the Northern Andes of South America. North American populations of Acorn Woodpeckers consume acorns from Quercus oaks and are limited by the presence of Quercus oaks. However, Acorn Woodpeckers in the Northern Andes seldom consume Colombian oak acorns (though may regularly drink sap from oak trees and have been observed at sites without Colombian oaks, the sole species of Quercus found in South America. We found that climate-only models overpredicted Acorn Woodpecker distribution, suggesting that suitable abiotic conditions (e.g. in northern Ecuador exist beyond the woodpecker's southern range margin. In contrast, models that incorporate Colombian oak presence outperformed climate-only models and more accurately predicted the location of the Acorn Woodpecker's southern range margin in southern Colombia. These findings support the hypothesis that a biotic interaction with Colombian oaks sets Acorn Woodpecker's broad-scale geographic limit in South America, probably because Acorn Woodpeckers rely on Colombian oaks as a food resource (possibly for the oak's sap rather than for acorns. Although empirical examples of particular plants limiting tropical birds' distributions are scarce, we predict that similar biotic interactions may play an important role in structuring the geographic distributions of many species of tropical montane birds with specialized foraging behavior.

  9. Determinación de procesos y áreas de riesgos en los Andes centrales de Chile mediterráneo: Casos de estudio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quintanilla, Víctor

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available ln the course of the Mountain Hazards Mapping Project in the Central Andes from Chile (Project FONDECYT Nº 482-91 natural hazards were assessed and mapped in the Aconcagua Bassin Test area of the high Andes (2.500 to 4.000 m.. Various geomorphic hazard processes (avalanches, rockfalls, landslide hazards, water activity were mapped on the scale 1:50.000 with a simplified legend. The mountainous area seems to be relatively stable and the rock substratum (mainly granitic is resistant to weathering. The greatest hazards are avalanches and landslides, which have a long recurrence interval and are difficult to predict, although their source areas can be identified.

    [es] Durante la realización del proyecto de Cartografía de Riesgos de Montaña en los Andes Centrales de Chile (Proyecto FONDECYT nº 482- 91 se cartografiaron los riesgos naturales en la cuenca del Aconcagua, altos Andes (2.500 a 4.000 m. Varios riesgos geomorfológicos (avalanchas, caídas de piedras, erosión hídrica fueron cartografiados a escala 1:50.000 con una leyenda simplificada. Las áreas de montaña parecen relativamente estables y el sustrato rocoso (principalmente granítico es resistente a la meteorización.
    Los mayores riesgos son las avalanchas y los deslizamientos, que tienen un largo periodo de recurrencia y son difíciles de predecir, aunque sus áreas fuente pueden ser fácilmente identificadas.
    [fr] Durant la réalisation du projet de cartographie des risques de montagne dans les Andes Centrales du Chili (Projet FONDECYT nº 482-91 on a réalisé des cartographies des risques naturels dans le bassin de Aconcagua, Hautes Andes (2500 à 4000 m. Des risques géomorphologiques variés (avalanches, chutes de pierres, érosion hydrique ont été représentés au 1:50.000ième avec une légende simplifiée. Les zones de montagne paraissent relativement stables et la roche mère (principalement granitique est résistante à la d

  10. Modern and long-term evaporation of central Andes surface waters suggests paleo archives underestimate Neogene elevations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorella, Richard P.; Poulsen, Christopher J.; Pillco Zolá, Ramiro S.; Jeffery, M. Louise; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2015-12-01

    Central Andean paleoelevations reconstructed from stable isotope and paleofloral data imply a large magnitude (>2 km) Miocene-to-modern surface uplift. However, the isotopic relationships between precipitation, surface waters, and soil waters upon which these reconstructions are based remain poorly constrained for both past, and in many cases, modern conditions. We quantify the relationships between central Andean precipitation and surface waters by measuring the isotopic composition of 249 stream water samples (δ18O and δD) collected between April 2009 and October 2012. The isotopic compositions of stream waters match precipitation along the eastern flank. In contrast, Altiplano surface waters possess a lower δD-δ18O slope (4.59 vs ∼8 for meteoric waters) not observed in precipitation, which signals heavy isotope evaporative enrichment in surface waters. Paleoclimate models indicate that highly evaporative conditions have persisted on the plateau throughout Andean uplift, and that conditions may have been more evaporative when the Andes were lower. Thus, more ancient proxy materials may have a greater evaporative bias than previously recognized and paleoelevation reconstructions from stable isotope based central Andean plateau proxy materials likely overstate Miocene-to-present surface uplift. We propose Altiplano paleoelevations of 1-2 km at 24.5 Ma, 1.5-2.9 km by 11.45 Ma, and modern elevations by ∼6 Ma based on the lightest isotopic compositions observed in Altiplano proxy materials, which are least likely to be influenced by evaporation. These constraints limit total late-Miocene-to-modern uplift to <2.2 km, are more consistent with crustal shortening records, and suggest that plateau uplift may have been more spatially uniform than suggested by previous interpretations of stable isotope proxies.

  11. Zonda downslope winds in the central Andes of South America in a 20-year climate simulation with the Eta model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antico, Pablo L.; Chou, Sin Chan; Mourão, Caroline

    2015-12-01

    The Zonda wind is a local version of the alpine foehn in the central Andes Mountains in South America. It blows on the eastern slopes and produces an extremely warm and dry condition in Argentina. In this study, the occurrence of Zonda wind events during a 20-year simulation from the regional Eta model is analyzed and results are compared to previous studies of Zonda wind events based on weather observations. We define a set of parameters to account for the zonal pressure gradient across the mountain, vertical movement, and air humidity typical of Zonda wind events. These parameters are applied to characterize Zonda wind events in model run and to classify them as surface-level or high-level episodes. The resulting annual distribution of Zonda occurrences based on composite analyses shows a preference for winter and spring with rare occurrences during summer. For the surface-level Zonda wind events, the highest frequency occurs during spring. Whereas surface-level Zonda wind episodes more commonly initiate in the afternoon, high-level Zonda wind events show no preference for a given initiation time. Our results are mostly in agreement with previous observational results.

  12. A Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF, coordinates and velocities for South American stations: contributions to Central Andes geodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Mackern

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Satellite positioning systems allow the fixing of the location of a point on the Earth's surface with very good precision and accuracy. To do this, however, it is necessary to determine the point coordinates taking account the reference system and the movements that affect them because of tectonic plate movements. These reference systems are materialized by a significant number of continuous measurement stations in South America. In SIRGAS (Sistema de Referencia Geocéntrico para las Américas, there are four Analysis Centers that process the data collected from satellites of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS, with the primary purpose to maintain the international terrestrial reference frame through calculation of the coordinates and velocities of the continuous GNSS stations of the SIRGAS-CON Network.

    In this work, we demonstrate the quality of the solutions from CIMA, one of the SIRGAS official processing centers operating in Mendoza, Argentina, in comparison with other South American processing centers. The importance of precise calculations of coordinates and velocities in a global frame is also shown. Finally, we give estimations of velocities from stations located within deformation zones in the Central Andes.

  13. Estimating glacier and snowmelt contributions to stream flow in a Central Andes catchment in Chile using natural tracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rodriguez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology for hydrograph separation in high elevation watersheds, which aims at identifying individual flow sources such as snow- and ice melt, rainfall and soil water. Daily summer and bi-daily spring water samples from the outlet of the Juncal River were analyzed for all major ions as well as stable water isotopes, δ18O and δ2H. Additionally, various water sources such as rain, springs, snow- and glacial melt were sampled throughout the catchment. A principal component analysis (PCA was performed in order to reduce the dimensionality of the problem. Potential sources were identified in a two-component U space that explains 77% of variability. Hydrograph separation (HS was performed through three models: (i Isotopic model, (ii Mixing–PCA model, and (iii Informative–Bayesian model, with very similar results in each case. At the Juncal River outlet, summer flows were composed by at least 50% of water originating in highly glaciarized headwaters in 2011–2012 (a dry period in the Central Andes. Autumn and winter flows were highly influenced by soil water and affect total annual discharge. Before the high flow season, snow melt accounted for approximately 25% of streamflow, However during summer, when streamflow was highest, snowmelt contribution was minimal, while glacier melt and soil water were the most important sources.

  14. Phylogeny and biogeography of the New World siskins and goldfinches: rapid, recent diversification in the Central Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Elizabeth J; Witt, Christopher C

    2015-06-01

    Time-calibrated molecular phylogenies can help us to understand the origins of the diverse and unique Andean avifauna. Previous studies have shown that the tempo of diversification differed between the Andes and adjacent lowland regions of South America. Andean taxa were found to have speciated more recently and to have avoided the decelerated diversification that is typical of Neotropical lowland clades. The South American siskins, a Pleistocene finch radiation, may typify this Andean pattern. We investigated the phylogenetic biogeography of all the New World siskins and goldfinches in new detail. To understand the specific role of the Andes in siskin diversification, we asked: (1) Was diversification faster in Andean siskin lineages relative to non-Andean ones? (2) Did siskin lineages move into and out of the Andes at different rates? We found that siskin lineages in the Andes had higher diversification rates and higher outward dispersal rates than siskin lineages outside the Andes. We conclude that páramo expansion and contraction in response to Pleistocene climatic cycles caused accelerated diversification and outward dispersal in Andean siskins. The younger average age of bird species in the Andes compared to lowland South America may be attributable to bursts of recent diversification in siskins and several other vagile, open-habitat clades. PMID:25796324

  15. Phylogeny and biogeography of the New World siskins and goldfinches: rapid, recent diversification in the Central Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Elizabeth J; Witt, Christopher C

    2015-06-01

    Time-calibrated molecular phylogenies can help us to understand the origins of the diverse and unique Andean avifauna. Previous studies have shown that the tempo of diversification differed between the Andes and adjacent lowland regions of South America. Andean taxa were found to have speciated more recently and to have avoided the decelerated diversification that is typical of Neotropical lowland clades. The South American siskins, a Pleistocene finch radiation, may typify this Andean pattern. We investigated the phylogenetic biogeography of all the New World siskins and goldfinches in new detail. To understand the specific role of the Andes in siskin diversification, we asked: (1) Was diversification faster in Andean siskin lineages relative to non-Andean ones? (2) Did siskin lineages move into and out of the Andes at different rates? We found that siskin lineages in the Andes had higher diversification rates and higher outward dispersal rates than siskin lineages outside the Andes. We conclude that páramo expansion and contraction in response to Pleistocene climatic cycles caused accelerated diversification and outward dispersal in Andean siskins. The younger average age of bird species in the Andes compared to lowland South America may be attributable to bursts of recent diversification in siskins and several other vagile, open-habitat clades.

  16. The Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system in the Puna Plateau, Central Andes: Geodynamic implications and stratovolcanoes emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norini, Gianluca; Baez, Walter; Becchio, Raul; Viramonte, Jose; Giordano, Guido; Arnosio, Marcelo; Pinton, Annamaria; Groppelli, Gianluca

    2013-11-01

    The structural evolution of the Puna Plateau is characterized by the activity of both orogen-parallel and orogen-oblique faults. Understanding the possible relationship between these two structural styles, their geodynamic implications and the influence on the migration of magmas is important to get insights into the tectonic and magmatic evolution of the Central Andes. In this study, we present a structural analysis of the orogen-oblique Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system and the surrounding orogen-parallel thrust faults in the central-eastern Puna Plateau. Morphostructural analysis and field mapping reveal the geometry, kinematics and dynamics of the tectonic features in the studied area. We propose a three-dimensional geometrical reconstruction of the main fault planes showing their attitude and intersections at depth. The study indicates that the crust underwent simultaneous deformation along both the vertical transcurrent Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system and the low-angle thrust faults, and that the back-arc portion of the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system developed as a transfer zone among the main N-striking thrusts. Our model considers that both orogen-parallel and orogen-oblique fault systems should be regarded as parts of the same tectonic system, accommodating crustal shortening of a thickened crust. The study suggests that the tectonic control on the magma and fluid circulation in the crust is mainly related to the geometry of the fault planes and the orientation of the stress field, with a previously unrecognized important role played by the orogen-parallel thrust faults on the emplacement of the stratovolcanoes.

  17. Early Cenozoic Shortening and Foreland Basin Sedimentation in the Marañon Fold-thrust Belt, Central Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, L. J.; Carlotto, V.; Horton, B. K.; Rosell, L. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Marañon fold-thrust belt in the westernmost Andes of Peru has long been considered a robust signature of early Cenozoic shortening in the Andean orogenic belt. However, the structural details and potential records of coeval synorogenic sedimentation remain elusive. We report results from new geologic mapping (1:50,000), cross-section construction, and U-Pb geochronology for the Matucana-Ticlio region at 11-12°S along the Lima-La Oroya highway. Zircon U-Pb age data from volcanic rocks and clastic basin fill provide a maximum depositional age of ~43 Ma for a middle Eocene syndeformational unit that we identify as the Anta Formation, which overlies the Paleocene Casapalca Formation. Sedimentary lithofacies and unconformable relationships within the volcaniclastic Anta Formation reveal mixed fluvial, alluvial-fan, and volcanic depositional conditions during shortening accommodated by a NE-verging thrust/reverse fault and corresponding backthrust (here named the Chonta fault system). Our cross-section reconstruction and geochronological data indicate that the region is a critical, possibly unique, zone of the broader NE-directed Marañon fold-thrust belt where pre-Neogene synorogenic sediments and their associated structures are preserved. We interpret this combined structural and basin system as an Eocene-age (Incaic) frontal thrust belt and corresponding foredeep to wedge-top depozone in central Peru. As one of the better-constrained segments of the Marañon fold-thrust belt, this zone provides insight into potential linkages with elusive early Cenozoic (Incaic) structures and foreland basin fill of the Western Cordillera and Altiplano farther south in the central Andean plateau.

  18. Structural inheritance and selective reactivation in the central Andes: Cenozoic deformation guided by pre-Andean structures in southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Nicholas D.; Horton, Brian K.; Carlotto, Victor

    2016-03-01

    Structural, stratigraphic, and geochronologic constraints from the Eastern Cordillera in the central Andean plateau of southern Peru (14-15°S) demonstrate the existence and position of major pre-Andean structures that controlled the accumulation of Triassic synrift fill and guided subsequent Cenozoic deformation. The timing of initial clastic deposition of the Triassic Mitu Group is here constrained to ~ 242-233 Ma on the basis of detrital and volcanic zircon U-Pb geochronology. Regionally distinct provenance variations, as provided by U-Pb age populations from localized synrift accumulations, demonstrate Triassic erosion of multiple diagnostic sources from diverse rift-flank uplifts. Stratigraphic correlations suggest synchronous initiation of extensional basins containing the Mitu Group, in contrast with previous interpretations of southward rift propagation. Triassic motion along the NE-dipping San Anton normal fault accommodated up to 7 km of throw and hanging-wall deposition of a synrift Mitu succession > 2.5 km thick. The contrasting orientation of a non-reactivated Triassic normal fault suggests selective inversion of individual structures in the Eastern Cordillera was dependent on fault dip and strike. Selective preservation of a ~ 4 km thick succession of Carboniferous-Permian strata in the down-dropped San Anton hanging wall, beneath the synrift Mitu Group, suggests large-scale erosional removal in the uplifted footwall. Field and map observations identify additional pre-Andean thrust faults and folds attributed to poorly understood Paleozoic orogenic events preserved in the San Anton hanging wall. Selective thrust reactivation of normal and reverse faults during later compression largely guided Cenozoic deformation in the Eastern Cordillera. The resulting structural compartmentalization and across-strike variations in kinematics and deformation style highlight the influence of inherited Paleozoic structures and Triassic normal faults on the long

  19. Erosion and Sediment Transport Across and Along Pronounced Topographic and Climatic Gradients: Examples from the Central Andes and Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookhagen, Bodo; Strecker, Manfred; Olen, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    Moisture impinging on high topographic barriers results in effective orographic barriers. For example, the interaction of the Indian Monsoon with the southern Himalaya and the South American Monsoon System with the eastern central Andes result in some of the most efficient orographic barriers on Earth. The steep topographic gradients, the impact of focused rainfall along the southern and eastern flanks of the range, and the northward and westward shifts of rainfall during frequent intensified storm systems are responsible for an efficient erosional regime, with some of the highest known erosion rates. The spatiotemporal correlation between various topographic, tectonic, climatic, and exhumational phenomena in these regions has resulted in the formulation of models of possible long-term erosional and tectonic feedback processes that drive the lateral expansion and vertical growth of mountain belts. However, despite an increase in thermochronologic, cosmogenic radionuclide, and sedimentological datasets that help explain some underlying mechanisms, the true nature of these relationships is still unclear and controversies particularly exist concerning the importance of the different forcing factors that drive sediment transport on different time scales. Here, we synthesize and assess these controversies with observations from studies conducted perpendicular to and along strike of the orogens, and combine them with new basin-wide erosion-rate data from the Sutlej Valley in the NW Himalaya and from the southern central Andean Plateau (Puna) in NW Argentina. At first order and across strike, erosion rates based on cosmogenic nuclide inventories on river sands suggest a correlation with rainfall rates. But along-strike rainfall gradients in the Himalaya indicate additional moderating factors, such as vegetation. Leeward of the orographic barrier, fluvial erosion variability increases and erosion processes become more stochastic. Further leeward in the high-elevation and

  20. Volcano deformation survey over the Northern and Central Andes with ALOS InSAR time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Rivera, Anieri M.; Amelung, Falk; Mothes, Patricia

    2016-07-01

    We use ALOS-1 Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar data spanning the period of 2007-2011 to obtain time-dependent ground deformation data over all of the volcanoes in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. We detect deformation on or near the proximity of Galeras, Reventador, Tungurahua, Guagua Pichincha, Sangay, and Cerro Auquihuato volcanoes, uncovering previously undocumented deformation in the latter three. Deformation is attributed to changes in pressurization of the volcanic systems (Galeras, Tungurahua, Guagua Pichincha, and Cerro Auquihuato), subsidence associated with flow deposits (Reventador), and flank creep (Sangay). Our models suggest that the pressure sources are located at depths of ˜1-6 km from the surface, indicating that the measurable deformation within our data is restricted to shallow magma chambers and hydrothermal systems.

  1. A first shallow firn-core record from Glaciar La Ollada, Cerro Mercedario, central Argentine Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolius, David; Schwikowski, Margit; Jenk, Theo; Gäggeler, Heinz W.; Casassa, Gino; Rivera, Andrés

    In January 2003, shallow firn cores were recovered from Glaciar Esmeralda on Cerro del Plomo (33°14‧ S, 70°13‧ W; 5300 ma.s.l.), central Chile, and from Glaciar La Ollada on Cerro Mercedario (31°58‧ S, 70°07‧ W; 6070 ma.s.l.), Argentina, in order to find a suitable archive for paleoclimate reconstruction in a region strongly influenced by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. In the area between 28° S and 35° S, the amount of winter precipitation is significantly correlated to the Southern Oscillation Index, with higher values during El Niño years. Glaciochemical analysis indicates that the paleo-record at Glaciar La Ollada is well preserved, whereas at Glaciar Esmeralda the record is strongly influenced by meltwater formation and percolation. A preliminary dating of the Mercedario core by annual-layer counting results in a time-span of 17 years (1986-2002), yielding an average annual net accumulation of 0.45 m w.e.

  2. Soil n-alkane δD and Branched GDGTs Distributions Track Elevation-induced Precipitation and Temperature Changes along the South Central Andes (Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Moreno, V.; Rohrmann, A.; van der Meer, M.; S Sinninghe Damsté, J.; Sachse, D.; Tofelde, S.; Niedermeyer, E. M.; Strecker, M. R.; Mulch, A.

    2015-12-01

    Orogenic surface uplift and topographic evolution of tectonically active mountain belts exert a strong impact on climatic teleconnections and Earth surface processes, including changes in global atmospheric circulation patterns, erosion rates, distribution of biomes, and precipitation patterns. Hence, quantifying the driving processes shaping the evolution of topography in ancient and active orogens is required in order to disentangle the dynamic interactions and feedbacks among surface uplift, climate, erosion and sedimentation. The south central Andes of Argentina provide a particularly suitable setting to study the interplay between the tectonic and climatic evolution of an actively subduction orogen over short and long time-scales. We present δD values of soil-derived n-alkane and brGDGTs distributions to assess their suitability for paleoelevation reconstructions in the southern central Andes. We collected soil samples from two different environmental and hydrological gradients, across the hillslope (26-28°S) and along a river-valley (22-24°S) of two individual mountain ranges. δD n-alkane and brGDGTs distributions are both linearly related with elevation and may be used for paleoaltimetry studies along the windward flanks of the south central Andes. δD n-alkane and brGDGT-derived temperature lapse rates broadly follow regional lapse rates along steep orographic fronts. The observed lapse rates are lower than the annual mean values of satellite-derived temperatures but approach those of temperature loggers along each transect. Instead, δD n-alkane lapse rates are in line with regional stream-water data. These linear relationships along the windward slopes break down when entering the internally drained part of the Puna plateau. Our data document that δD n-alkane and brGDGTs distributions can be used over time scales relevant for paleoclimate/-altimetry reconstructions but also stress that such reconstructions require knowledge of the depositional

  3. Structures and crustal development of the central andes between 21° and 25°S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutter, K.-J.; Giese, P.; Götze, H.-J.; Scheuber, E.; Schwab, K.; Schwarz, G.; Wigger, P.

    The tectonics of the morphostructural units of the Central Andean segment between 21°S and 25°S are reviewed and their relation to the deep crustal structures, as far as known from geophysical research, is discussed. Special regard is given to the superposition of structures due to the stepwise eastward displacement of four arc systems subsequently developing on the continental margin during the Andean Cycle: (1) Lias — Early Cretaceous, (2) Mid-Cretaceous, (3) Latest Cretaceous — Eocene, and (4) Miocene — Holocene. Within these arc systems, three areas of main tectonic activity can be distinguished: The subduction zone and subduction complex, the magmatic arc, and the backarc region. The subduction complexes of the fossil stages are not preserved and the tectonic activity of the present subduction complex affects the continent only locally along the coast. The structures of the four magmatic arcs are exposed respectively in the Coastal Range, the Longitudnal Valley, the Chilean Precordillera, and in the broad area extending from the Preandean Depression to the western part of the Eastern Cordillera. Notwithstanding great structural differences between the individual arcs, there are common features such as the close reationship between deformation and magmatism, the incorporation of basement into fold and horst structures, and conjugate reverse fault systems. In the case of oblique subduction, longitudinal strike slip faulting, which may be left-handed (Atacama Fault of the Coastal Range) or right-handed (West Fissure of the Chilean Precordillera), follows the magmatic arc. In the backarc region, east vergent fold and thrust belts developed only in the stages 3 and 4. All the different arc stages seem to have contributed gradually to crustal thickening as there is a general development in these systems from ensialic marine conditions over an environment of continental lowlands to the present high plateau situation.

  4. Photosynthetic performance of Colobanthus quitensis (Kunth Bartl. (Caryophyllaceae in a high-elevation site of the Andes of central Chile Desempeño fotosintético de Colobanthus quitensis (Kunth Bartl. (Caryophyllaceae en los Andes de Chile central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. ANGÉLICA CASANOVA-KATNY

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis of Colobanthus quitensis and mesoclimatic conditions of air temperature and light intensity during the growing season were investigated at 2,650 m in the central Chilean Andes. On three typical days of the growing period (January, March and May, CO2 exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured. In addition, a series of fluorescence response curves with increasing light intensity at different temperatures were performed to estimate the propensity of Andean C. quitensis populations to be photoinhibited. Net Photosynthesis (Pn was low (ca. 2.0 mmol CO2 m-2s-1 during the morning and noon in days with high photosynthetic active radiation (PAR, above 1,800 mmol photons m-2s-1. Pn increased in the afternoon (3.5-4.8 mmol CO2 m-2s-1 when PAR decreased to ca. 1,400 mmol photons m-2s-1 and leaf temperature were ca. 20 °C. Fv/Fm in the diurnal periods was between 0.7-0.75 without evidence of photoinhibition. Leaves at 15 and 22 °C exhibited a slow decrease of F PSII with the increase in actinic light intensity, although the fraction of reaction centers open (expressed by qP remained higher at 22 °C. NPQ was saturated at light intensities close to 500 mmol photons m-2s-1 in leaves at 22 °C and at higher intensities at 15 °C, suggesting that NPQ could be a mechanism of energy dissipation at high light intensity and high leaf temperature in the field. Our results indicated that C. quitensis is not photodamaged during the diurnal cycle and that the low Pn registered during some diurnal periods are likely to be related with photorespiration, which has been suggested as an efficient protective mechanism for photoinhibition in alpine plants. Our results are also compared with the photosynthetic performance of C. quitensis populations from the maritime AntarcticSe estudió la fotosíntesis de Colobanthus quitensis y las condiciones mesoclimáticas de temperatura del aire e intensidad lumínica a 2.650 m en los Andes de Chile central. Se

  5. Unraveling an antique subduction process from metamorphic basement around Medellín city, Central Cordillera of Colombian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Andres; Juliani, Caetano

    2011-10-01

    varies between 400 and 555 °C at pressures of 5-6 kbar in the retrograde metamorphic path. The El Retiro rocks evidence strong decompression with narrow variation in temperature, showing pressure values between 8.7 and 2.7 kbar at temperatures of 740-633 °C. These metamorphic fragments of the basement in the Central Cordillera of the Colombian Andes could represent a close relationship with an antique subduction zone.

  6. A survey of volcano deformation in the central Andes using InSAR: Evidence for deep, slow inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Simons, M.

    2001-12-01

    We use interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to survey about 50 volcanos of the central Andes (15-27o S) for deformation during the 1992-2000 time interval. Because of the remote location of these volcanos, the activity of most are poorly constrained. Using the ERS-1/2 C-band radars (5.6 cm), we observe good interferometric correlation south of about 21o S, but poor correlation north of that latitude, especially in southern Peru. This variation is presumably related to regional climate variations. Our survey reveals broad (10's of km), roughly axisymmetric deformation at 2 volcanic centers with no previously documented deformation. At Uturuncu volcano, in southwestern Bolivia, the deformation rate can be constrained with radar data from several satellite tracks and is about 1 cm/year between 1992 and 2000. We find a second source of volcanic deformation located between Lastarria and Cordon del Azufre volcanos near the Chile/Argentina border. There is less radar data to constrain the deformation in this area, but the rate is also about 1 cm/yr between 1996 and 2000. While the spatial character of the deformation field appears to be affected by atmosphere at both locations, we do not think that the entire signal is atmospheric, because the signal is observed in several interferograms and nearby edifices do not show similar patterns. The deformation signal appears to be time-variable, although it is difficult to determine whether this is due to real variations in the deformation source or atmospheric effects. We model the deformation with both a uniform point-source source of inflation, and a tri-axial point-source ellipsoid, and compare both elastic half-space and layered-space models. We also explore the effects of local topography upon the deformation field using the method of Williams and Wadge (1998). We invert for source parameters using the global search Neighborhood Algorithm of Sambridge (1998). Preliminary results indicate that the sources at both

  7. Phanerozoic geological evolution of Northern and Central Africa: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraud, R.; Bosworth, W.; Thierry, J.; Delplanque, A.

    2005-10-01

    The principal paleogeographic characteristics of North and Central Africa during the Paleozoic were the permanency of large exposed lands over central Africa, surrounded by northerly and northwesterly dipping pediplanes episodically flooded by epicontinental seas related to the Paleotethys Ocean. The intra-continental Congo-Zaire Basin was also a long-lived feature, as well as the Somali Basin from Late Carboniferous times, in conjunction with the development of the Karoo basins of southern Africa. This configuration, in combination with eustatic sea-level fluctuations, had a strong influence on facies distributions. Significant transgressions occurred during the Early Cambrian, Tremadocian, Llandovery, Middle to Late Devonian, Early Carboniferous, and Moscovian. The Paleozoic tectonic history shows an alternation of long periods of predominantly gentle basin subsidence and short periods of gentle folding and occasionally basin inversion. Some local rift basins developed episodically, located mainly along the northern African-Arabian plate margin and near the West African Craton/Pan-African Belt suture. Several arches or spurs, mainly N-S to NE-SW trending and inherited from late Pan-African fault swarms, played an important role. The Nubia Province was the site of numerous alkaline anorogenic intrusions, starting in Ordovician times, and subsequently formed a large swell. Paleozoic compressional events occurred in the latest Early Cambrian ("Iskelian"), Medial Ordovician to earliest Silurian ("pre-Caradoc" and "Taconian"), the end Silurian ("Early Acadian" or "Ardennian"), mid-Devonian ("Mid-Acadian"), the end Devonian ("Late Acadian" or "Bretonnian"), the earliest Serpukhovian ("Sudetic"), and the latest Carboniferous-earliest Permian ("Alleghanian" or "Asturian"). The strongest deformations, including folding, thrusting, and active strike-slip faulting, were registered in Northwestern Africa during the last stage of the Pan-African Belt development around the

  8. Game over! Wildlife collapse in northern Central African Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouché, Philippe; Nzapa Mbeti Mange, Roland; Tankalet, Floride; Zowoya, Florent; Lejeune, Philippe; Vermeulen, Cédric

    2012-11-01

    The wildlife populations of northern Central African Republic (CAR) have long suffered intense uncontrolled hunting. Socio-political turmoil in northern CAR that started in 2002 resulted in a rebellion in 2006. An aerial sample count was carried out in northern CAR after the ceasefire to assess the impact of this troubled period on wildlife. The survey was flown at the end of the dry season in February-March 2010. It covered a landscape complex of 95,000 km² comprising national parks, hunting reserves and community hunting areas. Comparison with earlier surveys revealed a dramatic decline of wildlife: the numbers of large mammals fell by 94% in 30 years, probably due to poaching, loss of habitat and diseases brought by illegal movements of cattle. Elephant (Loxodonta africana), Reduncinae and topi (Damaliscus lunatus) populations showed the greatest decline (each over 90%). Other species declined by 70-80% during the same period. The future of wildlife in this area is dark without a strong commitment to provide adequate funding and quickly implement of determined field management. Reinforced cooperation with neighbouring Chad and Sudan is required since they are facing similar problems.

  9. Reconstructing glacier mass balances in the Central Andes of Chile and Argentina using local and regional hydro-climatic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Masiokas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great number and variety of glaciers in southern South America, in situ glacier mass balance records are extremely scarce and glacier–climate relationships are still poorly understood in this region. Here we use the longest (> 35 years and most complete in situ mass balance record, available for glaciar Echaurren Norte in the Andes at ~34° S, to develop a minimal glacier surface mass balance model that relies on nearby monthly precipitation and air temperature data as forcing. This basic model is able to explain 78 % of the variance in the annual glacier mass balance record over the 1978–2013 calibration period. An attribution assessment indicates that precipitation variability constitutes the most important forcing modulating annual glacier mass balances at this site. A regionally-averaged series of mean annual streamflow records from both sides of the Andes is then used to estimate, through simple linear regression, this glacier's annual mass balance variations since 1909. The reconstruction model captures 68 % of the observed glacier mass balance variability and shows three periods of sustained positive mass balances embedded in an overall negative trend totaling almost −42 m w.eq. over the past 105 years. The three periods of sustained positive mass balances (centered in the 1920s–1930s, in the 1980s and in the first decade of the 21st century coincide with several documented glacier advances in this region. Similar trends observed in other shorter glacier mass balance series suggest the glaciar Echaurren Norte reconstruction is representative of larger-scale conditions and could be useful for more detailed glaciological, hydrological and climatological assessments in this portion of the Andes.

  10. Studies in Neotropical Paleobotany. XV. A Mio-Pliocene palynoflora from the Eastern Cordillera, Bolivia: implications for the uplift history of the Central Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, A; Gregory-Wodzicki, K M; Wright, K L

    2001-09-01

    An assemblage of 33 fossil pollen and spores, recovered from the 3600-m high Pislepampa locality of E. W. Berry, Eastern Cordillera, Bolivia, adds considerably to our knowledge of three aspects of the region in late Neogene time: (1) the paleovegetation, (2) the paleoclimate, and (3) the paleoelevation of the Central Andes. The plant microfossils recognized are Isoetes, Lycopodium (three types), Cnemidaria, Cyathea (three types), Grammitis, Hymenophyllum, Pteris, trilete fern spores (two types), Danaea, monolete fern spores (four types), Podocarpus, Gramineae, Palmae, Ilex, cf. Oreopanax, Cavanillesia, cf. Pereskia, Compositae (three types), Ericaceae, Tetrorchidium, and unknowns (three types). The diversity of the Compositae suggest that this flora has a maximum age around the Miocene-Pliocene boundary, that is, 6-7 million years. All members of the paleocommunity presently grow in the bosque montano húmedo (cloud forest) along the eastern slope of the Central Andes of Bolivia, which occurs between MATs (mean annual temperatures) of ∼10° and 20°C. The Pislepampa flora probably represents the lower limits of this forest because the fossil leaves collected by Berry from the same locality all have entire margins, suggesting that the flora grew near the cloud forest-tropical forest transition. Presently, the lower limit of the cloud forest forest has MATs of ∼20°C, a mean annual precipitation between 1000 and 1500 mm, and that part containing most of the identified genera of fossil pollen is found at elevations ∼1200-1400 m. These conditions are thus inferred for the Pislepampa flora; however, because of the uncertainty of the magnitude of global climate change and of possible changes in the ecological range of plant genera, we estimate an error of at least ±1000 m for the paleoelevation estimate. When the total uplift is corrected for probable amounts of erosionally driven isostatic rebound, the paleoelevation estimate suggests that from one-third to one

  11. Constuccion social de comuninad y migración en Usibamba : un estudio sobre el impacto de los procesos de globalización en los Andes centrales del Perú

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilvonio Perez, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The research for the thesis was conducted in the village of Usibamba, located in a high-Andean area called Alto Cunas east from the Mantaro Valley in the Peruvian Central Andes. Special attention was paid to the institutional context and the everyday life conditions in which the social construction

  12. Soil charcoal analysis as a climato-stratigraphical tool: The key case of Cordillera Real, northern Andes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Pasquale, G. [Dipartimento di Arboricoltura Botanica e Patologia Vegetale, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Impagliazzo, S., E-mail: stefania.impagliazzo@unina.i [Dipartimento di Arboricoltura Botanica e Patologia Vegetale, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Lubritto, C. [CIRCE, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, II Universita di Napoli, and INNOVA, via Vivaldi, 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy); Marziano, M. [Dipartimento di Arboricoltura Botanica e Patologia Vegetale, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Passariello, I. [CIRCE, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, II Universita di Napoli, and INNOVA, via Vivaldi, 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy); Ermolli, E. Russo [Dipartimento di Arboricoltura Botanica e Patologia Vegetale, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, 80055 Portici (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    The present study represents the first attempt of reconstructing fire history through soil charcoal dating. The investigated area is located in the Guandera Biological Reserve (western Cordillera Real, northern Ecuador). Six AMS radiocarbon dating, performed at the base of five soil profiles allowed a fire phase to be identified during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition. A strong correspondence was highlighted between the age of the Guandera fires and the El Abra stadial, which is considered the Younger Dryas equivalent in South America. This local evidence of fires contributes to define the geographic area in which the El Abra stadial was recorded and suggests a wider use of the soil charcoal analysis.

  13. Rayleigh wave velocities and structural informations in Central Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. MANTOVANI

    1978-06-01

    Full Text Available Rayleigh wave dispersion has been observed along the three profiles
    Trieste-Olbia, Olbia-Bologna and Olbia-Bolzano, in central-northern Italy.
    The interpretation of phase velocities indicates a crustal thickness increasing
    from East (25-30 km, Trieste-Olbia to West (30-35 km, Olbia-Bolzano.
    For each profile two values of the Moho depth are acceptable; the shallower
    one is associated with a set of models which have low velocity
    material (¡3=4.3 lcm/s just under or within a few km from the Moho;
    the deeper one still accepts low velocity material ((3=4.4 km/s under
    the Moho but does not exclude the presence of an almost normal LID
    above the low velocity channel.

  14. Evaluation of TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA performance in the Central Andes region and its dependency on spatial and temporal resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. M. Scheel

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Climate time series are of major importance for base line studies for climate change impact and adaptation projects. However, for instance, in mountain regions and in developing countries there exist significant gaps in ground based climate records in space and time. Specifically, in the Peruvian Andes spatially and temporally coherent precipitation information is a prerequisite for ongoing climate change adaptation projects in the fields of water resources, disasters and food security. The present work aims at evaluating the ability of Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA to estimate precipitation rates at daily 0.25° × 0.25° scale in the Central Andes and the dependency of the estimate performance on changing spatial and temporal resolution. Comparison of the TMPA product with gauge measurements in the regions of Cuzco, Peru and La Paz, Bolivia were carried out and analysed statistically. Large biases are identified in both investigation areas in the estimation of daily precipitation amounts. The occurrence of strong precipitation events was well assessed, but their intensities were underestimated. TMPA estimates for La Paz show high false alarm ratio.

    The dependency of the TMPA estimate quality with changing resolution was analysed by comparisons of 1-, 7-, 15- and 30-day sums for Cuzco, Peru. The correlation of TMPA estimates with ground data increases strongly and almost linearly with temporal aggregation. The spatial aggregation to 0.5°, 0.75° and 1° grid box averaged precipitation and its comparison to gauge data of the same areas revealed no significant change in correlation coefficients and estimate performance.

    In order to profit from the TMPA combination product on a daily basis, a procedure to blend it with daily precipitation gauge measurements is proposed.

    Different sources of errors and uncertainties introduced by the sensors, sensor

  15. Late Quaternary Glaciations in the Central Peruvian Andes (10°-11°S) and Evidence for a Link to Heinrich Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.; Farber, D. L.; Finkel, R. C.; Rodbell, D. T.; Seltzer, G. O.

    2009-05-01

    Seven cosmogenic 10Be ages from a moraine in the Santuario Nacional Bosque de Piedras de Huayllay (BP) in the Western Cordillera of the central Peruvian Andes (10°59'S, 76°20'W, 4180-4200 masl) are consistent with 10Be ages on moraines in both the Eastern Cordillera (40-45 km to the east) and Nevado Jeulla Rajo (NJR) massif (10°00'S, 77°16'W) at the southern end of the Cordillera Blanca (150 km to the northwest). In the BP, 10Be ages are ~14-15 ka on four ignimbrite boulders, ~26 and ~20 ka on two quartz boulders, and ~45 ka on ignimbrite bedrock below the trimline in the valley wall. In the Eastern Cordillera bordering Lake Junin, the most extensive glaciations are >150 ka, but end moraines farther upvalley date to the local last glacial maximum (LLGM; 25-30 ka) and a late-glacial stillstand or readvance (14-18 ka). In NJR, 10Be ages indicate that the largest lateral moraines were deposited during similar intervals (27-32 ka and 14-18 ka). Avulsion of a glacial valley preserved an older, smaller pair of lateral moraines (56-65 ka) in NJR; correlative moraines were apparently not preserved in the Junin valleys. We have found no moraines in NJR that date to the global LGM (ca. 19-24 ka), but see some evidence for an advance ca. 40-48 ka. Outwash deposits (ca. 43-50 ka) located beyond the termini of NJR moraines are underlain by lodgement till that extends ca. 6 km across the Conococha Plain, suggesting that at least one older glaciation was far more extensive than any of the late Quaternary NJR advances dated by 10Be (ages calculated using CRONUS-Earth Online Calculator v. 2.2, Lal/Stone time-dependent scaling, and zero erosion). The timing of glacial advances in the central Peruvian Andes since 70 ka suggests a correlation to Heinrich events and associated southward shifts of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in the Atlantic Ocean. We propose that Peruvian glaciers typically expanded when southward migration of the ITCZ resulted in increased

  16. Evaluation of TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA performance in the Central Andes region and its dependency on spatial and temporal resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. M. Scheel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Climate time series are of major importance for base line studies for climate change impact and adaptation projects. However, in mountain regions and in developing countries there exist significant gaps in ground based climate records in space and time. Specifically, in the Peruvian Andes spatially and temporally coherent precipitation information is a prerequisite for ongoing climate change adaptation projects in the fields of water resources, disasters and food security. The present work aims at evaluating the ability of Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA to estimate precipitation rates at daily 0.25° × 0.25° scale in the Central Andes and the dependency of the estimate performance on changing spatial and temporal resolution. Comparison of the TMPA product with gauge measurements in the regions of Cuzco, Peru and La Paz, Bolivia were carried out and analysed statistically. Large biases are identified in both investigation areas in the estimation of daily precipitation amounts. The occurrence of strong precipitation events was well assessed, but their intensities were underestimated. TMPA estimates for La Paz show high false alarm ratio.

    The dependency of the TMPA estimate quality with changing resolution was analysed by comparisons of 1-, 7-, 15- and 30-day sums for Cuzco, Peru. The correlation of TMPA estimates with ground data increases strongly and almost linearly with temporal aggregation. The spatial aggregation to 0.5°, 0.75° and 1° grid box averaged precipitation and its comparison to gauge data of the same areas revealed no significant change in correlation coefficients and estimate performance.

    In order to profit from the TMPA combination product on a daily basis, a procedure to blend it with daily precipitation gauge measurements is proposed.

    Different sources of errors and uncertainties introduced by the sensors, sensor-specific algorithm aspects

  17. Northern and Central Appalachian region assessment: The Pittsburgh coal bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruppert, L.; Tewalt, S.; Bragg, L. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Approximately 40% of the Nation`s coal is produced in the six states (Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Virginia, and Kentucky) that occupy parts of the Northern and Central Appalachian region. Coal is, and will continue to be, the primary energy commodity in this region where more than 50 coal beds and coal zones are currently being mined. About one-half of the productions is from just eight coal beds or zones. Three of these, the Pittsburgh and Upper Freeport coal beds and the Kittanning coal zone, are located in the northern part of the region. The remaining beds or zones, the Pond Creek, Fire Clay, Alma, Upper Elkhorn No. 3, and the Pocahontas No. 3, are located primarily in the central part of the region. This study is designed to utilize the data and expertise existing within the USGS and the State Geological Surveys to produce bed-specific, digital, coal resource assessments for most of the top-producing coal beds and coal zones. Unlike past USGS assessments, this study will emphasize not only the quantity of coal but also the quality of the coal. Particular attention will be paid to the geochemical parameters that are thought to adversely effect combustion characteristics and possibly have adverse effects on the environment, including ash yield, sulfur, calorific value, and, the elements listed in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Geochemical databases produced for the assessed beds will be augmented by new, representative, coal analyses of major, minor, and trace elements. Products will include stratigraphic and geochemical data bases, original and remaining source calculations, and comprehensive digital maps at a scale of 1:250,000 or 1:500,000 of crop-line, coal thickness, coal structure, overburden thickness, mined-out areas, and geochemistry for each assessed coal beds.

  18. Topaz magmatic crystallization in rhyolites of the Central Andes (Chivinar volcanic complex, NW Argentina): Constraints from texture, mineralogy and rock chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioncada, Anna; Orlandi, Paolo; Vezzoli, Luigina; Omarini, Ricardo H.; Mazzuoli, Roberto; Lopez-Azarevich, Vanina; Sureda, Ricardo; Azarevich, Miguel; Acocella, Valerio; Ruch, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Topaz-bearing rhyolite lavas were erupted as domes and cryptodomes during the early history of the Late Miocene Chivinar volcano, in Central Andes. These are the only topaz rhyolite lavas recognized in Central Andes. Textural, mineralogical and geochemical data on the Chivinar rhyolites suggest that topaz crystallized from strongly residual, fluorine-rich, peraluminous silicate melts of topazite composition before the complete solidification of the lava domes. Crystallization of the rhyolitic magma began with sodic plagioclase and alkali feldspar phenocrysts in the magma chamber, followed by groundmass quartz + alkali feldspar + minor sodic plagioclase during dome emplacement, and terminated with quartz + topaz + vapour bubbles forming small scattered miaroles. Fluorine partitioning into the fluid phase occurred only in the final stage of groundmass crystallization. The magmatic origin of topaz indicates the presence of a fluorine-rich highly differentiated magma in the early history of the Chivinar volcano and suggests the possibility of rare metals mineralizations related to the cooling and solidification of a silicic magma chamber. A late fluid circulation phase, pre-dating the andesitic phase of the Chivinar volcano, affected part of the topaz rhyolite lavas. The presence of Nb, Ta and Mn minerals as primary accessories in the rhyolites and as secondary minerals in veins suggests a connection of the fluid circulation phase with the silicic magmatic system. Although at the edge of the active volcanic arc, the Chivinar topaz rhyolites are in correspondence of the transtensive Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system, suggesting preferred extensional conditions for the formation of magmatic topaz in convergent settings, consistently with evidence from other known cases worldwide.

  19. Combining numerical modeling and stable isotope values to quantify groundwater recharge from the Chilean Andes to the Pampa del Tamarugal Basin, Atacama Desert, northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, J. P.; Pollyea, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Atacama Desert of northern Chile is one of the driest regions on Earth and receives less than 5mm of precipitation annually. The Pampa del Tamarugal (PdT) Basin contains the largest aquifer system in the region, yet the mechanisms and timing of aquifer recharge and continental-scale groundwater flux are poorly understood. Although there is little debate that the source of groundwater recharge is the higher elevation regions of the Andean Altiplano to the east of the PdT Basin, there remains much uncertainty surrounding the mechanisms and timing of aquifer recharge and continental-scale groundwater flux. Most recharge models of the PdT focus on surface water runoff and alluvial fan recharge on shorter time scales, but many of these models explicitly neglect deep flow pathways. Previous investigators have combined the thermal aquifer profile and 14C groundwater ages to propose an alternative conceptual model in which cold meteoric water infiltrates deep into the Cordillera before circulating upward into the PdT by thermal convection through fault-controlled migration pathways. Although this conceptual model provides a convincing theoretical argument for deep fluid circulation, it cannot constrain the magnitude of this deep recharge flux. In this work, we revisit deep-flow conceptual model by combining the spatial distribution of hydrogen and oxygen isotope values as groundwater tracers with a non-isothermal model of continental scale groundwater flow through a two-dimensional transect from the Chilean Andes to the PdT Basin. This work provides first-order estimates on the contribution of deep groundwater circulation within the PdT Aquifer, while providing a framework for (1) quantifying boundary conditions for high resolution models of groundwater resources within the PdT Aquifer, (2) assessing the influence of variable future climate scenarios for groundwater availability in the region, and (3) further integrating conservative tracers and numerical models for

  20. Lithospheric scale model of Merida Andes, Venezuela (GIAME Project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, M.; Orihuela, N. D.; Klarica, S.; Gil, E.; Levander, A.; Audemard, F. A.; Mazuera, F.; Avila, J.

    2013-05-01

    Merida Andes (MA) is one of the most important orogenic belt in Venezuela and represents the northern culmination of South America Andes. During the last 60 years, several models have been proposed to explain the shallow and deep structure, using different geological, geophysical, seismological, geochemical and petrologic concepts; nevertheless, most of them have applied local observation windows, and do not represent the major structure of MA. Therefore, a multidisciplinary research group, coordinated by FUNVISIS, in close cooperation with UCV, ULA and PDVSA, is proposed in order to get the outlined goals in the project entitled GIAME ("Geociencia Integral de los Andes de MErida") was established, which aims to generate a lithospheric scale model and the development of a temporal dynamic model for the MA. As a base for lithospheric investigations of the Merida Andes, we are proposing three wide angle seismic profiles across the orogen on three representative sites, in order to determine the inner structure and its relation with the orogen's gravimetric root. To the date, there are no seismic studies at lithospheric scale which cross MA. The wide angle seismic will be complemented with the re-processing and re-interpretation of existing reflection seismic data, which will allow to establish a relationship between MA and its associated flexural basins (Maracaibo and Barinas-Apure basins). Depending on the results of the VENCORP Project (VENezuelan COntinental Reflection Profiling), which might show some reliable results about crustal features and Moho reflectors along three long seismic profiles at Caribbean Moutain system, a reflection seismic profile across the central portion of MA is proposed. Additional tasks, consisting in MA quaternary deformation studies, using research methods like neotectonics and paleoseismology, georadar, numerical modeling, cinematic GPS, SAR interferometry, thermocronology, detailed studies on regional geology, flexural modeling

  1. Chironomids as indicators of natural and human impacts in a 700-yr record from the northern Patagonian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Natalia; Rieradevall, Maria; Añón Suárez, Diego; Rizzo, Andrea; Daga, Romina; Ribeiro Guevara, Sergio; Arribére, María Angélica

    2016-09-01

    Chironomid communities were studied in a sediment core collected from Lake Moreno Oeste, located in Nahuel Huapi National Park. A major change in midge assemblages occurred at ∼AD 1760, which was characterized by a decrease of "cold taxa" including Polypedilum sp.2 and Dicrotendipes, and an increase of "warm taxa" including Apsectrotanypus and Polypedilum sp.1. These taxa are likely related to climatic conditions concurrent with the end of a cold period at ∼AD 1500-1700 and the beginning of a drying climate at ∼AD 1740-1900 in northern Patagonia. Coarse tephra layers had low midge diversity; however they did not disrupt the climatic trend as the community recovered rapidly after the event. Since AD 1910, after the increase in suburban housing, fish introduction, and the construction of a road, there was an increase in the relative abundances of taxa typically associated with the littoral zone, such as Parapsectrocladius, Riethia, Apsectrotanypus, and some Tanytarsini morphotypes. The main change in the chironomid community appears to be associated with long-term climate change. At the beginning of the 20th century, other site-specific environmental factors (catchment change and fish introduction) altered the chironomid assemblages, making it more difficult to understand the relative importance of each driver of assemblage change.

  2. New Elemental and Isotopic Data From Mafic Lavas on the Puna Plateau and Re-Examining the Geochemical Signature of Convective Lithospheric Removal in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, K. E.; Ducea, M. N.; Reiners, P. W.

    2009-12-01

    Foundering or delamination of the lower lithosphere into the convecting mantle is required by mass balance in convergent orogens such as the central Andes. In the central Andean volcanic zone (CVZ), late Miocene to Recent mafic lavas erupted on the Puna plateau are small volume fissure flows and cinder cones classically cited as evidence of convective lithospheric removal, in concert with a suite of observations including high surface elevation (>4000m) and anomalously thin lithosphere relative to other parts of the CVZ. Mafic lavas provide the best available geochemical window into the recent history of the upper mantle in this and other regions. However, an increasing number of elemental and isotopic data suggest that these melts are less distinct from the neighboring arc magmatism than originally predicted. This observation weakens the hypothesis that there is a distinct geochemical fingerprint for so-called delamination magmatism, while advancing our understanding of the size of delaminating bodies and the timescales over which they detach from the lithosphere and interact with the mantle wedge. In this contribution, we present elemental and radiogenic isotopic data from 20 newly sampled mafic lavas from the Puna plateau (24.5°S to 27°S). Preliminary major element analyses show that the Puna lavas are high-K to shoshonitic in composition, in broad agreement with other mafic lavas sampled though out the region. Several sampled flows contain xenotliths of granitoid composition, which likely represent the crustal end member that contributed to the more evolved lavas. Along with major, trace and rare earth element analyses, we will present 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd data to further characterize source regions of these melts. In sum, these data will allow us to (1) expand the spatial coverage of this dataset in the central Andes, (2) contribute to the effort to parse contributions from the subcontinental lithosphere, asthenosphere, subduction-related fluids, and

  3. Digital assessment of northern and central Appalachian basin coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruppert, L.F.; Tewalt, S.J.; Braff, L.J.; Wallack, R.N. [US Geological Survey National Center, Reston, VA (US)

    1999-10-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) is currently conducting a coal resource assessment of the coalbeds and zones that are projected to provide the bulk of the nation's resources for the next few decades. The Pittsburgh and Upper Freeport coals are the first two beds in the northern and central Appalachian basin region to undergo fully digital coal assessments. The bed-specific assessments are being carried out in partnership with the state geologic surveys of West Virginia, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Maryland. Comprehensive stratigraphic and geochemical data-bases have been developed for both of the beds. The extent of the bed with mined areas, structure contour, isopach, and overburden thickness maps for the Pittsburgh coal bed have been realised as USGS open-file reports. The articles includes several detailed maps showing the export of the Pittsburgh coalbed, ash yield, sulphur contents and calorific value of the coal by county, structure contours, overburden thickness and isopac lines. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Gasterophilus spp. infections in horses from northern and central Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrayev, Baltabek; Lider, Lyudmila; Bauer, Christian

    2015-01-15

    A cross-sectional survey was performed to obtain current data on the gastrointestinal myiasis of horses in the provinces of Kostanay, Akmola and Karagandy, northern and central Kazakhstan. The stomach, small intestine and rectum of 148 slaughter horses were examined for Gasterophilus spp. larvae during a 26-month study period. All horses were infected with 2nd and 3rd stage larvae (mean intensity: 803±350), and 22% of them harboured >1000 Gasterophilus spp. larvae each. Four species were identified: G. intestinalis (prevalence: 100%; mean intensity: 361±240 larvae), G. haemorrhoidalis (100%; 353±191), G. nasalis (100%; 73±36) and G. pecorum (91.2%; 18±10). Horses aged<2 years were higher infected with Gasterophilus larvae than 2-4 years old animals. Both the prevalence and extremely high intensity of Gasterophilus infections of horses in these Kazakh regions suggest respective control measurements to improve the health and performance of the animals and to increase the economic income of horse owners. PMID:25522954

  5. Depositación atmosférica de nitrógeno en un transecto valle longitudinal-cordillera de Los Andes, centro-sur de Chile Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen in a transect from the Central Valley to Cordillera de Los Andes, south-central Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS E. OYARZÚN

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available El aumento de las actividades agrícolas y ganaderas en el centro-sur de Chile puede producir elevadas emisiones de nitrógeno hacia la atmósfera (mayormente NH3. El amoniaco es transportado por corrientes de aire y depositado en el suelo y vegetación. El presente estudio evalúa la depositación atmosférica de compuestos nitrogenados (NO3- y NH4+ en la química de las precipitaciones en un transecto altitudinal de 66 km, desde los alrededores de la ciudad de Osorno (40º 35' S, 72º 57' O, 55 m de altitud hasta la cordillera de Los Andes, Parque Nacional Puyehue (40º 46' S, 72º 11' O, 1.120 m de altitud. En siete sitios, durante el período anual junio-1999 hasta mayo-2000, se registró la precipitación y mensualmente se colectaron muestras de agua para determinar: pH, conductividad y las concentraciones de NO3- y NH4+. La precipitación anual se incrementó desde 1.103 mm en la zona de Osorno hasta 6.799 mm en el sector Antillanca, Parque Nacional Puyehue. Los valores promedio anual del pH registraron escasa variación desde 6,3 en el valle central hasta 5,8 en la cordillera de Los Andes. La conductividad presentó los máximos valores en la proximidad de Osorno (22,9 myS cm-1 para descender a través del transecto en zonas intermedias y alcanzar en la Cordillera de los Andes un valor de 11,3 myS cm-1. Las concentraciones promedio de NO3-Nen la lluvia fluctuaron entre 52,3 myg L-1 en la zona agrícola-ganadera y 6,9 myg L-1 en los bosques del Parque Nacional Puyehue. Las concentraciones de NH4-N variaron entre 699,4 myg L-1 en el sector de Osorno y 37,8 myL-1 en la cordillera de Los Andes. Los valores de N-inorgánico poseen una marcada tendencia estacional en el sector agrícola, con valores máximos en primavera-verano y los mínimos en invierno. Las tasas anuales de depositación atmosférica de NO3-N fluctuaron entre 0,53 y 0,57 kg ha-1 año-1 y las de NH4-N fueron entre 6,4 y 2,8 kg ha-1 año-1 para los sitios agrícola-ganaderos de

  6. Integrated provenance analysis of a convergent retroarc foreland system: U-Pb ages, heavy minerals, Nd isotopes, and sandstone compositions of the Middle Magdalena Valley basin, northern Andes, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Junsheng; Horton, Brian K.; Saylor, Joel E.; Mora, Andrés; Mange, Maria; Garzione, Carmala N.; Basu, Asish; Moreno, Christopher J.; Caballero, Victor; Parra, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Sediment provenance analysis remains a powerful method for testing hypotheses on the temporal and spatial evolution of uplifted source regions, but issues such as recycling, nonunique sources, and pre- and post-depositional modifications may complicate interpretation of results from individual provenance techniques. Convergent retroarc systems commonly contain sediment sources that are sufficiently diverse (continental magmatic arc, fold-thrust belt, and stable craton) to enable explicit provenance assessments. In this paper, we combine detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology, heavy mineral identification, Nd isotopic analyses, conventional sandstone petrography, and paleocurrent measurements to reconstruct the clastic provenance history of a long-lived sedimentary basin now exposed in an intermontane zone of the northern Andean hinterland of Colombia. The Middle Magdalena Valley basin, situated between the Central Cordillera and Eastern Cordillera, contains a 5-10 km-thick succession of Upper Cretaceous to Quaternary fill. The integrated techniques show a pronounced change in provenance during the Paleocene transition from the lower to upper Lisama Formation. We interpret this as a shift from an eastern cratonic source to a western Andean source composed of magmatic-arc rocks uplifted during initial shortening of the Central Cordillera. The appearance of detrital chloritoid and a shift to more negative ɛ Nd(t=0) values in middle Eocene strata of the middle La Paz Formation are attributed to shortening-related exhumation of a continental basement block (La Cira-Infantas paleohigh), now buried, along the axis of the Magdalena Valley. The diverse provenance proxies also show distinct changes during middle to late Eocene deposition of the Esmeraldas Formation that likely reflect initial rock uplift and exhumation of the fold-thrust belt defining the Eastern Cordillera. Upsection, detrital zircon U-Pb ages and heavy mineral assemblages for Oligocene and younger clastic

  7. From Pangaea to the present: geochronology, thermochronology and isotopic tracking of tectonic processes along the Northern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spikings, R.; Cochrane, R.; Van der Lelij, R.; Villagomez, D.

    2013-05-01

    Triassic - Tertiary rocks within the Central Cordillera of Colombia and Eastern Cordillera of Ecuador provide a record of the rift-to-drift phase of the western Tethys Wilson Cycle, Jurassic steady-state active margin magmatism, Early Cretaceous attenuation of the margin and the formation of new continental crust, and the accretion of an extensive oceanic plateau and arc sequence at ~75 Ma, which shielded juvenile continental crust from tectonic erosion during the Tertiary. The margin remained active throughout the Tertiary, and exhumed in response to changing oceanic plate kinematics and the collision of heterogeneous oceanic crust. We present geochronological, thermochronological, geochemical and Hf, Nd and O isotopic data that provide a highly-temporally resolved record of the evolution of NW Gondwana from Pangaea to the present. Migmatitic leucosomes and S-type granites were emplaced along the NW South American margin during ~275-225 Ma, and tholeiitic amphibolites intruded during ~240 - 225 Ma. These sequences formed during continental rifting in a back-arc, leading to the formation of ophiolite sequences and oceanic crust by ~216 Ma. The Maya and Oaxaquia terranes of Central America may represent parts of the conjugate margin. The NW South American margin remained passive until ~183 Ma, when subduction gave rise to calc-alkaline, I-type granitoids until ~143 Ma. Earliest Cretaceous roll-back extended and exhumed the margin, causing the arc axis to migrate oceanward while the magmatic rocks became progressively more isotopically juvenile. Arc migration opened Early Cretaceous intra-arc basins that were floored by lavas and filled with arc detritus. The arc axis stabilized at ~130-115 Ma and fringed the continental margin outboard of the Jurassic arc. Compression at 120-110 Ma closed the intra-arc basins, exhumed the buttressing continental margin and obducted variably metamorphosed rocks of the east dipping-subduction channel onto the continental margin during

  8. New species of high elevation cloud forest butterflies of the genus Pedaliodes Butler from the northern Colombian Andes (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Satyrinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrcz, Tomasz W; Prieto, Carlos; Viloria, Angel L; Andrade, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Four new species of Pedaliodes Butler (i.e., P. adrianae, n. sp., P. haydoni, n. sp., P. philinae, n. sp. and P. rodriguezi, n. sp.) are described from the high elevation cloud forests in the Frontino massif in the Colombian Western Cordillera and the northern part of the Central and Eastern Cordilleras. The affinities of these new species with other congeners are discussed. The total number of described species of Colombian Pronophilina is increased to 208, with a particularly high total number of species (88) and proportion of endemic species (26%) in the Western Cordillera.

  9. Geodynamical evolution of Central Andes at 24°S as inferred by magma composition along the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro transversal volcanic belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteini, M.; Mazzuoli, R.; Omarini, R.; Cas, R.; Maas, R.

    2002-11-01

    Miocene to Recent volcanism on the Puna plateau (Central Andes) developed in three geological settings: (a) volcanic arc in the Western Cordillera (Miocene-Recent); (b) trans-arc along the main NW-SE transverse fault systems (Miocene); and (c) back-arc, mainly monogenic volcanic centres (Pliocene-Quaternary). We have studied the evolution of the arc-trans-arc volcanism along one of the most extensive transverse structures of Central Andes, the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro, at 24°S. Compositional variations from arc to trans-arc volcanism provide insights into petrogenesis and magma source regions. Puntas Negras and Rincon volcanic centres are arc-type and have typical calc-alkaline geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic characteristics. East of the arc, lavas of the Tul-Tul, Del Medio and Pocitos complexes (TUMEPO) are heavy rare earth element-depleted and could be derived from 20-30% of partial melting of a lower crustal garnet-bearing metabasite. These liquids could be variably mixed with arc magmas at the base of the crust (MASH). This suggests important contributions from lower crustal sources to TUMEPO centres. Products at the Quevar and Aguas Calientes volcanic complexes to the east of TUMEPO show a prominent upper crustal signature (high 86Sr/ 87Sr, low 143Nd/ 144Nd) and could represent mixtures of 20-30% TUMEPO-type liquids with up to 70-80% of upper crustal melts. We propose a geodynamic model to explain geochemical variations for the arc-trans-arc transverse volcanism from the Upper Miocene to Recent. In our model, arc volcanism is linked to dehydration of the subducting Nazca plate, which produces typical calc-alkaline compositions. During the Upper Miocene (10-5 Ma), lithospheric evolution in the Puna plateau was dominated by thickening of ductile lower crust and thinning of the lithosphere. Lower crustal melting was promoted by concomitant asthenospheric upwelling and water release from the amphibolite-eclogite transformation, yielding TUMEPO magmas with lower

  10. Human exposure to piroplasms in Central and Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Gabrielli

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A serosurvey has been conducted in Northern and Central Italy to investigate the presence in humans of antibodies against zoonotic Babesia and Theileria species. The study focused on a total of 432 volunteers, of which 290 were persistently exposed to tick bites because of their jobs (forester employees, livestock keepers, veterinary practitioners, farmers and hunters and 142 resident in the same area less frequently exposed. An indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT for humans was used to detect antibodies to Babesia microti, IFAT tests for veterinary use were modified to detect reactivity to Babesia bovis, Babesia canis and Theileria equi. A laboratory-derived ELISA was employed to detect antibodies to Babesia divergens. Both reactive and 10 negative sera were analysed against plasmodial antigens to evaluate possible aspecificity. A high reactivity to piroplasm antigens was found, showing significant difference between the sera of the two groups of volunteers (24% vs 7.0%; p<0.001. No cross-reactivity was observed, while each professional group showed reactivity that would fit with the professional risk exposure. In particular, a high reactivity to B. microti and B. divergens antigens was observed in foresters and hunters (32% and 12%, respectively. This is the first report on the human seroreactivity to piroplasms in Italy; it also provides additional epidemiological information on these tick-borne zoonoses in Europe. Our findings suggest the possible occurrence of piroplasm infections in Italy and alert physicians to consider these otherwise neglected parasitic diseases when dealing with any febrile illness, especially in subjects exposed to tick bites.

  11. A new genus of Toads (Amphibia: Anura: Bufonidae) from the Pacific Slopes of the Andes in Northern Ecuador and Southern Colombia, with the description of two new species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The genus Andinophryne, characterized by the presence of an omosternum, an externally visible tympanum, elongate parotoids and extensively webbed hands and feet is described from the Pacific versant of the Andes in northwestern Ecuador and southwestern Colombia. Two new species, Andinophryne colomai

  12. Improved 3D density modelling of the Central Andes from combining terrestrial datasets with satellite based datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Theresa; Sobiesiak, Monika; Götze, Hans-Jürgen; Ebbing, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    As horizontal gravity gradients are proxies for large stresses, the uniquely high gravity gradients of the South American continental margin seem to be indicative for the frequently occurring large earthquakes at this plate boundary. It has been observed that these earthquakes can break repeatedly the same respective segment but can also combine to form M>9 earthquakes at the end of longer seismic cycles. A large seismic gap left behind by the 1877 M~9 earthquake existed in the northernmost part of Chile. This gap has partially been ruptured in the Mw 7.7 2007 Tocopilla earthquake and the Mw 8.2 2014 Pisagua earthquake. The nature of this seismological segmentation and the distribution of energy release in an earthquake is part of ongoing research. It can be assumed that both features are related to thickness variations of high density bodies located in the continental crust of the coastal area. These batholiths produce a clear maximum in the gravity signal. Those maxima also show a good spatial correlation with seismic asperity structures and seismological segment boundaries. Understanding of the tectonic situation can be improved through 3D forward density modelling of the gravity field. Problems arise in areas with less ground measurements. Especially in the high Andes severe gaps exist due to the inaccessibility of some regions. Also the transition zone between on and offshore date data displays significant problems, particularly since this is the area that is most interesting in terms of seismic hazard. We modelled the continental and oceanic crust and upper mantle using different gravity datasets. The first one includes terrestrial data measured at a station spacing of 5 km or less along all passable roads combined with satellite altimetry data offshore. The second data set is the newly released EIGEN-6C4 which combines the latest satellite data with ground measurements. The spherical harmonics maximum degree of EIGEN-6C4 is 2190 which corresponds to a

  13. Historical Glacier Variations in Southern South America since the Little Ice Age: Examples from Lago Viedma (Southern Patagonia) and Mendoza (Central Andes), Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaumer, S. U.; Masiokas, M.; Pitte, P.; Berthier, E.; Guerrido, C.; Luckman, B. H.; Villalba, R.

    2013-12-01

    The evaluation of historical information can give valuable insight into past glacier dynamics, especially before the onset of modern measurements. Early photographs and maps depict changes for selected glaciers in southern South America. Within this study, written documents and pictorial historical records (drawings, sketches, engravings, photographs, chronicles, topographic maps) are analysed critically, with a particular focus on two regions: Lago Viedma (El Chaltén, southern Patagonia, 49.5°S, 73.0°W) and the Río Mendoza basin (Mendoza, central Andes, 33.1°S, 69.9°W). For the Lago Viedma area, early historical data for the end of the 19th century stem from the expedition of the Chilean-Argentinean border commission. In addition, the expedition by the German Scientific Society, conducted between 1910 and 1916, and the later photographs by Alberto M. de Agostini give an excellent depiction of the glaciers. Glaciar Viedma is a calving glacier which shows distinct retreat from 1896 until the present (though with a stationary or possibly advancing glacier front between 1930/31 and 1951/52), similar to the neighbouring glaciers. On the contrary, nearby Glaciar Perito Moreno shows an exceptional behaviour: the glacier front has been advancing during the first half of the 20th century, staying in an advanced position until the present. At the beginning of the 20th century, Robert Helbling explored the Argentinean-Chilean Andes together with his friend Friedrich Reichert. In the summer of 1909/10, they started a detailed survey of the highly glacierized Juncal-Tupungato mountains (Río Mendoza basin), leading to the first accurate topographic map of the area published in 1914. Its outstanding quality allows a comparison with contemporary satellite imagery. The area received attention in 1934, when the sudden drainage of a glacier-dammed lake in the upper Río del Plomo valley caused fatalities and considerable damage to constructions and the Transandine Railway. A

  14. Glass and mineral chemistry of northern central Indian ridge basalts: Compositional diversity and petrogenetic significance

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, Dwijesh; Banerjee, R.; Iyer, S.D.; Basavalingu, B.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    The glass and mineral chemistry of basalts examined from the northern central Indian ridge (NCIR) provides an insight into magma genesis around the vicinity of two transform faults: Vityaz (VT) and Vema (VM). The studied mid-ocean ridge basalts...

  15. ASTER Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    In this image of the Andes along the Chile-Bolivia border, the visible and infrared data have been computer enhanced to exaggerate the color differences of the different materials. The scene is dominated by the Pampa Luxsar lava complex, occupying the upper right two-thirds of the scene. Lava flows are distributed around remnants of large dissected cones, the largest of which is Cerro Luxsar. On the middle left edge of the image are the Olca and Parumastrato volcanoes, which appear in blue due to a lack of vegetation (colored red in this composite). This image covers an area 60 kilometers (37 miles) wide and 60 kilometers (37 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. It was acquired on April 7, 2000.The image is located at 21 degrees south latitude, 68.3 degrees west longitude. Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Examples of applications include monitoring glacial advances and retreats

  16. Extensional Basins in a Convergent Margin: Oligocene-Early Miocene Salar de Atacama and Calama basins, Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, T. E.; Mpodozis, C.; Blanco, N.; Pananont, P.; Dávila, F.

    2004-12-01

    The Salar de Atacama Basin (SdAB) is the largest and most persistent sedimentary basin of northern Chile, accumulating nonmarine sediment from Cretaceous to modern times. Its northwestern neighbor, the Calama, was a Cenozoic basin. Although SdAB was in the backarc zone early in the Andean orogeny, both are now forearc basins. Others demonstrated that the basins overlie anomalously cold, strong, and dense crust and lithosphere. We focus on an extensional Oligocene basin stage. Interpretation of the basin-controlling faults is based on seismic reflection studies supported by field relations. The SdAB is limited to the west by the NNE-trending, steeply east-dipping, Paciencia Fault (PF). The PF experienced 5-7 km of down-to-the-east offset during the Oligocene-early Miocene. Syntectonic strata, an arid succession of siliciclastics and evaporites, are asymmetric, with thicknesses of 5000 m and abundant halite adjacent to the PF, and of 1000 m with fine detrital clastic strata 25 km farther east. Relations in conglomeratic growth strata that overlap the PF also demonstrate normal displacement during sediment accumulation. Seismic data reveal that a buried normal fault with 1-1.5 km down-to-the-east displacement limits the western margin of the Oligocene-Miocene Calama siliciclastic basin fill. Regionally, Oligocene-early Miocene margin-parallel strike-slip deformation dominated northwest of the basins, contributing sinistral offset (West Fissure Fault) to the northern segment of the long-lived Domeyko Fault System. The new SdAB and Calama data reveal that a 20,000 km2 domain of extensional basins existed within the dominantly strike-slip region. Even if PF and the fault in the Calama Basin were transtensional, the proportion of extension to strike-slip displacement is much greater in these basins than elsewhere in northern Chile. Further study is required to understand what combination of factors caused this kinematic distinction as well as delayed the onset of CVZ

  17. Vivid valleys, pallid peaks? Hypsometric variations and rural–urban land change in the Central Peruvian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Haller, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    What happens to the land cover within the hinterland's altitudinal belts while Central Andean cities are undergoing globalization and urban restructuring? What conclusions can be drawn about changes in human land use? By incorporating a regional altitudinal zonation model, direct field observations and GIS analyses of remotely sensed long term data, the present study examines these questions using the example of Huancayo Metropolitano – an emerging Peruvian mountain city of 420,000 inhabitant...

  18. Spatial-temporal evolution of topography of the central Andes and implications for deep tectonic processes (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzione, C. N.; Auerbach, D. J.; Bershaw, J. T.; Kar, N.; Smith, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Resolving the spatial and temporal evolution of changes in the elevation of mountain belts provides constraints on the geodynamic mechanisms that caused surface uplift of these regions. Several recent studies in the Central Andean plateau (between 13°S and 28°S) have used multiple climate proxies to demonstrate punctuated (several myr) changes in the composition of meteoric water and surface temperature inferred to reflect significant (≥1000 m) surface uplift. These studies suggest that different regions experienced surface uplift at different times. In comparison with crustal thickening histories derived from reconstructions of crustal shortening, it is also clear that crustal thickening and surface uplift are temporally decoupled, with significant crustal thickening preceding punctuated surface uplift events by several tens of millions of years. Here we compile results from paleoclimate studies of the Central Andean plateau to infer regional patterns of surface uplift. Limited paleoclimate data and geologic evidence indicate that the Eastern Cordillera experienced an earlier pulse of surface uplift than the Altiplano zone, associated with an eastward sweep of magmatism that marks the current limits of the plateau. Within the Altiplano zone, the southern Altiplano appears to have risen beginning in middle Miocene time and continuing through late Miocene time. During this time, the north-central Altiplano remained low and experienced increasing rates of sedimentation. In late Miocene time, sedimentation rates slowed dramatically at the same time that climate proxy data suggest rapid surface uplift of the north-central Altiplano. The northernmost Altiplano of Peru experienced a pulse of surface uplift in middle Miocene to early Pliocene time, with the exact timing unconstrained as of yet. Crustal shortening reconstructions from the southern through the north-central plateau (between 17°S and 24°S) yield upper estimates that range between 300×20 km, sufficient

  19. Petrology and mineralogy of the La Peña igneous complex, Mendoza, Argentina: An alkaline occurrence in the Miocene magmatism of the Southern Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Diego Sebastián; Galliski, Miguel Ángel; Márquez-Zavalía, María Florencia; Colombo, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The La Peña alkaline igneous complex (LPC) is located in the Precordillera (32°41‧34″ S - 68°59‧48″ W) of Mendoza province, Argentina, above the southern boundary of the present-day flat-slab segment. It is a 19 km2 and 5 km diameter subcircular massif emplaced during the Miocene (19 Ma) in the Silurian-Devonian Villavicencio Fm. The LPC is composed of several plutonic and subvolcanic intrusions represented by: a cumulate of clinopyroxenite intruded by mafic dikes and pegmatitic gabbroic dikes, isolated bodies of malignite, a central intrusive syenite that develops a wide magmatic breccia in the contact with clinopyroxenite, syenitic and trachytic porphyries, a system of radial and ring dikes of different compositions (trachyte, syenite, phonolite, alkaline lamprophyre, tephrite), and late mafic breccias. The main minerals that form the LPC, ordered according to their abundance, are: pyroxene (diopside, hedenbergite), calcium amphibole (pargasite, ferro-pargasite, potassic-ferro-pargasite, potassic-hastingsite, magnesio-hastingsite, hastingsite, potassic-ferro-ferri-sadanagaite), trioctahedral micas (annite-phlogopite series), plagioclase (bytownite to oligoclase), K-feldspar (sanidine and orthoclase), nepheline, sodalite, apatite group minerals (fluorapatite, hydroxylapatite), andradite, titanite, magnetite, spinel, ilmenite, and several Cu-Fe sulfides. Late hydrothermal minerals are represented by zeolites (scolecite, thomsonite-Ca), epidote, calcite and chlorite. The trace element patterns, coupled with published data on Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes, suggest that the primary magma of the LPC was generated in an initially depleted but later enriched lithospheric mantle formed mainly by a metasomatized spinel lherzolite, and that this magmatism has a subduction-related signature. The trace elements pattern of these alkaline rocks is similar to other Miocene calc-alkaline occurrences from the magmatic arc of the Southern Central Andes. Mineral and whole

  20. An InSAR survey of the central Andes: Constraints on magma chamber geometry and mass balance in a volcanic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Simons, M.

    2002-12-01

    The central Andes (14-28o S) has a high density of volcanoes, but a sparse human population, such that the activity of most volcanoes is poorly constrained. We use InSAR to conduct the first systematic observations of deformation at nearly 900 volcanoes (about 50 of which are classified ``potentially active'') during the 1992-2002 time interval. We find volcanic deformation in four locations. Subsidence is seen at Robledo (or Cerro Blanco) caldera, Argentina. We observe inflation at the stratovolcano Uturuncu, Bolivia, near stratovolcano Hualca Hualca, Peru, and in a region not associated with any known edifice on the border between Chile and Argentina that we call ``Lazufre'' because it lies between volcanoes Lastarria and Cordon del Azufre. The deformation pattern can be well explained by a uniform point-source source of inflation or deflation, but we compare these model results with those from a tri-axial point-source ellipsoid to test the robustness of estimated source depth and source strength (inferred here to be volume change). We further explore the sensitivity of these parameters to elastic half-space and layered-space models of crustal structure, and the influence of local topography. Because only one satellite look direction is available for most time periods, a variety of models are consistent with our observations. If we assume that inflation is due solely to magmatic intrusion, we can compare the rate of magma intrusion to volcanic extrusion during the decade for which data is available and the longer-term geologic rate. For the last decade, the ratio of volume intruded to extruded is between about 1-10, which agrees with previous geologic estimates in this and other volcanic arcs. The combined rate of intrusion and extrusion is within an order of magnitude of the inferred geologic rate.

  1. El tarwi o chocho: una de las principales fuentes de proteína vegetal de las comunidades indígenas de los Andes Centrales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Planchuelo, Ana M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available El lupino andino (Lupinus mutabilis Sweet conocido también como tarwi o chocho, es una especie de leguminosa nativa de los Andes Centrales. Su domesticación se remonta a los principios de la cultura Nazca y desde ese entonces hasta la actualidad el cultivo está ampliamente difundido en las laderas montañosas y en los altos valles de Ecuador, Perú y Bolivia. La importancia del lupino para las comunidades andinas prehispánicas quedo documentada en pinturas de cerámicas y en tributos encontrados en tumbas de 100-150 años AC. Diversas técnicas de lavado y de mejoramiento vegetal fueron aplicadas desde la antigüedad para eliminar los alcaloides tóxicos que le confieren el sabor amargo a la planta y los granos. El tarwi, el maíz. los frijoles, los pseudocereales, quinoa y amaranto y la papa junto a otras raíces y tubérculos constituyen la comida básica de muchas culturas andinas. El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar los componentes nutricionales de los granos del lupino andino para compararlos con los otros constituyentes de la dieta de las comunidades campesinas. Se analizaron por medio de técnicas fitoquímicas distintas variedades de tarwi. Se determinaron los contenidos de proteínas y grasas y los patrones de ácidos grasos. Los resultados muestran que la ingesta de lupinos, que provee un buen balance de proteínas y grasas en combinación con el maíz y los tubérculos, que aportan los hidratos de carbono, forman una dieta balanceada y de alto valor nutricional.

  2. Arc-oblique fault systems: their role in the Cenozoic structural evolution and metallogenesis of the Andes of central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquer, Jose; Berry, Ron F.; Scott, Robert J.; Cooke, David R.

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of the Main Cordillera of Central Chile is characterized by the formation and subsequent inversion of an intra-arc volcano-tectonic basin. The world's largest porphyry Cu-Mo deposits were emplaced during basin inversion. Statistically, the area is dominated by NE- and NW-striking faults, oblique to the N-striking inverted basin-margin faults and to the axis of Cenozoic magmatism. This structural pattern is interpreted to reflect the architecture of the pre-Andean basement. Stratigraphic correlations, syn-extensional deposits and kinematic criteria on fault surfaces show several arc-oblique structures were active as normal faults at different stages of basin evolution. The geometry of syn-tectonic hydrothermal mineral fibers, in turn, demonstrates that most of these structures were reactivated as strike-slip ± reverse faults during the middle Miocene - early Pliocene. Fault reactivation age is constrained by 40Ar/39Ar dating of hydrothermal minerals deposited during fault slip. The abundance and distribution of these minerals indicates fault-controlled hydrothermal fluid flow was widespread during basin inversion. Fault reactivation occurred under a transpressive regime with E- to ENE-directed shortening, and was concentrated around major plutons and hydrothermal centers. At the margins of the former intra-arc basin, deformation was largely accommodated by reverse faulting, whereas in its central part strike-slip faulting was predominant.

  3. Nazca-South America interactions and the late Eocene-late Oligocene flat-slab episode in the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, Leland J.; Richards, Mark A.; Humphreys, Eugene D.

    2012-04-01

    The most prominent features of the Andean range are the Altiplano and Puna plateaus, which were constructed by crustal shortening and uplift over the past ˜45 Myr. The early construction of these plateaus may have controlled subsequent growth of the orogen. Proposed models have suggested that an abrupt acceleration in relative motion between the Nazca plate and the South American plate at ˜30 Ma may have led to compression of the continent. However, the major plate motion change occurred at 25-23 Ma, and paleomagnetic rotations and crustal shortening of the Andean forearc require that the Arica Bend formed prior to about 25 Ma. Inferred history of flat-slab subduction along the Altiplano section of the Andean margin and the structure of the adjacent South American cratonic shield combine to suggest an alternate scenario, based partly upon geodynamic models of oceanic-continental plate interactions in subduction zones. We propose that central Andean tectonism may have been controlled by two distinct regimes of subduction: (1) oblique subduction along the central Andean margin during the late Eocene and Oligocene accompanied by downdip alignment with the center of the Amazonian Shield (flat-slab activity in this phase of orogenesis may have been caused by a combination of cratonic root enhanced tectonics and oceanic plateau subduction) and (2) an abrupt transition to trench-normal subduction after ˜25 Ma toward the more distal São Francisco Craton was accompanied by a return to normal angle subduction. Similar interactions are hypothesized to have occurred during the Laramide Orogeny in western North America.

  4. A large eruption convulsed in prehistoric times an extensive area of Catamarca, Southern Central Andes, NW Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Turiel, Jose-Luis; Ratto, Norma; Perez-Torrado, Francisco-Jose; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Rejas, Marta; Lobo, Agustin

    2016-04-01

    Geomorphological, stratigraphical, mineralogical and chemical characteristics of many recent 30-160 cm ash deposits occurring at the Bolsón de Fiambalá in Catamarca, NW Argentina, allow their correlation. This lithostratigraphic unit is named Fiambalá Ash and it is uncovered or covered by colluvial deposits and present-day aeolian deposits, reworked products of the primary fall deposits. The grain size of these ash deposits is gritty rather than silty. They are nearly unique among regional ashes in containing hornblende phenocrysts. In addition, they are made up of glass (subangular blocky shards), feldspars, biotite, and quartz; magnetite, ilmenite, apatite and titanite are scarce. The glass is rhyolitic (˜75 to 79 % m/m SiO2; ˜3 to 4 % m/m Na2O; ˜3 to 5 % m/m K2O; 1 to 2 % m/m CaO; normalized to 100 %). On the other hand, in northern margins of Fiambalá basin, extensive remnants of fines-poor pumiceous debris flows and hyperconcentrated sandflow deposits as thick as 10 m are exposed on the walls of the river gorges, where the base is usually covered, e.g., Chuquisaca River. There is no significant unconformity or intercalation of other materials, thus suggesting rapid emplacement after a single eruptive event. A preliminary age of Fiambalá Ash based on archaeological studies bracket it between 1400-1270 and 1270-980 cal a BP (OxCal 4.2.4, SHCal13, 2 sigma). The geographical distribution, the geomorphological features observed in satellite images and the information on the main trends of the stratigraphy, the abundance of hornblende and biotite in the younger proximal ash fall deposits, ignimbrites and lava-domes of the Nevado Tres Cruces complex, favours this edifice as the strongest candidate to be the source of the Upper Holocene pyroclastic deposits found in the Fiambalá basin. The archaeological records seem to evidence the abrupt environmental and societal changes associated with this major eruption. Significant areas of Catamarca were likely

  5. Interseismic Rates From the CTO cGPS Andes and Nepal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genrich, J. F.; Galetzka, J.; Chowdhury, F.; Avouac, J.; Simons, M.; Barrientos, S. E.; Comte, D.; Norabuena, E. O.; Sapkota, S. N.

    2009-12-01

    To study crustal deformation at converging plate margins the Caltech Tectonics Observatory (CTO), together with partner institutions in the host countries, operates continuously observing GPS stations in the central Andes (northern Chile and southern Peru) and in Nepal. The currently 20-site Andes network was established in 2005 with 7 stations. Efforts are underway to provide data streaming links at near real time for the majority of sites. The Nepal network started with 10 sites in 2004 and has been expanded to 23 sites in the last couple of years. Dual frequency code and phase data from all sites are processed with the GAMIT/GLOBK processing package. Reliable interseismic velocities are now available for the majority of sites. Network metadata, rinex data files, processed time series and velocity estimates can be found online thru links at the CTO website: tectonics.caltech.edu.

  6. Vivid valleys, pallid peaks? Hypsometric variations and rural-urban land change in the Central Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    What happens to the land cover within the hinterland's altitudinal belts while Central Andean cities are undergoing globalization and urban restructuring? What conclusions can be drawn about changes in human land use? By incorporating a regional altitudinal zonation model, direct field observations and GIS analyses of remotely sensed long term data, the present study examines these questions using the example of Huancayo Metropolitano - an emerging Peruvian mountain city of 420,000 inhabitants, situated at 3260 m asl in the Mantaro Valley. The study's results indicate that rapid urban growth during the late 1980s and early 1990s was followed by the agricultural intensification and peri-urban condominization at the valley floor (quechua) - since the beginning of Peru's neoliberal era. Moreover, regarding the adjoining steep slopes (suni) and subsequent grassland ecosystems (puna), the research output presents land cover change trajectories that clearly show an expansion of human land use, such as reforestation for wood production and range burning for livestock grazing, even at high altitudes - despite rural-urban migration trends and contrary to several results of extra-Andean studies. Consequently, rural-urban planners and policy makers are challenged to focus on the manifold impacts of globalization on human land use - at all altitudinal belts of the Andean city's hinterland: toward sustainable mountain development that bridges the social and physical gaps - from the bottom up. PMID:23564987

  7. Preliminary Depositional and Provenance Records of Mesozoic Basin Evolution and Cenozoic Shortening in the High Andes, La Ramada Fold-Thrust Belt, Southern-Central Andes (32-33°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackaman-Lofland, C.; Horton, B. K.; Fuentes, F.; Constenius, K. N.; McKenzie, R.; Alvarado, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Argentinian Andes define key examples of retroarc shortening and basin evolution above a zone of active subduction. The La Ramada fold-thrust belt (RFTB) in the High Andes provides insights into the relative influence and temporal records of diverse convergent margin processes (e.g. flat-slab subduction, convergent wedge dynamics, structural inversion). The RFTB contains Mesozoic extensional basin strata deformed by later Andean shortening. New detrital zircon U-Pb analyses of Mesozoic rift sediments reveal: (1) a dominant Permo-Triassic age signature (220-280 Ma) associated with proximal sources of effective basement (Choiyoi Group) during Triassic synrift deposition; (2) upsection younging of maximum depositional ages from Late Triassic through Early Cretaceous (230 to 100 Ma) with the increasing influence of western Andean arc sources; and (3) a significant Late Cretaceous influx of Paleozoic (~350-550 Ma) and Proterozoic (~650-1300 Ma) populations during the earliest shift from back-arc post-extensional subsidence to upper-plate shortening. The Cenozoic detrital record of the Manantiales foreland basin (between the Frontal Cordillera and Precordillera) records RFTB deformation prior to flat-slab subduction. A Permo-Triassic Choiyoi age signature dominates the Miocene succession, consistent with sources in the proximal Espinacito range. Subordinate Mesozoic (~80-250 Ma) to Proterozoic (~850-1800 Ma) U-Pb populations record exhumation of the Andean magmatic arc and recycling of different structural levels in the RFTB during thrusting/inversion of Mesozoic rift basin strata and subjacent Paleozoic units. Whereas maximum depositional ages of sampled Manantiales units cluster at 18-20 Ma, the Estancia Uspallata basin (~50 km to the south) shows consistent upsection younging of Cenozoic populations attributed to proximal volcanic centers. Ongoing work will apply low-temperature thermochronology to pinpoint basin accumulation histories and thrust timing.

  8. Mapping South American Summer Monsoon Changes during Heinrich Event 1 and the LGM: Insights from New Paleolake Records from the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. Y.; McGee, D.; Quade, J.

    2015-12-01

    Cave stalagmite records show strong evidence of abrupt changes in summer monsoons during Heinrich events, but we lack rigorous constraints on the amount of wetting or drying occurring in monsoon regions. Studies on shoreline deposits of closed-basin lakes can establish quantitative bounds on water balance changes through mapping-based estimates of lake volume variations. We present new dating constraints on lake level variations in Agua Caliente I and Laguna Loyoques, two closed-basin, high-altitude paleolakes on the Altiplano-Puna plateau of the Central Andes (23.1°S, 67.4°W, 4250 masl). Because this area receives >70% of its total annual precipitation during austral summer, the region is ideally suited to capture a pure response to changes in the South American summer monsoon (SASM). The plateau is home to several small (<40 km2) lakes surrounded by well-preserved paleoshorelines that indicate past wetter conditions. Agua Caliente I is unique, having multiple shorelines encrusted with biologically-mediated calcium carbonate "tufa" deposits. Initial U-Th dating of these massive shoreline tufas reveals that these deposits are dateable to within ±50 to 300 years due to high U concentrations and low initial Th content (as indicated by high 230Th/232Th). Our U-Th dates show that Agua Caliente I was greater in lake surface area during two periods: 17.5-14.5 kyrs BP, coincident with Heinrich Event 1 (HE1), and 24-23 kyrs BP, roughly coincident with the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). At these times, Agua Caliente I also overflowed into a neighboring lake basin (Loyoques) through an 8-km long southeast-trending stream channel. Thus, during HE1 and the LGM, the lake was ~9 times larger in surface area relative to modern. Hydrologic modeling constrained by paleotemperature estimates is used to provide bounds for these past precipitation changes. We also tentatively explore physical mechanisms linking Heinrich events and the regional hydroclimate by comparing freshwater

  9. Modelling the hydrological response of debris-free and debris-covered glaciers to present climatic conditions in the semiarid Andes of central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Alvaro; Pellicciotti, Francesca; MacDonell, Shelley; McPhee, James; Vivero, Sebastián; Campos, Cristián; Egli, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the main contributors to runoff of a 62 km2 glacierized catchment in the semiarid Andes of central Chile, where both debris-free and debris-covered glaciers are present, combining an extensive set of field measurements, remote sensing products and an advanced glacio-hydrological model (TOPKAPI-ETH). The catchment contains two debris-free glaciers reaching down to 3900 m asl (Bello and Yeso Glaciers) and one debris-covered avalanche-fed glacier reaching to 3200 m asl (Piramide Glacier). A unique dataset of field measurements collected in the ablation seasons 2013-14 and 2014-15 included four automatic weather stations, manual measurements of snow depth and debris cover thickness, discharge measurements at glaciers outlets, photographic monitoring of surface albedo as well as ablation stakes measurements and snow pits. TOPKAPI-ETH combines physically-oriented parameterizations of snow and ice ablation, gravitational distribution of snow, snow albedo evolution, glacier dynamics, runoff routing and the ablation of debris-covered ice.We obtained the first detailed estimation of mass balance and runoff contribution of debris-covered glaciers in this mountainous region. Results show that while the mass balance of Bello and Yeso Glaciers is mostly controlled by air temperature lapse rates, the mass balance of Piramide Glacier is governed by debris thickness and avalanches. In fact, gravitational distribution by avalanching on wet years plays a key role and modulates the mass balance gradient of all glaciers in the catchment and can turn local mass balance from negative to positive. This is especially the case for Piramide Glacier, which shows large amounts of snow accumulation below the steep walls surrounding its upper area. Despite the thermal insulation effect of the debris cover, the contribution to runoff from debris-free and debris-covered glaciers is similar, mainly due to elevation differences. At the catchment scale, snowmelt represents more than 60

  10. El clima de la vertiente del Pacífico de los Andes Centrales y sus implicaciones geomorfológicas El clima de la vertiente del Pacífico de los Andes Centrales y sus implicaciones geomorfológicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Úbeda Palenque

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate studies are of main importance to explain the external geodynamics of the Pacific Basin of the Central Andes between 15°S and 19°S. This is because the processes by which the relief modeling or morphogenesis develop are controlled by pluviometric variables and phyto stabilization. Moreover, the internal geodynamic of the region is related to the climatic conditions that determine the amounts of sediments aported to the Ocean basin (Kulm et al. 1977, affecting the erosion rate by subduction in the plane of contact between the tectonic plates and the composition of the magazas formed below the Andean erogene.In this paper we analyze the climatic effects in the external geodynamics, within a theoric framework that considers a morphoclimatic system as a set formed by the morphogenetic agents and processes that work the relief modeling in a territory, in function of its bioclimatic characteristics; and a morphoclimatic dominion is the spatial environment where a specific morphoclimatic system develops.First, we present the clima of the Central Andes, the factors that control its mean configuration and its main characteristics with diagrams made from the pluviometric data collected in a series of stations regularly distributed in the region. Second, we differentiate two climatic dominions, one in the Altiplano, related to Amazonia precipitations and the other at the Pacific side, associated to the anticyclonic permanency in the western cordillera. Third, we propose a subdivision of the western façade of the cordillera in altitudinal intervals or bioclimatics sections using bioindicators such as the vegetation absence or presence with altitudinal change. Fourth, we give a new division in altitudinal intervals or morphoclimatic zones, using the existence of some geoindicators, such as the endemic geomorphic units of each morphoclimatic zone.El estudio del clima es imprescindible para explicar la geodinámica externa en la vertiente del Pac

  11. The role of changing geodynamics in the progressive contamination of Late Cretaceous to Late Miocene arc magmas in the southern Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rosemary E.; Kirstein, Linda A.; Kasemann, Simone A.; Litvak, Vanesa D.; Poma, Stella; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Hinton, Richard

    2016-10-01

    The tectonic and geodynamic setting of the southern Central Andean convergent margin changed significantly between the Late Cretaceous and the Late Miocene, influencing magmatic activity and its geochemical composition. Here we investigate how these changes, which include changing slab-dip angle and convergence angles and rates, have influenced the contamination of the arc magmas with crustal material. Whole rock geochemical data for a suite of Late Cretaceous to Late Miocene arc rocks from the Pampean flat-slab segment (29-31 °S) of the southern Central Andes is presented alongside petrographic observations and high resolution age dating. In-situ U-Pb dating of magmatic zircon, combined with Ar-Ar dating of plagioclase, has led to an improved regional stratigraphy and provides an accurate temporal constraint for the geochemical data. A generally higher content of incompatible trace elements (e.g. Nb/Zr ratios from 0.019 to 0.083 and Nb/Yb from 1.5 to 16.4) is observed between the Late Cretaceous (~ 72 Ma), when the southern Central Andean margin is suggested to have been in extension, and the Miocene when the thickness of the continental crust increased and the angle of the subducting Nazca plate shallowed. Trace and rare earth element compositions obtained for the Late Cretaceous to Late Eocene arc magmatic rocks from the Principal Cordillera of Chile, combined with a lack of zircon inheritance, suggest limited assimilation of the overlying continental crust by arc magmas derived from the mantle wedge. A general increase in incompatible, fluid-mobile/immobile (e.g., Ba/Nb) and fluid-immobile/immobile (e.g., Nb/Zr) trace element ratios is attributed to the influence of the subducting slab on the melt source region and/or the influx of asthenospheric mantle. The Late Oligocene (~ 26 Ma) to Early Miocene (~ 17 Ma), and Late Miocene (~ 6 Ma) arc magmatic rocks present in the Frontal Cordillera show evidence for the bulk assimilation of the Permian-Triassic (P

  12. Geodynamic controls on the contamination of Cenozoic arc magmas in the southern Central Andes: Insights from the O and Hf isotopic composition of zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rosemary E.; Kirstein, Linda A.; Kasemann, Simone A.; Dhuime, Bruno; Elliott, Tim; Litvak, Vanesa D.; Alonso, Ricardo; Hinton, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Subduction zones, such as the Andean convergent margin of South America, are sites of active continental growth and crustal recycling. The composition of arc magmas, and therefore new continental crust, reflects variable contributions from mantle, crustal and subducted reservoirs. Temporal (Ma) and spatial (km) variations in these contributions to southern Central Andean arc magmas are investigated in relation to the changing plate geometry and geodynamic setting of the southern Central Andes (28-32° S) during the Cenozoic. The in-situ analysis of O and Hf isotopes in zircon, from both intrusive (granitoids) and extrusive (basaltic andesites to rhyolites) Late Cretaceous - Late Miocene arc magmatic rocks, combined with high resolution U-Pb dating, demonstrates distinct across-arc variations. Mantle-like δ18O(zircon) values (+5.4‰ to +5.7‰ (±0.4 (2σ))) and juvenile initial εHf(zircon) values (+8.3 (±0.8 (2σ)) to +10.0 (±0.9 (2σ))), combined with a lack of zircon inheritance suggests that the Late Cretaceous (∼73 Ma) to Eocene (∼39 Ma) granitoids emplaced in the Principal Cordillera of Chile formed from mantle-derived melts with very limited interaction with continental crustal material, therefore representing a sustained period of upper crustal growth. Late Eocene (∼36 Ma) to Early Miocene (∼17 Ma) volcanic arc rocks present in the Frontal Cordillera have 'mantle-like' δ18O(zircon) values (+4.8‰ (±0.2 (2σ) to +5.8‰ (±0.5 (2σ))), but less radiogenic initial εHf(zircon) values (+1.0 (±1.1 (2σ)) to +4.0 (±0.6 (2σ))) providing evidence for mixing of mantle-derived melts with the Late Paleozoic - Early Mesozoic basement (up to ∼20%). The assimilation of both Late Paleozoic - Early Mesozoic Andean crust and a Grenville-aged basement is required to produce the higher than 'mantle-like' δ18O(zircon) values (+5.5‰ (±0.6 (2σ) to +7.2‰ (±0.4 (2σ))) and unradiogenic, initial εHf(zircon) values (-3.9 (±1.0 (2σ)) to +1.6 (±4.4 (2

  13. Mineral chemistry and alteration characteristics of spinel in serpentinised peridotites from the northern central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Ray, Dwijesh; Ishii, T.

    Serpentinites (frequently cross cut by gabbroic dikelet), collected from Northern Central Indian Ridge (NCIR), Indian Ocean, contain both Cr-rich (Group I) and Cr-poor (Group II) variety of spinel. Based on mineralogy they can be classified as non...

  14. Bibliographies of Northern and Central California Indians. Volume 1--Tribal Bibliographies A-N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Randal S., Ed.; Davis-Kimball, Jeannine, Ed.

    This document is the first of a three-volume set made up of bibliographic citations to published texts, unpublished manuscripts, photographs, sound recordings, motion pictures, and maps concerning Native American tribal groups that inhabit, or have traditionally inhabited, northern and central California. Introductory material in this volume…

  15. Paleowetlands and regional climate change in the central Atacama Desert, northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, Jay; Rech, Jason A.; Betancourt, Julio L.; Latorre, Claudio; Quade, Barbra; Rylander, Kate Aasen; Fisher, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    Widespread, organic-rich diatomaceous deposits are evidence for formerly wetter times along the margins of the central Atacama Desert, one of the driest places on Earth today. We mapped and dated these paleowetland deposits at three presently waterless locations near Salar de Punta Negra (24.5°S) on the western slope of the Andes. Elevated groundwater levels supported phreatic discharge into wetlands during two periods: 15,900 to ~ 13,800 and 12,700 to ~ 9700 cal yr BP. Dense concentrations of lithic artifacts testify to the presence of paleoindians around the wetlands late in the second wet phase (11,000?–9700 cal yr BP). Water tables dropped below the surface before 15,900 and since 8100 cal yr BP, and briefly between ~ 13,800 and 12,700 cal yr BP. This temporal pattern is repeated, with some slight differences, in rodent middens from the study area, in both paleowetland and rodent midden deposits north and south of the study area, and in lake level fluctuations on the adjacent Bolivian Altiplano. The regional synchroneity of these changes points to a strengthening of the South American Monsoon — which we term the "Central Andean Pluvial Event" — in two distinct intervals (15,900–13,800 and 12,700–9700 cal yr BP), probably induced by steepened SST gradients across the tropical Pacific (i.e., La Niña-like conditions).

  16. Is tourism damaging ecosystems in the Andes? Current knowledge and an agenda for future research

    OpenAIRE

    Barros, Agustina; Monz, Christopher; Pickering, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Despite the popularity of tourism and recreation in the Andes in South America and the regions conservation value, there is limited research on the ecological impacts of these types of anthropogenic use. Using a systematic quantitative literature review method, we found 47 recreation ecology studies from the Andes, 25 of which used an experimental design. Most of these were from the Southern Andes in Argentina (13 studies) or Chile (eight studies) with only four studies from the Northern Ande...

  17. Quaternary glacial evolution in the Central Cantabrian Mountains (Northern Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, E.; González-Trueba, J. J.; Pellitero, R.; González-García, M.; Gómez-Lende, M.

    2013-08-01

    The glacial evolution of the Cantabrian Mountains is not well known. Previous studies have focused on the extent of the glacial maximum and the presence of younger features in several massifs. Recently, efforts have been made to date glacial periods, particularly the glacial maximum. This work presents a reconstruction of the glacial evolution in the Cantabrian Mountains, providing data on the environmental characteristics and timing of the different stages from the Quaternary glacial maximum to the Little Ice Age. The study area covers 3000 km2 between the 4°58'W and 3°34'W and includes eleven massifs of the central area of the Cantabrian Mountains. The selected sectors have an Atlantic and Atlantic-Mediterranean transitional climate and include the highest massifs (above 2600 m) and low-altitude glacierised massifs (lower than 2000 m). Glacial extent and evolution have been reconstructed on the basis of detailed geomorphological and morphostratigraphic mapping. The equilibrium line altitude (palaeo-ELA) has been estimated for the different stages of each tongue. The ELA has been assessed by the AAR and modified Kurowski methods and altitude methods have been considered. A numerical chronological framework is proposed using 17 AMS radiocarbon and one OSL data obtained in lake and bog deposits from three massifs. Four main glacial stages have been differentiated, between 38,000 BP and the Little Ice Age. They correspond to different cold environments, and the number of glacial stages varies from one to four among the different massifs. Conclusions are analysed in the context of the Quaternary glacial evolution of other Iberian mountains.

  18. Geological development and mineralization in the Atacama segment of the South American Andes, northern Chile (26°15' 27°25'S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Carlos M.; Townley, Brian C.; Lahsen, Alfredo A.; Egaña, Antonio M.

    1993-12-01

    Between the Late Jurassic and the Middle Miocene, widespread magmatism, tectonic events and hydrothermal mineralization characterized the geological evolution of the Atacama segment of the South American Andes. A characteristic feature of this zone is the coincidence in time and space between subduction-generated igneous activity, crustal deformation and mineralization in the magmatic arcs, which formed longitudinal belts migrating eastward. Mineralization in the last 140 Ma is generally restricted to four longitudinal metallogenic belts, in which hydrothermal activity was channelled along crustal-scale faults (1) the Atacama Fault System, along which Early Cretaceous Cu-Au-bearing breccia pipes, veins and stockwork were formed; (2) the Inca do Oro Belt, which contains Upper Cretaceous low sulphur precious metal epithermal mineralization, and Middle Eocene Cu-Mo-Au-bearing breccia pipes; (3) the West Fissure System, which hosts Upper Eocene to Early Oligocene porphyry copper deposits and high sulphur precious metal epithermal mineralization; and (4) the Maricunga Belt, when contains Upper Oligocene to Middle Miocene high sulphur precious metal epithermal deposits and Au-rich porphyry mineralization.

  19. Andean evolution of the Aluminé fold and thrust belt, Northern Patagonian Andes (38°30‧-40°30‧S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Morabito, Ezequiel; Ramos, Víctor A.

    2012-10-01

    The Aluminé fold and thrust belt between 38°30' and 40°30'S is the result of two periods of progression of deformation toward the foreland. The chronology of deformation and its relationship with magmatism through time show spatially and temporally separated magmatic events closely linked to distinct deformational stages. Data presented here confirms a Late Cretaceous mountain-building phase that coexisted in space and time with an eastward arc-migration. During this stage, a belt of deformation expanded through the foreland where it produced the Southern Neuquen Precordillera. This eastern independent mountain grew separately from the main Andean axis through a combination of inversion of the old rift systems and interaction with a pre-Andean belt which acted as a foreland obstacle. On the basis of tectonostratigraphic controls we define the last Andean contractional phase between the Late Miocene and the Pliocene. This event induced the reactivation of both sectors of the fold and thrust belt with minor propagation toward the foreland, leading to the uplift of the Patagonian Andes and reshaping the Southern Neuquén Precordillera. Both intervals of shortening are separated by a period of localized extension that resulted in the development of the Collón Cura basin within this Andean segment. Here, large thicknesses of volcanosedimentary sequences accumulated contemporaneously with the extensional activity between the earliest Oligocene and the Early Miocene.

  20. Mixed bird flocks: patterns of activity and species composition in a region of the Central Andes of Colombia Bandadas mixtas de aves: patrones de actividad y composición de especies en una región de la Cordillera Central de los Andes de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Arbeláez-Cortés

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mixed bird flocks are groups of individuals from different species that travel and forage together. Such groups are common in several bird communities around the world. We present species composition and activity patterns of mixed bird flocks in a region of the Central Andes of Colombia. We compared the number of species per flock, as well as the number of flocks among 3 different habitats. We tested hypotheses concerning the flocks daily activity and the co-occurrences of species within them. We recorded 75 species, and the species number per flock varied from 4 to 21. Our data suggest that habitat affects the number of flocks but not their species number, and that the activity of flocks is similar throughout the day. In addition, the association of birds in flocks is affected by interspecific facilitation, with some species co-occurrences found more times than expected by chance. We hypothesize that some tanager species could have a role in flock cohesion. We witnessed 2 predator attacks upon flocks, a number of agonistic interactions among flock members, and squirrels following bird flocks. Our results meet some general patterns described for mixed bird flocks.Las bandadas mixtas de aves son grupos de individuos de diferentes especies que viajan y forrajean juntos, y son comunes en varias comunidades de aves alrededor del mundo. Presentamos la composición de especies y los patrones de actividad de las bandadas mixtas de aves en una región de la Cordillera Central de los Andes Colombianos. Comparamos el número de especies por bandada y el número de bandadas en 3 hábitats distintos. Evaluamos hipótesis relacionadas con la actividad de las bandadas durante el día y la presencia simultánea de especies en estos grupos. Observamos 75 especies, y el número de especies por bandada varió entre 4 y 21. Nuestros datos indican que el hábitat parece afectar el número de bandadas pero no su número de especies y que la actividad de las bandadas

  1. History of Lake Andes

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Information about the history and management of Lake Andes is compiled in this report. It is intended to help future refuge managers become acquainted with the...

  2. Present and future water resources supply and demand in the Central Andes of Peru: a comprehensive review with focus on the Cordillera Vilcanota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenkhan, Fabian; Huggel, Christian; Salzmann, Nadine; Giráldez, Claudia; Suarez, Wilson; Rohrer, Mario; Molina, Edwin; Montoya, Nilton; Miñan, Fiorella

    2014-05-01

    Glaciers have been an important element of Andean societies and livelihoods as direct freshwater supply for agriculture irrigation, hydropower generation and mining activities. Peru's mainly remotely living population in the Central Andes has to cope with a strong seasonal variation of precipitations and river runoff interannually superimposed by El Niño impacts. Direct glacier and lake water discharge thus constitute a vital continuous water supply and represent a regulating buffer as far as hydrological variability is concerned. This crucial buffer effect is gradually altered by accelerated glacier retreat which leads most likely to an increase of annual river runoff variability. Furthermore, a near-future crossing of the 'peak water' is expected, from where on prior enhanced streamflow decreases and levels out towards a new still unknown minimum discharge. Consequently, a sustainable future water supply especially during low-level runoff dry season might not be guaranteed whereas Peru's water demand increases significantly. Here we present a comprehensive review, the current conditions and perspectives for water resources in the Cusco area with focus on the Vilcanota River, Cordillera Vilcanota, Southern Peru. With 279 km2 the Cordillera Vilcanota represents the second largest glacierized mountain range of the tropics worldwide. Especially as of the second half of the 1980s, it has been strongly affected by massive ice loss with around 30% glacier area decline until present. Furthermore, glacier vanishing triggers the formation of new lakes and increase of lake levels and therefore constitutes determining hazardous drivers for mass movements related to deglaciation effects. The Vilcanota River still lacks more profound hydrological studies. It is likely that its peak water has already been or might be crossed in near-future. This has strong implications for the still at 0.9% (2.2%) annually growing population of the Cusco department (Cusco city). People mostly

  3. Nurse effect in seedling establishment: facilitation and tolerance to damage in the Andes of central Chile Efecto nodriza en el establecimiento de plántulas: facilitación y tolerancia al daño en los Andes de Chile central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IAN S ACUÑA-RODRÍGUEZ

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Nurse effects, which occur when one plant species enhances the survival or growth of another plant species, are predicted to be most relevant in stressful environments. These effects are particulary important during seedling establishment due to their vulnerability to both biotic and abiotic factors, such as herbivory and drought. Tolerance to herbivory reflects the degree to which plants are able to regrow and reproduce after damage, and should vary with resource availability. In the high Andes of central Chile, the cushion plant Laretia acaulis (Apiaceae acts as a buffer against environmental stress, enhancing survival of several associated plant species. We hypothesized that tolerance to herbivory of seedlings growing inside the canopy of L. acaulis should be greater than that of seedlings growing outside the cushion plant. We conducted a field experiment to test this hypothesis for two native perennial species in the high Andes of central Chile: Hordeum comosum (Poaceae and Haplopappus anthylloides (Asteraceae. Seedlings of each species were planted inside and outside L. acaulis cushions and half of them received manual damage (50 % foliar tissue removed. Seedlings growing inside the nurse species showed high survival independent of the damage treatment. Whereas position (inside or outside the cushion plant did not affect tolerance of Haplopappus anthylloides, it significantly affected tolerance of Hordeum comosum. Thus, we found similar survival of damaged and control seedlings of H. comosum inside the cushions, but survival of damaged seedlings in the bare ground was lower than that of control seedlings. We verified the occurrence of nurse effects of Laretia acaulis on the establishment of both species, and detected enhancement of tolerance to damage in Hordeum comosum in this stressful habitatSe ha sugerido que el efecto nodriza, el cual se evidencia cuando una especie vegetal incrementa la supervivencia o el crecimiento de otra, es m

  4. The geochemical variations of the upper cenozoic volcanism along the Calama Olacapato El Toro transversal fault system in central Andes (˜24°S): petrogenetic and geodynamic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteini, M.; Mazzuoli, R.; Omarini, R.; Cas, R.; Maas, R.

    2002-02-01

    In this paper, we present new geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic data for several Upper Miocene volcanic centres aligned along one of the most extensive transcurrent lineament in the Central Andes, the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro (COT). The transversal volcanic belt along COT is constituted by large composite volcanoes and a caldera structure; they are, from NW to SE, Puntas Negras, Rincon, Tul Tul, Del Medio and Pocitos (TUMEPO), Quevar Aguas Calientes and Tastil. In order to compare chemical data from the different centres along the COT transect, differentiation effects were minimised by using data extrapolated at 60% SiO2 with least-square regression method. In the western sector of the COT, the volcanic products of Puntas Negras and Rincon show relatively high K2O and 87Sr/86Sr and low Rb/Cs, Ta/Th, La/Yb, 143Nd/144Nd. To the east, the TUMEPO products have high Sr and 143Nd/144Nd, La/Yb and Ba/Rb and low Y, 87Sr/86Sr. In the easternmost COT sector, Quevar, Aguas Calientes and Tastil volcanic complexes exhibit low La/Yb, high87Sr/Sr86 and low 143Nd/144Nd. On the basis of these data, we propose a petrogenetic and geodynamical model for Central Andes at 24°S. In correspondence of Miocene-Quaternary volcanic arc (Puntas Negras and Rincon), the magmas inherited a calcalkaline signature partly modified by upper crustal and/or sediment assimilation. In the central eastern sector, melting, assimilation, storage and homogenisation (MASH) processes occurred at the base of a thickened crust. In this COT sector, TUMEPO products show an evident lower crust signature and could be considered representative for MASH derived magmas. In the easternmost sector, Quevar, Aguas Calientes and Tastil products could represent magmas generated by partial melting of underthrusted Brasilian shield and mixed with magmas derived by MASH processes.

  5. Phosphate minerals of some granitic rocks associated quartz veins from northern and central Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Neiva, A.M.R.; Silva, M.M.V.G.; Antunes, I.M.H.R.; Ramos, J. M. F.

    2000-01-01

    Phosphate minerals are common in northern and central Portuguese granitic rocks. Childrenite, eosphorite and intermediate compositions in this solid-solution séries occur in muscovite granites at Paredes da Beira and Penamacor-Monsanto, muscovite-biotite granites at Penamacor-Monsanto and in aplite veins at Vidago. The composition of childrenite and eosphorite are similar in each of these localities. Germanite occurs in a muscovite granite at Segura.

  6. Serological survey of human Toxoplasma gondii infection in northern and central regions of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodadad Pirali-Kheirabadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Toxoplasma gondii is an important zoonotic protozoan parasite that can infect man and animals. The pathogen can infect the fetus by congenital transmission during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to investigate T. gondii infection in people referred to health care centers in northern and central regions of Iran.Materials and methods: Serum samples from 712 individuals in Mazandaran, Isfahan and ChaharmahalvaBakhtiari provinces, Iran, were examined for the levels of anti-T. Gondii IgG by ELISA. Prevalence of T. gondii infection in respect of gender and age was analyzed. Results: The overall anti-T. gondii IgG prevalence in the study population was 72.05%. In Mazandaran, Isfahan and ChaharmahalvaBakhtiari provinces,in male population respectively 87.6, 41.46 and 61.81% and in female population respectively 89.31, 47.61 and 64.44% were sero-positive with anti-T. gondii IgG. Sero-prevalance of anti-T.gondii IgG in the females was higher than in the males in the northern and central regions of Iran. Discussion and conclusion:The present study demonstrates high prevalence of Toxoplasma infection in northern and central regions of Iran and a higher prevalence of T. gondii infection was observed in females. Significant difference in infection rate between individuals living in northern and central areas in Iran was found (p <0.05, which indicated that T. gondii infection is dependent on living places. Deeper investigations for the potential risk factors that threat the Iranian populations, especially female are recommended.

  7. Assessment of tsunami hazards for the Central American Pacific coast from southern Mexico to northern Peru

    OpenAIRE

    B. Brizuela; Armigliato, A.; S. Tinti

    2014-01-01

    Central America (CA), from Guatemala to Panama, has been struck by at least 52 tsunamis between 1539 and 2013, and in the extended region from Mexico to northern Peru (denoted as ECA, Extended Central America in this paper) the number of recorded tsunamis in the same time span is more than 100, most of which were triggered by earthquakes located in the Middle American Trench that runs parallel to the Pacific coast. The most severe event in the catalogue is the tsunami that o...

  8. Etude paléomagnetique des formations crétacées et tertiaires des Andes centrales du Pérou. Rôle des rotations dans la formation des déflexions andines

    OpenAIRE

    Macedo Sanchez, Orlando

    1993-01-01

    La déflexion majeure d'Arica, située entre 19-22° S et qui dévie l'orientation générale des structures des Andes Centrales depuis une direction péruvienne N W-SE jusqu'à une direction chilienne presque NS, est une des caractéristiques importantes de la chaîne andine. Aussi à cette latitude la croûte sud-américaine atteint une épaisseur double de la normale (-70 km). Cet épaississement crustal est à l'origine du développement de l'Altiplano, vaste plateau situé à une altitude moyenne proche de...

  9. Cuando ya no se puede tomar trago ni chacchar coca. When alcohol can no longer be drunk or coca leaves chewed. the case of the “protestants” in the Peruvian central Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Magny

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Desde hace mucho tiempo el alcohol y la coca ocupan un lugar central en las comunidades andinas. Hasta ahora en el distrito de Churcampa (Huancavelica, Perú, los católicos, mayoritarios, siguen explicando al visitante lo siguiente: “acá no se puede hacer nada sin trago ni coca”. No obstante, durante las ultimas décadas, muchas personas en este distrito – así como en muchos otros distritos de los Andes peruanos – se han convertido y siguen convirtiéndose al “protestantismo” (termino genérico usado por los católicos para referirse en forma general a las Iglesias evangélicas. Esta conversión implica, entre otras cosas, dejar completamente de masticar hojas de coca y de beber cualquier tipo de bebidas alcohólicas. En esta exposición proponemos analizar hasta qué punto y bajo qué modalidades estas restricciones alimenticias afectan a los conversos (quienes siguen siendo minoritarios en el distrito en su vida social cotidiana.Alcohol and coca have played a central role in Andean communities for many centuries. Nowadays, in the district of Churcampa (Huancavelica, Peru, the Catholic people, who are the majority, still explain to visitors that “here you can’t do anything without trago [alcohol] and coca”. Yet, over the past decades, many men and women in this district - as well as in many other districts of the Peruvian Andes - have been converting to “Protestantism” (a generic term used by Catholics to refer to the Evangelical Churches. This conversion implies, among other things, completely giving up chewing of coca leaves and drinking of any type of alcoholic drink. The aim of this article is to analyze to what extent and how these restrictions in the dietary habits affect converted people in their everyday social life.alcohol, coca leaves, religion, conversion, evangelic Churches, Peru

  10. Findings in pinnipeds stranded along the central and northern California coast, 1984-1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, J A; Roletto, J; Morgan, L E; Smith, D M; Gage, L J

    1993-07-01

    Personnel at The Marine Mammal Center (The Center) treated 1,446 stranded marine mammals recovered from the central and northern California (USA) coast from 1984 through 1990, including California sea lions (Zalophus californianus), northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris), Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi), northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus), Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus), and Guadalupe fur seals (Arctocephalus townsendi). The primary disease findings in stranded California sea lions were renal disease, renal disease complicated by severe verminous pneumonia, verminous pneumonia, seizures of unknown etiology, and renal disease complicated by severe pneumonia of unknown etiology. Stranded elephant seals included pups, yearlings with dermatological problems, and neonates. Most harbor seals admitted to The Center were underweight and premature pups. Stranded northern fur seals included animals with seizures of unknown etiology and emaciated pups. Stranded Steller sea lions included underweight pups and aged adult females with pneumonia. Two Guadalupe fur seals had hemorrhagic gastroenteritis. Incidental findings at the time of stranding among the six species included verminous pneumonia and pneumonia of unknown etiology, renal disease, internal parasitism, ophthalmologic problems, gastrointestinal disorders, otitis externa, and external wounds. PMID:8355344

  11. Groundwater flow in a closed basin with a saline shallow lake in a volcanic area: Laguna Tuyajto, northern Chilean Altiplano of the Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Christian; Custodio, Emilio; Chong, Guillermo; Lambán, Luis Javier; Riquelme, Rodrigo; Wilke, Hans; Jódar, Jorge; Urrutia, Javier; Urqueta, Harry; Sarmiento, Alvaro; Gamboa, Carolina; Lictevout, Elisabeth

    2016-01-15

    Laguna Tuyajto is a small, shallow saline water lake in the Andean Altiplano of northern Chile. In the eastern side it is fed by springs that discharge groundwater of the nearby volcanic aquifers. The area is arid: rainfall does not exceed 200mm/year in the rainiest parts. The stable isotopic content of spring water shows that the recharge is originated mainly from winter rain, snow melt, and to a lesser extent from some short and intense sporadic rainfall events. Most of the spring water outflowing in the northern side of Laguna Tuyajto is recharged in the Tuyajto volcano. Most of the spring water in the eastern side and groundwater are recharged at higher elevations, in the rims of the nearby endorheic basins of Pampa Colorada and Pampa Las Tecas to the East. The presence of tritium in some deep wells in Pampa Colorada and Pampa Las Tecas indicates recent recharge. Gas emission in recent volcanoes increase the sulfate content of atmospheric deposition and this is reflected in local groundwater. The chemical composition and concentration of spring waters are the result of meteoric water evapo-concentration, water-rock interaction, and mainly the dissolution of old and buried evaporitic deposits. Groundwater flow is mostly shallow due to a low permeability ignimbrite layer of regional extent, which also hinders brine spreading below and around the lake. High deep temperatures near the recent Tuyajto volcano explain the high dissolved silica contents and the δ(18)O shift to heavier values found in some of the spring waters. Laguna Tuyajto is a terminal lake where salts cumulate, mostly halite, but some brine transfer to the Salar de Aguas Calientes-3 cannot be excluded. The hydrogeological behavior of Laguna Tuyajto constitutes a model to understand the functioning of many other similar basins in other areas in the Andean Altiplano.

  12. Trends in Waist Circumference and Central Obesity in Adults, Northern Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahim Tazik; Abdolhamid Angizeh; Pooneh Moharloei; Samieh Banihashem; Mehdi Sedaghat; Gholamreza Veghari; Abbas Moghaddami

    2012-01-01

     Objectives: The main aim of this study is to determine the centralobesity trends during the period from 2006 to 2010 among 15-65years old people in Northern Iran.Methods: This was a population-based cross-sectional studyconducted on 6466 subjects who had been chosen by a multistage cluster random sampling within five steps. The subjects wererandomly chosen from 325 clusters and each cluster included 20cases. Central obesity was defined as waist circumference ≥102 cmand ≥88 cm in men and wome...

  13. Dinosaur tracks from the Jurassic Shemshak Group in the Central Alborz Mountains (Northern Iran)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbassi, Nasrollah; Madanipour, Saeed

    2014-04-01

    The Shemshak Group includes alternating layers of coal-bearing shale and siliciclastic sediments in the Baladeh area in the central Alborz Mountains of northern Iran. A diverse and abundant Jurassic dinosaur footprint assemblage is now recognized in the group, which is Toarcian to Bajocian in age in the northern Baladeh. This is the first report of a diverse dinosaur ichnoassemblage from Iran that includes the footprints of sauropods. These tracks can be assigned to three groups of trackmakers: theropods, ornithopods and sauropods. Those of theropods are typically tridactyl in shape, their trackways reflecting bipedal movement. Theropod footprints are very abundant in both northern and western Baladeh. The studied theropod tracks themselves are divided into three major dimensional groups. The medium sized footprints (footprint length, 11-15 cm) are abundant and have a stride length, digit and pace angles like the coelurosaurs footprints and trackway. Theropod footprints were identified as similar to Schizograllator otariensis, Talmontopus tersi and Wildeichnus isp. Ornithopod footprints are tridactyl with rounded and thick toes and belong to bipeds. Some didactyl imprints were also observed. Skin imprints were well preserved in these footprints. The ornithopod tracks resemble Jiayinosorupus johnsoni, as well as Velociraptorichnus sichuanensis for didactyl footprints. Sauropod footprints found in the western part of Baladeh are assigned here to Eosauropus isp., which are pentadactyl pes imprints of a quadruped. The assemblage from Iran resembles similar associations from eastern Asia.

  14. Seroprevalence of heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) in feline and canine hosts from central and northern Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, L; Silvestre-Ferreira, A C; Fontes-Sousa, A P; Balreira, A C; Morchón, R; Carretón, E; Vilhena, H; Simón, F; Montoya-Alonso, J A

    2015-09-01

    Dirofilaria immitis is endemic in Portugal. Several studies have reported the presence of canine heartworm disease, although no previous studies on feline infections have been published. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of D. immitis in cats and dogs from central and northern Portugal. Blood samples from 434 cats were tested for circulating anti-D. immitis and anti-Wolbachia antibodies. Furthermore, 386 dogs were tested for circulating D. immitis antigens. Overall feline seroprevalence was 15%, while canine prevalence was 2.1%. The highest feline seroprevalences of 18.7% and 17.6% were found in Aveiro and Viseu, respectively, while the highest canine prevalences of 8.8% and 6.8% were found in Coimbra and Aveiro, respectively. Cats and dogs showing respiratory signs presented higher prevalences of 24.4% and 17%, respectively, while 50% of cats with gastrointestinal signs were seropositive. The present study confirms the seropositivity of D. immitis in the feline population in central and northern Portugal, and suggests the importance of including heartworm disease in the list of differential diagnoses of cats and dogs showing clinical signs compatible with the disease. PMID:24824176

  15. Study on the Horizontal Deformation Strain Field in the Central and Northern Parts of Yunnan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yanxing; Guo Liangqian; Zhang Zhongfu

    2003-01-01

    Based on the horizontal deformation field and the strain field derived from the GPS data over the period of 1999~2001 in the Yunnan area, the characteristics of deformation and strain in the northern part of Yunnan Province have been studied. The results indicate that the central part of the studied area is rather stable with little crustal displacement, while the western and eastern parts are active with larger displacement. The strain field reveals that the orientations of the principal compressive strain axis of the crust and the sub-blocks in the area are NW-SE, while the orientations of the principal tensile strain axis is NE-SW. In the studied area, the tensile strain is predominatly in the northern part and the compressive strain is predominatly in the central and southern parts. The stretching direction of the shear-strain contour is basically consistent with the strike of the active fault. The strain and stress fields of the fault activity are related to the structure where the fault is located, while the activity properties of the faults are different.

  16. Efficiency Analysis of Independent and Centralized Heating Systems for Residential Buildings in Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Rinaldi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The primary energy consumption in residential buildings is determined by the envelope thermal characteristics, air change, outside climatic data, users’ behaviour and the adopted heating system and its control. The new Italian regulations strongly suggest the installation of centralized boilers in renovated buildings with more than four apartments. This work aims to investigate the differences in primary energy consumption and efficiency among several independent and centralized heating systems installed in Northern Italy. The analysis is carried out through the following approach: firstly building heating loads are evaluated using the software TRNSYS® and, then, heating system performances are estimated through a simplified model based on the European Standard EN 15316. Several heating systems have been analyzed, evaluating: independent and centralized configurations, condensing and traditional boilers, radiator and radiant floor emitters and solar plant integration. The heating systems are applied to four buildings dating back to 2010, 2006, 1960s and 1930s. All the combinations of heating systems and buildings are analyzed in detail, evaluating efficiency and primary energy consumption. In most of the cases the choice between centralized and independent heating systems has minor effects on primary energy consumption, less than 3%: the introduction of condensing technology and the integration with solar heating plant can reduce energy consumption by 11% and 29%, respectively.

  17. Late Oligocene-Early Miocene compressional tectosedimentary episode and associated land-mammal faunas in the Andes of central Chile and adjacent Argentina (32 37°s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semper, Thierry; Marshall, Larry G.; Rivano, Sergio; Godoy, Estanislao

    1994-01-01

    A reassessment of the geologic and land-mammal fossil evidence used in attribution of a tectosedimentary episode in the Andes between 32 and 37°S to the Middle Eocene "Incaic tectonic phase" of Peru indicates that the episode occurred during Late Oligocene-Early Miocene times(~ 27-20 Ma). From west to east, three structural domains are recognized for this time span in the study area: a volcanic arc (Chile); a thin-skinned, E-verging fold-thrust belt (Cordillera Principal, Chile-Argentina border strip); and a foreland basin (Argentina). Initiation of thrusting in the Cordillera Principal fold-thrust belt produced the coeval initiation of sedimentation in the foreland basin of adjacent Argentina. This onset of foreland deposition postdates strata bearing a Divisaderan Land Mammal Age fauna (i.e. ~ 35-30 Ma) and is marked at ~ 36°30'S by the base of the "Rodados Lustrosos" conglomerates, which are conformably overlain by sedimentary rocks containing a Deseadan Land Mammal Age fauna (i.e. ~ 29-21 Ma). Geologic relationships between the thick volcanic Abanico (Coya-Machalí) and Farellones formations also demonstrate that this tectosedimentary episode practically ended at ~ 20 Ma at least in the volcanic arc, and was therefore roughly coeval with the major tectonic crisis (~ 27-19 Ma) known in northwestern Andean Bolivia some 1500 km to the north. This strongly suggests that a long, outstanding tectonic upheaval affected at least an extended 12-37°S segment of the Andean margin of South America during Late Oligocene and Early Miocene times.

  18. The U.S. Geological Survey`s National Coal Resource Assessment: The Northern and Central Appalachian Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruppert, L.; Bragg, L.; Tewalt, S. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) Energy Resource Surveys Program is currently conducting a five-year National Coal Resource Assessment project. Primary focus is on the quality and quantity of top-producing coal beds and coal zones in five of the nine major coal producing regions in the US. These regions include the (1) Northern and Central Appalachian Basin, (2) Gulf Coastal Plain, (3) Illinois Basin, (4) Colorado Plateau, and (5) Powder River Basin and Northern Great Plains.

  19. Is tourism damaging ecosystems in the Andes? Current knowledge and an agenda for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Agustina; Monz, Christopher; Pickering, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    Despite the popularity of tourism and recreation in the Andes in South America and the regions conservation value, there is limited research on the ecological impacts of these types of anthropogenic use. Using a systematic quantitative literature review method, we found 47 recreation ecology studies from the Andes, 25 of which used an experimental design. Most of these were from the Southern Andes in Argentina (13 studies) or Chile (eight studies) with only four studies from the Northern Andes. These studies documented a range of impacts on vegetation, birds and mammals; including changes in plant species richness, composition and vegetation cover and the tolerance of wildlife of visitor use. There was little research on the impacts of visitors on soils and aquatic systems and for some ecoregions in the Andes. We identify research priorities across the region that will enhance management strategies to minimise visitor impacts in Andean ecosystems. PMID:25201299

  20. El alto de Copahue - Pino Hachado y la fosa de Loncopué: un comportamiento tectónico episódico, Andes neuquinos (37º - 39ºS The Copahue-Pino Hachado high and the Loncopuè trough: An episodic tectonic behaviour, Neuquén Andes (37º- 39ºS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. García Morabito

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Los Andes de la parte central de Neuquén (38º-39ºS, enmarcados en los Andes Centrales Australes (35º-39ºS, han poseído una cronología de levantamiento similar al resto de los Andes Patagónicos Septentrionales (39º-46ºS construyéndose a través de sucesivas fases de alzamiento en el Cretácico medio, Eoceno medio y Mioceno superior. Sin embargo, se han diferenciado con respecto al resto de los Andes Patagónicos, ubicados hacia el sur, en lo relativo a las distintas fases de relajamiento extensional que han sufrido, tanto en el Oligoceno superior como en el Plio-Cuaternario. Existen evidencias que sugieren un comportamiento episódico de la faja plegada y corrida neuquina dado por regímenes tectónicos compresivos seguidos por estadios de extensión generalizados al menos desde el Cretácico medio. El estudio de dos unidades morfoestructurales desarrolladas entre los 37º y los 39ºS ejemplifican este comportamiento peculiar, el alto de Copahue - Pino Hachado ubicado en la zona limítrofe argentino-chilena y su extensión hacia el norte en territorio chileno, en la laguna de la Laja, y la fosa de Loncopué en el retroarco. El estudio de la estructura miocena a cuaternaria y la descripción detallada de la estratigráfía de este sector cordillerano han aportado un nuevo cuadro de evolución para este sector de los Andes.The Andes located in the central Neuquén (38º-39ºS, which belong to the southern Central Andes (35º-39ºS, have recorded a similar chronology of uplift than the neighbor northern Patagonian Andes (39º-46ºS. Both areas have been formed trough successive phases of contraction in the Late Cretaceous, Middle Eocene and Late Miocene respectively. However, the Neuquén Andes have experienced two discrete phases of orogenic relaxation, during the Late Oligocene and Pliocene-Quaternary, which make then distinctive respect to the area located to the south. Field studies have shown new evidences of an episodic behavior of

  1. Plio-Quaternary thin-skinned tectonics along the crustal front flexure of the southern Central Andes: a record of the regional stress regime or of local tectonic-driven gravitational processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messager, Grégoire; Nivière, Bertrand; Lacan, Pierre; Hervouët, Yves; Xavier, Jean-Paul

    2014-04-01

    We present here a record of Plio-Pleistocene deformations above the flexural front of the southern Central Andes of Argentina. We combine a seismic profile with structural and geomorphological observations to show that thin-skinned extension located on top of the crustal front flexure is coeval with thin-skinned shortening at the toe of the topographic bulge. The seismic line shows that a flat zone with no internal deformation separates the stretched and shortened domains. Such features are usually interpreted as the result of strike-slip faulting along basement faults, or tangential longitudinal strain folding in the soft sedimentary cover above crustal bending. We propose an alternative linking extension at the apex of the crustal anticline, to basal contraction by the downslope translation of a rigid thin nappe of sediments (30 × 30 km2 in area) above evaporites at a depth of 700-900 m. The size of such a process is unusually large onshore (630-810 km3) but mimics the gravity gliding observed in deltas and passive margins. Since this process disconnects zones with a shallow stress field from deeper crustal levels, it could allow extension above a compressive deformation front and should not be interpreted merely as a record of the crustal stress regime. Large-scale gravity gliding of the cover down the slope of a structural high could also explain some of the extension observed in mountain hinterlands.

  2. Federally owned coal and Federal lands in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan J. Tewalt

    2002-02-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) assessed five coals beds or coal zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions for the National Coal Resource Assessment: the Pittsburgh coal bed, the Upper Freeport coal bed, the Fire Clay coal zone, the Pond Creek coal zone, and the Pocahontas No. 3 coal bed. The assessment produced stratigraphic and geochemical databases and digital coal maps, or models, which characterized the coal beds and coal zones. Using the assessment models, the USGS estimated original and remaining (unmined) resources for these coal beds or zones. The Appalachian Basin assessment was conducted in collaboration with the State geological surveys of West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, Kentucky, and Virginia. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Coal resources of selected coal beds and zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie Ruppert; Susan Tewalt; Linda Bragg

    2002-02-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is completing a National Coal Resource Assessment of five coal-producing regions of the United States, including the Appalachian Basin. The USGS, in cooperation with the State geological surveys of Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia, has completed a digital coal resource assessment of five of the top-producing coal beds and coal zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions -- the Pittsburgh coal bed, the Upper Freeport coal bed, the Fire Clay and Pond Creek coal zones, and the Pocahontas No. 3 coal bed. Of the 93 billion short tons of original coal in these units, about 66 billion short tons remain. 2 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. A crustal section of northern Central America as inferred from wide angle reflections from shallow earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. J.

    A three-layered crustal structure for a portion of northern Central America is derived using both travel time and amplitude data from seismograms recorded at Tegucigalpa, Honduras. The sources are shallow earthquakes that occurred along the Motagua fault in Guatemala 200 to 450 km (25-50 seconds in terms of S-P time) from the station. Since ray paths are almost parallel to the axis of the Middle America trench, approximately 250 km away, a homogeneous, horizontally layered crust may be reasonably assumed. At this distance range, which is far beyond critical distance for reflections from within the crust, shallow sources always generate a small first arrival followed by several large later arrivals. The first arrival is interpreted as Pn (the head wave from the Mohorovicic discontinuity) and the later arrivals are interpreted as wide angle (over-critical) reflections from layer boundaries. Three wide angle reflections (PmP, PiP, and PgP) are identified.

  5. Geologic map of the west-central Buffalo National River region, northern Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Mark R.; Turner, Kenzie J.

    2014-01-01

    This map summarizes the geology of the west-central Buffalo National River region in the Ozark Plateaus region of northern Arkansas. Geologically, the region lies on the southern flank of the Ozark dome, an uplift that exposes oldest rocks at its center in Missouri. Physiographically, the map area spans the Springfield Plateau, a topographic surface generally held up by Mississippian cherty limestone and the higher Boston Mountains to the south, held up by Pennsylvanian rocks. The Buffalo River flows eastward through the map area, enhancing bedrock erosion of an approximately 1,600-ft- (490-m-) thick sequence of Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian carbonate and clastic sedimentary rocks that have been mildly deformed by a series of faults and folds. Quaternary surficial units are present as alluvial deposits along major streams, including a series of terrace deposits from the Buffalo River, as well as colluvium and landslide deposits mantling bedrock on hillslopes.

  6. A new species of arboreal pitviper from the Atlantic versant of northern Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J A; Smith, E N

    2000-12-01

    A new species of green, prehensile-tailed pitviper of the genus Bothriechis is described from the Atlantic slopes of eastern Guatemala and western Honduras. This species appears to be most closely related to B. bicolor of the Pacific versant of Chiapas (Mexico) and Guatemala. Several other species of Bothriechis occur on the Atlantic versant of northern Central America, including two montane species, B. aurifer and B. marchi but, with one possible exception, these are not known to be sympatric with the new species and occur in different mountain ranges. The widespread B. schlegelii occurs up to at least 900 m on the Sierra de Caral, where the lowest elevation recorded for the new species is 885 m. PMID:11487920

  7. Spatial pattern and weight of seabed marine litter in the northern and central Adriatic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strafella, P; Fabi, G; Spagnolo, A; Grati, F; Polidori, P; Punzo, E; Fortibuoni, T; Marceta, B; Raicevich, S; Cvitkovic, I; Despalatovic, M; Scarcella, G

    2015-02-15

    The present study analyzes spatial distribution and typology of marine litter on the seabed in the FAO Geographical Sub-Area 17 (northern and central Adriatic Sea). Two surveys were conducted during fall 2011 and 2012 and 67 stations were sampled each year. Litter items were collected using the "rapido" trawl, a modified beam trawl commonly used by the Italian fishermen to catch flat fish and other benthic species. Marine litter in the catches was sorted and classified in 6 major categories (plastic, metal, glass, rubber, wood, other). Plastic litter was further subdivided in 3 sub-categories based on its source: fishing nets, aquaculture nets and other. Plastic was dominant in terms of weight followed by metal and other categories. The highest concentration of litter was found close to the coast likely as a consequence of high coastal urbanization, river inflow and extensive navigation associated with the morphological and hydrological features of the basin. PMID:25560999

  8. What do we know about winter active ground beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae in Central and Northern Europe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radomir Jaskula

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the current knowledge on winter active Carabidae in Central and Northern Europe. In total 73 winter active species are listed, based on literature and own observations. Ground beetles are among the three most numerous Coleoptera families active during the autumn to spring period. The winter community of Carabidae is composed both of larvae (mainly autumn breeding species and adults, as well as of epigeic species and those inhabiting tree trunks. Supranivean fauna is characterized by lower species diversity than the subnivean fauna. The activity of ground beetles decreases in late autumn, is lowest during mid-winter and increases in early spring. Carabidae are noted as an important food source in the diet of insectivorous mammals. They are also predators, hunting small winter active invertebrates.

  9. Mid Holocene climate change and impact on evolution on human settlements in northern central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krossa, V. R.; Kim, H.-J.; Moros, M.; Dörfler, W.; Blanz, T.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Schneider, R.

    2012-04-01

    have facilitated the adaption of human societies, further developing agriculture and the domestication of animals in northern central Europe.

  10. Mujeres de los Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Arango, Luz Gabriela; Arizabaleta de García, María Teresa; Bejarano, Nilse; Borchart de Moreno, Christiana; Bucheli, Rocío Vaca; Cervantes, Elvira Llanos; Cisneros, Tatiana; Defossez, Anne-Claire; Fassin, Didier; Giraldo, Fernando Urrea; Li, Dina; Malaver, José; Montúfar, Verónica; Moscoso, Martha; Ortega, Diego Zapata

    2016-01-01

    El Seminario "Mujeres De Los Andes: Condiciones De Vida Y Salud" tuvo lugar en la ciudad de Quito, del 6 al 10 de junio de 1991. Reunió investigadores de distintas disciplinas académicas y actores de variados campos, de cuatro países del área andina-Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador y Perú-, en los cuales está presente el Instituto Francés de Estudios Andinos, principal instigador del evento. Este libro, que reúne la mayor parte de las ponencias en él presentadas, se inscribe en la línea de las corr...

  11. Combining point and distributed snowpack data with landscape-based discretization for hydrologic modeling of the snow-dominated Maipo River Basin, in the semi-arid Andes central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videla Giering, Y. A., III; McPhee, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Snow hydrology in mountain environments plays an important role in the availability of hydrological resources in warm climate areas and height effects, since the magnitude of snowpack, its spatial and temporal distribution is very important to determine the availability of water in the snowmelt season and take forward different productive activities This investigation models and assess the main phenomena hydrological cycle of snow using the software Cold Region Hydrological Model (Pomeroy et al., 2007). The software is a physically based model developed by the centre for hydrology, University of Saskatchewan. The aim of this model is to have a better understanding of hydrological processes involved in cold environments, which are particular in the sense that a host of specific phenomena such as snow and ice accumulation, transport and melt, infiltration through frozen soils, and the like, control the hydrograph timing) The analysis involved the development of a hydrologic model for the Upper Maipo River Basin, with elevations between 800 and 6500 meters above sea level and 5000-km^2 watershed in the Andes of Central Chile which supplies water resources to the capital city of Santiago (7 million inhabitants), to a thriving agricultural region, as well as to hydropower and large mining activities. The paper concludes that there is a differential distribution of snow cover in the study area, determined mainly by steep terrain geomorphology. These factors have been considered in the parameterization of the model, showing considerable variation in storage time, redistributions by blowing snow, melting intervals, infiltration rates and drainage basin. The fictional scenarios modeled demonstrate noticeable changes in the hydrograph, showing the fragile climate and hydrological condition of this basin of Central Chile.

  12. Neotectonics In The Central Depression (atacama Desert, 25-26°s, Northern Chile) and Its Implications For Recent Sedimentary Fluxes and Regional Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audin, L.; Hérail, G.; Riquelme, R.; Darrozes, J.; Martinod, J.; Font, E.

    In the northern Chilean Andes, the Pampas Exploradora and Carizo are part of a NS- trending basin (known as the Central Depression) that separates the Coastal Range from the Precodillera. The Exploradora and Carizo region has undergone an extremely arid climate at least since the Middle Miocene time (~15 Ma ago). The limited extent of erosion, due to exceptional aridity, has greatly contributed to the preservation of the landform. In such environment the landforms can be very well used to analyse the tectonic evolution. A basin infilling occurred during the Cenozoic (Atacama Gravels) with the deposition of large volumes of coarse gravels coming from the Precordillera. The aggradation and filling of the paleo-drainage system by the Atacama Gravels of fluviatil origin mark an important erosive unconformity. Moreover, this uniform preserved surface has undergone low magnitude deformation during the deposition period. But we have evidenced a late and post Atacama Gravel tectonic episode. On the western side of the Precordillera a number of normal faults that cross a dense network of very well preserved channels and its alluvial fans. This tectonic deformation is not large in magnitude, about 2m of vertical offset, but clearly appear in the landscape suggesting that the landforms and deformation in the western part of the basin may be quite young. The easterly dipping normal fault set does not correspond with a regional dip toward the west and thus does not satisfy an hypothesis of gravitationnal reajustment or collapse. On the contrary, west of the normal fault set, some ongoing compressional forces are revealed by a large scale folding of the Central basin. These tectonic features led to some minor topographic variations that produced on the top of the basin surface local sedimentary traps, regressive erosion, catchments and extrado grabens that controlled the sediment facies and distribution pattern. Recent coarse-grained alluvial fans were deposited and stopped by

  13. Disseminated sulphides in basalts from the northern central Indian ridge: Implications on late-stage hydrothermal activity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Ray, D.

    of hydrothermal seafloor mineralization at spreading centres of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans dating back to the mid-1960, systematic exploration for hydrothermal activity in the Indian Ocean ridge system is relatively recent (see Banerjee and Ray 2003... the Indian Ocean Ridge systems and b the dredge location (DR13) near the Vityaz transform fault, northern Central Indian Ridge. CR Carlsberg Ridge, CIR Central Indian Ridge, RTJ Rodriguez Triple Junction, SWIR Southwest Indian Ridge, SEIR Southeast Indian...

  14. The arbovirus vector Culex torrentium is more prevalent than Culex pipiens in northern and central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesson, J C; Rettich, F; Merdić, E; Vignjević, G; Ostman, O; Schäfer, M; Schaffner, F; Foussadier, R; Besnard, G; Medlock, J; Scholte, E-J; Lundström, J O

    2014-06-01

    Two species of arbovirus vector, Culex torrentium and Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae), occur in several European countries, but difficulties in their accurate identification and discrimination have hampered both detailed and large-scale distribution and abundance studies. Using a molecular identification method, we identified to species 2559 larvae of Cx. pipiens/torrentium collected from 138 sites in 13 European countries ranging from Scandinavia to the Mediterranean coast. In addition, samples of 1712 males of Cx. pipiens/torrentium collected at several sites in the Czech Republic were identified to species based on the morphology of their hypopygia. We found that the two species occur together in large areas of Europe, and that Cx. torrentium dominates in northern Europe and Cx. pipiens dominates south of the Alps. The transition in dominance occurs in central Europe, where both species are roughly equally common. There was a strong correlation between the length of the growing season at different sites and occurrences of the two species. As the growing season increases, the proportion and detection of Cx. torrentium decrease, whereas those of Cx. pipiens increase. The present findings have important consequences for the interpretation of the results of studies on major enzootic and link-vectors of mosquito-borne bird-associated viruses (i.e. Sindbis, West Nile and Usutu viruses), especially in central Europe and Scandinavia.

  15. Assessment of tsunami hazards for the Central American Pacific coast from southern Mexico to northern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizuela, B.; Armigliato, A.; Tinti, S.

    2014-07-01

    Central America (CA), from Guatemala to Panama, has been struck by at least 52 tsunamis between 1539 and 2013, and in the extended region from Mexico to northern Peru (denoted as ECA, Extended Central America in this paper) the number of recorded tsunamis in the same time span is more than 100, most of which were triggered by earthquakes located in the Middle American Trench that runs parallel to the Pacific coast. The most severe event in the catalogue is the tsunami that occurred on 2 September 1992 off Nicaragua, with run-up measured in the range of 5-10 m in several places along the Nicaraguan coast. The aim of this paper is to assess the tsunami hazard on the Pacific coast of this extended region, and to this purpose a hybrid probabilistic-deterministic analysis is performed, that is adequate for tsunamis generated by earthquakes. More specifically, the probabilistic approach is used to compute the Gutenberg-Richter coefficients of the main seismic tsunamigenic zones of the area and to estimate the annual rate of occurrence of tsunamigenic earthquakes and their corresponding return period. The output of the probabilistic part of the method is taken as input by the deterministic part, which is applied to calculate the tsunami run-up distribution along the coast.

  16.  Trends in Waist Circumference and Central Obesity in Adults, Northern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Tazik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available  Objectives: The main aim of this study is to determine the centralobesity trends during the period from 2006 to 2010 among 15-65years old people in Northern Iran.Methods: This was a population-based cross-sectional studyconducted on 6466 subjects who had been chosen by a multistage cluster random sampling within five steps. The subjects wererandomly chosen from 325 clusters and each cluster included 20cases. Central obesity was defined as waist circumference ≥102 cmand ≥88 cm in men and women, respectively.Results: Compared to 2010, the mean waist circumference in2006 changed from 87.2 cm to 88.1 cm in men (p=0.237, andfrom 90.3 cm to 88.6 cm in women (p=0.045. The comparisonbetween 2006 and 2010 revealed that the prevalence of centralobesity slightly decreased, 6.8�0and 2.4�0in urban women andmen, respectively. Generally, the mean of waist circumferencesignificantly decreased in urban women (by 0.069 cm in each year;p=0.020; however, the decrease of waist circumference in urbanmen was not significant (0.006 cm decrease each year; p=0.915.Conclusion: The prevalence of central obesity declined amongboth males and females in the urban area; however, there wasan attenuated increasing trend in the rural area. The disparity oftrends between the two regions should be considered for furtherstudy.

  17. Neogene north American-Caribbean plate boundary across Northern Central America: Offset along the polochic fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, Burke

    1983-12-01

    The Polochic fault was a segment of the North American-Caribbean plate boundary across Central America in the Neogene. Its 130 km of left slip was previously determined by matching structures and stratigraphie outcrop patterns of northwest and central Guatemala across the fault. Additional support for the model and the youthfulness of the recorded offset comes from an essentially perfect match of major geomorphic features across the fault. A reconstruction process which eliminates 123 km of left slip brings together rivers and drainage divides that existed before the Polochic became active. With the reconstruction carried across the isthmus on an east-west fault the regional structural geology assumes the coherent pattern of a continuous orogenic belt whose geometry is compatible with the model of collisional tectonics centered on the Motagua "suture zone". Confined within this belt, narrowed to some 60 km by the reconstruction, lie the major Laramide thrusts, folds and tectonically emplaced serpentinites of Guatemala. Crystalline rocks of Guatemala re-join the Chiapas Massif and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks, exposed in the core of an almost-continuous anticlinorium, extend from southern Chiapas to Lake Izabal. The Polochic does not bend in eastern Guatemala but continues eastward to the Motagua fault where it dies. Westward drift of the northern block resulted in rifting which extended from eastern Guatemala into the Caribbean along the Cayman trough. The Honduras depression may represent an element of a triple junction along with the Polochic and Izabal-Cayman rift. The Polochic continues westward into the Pacific Ocean and offsets the Middle America trench. The Polochic has offset the Miocene volcanic belt of northern Central America, confirming the previous estimate of a Neogene time of movement. About 300 km of relative east-west Neogene displacement has been recorded on the Mid-Cayman rise, only 130 km of which can be accounted for across the Polochic. It is

  18. Anti-gang policies and gang responses in the Northern Triangle : The Evolution of the Gang Phenomenon in Central America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Borgh, G.J.C.; Savenije, W.

    2014-01-01

    During the past decade, gangs have become a powerful and violent presence in El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, the ‘Northern Triangle’ of Central America. 1 The particular evolution of the gang phenomenon has been deeply shaped by a series of reactions and adaptations to ill-developed security po

  19. Effects of Bifenox, DCPA, and Napropamide on Ectomycorrhizal Development of Conifer Seedlings in Central and Northern Rocky Mountain Nurseries

    OpenAIRE

    United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service

    1985-01-01

    Postseeding and postgermination treatments with three weed control herbicides (Bifenox, DCPA, Napropamide) at two rates of application caused little reduction of ectomycorrhizal development on 1- and 2-year-old conifer seedlings in Central or Northern Rocky Mountain nurseries. In many cases, herbicide treatment increased ectomycorrhizal development, particularly with DCPA. In general, herbicide treatment effects on ectomycorrhizal development were species and nursery specific.

  20. Amelia Creek, Northern Territory, Australia: A 20 x 12 km Oblique Impact Structure with No Central Uplift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, F. A.; Mitchell, K.

    2003-02-01

    The Amelia Creek Structure is located in the Davenport Ranges of the Northern Territory, Australia at lat. 20 deg. 55 sec.S, long. 134 deg. 50 sec.E. Shock metamorphic features are developed on the southern, downrange side of the structure. No central uplift is developed and the dimensions of the impact structure are at least 20 X 12 km.

  1. [Ethnic conflicts and environmental degradation in Central Asia. The Ferghana valley and northern Kazakhstan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cordier, B

    1996-01-01

    This work seeks to demonstrate that the combination of ecological degradation, demographic pressure, and ethnic heterogeneity in Central Asia constitute a serious threat to the future stability of the region. The predominantly rural Ferghana Valley and Northern Kazakhstan suffer from shortages of water and land and from unemployment that leads to extensive out-migration to cities suffering from decline in their Soviet-era industries. The problem in the Ferghana Valley began with Tsarist conquest of the valley in 1876 and the subsequent imposition of cotton cultivation, which was greatly expanded by the Soviet Union. The Ferghana Valley, despite being a natural unit, was divided between Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Kyrgyzstan in the 1920s and 1930s, and remains divided between the independent states. The current population of 11 million is ethnically diverse, with Uzbeks in the majority and increasing most rapidly. Immigration from the Caucasus since 1950 added to the tension. Future peace will depend on such factors as whether the neo-Communist political regime chooses to incite ethnic hostilities, the manner in which land is redistributed, and the outcome of struggles for control of the flourishing narcotics trade. The northern Kazakhstan region was designated a pioneer wheat-growing region by Soviet planners in 1954. Russian and Ukrainian migrants established between 1954 and 1956 are today the predominant population sector, but feel their privileged position threatened by nationalist policies making Kazakh the official language and giving preference in employment to Kazakhs. Resettlement of Kazakhs from Mongolia, China, and Afghanistan in the region and the high Kazakh birth rate increase tensions. Grain production initially grew rapidly, but the mediocre soil and erosion-inducing constant dry winds have caused production to stagnate or decline. Regional disputes within Kazakhstan complicate the situation. Northern Kazakhstan, with its industrial development, is

  2. Latitudinal discontinuity in thermal conditions along the nearshore of central-northern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Fabian J; Largier, John L; Castillo, Manuel; Wieters, Evie A; Navarrete, Sergio A

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, evidence of abrupt latitudinal changes in the dynamics, structure and genetic variability of intertidal and subtidal benthic communities along central-northern Chile has been found consistently at 30-32°S. Changes in the advective and thermal environment in nearshore waters have been inferred from ecological patterns, since analyses of in situ physical data have thus far been missing. Here we analyze a unique set of shoreline temperature data, gathered over 4-10 years at 15 sites between 28-35°S, and combine it with satellite-derived winds and sea surface temperatures to investigate the latitudinal transition in nearshore oceanographic conditions suggested by recent ecological studies. Our results show a marked transition in thermal conditions at 30-31°S, superimposed on a broad latitudinal trend, and small-scale structures associated with cape-and-bay topography. The seasonal cycle dominated temperature variability throughout the region, but its relative importance decreased abruptly south of 30-31°S, as variability at synoptic and intra-seasonal scales became more important. The response of shoreline temperatures to meridional wind stress also changed abruptly at the transition, leading to a sharp drop in the occurrence of low-temperature waters at northern sites, and a concurrent decrease in corticated algal biomass. Together, these results suggest a limitation of nitrate availability in nearshore waters north of the transition. The localized alongshore change results from the interaction of latitudinal trends (e.g., wind stress, surface warming, inertial period) with a major headland-bay system (Punta Lengua de Vaca at 30.25°S), which juxtaposes a southern stretch of coast characterized by upwelling with a northern stretch of coast characterized by warm surface waters and stratification. This transition likely generates a number of latitude-dependent controls on ecological processes in the nearshore that can explain species

  3. Latitudinal discontinuity in thermal conditions along the nearshore of central-northern Chile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian J Tapia

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, evidence of abrupt latitudinal changes in the dynamics, structure and genetic variability of intertidal and subtidal benthic communities along central-northern Chile has been found consistently at 30-32°S. Changes in the advective and thermal environment in nearshore waters have been inferred from ecological patterns, since analyses of in situ physical data have thus far been missing. Here we analyze a unique set of shoreline temperature data, gathered over 4-10 years at 15 sites between 28-35°S, and combine it with satellite-derived winds and sea surface temperatures to investigate the latitudinal transition in nearshore oceanographic conditions suggested by recent ecological studies. Our results show a marked transition in thermal conditions at 30-31°S, superimposed on a broad latitudinal trend, and small-scale structures associated with cape-and-bay topography. The seasonal cycle dominated temperature variability throughout the region, but its relative importance decreased abruptly south of 30-31°S, as variability at synoptic and intra-seasonal scales became more important. The response of shoreline temperatures to meridional wind stress also changed abruptly at the transition, leading to a sharp drop in the occurrence of low-temperature waters at northern sites, and a concurrent decrease in corticated algal biomass. Together, these results suggest a limitation of nitrate availability in nearshore waters north of the transition. The localized alongshore change results from the interaction of latitudinal trends (e.g., wind stress, surface warming, inertial period with a major headland-bay system (Punta Lengua de Vaca at 30.25°S, which juxtaposes a southern stretch of coast characterized by upwelling with a northern stretch of coast characterized by warm surface waters and stratification. This transition likely generates a number of latitude-dependent controls on ecological processes in the nearshore that can explain

  4. Three-dimensional geometry and tectonostratigraphy of the Pennine zone, Central Alps, Switzerland and Northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxelon, Michael; Mancktelow, Neil S.

    2005-08-01

    Continental collision during Alpine orogenesis entailed a polyphase deformation history (D 1-D 5) in the Pennine zone of the Central Alps. The regional tectonostratigraphy was basically developed during D 1 and D 2, characterised by isoclinal, typically north-closing recumbent anticlines, separated by pinched-in synclines, on the scale of tens of kilometres. Later deformation phases (D 3 and D 4) warped the stack into wavy to open folds. Exhumation of this zone resulted locally in later vertical shortening and folding of already steep fabrics (D 5). Three-dimensional models of the nappe pile were constructed, based on geostatistical assessment of the regional foliation field and considering the abundant structural field data. These models indicate the existence of five principal tectonostratigraphic levels developed during D 1 and thus equivalent to nappe units s. str.: the Gotthard, the Leventina-Antigorio, the Maggia-Simano (and probably the Monte Leone as well as the Composite Lepontine Series), Lebendun-Soja and Adula-Cima Lunga levels. All these tectonic units formed part of the passive continental margin of Europe prior to the onset of the Alpine orogenesis. Individual isoclinal post-nappe folds reflect relative displacements on the order of 40 km or more. The most prominent D 2 post-nappe structure is the Wandfluhhorn Fold, structurally equivalent to the northern closure of the Leventina-Lucomagno Antiform. The Lebendun and Monte Leone folds are of similar magnitudes and also affect the whole nappe pile, whereas the smaller Mogno and Molare synforms only refold the Maggia-Simano nappe internally. Principal D 3 and D 4 structures are the tight Mergoscia Synform directly north of the Insubric Fault between Bellinzona and Locarno (Southern Steep Belt), the Maggia Steep Zone, forming the steep western limb of the Campo Tencia Synform and subdividing the Lepontine dome into the Simplon and Ticino subdomes, the Chiéra Synform steepening the dominant foliation in

  5. Crustal and Upper Mantle Investigations Using Receiver Functions and Tomographic Inversion in the Southern Puna Plateau Region of the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heit, B.; Yuan, X.; Bianchi, M.; Jakovlev, A.; Kumar, P.; Kay, S. M.; Sandvol, E. A.; Alonso, R.; Coira, B.; Comte, D.; Brown, L. D.; Kind, R.

    2011-12-01

    We present here the results obtained using the data form our passive seismic array in the southern Puna plateau between 25°S to 28°S latitude in Argentina and Chile. In first instance we have been able to calculate P and S receiver functions in order to investigate the Moho thickness and other seismic discontinuities in the study area. The RF data shows that the northern Puna plateau has a thicker crust and that the Moho topography is more irregular along strike. The seismic structure and thickness of the continental crust and the lithospheric mantle beneath the southern Puna plateau reveals that the LAB is deeper to the north of the array suggesting lithospheric removal towards the south. Later we performed a joint inversion of teleseismic and regional tomographic data in order to study the distribution of velocity anomalies that could help us to better understand the evolution of the Andean elevated plateau and the role of lithosphere-asthenosphere interactions in this region. Low velocities are observed in correlation with young volcanic centers (e.g. Ojos del Salado, Cerro Blanco, Galan) and agree very well with the position of crustal lineaments in the region. This is suggesting a close relationship between magmatism and lithospheric structures at crustal scale coniciding with the presence of hot asthenospheric material at the base of the crust probably induced by lithospheric foundering.

  6. Reactivation episodes of the romeral fault system in the northwestern part of central andes, colombia, through 39ar-40ar and k-ar results

    OpenAIRE

    VINASCO VALLEJO, CESAR JAVIER; Cordani, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    Direct dating of reactivation of the San Jerónimo Fault (SJF), easternmost limit of the Romeral fault system (RFS), is presented through 39Ar-40Ar and K-Ar results in neo-formed micas and mylonitic bands of strongly hidrothermalized gabbros. Published cooling and crystallization ages from sin-tectonic magmatic rocks exposed in the western fl ank of the Central Cordillera have suggest that tectonic evolution of the paleo-fault system began since Triassic and Lower Jurassic before the installat...

  7. Seismic imaging of the upper mantle beneath the northern Central Andean Plateau: Implications for surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, K. M.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Wagner, L. S.

    2015-12-01

    Extending over 1,800 km along the active South American Cordilleran margin, the Central Andean Plateau (CAP) as defined by the 3 km elevation contour is second only to the Tibetan Plateau in geographic extent. The uplift history of the 4 km high Plateau remains uncertain with paleoelevation studies along the CAP suggesting a complex, non-uniform uplift history. As part of the Central Andean Uplift and the Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project, we use surface waves measured from ambient noise and two-plane wave tomography to image the S-wave velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle to investigate the upper mantle component of plateau uplift. We observe three main features in our S-wave velocity model including (1), a high velocity slab (2), a low velocity anomaly above the slab where the slab changes dip from near horizontal to a normal dip, and (3), a high-velocity feature in the mantle above the slab that extends along the length of the Altiplano from the base of the Moho to a depth of ~120 km with the highest velocities observed under Lake Titicaca. A strong spatial correlation exists between the lateral extent of this high-velocity feature beneath the Altiplano and the lower elevations of the Altiplano basin suggesting a potential relationship. Non-uniqueness in our seismic models preclude uniquely constraining this feature as an uppermost mantle feature bellow the Moho or as a connected eastward dipping feature extending up to 300 km in the mantle as seen in deeper mantle tomography studies. Determining if the high velocity feature represents a small lithospheric root or a delaminating lithospheric root extending ~300 km into the mantle requires more integration of observations, but either interpretation shows a strong geodynamic connection with the uppermost mantle and the current topography of the northern CAP.

  8. Digital resource modeling of the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions: Top producing coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruppert, L.; Tewalt, S.; Bragg, L.; Wallack, R.; Jenkins, J.; Tully, J. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The US Geological Survey is currently conducting a coal resource assessment of the coal beds and zones that are expected to provide the bulk of the Nation`s coal resources for the next few decades. In partnership with the state geologic surveys of Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Maryland, six coal beds will be digitally assessed in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal region. In ascending stratigraphic order, the beds which range from the Lower Pennsylvanian Pocahontas Formation to the Upper Pennsylvanian Monongahela Group are the Pocahontas No. 3, Pond Creek, Fire Clay, Lower Kittanning, Upper Freeport, and Pittsburgh coals. Comprehensive stratigraphic and geochemical databases have been developed for the coal beds. Maps that show the extent and mined areas of the beds, structure contour, isopach, and overburden thickness have been compiled for the Pittsburgh coal bed and are in preparation for the other coal beds. The resource model for the Pittsburgh coal bed indicates that of the original 33.6 billion short tons (30.5 billion tonnes) of Pittsburgh coal, approximately 15.9 billion short tons (14.4 billion tonnes) remain. The remaining coal is, however, higher in ash and sulfur, and generally thinner and under thicker overburden cover.

  9. Prevalence of Toxocara ova in some schools and public grounds in northern and central Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo-Shehada, M N

    1989-02-01

    Two hundred and twenty-six soil samples were collected from school playgrounds and public places in four cities and 17 villages in northern and central Jordan. Toxacara eggs were found in 35 (15.45%) of the samples. Viable eggs were found in 18 samples, with viability ranging from 20 to 78%, and among these 18 samples the mean number of viable eggs per 5 g soil was 5.5 +/- 4.58 S.D. (range one to 15 eggs). Nine of 94 samples collected from public places and five of 86 samples collected from schools contained Toxocara eggs. Viable eggs were found in higher proportions of soils collected from villages around Jerash (three of 21) and Irbid (five of 44), and from Yarmouk University campus (four of 37), than of soils collected from cities (six of 124), but the differences are not significant (P less than 0.05). Eggs of Taenia spp., Hymenolepis diminuta and Ascaris lumbricoides were also recovered, in 34, 15 and nine samples respectively of the 226 examined. PMID:2596905

  10. Polyphase Neoproterozoic orogenesis within the east Africa- Antarctica orogenic belt in central and northern Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, R.M.; Pitfield, P.E.J.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Goodenough, K.M.; Waele, D.; Schofield, D.I.; Bauer, W.; Horstwood, M.S.A.; Styles, M.T.; Conrad, J.; Encarnacion, J.; Lidke, D.J.; O'connor, E. A.; Potter, C.; Smith, R.A.; Walsh, G.J.; Ralison, A.V.; Randriamananjara, T.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Rabarimanana, M.

    2011-01-01

    Our recent geological survey of the basement of central and northern Madagascar allowed us to re-evaluate the evolution of this part of the East Africa-Antarctica Orogen (EAAO). Five crustal domains are recognized, characterized by distinctive lithologies and histories of sedimentation, magmatism, deformation and metamorphism, and separated by tectonic and/or unconformable contacts. Four consist largely of Archaean metamorphic rocks (Antongil, Masora and Antananarivo Cratons, Tsaratanana Complex). The fifth (Bemarivo Belt) comprises Proterozoic meta-igneous rocks. The older rocks were intruded by plutonic suites at c. 1000 Ma, 820-760 Ma, 630-595 Ma and 560-520 Ma. The evolution of the four Archaean domains and their boundaries remains contentious, with two end-member interpretations evaluated: (1) all five crustal domains are separate tectonic elements, juxtaposed along Neoproterozoic sutures and (2) the four Archaean domains are segments of an older Archaean craton, which was sutured against the Bemarivo Belt in the Neoproterozoic. Rodinia fragmented during the early Neoproterozoic with intracratonic rifts that sometimes developed into oceanic basins. Subsequent Mid- Neoproterozoic collision of smaller cratonic blocks was followed by renewed extension and magmatism. The global 'Terminal Pan-African' event (560-490 Ma) finally stitched together the Mid-Neoproterozoic cratons to form Gondwana. ?? The Geological Society of London 2011.

  11. Temperature Characterization of Different Urban Microhabitats of Aedes albopictus (Diptera Culicidae) in Central-Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallorani, Roberto; Angelini, Paola; Bellini, Romeo; Carrieri, Marco; Crisci, Alfonso; Mascali Zeo, Silvia; Messeri, Gianni; Venturelli, Claudio

    2015-08-01

    Aedes albopictus (Skuse) is an invasive mosquito species that has spread to many countries in temperate regions bordering the Mediterranean basin, where it is becoming a major public health concern. A good knowledge of the thermal features of the most productive breeding sites for Ae. albopictus is crucial for a better estimation of the mosquitoes' life cycle and developmental rates. In this article, we address the problem of predicting air temperature in three microhabitats common in urban and suburban areas and the air and water temperature inside an ordinary catch basin, which is considered the most productive breeding site for Ae. albopictus in Italy. Temperature differences were statistically proven between the three microhabitats and between the catch basin external and internal temperature. The impacts on the developmental rates for each life stage of Ae. albopictus were tested through a parametric function of the temperature, and the aquatic stages resulted as being the most affected using the specific temperature inside a typical catch basin instead of a generic air temperature. The impact of snow cover on the catch basin internal temperature, and consequently on the mortality of diapausing eggs, was also evaluated. These data can be useful to improve epidemiological models for a better prediction of Ae. albopictus seasonal and population dynamics in central-northern Italian urban areas. PMID:26314064

  12. Unconformity related traps and production, Lower Cretaceous through Mississippian Strata, central and northern Rocky Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolson, J. (Amoco Production Co., Denver, CO (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Unconformities provide a useful means of equating stratigraphic traps between basins. Systematic mapping can define new concepts through analogy, often from geographically separate areas. Lower Cretaceous through Mississippian surfaces in the central and northern Rockies provide examples. Late Mississippian and Early Pennsylvanian surfaces formed at least four paleodrainage basins separated by the Transcontinental arch. Tyler Formation valley fills (Montana, North Dakota) have produced more than 100 million BOE. Analogous targets in Utah remain untested, but the Mid-Continent Morrow trend continues to yield new reserves. Permian and Triassic paleodrainages filled primarily with seals and form regional traps. A breached Madison trap (Mississippian, Colorado), more than 350 million BOE (Permian Minnelusa, Wyoming), more than 8 billion BOE (from the White Rim Sandstone tar deposits Permian Utah), and eastern Williston basin (Mississippian) are examples. Minor basal valley fill trapping also occurs. Transgressive carbonate facies changes have trapped more than 40 million BOE (Permian Phosphoria Formation, Wyoming). Additional deep gas potential exists. Jurassic unconformities control seal distribution over Nugget Sandstone (Jurassic) reservoirs and partially control Mississippian porosity on the Sweetgrass arch (Montana). Minor paleohill trapping also occurs. Lower Cretaceous surfaces have trapped nearly 2 billion BOE hydrocarbons in 10 paleodrainage networks. Undrilled paleodrainage basins remain deep gas targets. The systematic examination of Rocky Mountain unconformities has been understudied. New exploration concepts and reserve additions await the creative interpreter.

  13. Surface pollen and vegetation reconstruction from central and northern mountains of Taiwan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Surface pollen from various montane vegetations in Shalixian Mt. and Lepei Mt. of central and northern Taiwan have been explored and analyzed. The pollen data were used to simulate vegetation types by using the biomisation technique. Computing three matrixes of pollen taxa, plant functional types and combined biomes, vegetation types at each site have been finally defined through the fuzz selections of a tie-breaking rule. The results show that surface pollen data can simulate the subtropical Castanopsis and Cyclobalanopsis forests, alpine warm-temperate Quercus and Quercus-Pinus forests, and alpine temperate/cool-temperate conifers of Tsuga-Picea and Picea-Abies forests. Simulated elevations of the forests are similar to actual locations of the forests. This study can add vertical surface pollen data for extending investigation of various vegetation types in China, provide PFT schemes and vegetation types in low-latitude and montane areas, and be applied as modern analogues for fossil pollen in order to reconstruct Quaternary vegetations.

  14. Hydrothermal alteration studies of gabbros from Northern Central Indian Ridge and their geodynamic implications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dwijesh Ray; Catherine Mevel; Ranadip Banerjee

    2009-12-01

    Mylonitic gabbro and altered gabbro were recovered from off-axis high and corner high locations at ridge-transform intersection, adjacent to Vityaz transform fault of the slow spreading (32–35mm/yr, full spreading) Northern Central Indian Ridge. Both the varieties show signatures of extensive alteration caused due to interaction with sea water. Mylonitic gabbro represents high temperature metamorphism (∼700–800° C) and comprised of hornblende mineral which exhibits well defined foliation/gneissic appearance along with dynamically recrystallised plagioclase grains frequently intercalated with magnetite-ilmenite. Altered gabbro from corner high generally includes low temperature greenschist grade (∼300° C) mineralogical assemblages: chlorite, albite, quartz and locally magnesio hornblende. Crystal plastic deformation resulted in mylonite formation and often porphyroclasts of plagioclase and clinopyroxene grains, while altered gabbro locally exhibits cataclastic texture. Presence of Vityaz transform fault and adjacent megamullion at the weakly magmatic ridge-transform intersection and off-axis high locations prompted the present scenario very much conducive for hydrothermal circulation and further facilitate the exhumation of present suite of gabbro.

  15. Importance of water quality on plant abundance and diversity in high-alpine meadows of the Yerba Loca Natural Sanctuary at the Andes of north-central Chile Importancia de la calidad del agua sobre la abundancia y diversidad vegetal en vegas altoandinas del Santuario Natural Yerba Loca en los Andes de Chile centro-norte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROSANNA GINOCCHIO

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Porphyry Cu-Mo deposits have influenced surface water quality in high-Andes of north-central Chile since the Miocene. Water anomalies may reduce species abundance and diversity in alpine meadows as acidic and metal-rich waters are highly toxic to plants The study assessed the importance of surface water quality on plant abundance and diversity in high-alpine meadows at the Yerba Loca Natural Santuary (YLNS, central Chile (33°15' S, 70°18' W. Hydrochemical and plant prospecting were carried out on Piedra Carvajal, Chorrillos del Plomo and La Lata meadows the growing seasons of 2006 and 2007. Direct gradient analysis was performed through canonical correspondence analysis (CCA to look for relationships among water chemistry and plant factors. High variability in water chemistry was found inside and among meadows, particularly for pH, sulphate, electric conductivity, hardness, and total dissolved Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb and Fe. Data on species abundance and water chemical factors suggests that pH and total dissolved Cu are very important factor determining changes in plant abundance and diversity in study meadows. For instance, Festuca purpurascens, Colobanthus quitensis, and Arenaria rivularis are abundant in habitals with Cu-rich waters while Festuca magellanica, Patosia clandestina, Plantago barbata, Werneria pygmea, and Erigeron andícola are abundant in habitals with dilute waters.Los megadepósitos de pórfidos de Cu-Mo han influido sobre la calidad de las aguas superficiales en las zonas altoandinas del centro-norte de Chile desde el Mioceno. Estas alteraciones en la calidad de las aguas podrían afectar negativamente a la vegetación presente en las vegas altoandinas, ya que las aguas acidas y ricas en metales son altamente tóxicas para las plantas. En este estudio se evaluó el efecto de la calidad de las aguas en la abundancia y diversidad florística de las vegas altoandinas del Santuario de la Naturaleza Yerba Loca (SNYL, en Chile central (33

  16. Field study and three-dimensional reconstruction of thrusts and strike-slip faults in the Central Andes: implications for deep-seated geothermal circulation and ore deposits exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norini, Gianluca; Groppelli, Gianluca; Giordano, Guido; Baez, Walter; Becchio, Raul; Viramonte, Jose; Arnosio, Marcelo

    2014-05-01

    The Puna plateau (NW Argentina), located in the back-arc of the Central Andes, is a plateau characterized by both orogen-parallel and orogen-oblique deformation styles, extensive magmatic and geothermal activity, and the broad occurrence of igneous and hydrothermal ore-forming minerals. In this area, like in other convergent margins, the behaviour of the magma-tectonics interplay can affect the circulation of hydrothermal fluids, so that the full comprehension of the tectonic control on the magmas and fluids paths in the continental crust is crucial to plan the geothermal and ore exploration. In this study, we present a structural analysis of the back-arc portion of the orogen-oblique Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system and the surrounding orogen-parallel thrust faults in the central-eastern Puna Plateau, comprising the Cerro Tuzgle-Tocomar geothermal volcanic area, with high geothermal potential, and silicic calderas and domes associated with epithermal ore deposits. We also focused on the tectonic and volcanotectonic structures of the Chimpa and Tuzgle stratovolcanoes, two of the most important polygenetic volcanic centres of the plateau. Morphostructural analysis and field mapping reveal the geometry, kinematics and dynamics of the tectonic structures of the studied area. These data and the available stratigraphic and geophysical data have been integrated with the software MOVE and PETREL in a three-dimensional reconstruction of the main fault planes, showing their attitude and intersections at depth. As a result of our study, we show that despite different geometry and kinematics of the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro fault system and the thrust faults, they formed and evolved under the same progressive evolving dynamic state, forming a single tectonic system and accommodating crustal shortening of a thickened crust. In this frame, the crust underwent simultaneous deformation along both the low-angle thrust faults and the vertical transcurrent strike-slip faults

  17. Between Constraints and Coercion. Marriage and Social Reproduction in Northern and central Italy, 18th-19th Centuries.

    OpenAIRE

    Renzo Derosas; Marco Breschi; Alessio Fornasin; Matteo Manfredini; Cristina Munno

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we review the main theories of household and marriage systems, highlighting their inability to account for the astonishing variety of family and marriage patterns that characterized modern Italy. We propose a new interpretative framework, where social reproduction is given pride of place as the main factor shaping marital behavior and household formation in the past. We test our theory analyzing five populations in northern and central Italy, characterized by different ecologica...

  18. Limnological characteristics of Northern and Central Yakutian lakes (Siberia) – Physical and chemical properties of surface sediments and water samples

    OpenAIRE

    Kausche, Moritz

    2008-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of surface sediments and waters of 65 lakes in Northern and Central Yakutia were analysed. The studies included hydrochemical analyses as well as sedimentological, organic and inorganic geochemical analyses, the analysis of stable carbon isotope ratios and the analysis of magnetic susceptibilities. The objectives of this work were a) to characterise Yakutian lakes by their waters and surface sediments. Additionally, the geographical setting, i.e. the clima...

  19. A new report of serpentinites from Northern Central Indian Ridge (at 6 degrees S) - An implication for hydrothermal activity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, Dwijesh; Banerjee, R.; Iyer, S.D.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    . 1213-1222 ACTA GEOLOGICA SINICA Dec. 2008 A New Report of Serpentinites from Northern Central Indian Ridge (at 6"s) - An Implication for Hydrothermal Activity Dwijesh RAY', Ranadip BANEWEE', *, Sridhar D. IYER' and Subir MUKHOPADHYAY~ 1 Geological... their sparse petrographic descriptions. While, their detailed mineralogy, mineral chemistry and whole- rock chemistry are still lacking for several sites of the spreading ridge segments. Here we detail a new report on the mineralogy, crystal chemistry...

  20. Volcano-Hydrothermal Systems of the Central and Northern Kuril Island Arc - a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalacheva, E.; Taran, Y.; Voloshina, E.; Ptashinsky, L.

    2015-12-01

    More than 20 active volcanoes with historical eruptions are known on 17 islands composing the Central and Northern part of the Kurilian Arc. Six islands - Paramushir, Shiashkotan, Rasshua, Ushishir, Ketoy and Simushir - are characterized by hydrothermal activity, complementary to the fumarolic activity in their craters. There are several types of volcano-hydrothermal systems on the islands. At Paramushir, Shiashkotan and Ketoy the thermal manifestations are acidic to ultra-acidic water discharges associated with hydrothermal aquifers inside volcano edifices and formed as the result of the absorption of magmatic gases by ground waters. A closest known analogue of such activity is Satsuma-Iwojima volcano-island at the Ryukyu Arc. Another type of hydrothermal activity are wide spread coastal hot springs (Shiashkotan, Rasshua), situated as a rule within tide zones and formed by mixing of the heated seawater with cold groundwater or, in opposite, by mixing of the steam- or conductively heated groundwater with seawater. This type of thermal manifestation is similar to that reported for other volcanic islands of the world (Satsuma Iwojima, Monserrat, Ischia, Socorro). Ushishir volcano-hydrothermal system is formed by the absorption of magmatic gases by seawater. Only Ketoy Island hosts a permanent acidic crater lake. At Ebeko volcano (Paramushir) rapidly disappearing small acidic lakes (formed after phreatic eruptions) have been reported. The main hydrothermal manifestation of Simushir is the Zavaritsky caldera lake with numerous coastal thermal springs and weak steam vents. The last time measured temperatures of fumaroles at the islands are: >500ºC at Pallas Peak (Ketoy), 480ºC at Kuntamintar volcano (Shiashkotan), variable and fast changing temperatures from 120º C to 500ºC at Ebeko volcano (Paramushir), 150ºC in the Rasshua crater, and > 300ºC in the Chirpoy crater (Black Brothers islands). The magmatic and rock-forming solute output by the Kurilian volcano

  1. Glass and Mineral Chemistry of Northern Central Indian Ridge Basalts: Compositional Diversity and Petrogenetic Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dwijesh RAY; Ranadip BANERJEE; Sridhar D IYER; Basavaraju BASAVALINGU; Subir MUKHOPADHYAY

    2009-01-01

    The glass and mineral chemistry of basalts examined from the northern central Indian ridge (NCIR) provides an insight into magma genesis around the vicinity of two transform faults: Vityaz (VT) and Vema (VM). The studied mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs) from the outer ridge flank (VT area) and a near-ridge seamount (VM area) reveal that they are moderately phyric plagioclase basalts composed of plagioclase (phenocryst [An_(60-90)] and groundmass [An_(35-79)]), olivine (FO_(81-88)), diopside (Wo_(45-51), En_(25-37), Fs_(14-24)), and titanomagnetite (FeO_t~63.75 wt% and TiO_2 ~22.69 wt%). The whole-rock composition of these basalts has similar Mg# [mole Mg/mole(Mg+Fe~(2+)] (VT basalt: ~0.56-0.58; VM basalt: ~0.57), but differ in their total alkali content (VT basalt: ~2.65; VM basalt: ~3.24). The bulk composition of the magma was gradually depleted in MgO and enriched in FeO_t, TiO_2, P_2O_5, and Na_2O with progressive fractionation, the basalts were gradually enriched in Y and Zr and depleted in Ni and Cr. In addition, the ΣREE of magma also increased with fractionation, without any change in the (La/ Yb)_N value. Glass from the VM seamount shows more fractionated characters (Mg#: 0.56-0.57) compared to the outer ridge flank lava of the VT area (Mg#: 0.63-0.65). This study concludes that present basalts experienced low-pressure crystallization at a relatively shallow depth. The geochemical changes in the NCIR magmas resulted from fractional crystallization at a shallow depth. As a consequence, spinel was the first mineral to crystallize at a pressure 10 kbar, followed by Fe-rich olivine at <10 kbar pressure.

  2. Entomological and parasitological study on phlebotomine sandflies in central and northern Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velo E.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available An entomological survey was carried out in two districts of central (Kruje and northern (Lezhe Albania. Six collecting sites, showing a variety of diurnal resting sites, were monitored for adult sandflies from June through October 2002. Flies were collected with CDC miniature light traps, sticky traps and mechanical or hand aspirators in peridomestic sites, in bedrooms and inside cow barns, chicken coops and pigpens. All collecting sites monitored were found positive for sandflies. A total of 849 specimens were caught (29.2 % males belonging to five Phlebotomus species. Phlebotomus neglectus (75.6 % was the most abundant species followed by P. perfiliewi (14.4 %, P. papatasi (4.6 %, P. tobbi (3.6 % and P. similis (1.8 %. The first adult of P. neglectus appeared on June 11 and the last one was collected on October 16. The highest density for this species was observed at the end of July. A total of 111 blood-fed females were caught from the two areas studied. P. neglectus was the only species found blood fed in Lezhe and the same species was prevalent (56.1 % in Kruje followed by P. perfiliewi (30.3 %, P. tobbi (10.6 %; P. papatasi was represented by only two specimens. Blood meal origin was determined in 45/66 (68.2 % of the females tested from Kruje district. P. neglectus was found fed on four hosts, showing the following feeding patterns: cow (71.4 %, dog (17.1 %, chicken (5.7 % and human (5.7 % ; P. perfiliewi was found fed on cow (80.0 % and chicken (20.0 %, P. tobbi on cow (50.0 %, chicken (25.0 % and dog (25.0 %. One specimen of P. papatasi was found fed on cow. When such prevalences were analysed by the available biomass for each host present at the collecting site, P. neglectus resulted to be an opportunistic feeder rather than exhibiting preferences for any specific animal. PCR analysis of 39 P. neglectus from the Lezhe district gave negative results for the presence of Leishmania DNA.

  3. Late Miocene (Pannonian) Vegetation from the Northern Part of Central Paratethys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kováčová, M.; Doláková, N.

    2009-04-01

    During Late Miocene, the Western Carpathian paleogeography started to change. The Lake Pannon retreated southwards, and the northern coast of the back arc basin was slightly elevated due to progradation of deltaic and alluvial facies, especially in the lowlands. The studied „Pannonian lake" sediments come from the Czech and Slovak parts of Central Paratethys. Changes of the sedimentary environment from deep to shallow lake and deltaic environment, followed by development of alluvial plains were noticed. Salinity crisis due to Paratethys isolation led to development of total freshwater environment to the end of this period. Samples from 3 surficial localities and 15 boreholes were palynologically studied. Occasional occurences of Dinoflagellates indicate a slightly higher salinity, whereas green algae Pediastrum, aquatic ferns Azolla, and aquatic and coastal plants (Nelumbo, Nymphaea, Myriophyllum, Sparganium, Potamogeton, Cyperaceae etc.) represent a freshwater environment. Due to paleogeographic changes and climatic oscillations the number of thermophilous taxa decreased and some of them disappeared completely from this area (f. e. Sapotaceae, Palmae). Mostly broad-leaved deciduous elements of mixed mesophytic forests (Quercus, Celtis, Carya, Tilia, Carpinus, Betula, Juglans) with some thermophilous elements admixture of Engelhardia, Castanea, Trigonobalanopsis, Symplocos, Cornaceaepollis satzveyensis generally dominate. Variously high relief of the uplifted mountainy chains created ideal conditions for higher presence of extrazonal vegetation (Cedrus, Tsuga, Picea, Cathaya) in the investigated area. Zonal type of vegetation including marshes, riparian forests with Alnus, Salix, Pterocarya, Liquidambar, Betula, Fraxinus, shrubs and lianas on dryer substrates associated riparian forest (Buxus, Ericaceae, Vitaceae, Lonicera, Rosaceae type Rubus), and coastal swamps with Taxodiaceae, Nyssa, Myrica, Sciadopitys were growing in the floodplain lowlands of Vienna Basin

  4. Fishing management scenarios to rebuild exploited resources and ecosystems of the Northern-Central Adriatic (Mediterranean Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouzai, Nadia; Coll, Marta; Palomera, Isabel; Santojanni, Alberto; Arneri, Enrico; Christensen, Villy

    2012-10-01

    We examined various fishing management options to recover exploited marine resources and ecosystems of the Northern-Central Adriatic Sea. Dynamic simulations were based on a spatial ecological model previously calibrated with time series of data. Scenarios regarding spatial management were evaluated with the establishment of two marine protected areas, respectively, in the Pomo pit and the northern region. In addition, three temporal simulations of temporary closures and overall reduction of fishing effort of demersal and pelagic fleets (bottom, mid-water trawls and purse seines) were also considered. Simulations were run for 45 years (1975-2020), including the calibration period (1975-2002), and changes in biomass and catch of marine resources were analyzed. Our results confirm that current fishing management in the Adriatic Sea does not have clear beneficial impacts for the recovery of exploited resources, which will remain depleted in 2020 if "business as usual" continues. Simulations of alternative management suggest that both protected areas could be beneficial for fish population recovery predicting an increase in the biomass of commercial fish and predatory organisms. Simulations of temporary closures and overall reduction of fishing effort also show significant benefits for several commercial resources. We argue that both management measures may be effective tools to recover exploited ecosystems of the Northern-Central Adriatic Sea and halt the decline of marine resources.

  5. Direction and timing of uplift propagation in the Peruvian Andes deduced from molecular phylogenetics of highland biotaxa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Damien; Sempere, Thierry; Plantard, Olivier

    2008-07-01

    Physical paleoaltimetric methods are increasingly used to estimate the amount and timing of surface uplift in orogens. Because the rise of mountains creates new ecosystems and triggers evolutionary changes, biological data may also be used to assess the development and timing of regional surface uplift. Here we apply this idea to the Peruvian Andes through a molecular phylogeographic and phylochronologic analysis of Globodera pallida, a potato parasite nematode that requires cool temperatures and thus thrives above 2.0-2.5 km in these tropical highlands. The Peruvian populations of this species exhibit a clear evolutionary pattern with deeper, more ancient lineages occurring in Andean southern Peru and shallower, younger lineages occurring progressively northwards. Genetically diverging G. pallida populations thus progressively colonized highland areas as these were expanding northwards, demonstrating that altitude in the Peruvian Andes was acquired longitudinally from south to north, i.e. in the direction of decreasing orogenic volume. This phylogeographic structure is recognized in other, independent highland biotaxa, and point to the Central Andean Orocline (CAO) as the region where high altitudes first emerged. Moreover, molecular clocks relative to Andean taxa, including the potato-tomato group, consistently estimate that altitudes high enough to induce biotic radiation were first acquired in the Early Miocene. After calibration by geological and biological tie-points and intervals, the phylogeny of G. pallida is used as a molecular clock, which estimates that the 2.0-2.5 km threshold elevation range was reached in the Early Miocene in southernmost Peru, in the Middle and Late Miocene in the Abancay segment (NW southern Peru), and from the latest Miocene in central and northern Peru. Although uncertainties attached to phylochronologic ages are significantly larger than those derived from geochronological methods, these results are fairly consistent with coeval

  6. Tracing the Laacher See Tephra in the varved sediment record of the Trzechowskie palaeolake in central Northern Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Sabine Wulf; Florian Ott; Michal Slowinski; A. M. Noryskiewicz; Nadine Dräger; Celia Martin-Puertas; Markus Czymzik; Ina Neugebauer; Peter Dulski; A.J. Bourne; M. Błaszkiewicz; Achim Brauer

    2013-01-01

    Tephrochronological studies of partly varved sediments of Trzechowskie palaeolake in central Northern Poland led to the finding of the Late Allerød Laacher See Tephra (LST) from the Eifel Volcanic Field for the first time in a very distal site ca 840 km ENE from its volcanic source. The detection of glass shards of the LST involved a comprehensive combination of techniques, i.e. biostratigraphical constrains, high-resolution μ-XRF core scanning and areal μ-XRF mapping of impregnated sediment ...

  7. Chrysotile asbestos quantification in serpentinite quarries: a case study in Valmalenco, central Alps, northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    Outcrops of serpentinites are usually strongly fractured and cataclastic, and the rock can only be used as ballast. However, in rare cases, like in Valmalenco (Central Alps, Northern Italy), fractures are regular and well spaced, and the rock mass has good geotechnical quality, ideal conditions for the extraction of dimension stone blocks. The Valmalenco Serpentinite is marketed worldwide as dimension and decorative stone, with remarkable mechanical properties and pleasing colours and textures. However, the same area was once subject to chrysotile asbestos mining, in the form of discrete veins along the main discontinuities of the rock mass. For this reason, airborne asbestos contamination can occur during the extraction and processing cycle of the rocks, therefore it is essential to locate and quantify asbestos in the rock mass, to reduce as much as possible the exposure risk. The first step was a detailed geostructural survey of each quarry, in order to characterize the main discontinuities (orientation, spacing, linear persistence, opening, filling), with special attention to the identification of fibrous minerals. The surveys was followed by extensive sampling of massive rocks, mineralized veins and fillings of fractures, and the cutting sludge derived from diamond wire cutting. Preliminary qualitative XRPD was performed on all samples, while quantitative analysis was carried out on the most representative samples of the main rock mass discontinuities. On the other hand, XRPD is not effective in the identification of asbestos percentages of less than 2% by weight, and the accurate distinction among the various serpentine polymorphs (antigorite, lizardite, chrysotile) is very difficult (if not impossible) when they are simultaneously present, due to their very similar basic structure and the strong structural disorder. The same samples were then analyzed by SEM-EDS (fiber counting after filtration on a polycarbonate filter), for a better distinction between

  8. Paleomagnetic evidence of earliest Paleocene deformation in Calama (˜22°S), northern Chile: Andean-type or ridge-collision tectonics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoza, R.; Tomlinson, A. J.; Caffe, P. J.; Vilas, J. F.

    2012-08-01

    A paleomagnetic study from the earliest Paleocene Cerros de Montecristo Quartz Monzonite and its Jurassic to uppermost Cretaceous host rock (northern Chile, ˜22°S) provided high-temperature, high-coercivity magnetizations of dominantly reversed polarity. The remanences of the tilted host rock gave a negative fold-test and are indistinguishable from the remanences found in the pluton, indicating that the uppermost Cretaceous rocks underwent deformation before intrusion of the earliest Paleocene pluton, thus documenting a K-T deformation at the locality. Although this deformation may be another product of typical subduction-related noncollisional tectonics in the Central Andes, an alternative hypothesis, permitted by plate reconstructions, is that the event was associated with collision of an oceanic plate boundary. This latter hypothesis may also provide a context for several other tectonic events from northern Chile to the Patagonian Andes, wherein deformation would the consequence of a southward migrating triple junction between the latest Maastrichtian and Early Eocene.

  9. Characterization of Potential Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria Isolated from Maize (Zea mays L. in Central and Northern Benin (West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadège A. Agbodjato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our study aims to characterize Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR isolated from maize roots in five agroecological zones of central and northern Benin. Sixty samples were collected at the rate of four samples per village and three villages per agroecological zone. Rhizobacteria strains were isolated from these samples and biochemically characterized. These strains were analyzed for some of their PGPR traits like ammonia production and hydrogen cyanide following conventional methods. Microbiological investigation of these samples has shown that maize rhizospheres in central and northern Benin contain a high diversity of microorganisms. A total of nine species of maize Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria were identified. Those PGPR include five Bacillus species (B. polymyxa, B. pantothenticus, B. anthracis, B. thuringiensis, and B. circulans, three Pseudomonas species (P. cichorii, P. putida, and P. syringae, and Serratia marcescens. The microbial diversity does not depend on the soil types. The microbial density, generally high, varies according to both soil types and agroecological zones. All Serratia strains (100% have produced ammonia, whereas 80% of Bacillus and 77.77% of Pseudomonas produced this metabolite. The hydrogen cyanide was produced by all isolates (100% independent of their genus. These results suggest the possibility to use these rhizobacteria as biological fertilizers to increase maize production.

  10. The upper Pleistocene on the northern face of the Guadarrama Mountains (central Spain): Palaeoclimatic phases and glacial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullón, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    The present paper provides new information on Pleistocene glacial activity in a mountainous area of the Iberian Central System. A sediment analysis associated with Pleistocene modelling was carried out using: (1) granulometric and morphometric procedures, (2) quartz grain microtexture techniques (SEM) to discriminate between glacial and no glacial origins of sediments, (3) clay X-ray diffraction study to determine intra-Pleistocene climate variability, and (4) optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) absolute dating. The results show that the sediments were formed in two different phases associated with glacial dynamics, one of them was 35-30 ky BP and another was 25-20 ky BP, separated by a short intermediate warm-wet period. Identification of glacial phenomena is new for the northern slopes of the Guadarrama Mountains (facing the north Meseta, Duero basin), although they are not unusual within the general context of the Iberian Central System. From the data provided, we deduce that glaciation in these mountains was much more intense and widespread than had previously been thought because, on the northern slopes, glaciers occupied large areas reaching the base of the mountains. The evidence favours new interpretations of Pleistocene morphology in the centre of the Iberian Peninsula and, by extension, on the southwestern edge of Europe; it also highlights the sensitivity of mountainous areas with regard to Quaternary climate changes.

  11. 78 FR 24228 - Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... review and comment following the announcement in the Federal Register on October 29, 2012 ] (77 FR 65574... Fish and Wildlife Service Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Final... conservation plan and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) for the Lake Andes National Wildlife...

  12. Two New Species of Black Flies (Diptera: Simuliidae) from the High Andes of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Juan S; Moncada, Ligia I; Matta, Nubia E; Adler, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    The females, males, pupae, and larvae of two new species of Simulium are described and illustrated from a small stream 3950 m above sea level in the Lake Otún area of the Colombian Andes Mountains. Simulium (Pternaspatha) quimbayium n. sp. represents a 630-km northeastern extension of the distributional range of previously known members of the subgenus Pternaspatha, and Simulium (Psilopelmia) machetorum n. sp. represents the highest altitude recorded for a species of the subgenus Psilopelmia. These species illustrate the unique simuliid biodiversity in the páramo ecosystem of the high northern Andes.

  13. Jurassic and Cretaceous clays of the northern and central North Sea hydrocarbon reservoirs reviewed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, M.; Haszeldine, R.S.; Fallick, A.E.

    2006-03-15

    The principal clays of the northern and central North Sea are illite (sometimes with interlayered smectite) and kaolin. Chlorite is only locally important. Although it has been proposed that kaolin within North Sea sandstones is detrital in origin, the majority of workers have concluded that it is authigenic, largely the product of feldspar alteration. Kaolin is found within a wide range of sedimentary settings (and within shales) apparently defying the notion that kaolin is an indicator of meteoric water deposition. Within sandstones, the earliest authigenic kaolin has a vermiform morphology, the distribution of which is controlled by the availability of detrital mica to act as a nucleus, and the composition of the post-depositional porewaters. This vermiform kaolin formed in meteoric water, the presence of which is easily accounted for below sub-aerial exposure surfaces in non-marine formations, and below unconformities over marine units. In fully marine sands, and even marine shale units, kaolin still occurs. It has therefore been suggested that even these locations have been flushed with meteoric water. Early vermiform kaolin recrystallizes to a more blocky morphology as burial proceeds, at least in the Brent Group. Blocky kaolin has been reported as growing before, synchronously with, and after the formation of quartz overgrowths, though oxygen isotope studies support low-temperature growth, pre-quartz. Blocky kaolin may form during meteoric flushing associated with lower Cretaceous uplift and erosion, though it is found in fault blocks that are thought to have remained below sea level. Here, the kaolin may form in stagnant meteoric water, relics of the post-depositional porewater. It has also been proposed that the blocky kaolin grew in ascending basinal waters charged with carboxylic acids and CO{sub 2}, though this hypothesis is not supported by stable oxygen isotope data. Some of the blocky kaolin is dickite, the stable polymorph above 100{sup o}C. Fibrous

  14. Cenozoic crustal shortening and thickening contributions to Andean orogenesis: Preliminary results from structural mapping in the southern Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, N.; Horton, B. K.

    2012-12-01

    Estimates of Cenozoic crustal shortening and thickening from the southern Peruvian Andes are necessary to address ongoing debates regarding growth of the Andes and Altiplano plateau. However, limited regional studies in southern Peru prevent accurate assessments of the structural contributions to high topography. This study provides new structural mapping along a >200 km transect spanning the northernmost Altiplano to Subandes at 13-15.5°S and fills the gap between existing central Peruvian and northern Bolivian studies. New stratigraphic data, fault relationships and fold orientations are used to create an updated geologic map and provide insights into the style, timing and magnitude of crustal deformation. Preliminary cross sections accompanying these map transects illustrate deformation style and provide first-order estimates of shortening. Further cross section analyses will be balanced and provide estimates of total crustal shortening and associated thickening in southern Peru. The study transect is subdivided into belts according to the age of exposed rocks and style of deformation. From west to east these belts include: Cretaceous strata dominated by tight folds, closely spaced faults and multiple detachments; Permo-Triassic strata dominated by thicker thrust sheets and fault-fold orientations departing from typical Andean trends; and Paleozoic rocks characterized by thick thrust sheets and deformation focused near major faults. The Cretaceous belt is composed of marine limestones and upward coarsening, siltstone to coarse sandstone progradational sequences. Disharmonic and detachment folds in the Cretaceous section demonstrate the importance of interbedded gypsum and mudstone layers. Fault relationships suggest local shortening during the Early Cretaceous. The Permo-Triassic belt is composed of thick Permian carbonates (Copacabana Formation) and interbedded sandstones, conglomerates and volcanics of the Mitu Formation. This study defines the orientation of

  15. Environmental and climatic history in the NW Argentine Andes (24° S over the last 2100 years inferred from a high-altitude peatland record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schittek

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available High-altitude cushion peatlands are versatile archives for high-resolution palaeoenvironmental studies, due to their high accumulation rates, range of proxies and sensitivity to climatic and/or human-induced changes. Especially within the central Andes, the knowledge about climate conditions during the Holocene is limited. In this study, we present the environmental and climatic history for the last 2100 years of Cerro Tuzgle peatland (CTP, which is located in the dry Puna of NW Argentina, based on a multi-proxy approach. X-ray fluorescence (XRF, stable isotope and element content analyses (δ13C, δ15N, TN and TOC were conducted to analyse the inorganic geochemistry throughout the sequence, revealing changes in the peatland's past redox conditions. Pollen assemblages give an insight into substantial environmental changes on a regional scale. The palaeoclimate varied significantly during the last 2100 years. The results reflect prominent late Holocene climate anomalies and provide evidence that Northern Hemisphere temperature oscillations were extensive and affected the southward migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ, and hence, the intensity of moisture flux within the South American Summer Monsoon (SASM belt. Volcanic forcing at the beginning of the 19th century (1815 Tambora eruption seems to have had an impact on climatic settings in the central Andes. In the past, the peatland recovered from climatic perturbations. Nowadays, CTP is heavily degraded by human interventions, and the peat deposit becomes increasingly susceptible to erosion and incision.

  16. Impact on continuity of care of decentralized versus partly centralized mental health care in Northern Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Henrik Myklebust

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The issue of continuity of care is central in contemporary psychiatric services research. In Norway, inpatient admissions are mainly to take place locally, in a system of small bed-units that represent an alternative to traditional central psychiatric hospitals. This type of organization may be advantageous for accessibility and cooperation, but has been given little scientific attention. Aims: To study whether inpatients' utilization of outpatient services differ between an area with a decentralized care model in comparison to an adjacent area with a partly centralized model.   Method: The study was based on data from a one-year registered prevalence sample, drawing on routinely sampled data supplemented with data from medical records. Service-utilization for 247 inpatients was analyzed. The results were controlled for diagnosis, demographic variables, type of service system, localization of inpatient admissions, and length of hospitalization.  Results: Most inpatients in the area with the decentralized care model also utilized outpatient consultations, whereas a considerable number of inpatients in the area with a partly centralized model did not enter outpatient care at all. Type of service system, localization of inpatient admission, and length of hospitalization predicted inpatients' utilization of outpatient consultations. The results are discussed in the light of systems integration, particularly management-arrangements and clinical bridging over the transitional phase from inpatient to outpatient care.  Conclusion: Inpatients' utilization of outpatient services differed between an area with a decentralized care model in comparison to an adjacent area with a partly centralized care model. In the areas studied, extensive decentralization of the psychiatric services positively affected coordination of inpatient and outpatient services for people with severe psychiatric disorders. Small, local-bed units may therefore

  17. Genetic and phenotypic variation in central and northern European populations of Aedes (Aedimorphus) vexans (Meigen, 1830) (Diptera, Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francuski, Ljubinka; Milankov, Vesna; Ludoški, Jasmina; Krtinić, Bosiljka; Lundström, Jan O; Kemenesi, Gábor; Ferenc, Jakab

    2016-06-01

    The floodwater mosquito Aedes vexans can be a massive nuisance in the flood plain areas of mainland Europe, and is the vector of Tahyna virus and a potential vector of Dirofilaria immitis. This epidemiologically important species forms three subspecies worldwide, of which Aedes vexans arabiensis has a wide distribution in Europe and Africa. We quantified the genetic and phenotypic variation in Ae. vexans arabiensis in populations from Sweden (northern Europe), Hungary, and Serbia (central Europe). A landscape genetics approach (FST , STRUCTURE, BAPS, GENELAND) revealed significant differentiation between northern and southern populations. Similar to genetic data, wing geometric morphometrics revealed two different clusters, one made by Swedish populations, while another included Hungarian and Serbian populations. Moreover, integrated genetic and morphometric data from the spatial analysis suggested groupings of populations into three clusters, one of which was from Swedish and Hungarian populations. Data on spatial analysis regarding an intermediate status of the Hungarian population was supported by observed Isolation-by-Distance patterns. Furthermore, a low proportion of interpopulation vs intrapopulation variance revealed by AMOVA and low-to-moderate FST values on a broader geographical scale indicate a continuous between-population exchange of individuals, including considerable gene flow on the regional scale, are likely to be responsible for the maintenance of the observed population similarity in Aе. vexans. We discussed data considering population structure in the light of vector control strategies of the mosquito from public health importance. PMID:27232139

  18. The northern and central Appalachian basin coal region -- The Upper Freeport and Pond Creek coal bed assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruppert, L.; Tewalt, S.; Bragg, L.; Wallack, R.; Freeman, P.; Tully, J.

    1999-07-01

    The Upper Freeport and Pond Creek coal beds are two of six coal beds being assessed by the US Geological Survey (USGS) in the northern and central Appalachian basin coal region. The coal resource assessments were designed to provide up-to-date, concise data on the location, quantity, and quality of US coals for Federal agencies, the public, industry and academia. Assessment products are fully digital and include original and remaining resource estimates; maps depicting areal extent, mined areas, geologic structure contour, isopach, overburden thickness, ash yield, sulfur content, calorific value, and selected trace-element contents; and public domain geochemical and stratigraphic databases. The assessment methodology and a few results are presented.

  19. Estimating local records for Northern and Central Italy from a sparse secular temperature network and from 1961–1990 climatologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Brunetti

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents monthly 30-arc-second-resolution Northern and Central Italy temperature climatologies and discusses the procedure we adopt to superimpose the information of temperature secular records onto these climatologies. The climatologies are obtained by means of a step-wise linear regression method which aims at determining the temperature dependence on geographical and morphological variables. Such a method is applied to a database of about 800 monthly 1961–1990 temperature normals. In the first regression (temperature vs. elevation the recorded data are considered; the further regressions concern the residuals obtained after taking into account the effect of each variable, in order of importance. An estimated secular anomaly record can be obtained for each point of the climatology grid by means of a distance-weighted average of the temperature anomaly records of the stations surrounding the grid point.

  20. U-Pb zircon age data for selected sedimentary, metasedimentary, and igneous rocks from northern and central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    This publication contains the complete results of U-Pb zircon age dating studies of sedimentary and metasedimentary units from northern and central Alaska that are discussed and interpreted in other reports by the author. Most of the U-Pb ages are of detrital zircons from sandstones, although U-Pb ages from igneous and sedimentary clasts from conglomerates in some of those same units are also included. In addition to the data presented in the interpretive reports, this publication includes data that were excluded due to discordance, analytical problems, and publication space limitations. The U-Pb age data are reported in Excel-file format so that they can be easily downloaded and referenced or reinterpreted by future workers.

  1. Evaluation of radioactive environmental hazards in Area-3, Northern Palmyrides, Central Syria using airborne spectrometric gamma technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfahani, J; Aissa, M; Al-Hent, R

    2016-01-01

    Airborne spectrometric gamma data are used in this paper to estimate the degree of radioactive hazard on humanity in Area-3, Northern Palmyrides, Central Syria. Exposure Rate (ER), Absorbed Dose Rate (ADR), Annual Effective Dose Rate (AEDR), and Heat Production (HP) of the eleven radiometric units included in the established lithological scored map in the study area have been computed to evaluate the radiation background influence in humans. The results obtained indicate that a human body in Area-3 is subjected to radiation hazards in the acceptable limits for long duration exposure. The highest radiogenetic heat production values in Area-3 correspond to the phosphatic locations characterized by relatively high values of uranium and thorium.

  2. Osseous skeletal material and fish scales in marine sediments under the oxygen minimum zone off northern and central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milessi, Andrés C.; Sellanes, Javier; Gallardo, Víctor A.; Lange, Carina B.

    2005-08-01

    The significance of whale falls for the study of the biogeography, evolution and biodiversity of deep-sea biota has been recently recognized by international programs since large carcasses are known to give rise to biogenic chemosynthetic ecosystems. However, the plain accumulation of smaller bone material in the shallower settings of the continental shelf and upper slope under the hypoxic conditions of the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ), has received much less attention. Here we describe new findings of skeletal material and fish scales in marine sediments under the OMZ off northern and central Chile which, combined with previous reports for the study area, lead us to suggest the existence of a band in the benthos of accumulation of bones and scales extending at least twenty degrees in latitude (18-38° S). Future studies should focus on the characterization of biotic communities living upon these resources in order to elucidate their peculiarities and importance in the Eastern South Pacific.

  3. Dissolved Pesticide and Organic Carbon Concentrations Detected in Surface Waters, Northern Central Valley, California, 2001-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, James L.; Jacobson, Lisa A.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    2004-01-01

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted to determine the effects of pesticide mixtures on Chinook salmon under various environmental conditions in surface waters of the northern Central Valley of California. This project was a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the University of California. The project focused on understanding the environmental factors that influence the toxicity of pesticides to juvenile salmon and their prey. During the periods January through March 2001 and January through May 2002, water samples were collected at eight surface water sites in the northern Central Valley of California and analyzed by the USGS for dissolved pesticide and dissolved organic carbon concentrations. Water samples were also collected by the USGS at the same sites for aquatic toxicity testing by the Aquatic Toxicity Laboratory at the University of California Davis; however, presentation of the results of these toxicity tests is beyond the scope of this report. Samples were collected to characterize dissolved pesticide and dissolved organic carbon concentrations, and aquatic toxicity, associated with winter storm runoff concurrent with winter run Chinook salmon out-migration. Sites were selected that represented the primary habitat of juvenile Chinook salmon and included major tributaries within the Sacramento and San Joaquin River Basins and the Sacramento?San Joaquin Delta. Water samples were collected daily for a period of seven days during two winter storm events in each year. Additional samples were collected weekly during January through April or May in both years. Concentrations of 31 currently used pesticides were measured in filtered water samples using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry at the U.S. Geological Survey's organic chemistry laboratory in Sacramento, California. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations were analyzed in filtered water samples using a Shimadzu TOC-5000A total organic carbon

  4. {sup 210}Pb dating of sediments from the central and northern Adriatic Sea: deposition and preservation of sedimentary organic carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, T. F., LLNL

    1998-04-01

    Lead-210 ({sup 21O}Pb) and organic C depth distribution profiles in sediments from the northern and central Adriatic Sea were measured as part of the EEC funded project on Eutrophic Limits of the Northern Adriatic (ELNA). {sup 210}Pb derived mass-accumulation rates decrease southward from between 0.15 and 0.2 g cm{sup -2}y{sup -1} close to the Po River outflow (> 24 m, water depth) to less than 0.04 g cm{sup -2}y{sup -1} in the Jabuka Pit (246 m, water depth) in the central Adriatic Sea. The mass- accumulation rates obtained in the Jabuka Pit correspond to mean sedimentation rates of about 0.03 cm y{sup -1} (ref. porosity = 0.5) and fall between 5 to 20 times lower than rates found for north Adriatic shelf cores. Estimated sedimentation rates are considered as upper limits because of the possible effects of bioturbation and physical disturbance on the {sup 21O}Pb sedimentary record but are consistent with data from previous work. Rates of sediment accumulation and carbon burial appear to be strongly influenced by the transport of fluvial materials from land and transport of fine-grained particles. First-order estimates of organic C burial rates into surface sediment ranged from 1 to 0.028 mMol cm{sup -2}y{sup -1} between the Po delta and the Jabuka Pit regions, respectively. We estimate that a maximum of 50% of organic C preserved in surface sediment may be derived from biological production in the overlying water column.

  5. Spatial variations of scavenging rates within the central and northern Adriatic Sea: Use of U-Th disequilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Heilmann, J. [Danish Inst. for Fisheries and Marine Research, Charlottenlund (Denmark); Fowler, S.; Miquel, J.C. [IAEA Marine Environment Lab., Monaco (Monaco)

    1996-04-01

    Dissolved and particulate concentrations of {sup 234}Th, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po were measured in surface waters of the central and northern Adriatic Sea. The half-lives and biogeochemistry of {sup 234}Th (t{sub 1/2} = 24.1 days), {sup 210}Po (t{sub 1/2} = 138.4 days) and {sup 210}Pb (t{sub 1/2} = 22.3 years) are ideal for studying particle dynamics in the upper water column. It has been observed that the residence time of dissolved {sup 234}Th with respect to removal on biogenic particles is inversely proportional to primary productivity and may be used to predict export from or new production in the euphotic zone. Model-derived {sup 234}Th fluxes can also be used to help validate sediment trap collections in the upper water column. The aim of the present study was to gain an insight into the intensity and variability of active scavenging and particle removal processes in the central and northern Adriatic Sea. This semi-enclosed sea is strongly influenced by fresh water runoff from rivers carrying large quantities of dissolved nutrients and suspended particles. These inputs of nutrients and suspended particles are expected to give rise to large biological and biogeochemical gradients across the Continental Shelf and offer a range of environments for studying particle scavenging and removal processes. The authors have examined the relationships between {sup 234}Th scavenging rates and residence times of dissolved and particulate phases as a function of other physical and biological parameters (primary productivity, POC, chlorophyll, C/N and total suspended matter). Particular reference is made to the two contrasting environments of the Adriatic--a eutrophic zone near the Po River outflow and in the largely oligotrophic waters of the Jabuka Pit.

  6. Plant biodiversity of beech forests in central-northern Italy: a methodological approach for conservation purposes

    OpenAIRE

    Marcantonio M; Chiarucci A; Maccherini S; Guglietta D; Bacaro G

    2012-01-01

    Forests are reckoned essentials as biodiversity reservoirs and carbon sinks. Current threats to forest ecosystems (e.g., climate changes, habitat loss and fragmentation, management changes) call for monitoring their biodiversity and preserving their ecological functions. In this study, we characterized plants diversity of five beech forests located in central and north Apennines mountain chain, using results by a probabilistic sampling. In order to achieve our goals, we have considered specie...

  7. The Prevalence and Associated Factors of Central obesity in Northern Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Veghari, G; M Sedaghat; H Joshaghani; A Hoseini; F Niknajad; A Angizeh; E. Tazik; P Moharloei

    2010-01-01

    Background: The main objective of this study was to evaluate theprevalence of central obesity and some related factors in the north of Iran(Golestan province) in 2006.Method: This was a population –based cross-sectional study that comprised2471 subjects (1250 males and 1221 female), using stratified cluster sampling.Interviewers recorded the data using the multidimensional questionnaire andanthropometric indexes. Waist circumference ≥102 and ≥88 cm categorized ascentral obesity for men and wo...

  8. Neogene tectonics of northern Central America prior to offset across the polochic fault

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkart, B.; Sanchez-Barreda, L.A.; Deaton, B.C.

    1985-01-01

    The reconstruction which removes 130 km of documented left slip across the Polochic fault of northern Guatemala and southern Chiapas juxtaposes the foundered block of the Gulf of Tehuantepec and extensional terrane of Guatemala, lining up prolongations of the Motagua and Jocotan faults with known structures along the coastal margin of the Chiapas massif and within the Gulf. Coast-parallel faults with sinistral displacement, located along the margins of the Chiapas depression, were also active during the Miocene time interval of south-easterly migration of the Gulf of Tehuantepec block. Extensional terrane is well expressed in Guatemala and Honduras south of the Jocotan boundary fault, beginning where the southeasterly-moving block encounters the abrupt bend in the boundary fault. This complex plate boundary became simpler when the left-lateral, east-west-trending Polochic fault sliced across the isthmus in late Miocene, offsetting Laramide structures and the arcuate Neogene plate boundary faults. During its time of major activity the Polochic served as the principal plate boundary fault, across which the major displacement occurred. Today the western part of the NOAM-CARIB plate boundary is diffuse. From western Guatemala and southern Chiapas, where buckling and locking of the Polochic fault has taken place, displacement is distributed among countless shears which extend in a belt from western Guatemala across the Chiapas massif to the western landframe of the Gulf of Tehuantepec.

  9. Genesis of the central zone of the Nolans Bore rare earth element deposit, Northern Territory, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoneveld, Louise; Spandler, Carl; Hussey, Kelvin

    2015-08-01

    The Nolans Bore rare earth element (REE) deposit consists of a network of fluorapatite-bearing veins and breccias hosted within Proterozoic granulites of the Reynolds Range, Central Australia. Mineralisation is divided into three zones (north, central, and south-east), with the north and south-east zones consisting of massive REE-bearing fluorapatite veins, with minor brecciation and carbonate infill. The central zone is distinctively different in mineralogy and structure; it features extensive brecciation, a high allanite content, and a large, epidote-rich enveloping alteration zone. The central zone is a reworking of the original solid apatite veins that formed during the Chewings Orogeny at ca. 1525 Ma. These original apatite veins are thought to derive from phosphate-rich magmatic-hydrothermal fluid exsolved from as-yet unrecognised alkaline magmatic bodies at depth. We define four ore breccia types (BX1-4) in the central zone on the basis of detailed petrological and geochemical analysis of drillcore and thin sections. BX1 ore comprises fluorapatite with minor crackle brecciation with carbonate infill and resembles ore of the north and south-east zones. Breccia types BX2, BX3, and BX4 represent progressive stages of ore brecciation and development of calc-silicate mineral (amphibole, epidote, allanite, calcite) infill. Comparison of bulk ore sample geochemistry between breccia types indicates that REEs were not mobilised more than a few centimetres during hydrothermal alteration and brecciation. Instead, most of the REEs were partitioned from the original REE fluorapatite into newly formed allanite, REE-poor fluorapatite and minor REE carbonate in the breccias. Negative europium (Eu) anomalies in the breccia minerals are accounted for by a large positive Eu anomaly in epidote from the alteration zones surrounding the ore breccias. This observation provides a direct link between ore recrystallisation and brecciation, and the formation of the alteration halo in

  10. The ANDES Deep Underground Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Bertou, X

    2013-01-01

    ANDES (Agua Negra Deep Experiment Site) is a unique opportunity to build a deep underground laboratory in the southern hemisphere. It will be built in the Agua Negra tunnel planned between Argentina and Chile, and operated by the CLES, a Latin American consortium. With 1750m of rock overburden, and no close- by nuclear power plant, it will provide an extremely radiation quiet environment for neutrino and dark matter experiments. In particular, its location in the southern hemisphere should play a major role in understanding dark matter modulation signals.

  11. Middle Triassic volcanic rocks in the Northern Qiangtang (Central Tibet): Geochronology, petrogenesis, and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng-Sheng; Shi, Ren-Deng; Yi, Guo-Ding; Zou, Hai-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Although voluminous magmatism occurred during the Triassic in the Qiangtang terrane, the petrogenesis of the volcanic rocks and the associated tectonic scenarios remain mysterious. This study focuses on new identified primitive volcanic rocks from the Yanshiping area, Northern Qiangtang subterrane. The whole-rock major-trace elemental, Sr-Nd isotopic data, and zircon U-Pb age of volcanic rocks are reported in this paper in order to understand their petrogenesis and tectonic setting. The studied volcanic rocks can be grouped into two types, i.e., Nb-enriched basalts and basaltic andesites (NEBs) in the low sequence and arc basalts in the upper sequence. Zircon U-Pb dating using LA-ICP-MS techniques yields the concordant age with a weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of ca. 242-241 Ma for the NEBs and ca. 240 Ma for the arc basalts. The distinct geochemical and isotopic characteristics of whole-rock and varying Th-U-REE components of zircon grains from the volcanic rocks suggest that the NEBs were derived from partial melting of relatively enriched mantle wedge that have been metasomatised by slab-related melts and that the arc basalts originated from partial melting of mixing of mantle wedge and depleted asthenospheric mantle in response to the slab breakoff. Our new geochemical and geochronological results, in combination with regional studies, imply that the Middle Triassic magmatism was generated in the tectonic setting of northward subduction of the Paleo-Tethys or Bangong-Nujiang Ocean. Subduction-related processes that include melting of the slab and the slab breakoff during the Permian-Middle Triassic made an important contribution to crustal growth in the Qiangtang terrane, whereas vertical crustal growth associated with collision-related setting during the Late Triassic is nonsignificant.

  12. The 2014-2015 earthquake series in the northern Upper Rhine Graben, Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homuth, B.; Rümpker, G.

    2016-05-01

    Since March 2014, an unusually large amount of earthquakes occur southeast of the city of Darmstadt in the northern Upper Rhine Graben. During the period, until April 2015, we have recorded 356 earthquakes with magnitudes ranging from ML = -0.6 to 4.2. We identified two source clusters separated laterally by about 5 km. The hypocentres within these clusters are aligned vertically extending over a depth range from 1 to 8 km with a lateral extent of about 1 to 2 km. Focal mechanisms show left-lateral strike-slip movements; b values are changing with time between b = 0.6 and b = 0.9. This is the first time in almost 150 years that such high earthquake rates have been observed in the region. Historical accounts dating back to the nineteenth century report of over 2000 felt earthquakes over a time span from 1869 to 1871. From these, maximum intensities of VII have been estimated. Other seismic activities in the region were reported in the 1970s. The observations of the 2014-2015 earthquake series do not completely match a typical main shock-aftershock sequence or a typical earthquake swarm. Especially the activity at the beginning of the earthquake series may be considered as a mixture of a main shock-aftershock sequence and a short-lasting swarm event. Whether or not the time gap between the current seismic activity, which actually takes place at the same locations as parts of the seismic swarm in 1869-1871, and the seismic activity in the nineteenth century or the seismic activity in the 1970s can be interpreted as a seismic cycle remains unclear.

  13. A GPS and modelling study of deformation in northern Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M.; DeMets, C.; Rogers, R.; Tenorio, C.; Hernandez, D.

    2009-09-01

    We use GPS measurements at 37 stations in Honduras and El Salvador to describe active deformation of the western end of the Caribbean Plate between the Motagua fault and Central American volcanic arc. All GPS sites located in eastern Honduras move with the Caribbean Plate, in accord with geologic evidence for an absence of neotectonic deformation in this region. Relative to the Caribbean Plate, the other stations in the study area move west to west-northwest at rates that increase gradually from 3.3 +/- 0.6 mm yr-1 in central Honduras to 4.1 +/- 0.6 mm yr-1 in western Honduras to as high as 11-12 mm yr-1 in southern Guatemala. The site motions are consistent with slow westward extension that has been inferred by previous authors from the north-striking grabens and earthquake focal mechanisms in this region. We examine the factors that influence the regional deformation by comparing the new GPS velocity field to velocity fields predicted by finite element models (FEMs) that incorporate the regional plate boundary faults and known plate motions. Our modelling suggests that the obliquely convergent (~20°) direction of Caribbean-North American Plate motion relative to the Motagua fault west of 90°W impedes the ENE-directed motion of the Caribbean Plate in southern Guatemala, giving rise to extension in southern Guatemala and western Honduras. The FEM predictions agree even better with the measured velocities if the plate motion west of the Central American volcanic arc is forced to occur over a broad zone rather than along a single throughgoing plate boundary fault. Our analysis confirms key predictions of a previous numerical model for deformation in this region, and also indicates that the curvature of the Motagua fault causes significant along-strike changes in the orientations of the principal strain-rate axes in the fault borderlands, in accord with earthquake focal mechanisms and conclusions reached in a recent synthesis of the structural and morphologic data

  14. Hydrologic characteristics of soils in the High Plains, northern Great Plains, and Central Texas Carbonates Regional Aquifer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Jack T.; Hobbs, Ryne D.; Ihm, Laurie A.

    1990-01-01

    Certain physical characteristics of soils, including permeability, available water capacity, thickness, and topographic position, have a measurable effect on the hydrology of an area. These characteristics control the rate at which precipitation infiltrates or is transmitted through the soil, and thus they have an important role in determining the rates of actual evapotranspiration (consumptive water use), groundwater recharge, and surface runoff. In studies of groundwater hydrology, it is useful to differentiate soils spatially according to their physical characteristics and to assign values that indicate their hydrologic responses.The principal purpose of this report is to describe the relation between the hydrologic characteristics of the soils in the study area and those environmental factors that affect the development and distribution of the soils. This objective will be achieved by (1) defining both qualitatively and quantitatively those soil characteristics that affect hydrology, and (2) classifying and delineating the boundaries of the soils in the study area according to these hydrologic characteristics.The study area includes the High Plains, Northern Great Plains, the Central Texas Carbonates, and parts of the Central Midwest Regional Aquifer Systems as described by the U.S. Geological Survey Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) Program (Sun, 1986, p.5and Sun, personal commun., June 1985) and shown in figures 1 through 5. The spatial patterns of the soils classified according to their quantifiable hydrologic characteristics will subsequently serve as an integral component in the analysis of actual evapotranspiration (consumptive water use), consumptive irrigation requirements, and potential ground-water recharge of the study area.The classification system used to describe the soils in this report is compatible with that of Dugan (1986). Dugan described the same characteristics of soils that are immediately underlain by principal aquifers of

  15. Geospeedometry in the inverted metamorphic gradient of the Nestos Thrust Zone in central Rhodope (Northern Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioldi, Stefania; Moulas, Evangelos; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Thrust tectonics and inverted metamorphic gradients are major consequences of large and likely fast movements of crustal segments in compressional environments. The purpose of this study is to investigate the tectonic setting and the timescale of inverted metamorphic zonations related to crustal-scale thrusting. The aim is to contribute understanding the link between mechanical and thermal evolution of major thrust zones and to clarify the nature and the origin of orogenic heat. The Rhodope metamorphic complex (Northern Greece) is interpreted as a part of the Alpine-Himalaya orogenic belt and represents a collisional system with an association of both large-scale thrusting and pervasive exhumation tectonics. The Nestos Shear Zone overprints the suture boundary with a NNE-dipping pile of schists displaying inverted isograds. The inverted metamorphic zones start from chlorite-muscovite grade at the bottom and reach kyanite-sillimanite grades with migmatites in the upper structural levels. In order to reconstruct the thermo-tectonic evolution of inverted metamorphic zonation, reliable geochronological data are essential. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology with step-heating technique on white mica from micaschists provided a temporal resolution with the potential to characterize shearing. 40Ar/39Ar dating across the Nestos Shear Zone yields Late Eocene-Early Oligocene (40-30 Ma) cooling (~400-350° C) ages, which correspond to local thermo-deformation episodes linked to late and post-orogenic intrusions. U-Pb Sensitive High Resolution Ion Microprobe (SHRIMP) zircon geochronology on leucosomes from migmatitic orthogneisses were considered to estimate the age of peak metamorphic conditions, contemporaneous with anatexis. U-Pb ages of zircon rims specify regional partial melting during the Early Cretaceous (160-120 Ma). This is in disagreement with previous assertions, which argued that the formation of leucosomes in this region is Late Eocene (42-35 Ma) and implied multiple

  16. Marine neotectonic investigation of the San Gregorio Fault Zone on the northern flank of Monterey Canyon, offshore central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, K. L.; Paull, C. K.; Brothers, D. S.; McGann, M.; Caress, D. W.; Lundsten, E. M.; Anderson, K.; Gwiazda, R.

    2014-12-01

    The San Gregorio Fault Zone (SGFZ) is part of the North American-Pacific plate boundary and is thought to accommodate right-lateral offset up to 10 mm/yr. Because much of the SGFZ in Monterey Bay, central California, lies offshore in steep submarine canyon bathymetry, little is known of its recent activity. We provide initial direct evidence for faulting where the SGFZ has been interpreted based on canyon morphology to cross the northern flank of Monterey Canyon. High-resolution multibeam bathymetry and chirp subbottom profiles were acquired during 13 dives with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute's (MBARI) Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) from 2009-2014 on the northern flank of Monterey Canyon, extending from the shelf edge ~15 km offshore Santa Cruz to ~1850 m water depth. Chirp profiles resolve layered sediments up to ~40 m subsurface in this region, and no fault scarps or seafloor lineaments are visible in the 1-m resolution multibeam bathymetry. At least one subsurface fault is identified within the SGFZ by offset reflections across a discrete, nearly vertical fault. However, this fault is only imaged where mass wasting has exhumed older strata to within ~25 m of the seafloor. Numerous slumps scars on the seafloor and packages of chaotic internal reflectivity in chirp profiles suggest that submarine landslide processes dominate the study area. To constrain the age of reflections offset by the fault, MBARI's Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) Doc Ricketts, sampled faces of slump scars where the offset reflections crop out using vibracores and horizontal push cores. Radiocarbon dating of foraminifera within these core samples is being used to constrain the last recorded movement on the fault. Application of AUV and ROV methods allows detailed neotectonic investigation of significant offshore structures, like the SGFZ, that contribute to hazard assessment.

  17. Lessons learned from the integration of local stakeholders in water management approaches in central-northern Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokisch, A.; Urban, W.

    2012-04-01

    Water is the main limiting factor for economic and agricultural development in central-northern Namibia, where approximately 50% of the Namibian population lives on less than 10% of the country's surface area. The climate in the region can be characterized as semi-arid, with distinctive rainy and dry seasons and an average precipitation of 470 mm/a. Central-northern Namibia can furthermore be characterized by a system of so-called Oshanas, very shallow ephemeral river streams which drain the whole region from north to south towards the Etosha-Saltpan. Water quality within these ephemeral river streams rapidly decreases towards the end of the dry season due to high rates of evaporation (2,700 mm/a) which makes the water unsuitable for human consumption and in certain times of the year also for irrigation purposes. Other local water resources are scarce or of low quality. Therefore, the local water supply is mainly secured via a pipeline scheme which is fed by the Namibian-Angolan border river Kunene. Within the research project CuveWaters - Integrated Water Resources Management in central-northern Namibia different small scale water supply and sanitation technologies are implemented and tested as part of the projects multi-resource mix. The aim is to decentralize the regional water supply and make it more sustainable especially in the face of climate change. To gain understanding and to create ownership within the local population for the technologies implemented, stakeholder participation and capacity development are integral parts of the project. As part of the implementation process of rainwater harvesting and water harvesting from ephemeral river streams, pilot plants for the storage of water were constructed with the help of local stakeholders who will also be the beneficiaries of the pilot plants. The pilot plants consist of covered storage tanks and infrastructure for small scale horticultural use of the water stored. These small scale horticultural

  18. Agriculture at the Edge: Landscape Variability of Soil C Stocks and Fluxes in the Tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Peña, C.

    2015-12-01

    Paramos, or tropical alpine grasslands occurring right above the forest tree-line (2,800 - 4,700 m), are among the most transformed landscapes in the humid tropics. In the Tropical Andes, Paramos form an archipelago-like pattern from Northern Colombia to Central Peru that effectively captures atmospheric moisture originated in the Amazon-Orinoco basins, while marking the highest altitude capable of sustaining vegetation growth (i.e., 'the edge'). This study investigates the role of land management on mediating soil carbon stocks and fluxes in Paramo ecosystems of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia. Observations were collected at a Paramo site strongly modified by land use change, including active potato plantations, pasture, tillage, and land abandonment. Results show that undisturbed Paramos soils have high total organic carbon (TOC), high soil water content (SWC), and low soil CO2 efflux (RS) rates. However, Paramo soils that experience human intervention show lower TOC, higher and more variable RS rates, and lower SWC. This study demonstrates that changes in land use in Paramos affect differentially the accumulation and exchange of soil carbon with the atmosphere and offers implications for management and protection strategies of what has been deemed the fastest evolving biodiversity ecosystem in the world.

  19. Nazca - South America Convergence and Motion of the North Andes Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Femina, P. C.; Mora-paez, H.; Mothes, P. A.; Ruiz, G.

    2012-12-01

    The North Andes block (NAB) is a hypothesized tectonic block that moves (escapes) north-northeast relative to a stable South American reference frame. The motion of this block is thought to be derived by the collision of the Carnegie Ridge in southern Ecuador and/or by oblique convergence and high degrees of interplate coupling north of the ridge (i.e., strain partitioning). We investigate the kinematics of NAB motion utilizing a velocity field based on new continuous GPS networks and existing episodic GPS data in Ecuador and Colombia. The new velocity field and published earthquake slip vectors are inverted to solve for the Euler vector of the NAB and interseismic elastic strain accumulation on block-bounding faults using a block modeling approach. At the latitude of Ecuador, the NAB is rigid with transpressional deformation accommodating northeastward motion along its boundary with South America. In central to northern Colombia, the NAB is dissected by several prominent shear zones. We test a suite of block models to investigate the tectonic nature of the NAB and the style of faulting in the upper plate accommodating block motion. Through the estimation of elastic strain accumulation on all block-bounding faults, we improve the understanding of interseismic coupling along a convergent margin capable of producing M>8 earthquakes and upper plate faults capable of generating M>6 earthquakes.

  20. Tectonic geomorphology of large normal faults bounding the Cuzco rift basin within the southern Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, C.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Cuzco basin forms a 80-wide, relatively flat valley within the High Andes of southern Peru. This larger basin includes the regional capital of Cuzco and the Urubamba Valley, or "Sacred Valley of the Incas" favored by the Incas for its mild climate and broader expanses of less rugged and arable land. The valley is bounded on its northern edge by a 100-km-long and 10-km-wide zone of down-to-the-south systems of normal faults that separate the lower area of the down-dropped plateau of central Peru and the more elevated area of the Eastern Cordillera foldbelt that overthrusts the Amazon lowlands to the east. Previous workers have shown that the normal faults are dipslip with up to 600 m of measured displacements, reflect north-south extension, and have Holocene displacments with some linked to destructive, historical earthquakes. We have constructed topographic and structural cross sections across the entire area to demonstrate the normal fault on a the plateau peneplain. The footwall of the Eastern Cordillera, capped by snowcapped peaks in excess of 6 km, tilts a peneplain surface northward while the hanging wall of the Cuzco basin is radially arched. Erosion is accelerated along the trend of the normal fault zone. As the normal fault zone changes its strike from east-west to more more northwest-southeast, normal displacement decreases and is replaced by a left-lateral strike-slip component.

  1. Plant biodiversity of beech forests in central-northern Italy: a methodological approach for conservation purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcantonio M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Forests are reckoned essentials as biodiversity reservoirs and carbon sinks. Current threats to forest ecosystems (e.g., climate changes, habitat loss and fragmentation, management changes call for monitoring their biodiversity and preserving their ecological functions. In this study, we characterized plants diversity of five beech forests located in central and north Apennines mountain chain, using results by a probabilistic sampling. In order to achieve our goals, we have considered species richness and abundance, taxonomic distinctness and species composition, using both old and new analytical approaches. Results have shown how: (1 the forest type dominated by Fagus sylvatica is characterized by high complexity, with marked compositional, structural and biodiversity differences; (2 beech forests of Pigelleto di Piancastagnaio and Valle della Corte show the highest plants diversity values. The ecological characteristics of these areas, which sustain high diversity values, are unique and of great conservation interest; (3 the use of species richness as the only diversity measure have not allowed an efficient differentiation between studied areas. Indeed, the use of different indexes and analytical methods is required to detect multiple characteristics of biological diversity, as well as to carry out efficient biodiversity surveys aimed to develop optimal conservation strategies. In the future, we plan to apply the sampling methodology and the analytical approach used in this paper to characterize plants diversity of similar forest types.

  2. Hydromorphic to subaqueous soils transitions in the central Grado lagoon (Northern Adriatic Sea, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittori Antisari, Livia; De Nobili, Maria; Ferronato, Chiara; Natale, Marco; Pellegrini, Elisa; Vianello, Gilmo

    2016-05-01

    The Grado lagoon is among the largest in the Mediterranean sea and is characterized by salt marshes, where tides influenced the development of a complex micromorphology coupled to a micromosaic of vegetation covers. This study represents the first contribution to the understanding of the main processes governing formation, development and spatial transitions between hydromorphic and subaqueous soils in an Adriatic lagoon ecosystem. Physicochemical characteristics and development of soils were investigated in three salt marshes differing for their proximity to the open sea, textural composition and age of formation. Soils of back barrier salt marshes had A/C profiles and were mostly characterized by a sandy coarse texture that allows rapid drainage and subsurface oxygen exchanges. Soil sequences from the inner salt marsh to its submerged border slope or to a brackish waterhole do not simply represent a hydrosequence, but also reflect erosion/sorting/accumulation processes. The soils in the central part of the lagoon have finer texture and in displayed transition or cambic horizons. Silty clay loam textures and low positions allowed the development of more severe anoxic conditions and accumulation of sulphides. The tide oscillation strongly contributed to formation of redoximorphic features, intensity of anaerobic conditions but also colonization by different plant communities. Discriminant analysis was performed to identify physicochemical properties which discriminate the different soils according to geo-morphological position and prevailing plants. It confirmed that differentiation of plant communities occurred according to distinct morphological and physicochemical soil properties, but also acted as a primary affecting factor of pedogenesis.

  3. Interaction between central volcanoes and fissure swarms along divergent plate boundaries: an example from Askja Volcano, Northern Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippanera, Daniele; Ruch, Joel; Acocella, Valerio; Urbani, Stefano; Thordarson, Thor

    2016-04-01

    Central volcanoes located along divergent plate boundaries are typically part of a larger volcanic system that consists of a central edifice and a fissure swarm through which magma propagates and spreads plates apart. Regional normal faults and graben structures develop within the volcanic system, also dissecting portions of the central volcano with ring-faults faults and eruptive fissures related to the caldera structure. Both the fissure swarm and the caldera structure influence the pathway of the ascending magma, however, the influences of the structures on magma propagation and vice versa are not well defined and understood. Here we aim to understand the relationship between the activity of the central volcano structures (e.g. caldera ring faults, radial dykes and cone sheets) and those of the fissure swarm (e.g. regional normal faults, regional dikes). We focus on Askja volcano, located in the Northern Volcanic Zone of Iceland. It is comprised of three nested calderas, largely filled in with subaerial basaltic lava flows and surrounded by a massive hyaloclastite mountain on the Eastern side. Formation of the youngest, the Öskjuvatn caldera, was initiated during the 1874-1876 rifting episode on the Askja system. This major event was followed by several localized radial and circumferential magmatic intrusions taking place along the new-formed caldera ring fault, as well as intruding in the fissure swarm related to the regional tectonics. In order to characterize the influence of the caldera structure on the regional tectonics, we analysed the structural framework of the caldera and direct surroundings using remote sensing (optical imagery and high resolution DEM from TanDEM-X data). Then we made detailed field measurements (500 data) by analysing azimuth, dip, and opening of eruptive fissures, dikes, faults and extension fractures. Both remote sensing and field measurements have been then integrated producing a detailed structural map of Askja. Our results show

  4. Gradient distribution of persistent organic contaminants along northern slope of central-Himalayas, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Ping; Yao, Tan-Dong; Cong, Zhi-Yuan; Yan, Xing-Liang; Kang, Shi-Chang; Zhang, Yong

    2006-12-15

    High mountains may serve as condenser for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and the vegetation in remote areas has been used as a means to characterized atmospheric concentrations of air pollutants. In this study, organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Himalayan spruce needle samples from Zhangmu-Nyalam region (central-Himalayas) were analyzed and the altitudinal gradient of these pollutants was investigated. Total HCHs and DDTs concentration in needles were in the range of 1.3-2.9 ng g(-1) dry weight and 1.7-11 ng g(-1) dry weight, which were lower than concentrations reported in spruce needles from Alps, however higher than concentrations in conifer needles from mountain areas of Alberta. Total Himalayan spruce needle PAHs was below 600 ng g(-1) and fluorene, phenanthrene and acenaphthene were abundant individual compounds measured. The ratios of alpha-HCH/gamma-HCH in pine needles were similar with the usual values for technical HCH, implying technical HCHs might be used in this region. The high ratios of o-p'-DDT/p-p'-DDT and no p-p'-DDE measured in this study led to the suspicion that a new source of o-p'-DDT and/or p-p'-DDT existed in this region. In addition, higher ratios of low molecular weight-/high molecular weight-PAHs in this region indicated that petroleum combustion, vehicle emission and low-temperature combustion might be the major contributions of PAH source. To examine the POPs distillation, the analyte concentrations were correlated with altitude. The more volatile OCPs, alpha-HCH, gamma-HCH, aldrin and alpha-endosulfan positively correlated with altitude, however, less volatile OCPs (DDT and DDD) inversely related with elevation. Almost all PAHs detected in this area showed positive correlations with altitude. It is worthy to note that heavy PAHs (Benzo[k] fluoranthene and Benzo[a]anthracene) displayed positive correlation, which implied the sources of PAHs were near the sampling sites. The

  5. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1994 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1994 calendar year. The report begins...

  6. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : Updated- 2003 annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2003 calendar year. The report begins...

  7. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1996 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1996 calendar year. The report begins...

  8. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1997 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1997 calendar year. The report begins...

  9. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1998 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1998 calendar year. The report begins...

  10. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1999 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1999 calendar year. The report begins...

  11. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 1995 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1995 calendar year. The report begins...

  12. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Andes Wetland Management District : 2000 Annual narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2000 calendar year. The report begins...

  13. 3D Quaternary deformation pattern in the central Po Plain (Northern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sileo, G.; Mueller, K.; Michetti, A. M.; Livio, F.; Berlusconi, A.; Carcano, C.; Rogledi, S.; Vittori, E.

    2009-04-01

    The Po Plain is a foredeep basin flanked by the two major and active orogens of the Italian Peninsula, the Alps to the North and the Apennines to the South. The basin has a quasi - triangular shape and grades longitudinally to the East in the Adriatic Sea. We used petroleum industry seismic reflection data acquired by ENI E&P in the Central Po Plain, over an area spanning about 6800 km2 from Lake Como to the W to Lake Garda to the E, and from the Lombardian Southern Alps to the N and the Emilia Apennines to the S, in order to analyze and interpret selected seismic reflectors and to define the evolution in space and time of the local active tectonic structures. Folds associated with underlying thrusts were recognized based on deformation recorded by two regional sequence boundary horizons, i.e. the ‘A' Surface (1.6 Myr) and the ‘R' Surface (0. 9 Myr; e.g., Carcano & Piccin, 2002; Muttoni et al., 2003), characterized by good stratigraphic and age bracketing, and marking significant changes in the sedimentary architecture of the Po Basin. Age controls are based on stratigraphic, paleontological and magnetostratigraphic analysis by ENI E&P and Regione Lombardia (Carcano & Piccin, 2002; Scardia et al., 2006). The analysis of strain recorded by these horizons allowed us to: A) recognize a belt of active fold and thrust structures, each 10 to 20 km long, arranged with an en-echelon pattern across the whole Po Basin, and B) analyze their evolution over the Quaternary. 'A' surface (1.6 Myr) The ‘A' surface has been mapped over about 7800 Km2. From North to South four major morphobathymetric domains can be defined in the Pleistocene marine Po Basin: an Alpine platform domain, a slope that links it with the wider central basin domain, a smaller and steeper slope and an Apennine platform domain. The basin shape has an asymmetric transversal profile and is ca. 40 km wide. Several tectonic structures affect this surface. On the Alpine platform domain two small structures

  14. A review of the geology of the Argentinian Fuegian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivero, Eduardo B.; Martinioni, Daniel R.

    2001-06-01

    Seven stratigraphic units reflect the tectonic evolution of the Argentinian Fuegian Andes: Basement (Paleozoic-Jurassic); Lemaire Formation (Upper Jurassic); Yahgan-Beauvoir formations (Lower Cretaceous); Cerro Matrero Formation (Upper Cretaceous); Rı´o Claro Formation (Paleocene); La Despedida Group (Eocene); and Cabo Peña Formation (uppermost Eocene-Lower Oligocene). Basement rocks (garnet, quartz-sericite, and chlorite schists; and amphibolites) are unconformably covered by the Lemaire Formation (rhyolites; basalts; slates; and acidic volcaniclastic breccias, tuffs, conglomerates, and turbidites), formed during extensional tectonism. The post-rift Yahgan Formation (deep-marine black mudstones, andesitic volcaniclastic turbidites and tuffs) interfingers northward with the Beauvoir Formation (slope and platform black mudstones), and covers the Lemaire Formation unconformably. The Yahgan Formation represents an andesitic, volcaniclastic apron, coeval with a Pacific volcanic-arc, filling a marginal basin floored with oceanic crust. The Late Cretaceous compressional orogeny resulted in tectonic inversion, closure of the marginal basin, peak metamorphism and folding, and initial uplifting of the Fuegian Andes. By the latest Cretaceous-earliest Paleogene, the Andes were exposed to subaerial erosion, and the lowest Danian Rı´o Claro Formation bears clear evidence of an Andean clastic provenance. The Rı´o Claro Formation represents the first molasse deposits of the foreland stage of evolution of the Fuegian Andes. Earliest Paleogene north-verging thrust propagation deformed the Rı´o Claro Formation and older units, producing northward depocenter migration. La Despedida Group rests unconformably on the Rı´o Claro Formation and is involved in the thrust and fold belt. Important Eocene compression resulted in thrusting of central Andean basement schists and the Lemaire Formation over Lower Cretaceous and continental Paleogene rocks, respectively. In the

  15. A comparative analysis of the cultured micromycetes in oligotrophic peatlands of natural biosphere reservations located in the northern and central parts of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena N. Bilanenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The current study addresses the fungal diversity of the peatlands that vary geographically and geologically, in the central and northern parts of Russia. The central (Smolenskaya area, National Park «Smolenskoye Poozerie» and northern (White Sea Biological Station area peatlands have a different geological history, the former have a glacial origin, while the latter are of marine origin. Our aim was to investigate the fungal biota of these zones full of Sphagnum moss, and possibly reveal the species that are pertinent to these particular habitats. In both investigated areas, we found an overall poor species diversity with a high fraction of sterile mycelia. Many penicillia species were dominating in all peat samples – P. thomii, P. spinulosum, P. glabrum, P. funiculosum, P. aurantiogriseum (together with Geotrichum candidum, many of them are known to degrade Sphagnum. We were particularly interested in the dynamics of the species from the genus Oidiodendron that have been shown to be involved in primary Sphagnum degradation. The northern area contained a larger species diversity of Oidiodendron, as compared to the central zone. Interestingly, insect-associated species of the genus Tolypocladium and Beauveria, along with the psychrotolerant species of Geomyces and Tolypocladium were recovered only from the northern peatlands. Aspergillus spp. were found in peatlands of the central zone only. We link this result to the climatic features of the area, but also different invertebrate contents that may be utilized by fungi. We detected a tendency of an increasing diversity of Oidiodendron species, psychrotolerant and entomopathogenic fungal species as well as a proportion of sterile forms in the northern area.

  16. Chloritites of the Tocantins Group, Araguaia fold belt, central-northern Brazil: Vestiges of basaltic magmatism and metallogenetic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotschoubey, Basile; Villas, Raimundo Netuno; Aires, Benevides

    2016-08-01

    Chloritites from different localities (Arapoema, Couto Magalhães Velho, Juarina, Morro Grande, Morro do Jabuti, Morro do Pau Ferrado, Morro do Salto, Serra do Jacu, Serra do Quatipuru, Serra do Tapa, Serrinha) of the Araguaia fold belt, Tocantins geotectonic province, central-northern Brazil, have been investigated. Based on field work and petrographic, diffractometric, geochemical and mineral chemistry data, these rocks, commonly associated with metacherts and banded iron formations, have been interpreted as products of ocean-floor exhalative-hydrothermal activity on MORB basalts. Distribution patterns of rare earth elements and diagrams of relatively immobile components in the hydrothermal environment highlight not only the genetic link between the chloritites and the basaltic rocks that occur in the region (Serra do Tapa and Morro do Agostinho), but also some peculiar characteristics of the submarine environment. The rock association and anomalous contents of Cu, Zn, Ni, As, and Au are suggestive that the region was favorable to the formation of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, what makes it a potential target for mineral exploration programs.

  17. Hydrothermal Activity Along Multiple Ridge Segments of the Northern Central Indian Ridge, 8°-17°S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, J.; Kim, J.; Pak, S.; Son, S.; Moon, J.; Baker, E. T.

    2012-12-01

    We report the first systematic hydrothermal plume surveys conducted on the northern Central Indian Ridge (CIR, 8°-17°S), a slow spreading ridge with rates between ~35 and 40 mm/yr, during the CIR research program of KORDI between 2009 and 2011. Using a combined CTD/Miniature Autonomous Plume Recorder (MAPR) package we occupied 208 vertical casts and 82 tows along seven segments of the CIR totaling ~700 km of ridge length to estimate the frequency of hydrothermal activity on this slow-spreading ridge. Evidence for hydrothermal activity was found on each of the seven segments, with most plumes found between 3000 and 3500 m. Using only stations within the rift valley, the estimated value of plume incidence (ph=0.19) coincides with the global trend between the spatial density of hydrothermal plumes and full-spreading rate (an indicator of magmatic budget). However, there are also indications of possible discharge from hydrothermal activity or serpentinization from the ridge flanks (possible ocean core complexes), as has been observed along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. For example, some sites show methane anomalies unaccompanied by any optical anomaly. Our preliminary results support the increasing role of tectonic control on hydrothermal activity as spreading rates decrease. Further examination of the plume signals, combined with chemical composition of sampled water and geological data, will provide valuable insights into hydrothermal activity on slow spreading ridges.

  18. [Intoxication due to pesticides in the central northern region of the State of Paraná, Brazil - 2002 to 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Pedro Dias Mangolini; Bellini, Marcella

    2013-11-01

    This research is based on epidemiological records of toxicological occurrences in individual records of investigation into pesticide poisoning at the Maringá Intoxication Control Center at the Regional University Hospital of Maringá. The intoxications in patients poisoned from 2002 to 2011, in towns that comprise the Central Northern Paraná Geographic Mesoregion where Maringá is located, were taken into consideration in this study. As a result, it was established that approximately 67.12% of those poisoned were males, the age groups most affected are 20-29 years old and 30-39 years old. Suicide attempts appear as the main motivation for hospitalization (possibly disguising the chronic intoxication), and mainly insecticides and herbicides are involved in the poisonings, with 62.60% and 26%, respectively. Lastly, the urgent need for public health policies in to reduce this statistic immediately is self-evident, as these poisonings are the ones recorded, as those resulting from food poisoning are not being computed.

  19. Polyphase tectonic subsidence evolution of the Vienna Basin inferred from quantitative subsidence analysis of the northern and central parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Young; Wagreich, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The Vienna Basin is a tectonically complex Neogene basin situated at the Alpine-Carpathian transition. This study analyzes a detailed quantification of subsidence in the northern and central parts of the Vienna Basin to understand its tectonic subsidence evolution. About 200 wells were used to arrange stratigraphic setting, and wells reaching the pre-Neogene basement were analyzed for subsidence. To enhance the understanding of the regional subsidences, the wells were sorted into ten groups based on their position on major fault blocks. In the Early Miocene, subsidence was slow and along E-W to NE-SW trending axis, indicating the development of thrust-controlled piggyback basins. During the late Early Miocene data show abruptly increasing subsidence, making the initiation of the Vienna pull-apart basin system. From the Middle Miocene, the tectonic subsidence curves show regionally different patterns. The tectonic subsidence during the Middle Miocene varies laterally across the Vienna Basin, and the differential subsidence can be related to the changing tensional regime of weakening transtension and strengthening extension toward the late Middle Miocene. From the late Middle Miocene to the Late Miocene, the tectonic subsidence occurred dominantly along the regional active faults, and corresponds to the axis of E-W trending extension of the western parts of the Pannonian Basin system. In the Quaternary the Vienna Basin has been reactivated, and resulted in subsidence along the NE-SW trending Vienna Basin transfer fault system.

  20. A Petrogenetic Model of Basalts from the Northern Central Indian Ridge: 3-11°S

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dwijesh RAY; Sridhar D.IYER; Ranadip BANERJEE; Saumitra MISRA; M. WIDDOWSON

    2007-01-01

    Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts (MORB) from the Northern Central Indian Ridge (NCIR) were recovered between latitudes 3° and 11°S and are olivine tholeiite with higher abundances of K and Rb.They are of typical transitional MORB (T-MORB) variety and appear to have been generated from an enriched-mantle peridotite source. The primitive NCIR MORBs having Mg# > 0.68 are the product of partial melting at an estimated pressure of ~ 1 GPa. It is inferred that the magma was subsequently modified at a pressure > 1 GPa by crystal fractionation and spinel was the first mineral to crystallize followed by separation of relatively Fe-rich olivine with subsequent decrease in pressure. During progressive fractionation at lower pressure (between 1-0.5 GPa), the bulk composition of the magma became systematically depleted in MgO, and enriched in ∑FeO, TiO2, P2O5 and Na2O. There was,however, limited gradual depletion in Al2O3 and CaO and concomitant enrichment in K2O. With the progressive fractionation these basalts became gradually enriched in V, Co, Y, Zr and to some extent in Sr, and depleted in Ni and Cr. In addition, the ∑REE of the magma also increased with fractionation,without any change in (La/Yb)n value.

  1. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1958. The report highlights the weather, water, habitat, and wildlife conditions for the year of...

  2. Identificación, caracterización y dinámica de las geoformas glaciales y periglaciales en la Cordillera de los Andes a través de sensores remotos

    OpenAIRE

    Falaschi, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    El presente trabajo de Tesis Doctoral tuvo el objetivo de estudiar los glaciares y glaciares de escombros en tres regiones montañosas a lo largo de la Cordillera de los Andes Argentina: Monte San Lorenzo (Provincia de Santa Cruz), Volcán Domuyo (Provincia de Neuquén), y Nevados de Cachi (Provincia de Salta). Cada uno de estos sitios presenta características climáticas propias, representativas de tres porciones particulares de los Andes: Andes Patagónicos Meridionales, Andes Centrales Meridion...

  3. Global water watch in the Andes

    OpenAIRE

    S. Ruiz-Córdova; B. Duncan

    2001-01-01

    An "offspring" of SANREM Philippines experience, the Water Resources Management and Environmental Education activity in the Andes is approaching problems of water through community-based, participatory research. Forty-three citizens in Ecuador and eleven in Peru have become certified water quality monitors. Under sponsorship of UNORCAC, SANREM's partner in the Andes, a significant portion of water quality data obtained is the result of their efforts. Since July 1999 a time series of 2,800 bac...

  4. A millennium of metallurgy recorded by lake sediments from Morococha, Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Colin A; Abbott, Mark B; Wolfe, Alexander P; Kittleson, John L

    2007-05-15

    To date, information concerning pre-Colonial metallurgy in South America has largely been limited to the archaeological record of artifacts. Here, we reconstruct a millennium of smelting activity in the Peruvian Andes using the lake-sediment stratigraphy of atmospherically derived metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Ag, Sb, Bi, and Ti) and lead isotopic ratios (206Pb/ 207Pb) associated with smelting from the Morococha mining region in the central Peruvian Andes. The earliest evidence for metallurgy occurs ca. 1000 A.D., coinciding with the fall of the Wari Empire and decentralization of local populations. Smelting during this interval appears to have been aimed at copper and copper alloys, because of large increases in Zn and Cu relative to Pb. A subsequent switch to silver metallurgy under Inca control (ca. 1450 to conquest, 1533 A.D.) is indicated by increases in Pb, Sb, and Bi, a conclusion supported by further increases of these metals during Colonial mining, which targeted silver extraction. Rapid development of the central Andes during the 20th century raised metal burdens by an order of magnitude above previous levels. Our results represent the first evidence for pre-Colonial smelting in the central Peruvian Andes, and corroborate the sensitivity of lake sediments to pre-Colonial metallurgical activity suggested by earlier findings from Bolivia.

  5. Water-quality assessment of the Central Arizona Basins, Arizona and northern Mexico; environmental setting and overview of water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordy, Gail E.; Rees, Julie A.; Edmonds, Robert J.; Gebler, Joseph B.; Wirt, Laurie; Gellenbeck, Dorinda J.; Anning, David W.

    1998-01-01

    The Central Arizona Basins study area in central and southern Arizona and northern Mexico is one of 60 study units that are part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment program. The purpose of this report is to describe the physical, chemical, and environmental characteristics that may affect water quality in the Central Arizona Basins study area and present an overview of water quality. Covering 34,700 square miles, the study area is characterized by generally north to northwestward-trending mountain ranges separated by broad, gently sloping alluvial valleys. Most of the perennial rivers and streams are in the northern part of the study area. Rivers and streams in the south are predominantly intermittent or ephemeral and flow in response to precipitation such as summer thunderstorms. Effluent-dependent streams do provide perennial flow in some reaches. The major aquifers in the study area are in the basin-fill deposits that may be as much as 12,000 feet thick. The 1990 population in the study area was about 3.45 million, and about 61 percent of the total was in Maricopa County (Phoenix and surrounding cities). Extensive population growth over the past decade has resulted in a twofold increase in urban land areas and increased municipal water use; however, agriculture remains the major water use. Seventy-three percent of all water with drawn in the study area during 1990 was used for agricultural purposes. The largest rivers in the study area-the Gila, Salt, and Verde-are perennial near their headwaters but become intermittent downstream because of impoundments and artificial diversions. As a result, the Central Arizona Basins study area is unique compared to less arid basins because the mean surface-water outflow is only 528 cubic feet per second from a total drainage area of 49,650 square miles. Peak flows in the northern part of the study area are the result of snowmelt runoff; whereas, summer thunderstorms account for the peak flows in

  6. Observational evidences on the modulation of the South American Low Level Jet east of the Andes according the ENSO variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. M. Silva

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The differences on the phase and wavelength of the quasi-stationary waves over the South America generated by El Niño (EN and La Niña (LN events seem to affect the daily evolution of the South American Low Level Jet east of the Andes (SALLJ. For the austral summer period of 1977–2004 the SALLJ episodes detected according to Bonner criterion 1 show normal to above-normal frequency in EN years, and in LN years the episodes show normal to below-normal frequency.

    During EN and LN years the SALLJ episodes were associated with positive rainfall anomalies over the La Plata Basin, but more intense during LN years. During EN years the increase in the SALLJ cases were associated to intensification of the Subtropical Jet (SJ around 30° S and positive Sea Level Pressure (SLP anomalies over the western equatorial Atlantic and tropical South America, particularly over central Brazil. This favored the intensification of the northeasterly trade winds over the northern continent and it channeled by the Andes mountain to the La Plata Basin region where negative SLP are found. The SALLJ cases identified during the LN events were weaker and less frequent when compared to those for EN years. In this case the SJ was weaker than in EN years and the negative SLP anomalies over the tropical continent contributed to the inversion of the northeasterly trade winds. Also a southerly flow anomaly was generated by the geostrophic balance due to the anomalous blocking over southeast Pacific and the intense cyclonic transient over the southern tip of South America. As result the warm tropical air brought by the SALLJ encounters the cold extratropical air from the southerly winds over the La Plata basin. This configuration can increase the conditional instability over the La Plata basin and may explain the more intense positive rainfall anomalies in SALLJ cases during LN years than in EN years.

  7. U-Pb, Re-Os, and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the Nambija Au-skarn and Pangui porphyry Cu deposits, Ecuador: implications for the Jurassic metallogenic belt of the Northern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaradia, Massimo; Vallance, Jean; Fontboté, Lluis; Stein, Holly; Schaltegger, Urs; Coder, Joshua; Richards, Jeremy; Villeneuve, Mike; Gendall, Ian

    2009-05-01

    New U-Pb, Re-Os, and 40Ar/39Ar dates are presented for magmatic and hydrothermal mineral phases in skarn- and porphyry-related ores from the Nambija and Pangui districts of the Subandean zone, southeastern Ecuador. Nambija has been one of the main gold-producing centers of Ecuador since the 1980s due to exceptionally high-grade ores (average 15 g/t, but frequently up to 300 g/t Au). Pangui is a recently discovered porphyry Cu-Mo district. The geology of the Subandean zone in southeastern Ecuador is dominated by the I-type, subduction-related, Jurassic Zamora batholith, which intrudes Triassic volcanosedimentary rocks. The Zamora batholith is in turn cut by porphyritic stocks, which are commonly associated with skarn formation and/or porphyry-style mineralization. High precision U-Pb and Re-Os ages for porphyritic stocks (U-Pb, zircon), associated prograde skarn (U-Pb, hydrothermal titanite), and retrograde stage skarn (Re-Os, molybdenite from veins postdating gold deposition) of the Nambija district are all indistinguishable from each other within error (145 Ma) and indicate a Late Jurassic age for the gold mineralization. Previously, gold mineralization at Nambija was considered to be Early Tertiary based on K-Ar ages obtained on various hydrothermal minerals. The new Jurassic age for the Nambija district is slightly younger than the 40Ar/39Ar and Re-Os ages for magmatic-hydrothermal minerals from the Pangui district, which range between 157 and 152 Ma. Mineralization at Nambija and Pangui is associated with porphyritic stocks that represent the last known episodes of a long-lived Jurassic arc magmatism (˜190 to 145 Ma). A Jurassic age for mineralization at Nambija and Pangui suggests that the Northern Andean Jurassic metallogenic belt, which starts in Colombia at 3° N, extends down to 5° S in Ecuador. It also adds a new mineralization style (Au-skarn) to the metal endowment of this belt.

  8. Multiproxy record of the last interglacial (MIS 5e) off central and northern California, U.S.A., from Ocean Drilling Program sites 1018 and 1020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poore, Richard Z.; Dowsett, H.J.; Barron, J.A.; Heusser, L.; Ravelo, A.C.; Mix, A.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental and climatic conditions during the last interglacial (about 125,000 years ago) along the Central and Northern California coastal region are interpreted from study of marine cores recovered by the Ocean Drilling Program at sites 1018 and 1020. Marine microfossil and pollen assemblages, oxygen isotopes in benthic foraminifers, physical properties, and calcium carbonate contents of cored sediments are proxies indicating strong links between the marine and terrestrial environments during marine isotope stage 5 (MIS 5). At the beginning of the last interglacial (MIS 5e), reduction in global ice volume, increase in surface temperature, and warming of air temperature along the Central and Northern California coast were synchronous within the resolution of our sampling record.

  9. SHRIMP U-Pb dating and Hf isotopic analyses of Middle Ordovician meta-cumulate gabbro in central Qiangtang, northern Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Metabasites consisting of metamorphic ultra-mafic rocks, cumulate gabbro, gabbro (diabase), basalt, and plagiogranite are exposed at the Taoxinghu area in central Qiangtang, northern Tibetan Plateau. Zircon SHRIMP U-Pb dating for the cumulate gabbro yields a weighted mean age of 467±4 Ma, which is the oldest and most reliable magmatic age in this area. Zircon 176Hf/177Hf ratios range from 0.282615 to 0.282657, with εHf(t) values of 5.02±0.28, indicating that the cumulate gabbro was mainly derived from the depleted mantle. In addition, geochemical data of metabasites suggest that they have similar characteristics to those in the mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB). The Taoxinghu metabasites may represent the fragment of Early Paleozoic ophiolite in the "Central Uplift" of the Qiangtang, northern Tibetan Plateau.

  10. The Vocalism Quantity of Pre-Stressed Syllables in the Subdialect of the Central Region of Northern Žemaitian Kretinga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofija Babickienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with phonetic peculiarity of the quantity of pre-stressed syllables in the subdialect of the Central region of Northern Žemaitian Kretinga dictinguishing this subdialect from the neighbouring one of Telšiai region. The reseach was done with the help of both self-observing and experimental methods using the following programmes: Cool Edit Pro, PRAAT4.0.31 sound analysis programme created by Paul Boersma and David Weenink, the scientists of the university of Amsterdam. The statistical analysis was performed by the help of programme STUDENT (programming language TURBO-PASCAL, v. 7.0 created by Prof. Dr Habil of Vilnius university Aleksas Girdenis. The Analysis showed that the lengthening of long vowels and diphthongs of the first component is typical to the Central region of Northern Žemaitian Kretinga.While analysing the average of their duration, it was determined that the general vowel lengthening average in mixed diftongs, in fact, does not differ from the average length of the average of long vowels, such as i˙ , u˙, i. e the ratio of average duration is 1: 1,07. Unstressed syllables when preceeded by either short or semi-long stressed syllables in the subdialect of the Central region of Northern Žemaitian Kretinga are shorter when preceeded by long syllables. The presumption could be drawn that in the subdialect of the Central region of Northern Žemaitian Kretinga the lenght of pre-stressed syllables is the result of the communication between Žemaitians and Curonians. This reseach stimulates the interest to go deeper into those problems, which might specify the vocalism changes of that period.

  11. Petrography, mineral chemistry, fluid inclusion microthermometry and Re–Os geochronology of the Küre volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit (Central Pontides, Northern Turkey).

    OpenAIRE

    Akbulut, M; Oyman, T.; Çiçek, M.; Selby, D.; Özgenç, İ.; Tokçaer, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Re–Os isotopic system is applied for the first time to the sulfide ores and the overlying black-shales at the Küre volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit of the Central Pontides, Northern Turkey. The ore samples collected include predominantly pyrite, accompanied by chalcopyrite, sphalerite and other species. Massive ore is almost free of gangues, whereas the stockwork ore includes quartz and calcite gangue. The composition of sphalerite is similar to ancient and modern massive sulfide mine...

  12. Geomorphic analysis of transient landscapes in the Sierra Madre de Chiapas and Maya Mountains (northern Central America): implications for the North American–Caribbean–Cocos plate boundary

    OpenAIRE

    L. Andreani; R. Gloaguen

    2016-01-01

    We use a geomorphic approach in order to unravel the recent evolution of the diffuse triple junction between the North American, Caribbean, and Cocos plates in northern Central America. We intend to characterize and understand the complex tectonic setting that produced an intricate pattern of landscapes using tectonic geomorphology, as well as available geological and geophysical data. We classify regions with specific relief characteristics and highlight uplifted relict landsc...

  13. Evolution of the Tyrone ophiolite, Northern Ireland, during the Grampian-Taconic orogeny: a correlative of the Annieopsquotch Ophiolite Belt of central Newfoundland?

    OpenAIRE

    Hollis, S.P.; Cooper, M R; Roberts, S; Earls, G.; HERRINGTON, R.; Condon, D.J.; Daly, J S

    2013-01-01

    The Tyrone Plutonic Group of Northern Ireland represents the upper portions of a tectonically dissected suprasubduction-zone ophiolite accreted to the composite Laurentian margin during the Middle Ordovician. Understanding its development and relationship to the Tyrone Central Inlier, an outboard fragment of relatively high-grade, peri-Laurentian continental crust, is essential for reconstructing the closure of the Iapetus Ocean. The Tyrone Plutonic Group is composed of tectonized layered, is...

  14. Dengue virus in sub-tropical northern and central Viet Nam: population immunity and climate shape patterns of viral invasion and maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabaa, Maia A; Simmons, Cameron P; Fox, Annette; Le, Mai Quynh; Nguyen, Thuy Thi Thu; Le, Hai Yen; Gibbons, Robert V; Nguyen, Xuyen Thanh; Holmes, Edward C; Aaskov, John G

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus transmission occurs in both epidemic and endemic cycles across tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. Incidence is particularly high in much of Southeast Asia, where hyperendemic transmission plagues both urban and rural populations. However, endemicity has not been established in some areas with climates that may not support year-round viral transmission. An understanding of how dengue viruses (DENV) enter these environments and whether the viruses persist in inapparent local transmission cycles is central to understanding how dengue emerges in areas at the margins of endemic transmission. Dengue is highly endemic in tropical southern Vietnam, while increasingly large seasonal epidemics have occurred in northern Viet Nam over the last decade. We have investigated the spread of DENV-1 throughout Vietnam to determine the routes by which the virus enters northern and central regions of the country. Phylogeographic analysis of 1,765 envelope (E) gene sequences from Southeast Asia revealed frequent movement of DENV between neighboring human populations and strong local clustering of viral lineages. Long-distance migration of DENV between human population centers also occurred regularly and on short time-scales, indicating human-mediated viral invasion into northern Vietnam. Human populations in southern Vietnam were found to be the primary source of DENV circulating throughout the country, while central and northern Vietnam acted as sink populations, likely due to reduced connectedness to other populations in the case of the central regions and to the influence of temperature variability on DENV replication and vector survival and competence in the north. Finally, phylogeographic analyses suggested that viral movement follows a gravity model and indicates that population immunity and physical and economic connections between populations may play important roles in shaping patterns of DENV transmission.

  15. Dengue virus in sub-tropical northern and central Viet Nam: population immunity and climate shape patterns of viral invasion and maintenance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia A Rabaa

    Full Text Available Dengue virus transmission occurs in both epidemic and endemic cycles across tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. Incidence is particularly high in much of Southeast Asia, where hyperendemic transmission plagues both urban and rural populations. However, endemicity has not been established in some areas with climates that may not support year-round viral transmission. An understanding of how dengue viruses (DENV enter these environments and whether the viruses persist in inapparent local transmission cycles is central to understanding how dengue emerges in areas at the margins of endemic transmission. Dengue is highly endemic in tropical southern Vietnam, while increasingly large seasonal epidemics have occurred in northern Viet Nam over the last decade. We have investigated the spread of DENV-1 throughout Vietnam to determine the routes by which the virus enters northern and central regions of the country. Phylogeographic analysis of 1,765 envelope (E gene sequences from Southeast Asia revealed frequent movement of DENV between neighboring human populations and strong local clustering of viral lineages. Long-distance migration of DENV between human population centers also occurred regularly and on short time-scales, indicating human-mediated viral invasion into northern Vietnam. Human populations in southern Vietnam were found to be the primary source of DENV circulating throughout the country, while central and northern Vietnam acted as sink populations, likely due to reduced connectedness to other populations in the case of the central regions and to the influence of temperature variability on DENV replication and vector survival and competence in the north. Finally, phylogeographic analyses suggested that viral movement follows a gravity model and indicates that population immunity and physical and economic connections between populations may play important roles in shaping patterns of DENV transmission.

  16. An investigation of the genus Mesacanthus (Chordata: Acanthodii) from the Orcadian Basin and Midland Valley areas of Northern and Central Scotland using traditional morphometrics

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    Mesacanthus is a common and speciose genus of acanthodian fish from Lower Old Red Sandstone and Middle Old Red Sandstone assemblages (representing the Lower Devonian and Middle Devonian respectively) and is well represented in many palaeoichthyology collections in the UK. Based upon descriptions given during the 19th century, specimens of the genus Mesacanthus from the Orcadian Basin and Midland Valley areas of Northern and Central Scotland have historically been referred to a number of diffe...

  17. Trends and ENSO/AAO Driven Variability in NDVI Derived Productivity and Phenology alongside the Andes Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Meza

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing water use and droughts, along with climate variability and land use change, have seriously altered vegetation growth patterns and ecosystem response in several regions alongside the Andes Mountains. Thirty years of the new generation biweekly normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI3g time series data show significant land cover specific trends and variability in annual productivity and land surface phenological response. Productivity is represented by the growing season mean NDVI values (July to June. Arid and semi-arid and sub humid vegetation types (Atacama desert, Chaco and Patagonia across Argentina, northern Chile, northwest Uruguay and southeast Bolivia show negative trends in productivity, while some temperate forest and agricultural areas in Chile and sub humid and humid areas in Brazil, Bolivia and Peru show positive trends in productivity. The start (SOS and length (LOS of the growing season results show large variability and regional hot spots where later SOS often coincides with reduced productivity. A longer growing season is generally found for some locations in the south of Chile (sub-antarctic forest and Argentina (Patagonia steppe, while central Argentina (Pampa-mixed grasslands and agriculture has a shorter LOS. Some of the areas have significant shifts in SOS and LOS of one to several months. The seasonal Multivariate ENSO Indicator (MEI and the Antarctic Oscillation (AAO index have a significant impact on vegetation productivity and phenology in southeastern and northeastern Argentina (Patagonia and Pampa, central and southern Chile (mixed shrubland, temperate and sub-antarctic forest, and Paraguay (Chaco.

  18. Mid-crustal fluid related to the Matsushiro earthquake swarm (1965-1967) in northern Central Japan: Geochemical reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Yasuko; Funatsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Takashi; Takamoto, Naohiko; Tosha, Toshiyuki

    2016-06-01

    The Matsushiro district in the northern part of Ngano Prefecture, Central Japan, experienced a severe earthquake swarm associated with ground uplift and groundwater outflow during a period from 1965 to 1967. Geochemistry and isotope geochemistry of surface water and groundwater in the swarm area have been investigated. Water samples for the analyses were obtained from saline springs and streams, fresh water from streams and a shallow well, and, from seven wells of up to 600 m deep drilled in the Matsushiro fault zone. The results of analyses of water from the deep wells in the fault zone indicate a linear increase in dissolved Na, K, Al, Cl, Br, B and SiO4, and isotopic ratios of δD, δ18O and δ13C. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic ratios of the well water indicate a mixing between the surface water and isotopically heavy water exemplified by the "andesitic water" of Giggenbach (1992). Assuming that the isotopically heavy water has δD similar to the "andesitic water", the geochemistry of deep-seated brine is reproduced from the analytical data of well water. The reproduced composition of deep-seated brine is enriched in Na, Ca, Cl and HCO3 and has total dissolved solids comparable to seawater. The water of the reproduced composition is estimated to occupy a deep part (> 3 km below surface) of the fault zone. Available data show that the geochemical regime in the Matsushiro fault zone has remained unchanged since the swarm event. The reproduced composition of water is concluded to be similar to the brine triggering the swarm of earthquakes. The composition of the reproduced water is not as saline as the deep-seated fluid derived from dehydration of a subducting oceanic plate which results in water having a Cl content about twice that of the seawater. The relatively low-salinity nature comparable to seawater is one of the characteristics of mid-crustal fluid in volcanic fields.

  19. Predicting multi-scale relationships between geomorphology and bedrock geology of the rocky intertidal in Central and Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, A.; Aiello, I. W.

    2014-12-01

    Substratum geology is fundamental in shaping rocky shore morphology. Specific lithologies have various responses to wave action, tectonic features (e.g. fractures, faults) and sedimentary structures (e.g. bedding), creating distinctive weathering profiles. Along with local oceanography and climate forcing, different rock substrata create coastal morphologies that can vary distinctly between scales, ranging from mm to km. Despite the complexity of the system, qualitative observations show coastal areas with similar rock types share similar geomorphologies. Thus, a statistic relationship between geomorphology (expressed for instance by surface parameter rugosity) and geology can be envisaged. There are multiple benefits of finding such a relationship, as rocky intertidal geomorphology can be an important determinant in which organisms can settle, grow, and survive in near shore communities: allowing the prediction of geomorphologic parameters determining coastal ecology solely based on substratum geology, a crucial aspect in guiding the selection of marine protected areas. This study presents preliminary results of multi-scale geospatial surveys (cm to tens of meters) of rocky intertidal outcrops from Central to Northern California using a Terrestrial Laser Scanner. The outcrops investigated are representative of the most common igneous and sedimentary rocks in California (granitoids, conglomerates, sandstones, mudstones) and metamorphic units. The statistical analysis of the survey data support the hypothesis that surface properties can change significantly with changing scale, each rock type having distinct surface characteristics which are similar to comparable lithologies exposed at different locations. These scale dependent variations are controlled by different lithologic and structural characteristics of the outcrop in question. Our data also suggests lithologic variability within a rock unit could be a very significant factor in controlling changes in

  20. The role of vegetation in the formation of anabranching channels in an ephemeral river, Northern plains, arid central Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooth, Stephen; Nanson, Gerald C.

    2000-10-01

    As the distribution and abundance of vegetation in drylands is often controlled by the greater availability of water along river channels, riparian vegetation has the potential to influence significantly dryland river form, process and behaviour. This paper demonstrates how a small indigenous shrub, the inland teatree (Melaleuca glomerata), influences the formation and maintenance of anabranching channels in a reach of the ephemeral Marshall River, Northern Plains, arid central Australia. Here, the Marshall is characterized by ridge-form anabranching, where water and sediment are routed through subparallel, multiple channels of variable size which occur within a typically straight channel-train. Channels are separated by channel-train ridges - narrow, flow-aligned, vegetated features - or by wider islands. By providing a substantial element of boundary roughness, dense stands of teatrees growing on channel beds or atop the ridges and islands influence flow velocities, flow depths and sediment transport, resulting in flow diversion, bank and floodplain erosion, and especially sediment deposition. Ridges and islands represent a continuum of forms, and their formation and development can be divided into a three-stage sequence involving teatree growth and alluvial sedimentation.1Teatrees colonize a flat, sandy channel bed, initiating the formation of ridges by lee-side accretion. Individual ridges grow laterally, vertically and longitudinally and maintain a geometrically similar streamlined (lemniscate) form that presents minimum drag.2Individual ridges grow in size, and interact with neighbouring ridges, causing the lemniscate forms to become distorted. Ridges in the lee of other ridges tend to be protected from the erosive effects of floods and survive, whereas individual teatrees or small ridges exposed to flow concentrated between larger ridges, tend to be removed.3organized system of ridge-form anabranches. In the moderate- to low-gradient Marshall River, which is

  1. Variscan Collisional Magmatism and Deformation In The Viseu Area (northern Central Portugal) - Constraints From U-pb Geochronology of Granitoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, M. R.; Aguado, B. V.; Scaltegger, U.; Nolan, J.; Martins, M. R.; Medina, J.

    The Viseu area is located in the innermost zone of the Iberian Variscan Fold Belt (the Central Iberian Zone). It consists of abundant post-thickening, collision related grani- toids intruded into upper and middle crustal levels. The ascent of granite magmas took place after an extensional tectonic event (D2) and is coeval with D3 dextral and sinis- tral crustal-scale transcurrent shear zones. In the northern part of the area, the presence of a well preserved Upper Carboniferous tectonic basin filled with deformed conti- nental clastic sediments, bounded by contemporaneously exhumed deep crustal rocks and intruded by late-tectonic granites documents an episode of extension involving basin subsidence, uplift and erosion of the basement and granite magmatism in a post- thickening, but syn-convergent scenario. Convergence is manifested by strike-slip tec- tonics and basin inversion. According to structural criteria, the Variscan granitoids can be subdivided into two major groups: (1) syn-D3 granitoids including two dif- ferent petrological associations, highly peraluminous leucogranite and granodiorite- monzogranite intrusions and (2) late-D3 granitoids comprising slightly metaluminous to peraluminous granodiorites and monzogranites. Four plutons representing the syn- D3 leucogranites (Junqueira) and monzogranites (Maceira and Casal Vasco) and the late-D3 biotite granites (Cota) yielded U-Pb zircon + monazite or monazite ages of 310 Ma, 311 Ma, 311 Ma and 306 Ma, respectively. This points to a synchronous emplacement of the different syn-D3 plutons shortly followed by the intrusion of the late-D3 granites and suggests that the Upper Carboniferous plutonism occurred within a short time span of ca. 5 myr. Stratigraphic markers show that the oldest continental sediments in the Carboniferous basin are Westphalian whilst field relationships in- dicate that the deformation occurred prior to the intrusion of the late-D3 granitoids. Precise U-Pb geochronology proves that basin

  2. The subsurface geology of Central and Northern Negev with possible implications on the regional ground water flow pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, G.; Rosenthal, E.; Flexer, A.

    1992-02-01

    The hydrogeological properties of the Kurnub Group sequence in the central and northern Negev were reassessed following a broadly expanding data base. Over most of the study area, the Kurnub Group is composed of permeable horizons. The most pronounced aquiferous zone extends in the belt of the three breached anticlines (Makhteshim) toward the Dead Sea area whereas the least impervious zone was discerned north- and northwestward from this belt. The present-day relief at the base of the Kurnub Group is outlined by prominent structural highs. Major structural depressions are located close to the Dead Sea as well as in northwestern Negev and in the Coastal Plain of the Negev and its offshore. Three major subsurface structures i.e. the Dabbeshet, Gerar and the Judea blocks were formed along parallel, NE-striking Upper Cretaceous reverse faults (preceding normal faults). The amount of vertical displacements along these faults generally exceeds the thickness of impervious layers over- and underlying the Kurnub Group thus facilitating groundwater flow from the Arad Group into the Kurnub sequence and from the latter into the Judea Group aquifer. It appears that the Kurnub Group aquifer plunges from the structural highs of Ramon and Kurnub, toward the Dead Sea 3utlet, to the Sharsheret-Sedot Akiva basin and beneath the Coastal Plain. It also plunges westward to Shezaf and to the Sukkot-Julie low and further beneath the shelf. The new geological evidence and its hydrogeological implications provide solutions for various previously unexplained salinization processes and hydrochemical phenomena such as the ever increasing salinity in the Beer Sheva well-field, the high salinities and the particularly low U-concentrations in groundwater extracted from the Judea Group aquifer south of Beer Sheva, their thermal anomalies and high Fe +2 concentrations.

  3. An ecological model of the Northern and Central Adriatic Sea: Analysis of ecosystem structure and fishing impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, Marta; Santojanni, Alberto; Palomera, Isabel; Tudela, Sergi; Arneri, Enrico

    2007-08-01

    A trophic mass-balance model was developed to characterise the food web structure and functioning of the Northern and Central Adriatic Sea and to quantify the ecosystem impacts of fishing during the 1990s. Forty functional groups were described, including target and non-target fish and invertebrate groups, and three detritus groups (natural detritus, discards and by-catch of cetaceans and marine turtles). Results highlighted that there was an important coupling between pelagic-benthic production of plankton, benthic invertebrates and detritus. Organisms located at low and medium trophic levels, (i.e. benthic invertebrates, zooplankton and anchovy), as well as dolphins, were identified as keystone groups of the ecosystem. Jellyfish were an important element in terms of consumption and production of trophic flows within the ecosystem. The analysis of trophic flows of zooplankton and detritus groups indirectly underlined the importance of the microbial food web in the Adriatic Sea. Fishing activities inflicted notable impacts on the ecosystem during the 1990s, with a high gross efficiency of the fishery, a high consumption of fishable production, high exploitation rates for various target and non target species, a low trophic level of the catch and medium values of primary production required to sustain the fishery. Moreover, the analysis of Odum's ecological indicators highlighted that the ecosystem was in a low-medium developmental stage. Bottom trawling ( Strascico), mid-water trawling ( Volante) and beam trawling ( Rapido) fleets had the highest impacts on both target and non target ecological groups. On the contrary, purse seining ( Lampara) showed medium to low impacts on the ecosystem; cetaceans, marine turtles and sea birds were not significantly involved in competition with fishing activity.

  4. Active tectonics of the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, J. F.; Lamb, S. H.

    1992-04-01

    Nearly 90 mm a -1 of relative plate convergence is absorbed in the Andean plate-boundary zone. The pattern of active tectonics shows remarkable variations in the way in which the plate slip vector is partitioned into displacement and strain and the ways in which compatibility between different segments is solved. Along any traverse across the plate-boundary zone, the sum of relative velocities between points must equal the relative plate motion. We have developed a kinematic synthesis of displacement and strain partitioning in the Andes from 47°S to 5°N relevant for the last 5 Ma based upon: (1) relative plate motion deduced from oceanic circuits giving a roughly constant azimuth between 075 and 080; (2) moment tensor solutions for over 120 crustal earthquakes since 1960; (3) structural studies of deformed Plio-Pleistocene rocks; (4) topographic/geomorphic studies; (5) palaeomagnetic data; and (6) geodetic data. We recognize four neotectonic zones, with subzones and boundary transfer zones, that are partitioned in different ways. These zones are not coincident with the 'classic' zones defined by the presence or absence of a volcanic chain or differences in finite displacements and strains and tectonic form; the long-term segmentation and finite evolution of the Andes may not occur in constantly defined segments in space and time. In Segment 1 (47°-39°S), the slip vector is partitioned into roughly orthogonal Benioff Zone slip with large magnitude/large slip-surface earthquakes and both distributed dextral shear giving clockwise rotations of up to 50° and dextral slip in the curved Liquine-Ofqui Fault System giving 5°-10° of anticlockwise fore-arc rotation. In Segment 2 (39°-20°S), the slip vector is partitioned into Benioff Zone slip roughly parallel with the slip vector, Andean crustal shortening and a very small component of dextral slip, including that on the Atacama Fault System. Between 39° and 34°S, a cross-strike dextral transfer, which deflects

  5. Recreational Fishery Management Plan for Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Current condition of lake Andes (1996) and highlights potential problems and recommendations for improving the lake as a hatchery. Lake Andes was a much larger body...

  6. Formalized morphostructural zoning of the mountain zone of the Andes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabrielov, A.M.; Gvishiani, A.D.; Zhidkov, M.P.

    1982-01-01

    A plan is presented for morphostructural zoning of the Andes compiled according to formalized signs for purposes of seismic forecasting. Characteristics are presented for the basic morphostructural subdivisions of the Andes.

  7. Fish Population Investigation: Lake Andes, Charles Mix County

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Brief background on Lake Andes fishing history, and data on current fish populations. Lake Andes was a much larger body of water prior to the construction of an...

  8. Across the southern Andes on fin: glacial refugia, drainage reversals and a secondary contact zone revealed by the phylogeographical signal of Galaxias platei in Patagonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemlak, Tyler S; Habit, Evelyn M; Walde, Sandra J; Battini, Miguel A; Adams, Emily D M; Ruzzante, Daniel E

    2008-12-01

    We employed DNA sequence variation at two mitochondrial (control region, COI) regions from 212 individuals of Galaxias platei (Pisces, Galaxiidae) collected throughout Patagonia (25 lakes/rivers) to examine how Andean orogeny and the climatic cycles throughout the Quaternary affected the genetic diversity and phylogeography of this species. Phylogenetic analyses revealed four deep genealogical lineages which likely represent the initial division of G. platei into eastern and western lineages by Andean uplift, followed by further subdivision of each lineage into separate glacial refugia by repeated Pleistocene glacial cycles. West of the Andes, refugia were likely restricted to the northern region of Patagonia with small relicts in the south, whereas eastern refugia appear to have been much larger and widespread, consisting of separate northern and southern regions that collectively spanned most of Argentinean Patagonia. The retreat of glacial ice following the last glacial maximum allowed re-colonization of central Chile from nonlocal refugia from the north and east, representing a region of secondary contact between all four glacial lineages. Northwestern glacial relicts likely followed pro-glacial lakes into central Chilean Patagonia, whereas catastrophic changes in drainage direction (Atlantic --> Pacific) for several eastern palaeolakes were the likely avenues for invasions from the east. These mechanisms, combined with evidence for recent, rapid and widespread population growth could explain the extensive contemporary distribution of G. platei throughout Patagonia. PMID:19017262

  9. Glacial recession in the Tropical Andes from the Little Ice Age: the case of Ampato Volcanic Complex (Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá, J.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.

    2010-03-01

    Data published over the last decade reveal substantial glacial recession in the tropical Andes since the Little Ice Age (LIA), (Ramirez, et al., 2001; Rabatel, et al., 2005; Rabatel, et al., 2008; Vuille, et al., 2008; Hastenrath, 2009; Jomelli, et al., 2009), and a growing rate of recession since the 1980’s caused by global warming (Ramirez, et al., 2001; Vuille, et al., 2008). Today there is great interest in the evolution of these ice masses due to heightened awareness of climate change and of the strategic importance that glaciers have as a hydrologic resource for communities in arid climate zones in the tropical Andes (Mark, 2008; Vuille et al., 2008). Cordillera Blanca forms part of the Andes Mountains of northern Peru, and is a chosen site for many studies on glacier evolution. Vuille et al. 2008 determined that a considerable area of ice mass was lost at Huascarán-Chopicalqui glacier (18% from 1920-1970) and Astesonraju glacier (20% from 1962-2003). Studies at Coropuna volcano, which has the most extensive glacier field in the western range of southern Peru, also report a strong melting trend that began with only minimal recession from 1955-1986 (4%), but increased to 14% from 1986-2007 (Úbeda et al., 2009). Only a few of the Andes glaciers are consistently monitored, and the most comprehensive data are for Chacaltaya and Zongo glaciers (16º S) in Bolivia. Since the maximum LIA, Chacaltaya has lost 89% of its surface area, particularly in recent years. By 1983, the totaled loss was five times the shrinkage for the period 1940-1963 (Ramirez, et al., 2001). Zongo glacier maintained equilibrium from 1956-1975, but later experienced a period dominated by continuous recession (Soruco, et al., 2009). This study expands current knowledge of glacier evolution since the LIA in the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ; 14º - 27º S) (Stern, 2004) of the Andes. The study site was chosen in an area that had never been used for preliminary research of this type, concretely

  10. A 2,300-year-long annually resolved record of the South American summer monsoon from the Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Broxton W; Abbott, Mark B; Vuille, Mathias; Rodbell, Donald T; Stansell, Nathan D; Rosenmeier, Michael F

    2011-05-24

    Decadal and centennial mean state changes in South American summer monsoon (SASM) precipitation during the last 2,300 years are detailed using an annually resolved authigenic calcite record of precipitation δ(18)O from a varved lake in the Central Peruvian Andes. This unique sediment record shows that δ(18)O peaked during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) from A.D. 900 to 1100, providing evidence that the SASM weakened considerably during this period. Minimum δ(18)O values occurred during the Little Ice Age (LIA) between A.D. 1400 and 1820, reflecting a prolonged intensification of the SASM that was regionally synchronous. After the LIA, δ(18)O increased rapidly, particularly during the current warm period (CWP; A.D. 1900 to present), indicating a return to reduced SASM precipitation that was more abrupt and sustained than the onset of the MCA. Diminished SASM precipitation during the MCA and CWP tracks reconstructed Northern Hemisphere and North Atlantic warming and a northward displacement of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) over the Atlantic, and likely the Pacific. Intensified SASM precipitation during the LIA follows reconstructed Northern Hemisphere and North Atlantic cooling, El Niño-like warming in the Pacific, and a southward displacement of the ITCZ over both oceans. These results suggest that SASM mean state changes are sensitive to ITCZ variability as mediated by Western Hemisphere tropical sea surface temperatures, particularly in the Atlantic. Continued Northern Hemisphere and North Atlantic warming may therefore help perpetuate the recent reductions in SASM precipitation that characterize the last 100 years, which would negatively impact Andean water resources. PMID:21555548

  11. What do Great Subduction Earthquakes tell us About Continental Deformation of the Upper Plate in the Central Andes Forearc? Insights From Seismotectonics, Continental Deformation and Coulomb Modelisation Along Southern Peru Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audin, L.; Perfettini, H.; Tavera, H.

    2007-05-01

    Calientes Fault system (parallel to the trench) and a crustal depth of about 20km. Such a magnitud and crustal depth in the area correlates perfectly with the Quaternary geomorphic evidences of tectonic activity along the Sama-Calientes thrust fault in the forearc in Southern Peru. Some questions are raised by the occurrence of such continental seismicity, just after a major subduction event, as none has been registered in the area since more than 40 years. Continental fault systems constitute a key to the understanding of the forearc deformation in the Arica Elbow, where the Andes obliquity with respect to the Nazca plate convergence direction. Also these results suggest that continental deformation should give us clues to define the pattern of segmentation of the subduction zone by studying seismotectonics and its relation to the segmentation of the upper continental plate.

  12. Breeding ecology of ferruginous hawks, Swainson's hawks, and northern harriers in south-central North Dakota : Final report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Final report of research survey to document the breeding ecology of ferruginous hawks, Swainsons hawk, and northern harrier in Kulm Wetland Management District WMD...

  13. Breeding ecology of ferruginous hawks, Swainson's hawks, and northern harriers in south-central North Dakota : Final report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Final report of research survey to document the breeding ecology of ferruginous hawks, Swainson’s hawk, and northern harrier in Kulm Wetland Management District...

  14. Breeding ecology of ferruginous hawks, Swainson’s hawks, and northern harriers in south-central North Dakota : Proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Project proposal for research survey to document the breeding ecology of ferruginous hawks, Swainson’s hawk, and northern harrier in Kulm Wetland Management...

  15. CentralBeaufort_shorelines.shp - Shorelines for the northern Alaska coastal region used in shoreline change analysis, 1947 to 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska is an area of strategic economic importance to the United States, is home to remote Native American communities, and...

  16. l3a81nc.m77t - MGD77 data file for Geophysical data from field activity L-3A-81-NC in Central Coast, Northern California from 04/16/1981 to 04/26/1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry, gravity, and magnetic data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of field activity L-3A-81-NC in Central Coast, Northern...

  17. Miocene Bahean stratigraphy in the Longzhong Basin,northern central China and its implications in environmental change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Jijun; ZHANG; Jun; SONG; Chunhui; ZHAO; Zhijun; ZHANG; Yong; WANG; Xiuxi; ZHANG; Jianming; CUI; Qiaoyu

    2006-01-01

    Fossil mammal-riched Neogene strata are widely distributed in the southeast corner of the huge Longzhong Basin at Tianshui,Gansu Province,northern central China.Hipparion weihoense,a typical member of late Middle Miocene Bahean stage,was recently excavated at Yaodian along a well-exposed outcrop.Owing to the importance of the Bahean stage in the mammalian evolution and its potential for environmental change,we suggested a name of Yaodian Formation for the stratigraphy,which is correlated to the Bahe Formation at Lantian,Shaanxi.High resolution paleomagnetic dating of the section shows that the Yaodian Formation covers the period between 11.67 Ma and 7.43 Ma,with the site bearing Hipparion weihoense being estimated at about 10.54-10.30 Ma,providing first magnetostratigraphic chronology for the Bahean Stage.The Yaodian Formation consists of fluvial channel deposits (11.67-10.40 Ma) at the bottom,floodplain deposits in the middle (10.40-9.23 Ma) and shallow lake sediments at the top (9.23-7.43 Ma).This upward fining sequence suggests that the relief in nearby mountain ranges such as West Qinling to the south and Huajia Ling to the north was greatly reduced after long-term denudation,fluvial transport capacity was low,and finally the drainage system was disintegrated,replaced with broad-shallow lakes in which only fine sediments like mud and marlite were deposited,indicating an old stage of development of a planation surface.A remarkable shift in ecology and climatic environment was found at 7.4-7.7 Ma when paleoclimate changed from early warm humid to late dry as indicated by sedimentary facies changed from early shallow lake sequence to late eolian red clays and a former coniferous-deciduous mixed forest was replaced by grassland,leading to great growth of Hipparion Fauna of Baodean stage in the region.Therefore,it is estimated that the present high relief of Qinling and drainage pattern did not come into being until Late Pliocene in response to intensive

  18. Centralised electricity production from winter cereals biomass grown under central-northern Spain conditions: Global warming and energy yield assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We assess the sustainability of electricity production from winter cereals biomass. • Productivity ranks are generated from different genotypes cultivated in real farms. • GHG and energy balances show better performance compared to natural gas electricity. • Cereals yields below 8 odt/ha do not accomplish objective 60% of GHG savings. • Marginal yields and sustainability criteria are discussed suggesting optimization. - Abstract: The goal of this paper is to assess the sustainability of electricity production from winter cereals grown in one of the most important Spanish agricultural areas, Castilla y León Region, situated in central-northern Spain. This study analyses greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions and energy balances of electricity production in a 25 MWe power plant that was powered using straw biomass from three annual winter cereals (rye, triticale and oat) grown as dedicated energy crops. The results of these analyses were compared with those of electricity produced from natural gas in Spanish power plants. Assessments were performed using a wide range of scenarios, mainly based on the biomass yield variability obtained in demonstration plots of twelve different winter cereal genotypes. Demonstration plots were established in two different locations (provinces of Soria and León) of the Castilla y León Region during two crop seasons (2009/2010 and 2010/2011) using common management practices and input rates for rain-fed agriculture in these regions. Our results suggest that production of electricity from winter cereals biomass combustion yielded considerable reductions in terms of GHG emissions when compared to electricity from natural gas. Nevertheless, the results show that low biomass yields that are relatively frequent for Spanish farmers on low productivity lands may produce no significant reductions in GHG in comparison with electricity from natural gas. Consequently, the agronomic management of winter cereals should be re

  19. Field relationships and geochemistry of pre-collisional (India-Asia) granitoid magmatism in the central Karakoram, northern Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, M. B.; Searle, M. P.

    1992-05-01

    In the central Karakoram Range, northern Pakistan, seven major granitic units which were emplaced prior to the Eocene (ca. 50 Ma) India-Asia collision have been mapped and analysed geochemically. The mid-Cretaceous Hunza plutonic complex dominates the Karakoram batholith in the west and is composed of quartz diorite-granodiorite plutons which have been deformed in the south by later collision-related thrusting. The Sost and Khunjerab plutons intrude the Palaeozoic-early Mesozoic sediments north of the batholith. In the east pre-collision magmatic units occur both north of (K2 gneiss, Broad Peak quartz diorite, Muztagh Tower unit) and south of (Hushe gneiss) the batholith which is dominated by a Miocene monzogranite-leucogranite pluton (Baltoro unit). The plutonic units to the north of the batholith are mid- to late Cretaceous with an age range of ca. 115-80 Ma whereas the Hushe gneiss to the south is dominantly Jurassic spanning the age range 200-145 Ma. All the pre-collision magmatic units display similar chemical and isotopic characteristics. Major, trace and REE variations in the Hunza plutonic complex are controlled by high-level fractionation of clinopyroxene, hornblende, plagioclase, biotite, ilmenite and allanite. High LILE/HFSE and LREE/HREE ratios, together with negative Nb, P and Ti anomalies suggest an ultimate source in the mantle wedge above the subducting slab. 87Sr/ 86Sr initial ratios (0.7055-0.7157) in the Hunza plutonic complex can best be explained by contamination of a mantle-derived magma by a crustal component with highly radiogenic Sr. All the units except the Hushe gneiss are probably related to subduction during closure of a back-arc basin between the Karakoram to the north and the Kohistan-Dras arc to the south during the mid- to late Cretaceous, and correlate with widespread plutonism from the same period in Kohistan, Ladakh and southern Tibet along the southern margin of Asia. The Hushe gneiss is probably related to an earlier northward

  20. Survival of invasive bladder cancer patients, 1998–2009; a central and northern Denmark population-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund L

    2011-07-01

    slightly in northern and central Denmark in the 1998–2009 period.Keywords: outcome research, MRR, mortality rate ratio

  1. Otitis media in young Aboriginal children from remote communities in Northern and Central Australia: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silberberg Peter

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Middle ear disease (otitis media is common and frequently severe in Australian Aboriginal children. There have not been any recent large-scale surveys using clear definitions and a standardised middle ear assessment. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of middle ear disease (otitis media in a high-risk population of young Aboriginal children from remote communities in Northern and Central Australia. Methods 709 Aboriginal children aged 6–30 months living in 29 communities from 4 health regions participated in the study between May and November 2001. Otitis media (OM and perforation of the tympanic membrane (TM were diagnosed by tympanometry, pneumatic otoscopy, and video-otoscopy. We used otoscopic criteria (bulging TM or recent perforation to diagnose acute otitis media. Results 914 children were eligible to participate in the study and 709 were assessed (78%. Otitis media affected nearly all children (91%, 95%CI 88, 94. Overall prevalence estimates adjusted for clustering by community were: 10% (95%CI 8, 12 for unilateral otitis media with effusion (OME; 31% (95%CI 27, 34 for bilateral OME; 26% (95%CI 23, 30 for acute otitis media without perforation (AOM/woP; 7% (95%CI 4, 9 for AOM with perforation (AOM/wiP; 2% (95%CI 1, 3 for dry perforation; and 15% (95%CI 11, 19 for chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM. The perforation prevalence ranged from 0–60% between communities and from 19–33% between regions. Perforations of the tympanic membrane affected 40% of children in their first 18 months of life. These were not always persistent. Conclusion Overall, 1 in every 2 children examined had otoscopic signs consistent with suppurative ear disease and 1 in 4 children had a perforated tympanic membrane. Some of the children with intact tympanic membranes had experienced a perforation that healed before the survey. In this high-risk population, high rates of tympanic perforation were associated with high

  2. Acerca de la propuesta "Caldera de Ñireco" en el centro-oeste de los Andes Neuquinos (38º50'S - 70º50'O The "Ñireco Caldera" in the central-western Neuquén Andes (38º50'S - 70º50'O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio F González Díaz

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available En el tramo austral del alto estructural de Copahue-Pino Hachado, a la latitud de la cuenca lacustre Moquehue-Aluminé y cercanías del límite argentino-chileno, ha sido distinguido un conjunto anómalo de nueve calderas resultantes de la actividad volcánica del Plioceno-Cuaternario. La "caldera de Ñireco", parte integrante de este conjunto, es motivo del presente trabajo. Los autores objetan el reconocimiento de tal componente morfoestructural a partir de un análisis geomorfológico, estructural y estratigráfico del área. A partir de ello, se reconoce una correspondencia entre los propuestos límites de dicha caldera, y la situación de los principales valles resultantes del proceso erosivo fluvial, cuyo desarrollo estuvo controlado por fallas inversas y lineamientos regionales. No existen evidencias que faciliten el reconocimiento de un aparato volcánico que teóricamente albergue la sugerida depresión caldérica, o remanentes de sus flancos externos e internos. En el sector central de la propuesta "caldera de Ñireco" se dan las mayores alturas topográficas de la región (± 2.900 m s.n.m., valores que superan ampliamente a los de la Cordillera Principal a estas latitudes. La estratigrafía local de la propuesta área de la caldera está compuesta esencialmente por las rocas más antiguas de la zona (granitoides del Paleozoico superior y secuencias volcánicas y volcaniclásticas del Triásico y no guarda coincidencia temporal alguna con la actividad volcánica del Plioceno-Cuaternario, la que se halla bien representada inmediatamente al norte y sur del sector analizado. La zona de estudio se enmarca por el contrario dentro de una faja plegada y corrida de piel gruesa y vergencia occidental, en donde la inversión tectónica jugó un rol central.In the southern segment of the Copahue- Pino Hachado block, next to the Moquehue-Alumine lacustrine basin, an anomalous concentration of calderas, resulting from a Pliocene

  3. Karyotypic polymorphism and evolution within and between the Liolaemus monticola (Iguanidae "northern 2n = 38-40" chromosome race populations in central Chile Polimorfismo cromosómico y evolución intra e inter poblacional de la raza cromosómica "Norte 2n = 28-40" de Liolaemus monticola (Iguanidae en Chile Central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MADELEINE LAMBOROT

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal genotypes were scored from 359 Liolaemus monticola lizards of the "northern, 2n = 38-40" chromosomal race from 21 locality samples between the Maipo (and one of its tributaries and the Aconcagua (and one of its tributaries ribers, plus a sample from the interracial hybridization zone, and some representative locality samples of the "southern 2n = 34" and the "multiple fission 2n = 42-44" chromosomal races for comparisons. The first seven variable chromosomal pairs were coded as Mendelian genotypes and statistically summarized by several clustering and population genetic algorithms. Spatial and temporal differentiation was assessed by chromosome frequencies, chromosomal diversity and heterozygosity. While no differentiation was found for diversity in the "northern 2n = 38-40" race, chromosomal frequencies and heterozygosity showed significant spatial differentiation that permit distinguishing between the coastal, Andean and transversal mountain range populations. The sample of Cuesta Chacabuco may represent a hybrid zone between the other two range samples. The origin of the chromosomal rearrangements, the population cytogenetics, and the recombination patterns resulting from chromosomal heterozygosity are compared in these chromosomal races, thus expanding the geographical area. These patterns are discussed with respect to the evolution of this complex in Chile and the importance of the riverine barriers in central ChileSe cuantificaron los "genotipos" cromosómicos para 359 lagartijas de 21 muestras poblacionales de la raza "Norte, 2n = 38-40" comprendida entre los ríos: río Maipo y uno de sus afluentes el río Yeso y río Aconcagua (y uno de sus afluentes el río Juncal. Con fines comparativos agregamos una muestra de la zona de hibridación interracial, algunas muestras representativas de la raza "Sur 2n = 34" y una de la raza "múltiples fisiones 2n = 42-44". Los siete primeros pares cromosómicos variables fueron codificados

  4. A Comparative Study of the Perceptions of End Users in the Eastern, Western, Central, Southern and Northern Regions of Saudi Arabia About Email Spam and Dealing with it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Alkahtani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a survey of email users in different regions of Saudi Arabia about email SPAM. The survey investigated the nature of email SPAM, how email users in the eastern, western, central, southern and northern dealt with it, and the efforts made to combat it. It also investigated the effectiveness of existing Anti-SPAM filters in detecting Arabic and English email SPAM. 1,500 participants located in the eastern, western, central, southern and northern regions of Saudi Arabia were surveyed and completed surveys were collected from 1,020 of the participants. The results showed that there were different definitions for email SPAM based on different users’ opinions in Saudi Arabia. The results showed that the participants in the central and western regions were more aware of SPAM than the participants in other regions. The results revealed that the volume of email SPAM was different from region to another and the volume of SPAM received by the participants in the northern and central regions was larger than that received in other regions. The results indicated that the majority of email SPAM received by the participants in different regions was written in English. The results showed that the most common type of email SPAM received in Arabic was emails related to forums and in English was phishing and fraud, and business advertisements. The results also showed that a few participants in all regions responded to SPAM and the average of the participants who responded to SPAM was larger in the southern region than other regions. The results showed that most of the participants were not aware of Anti-SPAM programs and the participants in the central region were more aware of Anti-SPAM programs than the participants in other regions. The results showed that the participants in all regions estimated that the existing Anti-SPAM programs were more effective in detecting English SPAM than Arabic SPAM. The results showed that most

  5. Seismic hazard assessment in the Northern Andes (PILOTO Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Grünthal

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Five Andean countries (Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela and four European countries (Italy, Spain, Holland, Germany cooperated in the PILOTO program ("Test area for earthquake monitoring and seismic hazard assessment", launched under GSHAP and sponsored by the European Union (Ct.94-0103 to produce a unified SHA for the Andean region. Activities included the integration of national earthquake catalogues and source zonings in common regional databases and joint technical workshops for the assessment of the regional hazard, expressed in terms of expected peak ground acceleration with 10% exceedance probability in 50 years.

  6. Patterns of landscape evolution on the central and northern Tibetan Plateau investigated using in-situ produced 10Be concentrations from river sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingkui; Li, Dewen; Liu, Gengnian; Harbor, Jon; Caffee, Marc; Stroeven, Arjen P.

    2014-07-01

    Quantifying long-term erosion rates across the Tibetan Plateau and its bordering mountains is of critical importance to an understanding of the interaction between climate, tectonic movement, and landscape evolution. We present a new dataset of basin-wide erosion rates from the central and northern Tibetan Plateau derived using in-situ produced 10Be concentrations of river sediments. Basin-wide erosion rates from the central plateau range from 10.1±0.9 to 36.8±3.2 mm/kyr, slightly higher than published local erosion rates measured from bedrock surfaces. These values indicate that long-term downwearing of plateau surfaces proceeds at low rates and that the landscape is demonstrably stable in the central plateau. In contrast, basin-wide erosion rates from the Kunlun Shan on the northern Tibetan Plateau range from 19.9±1.7 to 163.2±15.9 mm/kyr. Although the erosion rates of many of these basins are much higher than the rates from the central plateau, they are lower than published basin-wide erosion rates from other mountains fringing the Tibetan Plateau, probably because the basins in the Kunlun Shan include both areas of low-relief plateau surface and high-relief mountain catchments and may also result from retarded fluvial sediment transport in an arid climate. Significantly higher basin-wide erosion rates derived from the Tibetan Plateau margin, compared to the central plateau, reflect a relatively stable plateau surface that is being dissected at its margins by active fluvial erosion.

  7. Geomorphic analysis of transient landscapes from the Sierra Madre de Chiapas and Maya Mountains (northern Central America): implications for the North American-Caribbean-Cocos plate boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreani, L.; Gloaguen, R.

    2015-09-01

    We use a geomorphic approach in order to unravel the recent evolution of the diffuse triple junction between the North American, Caribbean, and Cocos plates in northern Central America. The complex tectonic setting produced an intricate pattern of landscapes that we try to systemize using remote sensing tectonic geomorphology and available geological and geophysical data. We classify regions with specific relief characteristics and highlight uplifted relict landscapes in northern Central America. We also analyze the drainage network from the Sierra Madre de Chiapas and Maya Mountains in order to extract information about potential vertical displacements. Our results suggest that most of the landscapes of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas and Maya Mountains are in transient stage. Topographic profiles and morphometric maps highlight elevated relict surfaces that are characterized by a low amplitude relief. The river longitudinal profiles display upper reaches witnessing these relict landscapes while lower segments characterized by multiple knickpoints, that adjust to new base-level conditions. These results backed by published GPS and seismotectonic data allow us to refine and extend existing geodynamic models of the triple junction. Relict landscapes are delimited by faults and thus result from a tectonic control. The topography of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas evolved as the result of (1) the inland migration of deformation related to the coupling between the Chiapas Massif and the Cocos fore-arc sliver, and (2) the compression along the northern tip of the Central America Volcanic Arc. Although most of the shortening between the Cocos fore-arc sliver and the North American plate is accommodated within the Sierra de Chiapas and Sierra de los Cuchumatanes, a small part may be still transmitted to the Maya Mountains and the Belize margin through a "rigid" Petén basin.

  8. Geomorphic analysis of transient landscapes in the Sierra Madre de Chiapas and Maya Mountains (northern Central America): implications for the North American-Caribbean-Cocos plate boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreani, L.; Gloaguen, R.

    2016-01-01

    We use a geomorphic approach in order to unravel the recent evolution of the diffuse triple junction between the North American, Caribbean, and Cocos plates in northern Central America. We intend to characterize and understand the complex tectonic setting that produced an intricate pattern of landscapes using tectonic geomorphology, as well as available geological and geophysical data. We classify regions with specific relief characteristics and highlight uplifted relict landscapes in northern Central America. We also analyze the drainage network from the Sierra Madre de Chiapas and Maya Mountains in order to extract information about potential vertical displacements. Our results suggest that most of the landscapes of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas and Maya Mountains are in a transient stage. Topographic profiles and morphometric maps highlight elevated relict surfaces that are characterized by a low-amplitude relief. The river longitudinal profiles display upper reaches witnessing these relict landscapes. Lower reaches adjust to new base-level conditions and are characterized by multiple knickpoints. These results backed by published GPS and seismotectonic data allow us to refine and extend existing geodynamic models of the triple junction. Relict landscapes are delimited by faults and thus result from a tectonic control. The topography of the Sierra Madre de Chiapas evolved as the result of (1) the inland migration of deformation related to the coupling between the Chiapas Massif and the Cocos forearc sliver and (2) the compression along the northern tip of the Central American volcanic arc. Although most of the shortening between the Cocos forearc sliver and the North American Plate is accommodated within the Sierra de Chiapas and Sierra de los Cuchumatanes, a small part may be still transmitted to the Maya Mountains and the Belize margin through a "rigid" Petén Basin.

  9. New dinosaur (Theropoda, stem-Averostra) from the earliest Jurassic of the La Quinta formation, Venezuelan Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Max C; Rincón, Ascanio D; Ramezani, Jahandar; Solórzano, Andrés; Rauhut, Oliver W M

    2014-10-01

    Dinosaur skeletal remains are almost unknown from northern South America. One of the few exceptions comes from a small outcrop in the northernmost extension of the Andes, along the western border of Venezuela, where strata of the La Quinta Formation have yielded the ornithischian Laquintasaura venezuelae and other dinosaur remains. Here, we report isolated bones (ischium and tibia) of a small new theropod, Tachiraptor admirabilis gen. et sp. nov., which differs from all previously known members of the group by an unique suite of features of its tibial articulations. Comparative/phylogenetic studies place the new form as the sister taxon to Averostra, a theropod group that is known primarily from the Middle Jurassic onwards. A new U-Pb zircon date (isotope dilution thermal-ionization mass spectrometry; ID-TIMS method) from the bone bed matrix suggests an earliest Jurassic maximum age for the La Quinta Formation. A dispersal-vicariance analysis suggests that such a stratigraphic gap is more likely to be filled by new records from north and central Pangaea than from southern areas. Indeed, our data show that the sampled summer-wet equatorial belt, which yielded the new taxon, played a pivotal role in theropod evolution across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary.

  10. New dinosaur (Theropoda, stem-Averostra) from the earliest Jurassic of the La Quinta formation, Venezuelan Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Max C.; Rincón, Ascanio D.; Ramezani, Jahandar; Solórzano, Andrés; Rauhut, Oliver W. M.

    2014-01-01

    Dinosaur skeletal remains are almost unknown from northern South America. One of the few exceptions comes from a small outcrop in the northernmost extension of the Andes, along the western border of Venezuela, where strata of the La Quinta Formation have yielded the ornithischian Laquintasaura venezuelae and other dinosaur remains. Here, we report isolated bones (ischium and tibia) of a small new theropod, Tachiraptor admirabilis gen. et sp. nov., which differs from all previously known members of the group by an unique suite of features of its tibial articulations. Comparative/phylogenetic studies place the new form as the sister taxon to Averostra, a theropod group that is known primarily from the Middle Jurassic onwards. A new U–Pb zircon date (isotope dilution thermal-ionization mass spectrometry; ID-TIMS method) from the bone bed matrix suggests an earliest Jurassic maximum age for the La Quinta Formation. A dispersal–vicariance analysis suggests that such a stratigraphic gap is more likely to be filled by new records from north and central Pangaea than from southern areas. Indeed, our data show that the sampled summer-wet equatorial belt, which yielded the new taxon, played a pivotal role in theropod evolution across the Triassic–Jurassic boundary. PMID:26064540

  11. A new species of Eretris Thieme (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae, Satyrinae) from the Elbow of the Andes region in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrcz, Tomasz W; Gareca, Yuvinka

    2009-01-01

    A new species of cloud forest butterfly, Eretris julieta n. sp. is described from a region of south-central Bolivia known as the Elbow of the Andes. It is the southernmost known representative of the genus, hitherto known only from a restricted area of interandean valleys in the department of Santa Cruz. Its affinities with other congeners are evaluated.

  12. Relationships between soil heavy metal pollution and enzyme activities in mining areas of northern Hunan province, Central South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xue-Feng; Jiang, Ying; Shu, Ying

    2014-05-01

    Hunan province, Central South China, is a well-known nonferrous metal base in China. Mine exploiting and processing there, however, often lead to heavy metal pollution of farmland. To study the effects of mining activities on the soil environmental quality, four representative paddy fields, the HSG, SNJ, NT and THJ, in Y county, northern Hunan province, were investigated. It was found that the streams running through the HSG, SNJ and NT are severely contaminated due to the long-term discharge of untreated mineral wastewater from local indigenous mining factories. The stream at the HSG, for example, is brownish red in color, with high concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, Fe and Mn. The concentrations of Cu, Zn and Cd in all the stream water of the HSG, SNJ and NT exceed the maximum allowable levels of the Agricultural Irrigation Water Criteria of China. Correspondingly, the HSG, SNJ and NT are heavily polluted by Cu, Zn and Cd due to the long-term irrigation with the contaminated stream water. In comparison, both stream water and paddy fields of the THJ, far away from mining areas, are not contaminated by any heavy metals and hence regarded as a control in this study. The rice grain produced at the HSG, SNJ and NT has a high risk of Cd contamination. The rate of rice grain produced in the four paddy fields in Y county with Cd exceeding the safe level (Cd, 0.2 μg g-1) specified by the National Standards for Rice Quality and Safety of China reaches 90%. Cd content in the rice grain is positively significantly correlated with that in the paddy fields, especially with the content of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) - extracted Cd, suggesting that the heavy metal pollution of paddy fields has already posed a high risk to rice safety and human health. Soil enzyme activities and microbial biomass are significantly inhibited by the heavy metal pollution of the paddy fields. Microbial biomass C and N (MBC and MBN) at a severely contaminated site of the HSG are only 31

  13. Asbestos exposure during quarrying and processing of serpentinites: a case study in Valmalenco, Central Alps, Northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, A.; Rimoldi, B.

    2012-04-01

    Serpentinites are metamorphic rocks derived from ultramafics such as peridotites (lherzolites and/or harzburgites), with a typical mineralogical assemblage of antigorite, olivine, diopside and minor magnetite, chlorite and chrysotile. If the rock mass has good geotechnical properties, these stones are quarried because of their wide variety of green shades and outstanding technical properties. Excellent stones are produced in the Malenco Valley, Central Alps (northern Italy, Sondrio): here the geological set-up is dominated by the ultramafic Malenco massif (lower crust-mantle complex), exposed at the Penninic to Austroalpine boundary zone. Different processing operations give origin to valuable products like stoves, funeral monuments, design home appliances; important building element as roof slabs, tiles for floor and wall coverings constitute the main commercial line of production. In this area, good quality long fibre chrysotile asbestos was mined since the XIX century, till the seventies. The asbestos fissures (mostly slip-fiber) are well known in Valmalenco, associated to an important ENE-WSW striking fracture and hydrothermal vein system. Some actual serpentinite quarries "cross" at times tunnels of the old asbestos mines, because the fracture and vein system "guides" the extraction. At present time, this area represents an excellent example of naturally occurring asbestos (NOA). For these reasons, workers' exposure to asbestos during quarrying and processing cannot be ruled out, and must be assessed according to national laws. From 2004 to nowadays, the INAIL Regional Management of Lombardia, with the collaboration of University of Milan-Bicocca, carried out extensive monitoring campaigns both in quarries and in processing laboratories. More than 300 massive samples (rocks and veins) and 250 airborne dust samples were collected during the surveys. One of the main problems in the study of massive serpentinites is the accurate identification of the different

  14. Future Temperatures and Precipitations in the Arid Northern-Central Chile: A Multi-Model Downscaling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souvignet, M.; Heinrich, J.

    2010-03-01

    Downscaling of global climate outputs is necessary to transfer projections of potential climate change scenarios to local levels. This is of special interest to dry mountainous areas, which are particularly vulnerable to climate change due to risks of reduced freshwater availability. These areas play a key role for hydrology since they usually receive the highest local precipitation rates stored in form of snow and glaciers. In the central-northern Chile (Norte Chico, 26-33ºS), where agriculture still serves as a backbone of the economy as well as ensures the well being of people, the knowledge of water resources availability is essential. The region is characterised by a semiarid climate with a mean annual precipitation inferior to 100mm. Moreover, the local climate is also highly influenced by the ENSO phenomenon, which accounts for the strong inter-annual variability in precipitation patterns. Although historical and spatially extensive precipitation data in the headwaters of the basins in this region are not readily available, records at coastal stations show worrisome trends. For instance, the average precipitation in La Serena, the most important city located in the Coquimbo Region, has decreased dramatically in the past 100 years. The 30-year monthly average has decreased from 170 mm in the early 20th century to values less than 80 mm nowadays. Climate Change is expected to strengthen this pattern in the region, and therefore strongly influence local hydrological patterns. The objectives of this study are i) to develop climate change scenarios (2046-2099) for the Norte Chico using multi-model predictions in terms of temperatures and precipitations, and ii) to compare the efficiency of two downscaling techniques in arid mountainous regions. In addition, this study aims at iii) providing decision makers with sound analysis of potential impact of Climate Change on streamflow in the region. For the present study, future local climate scenarios were developed

  15. Distribution of chemical elements in calc-alkaline igneous rocks, soils, sediments and tailings deposits in northern central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzún, Jorge; Oyarzun, Roberto; Lillo, Javier; Higueras, Pablo; Maturana, Hugo; Oyarzún, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    This study follows the paths of 32 chemical elements in the arid to semi-arid realm of the western Andes, between 27° and 33° S, a region hosting important ore deposits and mining operations. The study encompasses igneous rocks, soils, river and stream sediments, and tailings deposits. The chemical elements have been grouped according to the Goldschmidt classification, and their concentrations in each compartment are confronted with their expected contents for different rock types based on geochemical affinities and the geologic and metallogenic setting. Also, the element behavior during rock weathering and fluvial transport is here interpreted in terms of the ionic potentials and solubility products. The results highlight the similarity between the chemical composition of the andesites and that of the average Continental Crust, except for the higher V and Mn contents of the former, and their depletion in Mg, Ni, and Cr. The geochemical behavior of the elements in the different compartments (rocks, soils, sediments and tailings) is highly consistent with the mobility expected from their ionic potentials, their sulfates and carbonates solubility products, and their affinities for Fe and Mn hydroxides. From an environmental perspective, the low solubility of Cu, Zn, and Pb due to climatic, chemical, and mineralogical factors reduces the pollution risks related to their high to extremely high contents in source materials (e.g., rocks, altered zones, tailings). Besides, the complex oxyanions of arsenic get bound by colloidal particles of Fe-hydroxides and oxyhydroxides (e.g., goethite), thus becoming incorporated to the fine sediment fraction in the stream sediments.

  16. Complex brittle deformation pattern along the Southern Patagonian Andes (Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberón, Vanesa; Sue, Christian; Ronda, Gonzalo; Ghiglione, Matías

    2016-04-01

    The Southern Patagonian Andes is located in the southern extreme of the Pacific subduction zone, where the Antartic oceanic plate sinks underneath South America. The history of the area begins with compression during Paleozoic, Jurassic extension associated to the rift and opening of the South Atlantic Ocean, then a sag stage in the Lower Cretaceous followed by a foreland phase as a result of plate tectonics (Ghiglione et al., 2016). The kinematic study is concentrated in the Argentinean foothills, between 46°40' and 48° SL. We measured around 800 fault planes and their striaes with the sense of movement in order to characterize the stress field. The software used to make the stress inversion were Tensor (Delvaux, 2011) and Multiple Inverse Method MIM (Yamaji et al., 2011). The stress field map was built with the results of the MIM. We present new data from 48 sites located in the northern sector of the Southern Patagonian Andes. The measurements were made in several rocks from Paleozoic to Lower Cretaceous, even though most were taken in pyroclastic jurassic rocks from El Quemado Complex. Paleostress tensors obtained are mostly strike-slip, although a 25% is normal and there are a few compresional. The pattern of faults found is complex. In some sites the tensor can be locally linked to satellite images and observations from the field or be related to a major thrust front. There is no clear correlation between the age and/or lithology with the tensor since the youngest rocks measured are Lower Cretaceous. Probably there are several generations of family faults connected to different and recent tectonic phases then the paleostress tensors might correspond to the latest tectonic events.

  17. Episodios de reactivación del sistema de fallas del Romeral en la parte Nor-Occidental de los Andes Centrales de Colombia a través de resultados 39AR-40AR y K-AR.

    OpenAIRE

    Vinasco Vallejo, Cesar; Cordani, Umberto

    2012-01-01

    Direct dating of reactivation of the San Jerónimo Fault (SJF), easternmost limit of the Romeral fault system (RFS), is presented through 39Ar-40Ar and K-Ar results in neo-formed micas and mylonitic bands of strongly hidrothermalized gabbros. Published cooling and crystallization ages from sin-tectonic magmatic rocks exposed in the western fl ank of the Central Cordillera have suggest that tectonic evolution of the paleo-fault system began since Triassic and Lower Jurassic before the installat...

  18. Síndrome pulmonar por hantavirus Andes en Chile CARDIOPULMONARY SYNDROME DUE TO ANDES VIRUS IN CHILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CONSTANZA CASTILLO H.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Desde 1993 han ocurrido 204 casos de Síndrome Cardiopulmonar por Hantavirus (SCPH en Chile. Los brotes epidémicos comenzaron en el sur y avanzan hacia el norte del país. Los más afectados son varones jóvenes, obreros agrícolas o forestales. En Chile, el SCPH es causado por el virus Andes, cuyo reservorio es el Oligorizomys longicaudatus (ratón de cola larga, que se distribuye desde la III Región al sur. El cuadro clínico es similar al descrito en EE.UU., caracterizado por una fase prodrómica que simula un estado gripal o cuadro gastrointestinal febril y que agrava por la aparición de edema pulmonar agudo e inestabilidad hemodinámica (fase cardiopulmonar. Sin embargo, cursa con mayores alteraciones hemorragí-paras y compromiso renal. La mortalidad inicial fue sobre 50% y actualmente es de alrededor del 33,3%. La presente revisión incluye: historia de la enfermedad, reservorio, modos de transmisión, patogenia, cuadro clínico, diagnóstico, tratamiento y medidas de prevenciónSince 1993, 204 cases of Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS occurred in Chile. Epidemic began in the south and moved thereafter to the northern regions. The disease affected predominantly young males, who worked in agricultural labours or as timber workers. The HCPS in Chile is caused by the Andes virus. The reservoir is the wild rat Oligoryzomis longicaudatus distributed from the III to the XII Region. The clinical features are similar to those described for Sin Nombre Virus. The disease has a prodromal stage characterised by fever, muscular pain, with or without gastrointestinal manifestations, followed by the rapid onset of respiratory insufficiency and haemodynamic unstability. Andes virus courses more often with haemorrhagic disorders and overt renal failure, than Sin Nombre Virus. The initial mortality was over 50% and declined to 33,3% in the last year. History of hantavirus-diseases, reservoir, and mode of contagion, pathogenesis, clinical

  19. Hydrological cycles and trends in the NW Argentine Andes since 1940

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castino, Fabiana; Bookhagen, Bodo; Strecker, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    Strong spatiotemporal variability characterizes the hydrometeorological pattern in the NW Argentine Andes, draining parts of the most populated and economically important areas of South America. During the summer monsoon season (DJF), the eastern flanks of the central Andes are characterized by deep convection, exposing them to extreme hydrometeorological events. These often result in floods and landslides with disastrous effects on the local populations. Here, we analyze river discharge to explore long-term hydrological variability in NW Argentine Andes and the linked climate controlling processes. We rely on 13 daily river discharge time series relevant to drainage basins spanning several size orders (102-104 km2) starting in 1914 and define different hydro-climate indices both for the mean and the extreme hydrological events. We apply quantile regression to investigate long-term trends and spectral analysis associated with cross-correlation with SST-based climate indices to identify links to large-scale climate variability modes. River discharge presents a pronounced and coherent variability signal in South America, particularly for wide drainage basins, such as the Amazon and Paraná/La Plata rivers, strongly associated to Pacific and Atlantic Oceans Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies (i.e. ENSO, PDO, AMO). Our analysis evidences that in the NW Argentine Andes, mean discharge values are characterized by statistically significant, mostly positive, long-term trends since 1940, whereas the extreme events present a more non-unidirectional trend pattern. Also, coherent multi-annual to multi-decadal cycles characterizing the discharge pattern have been identified, suggesting that processes linked to SST anomaly-modes strongly control the hydrometeorology variability in the NW Argentina Andes.

  20. Detection of recent faulting and evaluation of the vertical offsets from numerical analysis of SAR-ERS-1 images: the example of the Atacama fault zone in northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mering, Catherine; Chorowicz, Jean; Vicente, Jean-Claude; Chalah, Cherif; Rafalli, Gaelle

    1995-11-01

    Usually the analysis of high resolution satellite images such as radar SAR ERS-1 images is undertaken by photo-interpretation techniques in order to reveal geological features. The numerical image processing is based on a filtering method designed for a better identification of geological structures on SAR images. The method leads to a mapping of recent faults on which the vertical offset is quantified. As examples, steeply dipping active faults with abrupt scarps are extracted from SAR-ERS1 images of the Central Andes (Atacama Fault zone, Northern Chile). The fault throws are then evaluated with a specific numerical image processing.

  1. Phytogeography of the vascular páramo flora of Ramal de Guaramacal (Andes, Venezuela and its ties to other páramo floras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuello, Nidia L.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Ramal de Guaramacal is an outlier and lower elevation mountain range located at the northeastern end of the Venezuelan Andes. Phytogeographical patterns and affinities of the low altitude and wet vascular páramo flora of Ramal de Guaramacal, have been studied with emphasis in to the analysis of the floristic connections of the Guaramacal páramo flora with the neighboring dry páramos of the Sierra Nevada de Mérida and other páramo floras of the northern Andes and Central America. A total of 252 vascular plant taxa belonging to 150 genera and 69 families were recorded from the study area. The most species rich families are Asteraceae, Poaceae, Ericaceae and Orchidaceae, followed by the ferns families Grammitidaceae and Lycopodiacae. The most diverse genera are the ferns Elaphoglossum, Huperzia and Hymenophyllum. The analysis of generic phytogeographical composition of páramo flora showed that 52.8% of the genera are Tropical. The Temperate component is represented by 33.3% of the genera and the Cosmopolitan component is represented by 13.9% of the genera. The Neo - tropical montane element (38.9% is high in Guaramacal páramo, the Páramo endemic element (1.9% and the Andean alpine element (0.9% and represented by only one genus (Lachemilla are low compared to other páramo areas. The vascular flora of Páramo de Guaramacal is largely composed of (1 a group of Neotropical widespread distributed species (32%, (2 a group of Andean distributed species (49%, part of them confined to the Northern Andes and part widespread in the Andes from Colombia to Bolivia, and (3 a group of Venezuelan endemics (19%. From an eight páramo flora comparative dataset, the closest relationships among páramos is observed between the generic páramo floras of the Colombian Cordillera Oriental of Sumapáz and Sierra Nevada del Cocuy, which are both closely related to that of the Sierra Nevada de Mérida in Venezuela. The generic páramo flora of

  2. Potential of a Neutrino Detector in the ANDES Underground Laboratory for Geophysics and Astrophysics of Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Machado, P A N; Nunokawa, H; Funchal, R Zukanovich

    2012-01-01

    The construction of the Agua Negra tunnels that will link Argentina and Chile under the Andes, the world longest mountain range, opens the possibility to build the first deep underground labo- ratory in the Southern Hemisphere. This laboratory has the acronym ANDES (Agua Negra Deep Experiment Site) and its overburden could be as large as \\sim 1.7 km of rock, or 4500 mwe, providing an excellent low background environment to study physics of rare events like the ones induced by neutrinos and/or dark matter. In this paper we investigate the physics potential of a few kiloton size liquid scintillator detector, which could be constructed in the ANDES laboratory as one of its possible scientific programs. In particular, we evaluate the impact of such a detector for the studies of geoneutrinos and galactic supernova neutrinos assuming a fiducial volume of 3 kilotons as a reference size. We emphasize the complementary roles of such a detector to the ones in the Northern Hemisphere neutrino facilities through some adv...

  3. Evolución tectónica, paleogeográfica y metalogénica durante el Cenozoico en los Andes de Chile norte y central e implicaciones para las regiones adyacentes de Bolivia y Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Charrier

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available La orogenia incaica dio origen a un importante relieve en el Eoceno Medio, el que se concentró en el ámbito del arco magmático precedente, la Cordillera Incaica. Este relieve positivo de orientación NNE se extendió desde el sur de Perú hasta la región central de Chile y separó dos dominios paleogeográficos que tuvieron evoluciones diferentes durante el resto del Cenozoico. El dominio occidental se caracterizó por el predominio de procesos de erosión y sedimentación. En el dominio oriental también existieron importantes episodios de erosión que originaron depósitos que se encuentran en la vertiente oriental de la cadena en la actualidad y presentan una cronología comparable con la de los depósitos del dominio occidental. Sin embargo, la evolución se caracterizó por presentar, a partir del Eoceno Tardío, diferencias al norte y sur de los ~27ºS. Al norte de esa latitud, en el ámbito del Altiplano-Puna, el arco magmático se mantuvo aproximadamente en la misma posición, coincidente con la del arco actual, y estuvo bordeado por una cuenca de antepaís de retroarco; mientras que, al sur de ~27ºS, se desarrollaron sucesivos arcos magmáticos con una marcada migración hacia el este. El arco magmático del Eoceno Tardío al Oligoceno Tardío - Mioceno Temprano se caracterizó por el desarrollo de una amplia cuenca extensional de intra-arco, la cuenca de Abanico. En esta cuenca se acumularon hasta 3.000 m de rocas volcánicas, volcaniclásticas y, subordinadamente, sedimentarias. A partir del límite oligoceno-mioceno, tuvo lugar un nuevo evento compresivo a lo largo de todo el orógeno que rejuveneció el núcleo de la Cordillera Incaica e invirtió la cuenca de Abanico permitiendo la generación de abundantes depósitos sintectónicos a ambos lados de los nuevos relieves. El inicio de este evento coincide con la orogenia pehuenche, los pulsos compresivos se mantuvieron hasta el Plioceno Temprano. En el Mioceno Temprano a Medio

  4. Did growth of high Andes slow down Nazca plate subduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteros, J.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2010-12-01

    The convergence velocity rate of the Nazca and South-American plate and its variations during the last 100 My are quite well-known from the global plate reconstructions. The key observation is that the rate of Nazca plate subduction has decreased by about 2 times during last 20 Myr and particularly since 10 Ma. During the same time the Central Andes have grown to its present 3-4 km height. Based on the thin-shell model, coupled with mantle convection, it was suggested that slowing down of Nazca plate resulted from the additional load exerted by the Andes. However, the thin-shell model, that integrates stresses and velocities vertically and therefore has no vertical resolution, is not an optimal tool to model a subduction zone. More appropriate would be modeling it with full thermomechanical formulation and self-consistent subduction. We performed a set of experiments to estimate the influence that an orogen like the Andes could have on an ongoing subduction. We used an enhanced 2D version of the SLIM-3D code suitable to simulate the evolution of a subducting slab in a self-consistent manner (gravity driven) at vertical crossections through upper mantle, transition zone and shallower lower mantle. The model utilizes non-linear temperature- and stress-dependant visco-elasto-plastic rheology and phase transitions at 410 and 660 km depth. We started from a reference case with a similar configuration as both Nazca and South-America plates. After some Mys of slow kinematicaly imposed subduction, to develop a coherent thermo-mechanical state, subduction was totally dynamic. On the other cases, the crust was slowly thickened artificially during 10 My to generate the Andean topography. Although our first results show no substantial changes on the velocity pattern of the subduction, we, however, consider this result as preliminary. At the meeting we plan to report completed and verified modeling results and discuss other possible cases of the late Cenozoic slowing down of

  5. Late Quaternary deglacial history of the Mérida Andes, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansell, Nathan D.; Abbott, Mark B.; Polissar, Pratigya J.; Wolfe, Alexander P.; Bezada, Maximiliano; Rull, Valentí

    2005-10-01

    Radiocarbon-dated sediment cores from seven lakes and two bogs spanning the Cordillera de Mérida in the Venezuelan Andes were used to identify and date the regional history of late Pleistocene and Holocene glacial activity. Coring sites were selected at different elevations across a pronounced rain shadow from southeast (wet) to northwest (dry). Sediment lithostratigraphy and magnetic susceptibility, in conjunction with AMS radiocarbon dates on macrofossils and charcoal, were used to constrain deglaciation. The local expression of the Last Glacial Maximum occurred between 22 750 and 19 960 cal. yr BP. On the wetter southeastern side of the Cordillera de Mérida, glaciers had significantly retreated by 15 700 cal. yr BP, followed by several minor glacial advances and retreats between 14 850 and 13 830 cal. yr BP. At least one major glacial readvance occurred between 13 830 and 10 000 cal. yrBP in the wetter southeastern sector of the region. The drier northwest side of the Cordillera de Mérida records initial glacial retreat by 14240cal.yrBP. Multiple sites on both sides of the Mérida Andes record a further phase of extensive deglaciation approximately 10000cal.yrBP. However, the north-northwest facing Mucubají catchment remained partially glaciated until ca. 6000cal.yrBP. Deglacial ages from the Venezuelan Andes are consistently younger than those reported from the Southern Hemisphere Andes, suggesting an inter-hemispheric deglacial lag in the northern tropics of the order of two thousand years.

  6. Identificación de Hantavirus Andes en Rattus norvegicus Identification of Andes Hantavirus in Rattus norvegicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Fernández

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available En Chile y Argentina la especie Oligoryzomys longicaudatus ha sido identificada como el principal reservorio para Virus Andes (ANDV. El objetivo de este trabajo es reportar la presencia del virus Andes en Rattus norvergicus, roedor urbano recolectado de un muestreo en San Diego del Cristo, comuna de Melipilla, Región Metropolitana. La presencia del virus Andes en Rattus norvegicus podría indicar la importancia de otros roedores como eventuales vectores virales.In Chile and Argentina Oligoryzomys longicaudatus has been identified as the main reservoir for Hantavirus Andes. The aim of this work was to report the presence of Hantavirus Andes in Rattus norvegicus, an urban rodent collected during sampling in San Diego del Cristo, Melipilla, Metropolitan Region. The existence of Hantavirus Andes in Rattus norvegicus could indicate the importance of other rodents as possible viral vectors.

  7. Geology and geochemistry of the Bingdaban ophiolitic mélange in the boundary fault zone on the northern Central Tianshan Belt, and its tectonic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG YunPeng; ZHANG GuoWei; ZHOU DingWu; LUO JinHai; ZHANG ChengLi; XIA LinQi; XU XueYi; LI XiangMin

    2007-01-01

    The properties and tectonic significance of the fault bound zone on the northern margin of the Central Tianshan belt are key issues to understand the tectonic framework and evolutionary history of the Tianshan Orogenic Belt. Based on the geological and geochemical studies in the Tianshan orogenic belt, it is suggested that the ophiolitic slices found in the Bingdaban area represent the remaining oceanic crust of the Early Paleozoic ocean between the Hazakstan and Zhungaer blocks. Mainly composed of basalts, gabbros and diabases, the ophiolites were overthrust onto the boundary fault between the Northern Tianshan and Central Tianshan belts. The major element geochemistry is characterized by high TiO2 (1.50%-2.25%) and MgO (6.64%-9.35%), low K2O (0.06%-0.41%) and P2O5 (0.1%-0.2%), and Na2O>K2O as well. Low ∑REE and depletion in LREE indicate that the original magma was derived from a depleted mantle source. Compared with a primitive mantle, the geochemistry of the basalts from the Bingdaban area is featureded by depletion in Th, U, Nb, La, Ce and Pr, and unfractionated in HFS elements. The ratios of Zr/Nb, Nb/La, Hf/Ta, Th/Yb and Hf/Th are similar to those of the typical N-MORB. It can be interpreted that the basalts in the Bingdaban area were derived from a depleted mantle source, and formed in a matured mid-oceanic ridge setting during the matured evolutionary stage of the Northern Tianshan ocean. In comparison with the basalts, the diabases from the Bingdaban area show higher contents of Al2O3, (REE and HFS elements as well as unfractionated incompatible elements except Cs, Rb and Ba, and about 10 times the values of the primitive mantle. Thus, the diabases are thought to be derived from a primitive mantle and similar to the typical E-MORB. The diabases also have slight Nb depletion accompanying no apparent Th enrichment compared with N-MORB. From studies of the regional geology and all above evidence, it can be suggested that the diabases from the Bingdaban

  8. Geology and geochemistry of the Bingdaban ophiolitic mélange in the boundary fault zone on the northern Central Tianshan Belt,and its tectonic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The properties and tectonic significance of the fault bound zone on the northern margin of the Central Tianshan belt are key issues to understand the tectonic framework and evolutionary history of the Tianshan Orogenic Belt. Based on the geological and geochemical studies in the Tianshan orogenic belt, it is suggested that the ophiolitic slices found in the Bingdaban area represent the remaining oceanic crust of the Early Paleozoic ocean between the Hazakstan and Zhungaer blocks. Mainly com-posed of basalts, gabbros and diabases, the ophiolites were overthrust onto the boundary fault be-tween the Northern Tianshan and Central Tianshan belts. The major element geochemistry is charac-terized by high TiO2 (1.50%-2.25%) and MgO (6.64%-9.35%), low K2O (0.06%-0.41%) and P2O5 (0.1%-0.2%), and Na2O>K2O as well. Low ΣREE and depletion in LREE indicate that the original magma was derived from a depleted mantle source. Compared with a primitive mantle, the geochemistry of the basalts from the Bingdaban area is featureded by depletion in Th, U, Nb, La, Ce and Pr, and unfrac-tionated in HFS elements. The ratios of Zr/Nb, Nb/La, Hf/Ta, Th/Yb and Hf/Th are similar to those of the typical N-MORB. It can be interpreted that the basalts in the Bingdaban area were derived from a de-pleted mantle source, and formed in a matured mid-oceanic ridge setting during the matured evolu-tionary stage of the Northern Tianshan ocean. In comparison with the basalts, the diabases from the Bingdaban area show higher contents of Al2O3, ∑REE and HFS elements as well as unfractionated incompatible elements except Cs, Rb and Ba, and about 10 times the values of the primitive mantle. Thus, the diabases are thought to be derived from a primitive mantle and similar to the typical E-MORB. The diabases also have slight Nb depletion accompanying no apparent Th enrichment compared with N-MORB. From studies of the regional geology and all above evidence, it can be suggested that the diabases from the

  9. Neoproterozoic diamictite-bearing sedimentary rocks in the northern Yili Block and their constraints on the Precambrian evolution of microcontinents in the Western Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jingwen; Zhu, Wenbin; Zheng, Bihai; Wu, Hailin; Cui, Xiang; Lu, Yuanzhi

    2015-12-01

    The origin and tectonic setting of Precambrian sequences in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) have been debated due to a lack of high resolution geochronological data. Answering this question is essential for the understanding of the tectonic framework and Precambrian evolution of the blocks within the CAOB. Here we reported LA-ICP-MS detrital zircon U-Pb ages and in-situ Hf isotopic data for Neoproterozoic sedimentary cover in the northern Yili Block, an important component of the CAOB, in order to provide information on possible provenance and regional tectonic evolution. A total of 271 concordant U-Pb zircon ages from Neoproterozoic sedimentary cover in the northern Yili Block define three major age populations of 1900-1400 Ma, 1300-1150 Ma and 700-580 Ma, which are quite different from cratons and microcontinents involved in the CAOB. Although it is not completely consistent with the local basement ages, an autochthonous provenance interpretation is more suitable. Some zircon grains show significant old Hf model ages (TDMC; 3.9-2.4 Ga) and reveal continental crust as old as Paleoarchean probably existed. Continuous Mesoproterozoic zircon age populations exhibit large variations in the εHf(t) ratios, suggesting the long-time involvement of both reworked ancient crust and juvenile material. Similar Mesoproterozoic evolution pattern is identified in many continental terranes involved in the CAOB that surround the Tarim Craton. Based on our analysis and published research, we postulate that the northern Yili Block, together with Chinese Central Tianshan, Kyrgyz North Tianshan and some other microcontinents surrounding the Tarim Craton, once constituted the continental margin of the Tarim Craton in the Mesoproterozoic, formed by long-lived accretionary processes. Most of the late Neoproterozoic zircons exhibit significant positive εHf(t) ratios, suggesting the addition of juvenile crust. It is consistent with the tectonic event related to the East Africa

  10. Illicit crops and armed conflict as constraints on biodiversity conservation in the Andes region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjeldså, Jon; Alvarez, María D; Lazcano, Juan Mario; León, Blanca

    2005-05-01

    Coca, once grown for local consumption in the Andes, is now produced for external markets, often in areas with armed conflict. Internationally financed eradication campaigns force traffickers and growers to constantly relocate, making drug-related activities a principal cause of forest loss. The impact on biodiversity is known only in general terms, and this article presents the first regional analysis to identify areas of special concern, using bird data as proxy. The aim of conserving all species may be significantly constrained in the Santa Marta and Perijá mountains, Darién, some parts of the Central Andes in Colombia, and between the middle Marañón and middle Huallaga valleys in Peru. Solutions to the problem must address the root causes: international drug markets, long-lasting armed conflict, and lack of alternative income for the rural poor.

  11. Illicit crops and armed conflict as constraints on biodiversity conservation in the Andes region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjeldså, Jon; Alvarez, María D; Lazcano, Juan Mario; León, Blanca

    2005-05-01

    Coca, once grown for local consumption in the Andes, is now produced for external markets, often in areas with armed conflict. Internationally financed eradication campaigns force traffickers and growers to constantly relocate, making drug-related activities a principal cause of forest loss. The impact on biodiversity is known only in general terms, and this article presents the first regional analysis to identify areas of special concern, using bird data as proxy. The aim of conserving all species may be significantly constrained in the Santa Marta and Perijá mountains, Darién, some parts of the Central Andes in Colombia, and between the middle Marañón and middle Huallaga valleys in Peru. Solutions to the problem must address the root causes: international drug markets, long-lasting armed conflict, and lack of alternative income for the rural poor. PMID:16042278

  12. Central and South America GPS geodesy - CASA Uno

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, James N.; Dixon, Timothy H.

    1990-01-01

    In January 1988, scientists from over 25 organizations in 13 countries and territories cooperated in the largest GPS campaign in the world to date. A total of 43 GPS receivers collected approximately 590 station-days of data in American Samoa, Australia, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Sweden, United States, West Germany, and Venezuela. The experiment was entitled CASA Uno. Scientific goals of the project include measurements of strain in the northern Andes, subduction rates for the Cocos and Nazca plates beneath Central and South America, and relative motion between the Caribbean plate and South America. A second set of measurements are planned in 1991 and should provide preliminary estimates of crustal deformation and plate motion rates in the region.

  13. Kozu-Matsuda fault system in northern Izu collision zone, western part of Kanagawa Prefecture, central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odawara, K.; Aketagawa, T.; Yoshida, A.

    2010-12-01

    Western area of Kanagawa Prefecture is techtonically highlighted by its geological setting that the Izu-Bonin volcanic arc collides with the Japan Island arc there. The Kozu-Matsuda fault system which consists of the Kozu-Matsuda fault, the Matsuda-kita fault, the Hinata fault and the Hirayama fault is a surface manifestation of the plate boundary. Research of the Kozu-Matsuda fault has advanced dramatically after the 1995 Kobe Earthquake. Having conducted a trench survey, Kanagawa Prefectural Government (2004) reported that the Kozu-Matsuda fault was activated at least four times in the past 4000 years and the latest activity occurred 650-950 years ago (AD. 1350-1050). However, details of the activity of the Hinata and Hirayama faults, the northern extension of the Kozu-Matsuda fault, are not well understood. The Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Urban areas (DaiDaiToku) made a 2040 m deep drilling in 2004 in Yamakita Town (Hayashi et al., 2006). DaiDaiToku also carried out the seismic reflection profiling along a route from Odawara to Yamanashi in 2005 (Sato et al., 2005). The study done by DaiDaiToku elucidated presence of two north-dipping thrusts. The northern thrust corresponds to the Hinata fault, and the southern one which is also considered to be a continuation of the Kozu-Matsuda fault probably represents a frontal thrust (Miyauchi et al., 2006). We have conducted paleoseismic investigations using data from boreholes across these thrusts.

  14. Tectonic Affinity, T-t Path and Uplift Trajectory of Eclogites from Northern Dabie Mountains, Central-Eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Petrologic geochemistry and isotopic chronology of the eclogites suggest that most of the eclogites in northern Dabie Mountains produced from the Triassic Yangtze subducted continental crust (lower crust and formed during the deep subduction) and the metamorphosed mafic-untramafic belt with eclogite, marble and meta-peridotite blocks around the Mozitan-Xiaotian fault zone may represent the meta-tectonic melange produced during the active subduction of an ancient oceanic slab and subsequent collision between the Yangtze and North China continental plates. The cooling history of the eclogites from ~900 ℃ to 300 ℃ can be subdivided into three stages: one isothermal stage and two rapid cooling stages. The initial stage between (230±6) and 210 Ma was a near-isothermal or temperature rise process corresponding to the retrograded metamorphism of granulite-facies with a rapid uplift of 4 nun/a, then two fast cooling stages occurred with cooling rate of ~10 ℃/Ma during 210 Ma to (172±3) Ma and ~4 ℃/Ma during (172±3) Ma to 130 Ma. After the peak metamorphism of eclogite-facies, their initial isothermal stage with slower uplift rate and cooling rate and high-T overprinting of granulite-facies metamorphism is the major difference between the eciogites in northern Dabie Mountains from those in southern Dabie Mountains. This may be one of the most important reasons to preserve few evidences of earlier ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism.

  15. The Last Interglacial-Glacial cycle (MIS 5-2) re-examined based on long proxy records from central and northern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmens, Karin F.

    2014-02-01

    Current multi-proxy studies on a long sediment sequence preserved at Sokli (N Finland), i.e. in the central area of Fennoscandian glaciations, are drastically changing classic ideas of glaciations, vegetation and climate in northern Europe during the Late Pleistocene. The sediments in the Sokli basin have escaped major glacial erosion due to non-typical bedrock conditions. In this review, the Sokli record is compared in great detail with other long proxy records from central, temperate and northern, boreal Europe. These comprise the classic records of La Grande Pile (E France) and Oerel (N Germany) and more recently obtained records from Horoszki Duże (E Poland) and Lake Yamozero (NW Russia). The focus of the review is on pollen, lithology and macrofossil- and insect-based temperature inferences. The long records are further compared with recent proxy data from nearby terrestrial sites as well as with the rapidly accumulating high-resolution proxy data from the ocean realm. The comparison allows a re-examination of the environmental history and climate evolution of the Last Interglacial-Glacial (LI-G) cycle (MIS 5-2). It shows that environmental and climate conditions during MIS 5 (ca 130-70 ka BP) were distinctly different from those during MIS 4-2 (ca 70-15 ka BP). MIS 5 is characterized by three long forested intervals (broadly corresponding to MIS 5e, 5c, 5a), both in temperate and northern boreal Europe. These mild periods were interrupted by two short, relatively cold and dry intervals (MIS 5d and 5b) with mountain-centered glaciation in Fennoscandia. Millennial scale climate events were superimposed upon these longer lasting climate fluctuations. The time interval encompassing MIS 4-2 shows open vegetation. It is characterized by two glacial maxima (MIS 4 and 2) with sub-continental scale glaciation over northern Europe and dry conditions in strongly continental eastern European settings. High amplitude climate oscillations of millennial duration

  16. Active Folding of the Tame Anticline, Eastern Foothills, Colombian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloza-Fajardo, G.; Taylor, M. H.; Mora, A.; Stockli, D. F.

    2011-12-01

    We integrate neotectonic mapping and interpretation of seismic reflection profiles to evaluate the kinematics of folding and development of the Quaternary Tame anticline and Cusiana fault at 6.5 N Latitude in the eastern foothills of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia. The Tame anticline is located approximately 660 km to the east of the Nazca-South America and 810 km to the south of the Caribbean-South America subduction zones plate boundaries in a retroarc foreland basin setting. The Tame anticline is an elongated, N15E trending structure, 14 km long N-S by 6 km wide E-W, that represents the most frontal active structure of the northern Colombian Andes. The Tame fold is related to the east-directed Cusiana fault that day lights to the south. Seismic reflection profiles indicate the Cusiana fault is a listric, west-dipping blind structure. The east flowing antecedent Macaguana creek has incised the Tame fold forming three prominent terrace levels, uplifted approximately 220, 150 and 100 meters, above current river levels. The surfaces were sampled for terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides using the depth profiling approach to account for inheritance. Surface exposure ages from the highest to lowest surfaces are 93.9, 50.8 and 32.4 kyrs at the 1σ level respectively, which were calculated using Monte Carlo methods. Trishear kinematic modeling was used to retrodeform the folding history and based on the surface abandonment ages, we will present shortening rates at millennial timescales.

  17. Thermochronology and tectonics of the Mérida Andes and the Santander Massif, NW South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lelij, Roelant; Spikings, Richard; Mora, Andrés

    2016-04-01

    New apatite U-Pb and multiphase 40Ar/39Ar data constrain the high to medium temperature (~ 500 °C-~ 300 °C) thermal histories of igneous and metamorphic rocks exposed in the Mérida Andes of Venezuela, and new apatite and zircon fission track data constrain the ~ 500 °C-~ 60 °C thermal histories of pre-Jurassic igneous and metamorphic rocks of the adjacent Santander Massif of Colombia. Computed thermal history envelopes using apatite U-Pb dates and grain size information from an Early Palaeozoic granodiorite in the Mérida Andes suggest that it cooled from > 500 °C to rocks in the Mérida Andes by numerous new muscovite and biotite 40Ar/39Ar plateau dates spanning 257.1 ± 1.0 Ma to 205.1 ± 0.8 Ma. This episode of cooling is not recognised in the Santander Massif, where 40Ar/39Ar data suggest that some Early Palaeozoic rocks cooled below ~ 320 °C in the Early Palaeozoic. However, most data from pre-Jurassic rocks reveal a regional heat pulse at ~ 200 Ma during the intrusion of numerous shallow granitoids, resulting in temperatures in excess of ~ 520 °C, obscuring late Palaeozoic histories. The generally accepted timing of amalgamation of Pangaea along the Ouachita-Marathon suture pre-dates Late Permian to Triassic cooling recorded in basement rocks of the Mérida Andes by > 30 Ma, and its effect on rocks preserved in north-western South America is unknown. We interpret late Permian to Triassic cooling in the Mérida Andes to be driven by exhumation. Previous studies have suggested that a short phase of shortening and anatexis is recorded at ~ 253 Ma in the Maya Block, which may have been adjacent to the basement rocks of the Mérida Andes in the Late Permian. The coeval onset of exhumation in the Mérida Andes may be a result of increased coupling in the magmatic arc, which was located along the western margin of Pangaea. Triassic extension is documented in the Central Cordillera of Colombia and Ecuador between ~ 240 Ma and ~ 215 Ma, although extension at

  18. On Intensive Late Holocene Iron Mining and Production in the Northern Congo Basin and the Environmental Consequences Associated with Metallurgy in Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Karen D; Schmitt, Dave N; Kiahtipes, Christopher A; Ndanga, Jean-Paul; Young, D Craig; Simiti, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    An ongoing question in paleoenvironmental reconstructions of the central African rainforest concerns the role that prehistoric metallurgy played in shaping forest vegetation. Here we report evidence of intensive iron-ore mining and smelting in forested regions of the northern Congo Basin dating to the late Holocene. Volumetric estimates on extracted iron-ore and associated slag mounds from prehistoric sites in the southern Central African Republic suggest large-scale iron production on par with other archaeological and historically-known iron fabrication areas. These data document the first evidence of intensive iron mining and production spanning approximately 90 years prior to colonial occupation (circa AD 1889) and during an interval of time that is poorly represented in the archaeological record. Additional site areas pre-dating these remains by 3-4 centuries reflect an earlier period of iron production on a smaller scale. Microbotanical evidence from a sediment core collected from an adjacent riparian trap shows a reduction in shade-demanding trees in concert with an increase in light-demanding species spanning the time interval associated with iron intensification. This shift occurs during the same time interval when many portions of the Central African witnessed forest transgressions associated with a return to moister and more humid conditions beginning 500-100 years ago. Although data presented here do not demonstrate that iron smelting activities caused widespread vegetation change in Central Africa, we argue that intense mining and smelting can have localized and potentially regional impacts on vegetation communities. These data further demonstrate the high value of pairing archeological and paleoenvironmental analyses to reconstruct regional-scale forest histories.

  19. Microbial water quality during the northern migration of Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) at the central Platte River, Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Matthew T.

    2014-01-01

    The central Platte River is an important resource in Nebraska. Its water flows among multiple channels and supports numerous beneficial uses such as drinking water, irrigation for agriculture, groundwater recharge, and recreational activities. The central Platte River valley is an important stopover for migratory waterfowl and cranes, such as the Whooping (Grus americana) and Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis), in their annual northward traversal of the Central Flyway. Waterfowl, cranes, and other migratory birds moving across international and intercontinental borders may provide long-range transportation for any microbial pathogen they harbor, particularly through the spread of feces. Samples were collected weekly in the study reach from three sites (upstream, middle, and downstream from the roosting locations) during the spring of 2009 and 2010. The samples were analyzed for avian influenza, Escherichia coli, Cryptosporidium, Giardia, Campylobacter, and Legionella. Analysis indicates that several types of fecal indicator bacteria and a range of viral, protozoan, and bacterial pathogens were present in Sandhill Crane excreta. These bacteria and pathogens were present at a significantly higher frequency and densities in water and sediments when the Sandhill Cranes were present, particularly during evening roosts within the Platte River environment.

  20. Changing Student Attitudes using Andes, An Intelligent Homework System

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sande, Brett; Vanlehn, Kurt; Treacy, Don; Shelby, Bob; Wintersgill, Mary

    2007-03-01

    The size of introductory physics lectures often inhibits personal homework assistance and timely corrective feedback. Andes, an intelligent homework help system designed for two semesters of introductory physics, can fill this need by encouraging students to use sound problem solving techniques and providing immediate feedback on each step of a solution. On request, Andes provides principles-based hints based on previous student actions. A multi-year study at the U.S. Naval Academy demonstrates that students using Andes perform better than students working the same problems as graded pencil and paper homeworks. In addition, student attitude surveys show that Andes is preferred over other homework systems. These findings have implications for student attitudes toward, and mastery of, physics. See http://www.andes.pitt.edu for more information.

  1. Atmospheric transmissivity: Distribution and empirical estimation around the central andes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baigorria, G.A.; Villegas, E.B.; Trebejo, I.; Carlos, J.F.; Quiroz, R.

    2004-01-01

    This study of the distribution in space and time of atmospheric transmissivity takes into account the fact that, in complex terrain, many factors affect this variable; thus, it is not possible to use the generalizations that can be applied under more homogeneous conditions. Climatic controls, topogr

  2. Digital model of the seabed geomorphology of southern-central Espirito Santo basin and northern Campos basin; Modelo digital da geomorfologia do fundo oceanico do centro-sul da bacia do Espirito Santo e norte da bacia de Campos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiner, Simone; Souza, Mariana Beatriz Ferraz Mendonca de; Migliorelli, Joana Paiva Robalo [Petroleo Brasileiro S. A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Unidade de Servicos de Exploracao e Producao], Emails: schreiner@petrobras.com.br, mbfms.fototerra@petrobras.com.br, joanamigli.fototerra@petrobras.com.br

    2009-05-15

    That communication brings the result of a bathymetric mosaic of converted in a digital model of the ocean topography, consisting of 17 seismic projects 3D, besides 17 multibeam bathymetry surveys of South-Central Espirito Santo Basin and Northern Campos Basin.

  3. On the generation of coastal lows in central Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies of the coastal-low occurrences in central Chile have been aimed at the formulation of a conceptual model to explain observed features in connection with applied studies. The most prominent weather pattern associated with CL occurrences, (type A), coincides with the onset of a warm, middle-troposphere ridge over central Chile, and a surface high over northern Argentina. The synoptic forcing of the low is related to weak frontal disturbances that travel equatorwards. They result in a thickening of the marine layer that becomes blocked by the coastal escarpment, at the time of the onset of the ridge aloft. The blocking of the stable air above the subsidence inversion by the Andes is also hypothesized. The analysis of the subsidence inversion, the geometry of the coastal and Andes mountain ranges, and a scale analysis of the non-dimensional governing equations for the generation of the coastal lows, following the approach of Reason and Steyn (1990); leads to the conclusion that both blocking actions are strong and persistent in central Chile. An interactive mechanism between the upper and lower blocking effects is postulated to explain the cyclonic vorticity and the initial steering of the coastal lows. The scale analysis of the governing equations for the propagation stage of the low suggests that, departing for the South African case, non-linearity is important here, and that solitary Kelvin waves could be expected. Theoretical phase propagation speeds and Rossby radii are found to range between 8 and 15 m s-1 and 100-250 km, respectively. The importance of strong southerly winds ahead of the low and weak winds at its trailing edge is also stressed, as another major departure from the coastal-low behaviour elsewhere. (author). 17 refs, 4 figs, 4 tabs

  4. Northern Pintail Telemetry [ds231

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Using radio-telemetry, female northern pintail (Anas acuta) survival, distribution, and movements during late August-March in Central California were determined...

  5. Simulation of groundwater withdrawal scenarios for the Redwall-Muav and Coconino Aquifer Systems of northern and central Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, D.R.

    2016-09-23

    The Northern Arizona Regional Groundwater Flow Model was used to estimate the hydrologic changes, including water-level change and groundwater discharge to streams and springs, that may result from future changes in groundwater withdrawals in and near the Coconino Plateau Water Advisory Council study area, Coconino and Navajo Counties, Arizona. Three future groundwater withdrawal scenarios for tribal and nontribal uses were developed by the Coconino Plateau Water Advisory Council and were simulated for the period representing the years from 2006 through 2105. Scenario 1 assumes no major changes in groundwater use except for increased demand based on population projections. Scenario 2 assumes that a pipeline will provide a source of surface water from Lake Powell to areas near Cameron and Moenkopi that would replace local groundwater withdrawals. Scenario 3 assumes that the pipeline extends to the Flagstaff and Williams areas, and would replace groundwater demands for water in the area.The Coconino Plateau Water Advisory Council withdrawal scenarios primarily influence water levels and groundwater discharge in the Coconino Plateau basin, near the western margin of the Little Colorado River Plateau basin, and the Verde Valley subbasin. Simulated effects of the withdrawal scenarios are superimposed on effects of previous variations in groundwater withdrawals and artificial and incidental recharge. Pre-scenario variations include changes in water-levels in wells; groundwater storage; discharge to streams and springs; and evapotranspiration by plants that use groundwater. Future variations in groundwater discharge and water-levels in wells will continue to occur as a result of both the past and any future changes.Water-level variations resulting from post-2005 stresses, including groundwater withdrawals and incidental and artificial recharge, in the area of the withdrawal scenarios are primarily localized and superimposed on the regional changes caused by variations in

  6. Simulation of Groundwater Withdrawal Scenarios for the Redwall-Muav and Coconino Aquifer Systems of Northern and Central Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, D.R.

    2016-09-23

    The Northern Arizona Regional Groundwater Flow Model was used to estimate the hydrologic changes, including water-level change and groundwater discharge to streams and springs, that may result from future changes in groundwater withdrawals in and near the Coconino Plateau Water Advisory Council study area, Coconino and Navajo Counties, Arizona. Three future groundwater withdrawal scenarios for tribal and nontribal uses were developed by the Coconino Plateau Water Advisory Council and were simulated for the period representing the years from 2006 through 2105. Scenario 1 assumes no major changes in groundwater use except for increased demand based on population projections. Scenario 2 assumes that a pipeline will provide a source of surface water from Lake Powell to areas near Cameron and Moenkopi that would replace local groundwater withdrawals. Scenario 3 assumes that the pipeline extends to the Flagstaff and Williams areas, and would replace groundwater demands for water in the area.The Coconino Plateau Water Advisory Council withdrawal scenarios primarily influence water levels and groundwater discharge in the Coconino Plateau basin, near the western margin of the Little Colorado River Plateau basin, and the Verde Valley subbasin. Simulated effects of the withdrawal scenarios are superimposed on effects of previous variations in groundwater withdrawals and artificial and incidental recharge. Pre-scenario variations include changes in water-levels in wells; groundwater storage; discharge to streams and springs; and evapotranspiration by plants that use groundwater. Future variations in groundwater discharge and water-levels in wells will continue to occur as a result of both the past and any future changes.Water-level variations resulting from post-2005 stresses, including groundwater withdrawals and incidental and artificial recharge, in the area of the withdrawal scenarios are primarily localized and superimposed on the regional changes caused by variations in

  7. U Pb zircon and monazite geochronology of Variscan magmatism related to syn-convergence extension in Central Northern Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle Aguado, B.; Azevedo, M. R.; Schaltegger, U.; Martínez Catalán, J. R.; Nolan, J.

    2005-05-01

    The Viseu area is located in the Central Iberian Zone of the Iberian Variscan Belt and hosts numerous post-thickening, collision-related granitoids intruded into upper and middle crustal levels. The present paper reports high precision U-Pb zircon and monazite ages for four plutons of the Viseu area: the syn-kinematic granitoids of Maceira (314±5 Ma), Casal Vasco (311±1 Ma) and Junqueira (307.8±0.7 Ma) and the late-kinematic biotite monzogranites of Cota (306±9 Ma). This points to a synchronous emplacement of the different syn-kinematic plutons shortly followed by the intrusion of the late-kinematic granites and shows that the Upper Carboniferous plutonism occurred within a short time span of ca. 10 million years. The ascent of granite magmas took place after an extensional tectonic event (D 2) and is coeval with dextral and sinistral crustal-scale transcurrent shearing (D 3). Field and petrographical evidence suggest a narrow time-span between peak T metamorphic conditions and the intrusion of granitic melts which implies very fast uplift rates accommodated through active tectonic exhumation. Magma compositions evolve through time, reflecting an increasing involvement of mid-crustal sources and the underplating effect of an upwelling asthenospheric mantle at the base of a thinning and stretching continental crust.

  8. Late Cretaceous ARC to MORB compositional switch in the Quebradagrande Complex, Colombian Andes: understanding the long term tectonic evolution of a magmatic arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, J. S.; Cardona, A.; Zapata, S.; Valencia, V.

    2014-12-01

    The spatial and compositional characters of arc rocks are sensible markers of the tectonic changes experienced by convergent margins and therefore provide a fundamental view to the continuous tectonic evolution of active margins. The Early to Late Cretaceous tectonic evolution of the Northern Andes have been related to the growth and accretion of different continental and oceanic arc systems that were juxtaposed at the beginning of the Andean Orogeny in the Late Cretaceous. The Quebradagrande Complex is a tectonostratigraphic unit made of mafic to intermediate plutonic rocks, basic to intermediate volcanic flows and associated marine sedimentary rocks that have been related to a single Albian arc or back-arc environment that discontinuously outcrops along the western margin of the Central Cordillera of Colombia. New field, geochronological and geochemical data from the plutonic and volcanic rocks of the Quebradagrande complex shows that the pre-90-80 Ma volcanic arc rocks are intruded by ca. 90 Ma pyroxene gabbroic and hornblende dioritic plutons with medium to pegmatitic grain size characterized by a contrasting MORB-type signature. We related the compositional change to a transient modification of the convergent margin system, where and extensional roll-back related configuration or the subduction of an oceanic ridge allows the flux of the astenospheric mantle. This continental magmatic arc was subsequently deformed due to the collision and accretion of an allocthonous oceanic arc that migrate from the southeast Pacific at the beginning of the Andean orogeny.

  9. A glacial isostatic adjustment model for the central and northern Laurentide Ice Sheet based on relative sea level and GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, K. M.; James, T. S.; Henton, J. A.; Dyke, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    The thickness and equivalent global sea level contribution of an improved model of the central and northern Laurentide Ice Sheet is constrained by 24 relative sea level histories and 18 present-day GPS-measured vertical land motion rates. The final model, termed Laur16, is derived from the ICE-5G model by holding the timing history constant and iteratively adjusting the thickness history, in four regions of northern Canada. In the final model, the last glacial maximum (LGM) thickness of the Laurentide Ice Sheet west of Hudson Bay was ˜3.4-3.6 km. Conversely, east of Hudson Bay, peak ice thicknesses reached ˜4 km. The ice model thicknesses inferred for these two regions represent, respectively, a ˜30 per cent decrease and an average ˜20-25 per cent increase to the load thickness relative to the ICE-5G reconstruction, which is generally consistent with other recent studies that have focussed on Laurentide Ice Sheet history. The final model also features peak ice thicknesses of 1.2-1.3 km in the Baffin Island region, a modest reduction relative to ICE-5G and unchanged thicknesses for a region in the central Canadian Arctic Archipelago west of Baffin Island. Vertical land motion predictions of the final model fit observed crustal uplift rates well, after an adjustment is made for the elastic crustal response to present-day ice mass changes of regional ice cover. The new Laur16 model provides more than a factor of two improvement of the fit to the RSL data (χ2 measure of misfit) and a factor of nine improvement to the fit of the GPS data (mean squared error measure of fit), compared to the ICE-5G starting model. Laur16 also fits the regional RSL data better by a factor of two and gives a slightly better fit to GPS uplift rates than the recent ICE-6G model. The volume history of the Laur16 reconstruction corresponds to an up to 8 m reduction in global sea level equivalent compared to ICE-5G at LGM.

  10. Pandemic H1N1 influenza isolated from free-ranging Northern Elephant Seals in 2010 off the central California coast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey Goldstein

    Full Text Available Interspecies transmission of influenza A is an important factor in the evolution and ecology of influenza viruses. Marine mammals are in contact with a number of influenza reservoirs, including aquatic birds and humans, and this may facilitate transmission among avian and mammalian hosts. Virus isolation, whole genome sequencing, and hemagluttination inhibition assay confirmed that exposure to pandemic H1N1 influenza virus occurred among free-ranging Northern Elephant Seals (Mirounga angustirostris in 2010. Nasal swabs were collected from 42 adult female seals in April 2010, just after the animals had returned to the central California coast from their short post-breeding migration in the northeast Pacific. Swabs from two seals tested positive by RT-PCR for the matrix gene, and virus was isolated from each by inoculation into embryonic chicken eggs. Whole genome sequencing revealed greater than 99% homology with A/California/04/2009 (H1N1 that emerged in humans from swine in 2009. Analysis of more than 300 serum samples showed that samples collected early in 2010 (n = 100 were negative and by April animals began to test positive for antibodies against the pH1N1 virus (HI titer of ≥1∶40, supporting the molecular findings. In vitro characterizations studies revealed that viral replication was indistinguishable from that of reference strains of pH1N1 in canine kidney cells, but replication was inefficient in human epithelial respiratory cells, indicating these isolates may be elephant seal adapted viruses. Thus findings confirmed that exposure to pandemic H1N1 that was circulating in people in 2009 occurred among free-ranging Northern Elephant Seals in 2010 off the central California coast. This is the first report of pH1N1 (A/Elephant seal/California/1/2010 in any marine mammal and provides evidence for cross species transmission of influenza viruses in free-ranging wildlife and movement of influenza viruses between humans and wildlife.

  11. Annual narrative report: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge, Karl Mundt National Wildlife Refuge, and Lake Andes Wetland Management District: Calendar year 1975

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This collection of monthly activity reports summarizes activities on Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR during the 1975 calendar year. Resource...

  12. Tectonic geomorphology of the Andes with SIR-A and SIR-B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Arthur L.; Fielding, Eric J.

    1986-01-01

    Data takes from SIR-A and SIR-B (Shuttle Imaging Radar) crossed all of the principal geomorphic provinces of the central Andes between 17 and 34 S latitude. In conjunction with Thematic Mapping images and photographs from hand-held cameras as well as from the Large Format Camera that was flown with SIR-B, the radar images give an excellent sampling of Andean geomorphology. In particular, the radar images show new details of volcanic rocks and landforms of late Cenozoic age in the Puna, and the exhumed surfaces of tilted blocks of Precambrian crystalline basement in the Sierras Pampeanas.

  13. A new endemic focus of Chagas disease in the northern region of Veraguas Province, Western Half Panama, Central America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azael Saldaña

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas disease was originally reported in Panama in 1931. Currently, the best knowledge of this zoonosis is restricted to studies done in historically endemic regions. However, little is known about the distribution and epidemiology of Chagas disease in other rural areas of the country. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out between May 2005 - July 2008 in four rural communities of the Santa Fe District, Veraguas Province. The study included an entomologic search to collect triatomines, bloodmeal type identification and infection rate with trypanosomes in collected vectors using a dot- blot and PCR analysis, genotyping of circulating Trypanosoma cruzi (mini-exon gene PCR analysis and the detection of chagasic antibodies among inhabitants. The vector Rhodnius pallescens was more frequently found in La Culaca and El Pantano communities (788 specimens, where it was a sporadic household visitor. These triatomines presented darker coloration and larger sizescompared with typical specimens collected in Central Panama. Triatoma dimidiata was more common in Sabaneta de El Macho (162 specimens. In one small sub-region (El Macho, 60% of the houses were colonized by this vector. Of the examined R. pallescens, 54.7.0% (88/161 had fed on Didelphis marsupialis, and 24.6% (34/138 of T. dimidiata specimens collected inside houses were positive for human blood. R. pallescens presented an infection index with T. cruzi of 17.7% (24/136, with T. rangeli of 12.5% (17/136 and 50.7% (69/136 were mixed infections. In 117 T. dimidiata domestic specimens the infection index with T. cruzi was 21.4%. Lineage I of T. cruzi was confirmed circulating in these vectors. A T. cruzi infection seroprevalence of 2.3% (24/1,056 was found in this population. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of Chagas disease endemicity in Santa Fe District, and it should be considered a neglected public health problem in this area of Panama.

  14. The contribution of sulphuric acid to atmospheric particle formation and growth: a comparison between boundary layers in Northern and Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fiedler

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric gaseous sulphuric acid was measured and its influence on particle formation and growth was investigated building on aerosol data. The measurements were part of the EU-project QUEST and took place at two different measurement sites in Northern and Central Europe (Hyytiälä, Finland, March-April 2003 and Heidelberg, Germany, March-April 2004. From a comprehensive data set including sulphuric acid, particle number size distributions and meteorological data, particle growth rates, particle formation rates and source rates of condensable vapors were inferred. Growth rates were determined in two different ways, from particle size distributions as well as from a so-called timeshift analysis. Moreover, correlations between sulphuric acid and particle number concentration between 3 and 6 nm were examined and the influence of air masses of different origin was investigated. Measured maximum concentrations of sulphuric acid were in the range from 1x106 to 16x106cm-3. The gaseous sulphuric acid lifetime with respect to condensation on aerosol particles ranged from 2 to 33min in Hyytiälä and from 0.5 to 8 min in Heidelberg. Most calculated values (growth rates, formation rates, vapor source rates were considerably higher in Central Europe (Heidelberg, due to the more polluted air and higher preexistent aerosol concentrations. Close correlations between H2SO4 and nucleation mode particles (size range: 3-6 nm were found on most days at both sites. The percentage contribution of sulphuric acid to particle growth was below 10% at both places and to initial growth below 20%. An air mass analysis indicated that at Heidelberg new particles were formed predominantly in air advected from southwesterly directions.

  15. New insights into the evolution of central Tyrrhenian margin of Italy (northern Latium off-shore area): evidences and constraints from seismic data interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttinelli, M.; Vico, G.; Scrocca, D.; Petracchini, L.; de Rita, D.

    2009-04-01

    A revision of the available seismic reflection survey in the off-shore part of the northern Latium (central Italy) has been accomplished to better understand the deep structural setting of this area. Previous works performed in the last twenty years have compared the on-shore outcrops of cretaceous flyschoid and Plio-Pleistocene marine sedimentary units with shallow off-shore seismic reflection data (1/1,5 msec twt maximum), while the deep structural setting of calcareous basement of Tuscan units have been poorly analysed. The stratigraphy of the area is well constrained by a deep well, which goes through the entire sedimentary succession. Other geological constraints are provided by a discrete amount of deep wells in the on-shore part of the study area and by a voluminous bibliography, in which many authors tried to correlate this units to the tectonic units described in the central and northern part of the Apennines. The stratigraphy could be divided in four main groups of units; from top to bottom: Plio-Pleistocene marine deposits, Cretaceous Liguride deep-water units, Jurassic Tuscan pelagic deposits, and a Triassic evaporitic formation. Even volcanic intrusive bodies (Tolfa-Ceriti-Manziana dome complexes) are present in the on-shore part. The emplacement of this bodies generally caused a further overprint on the different deformation phases that affected this area. Seismic reflection data analysis show that this area was affected by at least three deformational phases. After the deposition of the Tuscan and Liguride sedimentary units, the area underwent: i) an initial compressional phase associated to the Alps-Northern Apennine chain build up, with formation of compressional features as regional thrusts, back-thrusts and fold structures. These structures are clearly visible in the deep Tuscan and Liguride units setting; ii) a successive extensional deformation phase related to the spreading of the Tyrrhenian Sea, starting in the late Miocene times. This caused

  16. Large slope failures in the La Paz basin, Bolivian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, N. J.; Hermanns, R. L.; Rabus, B.; Guzmán, M. A.; Minaya, E.; Clague, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    the La Paz basin provides insights into evolution of the Central Andes and the geologic contribution to the exceptionally high landslide risk in the modern city of La Paz.

  17. Eolian deposits of the southwestern margin of the Botucatú paleoerg: Reconstruction of the Gondwana landscape in Central Northern Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, V. Gisel; Naipauer, Maximiliano; Pimentel, Marcio; Barcelona, Hernan

    2016-06-01

    The Mesozoic Botucatú paleoerg at the southwestern margin of Gondwana includes a succession of eolian dunes cross-strata which are presently exposed in Otumpa Hills (Central Northern Argentina). Here, the architectural facies, petrology, and provenance of those rocks were studied in order to investigate depositional environments and paleoclimates. The stratigraphic sequence included basal eolian two-dimensional crescentic dunes (Slp) overlain by three-dimensional crescentic dunes of smaller scale (Smt). These were correlated with the Upper Member Rivera of the Tacuarembó Formation (Uruguay), or its equivalent in Brazil, the Botucatú Formation. These outcrops partially mark the southwestern margin of the Botucatú paleoerg along the Chaco-Paraná Basin boundary. The paleocurrents from the W, NW, and SW and the U-Pb ages of detrital zircons indicate a main Pampean cratonic and secondary Andean magmatic arc (180 Ma) source. A detrital zircon of 180 Ma by U-Pb limits a maximum depositional age at 180 Ma (Toarcian) for facies Slp. Upwards, the phreatic silcrete and calcrete indicate semiarid conditions during the Paleocene, which are correlated with the Queguay Formation of Uruguay. A saprolite paleoweathering profile, recording wet tropical-hyper-tropical climate at the Early Eocene and representing the Gondwana landscape and climate conditions, crowns the sequence. This study represents the first provenance and surface texture analysis of minerals from the Botucatú paleoerg and was instrumental to unravel past environmental and sedimentary conditions.

  18. Regional-scale nitrogen and phosphorus budgets for the northern (14°S) and central (17°S) Great Barrier Reef shelf ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnas, M.; Alongi, D.; McKinnon, D.; Trott, L.; Skuza, M.

    2011-12-01

    Seasonally averaged N and P box model budgets were constructed for two regional-scale sections of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) shelf, one in the near-pristine far-northern GBR (13.5-14.5°S) and the other in the central GBR (17-18°S) adjacent to more intensively farmed wet tropics watersheds. We were unable to simultaneously balance shelf-scale N and P budgets within seasonal or annual time frames, indicating that magnitudes of a number of key input and, especially, loss processes are still poorly constrained. In most cases, current estimates of system-level N and P sources (rainfall, runoff, upwelling, N-fixation) are less than estimated loss processes (denitrification, cross-shelfbreak mixing and burial). Nutrient dynamics in both shelf sections are dominated by the tightly coupled uptake and mineralization of soluble N and P in the water column and the sedimentation-resuspension of particulate detritus. On an area-averaged basis, internal cycling fluxes are an order of magnitude greater than input-output fluxes. Denitrification in shelf sediments is a significant sink for N while lateral mixing is both a source and sink for P.

  19. Lake Andes Easement Refuges: Narrative report: September to December, 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes activities on Lake Andes NWR between September and December of 1946. Water conditions, waterfowl, furbearers, maintenance and...

  20. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: Sedimentology and sequence stratigraphy of the Bryne and Lulu Formations, Middle Jurassic, northern Danish Central Graben

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andsbjerg, Jan

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The Middle Jurassic Bryne and Lulu Formations of the Søgne Basin (northern part of the Danish Central Graben consist of fluvially-dominated coastal plain deposits, overlain by interfingering shoreface and back-barrier deposits. Laterally continuous, mainly fining-upwards fluvial channel sandstones that locally show evidence for tidal influence dominate the alluvial/coastal plain deposits of the lower Bryne Formation. The sandstones are separated by units of fine-grained floodplain sediments that show a fining-upwards - coarsening-upwards pattern and locally grade into lacustrine mudstones. A regional unconformity that separates the lower Bryne Formation from the mainly estuarine upper Bryne Formation is defined by the strongly erosional base of a succession of stacked channel sandstones, interpreted as the fill of a system of incised valleys. Most of the stacked channel sandstones show abundant mud laminae and flasers, and rare herringbone structures, suggesting that they were deposited in a tidal environment, probably an estuary. Several tens of metres of the lower Bryne Formation may have been removed by erosion at this unconformity. The estuarine channel sandstone succession is capped by coal beds that attain a thickness of several metres in the western part of the Søgne Basin, but are thin and poorly developed in the central part of the basin. Above the coal beds, the Lulu Formation is dominated by various types of tidally influenced paralic deposits in the western part of the basin and by coarsening-upwards shoreface and beach deposits in central parts. Westwards-thickening wedges of paralic deposits interfinger with eastwards-thickening wedges of shallow marine deposits. The Middle Jurassic succession is subdivided into nine sequences. In the lower Bryne Formation, sequence boundaries are situated at the base of laterally continuous fluvial channel sandstones whereas maximum flooding surfaces are placed in laterally extensive floodplain

  1. Bi-directional subduction of the South Tianshan Ocean during the Late Silurian: Magmatic records from both the southern Central Tianshan Block and northern Tarim Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Jinjiang; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Kai; Ge, Maohui

    2016-10-01

    The subduction polarity of the South Tianshan Ocean (STO) is a matter of debate, primarily in that the Paleozoic structures of Tianshan orogenic belt have been strongly overprinted by the Cenozoic intra-continental deformation. Indentifying the arc-related magmatic rocks may provide a convincible clue for understanding the closure process of the STO. In this study, whole-rock geochemistry, zircon U-Pb dating and Hf isotope were presented on the andesite and monzonite from the Bayanbulak area of the southern Central Tianshan Block (CTB) and on the quartz diorite from the Ouxidaban area of the northern Tarim Craton. Geochemically, all the samples are Na-rich, enriched in light rare earth elements and large ion lithophile elements (Rb, Ba, U, K and Pb), and depleted in high strength field elements (Nb, Ta and Ti), like most arc-type igneous rocks. The Bayanbulak andesite samples display high MgO, Fe2O3T, TiO2 and Mg# values, and positive εHf(t) values, indicating magma source from the wedge mantle. But the existence of xenocrystic zircons implies that continental crust material were involved during magma ascend, suggesting a continental arc setting for the Bayanbulak andesite. The Bayanbulak monzonite and the Ouxidaban quartz diorite samples display relatively higher SiO2 contents, and lower MgO, Fe2O3T and TiO2 concentrations, indicating crustal sources. But the Mg# values of the Bayanbulak monzonite and the Ouxidaban quartz diorite are 48.76-51.85 and 50.31-53.73, and the εHf(t) values are -2.5 to 8.7 and -1.7 to 4.1, indicating that their magma sources were also mixed by mantle-derived components. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating results reveal that the Bayanbulak andesite, the Bayanbulak monzonite and the Ouxidaban quartz diorite were formed at 423, 424 Ma, and 421 Ma, respectively. The age and geochemical data indicate that both the southern CTB and northern Tarim Craton were active continental margins during the Late Silurian, favoring a bi-directional subduction

  2. Quantitative Temperature Reconstructions from Holocene and Late Glacial Lake Sediments in the Tropical Andes using Chironomidae (non-biting midges)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews-Bird, F.; Gosling, W. D.; Brooks, S. J.; Montoya, E.; Coe, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    Chironomidae (non-biting midges) is a family of two-winged aquatic insects of the order Diptera. They are globally distributed and one of the most diverse families within aquatic ecosystems. The insects are stenotopic, and the rapid turnover of species and their ability to colonise quickly favourable habitats means chironomids are extremely sensitive to environmental change, notably temperature. Through the development of quantitative temperature inference models chironomids have become important palaeoecological tools. Proxies capable of generating independent estimates of past climate are crucial to disentangling climate signals and ecosystem response in the palaeoecological record. This project has developed the first modern environmental calibration data set in order to use chironomids from the Tropical Andes as quantitative climate proxies. Using surface sediments from c. 60 lakes from Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador we have developed an inference model capable of reconstructing temperatures, with a prediction error of 1-2°C, from fossil assemblages. Here we present the first Lateglacial and Holocene chironomid-inferred temperature reconstructions from two sites in the tropical Andes. The first record, from a high elevation (4153 m asl) lake in the Bolivian Andes, shows persistently cool temperatures for the past 15 kyr, punctuated by warm episodes in the early Holocene (9-10 kyr BP). The chironomid-inferred Holocene temperature trends from a lake sediment record on the eastern Andean flank of Ecuador (1248 m asl) spanning the last 5 millennia are synchronous with temperature changes in the NGRIP ice core record. The temperature estimates suggest along the eastern flank of the Andes, at lower latitudes (~1°S), climate closely resemble the well-established fluctuations of the Northern Hemisphere for this time period. Late-glacial climate fluctuations across South America are still disputed with some palaeoecological records suggesting evidence for Younger Dryas

  3. Detection of detached forced-regressive nearshore wedges: a case study from the central-southern Siena Basin (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Ivan; Arragoni, Simone; Aldinucci, Mauro; Foresi, Luca Maria; Bambini, Anna Maria; Sandrelli, Fabio

    2013-07-01

    The detection of detached nearshore wedges formed in response to relative sea-level drops is considered one of the hottest topics in sequence stratigraphic analysis due to their importance as reservoir analogues. In fact, they usually constitute sandy and porous bodies generally encased in impermeable clay, thus presenting a good potential as traps for fluids. This paper focuses on the sequence stratigraphic analysis of the Pliocene deposits cropping out in the central-southern sector of the Siena Basin (Tuscany, Italy), a post-collisional basin of the Northern Apennines. The exposed sedimentary succession was investigated through a detailed sedimentological and stratigraphic approach, integrated by biostratigraphic analyses, aimed at a better characterization of the infilling history of this sector of the basin. Specifically, this study revealed the occurrence of repeated facies shifts that allowed the identification of two depositional sequences. In detail, a thick sand-rich body far from the basin margins, and previously considered as a turbiditic lobe, has been reinterpreted as formed in a nearshore setting during a fall in relative sea level. This body is totally encased in offshore clay, and due to the lack of physical connection with the related HST deposits, it has to be considered as a detached forced-regressive wedge. The present work led to the recognition of some sedimentological and stratigraphic features typical of falling stage systems tract deposits (e.g. presence of intrabasinal recycled materials, sedimentological evidence of a pre-existing fluvial network subsequently eroded) that can provide useful clues for the identification of detached forced-regressive nearshore wedges in core studies and poorly exposed settings.

  4. Fault kinematics in northern Central America and coupling along the subduction interface of the Cocos Plate, from GPS data in Chiapas (Mexico), Guatemala and El Salvador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, A.; Lasserre, C.; Lyon-Caen, H.; Kostoglodov, V.; Molina, E.; Guzman-Speziale, M.; Monterosso, D.; Robles, V.; Figueroa, C.; Amaya, W.; Barrier, E.; Chiquin, L.; Moran, S.; Flores, O.; Romero, J.; Santiago, J. A.; Manea, M.; Manea, V. C.

    2012-06-01

    New GPS measurements in Chiapas (Mexico), Guatemala and El Salvador are used to constrain the fault kinematics in the North America (NA), Caribbean (CA) and Cocos (CO) plates triple junction area. The regional GPS velocity field is first analysed in terms of strain partitioning across the major volcano-tectonic structures, using elastic half-space modelling, then inverted through a block model. We show the dominant role of the Motagua Fault with respect to the Polochic Fault in the accommodation of the present-day deformation associated with the NA and CA relative motion. The NA/CA motion decreases from 18-22 mm yr-1 in eastern Guatemala to 14-20 mm yr-1 in central Guatemala (assuming a uniform locking depth of 14-28 km), down to a few millimetres per year in western Guatemala. As a consequence, the western tip of the CA Plate deforms internally, with ≃9 mm yr-1 of east-west extension (≃5 mm yr-1 across the Guatemala city graben alone). Up to 15 mm yr-1 of dextral motion can be accommodated across the volcanic arc in El Salvador and southeastern Guatemala. The arc seems to mark the northern boundary of an independent forearc sliver (AR), pinned to the NA plate. The inversion of the velocity field shows that a four-block (NA, CA, CO and AR) model, that combines relative block rotations with elastic deformation at the block boundaries, can account for most of the GPS observations and constrain the overall kinematics of the active structures. This regional modelling also evidences lateral variations of coupling at the CO subduction interface, with a fairly high-coupling (≃0.6) offshore Chiapas and low-coupling (≃0.25) offshore Guatemala and El Salvador.

  5. Some Aspects of the Population Biology of the Green Tiger Prawn Penaeus semisulcatus (De Haan, 1844 from Pilar and Capiz Bays, Northern Panay, West Central Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A Villarta

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is a first report on the population biology of the green tiger prawn Penaeus semisulcatus (de Haan from northern Panay, west central Philippines. The study was conducted for eight months (May to December 2002 whereby total lengths of both male and female P. semisulcatus of various sizes were measured monthly from the catches of municipal trawlers operating at Pilar and Capiz Bays. Based on the Bhattacharya method, a mean growth rate of 0.78 ± 0.28 and 1.45 ± 0.39 mm/day were estimated for males and females, respectively. Using the ELEFAN I method, growth parameters derived for males were L∞ = 263 mm, k = 0.7/yr and a growth index (Ø' of 4.69. On the other hand, growth parameters derived for females were L∞ = 271 mm, k = 1.6/yr and a growth index (Ø' of 5.07.Based on length-converted catch curve analysis, the total mortality (Z of the male population is estimated to be 3.61/yr while that of the females is 5.65/yr. Male prawns showed a higher exploitation rate (0.53 compared to that of the females (0.35 indicating the susceptibility of males to fishing. This study also revealed that trawlers in Pilar and Capiz Bays are already getting small sizes of prawns, without allowing them to reach sexual maturity. Hence, there is a need to increase the present mesh size (2.5 cm of the cod end of trawls in order to avoid growth overfishing, which may occur with continued increase in fishing effort. Furthermore, the recruitment pattern showed two pulses of unequal strengths and time, dividing the year into a 7-5 month pattern. The said pattern, especially for females, may have resulted from a major and minor spawning peak of the said species during the months of June-September and January.

  6. Un método para el análisis de frecuencia regional de lluvias máximas diarias: aplicación en los Andes bolivianos A method for regional frequency analysis of maximum daily rainfall: application in the Bolivian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Luna Vera

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un análisis de frecuencia regional con series de lluvia diaria máxima anual para una zona con escasa información. La compleja orografía de montañas y el altiplano de una región en la cordillera de Los Andes, Bolivia, produce diferentes patrones de lluvia diaria. La combinación de los Momentos-L y el análisis de conglomerados resultan adecuados para identificarlas regiones homogéneas de las series máximas anuales. El trabajo desarrollado define 4 regiones homogéneas. La región 1 comprende las estaciones ubicadas en el altiplano y la zona Sur Este. La región 2 abarca el altiplano central y la cuenca del Río La Paz, compuesto por cuencas interandinas. La 3 delimita claramente las estaciones de la zona tropical amazónica; y la 4 está compuesta por estaciones ubicadas en las montañas del Norte. Se probaron diversas distribuciones para el análisis regional de frecuencias aplicando la técnica de estaciones-año; los mejores resultados se obtuvieron con las funciones Gumbel y Doble Gumbel. Finalmente se expresan las ecuaciones regionales y se comparan con algunas series puntuales de cada región, con el objeto de verificar la aplicabilidad de la metodología propuesta para fines de diseño hidrológico.A regional frequency analysis of daily annual maximum rainfall series for an area with poor information is presented. The complex topography mountains and the highlands region in the Cordillera de Los Andes, Bolivia, produce different patterns of daily rainfall. The combination of L-Moments and cluster analysis are adequate to identify the homogeneous regions of the annual maximum series. The work defines 4 homogeneous regions. Region 1 includes the stations located in the highlands and south-east. Region 2 covers the central highlands and La Paz River Basin, consisting of inter-Andean basins. Region 3 clearly defines the Amazonian basin stations and 4 is composed of stations located in the northern mountains. Different

  7. On the Central Government' Northern s Collating Medical Works during Song Dynasty%略论北宋官府之校理医书

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汝企和

    2012-01-01

    北宋校理医书的成就令人瞩目,本文首次将其官府校理医籍的概况与前代的状况进行纵向比较,从而彰显出北宋的突出之处,并对其成就突出之主要原因亦进行了探讨。%The achievements of Northern Song Dynasty in collating the ancient works of medicine during are very compelling. For the first time, this paper makes comparison between the situation of Northern Song' s collation of ancient works of medicine and that of the dynasties before Northern Song. By this way, the achievements of Northern Song Dynasty stand out. The paper also probes into the main causes why it could obtain such outstanding achievements. Key Words: Northern Song Dynasty; medical works; collation

  8. Carbon stabilization mechanisms in soils in the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Boris; Cammeraat, Erik

    2015-04-01

    The volcanic ash soils of the Andes contain very large stocks of soil organic matter (SOM) per unit area. Consequently, they constitute significant potential sources or sinks of the greenhouse gas CO2. Climate and/or land use change potentially have a strong effect on these large SOM stocks. To clarify the role of chemical and physical stabilisation mechanisms in volcanic ash soils in the montane tropics, we investigated carbon stocks and stabilization mechanisms in the top- and subsoil along an altitudinal transect in the Ecuadorian Andes. The transect encompassed a sequence of paleosols under forest and grassland (páramo), including a site where vegetation cover changed in the last century. We applied selective extraction techniques, performed X-ray diffraction analyses of the clay fraction and estimated pore size distributions at various depths in the top- and subsoil along the transect. In addition, from several soils the molecular composition of SOM was further characterized with depth in the current soil as well as the entire first and the top of the second paleosol using GC/MS analyses of extractable lipids and Pyrolysis-GC/MS analyses of bulk organic matter. Our results show that organic carbon stocks in the mineral soil under forest a páramo vegetation were roughly twice as large as global averages for volcanic ash soils, regardless of whether the first 30cm, 100cm or 200cm were considered. We found the carbon stabilization mechanisms involved to be: i) direct stabilization of SOM in organo-metallic (Al-OM) complexes; ii) indirect protection of SOM through low soil pH and toxic levels of Al; and iii) physical protection of SOM due to a very high microporosity of the soil (Tonneijck et al., 2010; Jansen et al. 2011). When examining the organic carbon at a molecular level, interestingly we found extensive degradation of lignin in the topsoil while extractable lipids were preferentially preserved in the subsoil (Nierop and Jansen, 2009). Both vegetation

  9. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1989 calendar year. The report...

  10. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1986 calendar year. The report...

  11. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1992 calendar year. The report begins...

  12. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1985 calendar year. The report...

  13. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1987 calendar year. The report...

  14. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1990 calendar year. The report...

  15. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1988 calendar year. The report...

  16. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1983 calendar year. The report...

  17. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1984 calendar year. The report...

  18. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1981 calendar year. The report...

  19. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Lake Andes WMD, and Karl E. Mundt NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1982 calendar year. The report...

  20. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1991 calendar year. The report begins...

  1. Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lake Andes NWR, Karl Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1993 calendar year. The report begins...

  2. Assembly patterns of mixed-species avian flocks in the Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado, Gabriel J; Rodewald, Amanda D

    2015-03-01

    The relative contribution of deterministic and stochastic processes in the assembly of biotic communities is a central issue of controversy in community ecology. However, several studies have shown patterns of species segregation that are consistent with the hypothesis that deterministic factors such as competition and niche-partitioning structure species assemblages in animal communities. Community assembly provides a theoretical framework for understanding these processes, but it has been seldom applied to social aggregations within communities. In this research, we assessed patterns of non-randomness in Andean mixed-species flocks using three assembly models: (i) co-occurrence patterns; (ii) guild proportionality; and (iii) constant body-size ratios using data from 221 species of resident and Neotropical migrant birds participating in 311 mixed-species flocks at 13 regions distributed in Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Significant assembly patterns for mixed-species flocks based on co-occurrence models and guild proportionality models suggest that competitive interactions play an important role in structuring this social system in the Andes. Distribution of species among foraging guilds (i.e. insectivore, frugivore, omnivore, nectivore) was generally similar among flocks, though with some regional variation. In contrast, we found little evidence that structuring of mixed-species flocks in the Andes was mediated by body size. Rather, we found greater than expected variance of body-size ratios within flocks, indicating that birds did not segregate morphologically. Overall, our findings suggest that deterministic factors associated to competitive interactions are important contributors to mixed-species flock assemblages across the Andes. PMID:25283441

  3. Proglacial lake sediments, cosmogenic ages and stable isotopes reveal Holocene climate changes in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansell, N.; Rodbell, D. T.; Licciardi, J. M.; Abbott, M. B.; Mark, B. G.; Schweinsberg, A.

    2013-12-01

    Sediment records from lakes and cosmogenic ages on moraine boulders in central Peru document the waxing and waning of alpine glaciers since the end of the late glacial stage. These records from the southern tropical Andes tentatively suggest that a brief re-advance occurred during the early Holocene, even though conditions overall were relatively warm and dry from ~12 to 8 ka. The middle Holocene (between 8 and 4 ka) was marked by a shift to cooler, and possibly wetter conditions in certain regions, leading to glacial advances. Although there were multiple periods of brief ice advances that punctuated the overall late Holocene trend, glaciers in multiple valleys generally retreated from ~4.0 ka through the Medieval Climate Anomaly (1.0 to 0.7 ka). This late Holocene pattern of ice retreat occurred during a period when lake level studies, and both lacustrine and speleothem stable isotopic records indicate wetter conditions, suggesting that higher temperatures contributed to the pattern of ice retreat. Following this period of glacial retreat, multiple proxy records suggest that the start of the Little Ice Age (~0.6 to 0.1 ka) was a colder and wetter time throughout much of the tropical Andes. While there is emerging evidence that the strength of the South American Summer Monsoon increased through the Holocene, these shifting precipitation patterns do not fully explain the record of glaciation in Peru. It is likely that sea surface temperature distributions in the tropical Pacific Ocean also affected atmospheric temperature, precipitation and circulation patterns over the Andes. The combined influences of both Atlantic and Pacific ocean and atmospheric influences thus contributed to the observed pattern of glacial variability during the Holocene.

  4. The first ANDES elements: 9-DOF plate bending triangles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militello, Carmelo; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1991-01-01

    New elements are derived to validate and assess the assumed natural deviatoric strain (ANDES) formulation. This is a brand new variant of the assumed natural strain (ANS) formulation of finite elements, which has recently attracted attention as an effective method for constructing high-performance elements for linear and nonlinear analysis. The ANDES formulation is based on an extended parametrized variational principle developed in recent publications. The key concept is that only the deviatoric part of the strains is assumed over the element whereas the mean strain part is discarded in favor of a constant stress assumption. Unlike conventional ANS elements, ANDES elements satisfy the individual element test (a stringent form of the patch test) a priori while retaining the favorable distortion-insensitivity properties of ANS elements. The first application of this formulation is the development of several Kirchhoff plate bending triangular elements with the standard nine degrees of freedom. Linear curvature variations are sampled along the three sides with the corners as gage reading points. These sample values are interpolated over the triangle using three schemes. Two schemes merge back to conventional ANS elements, one being identical to the Discrete Kirchhoff Triangle (DKT), whereas the third one produces two new ANDES elements. Numerical experiments indicate that one of the ANDES element is relatively insensitive to distortion compared to previously derived high-performance plate-bending elements, while retaining accuracy for nondistorted elements.

  5. Horizontal subduction zones, convergence velocity and the building of the Andes

    CERN Document Server

    Martinod, Joseph; Roperch, Pierrick; Guillaume, Benjamin; Espurt, Nicolas; 10.1016/j.epsl.2010.09.010

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the relationships between Andean shortening, plate velocities at the trench, and slab geometry beneath South America. Although some correlation exists between the convergence velocity and the westward motion of South America on the one hand, and the shortening of the continental plate on the other hand, plate kinematics neither gives a satisfactory explanation to the Andean segmentation in general, nor explains the development of the Bolivian orocline in Paleogene times. We discuss the Cenozoic history of horizontal slab segments below South America, arguing that they result from the subduction of oceanic plateaus whose effect is to switch the buoyancy of the young subducting plate to positive. We argue that the existence of horizontal slab segments, below the Central Andes during Eocene-Oligocene times, and below Peru and North-Central Chile since Pliocene, resulted (1) in the shortening of the continental plate interiors at a large distance from the trench, (2) in stronger interplate coupling and...

  6. Jurassic metabasic rocks in the Kızılırmak accretionary complex (Kargı region, Central Pontides, Northern Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Ömer Faruk; Chiaradia, Massimo; Marzoli, Andrea; Özkan, Mutlu; Billor, Zeki; Topuz, Gültekin

    2016-03-01

    The Kızılırmak accretionary complex near Kargı is tectonically bounded by the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous metamorphic massives of the Central Pontides. It consists mainly of serpentinite, serpentinized peridotite, gabbro, basalt, metabasite and deep-marine sedimentary rocks. The metabasites in the Kızılırmak accretionary complex are tectonically located within a serpentinite, radiolarian chert, spilitized basalt, gabbro association and commonly display a steep contact with serpentinites. Amphiboles from metabasites yielded robust 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages ranging between 159.4 ± 0.4 Ma and 163.5 ± 0.8 Ma. These are interpreted as cooling ages of the metabasites. The metabasites have 87Sr/86Sr(i) between 0.7035 and 0.7044 and 206Pb/204Pb(i) ranging between 18.18 and 18.92. The gabbros have higher 87Sr/86Sr(i) between 0.7044 and 0.7060 and 206Pb/204Pb(i) ranging between 17.98 and 18.43. Three basalt samples display 87Sr/86Sr(i) between 0.7040 and 0.7059. Their 206Pb/204Pb(i) are unrealistically low (15.42 and 15.62), suggesting, most likely, Pb loss which results in over-corrected values for decay through time. Pb-Sr-Nd isotopic compositions for all samples consistently plot between the fields of MORB or the Depleted MORB Mantle reservoirs and enriched mantle reservoirs (EMII rather than EMI). All the samples (except one dolerite dike) have negative ɛNdDM(t = 160 Ma) values, suggesting derivation from a reservoir more enriched than the depleted mantle. The protoliths of metabasites correspond to diverse sources (N-MORB, E-MORB, OIB and IAT) based on whole rock major and trace element composition. An IAT-like protolith for the metabasites indicates that the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan ocean domain was subducting and the tectonic regime was compressional during Late Jurassic and before. The protoliths of these rocks were metamorphosed during the subduction/accretion processes, as observed in the metamorphic rocks located along the Balkan, Northern Turkey and

  7. Timing and nature of the Xinlin-Xiguitu Ocean: constraints from ophiolitic gabbros in the northern Great Xing'an Range, eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhiqiang; Liu, Yongjiang; Liu, Binqiang; Wen, Quanbo; Li, Weimin; Liu, Qing

    2016-03-01

    Jifeng ophiolitic mélange (ultramafic rocks, meta-basalts and gabbros) crops out in the northern segment of the Great Xing'an Range, the eastern segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, which marks the closure of the Xinlin-Xiguitu Ocean associated with the collision between the Erguna block and Xing'an block. In order to investigate the formation age and magma source of the Jifeng ophiolitic mélange, the gabbros from newly discovered the Jifeng ophiolitic mélange are studied with zircon U-Pb ages, whole-rock geochemistry and zircon Hf isotopes. Zircon U-Pb dating from the ophiolitic gabbros yields U-Pb age of 647 ± 5.3 Ma, which may represent the formation age of the ophiolitic mélange. The gabbros display low SiO2, TiO2, K2O contents, high Na2O, LREE contents and indistinctive REE fractionation [(La/Yb)N = 1.97-2.98]. It shows an E-MORB-like affinity, while the element concentrations of the Jifeng samples are lower than that of E-MORB. More importantly, Nb displays negative anomaly in comparison with Th, which shows a transitional SSZ-type ophiolite signature. Moreover, the ɛ Hf ( t) values of ~647 Ma zircons in the gabbros range from +8.4 to +13.4, and the corresponding Hf single-stage ages ( T DM1) are between 687 and 902 Ma, which is obviously older than the crystallization age of 647 Ma. These geochemical features can be explained as melts from the partial melting of a depleted mantle source meta-somatized by fluids derived from a subducted slab. Accordingly, we conclude that the Jifeng ophiolitic mélange is probably related to transitional SSZ-type ophiolite and developed in an intra-oceanic subduction, which indicates that an ocean (the Xinlin-Xiguitu Ocean) existed between the Erguna block and Xing'an block. The Ocean's formation might be no later than the Neoproterozoic (647 Ma), and it was closed in the Late Cambrian because of the collision between the Erguna block and Xing'an block.

  8. The thick-bedded tail of turbidite thickness distribution as a proxy for flow confinement: Examples from tertiary basins of central and northern Apennines (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Mattia; Felletti, Fabrizio; Milli, Salvatore; Patacci, Marco

    2016-07-01

    This study reviews the thickness statistics of non-channelized turbidites from four tertiary basins of Central-Northern Apennines (Italy), where bed geometry and sedimentary character have been previously assessed. Though very different in terms of size and, arguably, character of feeder system, these basins share a common stratigraphic evolution consisting in transition from an early ponded to a late unconfined setting of deposition. Based on comparison of thickness subsets from diverse locations and stratigraphic heights within the studied turbidite fills, this paper seeks to answer the following questions: i) how data collection procedures and field operational constraints (e.g. measure location, outcrop quality, use of thicknesses data from single vs. multiple correlative sections, stratigraphic thickness of the study interval) can affect statistics of sample data? ii) how depositional controls of confined vs. unconfined turbidite basins can result in different thickness-frequency distributions?; and iii) is there in thickness statistics a 'flow confinement' signature which can be used to distinguish between confined and unconfined turbidites? Results suggest that: i) best practices of data collection are crucial to a meaningful interpretation of sample data statistics, especially in presence of stratigraphic and spatial trends of turbidite bed thickness; ii) a systematic bias against cm-thick Tcd Bouma sequence turbidites exists in sample data, which can result in the low-end tail of empirical thickness-frequency distributions to depart significantly from the actual distribution of turbidite thickness; and iii) thickness statistics of beds starting with a basal Ta/Tb Bouma division bear a coherent relationship to the transition from ponded to unconfined depositional settings, consisting in reduction of variance and mean and, consequently, parameters, or even type, of best fit model distribution. This research highlights the role of flow stripping, sediment by

  9. Evolución tectonomagmática de los Andes bolivianos Tectonomagmaticevolution of the Bolivian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Jiménez

    2009-10-01

    ó la superficie San Juan del Oro, al mismo tiempo que se iniciaba ladeformación en la región subandina. La actividad magmática de retroarco en lafaja de Huarina fue casi continua desde el Paleozoico hasta el Cuaternario. Encambio el arco volcánico se instaló en la frontera boliviano-chilena sólo en elMioceno Inferior, hace 23-22 Ma. La actividad volcánica de retroarco llegó a suclimax en el Mioceno Superior. Las características químicas de los magmas y lasimultaneidad de las grandes erupciones a lo largo de la faja de Huarina,sugieren que es un solo proceso el que desencadenó este magmatismo de granvolumen. Se sugiere que este proceso es la delaminación litosférica del mantoque provocó el ascenso de la astenosfera hasta la base de la corteza induciendoa su fusión en varios niveles.The Bolivian Andes remained in a retroarc positionalong most of the Phanerozoic. Its evolution can be divided in two majorstages; in the first one, restricted to the early Paleozoic, a voluminoustransfer of sedimentary mass in the upper crust occurred. In the second stage,reciclyng of the crustal mass predominated. In the early Paleozoic, anepicratonic marine basin formed among the Amazonia, Arequipa-Antofalla, and Pampean cratons. This basin changed from aretroarc-type to a foreland-type before it filled in the late Paleozoic. Alongthis interval, three deformation stages came to pass: the areally restrictedOcloyic phase (Ordovician-Silurian boundary, the Eohercinian phase(Devonian-Carboniferous boundary, and the Hercinian phase (Late Carboniferouswhich was also areally restricted. In the Mesozoic, brief marine incursionsocurred before a protocordillera began to build in the Eocene. The generaluplift of the central Andes started in the Late Oligocene involving thepresent Altiplano and Eastern Cordillera. Three stages of uplift, separated byregional erosion surfaces of 18 and 10 Ma, can be recognized. The western sideof the Eastern Cordillera, named the Huarina belt, played an

  10. A study of stratospheric GW fluctuations and sporadic E at midlatitudes with focus on possible orographic effect of Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocke, Klemens; Tsuda, Toshitaka; de la Torre, Alejandro

    2002-10-01

    Longitudinal dependences of stratospheric gravity wave (GW) fluctuations and lower ionospheric irregularities (sporadic E) at midlatitudes are studied by means of radio occultation data of the Global Positioning System/Meteorology Experiment (GPS/MET) satellite mission. The zonal average of temperature variance of GW fluctuations with vertical scales less than 7 km at northern midlatitudes is observed to be similar to that at southern midlatitudes, but there is a significant interhemispheric difference in the longitudinal dependence of GW fluctuations. The GPS/MET data at northern midlatitudes show a rapid change of the gravity wave distribution from 25 to 35 km height, resulting in a broad maximum of temperature variance located over the Atlantic and Eurasia. We only find in the wave distribution at h = 25 km some weak traces of possible orographic effects. On the other hand, the distribution of GW fluctuations at southern midlatitudes has a strong and sharp maximum over Andes, which is obviously due to orographic wave generation by the interaction of surface wind with the Andean mountain ridge. This observation of the new GPS radio occultation technique is in agreement with previous measurements of spaceborne microwave and infrared limb sounders. The amplitude of the average wave field increases with height over Andes, while the amplitude maximum moves westward, against the prevailing wind. The temperature fluctuations have an apparent, dominant vertical wavelength of around 6 km. In situ measurements by a balloon-borne rawinsonde at Ushuaia, Argentina (54.7°S, 68.1°W) are compared to a simultaneous GPS/MET temperature profile. The balloon observations of temperature and horizontal wind are interpreted by a large amplitude mountain wave propagating to the upper stratosphere. Wave characteristics and atmospheric background conditions are investigated in detail for this mountain wave observation. Finally, the GPS/MET experiment indicates enhanced sporadic E in

  11. Late Palaeozoic magmatism in the northern New England Orogen - evidence from U-Pb SHRIMP dating in the Yarrol and Connors provinces, central Queensland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The northern part of the New England Orogen in central Queensland has been divided into three provinces, which are from east to west, the Wandilla, Yarrol and Connors Provinces. Previous workers suggested that the provinces are elements in an Early Carboniferous west-dipping subduction system with the Wandilla Province representing the accretionary wedge, the Yarrol Province a forearc basin and the Connors Province the volcanic arc. Farther west, a fourth province, the Drummond Basin, is interpreted as a back-arc basin. The Connors Province crops out in two areas, the Auburn Arch in the south and Connors Arch in the north. Prior to the present study, some workers recognised two superimposed volcanic arcs, one in the Late Devonian and a second in the Early Permian. Other workers have challenged this model suggesting that the rocks in the Connors Province were mainly Late Carboniferous to Early Permian and that they recorded a period of continental extension. U-Pb SHRIMP dating in the Connors Province has confirmed the existence of at least episodic Early Carboniferous magmatism from the Tournaisian to Namurian in both the Auburn and Connors Arches. We suggest that the Tournaisian rocks are vestiges of the Early Carboniferous volcanic arc suggested by earlier workers. Ages of ∼350Ma and ∼349Ma in the Connors Province are similar to ages for volcanics in Cycle 1 in the Drummond Basin and to volcanics in the lower part of the Rockhampton Group in the Yarrol Province. Magmatism in the Drummond Basin and Yarrol Province continued into the Visean although no early Visean rocks have yet been recognised in the Connors Province. The mid-Carboniferous (late Visean) may represent an important change in the evolution of the region. East of the Auburn Arch, in the Yarrol Province, this time corresponds to the boundary between the Rockhampton Group and Lorray Formation, and is marked by a sudden increase in regional radiometric response. It represents the start of

  12. Affects of wastewater discharge from mining on soil heavy metal pollution and enzyme activities in northern Hunan province, Central South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ying; Hu, Xue-Feng; Shu, Ying; Yan, Xiao-Juan; Luo, Fan

    2013-04-01

    Hunan province, Central South China, is rich in mineral resources and also a well-known nonferrous metal base in China. Mining and ore processing there, however, are mostly conducted in indigenous methods, and thus causing heavy metal pollution of abundant farmland. Situated in northern Hunan province, Y county has antimony, manganese, vanadium, and pyrite mines, but still belongs to a region of rice cultivation, of which, paddy fields make up 84.5% of the total farmland. Our investigations found that irrigation water is threatened by the release of mining wastewater in the county. For example, a stream used for irrigation turns dark-red after long-term receiving wastewater discharged from a pyrite company at HS Town of the county. Concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, Fe and Mn in the stream water reach 0.03 mg kg-1, 2.14 mg kg-1, 0.02 mg kg-1, 96.0 mg kg-1 and 11.5 mg kg-1, respectively; these in the paddy soils nearby are 67.3 mg kg-1, 297 mg kg-1, 4.0 mg kg-1, 33.1 mg g-1 and 463 mg kg-1 on average, respectively, with a maximum of Cd reaching 16.8 mg kg-1. Microbial biomass and activities are significantly reduced by metal toxicity in the soils. The counts of fungal, actinomycin and bacterial colonies in the polluted soils are 8.8×103 /g (Fresh soil), 4.9×105 /g (Fresh soil) and 6.4×105 /g (Fresh soil), respectively, which are only 4.68%, 10.3% and 20.9% of these in non-polluted soils in Y county, respectively. Likewise, the microbial biomass (MB) - C and MB - N of the polluted soils are only 36.8% and 50.3% of these in the non-polluted, respectively. The activities of dehydrogenase, urease, catalase, acid and neutral phosphatase and sucrase in the polluted soils are only 41.2%, 49.8%, 56.8%, 69.9%, 80.7% and 81.0% of these in the non-polluted, respectively. There are significant negative correlations between Cu, Zn and Cd contents and the activities of dehydrogenase and catalase, suggesting that the two enzymes are the most sensitive to heavy metal toxicity in the

  13. Out of the Andes: patterns of diversification in clearwing butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, M; Joron, M; Willmott, K; Silva-Brandão, K L; Kaiser, V; Arias, C F; Gomez Piñerez, L M; Uribe, S; Brower, A V Z; Freitas, A V L; Jiggins, C D

    2009-04-01

    Global biodiversity peaks in the tropical forests of the Andes, a striking geological feature that has likely been instrumental in generating biodiversity by providing opportunities for both vicariant and ecological speciation. However, the role of these mountains in the diversification of insects, which dominate biodiversity, has been poorly explored using phylogenetic methods. Here we study the role of the Andes in the evolution of a diverse Neotropical insect group, the clearwing butterflies. We used dated species-level phylogenies to investigate the time course of speciation and to infer ancestral elevation ranges for two diverse genera. We show that both genera likely originated at middle elevations in the Andes in the Middle Miocene, contrasting with most published results in vertebrates that point to a lowland origin. Although we detected a signature of vicariance caused by the uplift of the Andes at the Miocene-Pliocene boundary, most sister species were parapatric without any obvious vicariant barrier. Combined with an overall decelerating speciation rate, these results suggest an important role for ecological speciation and adaptive radiation, rather than simple vicariance.

  14. Andes hantavirus variant in rodents, southern Amazon Basin, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razuri, Hugo; Tokarz, Rafal; Ghersi, Bruno M; Salmon-Mulanovich, Gabriela; Guezala, M Claudia; Albujar, Christian; Mendoza, A Patricia; Tinoco, Yeny O; Cruz, Christopher; Silva, Maria; Vasquez, Alicia; Pacheco, Víctor; Ströher, Ute; Guerrero, Lisa Wiggleton; Cannon, Deborah; Nichol, Stuart T; Hirschberg, David L; Lipkin, W Ian; Bausch, Daniel G; Montgomery, Joel M

    2014-02-01

    We investigated hantaviruses in rodents in the southern Amazon Basin of Peru and identified an Andes virus variant from Neacomys spinosus mice. This finding extends the known range of this virus in South America and the range of recognized hantaviruses in Peru. Further studies of the epizoology of hantaviruses in this region are warranted.

  15. Rapid millennial-scale vegetation changes in the tropical Andes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H. Urrego; H. Hooghiemstra; O. Rama-Corredor; B. Martrat; J.O. Grimalt; L. Thompson

    2015-01-01

    We compare eight pollen records reflecting climatic and environmental change from the tropical Andes. Our analysis focuses on the last 50 ka, with particular emphasis on the Pleistocene to Holocene transition. We explore ecological grouping and downcore ordination results as two approaches for extra

  16. Giant Reed Distribution - Northern California [ds333

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Arundo Distribution layer is a compilation of Arundo donax observations in northern and central California, obtained from several sources, including Arundo...

  17. Differences of granitic weathering at the northern and southern feet of Dabie Mountains, Central China: Implication for tectonic and climatic environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Haijin(续海金); MA; Changqian(马昌前); LIU; Fan(刘凡); YANG; Kunguang(杨坤光)

    2003-01-01

    Two weathering profiles of Yanshanian granites on the southern and northern feet of the Dabie Mountains were investigated. The results showed that, on the southern foot of the Dabie Mountains, the weathering profile of the Sikongshan biotite monzonitic granite was eroded with remarkable loss of alkila, calcium and silicon, and richness of aluminium during hydrolysis process and in acidic mediums. Feldspar and biotite, major rock-forming minerals, were altered to illite→(vermiculite→1.4 nm transition minerals) →kaolinite→halloysite. However, on the northern foot of the Dabie Mountains, the Hepeng biotite orthogranite weathering profile was stable, without silicon depletion, but with remarkably enriched iron and noncrystalline during oxidizing process and in feebly acidic-neutral mediums. The major rock-forming minerals such as feldspar and biotite in the Hepeng weathering profile were weathered to smectites and halloysite→noncrystalline. The above results reveal that weathering differences of the granites between southern and northern feet of the Dabie Mountains may be related to climatic environments and tectonic movements. The southern foot, in hot and rainy environments, was uplifted by tectonics and was intensively leached. The soils in the southern slope were under acidic conditions. In contrast, the northern foot was slightly leached in hot and droughty environments, and the soils were under feebly acidic-neutral conditions.

  18. Spatio-temporal variability of snow water equivalent in the extra-tropical Andes Cordillera from distributed energy balance modeling and remotely sensed snow cover

    OpenAIRE

    E. Cornwell; Molotch, N. P.; McPhee, J

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover is the primary water source for human use and ecosystems along the extratropical Andes Cordillera. Despite its importance, relatively little research has been devoted to understanding the properties, distribution and variability of this natural resource. This research provides high-resolution (500 m), daily distributed estimates of end-of-winter and spring snow water equivalent over a 152 000 km2 domain that includes the mountainous reaches of central Chi...

  19. Le lait des Andes vaut-il de l'or ? Logiques paysannes et insertion marchande de la production fromagère andine

    OpenAIRE

    Aubron, Claire

    2006-01-01

    In Peru, milk and farm cheese made from it both participate in elaborating the agricultural income of numerous Andean peasant families. Based upon a detailed study of the adoption of this dairy orientation by a peasant community of the western side of the central Andes, this thesis explores the issue of Andean dairy farming, using the methodological frame of Compared Agriculture. In the dry and uneven mountainous environment of the area, setting-up irrigation systems allowed landowners that l...

  20. Reasons for an outstanding plant diversity in the tropical Andes of Southern Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Richter

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Long-term field studies in the scope of a multidisciplinary project in southern Ecuador revealed extraordinary high species numbers of many organismic groups. This article discusses reasons for the outstanding vascular plant diversity using a hierarchical scale-oriented top-down approach (Grüninger 2005, from the global scale to the local microscale. The global scale explains general (paleo- ecological factors valid for most parts of the humid tropics, addressing various hypotheses and theories, such as the “greater effective evolutionary time”, constant input of “accidentals”, the “seasonal variability hypothesis”, the “intermediate disturbance hypothesis”, and the impact of soil fertility. The macroscale focuses on the Andes in northwestern South America. The tropical Andes are characterised by many taxa of restricted range which is particularly true for the Amotape-Huancabamba region, i.e. the so called Andean Depression, which is effective as discrete phytogeographic transition as well as barrier zone. Interdigitation of northern and southern flora elements, habitat fragmentation, geological and landscape history, and a high speciation rate due to rapid genetic radiation of some taxa contribute to a high degree of diversification. The mesoscale deals with the special environmental features of the eastern mountain range, the Cordillera Real and surrounding areas in southern Ecuador. Various climatic characteristics, the orographic heterogeneity, the geologic and edaphic conditions as well as human impact are the most prominent factors augmenting plant species diversity. On microscale, prevailing regimes of disturbance and environmental stresses, the orographic basement, as well as the general role on the various mountain chains are considered. Here, micro-habitats e.g. niches for epiphytes, effects of micro-relief patterns, and successions after small-sized disturbance events are screened. Direct effects of human impact are

  1. A statistical study of Weinmannia pollen trajectories across the Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Pérez

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent airborne pollen records data from Northern Patagonia (San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina, Lat. 41.1435° S, Long. 71.375° W, 800 m elevation suggest that pollen transport takes place from the west to the east slope of the Andes. However, the atmospheric characteristics responsible of this transport have not yet been studied. The aim of this paper is to assess potential source areas and to describe the involved atmospheric mechanisms of the trans-Andean pollen transport. Methodology relies on the analysis of backward trajectories of air masses calculated with the HYSPLIT 4.9 regional model for particular days where airborne pollen of Weinmannia trichosperma Cav. was detected east of the Andes. This pollen type was selected because it is found regularly at localities in eastern Patagonia beyond its present-day distribution. Weinmannia's substantial presence during early Holocene times would also benefit from better knowledge of its transport mechanisms. Correspondence between atmospheric trajectories and the position of sources was checked using GIS maps. Mode T, Principal Component Analysis (PCA with Varimax rotation was used to identify the main spatial structure of geopotential height anomalies producing the calculated trajectories. Eighty-eight cases showed that the calculated directions of trajectories trended from the Northwest to Southwest passing over the Chilean region of W. trichosperma distribution. PCs results showed two patterns of negative anomalies over southern Patagonia. The prevailing circulation pattern which drives airborne transport is the presence of a trough located south of 37 to 40° S with its axis over western Patagonia. The synoptic situations for two cases highly correlated with principal component scores were described.

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of the endemic and threatened killifish Orestias ascotanensis Parenti, 1984 (Cyprinodontiformes, Cyprinodontidae) from the High Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada-Romegialli, Claudio; Guerrero, Claudia Jimena; Véliz, David; Vila, Irma

    2016-07-01

    The killifish Orestias ascotanensis is endemic to the small isolated springs of Ascotán salt pan in the Central High Andes, Chile. Due to small populations, mining activity, and increasing aridity, this species is catalogued in danger of extinction. The complete mitochondrial genome of O. ascotanesis was assembled with an Ion Torrent sequencer (chip 318) that produced 2.61 million of reads. The 16 617 bp of the entire genome consisted of 22 transfer RNAs, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 13 protein-coding genes, and a control region, showing that the gene composition and arrangement match to that reported for most fishes. PMID:26152352

  3. A 2,300-year-long annually resolved record of the South American summer monsoon from the Peruvian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Bird, Broxton W.; Abbott, Mark B.; Vuille, Mathias; Donald T. Rodbell; Stansell, Nathan D.; Rosenmeier, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Decadal and centennial mean state changes in South American summer monsoon (SASM) precipitation during the last 2,300 years are detailed using an annually resolved authigenic calcite record of precipitation δ18O from a varved lake in the Central Peruvian Andes. This unique sediment record shows that δ18O peaked during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) from A.D. 900 to 1100, providing evidence that the SASM weakened considerably during this period. Minimum δ18O values occurred during the Litt...

  4. Privatizing Water in the Chilean Andes: The Case of Las Vegas de Chiu-Chiu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Prieto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Chilean water model has been described as a textbook example of a free-market water system. This article contributes to the critiques of this model by showing the effect of its implementation in the Atacameño community of Chiu-Chiu, located in the Atacama Desert in the south-central Andes. In this community, the privatization of water rights ignored local water management practices that had produced a high-altitude wetland (known as a vega. This led to the inhabitants’ dispossession of crucial water rights and to wetland degradation. This process belies statements that the Chilean model relies on an unregulated market and instead highlights the state’s role in marginalizing local irrigation practices by reducing the water consumption of the indigenous population while keeping the copper mining industry (the main source of Chilean income and related growing urban populations supplied with water.

  5. U-Pb La-ICP-ms geochronology and regional correlation of middle Jurassic intrusive rocks from the Garzon Massif, Upper Magdalena Valley and central cordillera, southern Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New U-Pb zircon geochronology from four granitic units sampled along a southeast-northwest transect between the Garzon massif and the Serrania de las Minas (central cordillera), records a middle Jurassic magmatic activity with two different spatio-temporal domains at ca. 189 ma and 180-173 ma. Reconnaissance data suggest that the four granitoids are characterized by mineralogical and geochemical characteristics akin to a continental magmatic arc setting. The new results suggest that the southern Colombian continental margin includes remnants of tectonomagmatic elements formed by the subduction of the Farallon plate under the South American continental margin. This middle Jurassic arc magmatism is part of the broader Andean scale arc province, and is significant for understanding the tectonic and paleogeographic scenario that characterized the Mesozoic tectonic evolution of the northern Andes.

  6. Caracterización y procedencia de obsidianas de sitios arqueológicos del Centro Oeste de Argentina y Centro de Chile con metodología no destructiva por fluorescencia de Rayos X (XRF Non-destructive x-ray fluorescence (XRF characterization and sourcing of obsidian from archaeological sites in Central West Argentina and Central Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Durán

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan los resultados de 101 análisis químicos por fluorescencia de Rayos X efectuados sobre artefactos de obsidiana provenientes de sitios arqueológicos del Centro Oeste Argentino y Chile Central. También se hace una caracterización química de seis fuentes y subfuentes de obsidiana ubicadas en ambientes cordilleranos y extracordilleranos del sur de Mendoza, Neuquén y Chile Central. Con esa información se discuten propuestas referidas a la movilidad y sistemas de intercambio de las sociedades humanas que ocuparon las dos vertientes de la cordillera de Los Andes durante el Holoceno medio y tardío. Los resultados obtenidos confirman que el método no destructivo por XRF es una herramienta válida para determinar el origen y dispersión de las obsidianas arqueológicas.The results of chemical analysis by X-ray Fluorescence (XRF performed on 101 obsidian artifacts from archaeological sites of Central western Argentina and Central Chile are presented. A chemical characterization of six obsidian sources and subsources located in both Andean and extra-Andean environments of Southern Mendoza, Northern Neuquén and Central Chile, is also performed. Based on this information, different proposals related to mobility patterns and exchange systems of human societies that occupied the two slopes of the Andes during the middle and late Holocene are discussed. The results confirm that non-destructive X-ray Fluorescence is a valid tool to determine the origin and dispersal of archaeological obsidian artifacts.

  7. Lateglacial temperature reconstruction in the Eastern Tropical Andes (Bolivia) inferred from paleoglaciers and paleolakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L.; Blard, P. H.; Lave, J.; Prémaillon, M.; Jomelli, V.; Brunstein, D.; Lupker, M.; Charreau, J.; Mariotti, V.; Condom, T.; Bourles, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Recent insights shed light on the global mechanisms involved in the abrupt oscillations of the Earth climate for the Late Glacial Maximum (LGM) to Holocene period (Zhang et al., 2014; Banderas et al., 2015). Yet the concomitant patterns of regional climate reorganization on continental areas are for now poorly documented. Particularly, few attempts have been made to propose temporal reconstructions of the regional climate variables in the High Tropical Andes, a region under the direct influence of the upper part of the troposphere. We present new glacial chronologies from the Zongo (16.3°S - 68.1°W, Bolivia) and Wara-Wara (17.3°S - 66.1°W, Bolivia) valleys based on Cosmic Ray Exposure dating (CRE) from an exceptional suite of recessive moraines. These new data permitted to refine existing chronologies (Smith et al., 2005 ; Zech et al., 2010): the Zongo valley is characterized by an older local last glacial maximum than the Wara Wara valley. Both sites however exhibit similar glacier behaviours, with a progressive regression between 18 ka and the Holocene. In both sites, glaciers recorded stillstand episodes synchronous with the cold events of the Norther Hemisphere (Henrich 1 event, Younger Dryas). Since the nearby Altiplano basin registered lake level variations over the same period, we were able to apply a joint modelling of glaciers Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) and lake budget. This permits to derive a temporal evolution of temperature and precipitation for both sites. These new reconstructions show for both sites that glaciers of the Eastern Tropical Andes were both influenced by the major climatic events of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. However, precipitation variability is more influenced by the Northern Atlantic events. This observation is in good agreement with the theories suggesting that North Hemisphere cold events are coeval with an important southward deflexion of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) due to the inter

  8. Glacier shrinkage and water resources in the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francou, Bernard; Coudrain, Anne

    For more than a century glaciers around the world have been melting as air temperatures rise due to a combination of natural processes and human activity. The disappearance of these glaciers can have wide-ranging effects, such as the creation of new natural hazards or changes in stream flow that could threaten water suppliesSome of the most dramatic melting has occurred in the Andes mountain range in South America. To highlight the climatic and glacial change in the Andes and to encourage the scientific community to strengthen the glacier observation network that stretches from Colombia to the Patagonian ice fields, the Instituto Nacional de Recursos Naturales (INRENA), Perú, and the Institute of Research and Development (IRD), France, recently organized the second Symposium on Mass Balance of Andean Glaciers in Huaráz,Perú.

  9. Modeling the Glacial Buzzsaw in the Patagonian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, M. T.; Tomkin, J. H.

    2006-12-01

    Modeling the Glacial Buzzsaw in the Patagonian Andes The concept of a "glacial buzzsaw" was spawned by Steve Porter's observation in 1977 and 1988 that the "equilibrium line altitude" (ELA) for alpine glaciation in the Andes parallels the summit elevations of the range. The modern ELA in the Patagonian Andes drops from about 4.5 km at 30 S to about 1 km at 50 S, due to colder temperatures at higher latitudes. The summit elevations decrease steadily by a similar amount over this 2200 km distance. The landscape of the western side of the Patagonian Andes clearly shows that it has long been dominated by glacial erosion. Locally preserved tills indicate that alpine glaciation was active at 7 to 4.6 Ma, if not earlier. The idea of a glacial buzzsaw is that erosion by alpine glaciers is aggressive enough to limit the height of a mountain range. Fission-track cooling ages indicate modest long-term erosion rates (~0.5 to 1 km/Ma) for the Patagonian Andes, which precludes the possibility that the range was trimmed down to size by Quaternary- age glaciations. Furthermore, the range shows clear evidence of growth by continental subduction and tectonic accretion along its eastern margin. Evidence for recent tectonic shortening is based on the observation that the range has an approximately constant taper, as expected for a critical wedge. The width of the range decreases southward in parallel with the decreasing summit elevations. We have developed a general analytical model for coupled wedge growth and glacial erosion that accounts for much of the tectonic evolution of the Patagonian Andes. The model is based on an actively accreting wedge that maintains a constant taper geometry. The size of the wedge is controlled by competition between accretion and glacial erosion. Recent work by one of us (JHT) and Gerard Roe shows that the erosional yield caused by alpine glaciation is approximately proportional to the local elevation difference between the summit of the range and the

  10. Middle Miocene near trench volcanism in northern Colombia: A record of slab tearing due to the simultaneous subduction of the Caribbean Plate under South and Central America?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, M.; Cardona, A.; Monsalve, G.; Yarce, J.; Montes, C.; Valencia, V.; Weber, M.; De La Parra, F.; Espitia, D.; López-Martínez, M.

    2013-08-01

    Field, geochemical, geochronological, biostratigraphical and sedimentary provenance results of basaltic and associated sediments northern Colombia reveal the existence of Middle Miocene (13-14 Ma) mafic volcanism within a continental margin setting usually considered as amagmatic. This basaltic volcanism is characterized by relatively high Al2O3 and Na2O values (>15%), a High-K calc-alkaline affinity, large ion lithophile enrichment and associated Nb, Ta and Ti negative anomalies which resemble High Al basalts formed by low degree of asthenospheric melting at shallow depths mixed with some additional slab input. The presence of pre-Cretaceous detrital zircons, tourmaline and rutile as well as biostratigraphic results suggest that the host sedimentary rocks were deposited in a platform setting within the South American margin. New results of P-wave residuals from northern Colombia reinforce the view of a Caribbean slab subducting under the South American margin. The absence of a mantle wedge, the upper plate setting, and proximity of this magmatism to the trench, together with geodynamic constraints suggest that the subducted Caribbean oceanic plate was fractured and a slab tear was formed within the oceanic plate. Oceanic plate fracturing is related to the splitting of the subducting Caribbean Plate due to simultaneous subduction under the Panama-Choco block and northwestern South America, and the fast overthrusting of the later onto the Caribbean oceanic plate.

  11. Caribbean affinities of mafic crust from northern Colombia: preliminary geochemical results from basaltic rocks of the Sinu-San Jacinto belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, C.; Cardona, A.; Valencia, V.; Weber, M.; Guzman, G.; Montes, C.; Ibañez, M.; Lara, M.; Toro, M.

    2009-12-01

    The petrotectonic characterization of accreted mafic remnants within the northern Andes and the Caribbean yield major insights on the growth and evolution of oceanic plates, as well as in the identification of the role of terrane accretion within the northern Andes orogeny. Within the northern termination of the Andes, in northern Colombia, several exposures of mafic and ultramafic rocks have been identified. However, extensive sedimentary cover and difficulties in field access have left the petogenetic analysis and tectonic implications of this rocks scarcely studied. Preliminary geochemical constrains from volcanic rocks obtained in outcrops and as clasts from a Paleocene-Eocene conglomerate indicate that the mafic rocks are mainly andesitic in composition, with well defined enrichment in Th and Ce and depletion in Nb and flat to weakly enriched LREE. These features suggest a relatively immature intra-oceanic volcanic arc setting for the formation of these rocks. Hornblende-dioritic dikes in peridotites also attest to the role of water in the magmatic evolution, and the affinity to a subduction related setting. The tectonic implications of this arc remnants and the relation between these rocks and other oceanic domains in the northern Andes suggest that the compositional and tectonic setting on the different accreted margins of the Caribbean plate are heterogeneous.

  12. Community-based technology transfer in rural aquaculture: the case of mudcrab Scylla serrata nursery in ponds in Northern Samar, Central Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baticados, Didi B; Agbayani, Renato F; Quinitio, Emilia T

    2014-12-01

    Finding aquaculture development approaches to open up livelihood opportunities for the rural poor and in mainstreaming smallholder fish farmers to reduce poverty remain a challenge. This paper examines the community-based technology transfer mechanism of mudcrab nursery