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Sample records for center-of-mass system

  1. Approximated center-of-mass motion for systems of interacting particles with space- and velocity-dependent friction and anharmonic potential

    CERN Document Server

    Olivetti, Alain; Kaiser, Robin

    2014-01-01

    We study the center-of-mass motion in systems of trapped interacting particles with space- and velocity-dependent friction and anharmonic traps. Our approach, based on a dynamical ansatz assuming a fixed density profile, allows us to obtain information at once for a wide range of binary interactions and interaction strengths, at linear and nonlinear levels. Our findings are first tested on different simple models by comparison with direct numerical simulations. Then, we apply the method to characterize the motion of the center of mass of a magneto-optical trap and its dependence on the number of trapped atoms. Our predictions are compared with experiments performed on a large Rb85 magneto-optical trap.

  2. The Moving Center of Mass of a Leaking Bob

    CERN Document Server

    Arun, P

    2010-01-01

    The evaluation of variation in oscillation time period of a simple pendulum as its mass varies proves a rich source of discussion in a physics class-room, overcoming erroneous notions carried forward by students as to what constitutes a pendulum's length due to picking up only the results of approximations and ignoring the rigorous definition. The discussion also presents a exercise for evaluating center of mass of geometrical shapes and system of bodies. In all, the pedagogical value of the problem is worth both theoretical and experimental efforts. This article discusses the theoretical considerations.

  3. The Center of Mass of a Soft Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna, Juan D.; Joshi, Amitabh

    2011-01-01

    This article uses calculus to find the center of mass of a soft, vertically suspended, cylindrical helical spring, which necessarily is stretched non-uniformly by the action of gravity. A general expression for the vertical position of the center of mass is obtained and compared with other results in the literature.

  4. Automated Determination of a Package's Center of Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayaz Hemani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to address the issue of increased efficiency and better planning for parcel shipments, an automated computer program was developed in Microsoft Excel that calculates center of mass and moments of mass with greater speed and reliability than currently implemented systems. This simple program requires only a variable density function and limits of integration for a given object as input within the spreadsheet system. Once the required input has been provided, a series of chain calculations, with the help of a Visual Basic for Applications (VBA script, is able to process the input, which is done through integration and a Riemann sum. Furthermore, the foundation of the program can also be used for calculating other physical quantities of interest such as the moment of inertia or surface area of an object.

  5. Anomalous center of mass shift gravitational dipole moment

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, E J

    1996-01-01

    The anomalous, energy dependent shift of the center of mass of an idealized, perfectly rigid, uniformly rotating hemispherical shell which is caused by the relativistic mass increase effect is investigated in detail. It is shown that a classical object on impact which has the harmonic binding force between the adjacent constituent particles has the similar effect of the energy dependent, anomalous shift of the center of mass. From these observations, the general mode of the linear acceleration is suggested to be caused by the anomalous center of mass shift whether it's due to classical or relativistic origin. The effect of the energy dependent center of mass shift perpendicular to the plane of rotation of a rotating hemisphere appears as the non zero gravitational dipole moment in general relativity. Controlled experiment for the measurement of the gravitational dipole field and its possible links to the cylindrical type line formation of a worm hole in the extreme case are suggested. The jets from the black ...

  6. Symmetry comparison between sacrum and center of mass during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navvab Motlagh, Fateme; Arshi, Ahmed Reza

    2016-07-01

    Sacrum motion is used extensively in clinical research to represent movement of the entire body by replacing the center of mass. The primary objective of this article was to investigate the effect of this replacement on symmetry determination. The secondary objective was to assess the correlation between the symmetries of trajectories of center of mass and sacrum, and that of spatiotemporal parameters. Three-dimensional trajectories obtained from 37 markers placed on anatomical landmarks of 15 healthy subjects were recorded while walking at three speeds on the treadmill. Trajectory of center of mass was determined using segmental analysis method. The results indicated that two symmetries, one determined using sacrum marker and the other using segmental analysis method, were different and this difference was more pronounced in anterior-posterior direction. In other words, harmonic analysis of sacrum and center of mass trajectories revealed different results. Furthermore, low-to-moderate correlations were observed between spatiotemporal parameters symmetry and symmetries obtained from both center of mass and sacrum. In conclusion, the results indicated that it may not be analytically acceptable to substitute sacrum for center of mass in symmetry determination. PMID:27272201

  7. The effect of center-of-mass motion on photon statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Shao-xiong; Yu, Chang-shui, E-mail: quaninformation@sina.com

    2015-10-15

    We analyze the photon statistics of a weakly driven cavity quantum electrodynamics system and discuss the effects of photon blockade and photon-induced tunneling by effectively utilizing instead of avoiding the center-of-mass motion of a two-level atom trapped in the cavity. With the resonant interaction between atom, photon and phonon, it is shown that the bunching and anti-bunching of photons can occur with properly driving frequency. Our study shows the influence of the imperfect cooling of atom on the blockade and provides an attempt to take advantage of the center-of-mass motion.

  8. Correction of Relativistic Center-of-Mass Vector on Electric Polarizability of Pion Meson

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yu-Bing

    2005-01-01

    We estimate the correction of relativistic center-of-mass vector on electric polarizability of an equal-mass quark-antiquark system numerically. Effect on the system confined by different interactive potentials is analysed. A great improvement for the electric polarizability of pion meson is obtained.

  9. Anomalous center of mass shift: gravitational dipole moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Eue Jin

    1997-02-01

    The anomalous, energy dependent shift of the center of mass of an idealized, perfectly rigid, uniformly rotating hemispherical shell which is caused by the relativistic mass increase effect is investigated in detail. It is shown that a classical object on impact which has the harmonic binding force between the adjacent constituent particles has the similar effect of the energy dependent, anomalous shift of the center of mass. From these observations, the general mode of the linear acceleration is suggested to be caused by the anomalous center of mass shift whether it's due to classical or relativistic origin. The effect of the energy dependent center of mass shift perpendicular to the plane of rotation of a rotating hemisphere appears as the non zero gravitational dipole moment in general relativity. Controlled experiment for the measurement of the gravitational dipole field and its possible links to the cylindrical type line formation of a worm hole in the extreme case are suggested. The jets from the black hole accretion disc and the observed anomalous red shift from far away galaxies are considered to be the consequences of the two different aspects of the dipole gravity.

  10. Dynamic Principles of Center of Mass in Human Walking

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yifang; Fan, Yubo; Li, Zhiyu; Lv, Changsheng

    2010-01-01

    We present results of an analytic and numerical calculation that studies the relationship between the time of initial foot contact and the ground reaction force of human gait and explores the dynamic principle of center of mass. Assuming the ground reaction force of both feet to be the same in the same phase of a stride cycle, we establish the relationships between the time of initial foot contact and the ground reaction force, acceleration, velocity, displacement and average kinetic energy of center of mass. We employ the dispersion to analyze the effect of the time of the initial foot contact that imposes upon these physical quantities. Our study reveals that when the time of one foot's initial contact falls right in the middle of the other foot's stride cycle, these physical quantities reach extrema. An action function has been identified as the dispersion of the physical quantities and optimized analysis used to prove the least-action principle in gait. In addition to being very significant to the researc...

  11. Comparison and evaluation of two common methods to measure center of mass displacement in three dimensions during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M; Bartonek, Asa; Saraste, Helena

    2006-04-01

    Center of mass displacement during gait has frequently been used as an indicator of gait efficiency or as a complement to standard gait analysis. With technological advances, measuring the center of mass as the centroid of a multi-segment system is practical and feasible, but must first be compared to the well-established Newtonian computation of double-integrating the ground reaction force. This study aims to verify that the kinematic centroid obtained from a commonly-used model (Vicon Peak Plug-In-Gait) provides at least as reliable measurements of center of mass displacement as those obtained from the ground reaction forces. Gait data was collected for able-bodied children and children with myelomeningocele who use larger lateral center of mass excursions during gait. Reasonable agreement between methods was found in fore-aft and vertical directions, where the methods' excursions differed by an average of less than 10 mm in either direction, and the average RMS differences between methods' computed curves were 6 and 13 mm. Particularly good agreement was observed in the lateral direction, where the calculated excursions differed by an average of less than 2 mm and the RMS difference was 5 mm. Error analyses in computing the center of mass displacement from ground reaction forces were performed. A 5% deviation in mass estimation increased the computed vertical excursion twofold, and a 5% deviation in the integration constant of initial velocity increased the computed fore-aft excursions by 10%. The suitability of calculating center of mass displacement using ground reaction forces in a patient population is questioned. The kinematic centroid is susceptible to errors in segment parameters and marker placement, but results in plausible results that are at least within the range of doubt of the better-established ground reaction force integration, and are more useful when interpreting 3-D gait data.

  12. Energy, momentum, and center of mass in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Mu-Tao

    2016-01-01

    These notions in the title are of fundamental importance in any branch of physics. However, there have been great difficulties in finding physically acceptable definitions of them in general relativity since Einstein's time. I shall explain these difficulties and progresses that have been made. In particular, I shall introduce new definitions of center of mass and angular momentum at both the quasi-local and total levels, which are derived from first principles in general relativity and by the method of geometric analysis. With these new definitions, the classical formula p=mv is shown to be consistent with Einstein's field equation for the first time. This paper is based on joint work [14][15] with Po-Ning Chen and Shing-Tung Yau.

  13. Center-of-mass corrections revisited a many-body expansion approach

    CERN Document Server

    Mihaila, B; Mihaila, Bogdan; Heisenberg, Jochen H.

    1999-01-01

    A many-body expansion for the computation of the charge form factor in the center-of-mass system is proposed. For convergence testing purposes, we apply our formalism to the case of the harmonic oscillator shell model, where an exact solution exists. We also work out the details of the calculation involving realistic nuclear wave functions. Results obtained for the Argonne $v$18 two-nucleon and Urbana-IX three-nucleon interactions are reported. No corrections due to the meson-exchange charge density are taken into account.

  14. Center-of-mass corrections reexamined: A many-body expansion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaila, Bogdan; Heisenberg, Jochen H.

    1999-11-01

    A many-body expansion for the computation of the charge form factor in the center-of-mass system is proposed. For convergence testing purposes, we apply our formalism to the case of the harmonic oscillator shell model, where an exact solution exists. We also work out the details of the calculation involving realistic nuclear wave functions. Results obtained for the Argonne v18 two-nucleon and Urbana-IX three-nucleon interactions are reported. No corrections due to the meson-exchange charge density are taken into account.

  15. 62-TeV center of mass hadron collider with superbunch beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryuji Yamada et al.

    2001-11-05

    The scheme of a 62-TeV center of mass p-p collider with superbunch beams at Fermilab is proposed as a practical and realistically achievable future project. It will be built in two stages, using the same tunnel, first with a 2 Tesla low field magnet collider ring and later with a 10 Tesla high field magnet collider ring. Both low and high field magnets have twin bore aperture and will be installed in the tunnel with the circumference of 87.25 km. In each bore a proton beam is accelerated, using induction cavities to increase luminosity. In the first stage they install a 7 TeV accelerator ring with operating field of 2 Tesla, based on the superferric transmission-line design. This ring will be operated at a 14-TeV center of mass collider. This will have the same energy as the LHC, but it will have 15 times higher luminosity, namely 1.5 x 10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}/sec. The estimated synchrotron radiation is negligible with this machine. The existing Fermilab accelerator system, including the 150 GeV main injector, will be used as the injector system. Its rough cost estimation and schedule for this first stage are presented. In the second stage proton beams are accelerated, also using induction cavities up to 31 TeV with the 10 Tesla dipole magnets. The counter circulating beams will collide with the 62-TeV center of mass energy. With the superbunch beams they can expect the luminosity can be increased about 15 times more than the conventional method with RF cavities. It will be 10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}/sec. In the second stage, the synchrotron radiation power will be about 12 W/m, and they need an elaborated beam screen.

  16. 62-TeV center of mass hadron collider with superbunch beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, R. [FNAL, Batavia, IL (United States); Takayama, K.; Kishiro, J.; Wake, M.; Toyama, T.; Nakamura, E.; Shimosaki, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Watanabe, N. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    The scheme of a 62-TeV center of mass p-p collider with superbunch beams at Fermilab is proposed as a practical and realistically achievable future project. It will be built in two stages, using the same tunnel, first with a 2 Tesla low field magnet collider ring and later with a 10 Tesla high field magnet collider ring. Both low and high field magnets have twin bore apertures and will be installed in the tunnel with the circumference of 87.25 km. In each bore a proton beam is accelerated, using induction cavities to increase luminosity. In the first stage we install a 7 TeV accelerator ring with operating field of 2 Tesla, based on the superferric transmission-line design. This ring will be operated as a 14-TeV center of mass collider. This will have the same energy as the LHC, but it will have 15 times higher luminosity, namely 1.5x10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}/sec. The estimated synchrotron radiation is negligible with this machine. The existing Fermilab accelerator system, including the 150 GeV main injector, will be used as the injector system. Its rough cost estimation and schedule for this first stage are presented. In the second stage proton beams are accelerated, also using induction cavities up to 31 TeV with the 10 Tesla dipole magnets. The counter circulating beams will collide with the 62-TeV center of mass energy. With the superbunch beams we can expect the luminosity can be increased more than the conventional method with RF cavities. It will be 5x10{sup 34}/cm{sup 2}/sec. In the second stage, the synchrotron radiation power will be about 12 W/m, which will be the limiting factor for beam intensity, and we need an elaborate beam screen. In appendix another hadron collider up to 90 to 100 TeV center of mass energy is attached. (author)

  17. Estimation of Center of Mass Trajectory using Wearable Sensors during Golf Swing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Bijan; Lee-Eng, Jacqueline; Wrobel, James S; Goebel, Ruben

    2015-06-01

    This study suggests a wearable sensor technology to estimate center of mass (CoM) trajectory during a golf swing. Groups of 3, 4, and 18 participants were recruited, respectively, for the purpose of three validation studies. Study 1 examined the accuracy of the system to estimate a 3D body segment angle compared to a camera-based motion analyzer (Vicon®). Study 2 assessed the accuracy of three simplified CoM trajectory models. Finally, Study 3 assessed the accuracy of the proposed CoM model during multiple golf swings. A relatively high agreement was observed between wearable sensors and the reference (Vicon®) for angle measurement (r > 0.99, random error 0.93 v. r = 0.52, respectively). On the same note, the proposed two-link model estimated CoM trajectory during golf swing with relatively good accuracy (r > 0.9, A-P random error golf swing)This study suggests that two-link model of human body provides optimum tradeoff between accuracy and minimum number of sensor module for estimation of center of mass trajectory in particular during fast movements.Wearable technologies based on inertial sensors are viable option for assessing dynamic postural control in complex task outside of gait laboratory and constraints of cameras, surface, and base of support. PMID:25983585

  18. Taking Einstein seriously: Relativistic coupling of internal and center of mass dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Dennis E

    2016-01-01

    Einstein's famous equation $E_{\\rm rest}=mc^2$ for the rest energy of a system with mass $m$ requires that the internal energy of the system be included in $m$. Pursuing this idea using Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics yields a relativistic coupling between the center of mass motion and the internal dynamics of the system. Here we explore the consequences of this coupling, first classically, where we find that the dynamics of the system is time dilated when moving relative to another inertial frame. We then apply the dynamics to a quantum 2-level atom bound in a 1-dimensional infinite potential well, and show that the coupling produces collapses and revivals in quantum interference.

  19. Measurement of the center-of-mass energies at BESIII via the di-muon process

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov$^{23, G; d,; e}$,; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch$^{14, M; 22}$,; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, X L; Gao, X Y; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, X Q; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kiese, P; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kühn, W; Kupsc, A; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leng, C; Li, C; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, F Y; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X M; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, D; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou$^{1, X C; a,; h}$,; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Pan, Y; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Pettersson, J; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prasad, V; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Rosner, Ch; Ruan, X D; Santoro, V; Sarantsev, A; Savri'e, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, W P; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, Z; Xia, L; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, H; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H J; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zeng, Z; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y N; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2015-01-01

    From 2011 to 2014, the BESIII experiment collected about 5 fb$^{-1}$ data at center-of-mass energies around 4 GeV for the studies of the charmonium-like and higher excited charmonium states. By analyzing the di-muon process $e^{+}e^{-}\\rightarrow\\gamma_{\\rm ISR/FSR}\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$, the center-of-mass energies of the data samples are measured with a precision of 0.8 MeV. The center-of-mass energy is found to be stable for most of time during the data taking.

  20. Estimation of Center of Mass Trajectory using Wearable Sensors during Golf Swing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Najafi, Jacqueline Lee-Eng, James S. Wrobel, Ruben Goebel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study suggests a wearable sensor technology to estimate center of mass (CoM trajectory during a golf swing. Groups of 3, 4, and 18 participants were recruited, respectively, for the purpose of three validation studies. Study 1 examined the accuracy of the system to estimate a 3D body segment angle compared to a camera-based motion analyzer (Vicon®. Study 2 assessed the accuracy of three simplified CoM trajectory models. Finally, Study 3 assessed the accuracy of the proposed CoM model during multiple golf swings. A relatively high agreement was observed between wearable sensors and the reference (Vicon® for angle measurement (r > 0.99, random error 0.93 v. r = 0.52, respectively. On the same note, the proposed two-link model estimated CoM trajectory during golf swing with relatively good accuracy (r > 0.9, A-P random error <1cm (7.7% and <2cm (10.4% for M-L. The proposed system appears to accurately quantify the kinematics of CoM trajectory as a surrogate of dynamic postural control during an athlete’s movement and its portability, makes it feasible to fit the competitive environment without restricting surface type.

  1. Macroscopic Center-of-mass Cooling using Whispering Gallery Mode Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ying Lia; Barker, P F

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous center-of-mass cooling of two coupled oscillators, consisting of a microsphere-cantilever and a tapered optical fiber. Excitation of a whispering gallery mode (WGM) of the microsphere, via the evanescent field of the taper, provides a transduction signal that continuously monitors the relative motion between these two microgram objects with a sensitivity of 3\\,pm. The cavity enhanced optical dipole force is used to provide feedback damping on the motion of the micron-diameter taper, whereas a piezo stack is used to damp the motion of the much larger (up to $ 180\\,\\mu$m in diameter), heavier (up to $1.5\\times 10^{-7}\\,$kg) and stiffer microsphere-cantilever. In each feedback scheme multiple mechanical modes of each oscillator can be cooled, and mode temperatures below 10\\,K are reached for the dominant mode, consistent with limits determined by the measurement noise of our system. This indicates stabilization on the $10^{-12}$ m level and is the first demonstration of using WGM reso...

  2. Center of Mass Estimation for a Spinning Spacecraft Using Doppler Shift of the GPS Carrier Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlak, Joseph E.

    2016-01-01

    A sequential filter is presented for estimating the center of mass (CM) of a spinning spacecraft using Doppler shift data from a set of onboard Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers. The advantage of the proposed method is that it is passive and can be run continuously in the background without using commanded thruster firings to excite spacecraft dynamical motion for observability. The NASA Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is used as a test case for the CM estimator. The four MMS spacecraft carry star cameras for accurate attitude and spin rate estimation. The angle between the spacecraft nominal spin axis (for MMS this is the geometric body Z-axis) and the major principal axis of inertia is called the coning angle. The transverse components of the estimated rate provide a direct measure of the coning angle. The coning angle has been seen to shift slightly after every orbit and attitude maneuver. This change is attributed to a small asymmetry in the fuel distribution that changes with each burn. This paper shows a correlation between the apparent mass asymmetry deduced from the variations in the coning angle and the CM estimates made using the GPS Doppler data. The consistency between the changes in the coning angle and the CM provides validation of the proposed GPS Doppler method for estimation of the CM on spinning spacecraft.

  3. Center-of-mass motion as a sensitive convergence test for variational multimode quantum dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Jayson G.; Weiss, Christoph; Brand, Joachim

    2016-10-01

    Multimode expansions in computational quantum dynamics promise convergence toward exact results upon increasing the number of modes. Convergence is difficult to ascertain in practice due to the unfavorable scaling of required resources for many-particle problems and therefore a simplified criterion based on a threshold value for the least occupied mode function is often used. Here we show how the separable quantum motion of the center of mass can be used to sensitively detect unconverged numerical multiparticle dynamics in harmonic potentials. Based on an experimentally relevant example of attractively interacting bosons in one dimension, we demonstrate that the simplified convergence criterion fails to assure qualitatively correct results. Furthermore, the numerical evidence for the creation of two-hump fragmented bright soliton-like states presented by A. I. Streltsov et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 130401 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.130401] is shown to be inconsistent with exact results. Implications for understanding dynamical fragmentation in attractive boson systems are briefly discussed.

  4. Quantum-State Engineering of Multiple Trapped Ions for Center-of-Mass Mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Hao-Sheng; KUANG Le-Man; ZHU Xi-Wen; GAO Ke-Lin

    2001-01-01

    We propose a scheme to generate a superposition of coherent states with arbitrary coeffcients on a line in phase space for the center-of-mass vibrational mode of N ions by means of isolating all other spectator vibrational modes from the center-of-mass mode. It can be viewed as the generalization of previous methods for preparing motional states of one ion. For a large number of ions, only one cyclic operation enables one to generate such a superposition of many coherent states.``

  5. Interacting electrons in a magnetic field in a center-of-mass free basis

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Peter; Kramer, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    We present an extension of the spin-adapted configuration-interaction method for the computation of four electrons in a quasi two-dimensional quantum dot. By a group-theoretical decomposition of the basis set and working with relative and center-of-mass coordinates we obtain an analytical identification of all spurious center-of-mass states of the Coulomb-interacting electrons. We find a substantial reduction in the basis set used for numerical computations. At the same time we increase the a...

  6. Kinematics of the Hip and Body Center of Mass in Front Crawl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ricardo J.; Ribeiro, João; Figueiredo, Pedro; Seifert, Ludovic; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2012-01-01

    The kinematic profiles of the hip and center of mass in front crawl swimming were compared to quantify the error of using a fixed body point to assess intracyclic velocity variations at moderate intensity exercise. The practical goal was to provide a useful tool, easy and fast to assess, and to use as feedback, for assessing swimming efficiency. Sixteen swimmers performed an intermittent incremental protocol that allowed assessing the individual anaerobic threshold velocity. One complete stroke cycle was analysed at the step intensity corresponding to each swimmer’s anaerobic threshold. The subjects were videotaped in the sagittal plane using a double camera set-up for two-dimensional kinematical analyses. The hip and the center of mass presented similar mean velocity and displacement values, being highly related to both parameters. However, the hip reflects the center of mass forward velocity and horizontal displacement with 7.54% and 3.24% associated error, respectively. Differences between hip and center of mass were observed for intracyclic velocity variations (0.19±0.05 and 0.25±0.08, respectively, for a p<0.001), and the negative mean error value found (−0.06) evidenced a tendency of the hip to overestimate the center of mass velocity variation. It is possible to conclude that the hips forward movements might provide a good estimate of the swimmer’s horizontal velocity and displacement that is relevant for diagnostic purposes, especially to assess swimming efficiency through the intracyclic velocity variations. Nevertheless, the hip point error magnitude should be taken into consideration in data interpretation. PMID:23486784

  7. Foot Bone in Vivo: Its Center of Mass and Centroid of Shape

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yifang; Fan, Yubo; Lin, Zhiyu; Lv, Changsheng

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies foot bone geometrical shape and its mass distribution and establishes an assessment method of bone strength. Using spiral CT scanning, with an accuracy of sub-millimeter, we analyze the data of 384 pieces of foot bones in vivo and investigate the relationship between the bone's external shape and internal structure. This analysis is explored on the bases of the bone's center of mass and its centroid of shape. We observe the phenomenon of superposition of center of mass and centroid of shape fairly precisely, indicating a possible appearance of biomechanical organism. We investigate two aspects of the geometrical shape, (i) distance between compact bone's centroid of shape and that of the bone and (ii) the mean radius of the same density bone issue relative to the bone's centroid of shape. These quantities are used to interpret the influence of different physical exercises imposed on bone strength, thereby contributing to an alternate assessment technique to bone strength.

  8. Center-of-mass motion effects in static properties of baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The center-of-mass motion effects in the statc properties of baryons (the Gsub(A)/Gsub(V) value, the proton magnetic moment and rms radius, and Asup((1)) and Ssup((2)) constants of the nonleptonic decays of baryons) are considered for some kinds of the potentials in the mean-field approximation. It is pointed out the potential form is rather essential for the values of the rms radius and Asup((1)) and Asup((2)) constants

  9. Fractal pattern growth simulation in electrodeposition and study of the shifting of center of mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikh, Yusuf H. [Shivaji Arts, Commerce and Science College, Kannad 431103 (India)], E-mail: yusufshaikh123@yahoo.com; Khan, A.R. [Dr. Rafiq Zakaria Centre for Higher Learning, Dr. Rafiq Zakaria marg, Rauza Bagh, Aurangabad 431001 (India); Pathan, J.M. [Dr. Rafiq Zakaria Campus, Dr. Rafiq Zakaria marg, Rauza Bagh, Aurangabad 431001 (India); Patil, Aruna [Viveakanand College, Aurangabad 431001 (India); Behere, S.H. [Departments of Physics, Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad 431004 (India)

    2009-12-15

    We presented simulation of fractal pattern in electrodeposition (Diffusion limited aggregation) using concept of off lattice walk. It is seen that the growth patterns are based on a parameter called 'bias'. This parameter 'bias' controls the growth of patterns similar to that of electric field in electrodeposition technique. In present study the fractal patterns are grown for different values of 'bias'. Dendritic patterns grown at lower value of 'bias' comprises open structure and show limited branching. As the bias is increased the growth tends to be dense and show more crowded branching. Box counting was implemented to calculate fractal dimension. The structural and textural complexities and are compared with the experimental observations. It was also noted that in the evolution of DLA patterns, the center of mass of the growth is shifted slightly. We tracked the position of the center of mass of simulated electro deposits under different electric field conditions. The center of mass exhibit random walk like patterns and it wanders around the origin or the starting point of the growth.

  10. Calibration and adjustment of center of mass (COM) based on EKF during in-flight phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Feng; LIAO He; JIA ChengLong; XIA XiaoJing

    2009-01-01

    The electrostatic accelerometer, assembled on gravity satellite, serves to measure all non-gravitational accelerations caused by atmosphere drag or solar radiation pressure, etc. The proof-mass center of the accelerometer needs to be precisely positioned at the center of gravity satellite, otherwise, the offset between them will bring measurement disturbance due to angular acceleration of satellite and gradient.Because of installation and measurement errors on the ground, fuel consumption during the in-flight phase and other adverse factors, the offset between the proof-mass center and the satellite center of mass is usually large enough to affect the measurement accuracy of the accelerometer, even beyond its range. Therefore, the offset needs to be measured or estimated, and then be controlled within the measurement requirement of the accelerometer by the center of mass (COM) adjustment mechanism during the life of the satellite. The estimation algorithm based on EKF, which uses the measurement of accelerometer, gyro and magnetometer, is put forward to estimate the offset, and the COM adjustment mechanism then adjusts the satellite center of mass in order to make the offset meet the requirement.With the special configuration layout, the COM adjustment mechanism driven by the stepper motors can separately regulate X, Y and Z axes. The associated simulation shows that the offset can be con-trolled better than 0.03 mm for all the axes with the method mentioned above.

  11. Explanation of observable secular variations of gravity and alternative methods of determination of drift of the center of mass of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Yury

    2010-05-01

    conditionally corresponded to the geocenter of the Earth approximately determined by position of stations of satellite observations, as the center of certain mantle systems of coordinates Oxyz. For an explanation of such significant drift of the center of mass of the Earth the mechanism of the unidirectional displacement of the core of the Earth (and its center of mass) relatively to a viscoelastic mantle [1, 2] has been offered. The next years attempts of determination of velocity of secular drift of the center of mass in the mantle reference frame by methods of a space geodesy on the basis of precision satellite observations were repeatedly undertaken. In our work [3] for determination of a trend of the center of mass the data of the International Service of Rotation of the Earth (IERS) for satellite observations of system DORIS have been used. For components of velocity of drift in geocentric Greenwich system of coordinates for period 1999-2007 estimations have been obtained: on coordinate x) -1.46 mm/yr, y) 0.79 mm/yr and z) 5.29 mm/yr (errors of the specified estimations make 5-10 %). The velocity of trend of the center of mass of the Earth and its direction are characterized by values: 5.54 mm/yr; latitude 72°6 N and a longitude 118°4 E. The direction of displacement of the center of mass will well be coordinated with a direction predicted earlier theoretically [2]: latitude 70° N and a longitude 104° E. We shall emphasize, that observable redistributions of superficial masses of the Earth explain only small part of observable displacement of the center of mass. It testifies in favour of a reality of secular relative displacement of the core and the mantle of the Earth. 2 Secular drift of the core to the North and variations of a gravity on the Earth surface. The displaced core of the Earth is characterized by the large superfluous mass approximately in 16.7 masses of the Moon. The superfluous mass is ditermined by contrast values of average densities of the core and

  12. Measurement of the Wigner Characteristic Function for the Center-of-Mass Motion of Two Trapped Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Li-Hua; WANG Ling-Zhi; JIANG Yun-Kun

    2003-01-01

    We proposed a scheme for the reconstruction of the quantum states for the center-of-mass vibrationalmode of two trapped ions. In the scheme the ions are multichromatically excited by three lasers. Then measurementof the difference between probabilities of the ions being both in electronic ground and excited states directly yields theWigner characteristic function for the center-of-mass vibrational state. The scheme can also be used to prepare entangledcoherent states for the center-of-mass and relative vibrational modes.

  13. Measurements of the center-of-mass energies at BESIII via the di-muon process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablikim, M.; N. Achasov, M.; C. Ai, X.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; J. Ambrose, D.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini, Ferroli R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Y. Deng, Z.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Q. Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kühn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Cheng, Li; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Fang, Liu; Feng, Liu; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Mao, Y. Y.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A. A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, B. K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, A. Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; , S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; BESIII Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    From 2011 to 2014, the BESIII experiment collected about 5 fb-1 data at center-of-mass energies around 4 GeV for the studies of the charmonium-like and higher excited charmonium states. By analyzing the di-muon process e+e- → γISR/FSRμ+μ-, the center-of-mass energies of the data samples are measured with a precision of 0.8 MeV. The center-of-mass energy is found to be stable for most of the time during data taking. Supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (2015CB856700), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11125525, 11235011, 11322544, 11335008, 11425524, Y61137005C), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Large-Scale Scientific Facility Program, CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP), Collaborative Innovation Center for Particles and Interactions (CICPI), Joint Large-Scale Scientific Facility Funds of NSFC and CAS (11179007, U1232201, U1332201), CAS (KJCX2-YW-N29, KJCX2-YW-N45), 100 Talents Program of CAS, National 1000 Talents Program of China, INPAC and Shanghai Key Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology, German Research Foundation DFG (Collaborative Research Center CRC-1044), Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Italy, Ministry of Development of Turkey (DPT2006K-120470), Russian Foundation for Basic Research (14-07-91152), Swedish Research Council, U. S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-04ER41291, DE-FG02-05ER41374, DE-FG02-94ER40823, DESC0010118), U.S. National Science Foundation, University of Groningen (RuG) and Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (GSI), Darmstadt, WCU Program of National Research Foundation of Korea (R32-2008-000-10155-0).

  14. Nuclear monopole charge form factor calculation for relativistic models including center-of-mass corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avancini, S.S.; Marinelli, J.R. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina Florianopolis, Depto de Fisica - CFM, Florianopolis (Brazil); Carlson, B.V. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Relativistic models for finite nuclei contain spurious center-of-mass motion in most applications for the nuclear many-body problem, where the nuclear wave function is taken as a single Slater determinant within a space-fixed frame description. We use the Peierls-Yoccoz projection method, previously developed for relativistic approaches together with a reparametrization of the coupling constants that fits binding energies and charge radius and apply our results to calculate elastic electron scattering monopole charge form factors for light nuclei. (orig.)

  15. Upper bound on the center-of-mass energy of the collisional Penrose process

    OpenAIRE

    Shahar Hod

    2016-01-01

    Following the interesting work of Bañados, Silk, and West (2009) [6], it is repeatedly stated in the physics literature that the center-of-mass energy, Ec.m, of two colliding particles in a maximally rotating black-hole spacetime can grow unboundedly. For this extreme scenario to happen, the particles have to collide at the black-hole horizon. In this paper we show that Thorne's famous hoop conjecture precludes this extreme scenario from occurring in realistic black-hole spacetimes. In partic...

  16. An Analysis of Body Center of Mass Movement during Walking for Power Asisst of Paraplegic Gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Takahiro; Yamashina, Hideki; Uno, Yoji

    An efficient and stable gait control is an essential problem to develop a legged locomotor device for paraplegics. In this study, we investigate a necessary condition of the ballistic walking to avoid a backward balance loss. The condition derived by an inverted pendulum model is represented as a simple relationship between a position and velocity of a body center of mass at toe-off. The condition was validated through simulation experiments of a 7-link musculoskeletal model and gait measurement experiments of normal and paraplegic subjects. The results of the model simulation showed a good agreement with some predictions of the inverted pendulum model. The measured center of mass trajectories of normal and paraplegic gaits were satisfied with the necessary condition. These results suggest that the necessary condition is effective to avoid a backward falling during walking. In addition, energy input was required in a double support phase while the trajectory followed the ballistic movement of the inverted pendulum in a single support phase for a normal subject. These results suggest that a power assist control to be satisfied with the necessary condition during a double support phase and a ballistic gait generation during a single support phase are required for a paraplegic locomotor with efficiency and stability.

  17. Impact of Center-of-Mass Acceleration on the Performance of Ultramarathon Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shun-Ping; Sung, Wen-Hsu; Kuo, Fon-Chu; Kuo, Terry B J; Chen, Jin-Jong

    2014-12-01

    Ultramarathon races are rapidly gaining popularity in several countries, raising interest for the improvement of training programs. The aim of this study was to use a triaxial accelerometer to compare the three-dimensional center-of-mass accelerations of two groups of ultramarathon runners with distinct performances during different running speeds and distances. Ten runners who participated in the 12-h Taipei International Ultramarathon Race underwent laboratory treadmill testing one month later. They were divided into an elite group (EG; n = 5) and a sub-elite group (SG; n = 5). The triaxial center-of-mass acceleration recorded during a level-surface progressive intensity running protocol (3, 6, 8, 9, 10, and 12 km/h; 5 min each) was used for correlation analyses with running distance during the ultramarathon. The EG showed negative correlations between mediolateral (ML) acceleration (r = -0.83 to -0.93, p cadence must be increased to reduce braking effects and enhance impetus. Consequently, the competition level of ultramarathons can be elevated. PMID:25713664

  18. Impact of Center-of-Mass Acceleration on the Performance of Ultramarathon Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Shun-Ping

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultramarathon races are rapidly gaining popularity in several countries, raising interest for the improvement of training programs. The aim of this study was to use a triaxial accelerometer to compare the three-dimensional centerof- mass accelerations of two groups of ultramarathon runners with distinct performances during different running speeds and distances. Ten runners who participated in the 12-h Taipei International Ultramarathon Race underwent laboratory treadmill testing one month later. They were divided into an elite group (EG; n = 5 and a sub-elite group (SG; n = 5. The triaxial center-of-mass acceleration recorded during a level-surface progressive intensity running protocol (3, 6, 8, 9, 10, and 12 km/h; 5 min each was used for correlation analyses with running distance during the ultramarathon. The EG showed negative correlations between mediolateral (ML acceleration (r = −0.83 to −0.93, p < 0.05, and between anterior-posterior (AP acceleration and running distance (r = −0.8953 to −0.9653, p < 0.05, but not for vertical control of the center of mass. This study suggests that runners reduce stride length to minimize mediolateral sway and the effects of braking on the trunk; moreover, cadence must be increased to reduce braking effects and enhance impetus. Consequently, the competition level of ultramarathons can be elevated.

  19. 62-TeV center of mass hadron collider with capability for super bunch beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryuji Yamada and Ken Takayama

    2001-08-22

    A 60 TeV center of mass hadron collider is proposed, which has capability of using Superbunch beam. With Superbunch beam, the luminosity is expected to be increased by a factor of 20, compared with conventional acceleration using RF cavities. This hadron collider will be built in two stages with a low field magnet ring first and a high field magnet ring later in the same tunnel. The low field magnet rig will be built with Pipetron scheme, with 7 TeV and 7 TeV proton beams, making a 14 TeV center of mass energy high luminosity collider, using Superbunch beams. In the second stage 10 Tesla high field magnets with twin beams, will be installed. It also utilizes Superbunch beams, realizing high luminosity collider. To accelerate Superbunch beams, the barrier bucket and acceleration induction cells will be used, which are made of induction cells, utilizing FINEMET material. The core loss of the FINEMET is estimated for the whole collider is estimated. The synchrotron radiation of the collider is also estimated. Merits of Superbunch beams over RF bunched beams for the high energy experiments is described.

  20. Upper bound on the center-of-mass energy of the collisional Penrose process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hod, Shahar

    2016-08-01

    Following the interesting work of Bañados, Silk, and West (2009) [6], it is repeatedly stated in the physics literature that the center-of-mass energy, Ec.m, of two colliding particles in a maximally rotating black-hole spacetime can grow unboundedly. For this extreme scenario to happen, the particles have to collide at the black-hole horizon. In this paper we show that Thorne's famous hoop conjecture precludes this extreme scenario from occurring in realistic black-hole spacetimes. In particular, it is shown that a new (and larger) horizon is formed before the infalling particles reach the horizon of the original black hole. As a consequence, the center-of-mass energy of the collisional Penrose process is bounded from above by the simple scaling relation Ec.mmax / 2 μ ∝(M / μ) 1 / 4, where M and μ are respectively the mass of the central black hole and the proper mass of the colliding particles.

  1. Upper bound on the center-of-mass energy of the collisional Penrose process

    CERN Document Server

    Hod, Shahar

    2016-01-01

    Following the interesting work of Ba\\~nados, Silk, and West [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 103}, 111102 (2009)], it is repeatedly stated in the physics literature that the center-of-mass energy, ${\\cal E}_{\\text{c.m}}$, of two colliding particles in a maximally rotating black-hole spacetime can grow unboundedly. For this extreme scenario to happen, the particles have to collide at the black-hole horizon. In this paper we show that Thorne's famous hoop conjecture precludes this extreme scenario from occurring in realistic black-hole spacetimes. In particular, it is shown that a new (and larger) horizon is formed {\\it before} the infalling particles reach the horizon of the original black hole. As a consequence, the center-of-mass energy of the collisional Penrose process is {\\it bounded} from above by the simple scaling relation ${\\cal E}^{\\text{max}}_{\\text{c.m}}/2\\mu\\propto(M/\\mu)^{1/4}$, where $M$ and $\\mu$ are respectively the mass of the central black hole and the proper mass of the colliding particles.

  2. Shape coexistence and center-of-mass effects in N=Z medium mass nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Petrovici, A; Faessler, A

    2002-01-01

    Results are presented concerning shape coexistence and shape transition at low and intermediate spins in the N=Z nuclei sup 7 sup 2 Kr, sup 7 sup 6 Sr and sup 8 sup 0 Zr obtained within the complex version of the Excited Vampir variational approach. The effects of possible contaminations due to the center-of-mass motion are discussed using a rough method to eliminate them at least approximately. The results indicate maximum influence on the observables depending on band mixing. Detailed illustration of the effects on the oblate-prolate mixing and the electromagnetic properties, as well as the alignments and particle occupations of the 0g sub 9 sub / sub 2 spherical orbital is presented for the sup 7 sup 2 Kr nucleus.

  3. On the Homology of Configuration Spaces Associated to Centers of Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Tamaki, Dai

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to make sample computations with the Salvetti complex of the "center of mass" arrangement introduced in [arXiv:math/0611732] by Cohen and Kamiyama. We compute the homology of the Salvetti complex of these arrangements with coefficients in the sign representation of symmetric groups on F_p in the case of four particles. We show, when p is an odd prime, the homology is isomorphic to the homology of the configuration space F(C,4) of distinct four points in the complex plane with the same coefficients. When p=2, we show the homology is different from that of F(C,4), hence obtain an alternative and more direct proof of a theorem of Cohen and Kamiyama in [arXiv:math/0611732].

  4. Longitudinal Form Factor for 12C Nucleus with Exact Center of Mass Correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The longitudinal electron scattering form factors of 12C are calculated for the ground state with JπT = 0+0 , and excited state with JπT = 2+0 (4.439 MeV) and JT= 2+1 (16.11 MeV) . The exact value of the center of mass correction in the translation invariant shell model (TISM) of Mihaila has been included and gives reasonable results. A higher 2p-shell configuration enhances the form factors for high q-values and resolves many discrepancies with the experiments. The data are well described when the core polarization (CP) effects are included through effective nucleon charge

  5. Preliminary design report of a relativistic-Klystron two-beam-accelerator based power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass next linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S.; Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-22

    A preliminary point design for an 11.4 GHz power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass Next Linear Collider (NLC) based on the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam-Accelerator (RK-TBA) concept is presented. The present report is the result of a joint LBL-LLNL systems study. consisting of three major thrust areas: physics, engineering, and costing. The new RK-TBA point design, together with our findings in each of these areas, are reported.

  6. Preliminary design report of a relativistic-Klystron two-beam-accelerator based power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass next linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary point design for an 11.4 GHz power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass Next Linear Collider (NLC) based on the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam-Accelerator (RK-TBA) concept is presented. The present report is the result of a joint LBL-LLNL systems study. consisting of three major thrust areas: physics, engineering, and costing. The new RK-TBA point design, together with our findings in each of these areas, are reported

  7. Validity of Ski Skating Center-of-Mass Displacement Measured by a Single Inertial Measurement Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myklebust, Håvard; Gløersen, Øyvind; Hallén, Jostein

    2015-12-01

    In regard to simplifying motion analysis and estimating center of mass (COM) in ski skating, this study addressed 3 main questions concerning the use of inertial measurement units (IMU): (1) How accurately can a single IMU estimate displacement of os sacrum (S1) on a person during ski skating? (2) Does incorporating gyroscope and accelerometer data increase accuracy and precision? (3) Moreover, how accurately does S1 determine COM displacement? Six world-class skiers roller-ski skated on a treadmill using 2 different subtechniques. An IMU including accelerometers alone (IMU-A) or in combination with gyroscopes (IMU-G) were mounted on the S1. A reflective marker at S1, and COM calculated from 3D full-body optical analysis, were used to provide reference values. IMU-A provided an accurate and precise estimate of vertical S1 displacement, but IMU-G was required to attain accuracy and precision of < 8 mm (root-mean-squared error and range of displacement deviation) in all directions and with both subtechniques. Further, arm and torso movements affected COM, but not the S1. Hence, S1 displacement was valid for estimating sideways COM displacement, but the systematic amplitude and timing difference between S1 and COM displacement in the anteroposterior and vertical directions inhibits exact calculation of energy fluctuations.

  8. Method of LSD profile asymmetry for estimating the center of mass velocities of pulsating stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britavskiy, N.; Pancino, E.; Tsymbal, V.; Romano, D.; Cacciari, C.; Clementini, C.

    2016-05-01

    We present radial velocity analysis for 20 solar neighborhood RR Lyrae and 3 Population II Cepheids. High-resolution spectra were observed with either TNG/SARG or VLT/UVES over varying phases. To estimate the center of mass (barycentric) velocities of the program stars, we utilized two independent methods. First, the 'classic' method was employed, which is based on RR Lyrae radial velocity curve templates. Second, we provide the new method that used absorption line profile asymmetry to determine both the pulsation and the barycentric velocities even with a low number of high-resolution spectra and in cases where the phase of the observations is uncertain. This new method is based on a least squares deconvolution (LSD) of the line profiles in order to an- alyze line asymmetry that occurs in the spectra of pulsating stars. By applying this method to our sample stars we attain accurate measurements (+- 2 kms^-1) of the pulsation component of the radial velocity. This results in determination of the barycentric velocity to within 5 kms^-1 even with a low number of high- resolution spectra. A detailed investigation of LSD profile asymmetry shows the variable nature of the project factor at different pulsation phases, which should be taken into account in the detailed spectroscopic analysis of pulsating stars.

  9. Entanglement of the Common Eigenvector of Two Particles' Center-of-Mass Coordinate and Mass-Weighted Relative Momentum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Hong-Yi; SUN Ming-Zhai

    2002-01-01

    We reveal that the common eigenvector of two particles' center-of-mass coordinate and mass-weightedrelative momentum is an entangled state. Its Schmidt decomposition exhibits that the entanglement involves squeezingwhich depends on the ratio of two particles' masses. The corresponding entangling operators are derived.

  10. Center of Mass Energy of the Collision for two Neutral Particles in the Background of a Kerr-Newman-Taub-NUT Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Zakria, Ayesha

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the center of mass energy of the collision for two neutral particles with different rest masses falling freely from rest at infinity in the background of a Kerr-Newman-Taub-NUT black hole. Further, we discuss the center of mass energy near the horizon(s) of an extremal and non-extremal Kerr-Newman-Taub-NUT black hole and show that an arbitrarily high center of mass energy is achievable under some restrictions. We will study the special case of the center of mass energy when the specific energy, specific angular momentum and Carter constant of both the particles are same.

  11. A THREE-DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS OF THE CENTER OF MASS FOR THREE DIFFERENT JUDO THROWING TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney T. Imamura

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Four black belt throwers (tori and one black belt faller (uke were filmed and analyzed in three-dimensions using two video cameras (JVC 60 Hz and motion analysis software. Average linear momentum in the anteroposterior (x, vertical (y, and mediolateral (z directions and average resultant impulse of uke's center of mass (COM were investigated for three different throwing techniques; harai-goshi (hip throw, seoi-nage (hand throw, and osoto-gari (leg throw. Each throw was broken down into three main phases; kuzushi (balance breaking, tsukuri (fit-in, and kake (throw. For the harai-goshi and osoto-gari throws, impulse measurements were the largest within kuzushi and tsukuri phases (where collision between tori and uke predominantly occurs. Both throws indicated an importance for tori to create large momentum prior to contact with uke. The seoi-nage throw demonstrated the lowest impulse and maintained forward momentum on the body of uke throughout the entire throw. The harai-goshi and osoto-gari are considered power throws well-suited for large and strong judo players. The seoi-nage throw is considered more technical and is considered well-suited for shorter players with good agility. A form of resistance by uke was found during the kuzushi phase for all throws. The resistance which can be initiated by tori's push or pull allows for the tsukuri phase to occur properly by freezing uke for a good fit-in. Strategies for initiating an effective resistance include initiating movement of uke so that their COM is shifted to their left (for right handed throw by incorporating an instantaneous "snap pull" with the pulling hand during kuzushi to create an opposite movement from uke

  12. Constructing a meaningful evolutionary average at the phylogenetic center of mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone Eric A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a consequence of the evolutionary process, data collected from related species tend to be similar. This similarity by descent can obscure subtler signals in the data such as the evidence of constraint on variation due to shared selective pressures. In comparative sequence analysis, for example, sequence similarity is often used to illuminate important regions of the genome, but if the comparison is between closely related species, then similarity is the rule rather than the interesting exception. Furthermore, and perhaps worse yet, the contribution of a divergent third species may be masked by the strong similarity between the other two. Here we propose a remedy that weighs the contribution of each species according to its phylogenetic placement. Results We first solve the problem of summarizing data related by phylogeny, and we explain why an average should operate on the entire evolutionary trajectory that relates the data. This perspective leads to a new approach in which we define the average in terms of the phylogeny, using the data and a stochastic model to obtain a probability on evolutionary trajectories. With the assumption that the data evolve according to a Brownian motion process on the tree, we show that our evolutionary average can be computed as convex combination of the species data. Thus, our approach, called the BranchManager, defines both an average and a novel taxon weighting scheme. We compare the BranchManager to two other methods, demonstrating why it exhibits desirable properties. In doing so, we devise a framework for comparison and introduce the concept of a representative point at which the average is situated. Conclusion The BranchManager uses as its representative point the phylogenetic center of mass, a choice which has both intuitive and practical appeal. Because our average is intrinsic to both the dataset and to the phylogeny, we expect it and its corresponding weighting scheme to be useful

  13. Calibration and adjustment of center of mass(COM) based on EKF during in-flight phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The electrostatic accelerometer,assembled on gravity satellite,serves to measure all non-gravitational accelerations caused by atmosphere drag or solar radiation pressure,etc.The proof-mass center of the accelerometer needs to be precisely positioned at the center of gravity satellite,otherwise,the offset between them will bring measurement disturbance due to angular acceleration of satellite and gradient.Because of installation and measurement errors on the ground,fuel consumption during the in-flight phase and other adverse factors,the offset between the proof-mass center and the satellite center of mass is usually large enough to affect the measurement accuracy of the accelerometer,even beyond its range.Therefore,the offset needs to be measured or estimated,and then be controlled within the measurement requirement of the accelerometer by the center of mass(COM) adjustment mechanism during the life of the satellite.The estimation algorithm based on EKF,which uses the measurement of accelerometer,gyro and magnetometer,is put forward to estimate the offset,and the COM adjustment mechanism then adjusts the satellite center of mass in order to make the offset meet the requirement.With the special configuration layout,the COM adjustment mechanism driven by the stepper motors can separately regulate X,Y and Z axes.The associated simulation shows that the offset can be con-trolled better than 0.03 mm for all the axes with the method mentioned above.

  14. Study of quark flow in exclusive reactions at 90 degrees in the center of mass (AGS E838)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a study of quark flow in 20 exclusive reactions measured at Brookhaven National Laboratory's AGS with a beam momentum of 5.9 GeV/c at 90 degree in the center of mass. This experiment confirms the strong quark flow reaction mechanism dependence of two-body hadron scattering at large angles seen at 9.9 GeV/c. Large differences in cross sections for different reactions are consistent with the dominance of quark interchange in these 90 degree reactions, and indicate that pure gluon exchange and quark/antiquark annihilation diagrams are less important. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  15. Impact of the equivalent center of mass separating from the sliding surface on the isolation performance of friction pendulum bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Junyong; Ning, Xiangliang; Tan, Ping; Hao, Hongxiao; Chen, Guoping

    2015-12-01

    A new equivalent center of mass model of FPBs (friction pendulum bearings) is introduced, and based on this model, coefficient j of the equivalent center of mass separating from the sliding surface is defined. It is thought in theory that j has a significant impact on the isolation parameter of FPBs, since the equivalent post-yielding stiffness and friction coefficients are not simply determined by sliding radius and sliding friction pairs. The results of numerical simulation analysis using ABAQUS conducted on two groups of FPBs support this viewpoint. For FPBs with the same sliding radius and sliding friction pairs, the FPB modules of structural analysis software such as ETABS could only distinguish the equivalent transformation using j one by one. The seismic response data obtained in a base isolation calculation example of FPBs are very different, which reveals that j's impact on the isolation effectiveness of FPBs cannot be ignored. The introduction of j will help improve the classical structural theory of FPBs and the weak points of structural analysis software based on this theory, which is important in achieving more accurate analyses in structural design.

  16. Effect of Leg Dominance on The Center-of-Mass Kinematics During an Inside-of-the-Foot Kick in Amateur Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Matteo; Motta, Andrea Francesco; Mapelli, Andrea; Annoni, Isabella; Galvani, Christel; Sforza, Chiarella

    2014-09-29

    Soccer kicking kinematics has received wide interest in literature. However, while the instep-kick has been broadly studied, only few researchers investigated the inside-of-the-foot kick, which is one of the most frequently performed techniques during games. In particular, little knowledge is available about differences in kinematics when kicking with the preferred and non-preferred leg. A motion analysis system recorded the three-dimensional coordinates of reflective markers placed upon the body of nine amateur soccer players (23.0 ± 2.1 years, BMI 22.2 ± 2.6 kg/m2), who performed 30 pass-kicks each, 15 with the preferred and 15 with the non-preferred leg. We investigated skill kinematics while maintaining a perspective on the complete picture of movement, looking for laterality related differences. The main focus was laid on: anatomical angles, contribution of upper limbs in kick biomechanics, kinematics of the body Center of Mass (CoM), which describes the whole body movement and is related to balance and stability. When kicking with the preferred leg, CoM displacement during the ground-support phase was 13% higher (pkinematics. Coaches can use these results to provide effective instructions to players in the learning process, moving their focus on kicking speed and upper body behavior. PMID:25414739

  17. Stable Walking of Humanoid Robots Using Vertical Center of Mass and Foot Motions by an Evolutionary Optimized Central Pattern Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Dae Hong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method to produce the stable walking of humanoid robots by incorporating the vertical center of mass (COM and foot motions, which are generated by the evolutionary optimized central pattern generator (CPG, into the modifiable walking pattern generator (MWPG. The MWPG extends the conventional 3-D linear inverted pendulum model (3-D LIPM by allowing a zero moment point (ZMP variation. The disturbance caused by the vertical COM motion is compensated in real time by the sensory feedback in the CPG. In this paper, the vertical foot trajectory of the swinging leg, as well as the vertical COM trajectory of the 3-D LIPM, are generated by the CPG for the effective compensation of the disturbance. Consequently, using the proposed method, the humanoid robot is able to walk with a vertical COM and the foot motions generated by the CPG, while modifying its walking patterns by using the MWPG in real time. The CPG with the sensory feedback is optimized to obtain the desired output signals. The optimization of the CPG is formulated as a constrained optimization problem with equality constraints and is solved by two-phase evolutionary programming (TPEP. The validity of the proposed method is verified through walking experiments for the small-sized humanoid robot, HanSaRam-IX (HSR-IX.

  18. Selective use of visual information signaling objects' center of mass for anticipatory control of manipulative fingertip forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Iran; Frazier, Wendy; Reilmann, Ralf; Gordon, Andrew M

    2003-05-01

    The present study examines whether visual information indicating the center of mass (CM) of an object can be used for the appropriate scaling of fingertip forces at each digit during precision grip. In separate experiments subjects lifted an object with various types of visual cues concerning the CM location several times and then rotated and lifted it again to determine whether the visual cues signaling the new location of the CM could be used to appropriately scale the fingertip forces. Specifically, subjects had either no visual cues, visual instructional cues (i.e., an indicator) or visual geometric cues where the longer axis of the object indicated the CM. When no visual cues were provided, subjects were unable to appropriately scale the load forces at each digit following rotation despite their knowledge of the new weight distribution. When visual cues regarding the CM location were provided, the nature of the visual cues determined their effectiveness in retrieval of internal representations underlying the anticipatory scaling of fingertip forces. Specifically, when subjects were provided with visual instructional information, they were unable to appropriately scale the forces. More appropriate scaling of the load forces occurred when the visual cues were ecologically meaningful, i.e., when the shape of the object indicated the CM location. We suggest that visual instructional cues do not have access to the implicit processes underlying dynamic force control, whereas visual geometric cues can be used for the retrieval of the internal representation related to CM for appropriate partitioning of the forces in each digit.

  19. Control of center of mass motion state through cuing and decoupling of spontaneous gait parameters in level walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espy, D D; Yang, F; Pai, Y-C

    2010-09-17

    Can the center of mass (COM) motion state, i.e., its position and velocity relative to the base of support (BOS), which dictate gait stability, be predictably controlled by the global gait parameters of step length and gait speed, or by extension, cadence? The precise relationships among step length and gait speed, and the COM motion state are unknown, partially due to the interdependence between step length and gait speed and the difficulty in independent control of both parameters during spontaneous level walking. The purposes of this study were to utilize simultaneous audio-visual cuing to independently manipulate step length and gait speed, and to determine the extent to which the COM position and velocity can be subsequently controlled. Fifty-six young adults were trained at one of the three gait patterns in which both the step length and gait speed were targeted simultaneously. The results showed that the cuing could successfully "decouple" gait speed from step length. Although this approach did yield reliable control of the COM velocity through manipulation of gait speed (R(2)=0.97), the manipulation of step length yielded less precise control of COM position (R(2)=0.60). This latter control appears to require manipulation of an additional degree-of-freedom at the local segment level, such that the inclusion of trunk inclination with step length improved the prediction of COM position (R(2)=0.80).

  20. Observation of e(+)e(-) -> eta J/psi at center-of-mass energy root s=4.009 GeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W. M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Feng, C. Q.; Ferroli, R. B.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Han, Y. L.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kuehn, W.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, Q. J.; Li, S. L.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Kai; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Morales, C. Morales; Motzko, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nicholson, C.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Park, J. W.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prencipe, E.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schaefer, B. D.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, S. X.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, X. P.; Xu, Z. R.; Xue, F.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, X.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yu, S. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. S.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, K. X.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X. W.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. M.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Werner, M.J.; Zheng, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Using a 478 pb(-1) data sample collected with the BESIII detector operating at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider storage ring at a center-of-mass energy of root s = 4.009 GeV, the production of e(+)e(-) -> eta J/psi is observed for the first time with a statistical significance of greater than

  1. Center of mass trajectory and orientation to ankle and knee in sagittal plane is maintained with forward lean when backpack load changes during treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Robert R; Wagenaar, Robert C; Lewis, Cara L; Saltzman, Elliot; Holt, Kenneth G

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining the normal shape and amplitude of the vertical trajectory of the center of mass (COM) during stance has been shown to maximize the efficiency of unloaded gait. Kinematic adaptations to load carriage, such as forward lean have yet to be understood in relation to COM movement. The purpose of this study is to better understand how load impacts the vertical COM(TSYS) trajectory and to clarify the impact of forward lean as it relates to the dynamics of sagittal plane COM(TSYS) movement during stance with changing load. 17 subjects walked on treadmill at a constant preferred walking velocity while nine different loads ranging from 12.5% to 40% bodyweight were systematically added and removed from a backpack. Kinematic data were collected using an Optotrak, three-dimensional motion analysis system and used to estimate position of the COM as well as segment and COM-to-joint vector orientation angles. The shape and amplitude of the COM vertical trajectory was maintained across all loaded conditions. The orientations of COM-to-ankle and -knee vectors were maintained in all loaded conditions except the heaviest load (40% BW). Results suggest that forward lean changed linearly with changes in load to maintain the COM-to-ankle and -knee vector orientations. COM vertical trajectory was maintained by a combination of invariants including lower-limb segment angles and a constant direction of toe-off impulse vector. The kinematic invariants found suggest a simplified control mechanism by which the system limits degrees of freedom and potentially minimizes torque about lower-extremity joints with added load.

  2. Wireless Tri-Axial Trunk Accelerometry Detects Deviations in Dynamic Center of Mass Motion Due to Running-Induced Fatigue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt H Schütte

    Full Text Available Small wireless trunk accelerometers have become a popular approach to unobtrusively quantify human locomotion and provide insights into both gait rehabilitation and sports performance. However, limited evidence exists as to which trunk accelerometry measures are suitable for the purpose of detecting movement compensations while running, and specifically in response to fatigue. The aim of this study was therefore to detect deviations in the dynamic center of mass (CoM motion due to running-induced fatigue using tri-axial trunk accelerometry. Twenty runners aged 18-25 years completed an indoor treadmill running protocol to volitional exhaustion at speeds equivalent to their 3.2 km time trial performance. The following dependent measures were extracted from tri-axial trunk accelerations of 20 running steps before and after the treadmill fatigue protocol: the tri-axial ratio of acceleration root mean square (RMS to the resultant vector RMS, step and stride regularity (autocorrelation procedure, and sample entropy. Running-induced fatigue increased mediolateral and anteroposterior ratios of acceleration RMS (p < .05, decreased the anteroposterior step regularity (p < .05, and increased the anteroposterior sample entropy (p < .05 of trunk accelerometry patterns. Our findings indicate that treadmill running-induced fatigue might reveal itself in a greater contribution of variability in horizontal plane trunk accelerations, with anteroposterior trunk accelerations that are less regular from step-to-step and are less predictable. It appears that trunk accelerometry parameters can be used to detect deviations in dynamic CoM motion induced by treadmill running fatigue, yet it is unknown how robust or generalizable these parameters are to outdoor running environments.

  3. Whole Body Center of Mass Estimation with Portable Sensors: Using the Statically Equivalent Serial Chain and a Kinect

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Alejandro; Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro; Bonnet, Vincent; Fraisse, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The trajectory of the whole body center of mass (CoM) is useful as a reliable metric of postural stability. If the evaluation of a subject-specific CoM were available outside of the laboratory environment, it would improve the assessment of the effects of physical rehabilitation. This paper develops a method that enables tracking CoM position using low-cost sensors that can be moved around by a therapist or easily installed inside a patient's home. Here, we compare the accuracy of a personalized CoM estimation using the statically equivalent serial chain (SESC) method and measurements obtained with the Kinect to the case of a SESC obtained with high-end equipment (Vicon). We also compare these estimates to literature-based ones for both sensors. The method was validated with seven able-bodied volunteers for whom the SESC was identified using 40 static postures. The literature-based estimation with Vicon measurements had a average error 24.9 ± 3.7 mm; this error was reduced to 12.8 ± 9.1 mm with the SESC identification. When using Kinect measurements, the literature-based estimate had an error of 118.4 ± 50.0 mm, while the SESC error was 26.6 ± 6.0 mm. The subject-specific SESC estimate using low-cost sensors has an equivalent performance as the literature-based one with high-end sensors. The SESC method can improve CoM estimation of elderly and neurologically impaired subjects by considering variations in their mass distribution. PMID:25215943

  4. Changing the PEP-II Center-of-Mass Energy Down to 10 GeV and up to 11 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, M; Bertsche, K.; Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Wienands, U.; /SLAC

    2009-05-20

    PEP-II, the SLAC, LBNL, LLNL B-Factory was designed and optimized to run at the Upsilon 4S resonance (10.580 GeV with an 8.973 GeV e- beam and a 3.119 GeV e+ beam). The interaction region (IR) used permanent magnet dipoles to bring the beams into a head-on collision. The first focusing element for both beams was also a permanent magnet. The IR geometry, masking, beam orbits and beam pipe apertures were designed for 4S running. Even though PEP-II was optimized for the 4S, we successfully changed the center-of-mass energy (E{sub cm}) down to the Upsilon 2S resonance and completed an E{sub cm} scan from the 4S resonance up to 11.2 GeV. The luminosity throughout most of these changes remained near 1 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The E{sub cm} was changed by moving the energy of the high-energy beam (HEB). The beam energy differed by more than 20% which produced significantly different running conditions for the RF system. The energy loss per turn changed 2.5 times over this range. We describe how the beam energy was changed and discuss some of the consequences for the beam orbit in the interaction region. We also describe some of the RF issues that arose and how we solved them as the high-current HEB energy changed.

  5. Effect of Leg Dominance on The Center-of-Mass Kinematics During an Inside-of-the-Foot Kick in Amateur Soccer Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zago Matteo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Soccer kicking kinematics has received wide interest in literature. However, while the instep-kick has been broadly studied, only few researchers investigated the inside-of-the-foot kick, which is one of the most frequently performed techniques during games. In particular, little knowledge is available about differences in kinematics when kicking with the preferred and non-preferred leg. A motion analysis system recorded the three-dimensional coordinates of reflective markers placed upon the body of nine amateur soccer players (23.0 ± 2.1 years, BMI 22.2 ± 2.6 kg/m2, who performed 30 pass-kicks each, 15 with the preferred and 15 with the non-preferred leg. We investigated skill kinematics while maintaining a perspective on the complete picture of movement, looking for laterality related differences. The main focus was laid on: anatomical angles, contribution of upper limbs in kick biomechanics, kinematics of the body Center of Mass (CoM, which describes the whole body movement and is related to balance and stability. When kicking with the preferred leg, CoM displacement during the ground-support phase was 13% higher (p<0.001, normalized CoM height was 1.3% lower (p<0.001 and CoM velocity 10% higher (p<0.01; foot and shank velocities were about 5% higher (p<0.01; arms were more abducted (p<0.01; shoulders were rotated more towards the target (p<0.01, 6° mean orientation difference.

  6. Evidence for $e^+e^-\\to\\gamma\\chi_{c1, 2}$ at center-of-mass energies from 4.009 to 4.360 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Chu, Y P; Cibinetto, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, Y; Garzia, I; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, T; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Han, Y L; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, H P; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Kupsc, A; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Li, Cheng; Li, C H; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, P R; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X M; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, R Q; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Moeini, H; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Pu, Y N; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ren, H L; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Santoro, V; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2014-01-01

    Using data samples collected at center-of-mass energies of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 4.009, 4.230, 4.260, and 4.360 GeV with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII collider, we perform a search for the process $e^+e^-\\to\\gamma\\chi_{cJ}$ $(J = 0, 1, 2)$ and find evidence for $e^+e^-\\to\\gamma\\chi_{c1}$ and $e^+e^-\\to\\gamma\\chi_{c2}$ with statistical significances of 3.0$\\sigma$ and 3.4$\\sigma$, respectively. The Born cross sections $\\sigma^{B}(e^+e^-\\to\\gamma\\chi_{cJ})$, as well as their upper limits at the 90% confidence level are determined at each center-of-mass energy.

  7. Measurement of multi-jet cross sections in proton-proton collisions at a 7 TeV center-of-mass energy

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonelli, Stefano; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benedict, Brian Hugues; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernardet, Karim; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Böser, Sebastian; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bona, Marcella; Bondarenko, Valery; Boonekamp, Maarten; Boorman, Gary; Booth, Chris; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borroni, Sara; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Botterill, David; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozhko, Nikolay; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Braem, André; Branchini, Paolo; Brandenburg, George; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Breton, Dominique; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodbeck, Timothy; Brodet, Eyal; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchanan, Norman; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Buira-Clark, Daniel; Bulekov, Oleg; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butin, François; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Byatt, Tom; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cambiaghi, Mario; Cameron, David; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Caramarcu, Costin; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carrillo Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cataneo, Fernando; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cauz, Diego; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Cevenini, Francesco; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Kevin; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Tingyang; Chen, Xin; Cheng, Shaochen; Cheplakov, Alexander; Chepurnov, Vladimir; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciba, Krzysztof; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciobotaru, Matei Dan; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Clifft, Roger; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coe, Paul; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Colas, Jacques; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collard, Caroline; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colon, German; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Michele; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conventi, Francesco; Cook, James; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Côté, David; Coura Torres, Rodrigo; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cuneo, Stefano; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Silva, Paulo Vitor; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Daum, Cornelis; Dauvergne, Jean-Pierre; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Dawson, John; Daya, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lotto, Barbara; De Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Oliveira Branco, Miguel; De Pedis, Daniele; de Saintignon, Paul; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dean, Simon; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Dehchar, Mohamed; Deile, Mario; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delpierre, Pierre; Delruelle, Nicolas; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djilkibaev, Rashid; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dobson, Marc; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donega, Mauro; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dosil, Mireia; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Dowell, John; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Drasal, Zbynek; Drees, Jürgen; Dressnandt, Nandor; Drevermann, Hans; Driouichi, Chafik; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dubbs, Tim; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Dzahini, Daniel; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckert, Simon; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrich, Thies; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Ely, Robert; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falou, Alain; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Woiciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Fellmann, Denis; Felzmann, Ulrich; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Ferland, Jonathan; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Matthew; Fisher, Steve; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Föhlisch, Florian; Fokitis, Manolis; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Forbush, David Alan; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Joe; Fournier, Daniel; Foussat, Arnaud; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallas, Manuel; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galyaev, Eugene; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gapienko, Vladimir; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Garvey, John; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaumer, Olivier; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniel Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghez, Philippe; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilbert, Laura; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gilewsky, Valentin; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Göttfert, Tobias; Goldfarb, Steven; Goldin, Daniel; Golling, Tobias; Golovnia, Serguei; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gonidec, Allain; Gonzalez, Saul; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gorokhov, Serguei; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouanère, Michel; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grabski, Varlen; Grafström, Per; Grah, Christian; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenfield, Debbie; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grognuz, Joel; Groh, Manfred; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guarino, Victor; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Andrea; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hackenburg, Robert; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Hongguang; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Hatch, Mark; Hauff, Dieter; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawes, Brian; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayden, Daniel; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Hazen, Eric; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Mathieu; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frédéric; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Hernandez, Carlos Medina; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hessey, Nigel; Hidvegi, Attila; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Daniel; Hill, John; Hill, Norman; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmes, Alan; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holtsch, Anne; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homma, Yasuhiro; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Horton, Katherine; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Houlden, Michael; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Howell, David; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurst, Peter; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Ichimiya, Ryo; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Idzik, Marek; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Imbault, Didier; Imhaeuser, Martin; Imori, Masatoshi; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Ionescu, Gelu; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Ishii, Koji; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Itoh, Yuki; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jankowski, Ernest; Jansen, Eric; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jelen, Kazimierz; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Ge; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tegid; Jones, Tim; Jonsson, Ove; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joseph, John; Ju, Xiangyang; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagoz, Muge; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karr, Kristo; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keates, James Robert; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kelly, Marc; Kennedy, John; Kenney, Christopher John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Ketterer, Christian; Keung, Justin; Khakzad, Mohsen; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Kholodenko, Anatoli; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Peter; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Guillaume; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kiyamura, Hironori; Kladiva, Eduard; Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knobloch, Juergen; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kocnar, Antonin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kokott, Thomas; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollar, Daniel; Kollefrath, Michael; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Kopikov, Sergey; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Koreshev, Victor; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotamäki, Miikka Juhani; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasel, Olaf; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kundu, Nikhil; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuykendall, William; Kuze, Masahiro; Kuzhir, Polina; Kvasnicka, Ondrej; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Rémi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Landsman, Hagar; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larionov, Anatoly; Larner, Aimee; Lasseur, Christian; Lassnig, Mario; Lau, Wing; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorato, Antonia; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Lazzaro, Alfio; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; Lebedev, Alexander; Lebel, Céline; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Leger, Annie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lellouch, Jeremie; Leltchouk, Mikhail; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lesser, Jonas; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levitski, Mikhail; Lewandowska, Marta; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhihua; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lifshitz, Ronen; Lilley, Joseph; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Shengli; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Lockwitz, Sarah; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Loken, James; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lupi, Anna; Lutz, Gerhard; Lynn, David; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magalhaes Martins, Paulo Jorge; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Manz, Andreas; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin, Alexandru; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Robin; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Martin, Tim; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Maß, Martin; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mathes, Markus; Matricon, Pierre; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maugain, Jean-Marie; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; May, Edward; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mazzoni, Enrico; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McLaren, Robert Andrew; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meinhardt, Jens; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Menot, Claude; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meuser, Stefan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Miele, Paola; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Miralles Verge, Lluis; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitrofanov, Gennady; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mockett, Paul; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohn, Bjarte; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Möck, Susanne; Moisseev, Artemy; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morais, Antonio; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morita, Youhei; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morone, Maria-Christina; Morozov, Sergey; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muijs, Sandra; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murakami, Koichi; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Nash, Michael; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Silke; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Nesterov, Stanislav; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Niinikoski, Tapio; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nožička, Miroslav; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nyman, Tommi; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Ohska, Tokio Kenneth; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olcese, Marco; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Ortega, Eduardo; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Øye, Ola; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pajchel, Katarina; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Pengo, Ruggero; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Persembe, Seda; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Onne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Alan; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickford, Andrew; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Ping, Jialun; Pinto, Belmiro; Pirotte, Olivier; Pizio, Caterina; Placakyte, Ringaile; Plamondon, Mathieu; Plano, Will; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskach, Anatoly; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomarede, Daniel Marc; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Porter, Robert; Posch, Christoph; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Price, Michael John; Prichard, Paul; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Zuxuan; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Ramstedt, Magnus; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Ratoff, Peter; Rauscher, Felix; Rauter, Emanuel; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reichold, Armin; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Reljic, Dusan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Renkel, Peter; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richards, Alexander; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rieke, Stefan; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robinson, Mary; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodier, Stephane; Rodriguez, Diego; Rodriguez Garcia, Yohany; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rojo, Victoria; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romanov, Victor; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Maltrana, Diego; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rossi, Lucio; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckert, Benjamin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruggieri, Federico; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rulikowska-Zarebska, Elzbieta; Rumiantsev, Viktor; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Runge, Kay; Runolfsson, Ogmundur; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rust, Dave; Rutherfoord, John; Ruwiedel, Christoph; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Ryadovikov, Vasily; Ryan, Patrick; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Rzaeva, Sevda; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sandvoss, Stephan; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Takashi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Savva, Panagiota; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Says, Louis-Pierre; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scallon, Olivia; Scannicchio, Diana; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schäfer, Uli; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schlereth, James; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitz, Martin; Schneider, Markus; Schöning, André; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schuh, Silvia; Schuler, Georges; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Jan; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedykh, Evgeny; Segura, Ester; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sevior, Martin; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaver, Leif; Shaw, Christian; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shibata, Akira; Shichi, Hideharu; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siebel, Anca-Mirela; Siegert, Frank; Siegrist, James; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simmons, Brinick; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Skvorodnev, Nikolai; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Sloan, Terrence; Sloper, John erik; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snuverink, Jochem; Snyder, Scott; Soares, Mara; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Sondericker, John; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sorbi, Massimo; Sosebee, Mark; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahl, Thorsten; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Stavropoulos, Georgios; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stevenson, Kyle; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockmanns, Tobias; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Sugimoto, Takuya; Suhr, Chad; Suita, Koichi; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sushkov, Serge; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Sviridov, Yuri; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Szeless, Balazs; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taga, Adrian; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanaka, Yoshito; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tappern, Geoffrey; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terwort, Mark; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Thadome, Jocelyn; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thioye, Moustapha; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timmermans, Charles; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Tobias, Jürgen; Toczek, Barbara; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokunaga, Kaoru; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Guoliang; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Traynor, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Trinh, Thi Nguyet; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trivedi, Arjun; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Tyrvainen, Harri; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Underwood, David; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urkovsky, Evgeny; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valenta, Jan; Valente, Paolo; Valentinetti, Sara; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; van der Graaf, Harry; van der Kraaij, Erik; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; Van Eijk, Bob; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Kesteren, Zdenko; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vandelli, Wainer; Vandoni, Giovanna; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Varela Rodriguez, Fernando; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Vellidis, Constantine; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Viret, Sébastien; Virzi, Joseph; Vitale, Antonio; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vlasov, Nikolai; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Loeben, Joerg; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobiev, Alexander; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Voss, Thorsten Tobias; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walbersloh, Jorg; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Joshua C; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Warsinsky, Markus; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Jens; Weber, Marc; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wellenstein, Hermann; Wells, Phillippa; Wen, Mei; Wenaus, Torre; Wendler, Shanti; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Weydert, Carole; Whalen, Kathleen; Wheeler-Ellis, Sarah Jane; Whitaker, Scott; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Sebastian; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Catherine; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wunstorf, Renate; Wynne, Benjamin; Xaplanteris, Leonidas; Xella, Stefania; Xie, Song; Xie, Yigang; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Guofa; Yabsley, Bruce; Yamada, Miho; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamaoka, Jared; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Weiming; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ybeles Smit, Gabriel Valentijn; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Young, Charles; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zaets, Vassilli; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zalite, Youris; Zanello, Lucia; Zarzhitsky, Pavel; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Anton; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zenonos, Zenonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhan, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zheng, Shuchen; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zieminska, Daria; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zolnierowski, Yves; Zsenei, Andras; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2011-01-01

    Inclusive multi-jet production is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, using the ATLAS detector. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.4 pb-1. Results on multi-jet cross sections are presented and compared to both leading-order plus parton-shower Monte Carlo predictions and to next-to-leading-order QCD calculations.

  8. Measurements of the reaction e+e-→e+e- at center-of-mass energies of 7.0 and 7.4 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the cross section for the reaction e+e-→e+e- (Bhabha scattering) at angles close to 90degree, relative to Bhabha scattering at 4degree, are reported at center-of-mass energies of 7.0 and 7.4 GeV. The results are in agreement with quantum electrodynamics, and new limits on cutoff parameters for the photon propagator are given

  9. Center of mass energy and system-size dependence of photon production at forward rapidity at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    We present the multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of photons produced in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 and 200 GeV. The photons are measured in the region -3.7 < {eta} < -2.3 using the photon multiplicity detector in the STAR experiment at RHIC. The number of photons produced per average number of participating nucleon pairs increases with the beam energy and is independent of the collision centrality. For collisions with similar average numbers of participating nucleons the photon multiplicities are observed to be similar for Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at a given beam energy. The ratios of the number of charged particles to photons in the measured pseudorapidity range are found to be 1.4 {+-} 0.1 and 1.2 {+-} 0.1 for {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 GeV and 200 GeV, respectively. The energy dependence of this ratio could reflect varying contributions from baryons to charged particles, while mesons are the dominant contributors to photon production in the given kinematic region. The photon pseudorapidity distributions normalized by average number of participating nucleon pairs, when plotted as a function of {eta} - ybeam, are found to follow a longitudinal scaling independent of centrality and colliding ion species at both beam energies.

  10. Real time algorithms in the ATLAS tau trigger system at 7 TeV center of mass energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadlecik, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS hadronic tau trigger plays an important role in many analyses. Among these analyses are searches for H 0 , H ± , W ' , and Z ' in the tau decay channel. In order to achieve the needed sensitivity in these measurement it is important to reduce the QCD background, but at the same time to ...... keep the signal efficiency high. Furthermore it is important to understand the trigger efficiency in real data. This paper summarizes the performance of the tau trigger in data collected by the ATLAS detector in 2011....

  11. Measurement of the jet fragmentation function and transverse profile in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernardet, Karim; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek

    2011-01-01

    The jet fragmentation function and transverse profile for jets with 25 GeV < ptJet < 500 GeV and etaJet<1.2 produced in proton-proton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV are presented. The measurement is performed using data with an integrated luminosity of 36 pb^-1. Jets are reconstructed and their momentum measured using calorimetric information. The momenta of the charged particle constituents are measured using the tracking system. The distributions corrected for detector effects are compared with various Monte Carlo event generators and generator tunes. Several of these choices show good agreement with the measured fragmentation function. None of these choices reproduce both the transverse profile and fragmentation function over the full kinematic range of the measurement.

  12. Effective mass distributions for protons, pions and kaons particle combinations (two and three hadrons) for Au-Au reactions at 200 AGeV center of mass energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary analysis of the effective mass distributions for two and three hadronic combinations including protons, pions and kaons is presented for a number of 798,000 Au-Au reactions at 200 AGeV center of mass energy collected by the BRAHMS Collaboration (RHIC-Brookhaven National Laboratory). Different procedures to detect the classical resonances inside the high level of background were used. Comparisons with simulations of experimental data using UrQMD code are given, too. The strong suppression of the hadronic resonances weights (delta resonance, N*, K*, rho, etc.) could suggest a possible quark-gluon state. (authors)

  13. Measurements of the reaction e+e- → μ+μ- at center-of-mass energies in the range 6.2--7.4 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the cross section for the muon-pair-annihilation reaction e+e- → μ+μ-, relative to Bhabha scattering at 40, are reported at center-of-mass energies in the range 6.2--7.4 GeV. These measurements provide a fundamental test of quantum electrodynamics (QED) for timelike values of the invariant four-momentum transfer q2 as high as 54.8 (GeV/c)2, which in this reaction is carried by the photon propagator. The results are in agreement with predictions of QED

  14. Measurement of the photon-proton total cross section at a center-of-mass energy of 209 GeV at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photon-proton total cross section has been measured in the process e+p→e+γp→e+X with the ZEUS detector at HERA. Events were collected with photon virtuality Q22 and average γp center-of-mass energy Wγp=209 GeV in a dedicated run, designed to control systematic effects, with an integrated luminosity of 49 nb-1. The measured total cross section is σtotγp=174±1 (stat.)±13 (syst.) μb. The energy dependence of the cross section is compatible with parameterizations of high-energy pp and pp-bar data

  15. Study of $e^+e^-\\to\\omega\\chi_{cJ}$ at center-of-mass energies from 4.21 to 4.42 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Chu, Y P; Cibinetto, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, Y; Garzia, I; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, T; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Han, Y L; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, H P; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Kupsc, A; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Li, Cheng; Li, C H; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, P R; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X M; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, R Q; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Moeini, H; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Pu, Y N; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ren, H L; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Santoro, V; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2014-01-01

    Based on data samples collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider at 9 center-of-mass energies from 4.21 to 4.42 GeV, we search for the production of $e^+e^-\\to \\omega\\chi_{cJ}$ ($J$=0, 1, 2). The process $e^+e^-\\to \\omega\\chi_{c0}$ is observed for the first time, and the Born cross sections at $\\sqrt{s}$=4.23 and 4.26 GeV are measured to be $(55.4\\pm 6.0\\pm 5.9)$ and $(23.7\\pm 5.3\\pm 3.5)$ pb, respectively, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic. The $\\omega\\chi_{c0}$ signals at the other 7 energies and $e^+e^-\\to \\omega\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\omega\\chi_{c2}$ signals are not significant, and the upper limits on the cross sections are determined. By examining the $\\omega\\chi_{c0}$ cross section as a function of center-of-mass energy, we find that it is inconsistent with the line shape of the $Y(4260)$ observed in $e^+ e^-\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-J/\\psi$.

  16. Measurement of the photon proton total cross section at a center-of-mass energy of 209-GeV at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Chekanov, S; Krakauer, D A; Magill, S; Musgrave, B; Pellegrino, A; Repond, J; Yoshida, R; Mattingly, M C K; Antonioli, P; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Cara Romeo, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Corradi, M; De Pasquale, S; Giusti, P; Iacobucci, G; Levi, G; Margotti, A; Massam, Thomas; Nania, R; Palmonari, F; Pesci, A; Sartorelli, G; Zichichi, A; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Bartsch, D; Brock, I; Crittenden, James Arthur; Goers, S; Hartmann, H; Hilger, E; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Kappes, A; Katz, U F; Kerger, R; Kind, O; Paul, E; Rautenberg, J; Renner, R; Schnurbusch, H; Stifutkin, A; Tandler, J; Voss, K C; Weber, A; Wessoleck, H; Bailey, D S; Brook, N H; Cole, J E; Foster, B; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Robins, S; Rodrigues, E; Scott, J; Tapper, R J; Wing, M; Capua, M; Mastroberardino, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Jeoung, H Y; Kim, J Y; Lee, J H; Lim, I T; Ma, K J; Pac, M Y; Caldwell, A; Helbich, M; Liu, X; Mellado, B; Paganis, S; Schmidke, W B; Sciulli, F; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, Andrzej; Figiel, J; Olkiewicz, K; Przybycien, M B; Stopa, P; Zawiejski, L; Bednarek, B; Grabowska-Bold, I; Jelen, K; Kisielewska, D; Kowal, A M; Kowal, M; Kowal, T; Mindur, B; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Suszycki, L; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Kotanski, Andrzej; Slominski, W; Bauerdick, L A T; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Chiochia, V; Dannheim, D; Desler, K; Drews, G; Fourletova, J; Fox-Murphy, A; Fricke, U; Geiser, A; Göbel, F; Göttlicher, P; Graciani, R; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hartner, G F; Hillert, S; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Labes, H; Lelas, D; Löhr, B; Mankel, R; Martens, J; Martínez, M; Moritz, M; Notz, D; Petrucci, M C; Polini, A; Schneekloth, U; Selonke, F; Stonjek, S; Surrow, B; Whitmore, J J; Wichmann, R; Wolf, G; Youngman, C; Zeuner, W; Coldewey, C; López-Duran-Viani, A; Meyer, A; Schlenstedt, S; Barbagli, G; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Pelfer, P G; Bamberger, Andreas; Benen, A; Coppola, N; Markun, P; Raach, H; Wölfle, S; Bell, M; Bussey, Peter J; Doyle, A T; Glasman, C; Hanlon, S; Lee, S W; Lupi, A; McCance, G J; Saxon, D H; Skillicorn, Ian O; Bodmann, B; Holm, U; Salehi, H; Wick, K; Ziegler, A; Carli, T; Gialas, I; Klimek, K; Lohrmann, E; Milite, M; Collins-Tooth, C; Foudas, C; Goncalo, R; Long, K R; Metlica, F; Miller, D B; Tapper, A D; Walker, R; Cloth, P; Filges, D; Kuze, M; Nagano, K; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Barakbaev, A N; Boos, E G; Pokrovskiy, N S; Zhautykov, B O; Ahn, S H; Lee, S B; Park, S K; Lim, H; Son, D; Barreiro, F; García, G; González, O; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Redondo, I; Terron, J; Vázquez, M; Barbi, M; Bertolin, A; Corriveau, F; Ochs, A; Padhi, S; Stairs, D G; Saint-Laurent, M G; Tsurugai, T; Antonov, A; Bashkirov, V; Danilov, P; Dolgoshein, B A; Gladkov, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Suchkov, S; Dementiev, R K; Ermolov, P F; Golubkov, Yu A; Katkov, I I; Khein, L A; Korotkova, N A; Korzhavina, I A; Kuzmin, V A; Levchenko, B B; Lukina, O Yu; Proskuryakov, A S; Shche, L M; Solomin, A N; Vlasov, N N; Zotkin, S A; Bokel, C; Engelen, J; Grijpink, S; Koffeman, E; Kooijman, P; Maddox, E; Schagen, S; Tassi, E; Tiecke, H G; Tuning, N; Velthuis, J J; Wiggers, L; De Wolf, E; Brümmer, N; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Ginsburg, C M; Kim, C L; Ling, T Y; Boogert, S; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Devenish, R C E; Ferrando, J; Matsushita, T; Rigby, M; Ruske, O; Sutton, M R; Walczak, R; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Dal Corso, F; Dusini, S; Garfagnini, A; Limentani, S; Longhin, A; Parenti, A; Posocco, M; Stanco, L; Turcato, M; Adamczyk, L; Oh, B Y; Saull, P R B; Iga, Y; D'Agostini, Giulio; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Cormack, C; Hart, J C; McCubbin, N A; Heusch, C A; Park, I H; Pavel, N; Abramowicz, H; Dagan, S; Gabareen, A; Kananov, S; Kreisel, A; Levy, A; Abe, T; Fusayasu, T; Kohno, T; Umemori, K; Yamashita, T; Hamatsu, R; Hirose, T; Inuzuka, M; Kitamura, S; Matsuzawa, K; Nishimura, T; Arneodo, M; Cartiglia, N; Cirio, R; Costa, M; Ferrero, M I; Maselli, S; Monaco, V; Peroni, C; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Galea, R; Koop, T; Levman, G M; Martin, J F; Mirea, A; Sabetfakhri, A; Butterworth, J M; Gwenlan, C; Hall-Wilton, R; Hayes, M E; Heaphy, E A; Jones, T W; Lane, J B; Lightwood, M S; West, B J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Grzelak, G; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Smalska, B; Sztuk, J; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Zakrzewski, J A; Adamus, M; Plucinsky, P P; Eisenberg, Y; Gladilin, L K; Hochman, D; Karshon, U; Breitweg, J; Chapin, D; Cross, R; Kcira, D; Lammers, S; Reeder, D D; Savin, A A; Smith, W H; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S; Hughes, V W; Straub, P B; Bhadra, S; Catterall, C D; Fourletov, S; Menary, S R; Soares, M; Standage, J

    2002-01-01

    The photon-proton total cross section has been measured in the process e+ p -> e+ gamma p -> e+ X with the ZEUS detector at HERA. Events were collected with photon virtuality Q^2 < 0.02 GeV^2 and average gamma-p center-of-mass energy W_{gamma p} = 209 GeV in a dedicated run, designed to control systematic effects, with an integrated luminosity of 49 nb^{-1}. The measured total cross section is sigma_{tot}^{gamma p} = 174 +- 1 (stat.) +- 13 (syst.) microbarns. The energy dependence of the cross section is compatible with parameterizations of high-energy p-p and p-pbar data.

  17. Classical states of an electric dipole in an external magnetic field: Complete solution for the center of mass and trapped states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the classical behavior of an electric dipole in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. Using the Lagrangian formulation, we obtain the equations of motion, whose solutions are represented in terms of Jacobi functions. We also identify two constants of motion, namely, the energy E and a pseudomomentumC→. We obtain a relation between the constants that allows us to suggest the existence of a type of bound states without turning points, which are called trapped states. These results are consistent with and complementary to previous results. - Highlights: • Bound states without turning points. • Lagrangian Formulation for an electric dipole in a magnetic field. • Motion of the center of mass and trapped states. • Constants of motion: pseudomomentum and energy

  18. Search for the Higgs boson at center-of-mass energies between 161 and 184 GeV in the 4-jet channel with OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using data from e+e- collisions collected at center-of-mass energies from 161 to 184 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP is presented. The search is applied to events in the four-jet-channel, in which the Higgs boson decays into a bb pair and the associated Z0 decays into quark and anti-quark. The data analyzed corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 75.0 pb-1. Five candidate events are observed, in agreement with the Standard Model background expectation of 6.61±0.42 (stat.) ±1.72 (syst.) events. A lower limit of 74.0 GeV is derived for the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson at the 95% confidence level. In combination with OPAL searches in other channels a limit of 86.9 GeV is obtained. (orig.)

  19. Classical states of an electric dipole in an external magnetic field: Complete solution for the center of mass and trapped states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atenas, Boris; Pino, Luis A. del; Curilef, Sergio, E-mail: scurilef@ucn.cl

    2014-11-15

    We study the classical behavior of an electric dipole in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. Using the Lagrangian formulation, we obtain the equations of motion, whose solutions are represented in terms of Jacobi functions. We also identify two constants of motion, namely, the energy E and a pseudomomentumC{sup →}. We obtain a relation between the constants that allows us to suggest the existence of a type of bound states without turning points, which are called trapped states. These results are consistent with and complementary to previous results. - Highlights: • Bound states without turning points. • Lagrangian Formulation for an electric dipole in a magnetic field. • Motion of the center of mass and trapped states. • Constants of motion: pseudomomentum and energy.

  20. J/Ψ production in proton-proton and deuteron-gold collisions at 200 GeV in the nucleon-nucleon center of mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand the quark-gluon plasma formed in heavy-ion collisions, we have to understand the cold nuclear matter behavior. In this aim we studied deuteron-gold collisions at 200 GeV in the nucleon-nucleon center of mass at the collider RHIC. The J/Ψ was suggested to probe the plasma. We studied its production via its muon decay measured in the muon spectrometers of the PHENIX experiment. We developed a Kalman fit method for tracks and vertex, for the muon spectrometers data analysis. The J/Ψ production was analyzed in function of kinematic and geometric variables. Comparison between proton-proton and deuterium-gold data allowed a better understanding of shadowing and absorption phenomena present in collisions without any dense matter. (author)

  1. Tests of constituent-quark generation methods which maintain both the nucleon center of mass and the desired radial distribution in Monte Carlo Glauber models

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, J T; Tannenbaum, M J; Stankus, P W

    2016-01-01

    Several methods of generating three constituent-quarks in a nucleon are evaluated which explicitly maintain the nucleon's center of mass and desired radial distribution and can be used within Monte Carlo Glauber frameworks. The geometric models provided by each method are used to generate distributions over the Number of Constituent Quark Participants ($N_{qp}$) in $p+p$, $d+$Au and Au$+$Au collisions. The results are compared with each other and to a previous result of $N_{qp}$ calculations, without this explicit constraint, used in measurements of $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200 GeV $p+p$, $d+$Au and Au$+$Au collisions at RHIC.

  2. Measurements of the reaction e+e- → γγ at center-of-mass energies in the range 6.2--7.4 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the cross section for the pair-annihilation reaction e+e- → γγ at angles close to 90degree, relative to Bhabha scattering at 4degree, are reported at center-of-mass energies in the range 6.2--7.4 GeV. These measurements provide a fundamental test of quantum electrodynamics (QED) for spacelike values of the invariant four-momentum transfer q2 as high at -40 (GeV/c)2, which in this reaction is carried by the lepton propagator. A principal feature of the detection apparatus is the use of large NaI(Tl) total-absorption spectrometers. The results are in agreement with the predictions of QED

  3. Stability of fragments and study of participant-spectator matter at peak center-of-mass energy

    CERN Document Server

    Kaur, Sukhjit

    2011-01-01

    We simulate the central reactions of nearly symmetric, and asymmetric systems, for the energies at which the maximum production of IMFs occurs (E$_{c.m.}^{peak}$).This study is carried out by using hard EOS along with cugnon cross section and employing MSTB method for clusterization. We study the various properties of fragments. The stability of fragments is checked through persistence coefficient, gain term and binding energy. The information about the thermalization and stopping in heavy-ion collisions is obtained via relative momentum, anisotropy ratio, and rapidity distribution. We find that for a complete stopping of incoming nuclei very heavy systems are required. The mass dependence of various quantities (such as average and maximum central density, collision dynamics as well as the time zone for hot and dense nuclear matter) is also presented. In all cases (i.e., average and maximum central density, collision dynamics as well as the time zone for hot and dense nuclear matter) a power law dependence is...

  4. Modeling the Impact of Space Suit Components and Anthropometry on the Center of Mass of a Seated Crewmember

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackledge, Christopher; Margerum, Sarah; Ferrer, Mike; Morency, Richard; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2010-01-01

    The Crew Impact Attenuation System (CIAS) is the energy-absorbing strut concept that dampens Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) landing loads to levels sustainable by the crew. Significant COM variations across suited crew configurations would amplify the inertial effects of the pallet and potentially create unacceptable crew loading during launch and landing. The objective of this study was to obtain data needed for dynamic simulation models by quantifying the effects of posture, suit components, and the expected range of anthropometry on the COM of a seated individual. Several elements are required for the COM calculation of a suited human in a seated position: anthropometry, body segment mass, suit component mass, suit component location relative to the body, and joint angles defining the seated posture. Three-dimensional (3D) human body models, suit mass data, and vector calculus were utilized to compute the COM positions for 12 boundary manikins in two different seated postures. The analysis focused on two objectives: (1) quantify how much the wholebody COM varied from the smallest to largest subject and (2) quantify the effects of the suit components on the overall COM in each seat configuration. The location of the anterior-posterior COM varied across all boundary manikins by about 7 cm, and the vertical COM varied by approximately 9 to 10 cm. The mediolateral COM varied by 1.2 cm from the midline sagittal plane for both seat configurations. The suit components caused an anterior shift of the total COM by approximately 2 cm and a shift to the right along the mediolateral axis of 0.4 cm for both seat configurations. When the seat configuration was in the standard posture the suited vertical COM shifted inferiorly by as much as 1 cm, whereas in the CEV posture the vertical COM had no appreciable change. These general differences were due to the high proportion of suit mass located in the boots and lower legs and their corresponding distance from the body COM

  5. Measurement of Hadronic Event Shapes and Jet Substructure in Proton-Proton Collisions at 7.0 TeV Center-of-Mass Energy with the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David Wilkins

    2012-03-20

    This thesis presents the first measurement of 6 hadronic event shapes in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Results are presented at the particle-level, permitting comparisons to multiple Monte Carlo event generator tools. Numerous tools and techniques that enable detailed analysis of the hadronic final state at high luminosity are described. The approaches presented utilize the dual strengths of the ATLAS calorimeter and tracking systems to provide high resolution and robust measurements of the hadronic jets that constitute both a background and a signal throughout ATLAS physics analyses. The study of the hadronic final state is then extended to jet substructure, where the energy flow and topology within individual jets is studied at the detector level and techniques for estimating systematic uncertainties for such measurements are commissioned in the first data. These first substructure measurements in ATLAS include the jet mass and sub-jet multiplicity as well as those concerned with multi-body hadronic decays and color flow within jets. Finally, the first boosted hadronic object observed at the LHC - the decay of the top quark to a single jet - is presented.

  6. Using The Balance Function To Search For Late Hadronization In Gold+gold Collisions At A Center Of Mass Energy Of 130 Gev Per Nucleon Pair

    CERN Document Server

    Tonjes, M B

    2002-01-01

    Relativistic heavy ion physics is the study of nuclear matter interacting at high energies and densities. The collisions of gold nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provide a source of high density matter for the study and creation of a novel state of matter, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). The data set studied in this dissertation is taken from Au+Au interactions at a center of mass energy of 130 GeV, measured in summer 2000. This is the first such data produced at RHIC. The analysis presented here focuses upon the measurement of balance functions, which are new observables in the field of heavy ion physics. The balance function for heavy ion physics is introduced in Bass, Danielewicz, and Pratt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2689 (2000). The data were taken with the STAR (Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC) detector, with analysis performed on charged particles in a pseudorapidity region of |η| < 1.3. The balance function measured for conserving charge/anti- charge pion pairs as a function of r...

  7. Center of Mass Compensation during Gait in Hip Arthroplasty Patients: Comparison between Large Diameter Head Total Hip Arthroplasty and Hip Resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffard, Vicky; Nantel, Julie; Therrien, Marc; Vendittoli, Pascal-André; Lavigne, Martin; Prince, François

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To compare center of mass (COM) compensation in the frontal and sagittal plane during gait in patients with large diameter head total hip arthroplasty (LDH-THA) and hip resurfacing (HR). Design. Observational study. Setting. Outpatient biomechanical laboratory. Participants. Two groups of 12 patients with LDH-THA and HR recruited from a larger randomized study and 11 healthy controls. Interventions. Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures. To compare the distance between the hip prosthetic joint center (HPJC) and the COM. The ratio (R(HPJC-COM)) and the variability (CV(HPJC-COM)) were compared between groups. Hip flexor, abductor, and adductor muscle strength was also correlated between groups while radiographic measurements were correlated with the outcome measures. Results. In the frontal plane, HR shows less variability than healthy controls at push-off and toe-off and R(HPJC-COM) is correlated with the muscle strength ratios (FR(ABD)) at heel contact, maximal weight acceptance, and mid stance. In the sagittal plane, LDH-THA has a higher R(HPJC-COM) than healthy controls at push-off, and CV(HPJC-COM) is significantly correlated with FR(FLEX). Conclusions. One year after surgery, both groups of patients, LDH-THA and HR, demonstrate minor compensations at some specific instant of the gait cycle, in both frontal and sagittal planes. However, their locomotion pattern is similar to the healthy controls. PMID:22110976

  8. Center of Mass Compensation during Gait in Hip Arthroplasty Patients: Comparison between Large Diameter Head Total Hip Arthroplasty and Hip Resurfacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicky Bouffard

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare center of mass (COM compensation in the frontal and sagittal plane during gait in patients with large diameter head total hip arthroplasty (LDH-THA and hip resurfacing (HR. Design. Observational study. Setting. Outpatient biomechanical laboratory. Participants. Two groups of 12 patients with LDH-THA and HR recruited from a larger randomized study and 11 healthy controls. Interventions. Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures. To compare the distance between the hip prosthetic joint center (HPJC and the COM. The ratio (RHPJC-COM and the variability (CVHPJC-COM were compared between groups. Hip flexor, abductor, and adductor muscle strength was also correlated between groups while radiographic measurements were correlated with the outcome measures. Results. In the frontal plane, HR shows less variability than healthy controls at push-off and toe-off and RHPJC-COM is correlated with the muscle strength ratios (FRABD at heel contact, maximal weight acceptance, and mid stance. In the sagittal plane, LDH-THA has a higher RHPJC-COM than healthy controls at push-off, and CVHPJC-COM is significantly correlated with FRFLEX. Conclusions. One year after surgery, both groups of patients, LDH-THA and HR, demonstrate minor compensations at some specific instant of the gait cycle, in both frontal and sagittal planes. However, their locomotion pattern is similar to the healthy controls.

  9. Search for new particles and new phenomena in e+e- collisions at 44 GeV/c2 in the center of mass with the CELLO detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of this thesis is the search of new particles and new phenomena in e+e- collisions at an average energy of 44 GeV/c2 in the center of mass. The experimental set-up used was the CELLO detector located at the PETRA e+e-collider. After a theoretical introduction of these new particles in the framework of the electroweak standard model, a search of new charged and neutral heavy leptons has been carried out. No evidence has been found for such objects. This has led to the setting new limits of the mass of these new particles. However this analysis has led to the discovery of a very peculiar event. In order to investigate further the origin of this event, study of the quantum electrodynamic at the order α4 has been made. A very poor agreement of the data with the theory has been observed. However the limited statistics did not allow to a definitive conclusion. Finally, we have searched for new particles beyond the standard model. This new particles might reveale the existence of new forces. No evidence has been found and new limits for the mass of these objects have been set

  10. Search for Supersymmetry Using Diphoton Events in p anti-p Collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Sin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2010-05-01

    This dissertation presents the results of a search for supersymmetry in protonantiproton collisions with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV studied with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. Our strategy is to select collisions with two photons in the nal state that have the properties of being the decays of very massive supersymmetric particles. This includes looking for large total energy from the decayed particles as well as for the presence of particles that leave the detector without interacting. We nd no events using 2.6 fb-1 of data collected during the 2004-2008 collider run of the Fermilab Tevatron which is consistent with the background estimate of 1.4 0.4 events. Since there is no evidence of new particles we set cross section limits in a gaugemediated supersymmetry model with X$\\tilde{o}$1→ eG, where the X$\\tilde{o}$1 and eG are the lightest neutralino and the gravitino (the lightest supersymmetric particle), respectively. We set limits on models as a function of the X$\\tilde{o}$1 mass and lifetime, producing the world's most sensitive search for X$\\tilde{o}$1 by excluding masses up to 149 GeV=c2 for X$\\tilde{o}$1 lifetimes much less than 1 ns.

  11. Observation and studies of jet quenching in PbPb collisions at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy = 2.76 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); et al.

    2011-08-01

    Jet production in PbPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV was studied with the CMS detector at the LHC, using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 inverse microbarns. Jets are reconstructed using the energy deposited in the CMS calorimeters and studied as a function of collision centrality. With increasing collision centrality, a striking imbalance in dijet transverse momentum is observed, consistent with jet quenching. The observed effect extends from the lower cut-off used in this study (jet transverse momentum = 120 GeV/c) up to the statistical limit of the available data sample (jet transverse momentum approximately 210 GeV/c). Correlations of charged particle tracks with jets indicate that the momentum imbalance is accompanied by a softening of the fragmentation pattern of the second most energetic, away-side jet. The dijet momentum balance is recovered when integrating low transverse momentum particles distributed over a wide angular range relative to the direction of the away-side jet.

  12. Observation of the intermediate vector bosons W+- and Z0 in proton-antiproton collisions at 546 GeV center of mass energy. UA2 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Standard Model of electromagnetic and weak interactions predicts the existence of the intermediate vector bosons W+- and Z0 and gives precise predictions for their masses. Antiproton accumulation by stochastic cooling and the operation of the CERN SPS accelerator in collider mode made accessible pantip at 546 GeV center of mass energy. This thesis presents the observation of the intermediate vector bosons through their decays Z0 → e+e-, W → eν. During running periods 1982 and 1983, 8 decays Z0 → e+e- and 32 decays W → eν with an electron of Psub(T) > 25 GeV/c were observed in UA2 experiment. Cross sections of W+- and Z0 production and the weak interaction parameters: Msub(W), Msub(Z), sin2thetasub(W) and rho are determined. These results are in agreement with Standard Model predictions, thus confirming theory in a spectacular way. An upper limit to the total width of the Z0 is given. An upper limit to the number of additional neutrinos is inferred. Radiative decays of the intermediate vector bosons are discussed

  13. Inclusive hadron production and two particle correlations in e+e- annihilation at 29 GeV center-of-mass energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied hadron production in e+e- annihilation at 29 GeV center-of-mass energy using the PEP-4 Time Projection Chamber Detector. The inclusive cross sections and mean multiplicities for π+-, K+- and (p + anti p) production have been measured using ionization energy loss to separate particle species. We find on average 10.7 +- 0.6 π+-, 1.35 +- .13 K+- and 0.60 +- 0.08 (p + anti p) per multihadron event. The differential cross section is well described by a number of Monte Carlo hadronization models. In addition, we have observed correlations in rapidity space for identified pions and kaons. Short-range KK correlations provide evidence for local flavor compensation during hadronization. Long-range ππ and KK correlations indicate that the initial partons carry flavor. We also observe significant long-range πK correlations as a result of heavy quark decays. 85 references, 67 figures, 11 tables

  14. Search for New Physics in a Final State with Same-Sign Dileptons, Jets, and Missing Transverse Energy at 7 TeV Center of Mass Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golf, Frank, III [UC, San Diego

    2012-01-01

    We report on a search for new physics in a final state with two same sign leptons, missing transverse energy, and significant hadronic activity at a center of mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV. The data were collected with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 0.98 $\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. Data--driven methods are developed to estimate the dominant Standard Model backgrounds. No evidence for new physics is observed. The dominant background to the analysis comes from failures of lepton identification in Standard Model $t\\bar{t}$ events. The $t\\bar{t}$ production cross section in the dilepton final state is measured using 3.1 $\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ of data. The cross section is measured to be 194 $\\pm$ 72 (stat) $\\pm$ 24 (syst) $\\pm$ 21 (lumi) pb. An algorithm is developed that uses tracking information to improve the reconstruction of missing transverse energy. The reconstruction of missing transverse energy is commissioned using the first collisio ns recorded at 0.9, 2.36 and 7 TeV data. Events with abnormally large values of missing transverse energy are identified as arising from anomalous signals in the calorimeters. Tools are developed to identify and remove these anomalous signals.

  15. A calorimetric measurement of the strong coupling constant in electron-positron annihilation at a center-of-mass energy of 91.6 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, a measurement of the strong coupling constant αs in e+e- annihilation at a center-of-mass energy of 91.6 GeV is presented. The measurement was performed with the SLD at the Stanford Linear Collider facility located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. The procedure used consisted of measuring the rate of hard gluon radiation from the primary quarks in a sample of 9,878 hadronic events. After defining the asymptotic manifestation of partons as 'jets', various phenomenological models were used to correct for the hadronization process. A value for the QCD scale parameter ΛbarMS, defined in the barMS renormalization convention with 5 active quark flavors, was then obtained by a direct fit to O(αs2) calculations. The value of αs obtained was αs(Mz0) = 0.122 ± 0.004 -0.007+0.008 where the uncertainties are experimental (combined statistical and systematic) and theoretical (systematic) respectively. Equivalently, ΛbarMS = 0.28 -0.10+0.16 GeV where the experimental and theoretical uncertainties have been combined

  16. Measurements of the charged underlying event with the ATLAS detector at 7TeV & 900 GeV center of mass energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Gabriel Archacki

    Proton collisions simultaneously access very high energies through parton scattering and low energy effects through parton correlations. While the interactions of partons at high energies are well described by perturbative parton calculations, simulations of low energy interactions of the quark and gluon partons are based on models rather than well-defined approximations from first principles. In proton collisions that are selected for high energy physics studies one pair of partons carries a large fraction of the energy of the colliding protons. In addition to this primary parton scattering it is expected that there will be secondary interactions of additional parton pairs yielding an "Underlying Event." Measuring correlations between the primary and secondary scattering provides some insight into the modeling of low-energy QCD. The first measurements of the Underlying Event by the ATLAS detector at 900 GeV and 7 TeV center of mass energies are presented. For these measurements the highest transverse momentum reconstructed track is used to characterize the energy and orientation of the primary scattering of partons. The results of these measurements indicate a higher mean multiplicity of particles arising from secondary interactions than was predicted by models tuned to measurements made at lower energies. In the context of a Negative Binomial distribution for particle multiplicities these results indicate that the measured Negative Binomial distribution is more Exponential than was predicted by any contemporaneous model of hadron production.

  17. Measurement of Dijet Cross Sections in Proton-Proton Collisions at 7 TeV Center-of-Mass Energy Using the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Christopher

    Dijet production is measured in proton-proton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV at the LHC. Double-differential dijet cross sections are presented as functions of the dijet mass and rapidity separation of the two highest-transverse-momentum jets in an event. The data sample collected in 2011 by the ATLAS detector is considered, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.5 fb-1. Jets are defined using the anti-kt algorithm, with two choices of the jet radius parameter, R=0.4 and R=0.6. The results are compared with next-to-leading-order (NLO) perturbative calculations, as well as NLO Monte Carlo generator predictions. In both cases, electroweak effects are accounted for. A method for the quantitative comparison of theory predictions with data is presented, employing a frequentist technique. This allows for strong statements on which sets of parton distribution functions best describe the data. A theory of quark compositeness modeled by contact interactions is confronted by the unfolded data ...

  18. A calorimetric measurement of the strong coupling constant in electron-positron annihilation at a center-of-mass energy of 91.6 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martirena, S.G.

    1994-04-01

    In this work, a measurement of the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s} in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation at a center-of-mass energy of 91.6 GeV is presented. The measurement was performed with the SLD at the Stanford Linear Collider facility located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. The procedure used consisted of measuring the rate of hard gluon radiation from the primary quarks in a sample of 9,878 hadronic events. After defining the asymptotic manifestation of partons as `jets`, various phenomenological models were used to correct for the hadronization process. A value for the QCD scale parameter {Lambda}{sub bar MS}, defined in the {sub bar MS} renormalization convention with 5 active quark flavors, was then obtained by a direct fit to O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) calculations. The value of {alpha}{sub s} obtained was {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub z0}) = 0.122 {plus_minus} 0.004 {sub {minus}0.007} {sup +0.008} where the uncertainties are experimental (combined statistical and systematic) and theoretical (systematic) respectively. Equivalently, {Lambda}{sub bar MS} = 0.28 {sub {minus}0.10}{sup +0.16} GeV where the experimental and theoretical uncertainties have been combined.

  19. Search for New Physics in a Final State with Same-Sign Dileptons, Jets, and Missing Transverse Energy at 7 TeV Center of Mass Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Golf, Frank

    2012-01-01

    We report on a search for new physics in a final state with two same sign leptons, missing transverse energy, and significant hadronic activity at a center of mass energy $sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV. The data were collected with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 0.98 $mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. Data--driven methods are developed to estimate the dominant Standard Model backgrounds. No evidence for new physics is observed. The dominant background to the analysis comes from failures of lepton identification in Standard Model $tar{t}$ events. The $tar{t}$ production cross section in the dilepton final state is measured using 3.1 $mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ of data. The cross section is measured to be 194 $pm$ 72 (stat) $pm$ 24 (syst) $pm$ 21 (lumi) pb. An algorithm is developed that uses tracking information to improve the reconstruction of missing transverse energy. The reconstruction of missing transverse energy is commissioned using the first collisio ns recorded at 0.9, 2.36 and 7 TeV data. E...

  20. Properties of jets measured from tracks in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benedict, Brian Hugues; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernardet, Karim; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges

    2011-01-01

    Jets are identified and their properties studied in center-of-mass energy sqrt(s) = 7 TeV proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider using charged particles measured by the ATLAS inner detector. Events are selected using a minimum bias trigger, allowing jets at very low transverse momentum to be observed and their characteristics in the transition to high-momentum fully perturbative jets to be studied. Jets are reconstructed using the anti-kt algorithm applied to charged particles with two radius parameter choices, 0.4 and 0.6. An inclusive charged jet transverse momentum cross section measurement from 4 GeV to 100 GeV is shown for four ranges in rapidity extending to 1.9 and corrected to charged particle-level truth jets. The transverse momenta and longitudinal momentum fractions of charged particles within jets are measured, along with the charged particle multiplicity and the particle density as a function of radial distance from the jet axis. Comparison of the data with the theoretical models i...

  1. Search for Scalar Bottom Quarks from Gluino Decays in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at a Center-of-Mass Energy of 1.96-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rott, Carsten

    2004-12-01

    The authors have performed a search for the scalar bottom quark ({tilde b}{sub 1}) from gluino ({tilde g}) decays in an R-parity conserving SUSY scenario with m{sub {tilde g}} > m{sub {tilde b}{sub 1}}, by investigating a final state of large missing transverse energy, with three or more jets, and some of them from the hadronization of b-quarks. A data sample of 156 pb{sup -1} collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV was used. For the final selection, jets containing secondary displaced vertices were required. This analysis has been performed ''blind'', in that the inspection of the signal region was only made after the Standard Model prediction was finalized. Comparing data with SUSY predictions, they can exclude masses of the gluino and sbottom of up to 280 and 240 GeV/c{sup 2} respectively.

  2. Observation of $e^{+}e^{-} \\to \\eta J/\\psi$ at center-of-mass energy $sqrt{s}=4.009$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; An, Z H; Bai, J Z; Ban, Y; Becker, J; Bertani, M; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Bytev, V; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Feng, C Q; Ferroli, R B; Fu, C D; Fu, J L; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, G M; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y P; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jing, F F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kavatsyuk, M; Kuehn, W; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, Q J; Li, S L; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, X R; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Liao, X T; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, C Y; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, H W; Liu, J P; Liu, K Y; Liu, Kai; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X H; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Q W; Lu, X R; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Morales, C Morales; Motzko, C; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nicholson, C; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Park, J W; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prencipe, E; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schaefer, B D; Schulze, J; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, D H; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B Q; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, Q G; Wen, S P; Werner, M; Wiedner, U; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, S X; Wu, W; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, G M; Xu, H; Xu, Q J; Xu, X P; Xu, Z R; Xue, F; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y S; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, H S; Zhao, J W; Zhao, K X; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhong, J; Zhou, L; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhu, C; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, X W; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y M; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2012-01-01

    Using a 478 pb$^{-1}$ data sample collected with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII storage ring at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=4.009$ GeV, the production of $e^{+}e^{-}\\to \\eta J\\psi$ is observed for the first time with a statistical significance of greater than $10\\sigma$. The Born cross section is measured to be $(32.1\\pm 2.8 \\pm 1.3)$ pb, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. Assuming the $\\eta J\\psi$ signal is from a hadronic transition of the $\\psi(4040)$, the fractional transition rate is determined to be ${\\cal B}(\\psi(4040)\\to \\eta J\\psi)=(5.2\\pm 0.5\\pm 0.2\\pm 0.5)\\times 10^{-3}$, where the first, second, and third errors are statistical, systematic, and the uncertainty from the $\\psi(4040)$ resonant parameters, respectively. The production of $e^{+}e^{-} \\to \\pi^0 J\\psi$ is searched for, but no significant signal is observed, and ${\\cal B}(\\psi(4040)\\to \\pi^0 J\\psi) < 2.8 \\times 10^{-4}$ is obtained at the 90% confidence level.

  3. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voutilainen, Mikko Antero [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    This thesis studies the high-energy collisions of protons and antiprotons. The data used in the measurement were collected during 2004-2005 with the D0 detector at the Tevatron Collider of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and correspond to 0.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. High energy hadron collisions usually produce collimated sprays of particles called jets. The energy of the jets is measured using a liquid Argon-Uranium calorimeter and the production angle is determined with the help of silicon microstrip and scintillating fiber trackers. The inclusive jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions is measured as a function of jet transverse momentum pT in six bins of jet rapidity at the center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. The measurement covers jet transerve momenta from 50 GeV up to 600 GeV and jet rapidities up to |y| = 2.4. The data are collected using a set of seven single jet triggers. Event and jet cuts are applied to remove non-physical backgrounds and cosmic-ray interactions. The data are corrected for jet energy calibration, cut and trigger efficiencies and finite jet pT resolution. The corrections are determined from data and the methods are tested with Monte Carlo simulation. The main experimental challenges in the measurement are the calibration of jet energies and the determination of the jet pT resolution. New methods are developed for the jet energy calibration that take into account physical differences between the {gamma}+jet and dijet calibration samples arising from quark and gluon jet differences. The uncertainty correlations are studied and provided as a set of uncertainty sources. The production of particle jets in hadron collisions is described by the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). When the transverse jet momentum is large, the contributions from long-distance physics processes are small and the production rates of jets can be predicted by perturbative QCD. The

  4. Evidence for e+e− →γχc1,2 at center-of-mass energies from 4.009 to 4.360 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using data samples collected at center-of-mass energies of √s=4.009, 4.230, 4.260, and 4.360 GeV with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII collider, we perform a search for the process e+e− → γχcJ (J=0, 1, 2) and find evidence for e+e− → γχc1 and e+e− → γχc2 with statistical significances of 3.0σ and 3.4σ, respectively. The Born cross sections σB(e+e− → γχcJ), as well as their upper limits at the 90% confidence level (C.L.) are determined at each center-of-mass energy

  5. Precision measurement of the integrated luminosity of the data taken by BESIII at center-of-mass energies between 3.810 GeV and 4.600 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From December 2011 to May 2014, about 5 fb−1 of data were taken with the BESIII detector at center-of-mass energies between 3.810 GeV and 4.600 GeV to study the charmonium-like states and higher excited charmonium states. The time-integrated luminosity of the collected data sample is measured to a precision of 1% by analyzing events produced by the large-angle Bhabha scattering process

  6. Precision measurement of the integrated luminosity of the data taken by BESIII at center of mass energies between 3.810 GeV and 4.600 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Han, Y L; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, H P; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Kupsc, A; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leng, C; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X M; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, R Q; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Pu, Y N; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ren, H L; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Santoro, V; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2015-01-01

    From December 2011 to May 2014, about 5 $\\rm fb^{-1}$ of data were taken with the BESIII detector at center-of-mass energies between 3.810 GeV and 4.600 GeV to study the charmoniumlike states and higher excited charmonium states. The time integrated luminosity of the collected data sample is measured to a precision of 1% by analyzing events produced by the large-angle Bhabha scattering process.

  7. Study of the $e^+e^- \\to D^{(*)}\\bar{D}^*$ cross section in the center of mass energy range near $D^{(*)}\\bar{D}^*$ threshold with initial state radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Aihara, H; Anipko, D; Aoki, K; Arakawa, T; Arinstein, K; Asano, Y; Aso, T; Aulchenko, V M; Aushev, T; Aziz, T; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Ban, Y; Banerjee, S; Barberio, E; Barbero, M; Bay, A; Bedny, I; Belous, K S; Bitenc, U; Bizjak, I; Blyth, S; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chang, M C; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, K F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chistov, R; Choi, J H; Choi, S K; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Chuvikov, A; Cole, S; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Dowd, R; Dragic, J; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Enari, Y; Epifanov, D A; Fratina, S; Fujii, H; Fujikawa, M; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Gershon, T; Go, A; Gokhroo, G; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Gorisek, A; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guler, H; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hara, K; Hara, T; Hasegawa, Y; Hastings, N C; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Higuchi, T; Hinz, L; Hokuue, T; Hoshi, Y; Hoshina, K; Hou, S; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y B; Igarashi, Y; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Imoto, A; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, K; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Jacoby, C; Jones, M; Kakuno, H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapusta, P; Kataoka, S U; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Khan, H R; Kibayashi, A; Kichimi, H; Kikuchi, N; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, J H; Kim, S K; Kim, T H; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Kishimoto, N; Korpar, S; Kozakai, Y; Krizan, P; Krokovnyi, P P; Kubota, T; Kulasiri, R; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kurihara, E; Kusaka, A; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y J; Lange, J S; Leder, G; Lee, J; Lee, S E; Lee, Y J; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Limosani, A; Lin, C Y; Lin, S W; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; MacNaughton, J; Majumder, G; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; Matsumoto, T; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mikami, Y; Mitaroff, W A; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Mohapatra, D; Moloney, G R; Mori, T; Müller, J; Murakami, A; Nagamine, T; Nagasaka, Y; Nakagawa, T; Nakahama, Y; Nakamura, I; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Natkaniec, Z; Neichi, K; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, A; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okabe, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ono, S; Ostrowicz, W; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Palka, H; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, K S; Parslow, N; Peak, L S; Pernicka, M; Pestotnik, R; Peters, M; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Ronga, F J; Root, N; Rorie, J; Rózanska, M; Sahoo, H; Saitoh, S; Sakai, Y; Sakamoto, H; Sakaue, H; Sarangi, T R; Sato, N; Satoyama, N; Sayeed, K; Schietinger, T; Schneider, O; Schonmeier, P; Schümann, J; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Seidl, R; Seki, T; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shen, Y T; Shibuya, H; Shwartz, B; Sidorov, V; Singh, J B; Sokolov, A; Somov, A; Soni, N; Stamen, R; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Stöck, H; Sugiyama, A; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, S Y; Tajima, O; Takada, N; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tamura, N; Tanabe, K; Tanaka, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tian, X C; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Tsai, Y T; Tse, Y F; Tsuboyama, T; Tsukamoto, T; Uchida, K; Uchida, Y; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Ueno, K; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Yu; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Villa, S; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, M Z; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wicht, J; Widhalm, L; Wiechczynski, J; Won, E; Wu, C H; Xie, Q L; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamamoto, H; Yamamoto, S; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Heyoung Yang; Yoshino, S; Yuan, Y; Yusa, Y; Zang, S L; Zhang, C C; Zhang, J; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Ziegler, T; Zupanc, A; Zürcher, D

    2006-01-01

    We report measurements of the exclusive $e^+e^- \\to D^{(*)} \\bar{D}{}^*$ cross section as a function of center-of-mass energy near the $D^{(*)}\\bar{D}{}^$ threshold with initial state radiation. A partial reconstruction technique involving full reconstruction of one $D^{(*)}$ and reconstruction of the slow pion from the other $D^*$ is used to increase the efficiency and to suppress background. The analysis is based on a data sample collected with the Belle detector at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance and nearby continuum with an integrated luminosity of 547.8 $\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at the KEKB asymmetric energy $e^+e^-$ collider.

  8. Study of the process $e^+ e^- \\to K\\overline{K}$ in the center-of-mass energy range 1004--1060 MeV with the CMD-3 detector at $e^+ e^-$ VEPP-2000 collider

    CERN Document Server

    Kozyrev, E A

    2016-01-01

    The $e^+ e^- \\to K^0_{S}K^0_{L}$ and $e^+ e^- \\to K^{-}K^{+}$ cross sections have been measured in the center-of-mass energy range 1004--1060 MeV for 25 energy points with about 2$\\div$3\\% systematic uncertainties. The analysis is based on 5.5 pb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity collected with the CMD-3 detector at the VEPP-2000 $e^+ e^-$ collider. The measured cross section is approximated according to Vector Meson Dominance model as a sum of $\\phi, \\omega, \\rho$-like amplitudes and their excitations, and $\\phi(1020)$ meson parameters have been obtained.

  9. Study of the process $e^+ e^- \\to K^0_{S}K^0_{L}$ in the center-of-mass energy range 1004--1060 MeV with the CMD-3 detector at the VEPP-2000 $e^+ e^-$ collider

    CERN Document Server

    Kozyrev, E A

    2016-01-01

    The $e^+ e^- \\to K^0_{S}K^0_{L}$ cross section has been measured in the center-of-mass energy range 1004--1060 MeV at 25 energy points using $6.1 \\times 10^5$ events with $K^0_{S}\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decay. The analysis is based on 5.9 pb$^{-1}$ of an integrated luminosity collected with the CMD-3 detector at the VEPP-2000 $e^+ e^-$ collider. To obtain $\\phi(1020)$ meson parameters the measured cross section is approximated according to the Vector Meson Dominance model as a sum of the $\\rho, \\omega, \\phi$-like amplitudes and their excitations. This is the most precise measurement of the $e^+ e^- \\to K^0_{S}K^0_{L}$ cross section with a 1.8\\% systematic uncertainty.

  10. Study of the process e+e- → KS0 KL0 in the center-of-mass energy range 1004-1060 MeV with the CMD-3 detector at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, E. A.; Solodov, E. P.; Amirkhanov, A. N.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Banzarov, V. S.; Bashtovoy, N. S.; Berkaev, D. E.; Bondar, A. E.; Bragin, A. V.; Eidelman, S. I.; Epifanov, D. A.; Epshteyn, L. B.; Erofeev, A. L.; Fedotovich, G. V.; Gayazov, S. E.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Gribanov, S. S.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Ignatov, F. V.; Ivanov, V. L.; Karpov, S. V.; Kasaev, A. S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Kirpotin, A. N.; Korobov, A. A.; Kovalenko, O. A.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Koop, I. A.; Krokovny, P. P.; Kuzmenko, A. E.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Logashenko, I. B.; Lukin, P. A.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Okhapkin, V. S.; Otboev, A. V.; Pestov, Yu. N.; Popov, A. S.; Razuvaev, G. P.; Ruban, A. A.; Ryskulov, N. M.; Ryzhenenkov, A. E.; Senchenko, A. I.; Shebalin, V. E.; Shemyakin, D. N.; Shwartz, B. A.; Shwartz, D. B.; Sibidanov, A. L.; Shatunov, P. Yu.; Shatunov, Yu. M.; Titov, V. M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Vorobiov, A. I.; Yudin, Yu. V.

    2016-09-01

    The e+e- → KS0 KL0 cross section has been measured in the center-of-mass energy range 1004-1060 MeV at 25 energy points using 6.1 ×105 events with KS0 →π+π- decay. The analysis is based on 5.9 pb-1 of an integrated luminosity collected with the CMD-3 detector at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider. To obtain ϕ (1020) meson parameters the measured cross section is approximated according to the Vector Meson Dominance model as a sum of the ρ , ω , ϕ-like amplitudes and their excitations. This is the most precise measurement of the e+e- → KS0 KL0 cross section with a 1.8% systematic uncertainty.

  11. Study of the process e+e- → KS0 KL0 in the center-of-mass energy range 1004-1060 MeV with the CMD-3 detector at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, E. A.; Solodov, E. P.; Amirkhanov, A. N.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Banzarov, V. S.; Bashtovoy, N. S.; Berkaev, D. E.; Bondar, A. E.; Bragin, A. V.; Eidelman, S. I.; Epifanov, D. A.; Epshteyn, L. B.; Erofeev, A. L.; Fedotovich, G. V.; Gayazov, S. E.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Gribanov, S. S.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Ignatov, F. V.; Ivanov, V. L.; Karpov, S. V.; Kasaev, A. S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Kirpotin, A. N.; Korobov, A. A.; Kovalenko, O. A.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Koop, I. A.; Krokovny, P. P.; Kuzmenko, A. E.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Logashenko, I. B.; Lukin, P. A.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Okhapkin, V. S.; Otboev, A. V.; Pestov, Yu. N.; Popov, A. S.; Razuvaev, G. P.; Ruban, A. A.; Ryskulov, N. M.; Ryzhenenkov, A. E.; Senchenko, A. I.; Shebalin, V. E.; Shemyakin, D. N.; Shwartz, B. A.; Shwartz, D. B.; Sibidanov, A. L.; Shatunov, P. Yu.; Shatunov, Yu. M.; Titov, V. M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Vorobiov, A. I.; Yudin, Yu. V.

    2016-09-01

    The e+e- → KS0 KL0 cross section has been measured in the center-of-mass energy range 1004-1060 MeV at 25 energy points using 6.1 ×105 events with KS0 →π+π- decay. The analysis is based on 5.9 pb-1 of an integrated luminosity collected with the CMD-3 detector at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider. To obtain ϕ (1020) meson parameters the measured cross section is approximated according to the Vector Meson Dominance model as a sum of the ρ, ω, ϕ-like amplitudes and their excitations. This is the most precise measurement of the e+e- → KS0 KL0 cross section with a 1.8% systematic uncertainty.

  12. Observation of $e^{+}e^{-} \\to \\eta^{\\prime} J/\\psi$ at center-of-mass energies between 4.189 and 4.600 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ahmed, S; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Berger, N; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Dou, Z L; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Farinelli, R; Fava, L; Fedorov, O; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, X L; Gao, X Y; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Goetzen, K; Gong, L; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, R P; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; Heinsius, F H; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Holtmann, T; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G S; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, X Z; Huang, Y; Huang, Z L; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kiese, P; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kupsc, A; Kühn, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leithoff, H; Leng, C; Li, C; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, F Y; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, H J; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, Q Y; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y B; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, D; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Y Y; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, M M; Ma, Q M; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y M; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Mezzadri, G; Min, J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales, C Morales; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Musiol, P; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Pan, Y; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Pettersson, J; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prasad, V; Qi, H R; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Rosner, Ch; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Savri, M; Schnier, C; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, M; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, X H; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, W P; Wang, X F; Wang, Y; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, L J; Wu, Z; Xia, L; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, H; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, J J; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H J; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y X; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zeng, Z; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y N; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2016-01-01

    The process $e^{+}e^{-}\\to \\eta^{\\prime} J/\\psi$ is observed for the first time with a statistical significance of $8.6\\sigma$ at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s} = 4.226$ GeV and $7.3\\sigma$ at $\\sqrt{s} = 4.258$ GeV using data samples collected with the BESIII detector. The Born cross sections are measured to be $(3.7 \\pm 0.7 \\pm 0.3)$ and $(3.9 \\pm 0.8 \\pm 0.3)$ pb at $\\sqrt{s} = 4.226$ and $4.258$ GeV, respectively, where the first errors are statistical and the second systematic. Upper limits at the 90% confidence level of the Born cross sections are also reported at other 12 energy points.

  13. Evidence for e+e- →γχc1,2 at center-of-mass energies from 4.009 to 4.360 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablikim, M.; N. Achasov, M.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; J. Ambrose, D.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; R. Baldini, Ferroli; Ban, Y.; W. Bennett, D.; V. Bennett, J.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; A. Briere, R.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; A. Cetin, S.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; F. De, Mori; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y.; P. Guo, Y.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; A. Harris, F.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; C. Ke, B.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; B. Kolcu, O.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; S. Lange, J.; M., Lara; Larin, P.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; X. Lin(Lin, D.; Liu, B. J.; L. Liu, C.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhiqing, Liu; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; E. Maas, F.; Maggiora, M.; A. Malik, Q.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; G. Messchendorp, J.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; E. Mitchell, R.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; C. Morales, Morales; Moriya, K.; Yu. Muchnoi, N.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; B. Nikolaev, I.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; H. Rashid, K.; F. Redmer, C.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; R. Shepherd, M.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; H. Thorndike, E.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; S. Varner, G.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; D. Wang(Yadi, Y.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; A. Zafar, A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; BESIII Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Using data samples collected at center-of-mass energies of √s = 4.009, 4.230, 4.260, and 4.360 GeV with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII collider, we perform a search for the process e+e- → γχcJ (J=0, 1, 2) and find evidence for e+e- → γχc1 and e+e- → γχc2 with statistical significances of 3.0σ and 3.4σ, respectively. The Born cross sections σB(e+e- → γχcJ), as well as their upper limits at the 90% confidence level (C.L.) are determined at each center-of-mass energy. Supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (2015CB856700), Joint Funds of National Natural Science Foundation of China (11079008, 11179007, U1232201, U1332201, U1232107), National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (10935007, 11121092, 11125525, 11235011, 11322544, 11335008), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Large-Scale Scientific Facility Program, CAS (KJCX2-YW-N29, KJCX2-YW-N45), 100 Talents Program of CAS, INPAC and Shanghai Key Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology; German Research Foundation DFG (Collaborative Research Center CRC-1044), Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Italy, Ministry of Development of Turkey (DPT2006K-120470), Russian Foundation for Basic Research (14-07-91152), U. S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-04ER41291, DE-FG02-05ER41374, DE-FG02-94ER40823, DESC0010118), U.S. National Science Foundation, University of Groningen (RuG) and Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (GSI), Darmstadt, WCU Program of National Research Foundation of Korea (R32-2008-000-10155-0)

  14. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veszpremi, Viktor [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2007-08-01

    A scientifically accurate description of matter interpreted as a substance made up of corpuscular constituents was established during the course of the 19th century. In this description, atoms - the building blocks of the matter - form molecules. The properties of the molecules were described by chemistry or thermodynamics depending on what characteristics of the matter were investigated. In both theories, the molecules can dissociate to atoms when the kinetic energies of the atoms exceed the strength of the chemical bonds. The number of atoms is always preserved in a closed system. This is not true, however, when the matter takes up much higher energies at relativistic scales. New particles can be produced at the expense of the kinetic energy. The number of particles is no longer preserved. There are other conserved quantities, however, these quantities, the charge, baryon number, lepton number, are associated with particles that are considered elementary today. The properties and behavior of these elementary particles are the subject of Particle Physics or High Energy Physics.

  15. Universality of nucleon-nucleon short-range correlations: the factorization property of the nuclear wave function, the relative and center-of-mass momentum distributions, and the nuclear contacts

    CERN Document Server

    Alvioli, Massimiliano; Morita, Hiko

    2016-01-01

    The two-nucleon momentum distributions have been calculated for nuclei up to A=40 and various values of the relative and center-of-mass momenta and angle between them. For complex nuclei a parameter-free linked-cluster expansion, based upon a realistic local two-nucleon interaction of the Argonne family and variational wave function featuring central, tensor, spin and iso-spin correlations, has been used. The obtained results show that: 1) independently of the mass number A, at values of the relative momentum k_rel> 2 fm^{-1} the proton-neutron momentum distributions for back-to-back (BB) nucleons (K_cm=0) exhibit the factorization property n_A^{pn}(k_rel,K_cm=0)=C_A^{pn} n_D(k_rel) n_{cm}^{pn}(K_cm=0), where n_D is the deuteron momentum distribution, n_{cm}^{pn}(K_{cm}=0) the momentum distribution of the c.m. motion of the pair and C_A^{pn} the nuclear contact measuring the number of BB pn pairs with deuteron-like momenta; 2) the values of the proton-neutron nuclear contact C_A^{pn} are obtained in a model-i...

  16. Long-range and short-range dihadron angular correlations in central PbPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon center of mass energy of 2.76 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); et al.

    2011-07-01

    First measurements of dihadron correlations for charged particles are presented for central PbPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV over a broad range in relative pseudorapidity, Delta(eta), and the full range of relative azimuthal angle, Delta(phi). The data were collected with the CMS detector, at the LHC. A broadening of the away-side (Delta(phi) approximately pi) azimuthal correlation is observed at all Delta(eta), as compared to the measurements in pp collisions. Furthermore, long-range dihadron correlations in Delta(eta) are observed for particles with similar phi values. This phenomenon, also known as the "ridge", persists up to at least |Delta(eta)| = 4. For particles with transverse momenta (pt) of 2-4 GeV/c, the ridge is found to be most prominent when these particles are correlated with particles of pt = 2-6 GeV/c, and to be much reduced when paired with particles of pt = 10-12 GeV/c.

  17. Precise measurement of the $e^+e^-\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-J/\\psi$ cross section at center-of-mass energies from 3.77 to 4.60 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S Chen; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, X L; Gao, X Y; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, R P; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, X Q; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kiese, P; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Kupsc, A; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leng, C; Li, C; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, F Y; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, H J; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X M; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, J J; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, D; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, M M; Ma, Q M; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Pan, Y; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Pettersson, J; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prasad, V; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Rosner, Ch; Ruan, X D; Santoro, V; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, M; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, X H; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, W P; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, L J; Wu, Z; Xia, L; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, H; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, J J; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H J; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zeng, Z; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y N; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2016-01-01

    The cross section for the process $e^+e^-\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-J/\\psi$ is measured precisely at center-of-mass energies from 3.77 to 4.60 GeV using 9 fb$^{-1}$ of data collected with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII storage ring. Two resonant structures are observed in a fit to the cross section. The first resonance has a mass of $(4222.0\\pm 3.1\\pm 1.4)$~MeV/$c^2$ and a width of $(44.1\\pm 4.3\\pm 2.0)$~MeV, while the second one has a mass of $(4320.0\\pm 10.4 \\pm 7.0)$~MeV/$c^2$ and a width of $(101.4^{+25.3}_{-19.7}\\pm 10.2)$~MeV, where the first errors are statistical and second ones systematic. The first resonance is near $4.22$~GeV/$c^2$, corresponding to the so-called $Y(4260)$ resonance reported by previous experiments. However, our measured mass is lower and the width is narrower than previous measurements. The second structure is observed in $e^+e^-\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-J/\\psi$ for the first time. The statistical significance is estimated to be larger than $7.6\\sigma$.

  18. Search for high-mass resonances decaying to dilepton final states in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Å kesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Å sman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Atkinson, Markus; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bittner, Bernhard; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is used to search for high-mass resonances decaying to an electron-positron pair or a muon-antimuon pair. The search is sensitive to heavy neutral Z' gauge bosons, Randall-Sundrum gravitons, Z* bosons, techni-mesons, Kaluza-Klein Z/gamma bosons, and bosons predicted by Torsion models. Results are presented based on an analysis of pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9/fb in the dielectron channel and 5.0/fb in the dimuon channel. A Z' boson with Standard Model-like couplings is excluded at 95 percent confidence level for masses below 2.22 TeV. A Randall-Sundrum graviton with coupling k/Mbar = 0.1 is excluded at 95 percent confidence level for masses below 2.16 TeV. Limits on the other models are also presented, including Technicolor and Minimal Z' Models.

  19. Evidence and cross section measurement of the process $pp\\rightarrow t\\bar{t}\\gamma$ at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenthal, Oliver

    The cross section measurement of top quark pair production with an additional prompt photon in the final state ($t\\bar{t}\\gamma$) is presented. The total 2011 dataset of 4.7\\,fb$^{-1}$ has been analyzed in this thesis, recorded by the ATLAS detector in proton-proton collisions at the LHC with a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7\\,$TeV. \\\\ A event selection has been developed for the single electron and single muon channels, following closely the selection used in \\ttbar\\ cross section measurements published by the \\\\ ATLAS collaboration, with the addition of photon selection cuts, identifying a total of 414 \\ttg\\ event candidates in the dataset. Various background contributions have been estimated, which can be categorized in three classes according to the true type of the selected photon. Besides true prompt photons, electrons and hadrons from jet fragmentation can be misidentified as a photon. A signifcant difference has been found in the photon distribution shape of the track isolation variable \\ptcone\\ ...

  20. Measurements of Higgs boson production and couplings in the four-lepton channel in $pp$ collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The final ATLAS Run 1 measurements of Higgs boson production and couplings in the decay channel $H\\to ZZ^{*}\\to\\ell^+\\ell^-\\ell^{'+}\\ell^{'-}$, where $\\ell,\\ell^{'}=e$ or $\\mu$, are presented. These measurements were performed using $pp$ collision data corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.5 fb$^{-1}$ and 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV, respectively, recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The $H\\to ZZ^{*}\\to 4\\ell$ signal is observed with a significance of 8.1 standard deviations at 125.36 GeV, the combined ATLAS measurement of the Higgs boson mass from the $H\\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ and $H\\to ZZ^{*}\\to 4\\ell$ channels. The production rate relative to the Standard Model expectation, the signal strength, is measured in four different production categories in the $H\\to ZZ^{*}\\to 4\\ell$ channel. The measured signal strength, at this mass, and with all categories combined, is 1.44 $^{+0.40}_{-0.33}$. The signal strength for Higgs boson production in gluon fusion or in ...

  1. Search for supersymmetry using a photon, b-jets, and E missT final state with the ATLAS detector in proton-proton collisions at 8TeV center-of-mass energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Andrew David

    A search for supersymmetric particle production in a photon, b-jet and Emiss T final state is conducted using 20.3 fb--1of proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at a center-of-mass energy of [special characters omitted] at the LHC in 2012. Two signal regions are defined, with one geared toward high-mass gluino production decaying to a moderate-to-high-mass neutralino and the other geared toward direct gaugino production. Several variables are optimized for sensitivity to the targeted scenario, including photon pT, [special characters omitted], Njets, and Nb--jets, among others. The Standard Model contribution is estimated using data-driven methods, and no significant excess above Standard Model expectations is observed in either of the signal regions. In one signal region, a total of 12 candidate events are observed while 18.8 +/- 5.3 events are expected from Standard Model backgrounds. In the other signal region, a total of 2 candidate events are observed while 3.63 +/- 1.25 events are expected from Standard Model backgrounds. The result of this analysis is interpreted in a general gauge mediation framework with a lightest neutralino that is a mixture of bino and higgsino. Limits are set in a 2D plane of gluino mass vs neutralino mass. Neutralino masses between 150 GeV and 450 GeV are excluded at 95% CL for all gluino masses, and gluino masses up to at least 1200 GeV (and up to 1350 GeV in some cases) are excluded at 95% CL for neutralino masses between 450 GeV and 50 GeV less than the gluino mass.

  2. Precision measurement of the integrated luminosity of the data taken by BESIII at center-of-mass energies between 3.810 GeV and 4.600 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablikim, M.; N. Achasov, M.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; J. Ambrose, D.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; R. Baldini, Ferroli; Ban, Y.; W. Bennett, D.; V. Bennett, J.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; A. Briere, R.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; A. Cetin, S.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; F. De, Mori; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; P. Guo, Y.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; Hao, X. Q.; A. Harris, F.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; C. Ke, B.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; B. Kolcu, O.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; S. Lange, J.; M., Lara; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; X. Lin(Lin, D.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhiqing, Liu; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; E. Maas, F.; Maggiora, M.; A. Malik, Q.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; G. Messchendorp, J.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; E. Mitchell, R.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; C. Morales, Morales; Moriya, K.; Yu. Muchnoi, N.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; B. Nikolaev, I.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; H. Rashid, K.; F. Redmer, C.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; H. Thorndike, E.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; S. Varner, G.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Yadi, Wang; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; A. Zafar, A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; BESIII Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    From December 2011 to May 2014, about 5 fb-1 of data were taken with the BESIII detector at center-of-mass energies between 3.810 GeV and 4.600 GeV to study the charmonium-like states and higher excited charmonium states. The time-integrated luminosity of the collected data sample is measured to a precision of 1% by analyzing events produced by the large-angle Bhabha scattering process. Supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (2015CB856700), National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (11125525, 11235011, 11322544, 11335008, 11425524), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Large-Scale Scientific Facility Program, Joint Large-Scale Scientific Facility Funds of the NSFC and CAS (11179007, U1232201, U1332201) CAS (KJCX2-YW-N29, KJCX2-YW-N45), 100 Talents Program of CAS, INPAC and Shanghai Key Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology, German Research Foundation DFG (Collaborative Research Center CRC-1044), Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Italy; Ministry of Development of Turkey (DPT2006K-120470), Russian Foundation for Basic Research (14-07-91152), U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-04ER41291, DE-FG02-05ER41374, DE-FG02-94ER40823, DESC0010118), U.S. National Science Foundation, University of Groningen (RuG) and the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (GSI), Darmstadt and WCU Program of National Research Foundation of Korea (R32-2008-000-10155-0)

  3. The Relationships Between the Center of Mass Position and the Trunk, Hip, and Knee Kinematics in the Sagittal Plane: A Pilot Study on Field-Based Video Analysis for Female Soccer Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasaki Shogo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Athletes with non-contact anterior cruciate ligament tears have common features in the sagittal plane; namely, the body’s center of mass (COM is located posterior to the base of support, the trunk and knee joints are extended, and the hip angle is flexed. However, the relationships among these variables have not been assessed in field-based movements. This study sought to determine relationships between distances from the COM to the base of support and the trunk, hip, and knee positions in women while playing soccer. Sixty events (29 single-leg landing and 31 single-leg stopping events were analyzed using two-dimensional video analysis. The relationships among the measurement variables were determined using the Pearson’s product-moment correlation coefficient, and stepwise multiple linear regression models were used to explore the relationships between the COM position and the kinematic variables. The distance from the COM to the base of support displayed a moderate negative relationship with the trunk angle (r = - 0.623, p < .0001, r2 = 0.388 and a strong positive relationship with the limb angle (r = 0.869, p < .0001, r2 = 0.755. The limb, knee, and trunk angles were selected in the best regression model (adjusted r2 = 0.953, p < .0001, f2 = 20.277. These findings suggest that an increased trunk angle and a decreased limb angle at initial contact are associated with a safer COM position. Neuromuscular training may be useful for controlling the trunk and lower limb positions during dynamic activities.

  4. The relationships between the center of mass position and the trunk, hip, and knee kinematics in the sagittal plane: a pilot study on field-based video analysis for female soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Shogo; Nagano, Yasuharu; Kaneko, Satoshi; Imamura, Shoichiro; Koabayshi, Takuma; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2015-03-29

    Athletes with non-contact anterior cruciate ligament tears have common features in the sagittal plane; namely, the body's center of mass (COM) is located posterior to the base of support, the trunk and knee joints are extended, and the hip angle is flexed. However, the relationships among these variables have not been assessed in field-based movements. This study sought to determine relationships between distances from the COM to the base of support and the trunk, hip, and knee positions in women while playing soccer. Sixty events (29 single-leg landing and 31 single-leg stopping events) were analyzed using two-dimensional video analysis. The relationships among the measurement variables were determined using the Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient, and stepwise multiple linear regression models were used to explore the relationships between the COM position and the kinematic variables. The distance from the COM to the base of support displayed a moderate negative relationship with the trunk angle (r = -0.623, p < .0001, r(2) = 0.388) and a strong positive relationship with the limb angle (r = 0.869, p < .0001, r(2) = 0.755). The limb, knee, and trunk angles were selected in the best regression model (adjusted r(2) = 0.953, p < .0001, f(2) = 20.277). These findings suggest that an increased trunk angle and a decreased limb angle at initial contact are associated with a safer COM position. Neuromuscular training may be useful for controlling the trunk and lower limb positions during dynamic activities. PMID:25964811

  5. Experimental tests of quantum electrodynamics through the measurement of the reactions e+e- → e+e-, e+e- → γγ, and e+e- → μ+μ- at a center-of-mass energy of 5.2 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report measurements of the reactions e+e- → e+e-, e+e- → γγ, and e+e- → μ+μ- at angles close to 900, relative to Bhabha scattering, at a center-of-mass energy of 5.2 GeV. The results are found to be in agreement with the predictions of quantum electrodynamics

  6. Measurement of the W and Z cross sections in the electron channel for proton-antiproton collisions at center of mass energy = 1.96 TeV and extraction of the W total width from the ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, John Michael

    This dissertation presents measurements of the inclusive production cross sections for W and Z gauge bosons decaying through the electron channel with pp¯ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The ratio of these cross sections is then used to extract the W total width. The Standard Model (SM) of electroweak and strong interactions is a collection of theories which together encompass what is currently known about the elementary particles that make up matter and the forces through which they interact. Experimentalists are constantly searching for violations of the Standard Model by making precision measurements of predicted interactions. The decay of the W boson is one such interaction. The rate of its decay is reflected in its width which is predicted to high precision using Standard Model-based calculations. Therefore, a high precision experimental width measurement would be very sensitive to any such violation. In principle the W and Z boson production cross sections could also be good Standard Model tests. However, a precise knowledge of integrated luminosity is required which is unfortunately difficult to obtain at the Tevatron. In fact, the W and Z cross section results can be used to obtain a more precise luminosity measurement. The data set consists of a total integrated luminosity of 177 pb -1 collected from September 2002 to September 2003 using the DO detector at Fermilab. From this, 97757 W → enu and 7928 Z → ee candidates are found where at least one electron having a matched track is present within the central region of the detector (|etadet| pdf+/-190 lumipb , s ZxBZ→e+e- =267.7+/-3.0 stat+/-4.8 sys+4.0-3.3 pdf+/-17.4 lumipb , and R≡ sWxBW→e +/-ns ZxBZ→e+ e-=10.94+/- 0.13stat +/-0.16sys +0.12-0.08 pdf. Sources of uncertainty arise from limited statistics (stat), systematic effects (sys), parton distribution function parameters (pdf) and integrated luminosity (lumi). Indirect measurements of the branching ratio, Br( W → e

  7. Measurement of the $e^{+}e^{-} \\to \\eta J/\\psi$ cross section and search for $e^{+}e^{-} \\to \\pi^{0} J/\\psi$ at center-of-mass energies between 3.810 and 4.600~GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Han, Y L; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, H P; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Kupsc, A; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leng, C; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X M; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, R Q; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Pu, Y N; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ren, H L; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Santoro, V; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Xu, Z R; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2015-01-01

    Using data samples collected with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII collider at center-of-mass energies from 3.810 to 4.600 GeV, we perform a study of $e^{+}e^{-} \\to \\eta J/\\psi$ and $\\pi^0 J/\\psi$. Statistically significant signals of $e^{+}e^{-} \\to \\eta J/\\psi$ are observed at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 4.190, 4.210, 4.220, 4.230, 4.245, 4.260, 4.360 and 4.420 GeV, while no signals of $e^{+}e^{-} \\to \\pi^{0} J/\\psi$ are observed. The measured energy-dependent Born cross section for $e^{+}e^{-} \\to \\eta J/\\psi$ shows an enhancement around 4.2~GeV. The measurement is compatible with an earlier measurement by Belle, but with a significantly improved precision.

  8. The e^+e^- -> 3(\\pi^+\\pi^-), 2(\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0) and K^+K^-2(\\pi^+\\pi^-) Cross Sections at Center-of-Mass Energies 0.5--4.5 GeV Measured with Initial-State Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-02-08

    We study the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} 3({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}){gamma}, 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}){gamma} and K{sup +}K{sup -} 2({pi}{sup +} {sup -}){gamma}, with the photon radiated from the initial state. About 20,000, 33,000 and 4,000 fully reconstructed events, respectively, have been selected from 232 fb{sup -1} of BABAR data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy, so that these data can be compared with the corresponding direct e{sup +}e{sup -} measurements. From the 3({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}) and K{sup +}K{sup -} 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) mass spectra, the cross sections for the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} 3({pi}{sup +}{sup -}), e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}) and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) are measured for center-of-mass energies from production threshold to 4.5 GeV. The uncertainty in the cross section measurement is typically 6-15%. We observe the J/{psi} in all these final states and measure the corresponding branching fractions.

  9. An alternative flight control system for an unmanned aircraft whose flight control system fails during a longitudinal flight with constant forward velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta M. BALINT

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we build up a flight control system for an unmanned aircraft whose flightcontrol system fails during a longitudinal flight with constant forward velocity. This task isaccomplished using only the system of differential equations, which governs the movement of theaircraft around its center of mass. Numerical simulation is given.

  10. Hyperon production in proton-nucleus collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √(sNN) = 41.6 GeV at HERA-B and design of silicon microstrip detectors for tracking at LHCb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topics of this thesis are the measurements of hyperon production in protonnucleus collisions at √(s)=41.6 GeV with the Hera-B detector located at DESY, Hamburg (Germany), and the design of silicon microstrip sensors for the LHCb experiment at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland). Λ, Ξ and Ω hyperons and their antiparticles were reconstructed from 113.5 . 106 inelastic collisions of protons with fixed carbon, titanium and tungsten targets. With these samples, antiparticle-to-particle ratios, cross sections integrated for the accessible kinematic region of Hera-B and single differential cross sections as function of transverse momentum, dσ/dpT2 (for Λ and Ξ) and rapidity, dσ/dy (for Λ only), have been been measured as well as the dependence of these quantities on the atomic number of the target nucleus, as parameterized using the Glauber model. The obtained ratios follow the same trend as found for the energy dependence of measurements from nucleus-nucleus collisions. Silicon microstrip sensors have been designed for the tracking system of the LHCb detector. Evaluating the performance in beam tests at CERN, the strip geometry and sensor thickness were varied optimizing for a large signal-to-noise ratio, a small number of read-out channels and a low occupancy. The detector is currently being built to be operational for first proton-proton collisions in autumn 2007. (orig.)

  11. Hyperon production in proton-nucleus collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 41.6 GeV at HERA-B and design of silicon microstrip detectors for tracking at LHCb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agari, Michaela

    2006-07-01

    The topics of this thesis are the measurements of hyperon production in protonnucleus collisions at {radical}(s)=41.6 GeV with the Hera-B detector located at DESY, Hamburg (Germany), and the design of silicon microstrip sensors for the LHCb experiment at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland). {lambda}, {xi} and {omega} hyperons and their antiparticles were reconstructed from 113.5 . 10{sup 6} inelastic collisions of protons with fixed carbon, titanium and tungsten targets. With these samples, antiparticle-to-particle ratios, cross sections integrated for the accessible kinematic region of Hera-B and single differential cross sections as function of transverse momentum, d{sigma}/dp{sub T}{sup 2} (for {lambda} and {xi}) and rapidity, d{sigma}/dy (for {lambda} only), have been been measured as well as the dependence of these quantities on the atomic number of the target nucleus, as parameterized using the Glauber model. The obtained ratios follow the same trend as found for the energy dependence of measurements from nucleus-nucleus collisions. Silicon microstrip sensors have been designed for the tracking system of the LHCb detector. Evaluating the performance in beam tests at CERN, the strip geometry and sensor thickness were varied optimizing for a large signal-to-noise ratio, a small number of read-out channels and a low occupancy. The detector is currently being built to be operational for first proton-proton collisions in autumn 2007. (orig.)

  12. Measurement of the e{sup +}e{sup –} → ηπ{sup +}π{sup –} cross section in the center-of-mass energy range 1.22–2.00 GeV with the SND detector at the VEPP-2000 collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shtol, D. A., E-mail: D.A.Shtol@inp.nsk.su [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    In the experiment with the SND detector at the VEPP-2000 e+e– collider the cross section for the process e{sup +}e{sup –} → ηπ{sup +}π{sup –} has been measured in the center-of-mass energy range from 1.22 to 2.00 GeV. Obtained results are in agreement with previous measurements and have better accuracy. The energy dependence of the e{sup +}e{sup –} → ηπ{sup +}π{sup –} cross section has been fitted with the vector-meson dominance model. From this fit the product of the branching fractions B(ρ(1450) → ηπ{sup +}π{sup –})B(ρ(1450) → π{sup +}π{sup –}) has been extracted and compared with the same products for (ρ(1450) → ωΠ{sup 0} and (ρ(1450) → π{sup +}π{sup –} decays. The obtained cross section data have been also used to test the conservation of vector current hypothesis.

  13. Method to Compute CT System MTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallman, Jeffrey S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-05-03

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) is the normalized spatial frequency representation of the point spread function (PSF) of the system. Point objects are hard to come by, so typically the PSF is determined by taking the numerical derivative of the system's response to an edge. This is the method we use, and we typically use it with cylindrical objects. Given a cylindrical object, we first put an active contour around it, as shown in Figure 1(a). The active contour lets us know where the boundary of the test object is. We next set a threshold (Figure 1(b)) and determine the center of mass of the above threshold voxels. For the purposes of determining the center of mass, each voxel is weighted identically (not by voxel value).

  14. Noise, Bifurcations, and Modeling of Interacting Particle Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Mier-y-Teran-Romero, Luis; Forgoston, Eric; Schwartz, Ira B.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the stochastic patterns of a system of communicating, or coupled, self-propelled particles in the presence of noise and communication time delay. For sufficiently large environmental noise, there exists a transition between a translating state and a rotating state with stationary center of mass. Time delayed communication creates a bifurcation pattern dependent on the coupling amplitude between particles. Using a mean field model in the large number limit, we show how the complete...

  15. Cargo-Positioning System for Next-Generation Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holladay, Jon; Colton, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    A report discusses a proposed system for mounting loaded pallets in the cargo bay of a next-generation space-shuttle-like spacecraft, such that the center of mass of the cargo would lie within a 1-in. (2.54-cm) cube that would also contain the center of mass of the spacecraft. The system would include (1) an algorithm for planning the locations of the pallets, given the geometric and weight properties of the pallets, and the geometric restrictions of the cargo bay; (2) quick-connect/quick-disconnect mounting mechanisms similar to those now used on air hoses; (3) other mounting mechanisms, comprising mostly spring-loaded pins, in a locking subsystem that would prevent shifting of the pallets under load; and (4) mechanisms for performing fine position adjustments to satisfy the center-of-mass requirement. The position- adjusting mechanisms would be motor-driven lead-screw mechanisms in groups of three - one for positioning each pin of the locking subsystem along each of three mutually perpendicular coordinate axes. The system also would include a triple-threaded screw that would provide compensation for thermal expansion or contraction of the spacecraft.

  16. Reconstruction and study of the multi-strange baryons in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 200 GeV, with the Star experiment at RHIC; Reconstruction et etude des baryons multi-etranges dans les collisions d'ions lourds ultra-relativistes a {radical}S{sub NN} = 200 GeV avec l'experience STAR au RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faivre, J

    2004-10-15

    The study of strangeness production is essential for the understanding of processes occurring in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Strangeness production is directly linked to the phase of deconfined partons that followed these collisions: the quark and gluon plasma. STAR, one of the 4 experiments at RHIC collider, is a perfect tool for studying the multi-strange {xi} and {omega} particles. We have devised a {xi} and {omega} reconstruction program using signals from the STAR time projection chamber. We have worked out a multi-variable selection method for extracting the signals from the combinative background: the linear discriminant analysis. We have applied it to Au-Au collisions at 200 GeV (in the center of mass frame) to improve the accuracy of previous results. The {omega} and anti-{omega} production rates have been obtained for 3 ranges of centrality as well as their radial flow and their kinetic uncoupling temperatures. The gain on the relative uncertainty is between 15 and 30% according to the variable. The average speed of the radial flow is 0.50 {+-} 0.02 and the kinetic uncoupling temperature is 132 {+-} 20 MeV which indicates that multi-strange baryons uncouple in hadronic medium earlier that lighter particles like pions, kaons and protons. However, uncertainty intervals remain too broad to draw strong conclusions. (A.C.)

  17. Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Mission Attitude Ground System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlak, Joseph E.; Superfin, Emil; Raymond, Juan C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the attitude ground system (AGS) currently under development for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission. The primary responsibilities for the MMS AGS are definitive attitude determination, validation of the onboard attitude filter, and computation of certain parameters needed to improve maneuver performance. For these purposes, the ground support utilities include attitude and rate estimation for validation of the onboard estimates, sensor calibration, inertia tensor calibration, accelerometer bias estimation, center of mass estimation, and production of a definitive attitude history for use by the science teams. Much of the AGS functionality already exists in utilities used at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center with support heritage from many other missions, but new utilities are being created specifically for the MMS mission, such as for the inertia tensor, accelerometer bias, and center of mass estimation. Algorithms and test results for all the major AGS subsystems are presented here.

  18. Two-particle system in noncommutative space with preserved rotational symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Gnatenko, Kh P

    2016-01-01

    We consider a system of two particles in noncommutative space which is rotationally invariant. It is shown that the coordinates of the center-of-mass position and the coordinates of relative motion satisfy noncommutative algebra with corresponding effective tensors of noncommutativity. The hydrogen atom is studied as a two-particle system. We find the corrections to the energy levels of the hydrogen atom up to the second order over the parameter of noncommutativity.

  19. Challenges in calculating molecular systems with Coulomb interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirnosov, Nikita; Sharkey, Keeper; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2014-03-01

    The highly accurate quantum mechanical calculations are not only crucial for high-resolution experimental data verification, but may also serve as a guide in the field of exotic systems exploration. Including all non-relativistic effects in a single-step variational approach and rigorously separating out the center of mass motion allows us to build a reliable model for calculating bound states of molecular systems with Coulomb interactions. In these calculations the wave function of the system is expanded in terms of explicitly correlated Gaussian (ECG) basis functions. Examples of calculations of energies and other properties of some molecular systems will be presented.

  20. Langevin model for a Brownian system with directed motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambía, Francisco; Híjar, Humberto

    2016-08-01

    We propose a model for an active Brownian system that exhibits one-dimensional directed motion. This system consists of two Brownian spherical particles that interact through an elastic potential and have time-dependent radii. We suggest an algorithm by which the sizes of the particles can be varied, such that the center of mass of the system is able to move at an average constant speed in one direction. The dynamics of the system is studied theoretically using a Langevin model, as well as from Brownian Dynamics simulations.

  1. Analysis on motion of Earth’s center of mass observed with CHAMP mission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HWANG; CheinWay

    2008-01-01

    Geocenter motion (GCM) is one important topic for constructing and maintaining the terrestrial reference frame and its applications. GCM is studied from CHAMP with the multi-step approach in this paper. Geometric orbits of CHAMP in 2001-2006 are precisely determined with the kinematic method only from the satel-lite-borne GPS zero-difference data. Then a GCM time series is estimated from the precise kinematic orbits based on the theory of satellite dynamics to fit the CHAMP’s real geometric orbits. We compare the series with the geocenter series used in ITRF2005. Then the GCM series are analyzed with Fourier transform and wavelet transformation. The mean motions within 6 years in TX, TY and TZ direc-tions are respectively 0.8 mm, 2.2 mm, and 7.9 mm. The trends of GCM in the three directions are 0.495 mm/a, -0.004 mm/a, and 1.309 mm/a, respectively. The long-term movement (2001-2006) indicates that the crustal figure is changing. The seasonal variations are the main component which may be excitated by the mass redistribution of Earth’s fluid layer, e.g. ocean, atmosphere and continental water. The inter-annual variations are also found in the GCM series measured with CHAMP.

  2. Impact of Center-of-Mass Acceleration on the Performance of Ultramarathon Runners

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Shun-Ping; Sung Wen-Hsu; Kuo Fon-Chu; Kuo Terry B J; Chen Jin-Jong

    2014-01-01

    Ultramarathon races are rapidly gaining popularity in several countries, raising interest for the improvement of training programs. The aim of this study was to use a triaxial accelerometer to compare the three-dimensional centerof- mass accelerations of two groups of ultramarathon runners with distinct performances during different running speeds and distances. Ten runners who participated in the 12-h Taipei International Ultramarathon Race underwent laboratory treadmill testing one month la...

  3. Relative and center-of-mass motion in the attractive Bose-Hubbard model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole Søe; Gammelmark, Søren; Mølmer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    We present first-principles numerical calculations for few-particle solutions of the attractive Bose-Hubbard model with periodic boundary conditions. We show that the low-energy many-body states found by numerical diagonalization can be written as translational superposition states of compact...

  4. Experimental Investigation of Hadron Collisions at the Highest Center-of-Mass Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marc, Baarmand [Florida Institute of Technology; Hohlmann, Marcus [Florida Institute of Technology

    2012-05-31

    In this report, we summarize the research in physics of elementary particles conducted by the Florida Tech DOE supported group at the CMS experiment at CERN, during the last 3-year cycle under this grant.

  5. Cold atoms as a coolant for levitated optomechanical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjit, Gambhir; Geraci, Andrew A

    2014-01-01

    Optically trapped dielectric objects are well suited for reaching the quantum regime of their center of mass motion in an ultra-high vacuum environment. We show that ground state cooling of an optically trapped nanosphere is achievable when starting at room temperature, by sympathetic cooling of a cold atomic gas optically coupled to the nanoparticle. Unlike cavity cooling in the resolved sideband limit, this system requires only a modest cavity finesse and it allows the cooling to be turned off, permitting subsequent observation of strongly-coupled dynamics between the atoms and sphere. Nanospheres cooled to their quantum ground state could have applications in quantum information science or in precision sensing.

  6. Rotor health monitoring and damage detection utilizing a disk spin simulation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2001-08-01

    This paper describes a unique, disk spin simulation system currently being utilized at NASA Glenn Research Center. The system allows for precision controlled spin tests that can facilitate the application of various sensing technologies for in-situ detection of rotor damage. In addition, the disk spin simulation system has the capability for elevated temperatures up to 540°C (1000°F). The current rotor used to simulate a bladed disk consists of a 46 cm(18 in.) diameter, titanium disk with 30 machined gear teeth. The gear design imitates the blades of a compressor or turbine disk. Operating speeds for the system can reach 1000 revolutions per minute. This allows the system to achieve circumferential velocities paralleling those seen in actual aircraft engines. For this study, a new, innovative capacitive sensing system was used to monitor blade tip clearance (i.e., gear tooth clearance). In turn, the sensor information was employed to calculate the change in the center of mass of the rotor system. T he capacitive sensor and corresponding software were analyzed by attaching a localized weight at numerous positions on the disk. Upon calculating the change in the center of mass, the sensitivities of the sensor and software were established. In the end, it is hoped that by studying the motion and position of blades as well as the change in the center of mass of a rotor system, it may be feasible to identify alterations due to damage (e.g., cracks) eitehr in the blades or the disk itself.

  7. Elastic scattering for the system {sup 6}Li+p at near barrier energies with MAGNEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukeras, V.; Pakou, A.; Sgouros, O. [Department of Physics and HINP, The University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Cappuzzello, F.; Bondi, M.; Nicolosi, D. [INFN Laboratory Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95125, Catania, Italy and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95125, Catania (Italy); Acosta, L.; Marquinez-Duran, G.; Martel, I. [Departamento di Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, E-21071, Huelva (Spain); Agodi, C.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Cunsolo, A.; Di Pietro, A.; Fernández-García, J. P.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M. [INFN Laboratory Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95125, Catania (Italy); Alamanos, N. [CEA-Saclay, DAPNIA-SPhN, 91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); De Napoli, M. [INFN - Sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95125, Catania (Italy); Foti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95125, Catania, Italy and INFN - Sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95125, Catania (Italy); and others

    2015-02-24

    Elastic scattering measurements have been performed for the {sup 6}Li+p system in inverse kinematics at the energies of 16, 20, 25 and 29 MeV. The heavy ejectile was detected by the large acceptance MAGNEX spectrometer at the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) in Catania, in the angular range between ∼2{sup 0} and 12{sup 0} in the laboratory system, giving us the possibility to span almost a full angular range in the center of mass system. Results will be presented and discussed for one of the energies.

  8. Maximal temperature in a simple thermodynamical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, De-Chang; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2016-06-01

    Temperature in a simple thermodynamical system is not limited from above. It is also widely believed that it does not make sense talking about temperatures higher than the Planck temperature in the absence of the full theory of quantum gravity. Here, we demonstrate that there exist a maximal achievable temperature in a system where particles obey the laws of quantum mechanics and classical gravity before we reach the realm of quantum gravity. Namely, if two particles with a given center of mass energy come at the distance shorter than the Schwarzschild diameter apart, according to classical gravity they will form a black hole. It is possible to calculate that a simple thermodynamical system will be dominated by black holes at a critical temperature which is about three times lower than the Planck temperature. That represents the maximal achievable temperature in a simple thermodynamical system.

  9. Analysis of the Reference Systems of Modern Selenographic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedyev, Yuri; Petrova, Natalia; Andreev, Alexey; Demina, Natalya

    2016-07-01

    In this work analysis of the reference systems of modern selenographic systems was made. The center of the Moon's mass position relative to its center of figure was determined from the data of "Clementine" and "Kaguya" missions and "ULCN" and "KSC-1162" catalogues. The knowledge of the Moon's center of mass position relative to its center of figure is important for researches of the lunar origin, structure and evolution and in terms of precision solutions circumlunar navigation tasks. At the present this task is the most relevant and demanded for cosmic lunar missions.The expansions by spherical harmonics N=5 degree and order of the lunar function h (λ, β) using the package ASNI USTU were executed. Module of the expansion of the local area to surfaces to full sphere was used. The parameters of cosmic missions are given for comparison (SAI; Bills, Ferrari). The normalized coefficients from expansions for eight sources of hypsometric information are obtained: "Clementine" (N=40), "KSC-1162" (N=5), "Kiev" (N=5), "SAI" (N=10; Chuikova (1975)), "Bills, Ferrari", "Kaguya" (Selena, Japan mission), "ULCN" (The Unified Lunar Control Network 2005). The displacements of the lunar center of figure relative to the lunar center of the mass were defined from equations (Chuikova (1975)): Δ ξ = C_{11} √{3}, Δ η= S_{11} √{3}, Δ ζ = C_{10} √{3}, where ξ is the axis directed towards the Earth, η is equatorial axis directed perpendicularly to ξ , ζ is rotation axis of the Moon, C_{11} , S_{11} , C_{10} are the normalized amplitudes of the harmonics of the first order expansion of the relief. After that we considered: - mathematical models in the form of expansions in spherical functions - methods for estimating the model parameters; - information technology data processing. As a model describing the behavior of the relief on the lunar sphere is used the expansion of the height in a series of spherical harmonics (Sagitov (1979)) in the form of a regression model

  10. On Antiproton Production in 158 GeV/c Proton-Carbon Collisions and Nuclear Temperature of Interacting System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Hu Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The multisource thermal model is used in this paper to analyze the antiproton (p¯ production process in high-energy proton-carbon (p-C collisions. The transverse momentum, Feynman variable, and rapidity distributions of antiprotons in the nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass system are calculated by using the model. The modeling results are compared and found to be in agreement with the experimental data measured by the NA49 Collaboration at 158 GeV/c beam momentum. As a parameter, the nuclear temperature of interacting system extracted from the antiproton spectrum is estimated to be about 150 MeV.

  11. An Integrated X-Ray/Optical Tomography System for Pre-clinical Radiation Research

    OpenAIRE

    Eslami, S.; Yang, Y.; Wong, J; Patterson, M S; Iordachita, I.

    2013-01-01

    The current Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is poor for localizing small soft tissue targets for irradiation or tumor models growing in a soft tissue environment. Therefore, an imaging method complementary to x-ray CT is required to localize the soft tissue target’s Center of Mass (CoM) to within 1 mm. In this paper, we report the development of an integrated x-ray/bioluminescence imaging/tomography (BLI/BLT) system to provide a pre-clinical, high resolution irradiation syste...

  12. Single Gaussian Chaotic Neuron: Numerical Study and Implementation in an Embedded System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Torres-Treviño

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial Gaussian neurons are very common structures of artificial neural networks like radial basis function. These artificial neurons use a Gaussian activation function that includes two parameters called the center of mass (cm and sensibility factor (λ. Changes on these parameters determine the behavior of the neuron. When the neuron has a feedback output, complex chaotic behavior is displayed. This paper presents a study and implementation of this particular neuron. Stability of fixed points, bifurcation diagrams, and Lyapunov exponents help to determine the dynamical nature of the neuron, and its implementation on embedded system illustrates preliminary results toward embedded chaos computation.

  13. Assessment of alternate procedures for the seismic analysis of multiply supported piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When response spectrum methods are used in the seismic analysis of piping systems the response due to inertial action, the dynamic response, and the response due to the time varying differential motions of the support points (the pseudo-static response) must be determined. In this study the adequacy and the degree of conservatism associated with the uniform response spectrum method, the center of mass response spectrum method and fourteen variants of the independent response spectrum method to compute the dynamic response and five different methods to compute the pseudo-static response were evaluated. For this purpose a sample of six piping systems, two of which were subjected to thirty-three earthquakes, were studied. For each system and seismic excitation a multiple independent support excitation time history analysis was developed and used to provide a best estimate of true response and to form the basis for comparison. A combination procedure to calculate the total responses is considered as well. Results are presented and compared to the corresponding responses evaluated using the current uniform response spectrum method and the center of mass response spectra approach. Based on the results, recommendations concerning the use of the methods were developed

  14. Measurement Of The Center-of-mass Energy Dependence Of Isolated Direct Photon Production In Proton-antiproton Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Partos, D S

    2001-01-01

    We present a measurement of the s dependence of isolated prompt photon production in hadronic collisions. Prompt photon samples from 1.8 TeV and 0.63 TeV pp¯ collisions were recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. Two independent background subtraction methods, shower shape and conversion rates, were calibrated and used to calculate the photon cross sections. The shapes of the measured cross sections as a function of photon transverse momentum were not adequately predicted by current calculations of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). One possible explanation for the disagreement between data and theory, an incorrect parameterization of the proton's parton distribution function, is excluded by a comparison of the cross sections as a function of photon xT, the fraction of the proton's momentum carried by the photon.

  15. Influence of the velocity vector base relocation to the center of mass of the interrogation area on PIV accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouba Jan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at modification of calculation algorithm used in data processing from PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry method. The modification of standard Multi-step correlation algorithm is based on imaging the centre of mass of the interrogation area to define the initial point of the respective vector, instead of the geometrical centre. This paper describes the principle of initial point-vector assignment, the corresponding data processing methodology including the test track analysis. Both approaches are compared within the framework of accuracy in the conclusion. The accuracy test is performed using synthetic and real data.

  16. Inelastic scattering of light by a cold trapped atom: Effects of the quantum center-of-mass motion

    CERN Document Server

    Bienert, M; Morigi, G; Bienert, Marc; Merkel, Wolfgang; Morigi, Giovanna

    2005-01-01

    The light scattered by a cold trapped ion, which is in the stationary state of laser cooling, presents features due to the mechanical effects of atom-photon interaction. These features appear as additional peaks (sidebands) in the spectrum of resonance fluorescence. Among these sidebands the literature has discussed the Stokes and anti-Stokes components, namely the sidebands of the elastic peak. In this manuscript we show that the motion also gives rise to sidebands of the inelastic peaks. These are not always visible, but, as we show, can be measured in parameter regimes which are experimentally accessible.

  17. Deformation Effect on the Center-of-Mass Correction Energy in Nuclei Ranging from Oxygen to Calcium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Peng-Wei; SUN Bao-Yuan; MENG Jie

    2009-01-01

    The microscopic c.m. correction energies for nuclei ranging from oxygen to calcium are systematically calculated by both spherical and axially deformed relativistic mean-field (RMF) models with the effective interaction PK1. The microscopic c.m. correction energies strongly depend on the isospin as well as deformation and deviate from the phenomenological ones. The deformation effect is discussed in detail by comparing the deformed with the spherical RMF calculation. It is found that the direct and exchange terms of the c.m. correction energies are strongly correlated with the density distribution of nuclei and are suppressed in the deformed case.

  18. 1000-TeV in the Center-Of-Mass: Introduction to High-Energy Storage Rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjorken, J D

    1982-09-01

    The lecture discusses, in a pedagogic way, a hypothetical 500 TeV proton storage ring accelerator. It gives machine parameters, discusses linear optics and betatron motions, surveys questions of errors, tolerances and nonlinear resonances, and discusses some of the demands on the detection apparatus, especially the apparent inevitability of multiple interactions per bunch crossing. (GHT)

  19. Multivariate Methods For Hadronic Final States In Electron-positron Collisions At Center Of Mass Energy = 500 Gev

    CERN Document Server

    Pathak, S

    2005-01-01

    We approach the hadronic final state events in a future linear collider at s = 500 GeV from the knowledge discovery (data mining) point of view. We present FastCal, a fast configurable calorimeter Monte Carlo simulator for linear collider detector simulations that produces data at a rate that is 3000 times that of full simulation. Neural networks based on earlystopping are designed for the jet- combinatorial problem. CJNN, a neural network package is presented for use in the linear collider analysis environment. Neural network performances are optimized by implementing an ensemble of neural networks. A binary tree is used to obtain novel automatic cuts on physics variables. Data visualization is introduced as a crucial component of data analysis, and principal component analysis is used to understand data distributions and structures in multiple dimensions. Finally, cluster analyses with fuzzy c-means and demographic clustering are used to partition data automatically in an unsupervised regime, and we sho...

  20. The LUCID detector ATLAS luminosity monitor and its electronic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manghi, F. Lasagni

    2016-07-01

    In 2015 LHC is starting a new run, at higher center of mass energy (13 TeV) and with 25 ns bunch-spacing. The ATLAS luminosity monitor LUCID has been completely rebuilt, both the detector and the electronics, in order to cope with the new running conditions. The new detector electronics features a new read-out board (LUCROD) for signal acquisition and digitization, PMT-charge integration and single-side luminosity measurements, and a revisited LUMAT board for combination of signals from the two detectors. This note describes the new board design, the firmware and software developments, the implementation of luminosity algorithms, the optical communication between boards and the integration into the ATLAS TDAQ system.

  1. User‘s Friendly Interface to the CDF Data Handling System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.Ratnikov

    2001-01-01

    The CDF collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron analyses proton-antiproton interactions at a center-of=mass energy of 2 TeV.during the the collider run starting this year the experiment expects to record 1 Petabyte of data and associated data samples,The Data Handling(DH) system has online and offline components.The DH offline component provides access to the stored data,to stored reconstruction output,to stored Monte-Carlo data samples,and user owned data samples.It serves more than 450 physicists of the collaboration.The extra requirements to the offline component of the Data Handling system are simplicity and convenience for users.More than 50 million events of the CDF Run II data have been already processed using this system.

  2. Trigonometric and elliptic Ruijsenaars-Schneider systems on the complex projective space

    CERN Document Server

    Feher, L

    2016-01-01

    We present a direct construction of compact real forms of the trigonometric and elliptic $n$-particle Ruijsenaars-Schneider systems whose completed center-of-mass phase space is the complex projective space $\\mathbb{CP}^{n-1}$ with the Fubini-Study symplectic structure. These systems are labelled by an integer $p\\in\\{1,\\dots,n-1\\}$ relative prime to $n$ and a coupling parameter $y$ varying in a certain punctured interval around $p\\pi/n$. Our work extends Ruijsenaars's pioneering study of compactifications that imposed the restriction $0systems by Hamiltonian reduction.

  3. An efficient approach to dynamics and control of flexible multibody systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, V. J.; Ng, A. C.; Suleman, A.

    A relatively general formulation for studying the dynamics and control of an arbitrary spacecraft, with interconnected flexible, deployable and articulating structural members, is reviewed which accounts for thermal deflection, transient system properties, shift in the center of mass, shear deformations, rotary inertias and geometric nonlinearities. A rather self-contained, comprehensive, numerical algorithm using system as well as component modes follows which is applicable to a large class of spacecraft configurations of contemporary and future interests. Versatility of the general formulation has been assessed so far through its application to Japan's Space Flyer Unit (SFU); Canadian Mobile Servicing System (MSS); and the recently launched (August 1992) Indian communications satellite INSAT-2. Here the focus is on the dynamics and control studies aimed at the evolving Space Station Freedom.

  4. Influence of projectile breakup in the elastic scattering of the systems 6,7Li+80Se

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardona M.A.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the influence of the breakup channel in the elastic scattering of the 6,7Li+80Se systems, we have measured angular distributions at center- of-mass energies from 13 ≤ Ec.m. ≤ 24 MeV (0.8VCB up to 1.6VCB . They were analyzed within the framework of the optical model to study the energy dependence of the real and imaginary parts of the nuclear potential. The focus was to investigate the threshold anomaly in those weakly bound systems. The behavior of the calculated potentials as a function of energy indicates that our results are consistent with the dispersion relation. The threshold anomaly was observed in the 7Li+80Se system and the breakup threshold anomaly was confirmed for the 6Li+80Se system.

  5. The cryogenic system for the superconducting e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider TESLA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horlitz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    1996-09-01

    The superconducting electron/positron collider TESLA (center of mass energy 500 GeV) requires a cryogenic supply system of total estimated cooling capacities of 33 kW at 2.0 K, 36 kW at 4.5 K, 243 kW at 40/80 K and current lead cooling flow rate (liquefaction power) of 0.2 kg/s. The system is spread over a linear range of about 30 km. A new layout is presented in this paper (reduction of HF - pulse rate from 10/s to 5/s results in reduced heat loads, lower numbers of cryo halls with refrigerators and increased subunit lengths). (author)

  6. The ATLAS FTK system: how to improve the physics potential with a tracking trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Iizawa, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    After a very successful data taking run, the ATLAS experiment [1] is being upgraded to cope with the higher luminosity and higher center of mass energy that the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will provide in the next years. The Fast Tracker (FTK) trigger system, part of the ATLAS trigger upgrade program, is a highly parallel hardware device processor based on a mixture of advanced technologies. Modern, powerful Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) form an important part of the system architecture, and the large level of computing power required for pattern recognition is provided by incorporating standard-cell ASICs named Associative Memory (AM). FTK provides global track reconstruction in the full inner silicon detector, with resolution comparable to the offline algorithms, in approximately 100 microseconds, allowing a fast and precise detection of the primary and secondary vertex information. The track and vertex information is then used by the high-level trigger (HLT) algorithms, allowing highly improved tr...

  7. The ATLAS FTK system: how to improve the physics potential with a tracking trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Iizawa, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    After a very successful data taking run, the ATLAS experiment is being upgraded to cope with the higher luminosity and higher center of mass energy that the Large Hadron Collider will provide in the next years. The Fast Tracker (FTK) trigger system, part of the ATLAS trigger upgrade program, is a highly parallel hardware device designed to operate at the level-1 trigger output rate. FTK is a dedicated processor based on a mixture of advanced technologies. Modern, powerful Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) form an important part of the system architecture, and the large level of computing power required for pattern recognition is provided by incorporating standard-cell ASICs named Associative Memories (AM). FTK provides global track reconstruction in the full inner silicon detector, with resolution comparable to the offline algorithms, in approximately 100 microseconds, allowing a fast and precise detection of the primary and secondary vertex information. The track and vertex information is then used by t...

  8. COLLI-PTB, Neutron Fluence Spectra for 3-D Collimator System by Monte-Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: For optimizing collimator systems (shieldings) for fast neutrons with energies between 10 KeV and 20 MeV. Only elastic and inelastic neutron scattering processes are involved. Isotropic angular distribution for inelastic scattering in the center of mass system is assumed. 2 - Method of solution: The Monte Carlo method with importance sampling technique, splitting and Russian Roulette is used. The neutron attenuation and scattering kinematics is taken into account. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Energy range from 10 KeV to 20 MeV. For the output spectra any bin width is possible. The output spectra are confined to 40 equidistant channels

  9. Macroscopic quantum systems and gravitational phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-energy quantum systems are studied theoretically in light of possible experiments to test the interplay between quantum theory and general relativity. The research focus in this thesis is on quantum systems which can be controlled with very high precision and which allow for tests of quantum theory at novel scales in terms of mass and size. The pulsed regime of opto-mechanics is explored and it is shown how short optical pulses can be used to prepare and characterize quantum states of a massive mechanical resonator, and how some phenomenological models of quantum gravity can be probed. In addition, quantum interferometry with photons and matter-waves in the presence of gravitational time dilation is considered. It is shown that time dilation causes entanglement between internal states and the center-of-mass position and that it leads to decoherence of all composite quantum systems. The results of the thesis show that the interplay between quantum theory and general relativity affects even low-energy quantum systems and that it offers novel phenomena which can be probed in experiments. (author)

  10. TALON and CRADLE: Systems for the rescue of tumbling spacecraft and astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idle, Dunning, V

    1991-01-01

    Advanced pressure suit and tool designs are beginning to allow extravehicular astronauts to repair space vehicles and so increase mission life and system reliability. A common spacecraft failure that is a severe challenge to the rescue mission planner is loss of attitude control resulting in tumbling motion. If an extravehicular astronaut flying the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) 'falls' into a tumble, the result could be loss of life. TALON (Tumble Arresting Large Oscillation Nullifier) is a device capable of capturing a target in an uncontrolled three-axis tumble. CRADLE (Concentric Rotating Astronaut Detumble Lifesaving Equipment) is a similar device sized to rescue a suited astronaut. The two rescue vehicles work on the same basic principle. They are structural shells with articulated limbs which can surround a tumbling target and thus align both the chaser and target centers of mass (CM).

  11. New results related to QGP-like effects in small systems with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Vislavicius, Vytautas

    2016-01-01

    Results on the production of $\\pi^{\\pm}$, $\\textrm{K}^{\\pm}$, $\\textrm{p}(\\bar{\\textrm{p}})$, $\\Lambda(\\bar{\\Lambda})$, $\\Xi^{-} \\left(\\bar{\\Xi}^{+}\\right)$ and $\\Omega^{-} \\left(\\bar{\\Omega}^{+}\\right)$ at midrapidity (${|y|<0.5}$) as a function of multiplicity in $\\sqrt{s}~=~7~\\textrm{TeV}$ pp collisions are reported. Transverse momentum distributions and integrated yields are compared to expectations from statistical hadronization models along with results from different colliding systems and center-of-mass energies. The evolution of spectral shapes with multiplicity show similar patterns to those seen in p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions. The $p_{\\textrm{T}}$-integrated baryon yields relative to pions exhibit a significant strangeness-related enhancement in both pp and p-Pb collisions.

  12. Dynamics and control of the tether elevator/crawler system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, E. C.; Cosmo, M.; Vetrella, S.; Moccia, A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper investigates the dynamics and acceleration levels of a new tethered system for micro- and variable-gravity applications. The system consists of two platforms tethered on opposite sides to the Space Station. A fourth platform, the elevator, is placed in between the Space Station and the upper platform. Variable-g levels on board the elevator are obtained by moving this facility along the upper tether, while microgravity experiments are carried out on board the Space Station. By controlling the length of the lower tether the position of the system center of mass can be maintained on board the Space Station despite variations of the system's distribution of mass. The paper illustrates the mathematical model, the environmental perturbations and the control techniques which have been adopted for the simulation and control of the system dynamics. Two sets of results from two different simulation runs are shown. The first set shows the system dynamics and the acceleration spectra on board the Space Station and the elevator during station-keeping. The second set of results demonstrates the capability of the elevator to attain a preselected g-level.

  13. systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Leonessa

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonlinear robust control-system design framework predicated on a hierarchical switching controller architecture parameterized over a set of moving nominal system equilibria is developed. Specifically, using equilibria-dependent Lyapunov functions, a hierarchical nonlinear robust control strategy is developed that robustly stabilizes a given nonlinear system over a prescribed range of system uncertainty by robustly stabilizing a collection of nonlinear controlled uncertain subsystems. The robust switching nonlinear controller architecture is designed based on a generalized (lower semicontinuous Lyapunov function obtained by minimizing a potential function over a given switching set induced by the parameterized nominal system equilibria. The proposed framework robustly stabilizes a compact positively invariant set of a given nonlinear uncertain dynamical system with structured parametric uncertainty. Finally, the efficacy of the proposed approach is demonstrated on a jet engine propulsion control problem with uncertain pressure-flow map data.

  14. The ATLAS Trigger System: Ready for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Czodrowski, Patrick; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS trigger system has been used successfully for data collection in the 2009-2013 Run 1 operation cycle of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at center-of-mass energies of up to 8 TeV. With the restart of the LHC for the new Run 2 data-taking period at 13 TeV, the trigger rates are expected to rise by approximately a factor of 5. The trigger system consists of a hardware-based first level (L1) and a software-based high-level trigger (HLT) that reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of ~ 1kHz. This presentation will give an overview of the upgrades to the ATLAS trigger system that have been implemented during the LHC shutdown period in order to deal with the increased trigger rates while efficiently selecting the physics processes of interest. These upgrades include changes to the L1 calorimeter trigger, the introduction of a new L1 topological trigger module, improvements in the L1 muon system, and the merging of the previously two-level HLT ...

  15. Effect of Traction Angle on the External Work Performed During Running in Weightlessness on a Treadmill Equipped with a Subject Loading System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosseye, T. P.; Willems, P. A.; Heglund, N. C.

    2008-06-01

    During long duration spaceflight, astronauts regularly run on a treadmill-gravity simulator to mitigate bone and muscle loss. This study compares the biomechanics of running on a treadmill-gravity simulator during parabolic flights with the biomechanics of running on Earth. We designed a treadmill equipped with a gravity-like subject pull-down system (SLS) and transducers that measure ground reaction forces and pull-down forces. From these signals we calculate the external work (Wext) to sustain the movements of the center of mass (COM) of the body. In weightlessness, most subjects spontaneously tilt backwards while running. This posture imitates running down a ~2° slope on Earth. Consequently, the Wext is ~15% smaller on the simulator than during level running on Earth. This effect can be avoided by mounting the SLS on mobile chariots that maintain the pull-down force vertical (as in gravity).

  16. Critical Technologies for the Development of Future Space Elevator Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitherman, David V., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    A space elevator is a tether structure extending through geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) to the surface of the earth. Its center of mass is in GEO such that it orbits the earth in sync with the earth s rotation. In 2004 and 2005, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Institute for Scientific Research, Inc. worked under a cooperative agreement to research the feasibility of space elevator systems, and to advance the critical technologies required for the future development of space elevators for earth to orbit transportation. The discovery of carbon nanotubes in the early 1990's was the first indication that it might be possible to develop materials strong enough to make space elevator construction feasible. This report presents an overview of some of the latest NASA sponsored research on space elevator design, and the systems and materials that will be required to make space elevator construction possible. In conclusion, the most critical technology for earth-based space elevators is the successful development of ultra high strength carbon nanotube reinforced composites for ribbon construction in the 1OOGPa range. In addition, many intermediate technology goals and demonstration missions for the space elevator can provide significant advancements to other spaceflight and terrestrial applications.

  17. Alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector tracking system

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, O

    2009-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is the world largest particle accelerator. It will collide two proton beams at an unprecedented center of mass energy of 14 TeV. ATLAS is equipped with a charge particle tracking system built on two technologies: silicon and drift tube based detectors, composing the ATLAS Inner Detector (ID). The alignment of the tracking system poses a challenge as one should solve a linear equation with almost 36000 degrees of freedom. The required precision for the alignment of the most sensitive coordinates of the silicon sensors is just a few microns. This limit comes from the requirement that the misalignment should not worsen the resolution of the track parameter measurements by more than 20%. So far the proposed alignment algorithms are exercised on several applications. We will present the outline of the alignment approach and results using real data from cosmic rays and large scale computing simulation of physics samples mimicking the ATLAS operation during real data taking. T...

  18. The CDF vertex time projection chamber system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vertex time projection chamber (VTPC) system is one of the major components of the charged particle tracking system for the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The chambers cover about seven units of pseudorapidity (η) and must be capable of handling substantially more than the 30-35 charged particle tracks produced by typical anti pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 1.8 TeV. The chambers are optimized to provide the good pattern recognition in the r-z view required to locate the event vertex, measure the overall event topology, and to complement the r-φ tracking in the large axial wire drift chamber that surrounds them. The chambers provide r-z information using TDC data from sense wire signals. Information on the φ of tracks is obtained from cathode pad signals on a subset of chambers read out by a FADC system. A similar system measures dE/dx of tracks in the forward cones surrounding the exiting beams. Because of the large number of photons that pass through the detector during each collision, novel techniques are required to reduce the amount of material in the chamber. These techniques include a custom surface mount integrated circuit preamplifier, epoxy-graphite and Kapton covered foam structural members, and miniature coaxial signal cables. The mechanical construction of the chamber, radiation length vs angle, and details of the electronics are described. The event reconstruction, corrections, and preliminary performance results for 1.8 TeV anti pp collisions are also discussed. (orig.)

  19. Transverse single spin asymmetrics in heavy flavor production in polarized p+p collisions at center of mass energy = 200 GeV at PHENIX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albataineh, Hisham

    The spin structure of the proton has revealed itself to be extremely complex and is an area of ongoing research. In particular its transverse spin structure remains poorly understood. Large transverse single-spin asymmetries of up to 20%--40% were observed in forward pion production by the E704 collaboration at Fermi lab at large xF at s = 19.4 GeV [161, 162] and have been found by the STAR [113] and BRAHMS experiments [163] to persist at RHIC energies. Such large asymmetries were initially surprising because at leading order, perturbative quantum chromodynamics predicted only small effects. A number of pQCD based models have been developed to explain this phenomenon. Among them are the Sivers effect (transversely asymmetric kT quark and gluon distributions) [78], the Collins effect (transversity distribution in combination with spin-dependent fragmentation function) [180], and the higher twist effect (interference between quark and gluon fields in the initial or final state) [80, 181]. In addition, single-spin azimuthal asymmetries were observed recently in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) experiments i.e. HERMES experiment at DESY and BELLE experiment at KEKB. Measurement of single-spin asymmetries in SIDIS on a transversely polarized hydrogen target at HERMES [105], and the measurement of azimuthal asymmetries in inclusive production of hadron pairs in e+e- annihilation at BELLE [18], provided evidence that Sivers and Collins effect are real physical mechanisms. The transverse single spin asymmetry of high pT muons from open heavy avor production in polarized p+ p collisions at s = 200 GeV has been measured from Run 6 data. The corresponding luminosity used in this analysis is 2.7 pb-1 with average beam polarization about 52% +/- 4.7% for blue beam and 50% +/- 4.8% for yellow beam.

  20. Search for the Higgs Boson Decaying to Two Tau Leptons in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at a Center of Mass Energy of 1.96 Tev

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elagin, Andrey Lvovich [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2011-12-01

    A search for the Higgs boson decaying to $\\tau\\tau$ using 7.8~fb$^{-1}$ of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at 1.96~TeV collected with CDF II detector is presented. The search is sensitive to four production mechanisms of the Higgs boson: ggH, WH, ZH and VBF. Modes where one tau decay leptonically, and another decay, hadronically, are considered. Two novel techniques are developed and used in the search. A Probabilistic Particle Flow Algorithm is used for energy measurements of the hadronic tau candidates. The signal is discriminated from backgrounds by the Missing Mass Calculator, which allows for full invariant mass reconstruction of $\\tau\\tau$ pair. The data are found to be consistent with the background only hypothesis. Therefore a 95\\% confidence level upper limit on the Standard Model Higgs boson cross section was set. At $M_H$$=$120~GeV/$c^2$ observed limit is 14.9$\\times\\sigma_{SM}\\times Br (H → ττ)$.

  1. Search for Supersymmetry with R-parity violation in leptonic final states with the ATLAS detector at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2093982; Flowerdew, Michael

    Supersymmetry with R-parity violation, where the lightest supersymmetric particle can decay into Standard Model particles is an attractive target for collider-based searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. In this thesis, four-lepton events are studied as a possible signature of R-parity-violating supersymmetry, using proton- proton collision events collected by the ATLAS experiment at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 13 TeV. The event selection is optimized for events with low-mass collimated lepton pairs, and the viability of estimating the important $t\\bar{t}Z$ background process from $t\\bar{t}\\gamma$ events is shown. Using the optimized selection, it is found that pair-produced charginos with masses above 1 TeV can be discovered with $3\\sigma$ significance in $10~\\text{fb}^{-1}$ of data.

  2. Evolution of few-cycle pulses in nonlinear dispersive media: Velocity of the center of mass and root-mean-square duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoyko, Yury A.; Drozdov, Arkadiy A.; Kozlov, Sergei A.; Zhang, Xi-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Simple arithmetic dependencies of the velocity of the mass center motion and the root-mean-square duration of initially single-cycle, two-cycle, and Gaussian pulses with a random number of oscillations under the pulse envelope are derived depending on their center frequency, initial duration, and peak field amplitude, as well as on dispersive and nonlinear characteristics of homogeneous isotropic dielectric media. In media with normal group dispersion, it is shown that due to nonresonant dispersion the square of the few-cycle pulse duration increases with distance inversely proportional to the fourth power of the number of input pulse cycles. In media with normal group dispersion, the square of the pulse duration is inversely proportional to the number of input pulse cycles due to cubic nonlinearity. In media with anomalous group dispersion, it is shown that due to cubic nonlinearity, few-cycle pulse self-compression decreases with the reduction of the number of cycles in the initial pulse. This pulse self-compression effect has a threshold nature and terminates at a fixed number of cycles of the input pulse. Such a number of cycles is determined by the input intensity and the central frequency of the pulse, as well as by the dispersive and nonlinear characteristics of the medium.

  3. Center of Mass of Two or More Celestial Bodies as a Basis of Comets and «Black Holes» Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Eugeny F. Orlov

    2012-01-01

    The article considers the questions, arising during rendezvous of two celestial bodies with equal mass, one of which is the Earth and the consequences of such rendezvous to modern civilization, suggests the idea of centers of galaxies mass with anomalously large values of the gravitational fields, which allows to divide them into two types – material filled and hollow.

  4. Measurement of the $W$ Boson Mass in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at a Center of Mass Energy of 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yacoob, Sahal [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2010-06-01

    I present the measurement of the mass of the W Boson in the electron channel using 4.4 fb-1 of p $\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1:96 TeV recorded by the D0 detector operating at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider.

  5. Center of Mass of Two or More Celestial Bodies as a Basis of Comets and «Black Holes» Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugeny F. Orlov

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the questions, arising during rendezvous of two celestial bodies with equal mass, one of which is the Earth and the consequences of such rendezvous to modern civilization, suggests the idea of centers of galaxies mass with anomalously large values of the gravitational fields, which allows to divide them into two types – material filled and hollow.

  6. Similar muscles contribute to horizontal and vertical acceleration of center of mass in forward and backward walking: implications for neural control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, K.; Groote, F. de; Massaad, F.; Meyns, P.; Duysens, J.E.J.; Jonkers, I.

    2012-01-01

    Leg kinematics during backward walking (BW) are very similar to the time-reversed kinematics during forward walking (FW). This suggests that the underlying muscle activation pattern could originate from a simple time reversal, as well. Experimental electromyography studies have confirmed that this i

  7. Interaction and dephasing of center-of-mass quantized excitons in wide ZnSe/Zn0.94Mg0.06Se quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Hans Peter; Schätz, A.; Maier, R.;

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the interaction and dephasing of the excitons in wide ZnSe/Zn0.94Mg0.06Se quantum wells by spectrally resolved, femtosecond four-wave mixing (FWM). Polarization-dependent measurements indicate that excitation-induced dephasing is the dominant FWM process. The biexcitons of the center...... repulsion for coherent excitons. The exciton interaction rates with acoustic and optical phonons are deduced by their temperature dependencies. The acoustic-phonon scattering is found to be strongly reduced in the investigated wide wells due to the reduced accessible phonon wave vector....

  8. Study of the e+e- → μ+μ-γ reaction at center-of-mass energies between 54 and 64 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross section and forward-backward muon charge asymmetry for the e+e-→μ+μ-γ reaction were measured to be σ = 2.82 ± 0.35 pb and A = 0.34 ± 0.10 with the VENUS detector at TRISTAN at = 59.2 GeV for an integrated luminosity of 53.5 pb-1. The measured cross section agrees with the theoretical prediction. The asymmetry result is consistent with the electroweak prediction but not with the QED prediction at the level of 2σ. (orig.)

  9. Reaction plane dependence of neutral pion production in center-of-mass energy of 200 GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC-PHENIX

    OpenAIRE

    Aramaki, Yoki; Collaboration, for the PHENIX

    2009-01-01

    It has been observed in central Au+Au collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) that the yield of neutral pions at high transverse momentum (pT> 5 GeV/c) is strongly suppressed compared to the one expected from p+p collisions scaled by the number of binary collisions. This suppression is considered to be due to the energy lost by hard scattered partons in the medium (jet quenching), which results in a decrease of the yield at a given pT. The magnitude of the suppression depends on ...

  10. SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Swarnalatha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Risk analysis of urban aquatic systems due to heavy metals turns significant due to their peculiar properties viz. persis tence, non-degradab ility, toxicity, and accumulation. Akkulam Veli (AV, an urba n tropical lake in south India is subjected to various environmental stresses due to multiple waste discharge, sand mining, developmental activities, tour ism related activitie s etc. Hence, a comprehensive approach is adopted for risk assessment using modified degree of contamination factor, toxicity units based on numerical sediment quality guidelines (SQGs, and potentialecological risk indices. The study revealed the presence of toxic metals such as Cr, C d, Pb and As and the lake is rated under ‘low ecological risk’ category.

  11. Exploring the free-energy landscapes of biological systems with steered molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L Y

    2011-04-01

    We perform steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations and use the Brownian dynamics fluctuation-dissipation-theorem (BD-FDT) to accurately compute the free-energy profiles for several biophysical processes of fundamental importance: hydration of methane and cations, binding of benzene to T4-lysozyme L99A mutant, and permeation of water through aquaglyceroporin. For each system, the center-of-mass of the small molecule (methane, ion, benzene, and water, respectively) is steered (pulled) at a given speed over a period of time, during which the system transitions from one macroscopic state/conformation (State A) to another one (State B). The mechanical work of pulling the system is measured during the process, sampling a forward pulling path. Then the reverse pulling is conducted to sample a reverse path from B back to A. Sampling a small number of forward and reverse paths, we are able to accurately compute the free-energy profiles for all the afore-listed systems that represent various important aspects of biological physics. The numerical results are in excellent agreement with the experimental data and/or other computational studies available in the literature.

  12. Attitude Ground System (AGS) For The Magnetospheric Multi-Scale (MMS) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Juan C.; Sedlak, Joseph E.; Vint, Babak

    2015-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is a Solar-Terrestrial Probe mission consisting of four identically instrumented spin-stabilized spacecraft flying in an adjustable pyramid-like formation around the Earth. The formation of the MMS spacecraft allows for three-dimensional study of the phenomenon of magnetic reconnection, which is the primary objective of the mission. The MMS spacecraft were launched early on March 13, 2015 GMT. Due to the challenging and very constricted attitude and orbit requirements for performing the science, as well as the need to maintain the spacecraft formation, multiple ground functionalities were designed to support the mission. These functionalities were incorporated into a ground system known as the Attitude Ground System (AGS). Various AGS configurations have been used widely to support a variety of three-axis-stabilized and spin-stabilized spacecraft missions within the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The original MMS operational concept required the AGS to perform highly accurate predictions of the effects of environmental disturbances on the spacecraft orientation and to plan the attitude maneuvers necessary to stay within the science attitude tolerance. The orbit adjustment requirements for formation control drove the need also to perform calibrations that have never been done before in support of NASA GSFC missions. The MMS mission required support analysts to provide fast and accurately calibrated values of the inertia tensor, center of mass, and accelerometer bias for each MMS spacecraft. During early design of the AGS functionalities, a Kalman filter for estimating the attitude, body rates, center of mass, and accelerometer bias, using only star tracker and accelerometer measurements, was heavily analyzed. A set of six distinct filters was evaluated and considered for estimating the spacecraft attitude and body rates using star tracker data only. Four of the six filters are closely related and were compared

  13. A stepwise validation of a wearable system for estimating energy expenditure in field-based research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regular physical activity (PA) is an important contributor to a healthy lifestyle. Currently, standard sensor-based methods to assess PA in field-based research rely on a single accelerometer mounted near the body's center of mass. This paper introduces a wearable system that estimates energy expenditure (EE) based on seven recognized activity types. The system was developed with data from 32 healthy subjects and consists of a chest mounted heart rate belt and two accelerometers attached to a thigh and dominant upper arm. The system was validated with 12 other subjects under restricted lab conditions and simulated free-living conditions against indirect calorimetry, as well as in subjects' habitual environments for 2 weeks against the doubly labeled water method. Our stepwise validation methodology gradually trades reference information from the lab against realistic data from the field. The average accuracy for EE estimation was 88% for restricted lab conditions, 55% for simulated free-living conditions and 87% and 91% for the estimation of average daily EE over the period of 1 and 2 weeks

  14. The ATLAS High Level Trigger Steering Framework and the Trigger 
Configuration System.

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez Cavalcanti, Tiago; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS High Level Trigger Steering Framework and the Trigger 
Configuration System.
 
The ATLAS detector system installed in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) 
at CERN is designed to study proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus 
collisions with a maximum center of mass energy of 14 TeV at a bunch 
collision rate of 40MHz.  In March 2010 the four LHC experiments saw 
the first proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV. Still within the year a 
collision rate of nearly 10 MHz is expected. At ATLAS, events of 
potential interest for ATLAS physics are selected by a three-level 
trigger system, with a final recording rate of about 200 Hz. The first 
level (L1) is implemented in custom hardware; the two levels of 
the high level trigger (HLT) are software triggers, running on large 
farms of standard computers and network devices. 

Within the ATLAS physics program more than 500 trigger signatures are 
defined. The HLT tests each signature on each L1-accepted event; the 
test outcome is recor...

  15. Smed-dynA-1 is a planarian nervous system specific dynamin 1 homolog required for normal locomotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared A. Talbot

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamins are GTPases that are required for separation of vesicles from the plasma membrane and thus are key regulators of endocytosis in eukaryotic cells. This role for dynamin proteins is especially crucial for the proper function of neurons, where they ensure that synaptic vesicles and their neurotransmitter cargo are recycled in the presynaptic cell. Here we have characterized the dynamin protein family in the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea and showed that it possesses six dynamins with tissue specific expression profiles. Of these six planarian homologs, two are necessary for normal tissue homeostasis, and the loss of another, Smed-dynA-1, leads to an abnormal behavioral phenotype, which we have quantified using automated center of mass tracking. Smed-dynA-1 is primarily expressed in the planarian nervous system and is a functional homolog of the mammalian Dynamin I. The distinct expression profiles of the six dynamin genes makes planarians an interesting new system to reveal novel dynamin functions, which may be determined by their differential tissue localization. The observed complexity of neurotransmitter regulation combined with the tools of quantitative behavioral assays as a functional readout for neuronal activity, renders planarians an ideal system for studying how the nervous system controls behavior.

  16. Smed-dynA-1 is a planarian nervous system specific dynamin 1 homolog required for normal locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Jared A; Currie, Ko W; Pearson, Bret J; Collins, Eva-Maria S

    2014-01-01

    Dynamins are GTPases that are required for separation of vesicles from the plasma membrane and thus are key regulators of endocytosis in eukaryotic cells. This role for dynamin proteins is especially crucial for the proper function of neurons, where they ensure that synaptic vesicles and their neurotransmitter cargo are recycled in the presynaptic cell. Here we have characterized the dynamin protein family in the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea and showed that it possesses six dynamins with tissue specific expression profiles. Of these six planarian homologs, two are necessary for normal tissue homeostasis, and the loss of another, Smed-dynA-1, leads to an abnormal behavioral phenotype, which we have quantified using automated center of mass tracking. Smed-dynA-1 is primarily expressed in the planarian nervous system and is a functional homolog of the mammalian Dynamin I. The distinct expression profiles of the six dynamin genes makes planarians an interesting new system to reveal novel dynamin functions, which may be determined by their differential tissue localization. The observed complexity of neurotransmitter regulation combined with the tools of quantitative behavioral assays as a functional readout for neuronal activity, renders planarians an ideal system for studying how the nervous system controls behavior. PMID:24950970

  17. Integrated Orbit, Attitude, and Structural Control System Design for Space Solar Power Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica (Technical Monitor); Moore, Chris (Technical Monitor); Wie, Bong; Roithmayr, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    The major objective of this study is to develop an integrated orbit, attitude, and structural control system architecture for very large Space Solar Power Satellites (SSPS) in geosynchronous orbit. This study focuses on the 1.2-GW Abacus SSPS concept characterized by a 3.2 x 3.2 km solar-array platform, a 500-m diameter microwave beam transmitting antenna, and a 500 700 m earth-tracking reflector. For this baseline Abacus SSPS configuration, we derive and analyze a complete set of mathematical models, including external disturbances such as solar radiation pressure, microwave radiation, gravity-gradient torque, and other orbit perturbation effects. The proposed control system architecture utilizes a minimum of 500 1-N electric thrusters to counter, simultaneously, the cyclic pitch gravity-gradient torque, the secular roll torque caused by an o.set of the center-of-mass and center-of-pressure, the cyclic roll/yaw microwave radiation torque, and the solar radiation pressure force whose average value is about 60 N.

  18. Integrated Orbit, Attitude, and Structural Control Systems Design for Space Solar Power Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Bong; Roithmayr, Carlos M.

    2001-01-01

    The major objective of this study is to develop an integrated orbit, attitude, and structural control systems architecture for very large Space Solar Power Satellites (SSPS) in geosynchronous orbit. This study focuses on the 1.2-GW Abacus SSPS concept characterized by a 3.2 x 3.2 km solar-array platform, a 500-m diameter microwave beam transmitting antenna, and a 500 x 700 m earth-tracking reflector. For this baseline Abacus SSPS configuration, we derive and analyze a complete set of mathematical models, including external disturbances such as solar radiation pressure, microwave radiation, gravity-gradient torque, and other orbit perturbation effects. The proposed control systems architecture utilizes a minimum of 500 1-N electric thrusters to counter, simultaneously, the cyclic pitch gravity-gradient torque, the secular roll torque caused by an offset of the center-of-mass and center-of-pressure, the cyclic roll/yaw microwave radiation torque, and the solar radiation pressure force whose average value is about 60 N.

  19. Stability analysis of a multibody system model for coupled slosh-vehicle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichkawde, Chetan; Harish, P. M.; Ananthkrishnan, N.

    2004-08-01

    The coupled slosh-vehicle dynamics of a rigid body in planar atmospheric flight carrying a sloshing liquid is considered as a multibody system with the sloshing motion modelled as a simple pendulum. The coupled, non-linear equations for the four-degree-of-freedom multibody system are derived using the method of Lagrangian dynamics. Careful non-dimensionalization reveals two crucial parameters that determine the extent of coupling between the rigid body and slosh modes, and also two important frequency parameters. Using a two-parameter continuation method, critical combinations of these four parameters for which the coupled slosh-vehicle dynamics can become unstable are computed. Results are displayed in the form of neutral stability curves (stability boundaries) in parameter space, and an analytical expression incorporating the four parameters that represents the neutral stability curves is obtained. Reduced-order linearized models and key transfer functions are derived in an effort to understand the instability phenomenon. Physically, the sloshing motion is seen to induce a static instability, sometimes called tumbling, in the vehicle pitch dynamics, depending on the slosh mass fraction and the location of the slosh pendulum hinge point above the rigid vehicle center of mass.

  20. Reducing Pointing Errors During Cassini Reaction Control System Orbit Trim Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Farheen

    2013-01-01

    The effect of altering a gain parameter in the Cassini reaction control system (RCS) delta-V controller on the maneuver execution errors during orbit trim maneuvers (OTMs) is explored. Cassini consists of two reaction control thruster branches (A & B) each with eight thrusters. Currently, the B-branch is operational while the A-branch serves as a back-up. The four Z-thrusters control the X and Y-axes, while the four Y-thrusters control the Z-axis. During an OTM, the Z-thrusters fire to maintain the X and Y-axes pointing within an attitude control dead-zone (-10 to 10 milliradians). The errors do not remain at zero due to pointing error sources such as spacecraft center of mass offset from the geometric center of the Z-facing thrusters, and variability in the thruster forces due to the thruster hardware differences. The delta-V reaction control system (RCS) controller ensures that the attitude error remains within this dead-zone. Gain parameters within the RCS delta-V controller affect the maneuver execution errors. Different parameter values are used to explore effect on these errors. It is found that pointing error decreases and magnitude error increases rapidly for gain parameters 10 times greater than the current parameter values used in the flight software.

  1. The progression of the entropy of a five dimensional psychotherapeutic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badalamenti, A.F.; Langs, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    This paper presents a study of the deterministic and stochastic behavior of the entropy of a 5-dimensional, 2400 state, system across each of six psychotherapeutic sessions. The growth of entropy was found to be logarithmic in each session. The stochastic behavior of a moving 600 second estimator of entropy revealed a Box-Jenkins model of type (1,1,0) - that is, the first difference of the entropy series was first order autoregressive or prior state sensitive. In addition, the patient and therapist entropy series exhibited no significant cross correlation across lags of -300 to +300 seconds. Yet all such pairs of series exhibited high coherency past the frequency of .06 (on a full range of 0 to .5). Furthermore, all the patients and therapists were attracted to a geometric center of mass in 5-dimensional space which was different from the geometric center of the region where the system lived. The process significance of the findings and the relationship between the deterministic and stochastic results are discussed. The paper is then placed in the broader context of our efforts to provide new and meaningful quantitative dimensions and mathematical models to psychotherapy research. 59 refs.

  2. Intrinsic decoherence and classical-quantum correspondence in two coupled delta-kicked rotors

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hwa-Kyun; Kim, Sang Wook

    2002-01-01

    We show that classical-quantum correspondence of center of mass motion in two coupled delta-kicked rotors can be obtained from intrinsic decoherence of the system itself which occurs due to the entanglement of the center of mass motion to the internal degree of freedom without coupling to external environment.

  3. Orientation Control Method and System for Object in Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whorton, Mark Stephen (Inventor); Redmon, Jr., John W. (Inventor); Cox, Mark D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An object in motion has a force applied thereto at a point of application. By moving the point of application such that the distance between the object's center-of-mass and the point of application is changed, the object's orientation can be changed/adjusted.

  4. Satellite Attitude Control System Design Taking into Account the Fuel Slosh and Flexible Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain G. de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of the spacecraft Attitude Control System (ACS becomes more complex when the spacecraft has different type of components like, flexible solar panels, antennas, mechanical manipulators and tanks with fuel. The interaction between the fuel slosh motion, the panel’s flexible motion and the satellite rigid motion during translational and/or rotational manoeuvre can change the spacecraft center of mass position damaging the ACS pointing accuracy. This type of problem can be considered as a Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI where some movable or deformable structure interacts with an internal fluid. This paper develops a mathematical model for a rigid-flexible satellite with tank with fuel. The slosh dynamics is modelled using a common pendulum model and it is considered to be unactuated. The control inputs are defined by a transverse body fixed force and a moment about the centre of mass. A comparative investigation designing the satellite ACS by the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR and Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG methods is done. One has obtained a significant improvement in the satellite ACS performance and robustness of what has been done previously, since it controls the rigid-flexible satellite and the fuel slosh motion, simultaneously.

  5. Laboratory drop towers for the experimental simulation of dust-aggregate collisions in the early solar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Jürgen; Beitz, Eike; Bukhari, Mohtashim; Gundlach, Bastian; Hagemann, Jan-Hendrik; Heißelmann, Daniel; Kothe, Stefan; Schräpler, Rainer; von Borstel, Ingo; Weidling, René

    2014-06-05

    For the purpose of investigating the evolution of dust aggregates in the early Solar System, we developed two vacuum drop towers in which fragile dust aggregates with sizes up to ~10 cm and porosities up to 70% can be collided. One of the drop towers is primarily used for very low impact speeds down to below 0.01 m/sec and makes use of a double release mechanism. Collisions are recorded in stereo-view by two high-speed cameras, which fall along the glass vacuum tube in the center-of-mass frame of the two dust aggregates. The other free-fall tower makes use of an electromagnetic accelerator that is capable of gently accelerating dust aggregates to up to 5 m/sec. In combination with the release of another dust aggregate to free fall, collision speeds up to ~10 m/sec can be achieved. Here, two fixed high-speed cameras record the collision events. In both drop towers, the dust aggregates are in free fall during the collision so that they are weightless and match the conditions in the early Solar System.

  6. Search for critical point indications in long-range correlations by energy and system size scanning in string fusion approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, V. N.; Vechernin, V. V. [Saint Petersburg State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-22

    The ultrarelativistic collisions of heavy and light ions in the center-of-mass energy range from a few up to a hundred GeV per nucleon have been considered in string fusion approach. A Monte Carlo model of proton-proton, proton-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions has been developed, which takes into account both the string fusion and the finite rapidity length of strings, implementing the hadronic scattering through the interaction of color dipoles. It well describes the proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the partonic level without using Glauber model of nuclear collisions. All parameters are fixed using experimental data on inelastic cross section and multiplicity. In the framework of the model, we performed a beam energy and system size scan and studied the behaviour of n-n, pt-n and pt-pt long-range correlation coefficients. The detailed modeling of the event by event charged particles production allowed to provide predictions in the conditions close to the experimental ones allowing a direct comparison to the data.

  7. Search for critical point indications in long-range correlations by energy and system size scanning in string fusion approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultrarelativistic collisions of heavy and light ions in the center-of-mass energy range from a few up to a hundred GeV per nucleon have been considered in string fusion approach. A Monte Carlo model of proton-proton, proton-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions has been developed, which takes into account both the string fusion and the finite rapidity length of strings, implementing the hadronic scattering through the interaction of color dipoles. It well describes the proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the partonic level without using Glauber model of nuclear collisions. All parameters are fixed using experimental data on inelastic cross section and multiplicity. In the framework of the model, we performed a beam energy and system size scan and studied the behaviour of n-n, pt-n and pt-pt long-range correlation coefficients. The detailed modeling of the event by event charged particles production allowed to provide predictions in the conditions close to the experimental ones allowing a direct comparison to the data

  8. SU-E-T-20: A Novel Hybrid CBCT, Bioluminescence and Fluorescence Tomography System for Preclinical Radiation Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, B; Eslami, S; Iordachita, I [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Yang, Y [University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Patterson, M [Hamilton Regional Cancer Ctr., Hamilton, ON (Canada); Wong, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, K [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A novel standalone bioluminescence and fluorescence tomography (BLT and FT) system equipped with high resolution CBCT has been built in our group. In this work, we present the system calibration method and validate our system in both phantom and in vivo environment. Methods: The CBCT is acquired by rotating the animal stage while keeping the x-ray source and detector panel static. The optical signal is reflected by the 3-mirror system to a multispectral filter set and then delivered to the CCD camera with f/1.4 lens mounted. Nine fibers passing through the stage and in contact with the mouse skin serve as the light sources for diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and FT. The anatomical information and optical properties acquired from the CBCT and DOT, respectively, are used as the priori information to improve the BLT/FT reconstruction accuracy. Flat field correction for the optical system was acquired at multiple wavelengths. A home-built phantom is used to register the optical and CBCT coordinates. An absolute calibration relating the CCD photon counts rate to the light fluence rate emitted at animal surface was developed to quantify the bioluminescence power or fluorophore concentration. Results: An optical inhomogeneous phantom with 2 light sources (3mm separation) imbedded is used to test the system. The optical signal is mapped onto the mesh generated from CBCT for optical reconstruction. Our preliminary results show that the center of mass can be reconstructed within 2.8mm accuracy. A live mouse with the light source imbedded is also used to validate our system. Liver or lung metastatic luminescence tumor model will be used for further testing. Conclusion: This hybrid system transforms preclinical research to a level that even sub-palpable volume of cells can be imaged rapidly and non-invasively, which largely extends the scope of radiobiological research. The research is supported by the NCI grant R01CA158100-01.

  9. SU-E-T-20: A Novel Hybrid CBCT, Bioluminescence and Fluorescence Tomography System for Preclinical Radiation Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A novel standalone bioluminescence and fluorescence tomography (BLT and FT) system equipped with high resolution CBCT has been built in our group. In this work, we present the system calibration method and validate our system in both phantom and in vivo environment. Methods: The CBCT is acquired by rotating the animal stage while keeping the x-ray source and detector panel static. The optical signal is reflected by the 3-mirror system to a multispectral filter set and then delivered to the CCD camera with f/1.4 lens mounted. Nine fibers passing through the stage and in contact with the mouse skin serve as the light sources for diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and FT. The anatomical information and optical properties acquired from the CBCT and DOT, respectively, are used as the priori information to improve the BLT/FT reconstruction accuracy. Flat field correction for the optical system was acquired at multiple wavelengths. A home-built phantom is used to register the optical and CBCT coordinates. An absolute calibration relating the CCD photon counts rate to the light fluence rate emitted at animal surface was developed to quantify the bioluminescence power or fluorophore concentration. Results: An optical inhomogeneous phantom with 2 light sources (3mm separation) imbedded is used to test the system. The optical signal is mapped onto the mesh generated from CBCT for optical reconstruction. Our preliminary results show that the center of mass can be reconstructed within 2.8mm accuracy. A live mouse with the light source imbedded is also used to validate our system. Liver or lung metastatic luminescence tumor model will be used for further testing. Conclusion: This hybrid system transforms preclinical research to a level that even sub-palpable volume of cells can be imaged rapidly and non-invasively, which largely extends the scope of radiobiological research. The research is supported by the NCI grant R01CA158100-01

  10. Effect of coulomb interaction on Anderson localization; Effet de l'interaction coulombienne sur la localisation d'Anderson dans des systemes de basses dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waintal, X

    1999-09-10

    We study the quantum mechanics of interacting particles in a disordered system, and in particular, what happens to Anderson localisation when interaction is taken into account. In the first part,one looks at the excited states of two particles in one dimension. For this model, it has been shown (Shepelyansky 1994) that a local repulsive interaction can partially destroy Anderson localisation. Here, we show that this model has similarities with the three-dimensional Anderson model at the metal-insulator transition. In particular, the maximum of rigidity obtained in the spectral statistics correspond to some intermediary statistics that cannot be described by random matrix theory neither by a Poisson statistics. The wave functions show a multifractal behaviour and the spreading of the center of mass of a wave packet is logarithmic in time. The second part deals with the ground state of a finite density of spinless fermions in two dimensions. After the scaling theory of localisation, it was commonly accepted that there was no metal in two dimensions. This idea has been challenged by the observation of a metal-insulator transition in low density electron gas (Kravchenko et al. 1994). We propose a scenario in which a metallic phase occurs between the Anderson insulator and the pinned Wigner crystal. This intermediate phase is characterized by an alignment of the local currents flowing in the system. (author)

  11. The dependence of scattering length on van der Waals interaction and on the reduced-mass of the system in two-atomic collision at cold energies

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, Hasi

    2015-01-01

    The static-exchange model (SEM) and the modified static-exchange model (MSEM) recently introduced by Ray [1] is applied to study the elastic collision between two hydrogen-like atoms when both are in ground states considering the system as a four-body Coulomb problem in the center of mass frame, in which all the Coulomb interaction terms in direct and exchange channels are treated exactly. The SEM includes the non-adiabatic short-range effect due to electron-exchange. The MSEM added in it, the long-range effect due to induced dynamic dipole polarizabilities between the atoms e.g. the Van der Waals interaction. Applying the SEM code in different H-like two-atomic systems, a reduced mass dependence on scattering length is observed. Again applying the MSEM code on H(1s)-H(1s) elastic scattering and varying the minimum values of interatomic distance, the dependence of scattering length on the effective interatomic potential consistent with the existing physics are observed. Both these basic findings in low and co...

  12. Exact non-Born-Oppenheimer wave functions for three-particle Hookean systems with arbitrary masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Hookean model of a three-body problem for particles with arbitrary masses and charges where two of them interact with each other through a Coulomb potential and with the third through a harmonic potential is presented. It is shown that a condition relating the masses to the harmonic coupling constants must be satisfied in order to render this problem separable. A general exact analytic solution written in terms of the relative interparticle coordinates is given as well as general expressions for the total and binding energies of this three-body system. We apply these results to examine electronic, muonic, antiprotonic, and pionic families of non-Born-Oppenheimer Hookean systems. The first contains the atoms or atomic ions: Ps-(e+e-e-), H-(p+e-e-), D-(d+e-e-), T-(p+e-e-), 4He(he+2e-e-), and the following molecular ions: Ps2+(e-e+e+), H2+(e-p+p+), HD+(e-d+p+), HT+(e-t+p+), DT+(e-d+t+), D2+(e-d+d+), T2+(e-t+t+). The muonic and antiprotonic families are similar to the electronic ones except that the species are formed replacing e- by μ- or p-. The pionic family comprises exotic atoms containing at least one pion. We also apply these results to two-electron three-dimensional spherical quantum dots and for these systems we examine the effect of electronic correlation, particularly on the singlet-triplet transitions and on the collective motion of the electrons and center of mass leading to ''floppy''dynamics

  13. Measurement of transverse momentum relative to dijet systems in PbPb and pp collisions at √{s_{NN}}=2.76 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Awad, A.; El Sawy, M.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; de Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. 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G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2016-01-01

    An analysis of dijet events in PbPb and pp collisions is performed to explore the properties of energy loss by partons traveling in a quark-gluon plasma. Data are collected at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV at the LHC. The distribution of transverse momentum ( p T) surrounding dijet systems is measured by selecting charged particles in different ranges of p T and at different angular cones of pseudorapidity and azimuth. The measurement is performed as a function of centrality of the PbPb collisions, the p T asymmetry of the jets in the dijet pair, and the distance parameter R used in the anti- k T jet clustering algorithm. In events with unbalanced dijets, PbPb collisions show an enhanced multiplicity in the hemisphere of the subleading jet, with the p T imbalance compensated by an excess of low- p T particles at large angles from the jet axes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Measurement of transverse momentum relative to dijet systems in PbPb and pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}} = $ 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

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Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schwandt, Joern; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Frensch, Felix; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Maier, Benedikt; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hazi, Andras; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutta, Suchandra; Jain, Sandhya; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukherjee, Swagata; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Kothekar, Kunal; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Boletti, Alessio; Branca, Antonio; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Fanzago, Federica; Gonella, Franco; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Margoni, Martino; Maron, Gaetano; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Michelotto, Michele; Montecassiano, Fabio; Passaseo, Marina; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pegoraro, Matteo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Ventura, Sandro; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Zanetti, Anna; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Tae Jeong; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kaminskiy, Alexandre; Kodolova, Olga; Korotkikh, Vladimir; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Vardanyan, Irina; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Soares, Mara Senghi; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Berruti, Gaia Maria; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Duggan, Daniel; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kirschenmann, Henning; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Piparo, Danilo; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, Rachel; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Cerci, Salim; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Gastler, Daniel; Lawson, Philip; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Saltzberg, David; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova PANEVA, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Derdzinski, Mark; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Incandela, Joe; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Nauenberg, Uriel; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Sun, Werner; Tan, Shao Min; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Wittich, Peter; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Apollinari, Giorgio; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Jung, Andreas Werner; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Low, Jia Fu; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Rossin, Roberto; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bein, Samuel; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Trauger, Hallie; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sady, Alice; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Evans, Andrew; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Ratnikov, Fedor; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Kamon, Teruki; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Mueller, Ryan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Sharma, Archana; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2016-01-01

    An analysis of dijet events in PbPb and pp collisions is performed to explore the properties of energy loss by partons traveling in a quark-gluon plasma. Data are collected at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV at the LHC. The distribution of transverse momentum ($p_{\\mathrm{T}}$) surrounding dijet systems is measured by selecting charged particles in different ranges of $p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ and at different angular cones of pseudorapidity and azimuth. The measurement is performed as a function of centrality of the PbPb collisions, the $p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ asymmetry of the jets in the dijet pair, and the distance parameter R used in the anti-$k_t$ jet clustering algorithm. In events with unbalanced dijets, PbPb collisions show an enhanced multiplicity in the hemisphere of the subleading jet, with the $p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ imbalance compensated by an excess of low-$p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ particles at large angles from the jet axes.

  15. Microscopic Calculation of the Inclusive Electron Scattering Structure Function in 16O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaila, Bogdan; Heisenberg, Jochen H.

    2000-02-01

    We calculate the charge form factor and the longitudinal structure function for 16O and compare with the available experimental data, up to a momentum transfer of 4 fm-1. The ground-state correlations are generated using the coupled-cluster [ exp\\(S\\)] method, together with the realistic v18 NN interaction and the Urbana IX three-nucleon interaction. Center-of-mass corrections are dealt with by adding a center-of-mass Hamiltonian to the usual internal Hamiltonian, and by means of a many-body expansion for the computation of the observables measured in the center-of-mass system.

  16. Microscopic calculation of the inclusive electron scattering structure function in O-16

    CERN Document Server

    Mihaila, B; Mihaila, Bogdan; Heisenberg, Jochen

    2000-01-01

    We calculate the charge form factor and the longitudinal structure function for $^{16}$O and compare with the available experimental data, up to a momentum transfer of 4 fm$^{-1}$. The ground state correlations are generated using the coupled cluster [exp(S}] method, together with the realistic v-18 NN interaction and the Urbana IX three-nucleon interaction. Center-of-mass corrections are dealt with by adding a center-of-mass Hamiltonian to the usual internal Hamiltonian, and by means of a many-body expansion for the computation of the observables measured in the center-of-mass system.

  17. Dynamics and control of orbiting flexible systems: A formulation with applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chun-Ki Alfred

    1992-06-01

    A relatively general formulation for studying the nonlinear dynamics and control of spacecraft with interconnected flexible members in a tree-type topology is developed. The distinctive features of the formulation include the following: (1) It is applicable to a large class of present and future spacecraft with flexible beam and plate type appendages, arbitrary in number and orientation. (2) The members are free to undergo predefined slewing maneuvers to facilitate modelling of sun tracking solar panels and large angle maneuvers of space based robots. (3) Solar radiation induced thermal deformations of flexible members are incorporated in the study. (4) The governing equations of motion are highly nonlinear, nonautonomous and coupled. They are programmed in a modular fashion to help isolate the effects of flexibility, librational motion, thermal deformations, slewing maneuvers, shifting center of mass, higher modes, initial conditions, etc. The first chapter of the thesis presents a general background to the subject and a brief review of the relevant literature on multibody dynamics. This is followed by the kinematics and kinetics of the problem leading to the Lagrangian equations of motion. The third chapter focuses on methodology and development of the computer code suitable for parametric dynamical study and control. Next versatility of the general formulation is illustrated through the analysis of five spacecraft configurations of contemporary interest the next generation of multi-purpose communications spacecraft represented by the INdian SATellite II (IN-SAT II): the First Element Launch (FEL) and the Permanently Manned Configuration (PMC) of the proposed Space Station Freedom; the Mobile Servicing System (MSS) to be developed by Canada for operation on the Space Station; and the Space Flyer Unit (SFU) to be launched by Japan in mid-nineties. In the FEL study, the attention is directed towards interactions between the librational and vibrational dynamics

  18. CHAWS user`s guide: System description and standard operating procedures, Lexington-Blue Grass Army Depot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, S.A.; Shinn, J.H. [eds.

    1993-05-01

    The Chemical Hazard Warning System (CHAWS) is designed to collect meteorological data and to display, in real time, the dispersion of hazardous chemicals that may result from an accidental release. Meteorological sensors have been placed strategically around the Lexington-Blue Grass Army Depot and are used to calculate direction and hazard distance for the release. Based on these data, arrows depicting the release direction and distance traveled are graphically displayed on a computer screen showing a site map of the facility. The objectives of CHAWS are as follows: To determine the trajectory of the center of mass of released material from the measured wind field; to calculate the dispersion of the released material based on the measured lateral turbulence intensity (sigma theta); to determine the height of the mixing zone by measurement of the inversion height and wind profiles up to an altitude of about 1 km at sites that have SODAR units installed; to archive meteorological data for potential use in climatological descriptions for emergency planning; to archive air-quality data for preparation of compliance reports; and to provide access to the data for near real time hazard analysis purposes. CHAWS sites are located at the Pine Bluff Arsenal, Arkansas, Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, Tooele Depot, Utah, Lexington-Blue Grass Depot, Kentucky, and Johnston Island in the Pacific. The systems vary between sites with different features and various types of hardware. The basic system, however, is the same. Nonetheless, we have tailored the manuals to the equipment found at each site.

  19. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Cross Section in the Lepton Plus Jets Final State in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at a Center of Mass Energy of 1.96 TeV Using the CDF II Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhenbin [Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We present a measurement of the single top quark cross section in the lepton plus jets final state using an integrated luminosity corresponding to 7.5 fb-1 of p\\bar p collision data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The single top candidate events are identified by the signature of a charged lepton, large missing transverse energy, and two or three jets with at least one of them identified as originating from a bottom quark. A new Monte Carlo generator POWHEG is used to model the single top quark production processes, which include s-channel, t-channel, and Wt-channel. A neural network multivariate method is exploited to discriminate the single top quark signal from the comparatively large backgrounds. We measure a single top production cross section of $3.04^{+0.57}_{-0.53} (\\mathrm{stat.~+~syst.})$ pb assuming $m_{\\rm top}=172.5$~GeV/$c^2$. In addition, we extract the CKM matrix element value $|V_{tb}|=0.96\\pm 0.09~(\\mathrm{stat.~+~syst.})\\ ± 0.05~(\\mathrm{theory})$ and set a lower limit of $|V_{tb}|>0.78$ at the 95% credibility level.

  20. Search for the production of the standard model z boson in association with W± boson in proton anti-p collisions at 1.96 TeV center of mass energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keung, Justin Kien [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The search for the production of the Standard Model Z boson in association with a W boson is motivated and discussed. This is performed using 4.3 fb-1 of Tevatron Run II data collected with the CDF detector in √s = 1.96 TeV proton anti-proton collisions. This is a signature-based analysis where the W boson decays semileptonically into a high-PT electron or muon plus a neutrino, and where the Z boson decays into two b quark jets (b-jets). We increase the signal-to-background ratio by identifying the b-quarks in the jets with a new neural network-based algorithm. Another neural network then uses kinematic information to distinguish WZ to further increase the signal-to-background ratio. Since our sensitivity is still not enough to achieve an observation, we set a 95% Confidence Level upper limit on the product of the WZ production cross section and its branching fraction to the decay products specified above, and express it as a ratio to the theoretical Standard Model prediction. The resulting limit is 3.9 x SM (3.9 x SM expected).

  1. Hyperon production in proton-nucleus collisions at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt(S_NN)=41.6 GeV$ at HERA-B and design of silicon microstrip detectors for tracking at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Agari, M

    2006-01-01

    The topics of this thesis are the measurements of hyperon production in protonnucleus collisions at ps = 41.6 GeV with the Hera-B detector located at DESY, Hamburg (Germany), and the design of silicon microstrip sensors for the LHCb experiment at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland), and hyperons and their antiparticles were reconstructed from 113.5A.106 inelastic collisions of protons with fixed carbon, titanium and tungsten targets. With these samples, antiparticle-to-particle ratios, cross sections integrated for the accessible kinematic region of Hera-B and single differential cross sections as function of transverse momentum, $d\\sigma /dp^{2}_{T}$ (for and) and rapidity, $d\\sigma /dy$ (for only), have been been measured as well as the dependence of these quantities on the atomic number of the target nucleus, as parameterized using the Glauber model. The obtained ratios follow the same trend as found for the energy dependence of measurements from nucleus-nucleus collisions. Silicon microstrip sensors have been desi...

  2. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, hadronic top decays with the D0 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegeman, Jeroen Guido [Univ. of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2009-01-16

    Of the six quarks in the standard model the top quark is by far the heaviest: 35 times more massive than its partner the bottom quark and more than 130 times heavier than the average of the other five quarks. Its correspondingly small decay width means it tends to decay before forming a bound state. Of all quarks, therefore, the top is the least affected by quark confinement, behaving almost as a free quark. Its large mass also makes the top quark a key player in the realm of the postulated Higgs boson, whose coupling strengths to particles are proportional to their masses. Precision measurements of particle masses for e.g. the top quark and the W boson can hereby provide indirect constraints on the Higgs boson mass. Since in the standard model top quarks couple almost exclusively to bottom quarks (t → Wb), top quark decays provide a window on the standard model through the direct measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix element Vtb. In the same way any lack of top quark decays into W bosons could imply the existence of decay channels beyond the standard model, for example charged Higgs bosons as expected in two-doublet Higgs models: t → H+b. Within the standard model top quark decays can be classified by the (lepton or quark) W boson decay products. Depending on the decay of each of the W bosons, t$\\bar{t}$ pair decays can involve either no leptons at all, or one or two isolated leptons from direct W → e$\\bar{v}${sub e} and W → μ$\\bar{v}$μ decays. Cascade decays like b → Wc → e$\\bar{v}$ec can lead to additional non-isolated leptons. The fully hadronic decay channel, in which both Ws decay into a quark-antiquark pair, has the largest branching fraction of all t$\\bar{t}$ decay channels and is the only kinematically complete (i.e. neutrino-less) channel. It lacks, however, the clear isolated lepton signature and is therefore hard to distinguish from the multi-jet QCD background. It is important to measure the cross section (or branching fraction) in each channel independently to fully verify the standard model. Top quark pair production proceeds through the strong interaction, placing the scene for top quark physics at hadron colliders. This adds an additional challenge: the huge background from multi-jet QCD processes. At the Tevatron, for example, t$\\bar{t}$ production is completely hidden in light q$\\bar{q}$ pair production. The light (i.e. not bottom or top) quark pair production cross section is six orders of magnitude larger than that for t$\\bar{t}$ production. Even including the full signature of hadronic t$\\bar{t}$ decays, two b-jets and four additional jets, the QCD cross section for processes with similar signature is more than five times larger than for t$\\bar{t}$ production. The presence of isolated leptons in the (semi)leptonic t$\\bar{t}$ decay channels provides a clear characteristic to distinguish the t$\\bar{t}$ signal from QCD background but introduces a multitude of W- and Z-related backgrounds.

  3. First search at CDF for the Higgs boson decaying to a W-boson pair in proton-antiproton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Shan-Huei S.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-12-01

    By way of retaining the gauge invariance of the Standard Model (SM) and giving masses to the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} bosons and the fermions, the Higgs mechanism predicts the existence of a neutral scalar bosonic particle, whose mass is not exactly known. The Higgs boson is the only experimentally unconfirmed SM particle to date. This thesis documents a search for the Higgs boson in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron, using 360 {+-} pb {sup -1} data collected by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II), as part of the most important quest for contemporary particle physicists. The search was for a Higgs boson decaying to a pair of W{sup {+-}} bosons, where each W boson decays to an electron, a muon or a tau that further decays to an electron or a muon with associated neutrinos. Events with two charged leptons plus large missing energy were selected in data triggered on a high p{sub t} lepton and compared to the signal and backgrounds modeled using Monte Carlo and jet data. No signal-like excess was observed in data. Therefore, upper limits on the HWW production cross-section in the analyzed mass range were extracted using the binned likelihood maximum from distributions of dilepton azimuthal angle at 95% Bayesian credibility level (CL), as shown in the table below.

  4. Search for first-generation leptoquarks in the jets and missing transverse energy topology in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsybychev, Dmitri

    2004-03-01

    The authors performed a search for the pair production of first-generation leptoquarks using 191 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data recorded by the CDF experiment during Run II of the Tevatron. The leptoquarks are sought via their decay into a neutrino and quark, which yields missing transverse energy and several high-E{sub T} jets. Several control regions were studied to check the background estimation from Standard Model sources, with good agreement observed in data. In the leptoquark signal region, 124 events were observed with 118.3 {+-} 14.5 expected from background. Therefore, no evidence for leptoquark production was observed, and limits were set on the cross section times the squared branching ratio. Using the next-to-leading order cross section for leptoquark production, they excluded the mass interval 78 to 117 GeV/c{sup 2} at the 95% confidence level for 100% branching ratio into neutrino plus quark.

  5. Measurement of the top-antitop quark pair differential cross section with respect to the invariant mass of the pair in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridgeman, Alice Patricia [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2008-01-01

    I present a measurement of the t$\\bar{t}$ differential cross section, dσ/dMt$\\bar{t}$, in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using 2.7 fb-1 of CDF II data. I find that dσ/dMt$\\bar{t}$ is consistent with the Standard Model expectation, as modeled by PYTHIA with CTEQ5L parton distribution functions. I set limits on the ratio Κ/MPl in the Randall-Sundrum model by looking for Kaluza Klein gravitons which decay to top quarks. I find Κ/MPl > 0.16 at the 95% confidence level.

  6. Inclusive jet cross sections in proton-proton collisions at 7.0 TeV center-of-mass energy with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park-Martinez, Jayne Irene

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of node-link mapping on students' meaningful learning and conceptual change in a 1-semester introductory life-science course. This study used node-link mapping to integrate and apply the National Research Council's (NRC, 2005) three principles of human learning: engaging students' prior knowledge, fostering their metacognition, and supporting their formulation of a scientific conceptual framework. The study was a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest, control group design. The sample consisted of 68 primarily freshmen non-science majors enrolled in two intact sections of the targeted course. Both groups received the same teacher-centered instruction and student-centered activities designed to promote meaningful learning and conceptual change; however, the activity format differed. Control group activities were written; treatment group activities were node-link mapped. Prior to instruction, both groups demonstrated equivalent knowledge and misconceptions associated with genetics and evolution (GE), and ecology and environmental science (EE). Mean differences, pre-to-post instruction, on the GE and EE meaningful learning exam scores and the EE conceptual change inventory scores between the writing group (control) and the node-link mapping group (treatment) were analyzed using repeated measures MANOVAs. There were no significant mean pre-to-post differences between groups with respect to meaningful learning in the GE or EE units, or conceptual change in the EE unit. However, independent of group membership, the overall mean pre-to-post increases in meaningful learning and conceptual change were significant. These findings suggest that both node-link mapping and writing, when used in conjunction with the National Research Council's (NRC, 2005) three principles of human learning, can promote meaningful learning and conceptual change. The only significant interaction found with respect to meaningful learning, conceptual change, and learning styles (Kolb, 2005) was a positive effect of node-link mapping on converger's meaningful learning. However, that result was probably an artifact of small sample size rather than a true treatment effect. No other significant interactions were found. These results suggest that all students, regardless of their learning style, can benefit from either node-link mapping or writing to promote meaningful learning and conceptual change in general life-science courses.

  7. A Measurement of the production cross section of top-antitop pairs in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass of 1.96 TeV using secondary vertex b-tagging.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachacou, Henri

    2004-12-01

    A measurement of the t{bar t} pair production cross section is presented using 162 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF experiment during Run II at the Tevatron. t{bar t} events in the lepton+jets channel are isolated by identifying electrons and muons, reconstructing jets and transverse missing energy, and identifying b jets with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm. The efficiency of the algorithm is measured in a control sample using a novel technique that is less dependent on the simulation. For a top quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}, a cross section of {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 5.6{sub -1.1}{sup +1.2}(stat.){sub -0.6}{sup +0.9}(syst.)pb is measured.

  8. First search at CDF for the Higgs boson decaying to a W-boson pair in proton-antiproton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Shan-Huei S. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2006-01-01

    By way of retaining the gauge invariance of the Standard Model (SM) and giving masses to the W± and Z0 bosons and the fermions, the Higgs mechanism predicts the existence of a neutral scalar bosonic particle, whose mass is not exactly known. The Higgs boson is the only experimentally unconfirmed SM particle to date. This thesis documents a search for the Higgs boson in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron, using 360 ± pb -1 data collected by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II), as part of the most important quest for contemporary particle physicists. The search was for a Higgs boson decaying to a pair of W± bosons, where each W boson decays to an electron, a muon or a tau that further decays to an electron or a muon with associated neutrinos. Events with two charged leptons plus large missing energy were selected in data triggered on a high p$\\bar{p}$ lepton and compared to the signal and backgrounds modeled using Monte Carlo and jet data. No signal-like excess was observed in data. Therefore, upper limits on the HWW production cross-section in the analyzed mass range were extracted using the binned likelihood maximum from distributions of dilepton azimuthal angle at 95% Bayesian credibility level (CL), as shown in the table below.

  9. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the Missing Transverse Energy and b-jet signature in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apresyan, Artur; /Purdue U.

    2009-05-01

    We report on the results of a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV recorded by the CDF II experiment at the Tevatron in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.1 fb{sup -1}. We consider events having no identified charged leptons, a large imbalance in transverse momentum, and two or three jets where at least one jet contains a secondary vertex consistent with the decay of a b hadron. The main backgrounds are modeled with innovative techniques using data. The sensitivity of the search is optimized using multivariate discriminant techniques. We find good agreement between data and the standard model predictions. We place 95% confidence level upper limits on production cross section times branching ratio for several Higgs boson masses ranging from 110 GeV=c{sup 2} to 150 GeV=c{sup 2}. For a mass of 115 GeV=c{sup 2} the observed (expected) limit is 6.9 (5.6) times the standard model prediction.

  10. Measurement of Higgs boson production in the diphoton decay channel in $pp$ collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    A measurement of the production processes of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed in the two-photon final state using 5.4 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions data at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The number of observed Higgs boson decays to diphotons divided by the corresponding Standard Model prediction, called the signal strength, is found to be $\\mu = 1.17 \\pm 0.27$ at the value of the Higgs boson mass measured by ATLAS, $m_{H}$ = 125.4 GeV. The analysis is optimized to measure the signal strengths for individual Higgs boson production processes at this value of $m_{H}$. They are found to be $\\mu_{\\mathrm{ggF}} = 1.32 \\pm 0.38$, $\\mu_{\\mathrm{VBF}} = 0.8 \\pm 0.7$, $\\mu_{\\mathrm{WH}} = 1.0 \\pm 1.6 $, $\\mu_{\\mathrm{ZH}} = 0.1 ^{+3.7}_{-0.1} $, $\\mu_{\\mathrm{t\\bar{t}H}} = 1.6 ^{+2.7}_{-1.8} $, for Higgs boson production through gluon fusion, vector-boson fusion, and in association with a $W$ or $Z$ boson or a...

  11. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV in final states with a $\\tau$ lepton with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez García-Estañ, Teresa

    The top quark is the heaviest elementary particle and has the largest coupling to the Standard Model Higgs boson. Top quark decays with a tau lepton in the final state play an important role in the search for SM and BSM Higgs bosons. In particular, if a charged Higgs boson exists as predicted by the MSSM, and its mass is lower than the top quark mass minus the bottom quark mass, the top quark predominantly decays into a charged Higgs boson and a $b$-quark: $t \\rightarrow H^{+}b$. A heavy charged Higgs can also be produced associated with a top quark: tH$^{+}$. In some scenarios, the charged Higgs would decay predominantly to a tau lepton and a neutrino, producing then an excess in the $\\ell + \\tau$ channel over the other dilepton channels which, if observed, would constitute experimental evidence of the the existence of a charged Higgs boson. The $t\\bar{t}$ production cross section in the lepton plus tau channel ($pp \\rightarrow t\\bar{t} \\rightarrow\\ell + \\tau$) measurement presented in this thesis has been ...

  12. Measurement of the Z{yields}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} production cross section in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV center-of-mass energy with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capriotti, Daniele

    2012-06-11

    The subject of this thesis is the measurement of the Z{yields}{tau}{tau} production cross section in protonproton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The study of this process is important for several reasons. First, the measurement of the Z boson production in the {tau}{tau} final state confirms the measurements in the electron and muon pair final states providing information about the parton density functions at the energy of the Large Hadron Collider. In addition, the search for a low mass Higgs boson decaying into {tau} lepton pairs requires knowledge of the inclusive Z{yields}{tau}{tau} production cross section. Z{yields}{tau}{tau} production is an important benchmark process for the validation of {tau} lepton reconstruction and identification which is very difficult at a hadron collider. The reconstruction of Z{yields}{tau}{tau} events can be performed in several final states depending on the decay modes of the {tau} leptons. The semi-leptonic final state, where one {tau} lepton decays into an electron or muon and neutrinos and the other one into hadrons plus neutrino, has been investigated in this thesis. The production cross section has been determined for data collected in 2011 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.5 fb{sup -1}. This involved the determination of the muon trigger and reconstruction efficiencies from data and the estimation of the multi-jet background with a data driven technique. The results using the semileptonic final states, {sigma}(pp{yields}Z+X, Z{yields}{tau}{tau})=998.1{+-}23.7(stat){+-}131.9(syst){+-}36.9(lumi) pb ({tau}{sub e}{tau} h channel), {sigma}(pp{yields}Z+X, Z{yields}{tau}{tau})=912.4{+-}15.0(stat){+-}94.7(syst){+-}33.7(lumi) pb ({tau}{sub {mu}}{tau} h channel), can be combined with the measurement in the {tau}{sub e}{tau}{sub {mu}} channel to {sigma}(pp {yields}Z+X, Z{yields}{tau}{tau})=920.6 {+-}16.7(stat){+-}78.1(syst){+-}34.0(lumi) pb (combined) and are in a good agreement with the theoretical expectation at NNLO.

  13. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV in final states with a tau lepton with the ATLAS detector

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa

    2014-01-01

    El Modelo Estándar (SM) de la Física de Partículas es una teoría cuántica de campos desarrollada en los años 60 para explicar el comportamiento de las partículas elementales y las fuerzas fundamentales que gobiernan sus interacciones. El Modelo Estándar ha sido comprobado experimentalmente, ha pronosticado con gran precisión una amplia variedad de fenómenos y ha explicado con éxito numerosos resultados experimentales. Para la exploración de fenómenos de nueva Física, la Organización Europe...

  14. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the Missing Transverse Energy and b-jet signature in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apresyan, Artur [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2009-05-01

    We report on the results of a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV recorded by the CDF II experiment at the Tevatron in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.1 fb-1. We consider events having no identified charged leptons, a large imbalance in transverse momentum, and two or three jets where at least one jet contains a secondary vertex consistent with the decay of a b hadron. The main backgrounds are modeled with innovative techniques using data. The sensitivity of the search is optimized using multivariate discriminant techniques. We find good agreement between data and the standard model predictions. We place 95% confidence level upper limits on production cross section times branching ratio for several Higgs boson masses ranging from 110 GeV=c2 to 150 GeV=c2. For a mass of 115 GeV=c2 the observed (expected) limit is 6.9 (5.6) times the standard model prediction.

  15. SU-E-I-56: Scan Angle Reduction for a Limited-Angle Intrafraction Verification (LIVE) System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a novel adaptive reconstruction strategy to further reduce the scanning angle required by the limited-angle intrafraction verification (LIVE) system for intrafraction verification. Methods: LIVE acquires limited angle MV projections from the exit fluence of the arc treatment beam or during gantry rotation between static beams. Orthogonal limited-angle kV projections are also acquired simultaneously to provide additional information. LIVE considers the on-board 4D-CBCT images as a deformation of the prior 4D-CT images, and solves the deformation field based on deformation models and data fidelity constraint. LIVE reaches a checkpoint after a limited-angle scan, and reconstructs 4D-CBCT for intrafraction verification at the checkpoint. In adaptive reconstruction strategy, a larger scanning angle of 30° is used for the first checkpoint, and smaller scanning angles of 15° are used for subsequent checkpoints. The onboard images reconstructed at the previous adjacent checkpoint are used as the prior images for reconstruction at the current checkpoint. As the algorithm only needs to reconstruct the small deformation occurred between adjacent checkpoints, projections from a smaller scan angle provide enough information for the reconstruction. XCAT was used to simulate tumor motion baseline drift of 2mm along sup-inf direction at every subsequent checkpoint, which are 15° apart. Adaptive reconstruction strategy was used to reconstruct the images at each checkpoint using orthogonal 15° kV and MV projections. Results: Results showed that LIVE reconstructed the tumor volumes accurately using orthogonal 15° kV-MV projections. Volume percentage differences (VPDs) were within 5% and center of mass shifts (COMS) were within 1mm for reconstruction at all checkpoints. Conclusion: It's feasible to use an adaptive reconstruction strategy to further reduce the scan angle needed by LIVE to allow faster and more frequent intrafraction verification to minimize the

  16. Delta robot

    OpenAIRE

    J. L. Herder; Van der Wijk, V.

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a delta robot comprising a stationary base (2) and a movable platform (3) that is connected to the base with three chains of links (4,5,6), and comprising a balancing system incorporating at least one pantograph (7) for balancing the robot's center of mass, wherein the at least one pantograph has a first free extremity (10) at which it supports a countermass (13) which is arranged to balance the center of mass of the robot.

  17. van der Waals interaction of finite metallic systems: A study of cluster-atom scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absolute integral cross sections for elastic collisions of neutral sodium clusters Nan (n=2--20) with sodium atoms have been measured and the van der Waals interaction constants determined. The center-of-mass cross sections are very large (up to thousands of square angstroms), reflecting high cluster polarizabilities. It is found that the dispersion theory based on measured response parameters of alkali-metal clusters tends to overestimate the interaction strength

  18. SU-C-303-04: Evaluation of On- and Off-Line Bioluminescence Tomography System for Focal Irradiation Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, B; Wang, K; Reyes, J; Tran, P; Wong, J [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Iordachita, I [Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We have developed offline and on-board bioluminescence tomography(BLT) systems for the small animal radiation research platform(SARRP) for radiation guidance of soft tissue targets. We investigated the effectiveness of offline BLT guidance. Methods: CBCT is equipped on both the offline BLT system and SARRP that are 10 ft. apart. To evaluate the setup error during animal transport between the two systems, we implanted a luminescence source in the abdomen of anesthetized mice. Five mice were studied. After CBCT was acquired on both systems, source centers and correlation coefficients were calculated. CBCT was also used to generate object mesh for BLT reconstruction. To assess target localization, we compared the localization of the luminescence source based on (1)on-board SARRP BLT and CBCT, (2)offline BLT and CBCT, and (3)offline BLT and SARRP CBCT. The 3rd comparison examines if an offline BLT system can be used to guide radiation when there is minimal target contrast in CBCT. Results: Our CBCT results show the offset of the light source center can be maintained within 0.2 mm during animal transport. The center of mass(CoM) of the light source reconstructed by the offline BLT has an offset of 1.0 ± 0.4 mm from the ‘true’ CoM as derived from the SARRP CBCT. The results compare well with the offset of 1.0 ± 0.2 mm using on-line BLT. Conclusion: With CBCT information provided by the SARRP and effective animal immobilization during transport, these findings support the use of offline BLT in close vicinity for accurate soft tissue target localization for irradiation. However, the disadvantage of the off-line system is reduced efficiency as care is required to maintain stable animal transport. We envisage a dual use system where the on-board arrangement allows convenient access to CBCT and avoids disturbance of animal setup. The off-line capability would support standalone longitudinal imaging studies. The work is supported by NIH R01CA158100 and Xstrahl

  19. SU-C-303-04: Evaluation of On- and Off-Line Bioluminescence Tomography System for Focal Irradiation Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We have developed offline and on-board bioluminescence tomography(BLT) systems for the small animal radiation research platform(SARRP) for radiation guidance of soft tissue targets. We investigated the effectiveness of offline BLT guidance. Methods: CBCT is equipped on both the offline BLT system and SARRP that are 10 ft. apart. To evaluate the setup error during animal transport between the two systems, we implanted a luminescence source in the abdomen of anesthetized mice. Five mice were studied. After CBCT was acquired on both systems, source centers and correlation coefficients were calculated. CBCT was also used to generate object mesh for BLT reconstruction. To assess target localization, we compared the localization of the luminescence source based on (1)on-board SARRP BLT and CBCT, (2)offline BLT and CBCT, and (3)offline BLT and SARRP CBCT. The 3rd comparison examines if an offline BLT system can be used to guide radiation when there is minimal target contrast in CBCT. Results: Our CBCT results show the offset of the light source center can be maintained within 0.2 mm during animal transport. The center of mass(CoM) of the light source reconstructed by the offline BLT has an offset of 1.0 ± 0.4 mm from the ‘true’ CoM as derived from the SARRP CBCT. The results compare well with the offset of 1.0 ± 0.2 mm using on-line BLT. Conclusion: With CBCT information provided by the SARRP and effective animal immobilization during transport, these findings support the use of offline BLT in close vicinity for accurate soft tissue target localization for irradiation. However, the disadvantage of the off-line system is reduced efficiency as care is required to maintain stable animal transport. We envisage a dual use system where the on-board arrangement allows convenient access to CBCT and avoids disturbance of animal setup. The off-line capability would support standalone longitudinal imaging studies. The work is supported by NIH R01CA158100 and Xstrahl

  20. System Budgets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle

    1996-01-01

    The lecture note is aimed at introducing system budgets for optical communication systems. It treats optical fiber communication systems (six generations), system design, bandwidth effects, other system impairments and optical amplifiers.......The lecture note is aimed at introducing system budgets for optical communication systems. It treats optical fiber communication systems (six generations), system design, bandwidth effects, other system impairments and optical amplifiers....

  1. System Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keesman, K.J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary System Identification Introduction.- Part I: Data-based Identification.- System Response Methods.- Frequency Response Methods.- Correlation Methods.- Part II: Time-invariant Systems Identification.- Static Systems Identification.- Dynamic Systems Identification.- Part III: Time-varying Syste

  2. Comparing Extended System Interactions with Motions in Softened Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, Eric I

    2015-01-01

    Using an $N$-body evolution code that does not rely on softened potentials, I have created a suite of interacting binary cluster simulations. The motions of the centers-of-mass of the clusters have been tracked and compared to the trajectories of point masses interacting via one of four different softened potential prescriptions. There is a robust, nearly linear relationship between the impact parameter of the cluster interaction and the point-mass softening length that best approximates the cluster centers-of-mass motion. In an $N$-body simulation that adopts a fixed softening length, such a relationship leads to regimes where two-body effects, like dynamical friction, can be either larger or smaller than the corresponding cluster situation. Further consideration of more specific $N$-body simulations leads to an estimate that roughly 10 per cent of point-mass interactions in an $N$-body simulation will experience two-body effects larger than those for equivalent clusters.

  3. The fusion excitation function for a positive Q-value system at near and deep sub-barrier energies using Skyrme energy density formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, without any adjustment, the nuclear interaction potential is obtained in semiclassical extended Thomas-Fermi approach of the Skyrme energy density formalism, where the potential is expressed as the sum of (i) spin-orbit density independent part (attractive) and (ii) the spin-orbit density dependent potential part (repulsive), following our earlier work for arbitrarily chosen Skyrme force SIV over the center of mass energy range 20 to 30 MeV. The total interaction potential is obtained by adding Coulomb potential directly to the nuclear potential. The characteristics of the said interaction potential are used in Wong's formula to calculate the fusion cross-section as a function of center of mass energies

  4. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Immune System KidsHealth > For Teens > Immune System Print A A ... put us out of commission. What the Immune System Does The immune (pronounced: ih-MYOON) system, which ...

  5. Thermal systems; Systemes thermiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalot, S. [Valenciennes Univ. et du Hainaut Cambresis, LME, 59 (France); Lecoeuche, S. [Ecole des Mines de Douai, Dept. GIP, 59 - Douai (France)]|[Lille Univ. des Sciences et Technologies, 59 - Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Ahmad, M.; Sallee, H.; Quenard, D. [CSTB, 38 - Saint Martin d' Heres (France); Bontemps, A. [Universite Joseph Fourier, LEGI/GRETh, 38 - Grenoble (France); Gascoin, N.; Gillard, P.; Bernard, S. [Laboratoire d' Energetique, Explosion, Structure, 18 - Bourges (France); Gascoin, N.; Toure, Y. [Laboratoire Vision et Robotique, 18 - Bourges (France); Daniau, E.; Bouchez, M. [MBDA, 18 - Bourges (France); Dobrovicescu, A.; Stanciu, D. [Bucarest Univ. Polytechnique, Faculte de Genie Mecanique (Romania); Stoian, M. [Reims Univ. Champagne Ardenne, Faculte des Sciences, UTAP/LTM, 51 (France); Bruch, A.; Fourmigue, J.F.; Colasson, S. [CEA Grenoble, Lab. Greth, 38 (France); Bontemps, A. [Universite Joseph Fourier, LEGI/GRETh, 38 - Grenoble (France); Voicu, I.; Mare, T.; Miriel, J. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), LGCGM, IUT, 35 - Rennes (France); Galanis, N. [Sherbrooke Univ., Genie Mecanique, QC (Canada); Nemer, M.; Clodic, D. [Ecole des Mines de Paris, Centre Energetique et Procedes, 75 (France); Lasbet, Y.; Auvity, B.; Castelain, C.; Peerhossaini, H. [Nantes Univ., Ecole Polytechnique, Lab. de Thermocinetiquede Nantes, UMR-CNRS 6607, 44 (France)

    2005-07-01

    This session about thermal systems gathers 26 articles dealing with: neural model of a compact heat exchanger; experimental study and numerical simulation of the thermal behaviour of test-cells with walls made of a combination of phase change materials and super-insulating materials; hydraulic and thermal modeling of a supercritical fluid with pyrolysis inside a heated channel: pre-dimensioning of an experimental study; energy analysis of the heat recovery devices of a cryogenic system; numerical simulation of the thermo-hydraulic behaviour of a supercritical CO{sub 2} flow inside a vertical tube; mixed convection inside dual-tube exchangers; development of a nodal approach with homogenization for the simulation of the brazing cycle of a heat exchanger; chaotic exchanger for the cooling of low temperature fuel cells; structural optimization of the internal fins of a cylindrical generator; a new experimental approach for the study of the local boiling inside the channels of exchangers with plates and fins; experimental study of the flow regimes of boiling hydrocarbons on a bundle of staggered tubes; energy study of heat recovery exchangers used in Claude-type refrigerating systems; general model of Carnot engine submitted to various operating constraints; the free pistons Stirling cogeneration system; natural gas supplied cogeneration system with polymer membrane fuel cell; influence of the CRN coating on the heat flux inside the tool during the wood unrolling process; transport and mixture of a passive scalar injected inside the wake of a Ahmed body; control of a laser welding-brazing process by infrared thermography; 2D self-adaptative method for contours detection: application to the images of an aniso-thermal jet; exergy and exergy-economical study of an 'Ericsson' engine-based micro-cogeneration system; simplified air-conditioning of telephone switching equipments; parametric study of the 'low-energy' individual dwelling; brief synthesis of

  6. Data Systems vs. Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Amatayakul, Margret K.

    1982-01-01

    This paper examines the current status of “hospital information systems” with respect to the distinction between data systems and information systems. It is proposed that the systems currently existing are incomplete data dystems resulting in ineffective information systems.

  7. Multibody Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Falko Jens

    1999-01-01

    Multibody Systems is one area, in which methods for solving DAEs are of special interst. This chapter is about multibody systems, why they result in DAE systems and what kind of problems that can arise when dealing with multibody systems and formulating their corresponding DAE system....

  8. Digestive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Digestive System KidsHealth > For Parents > Digestive System Print A A ... body can absorb and use. About the Digestive System Almost all animals have a tube-type digestive ...

  9. Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. The Respiratory System The respiratory system is made up of organs ... and the muscles that enable breathing. The Respiratory System Figure A shows the location of the respiratory ...

  10. Exclusive initial-state-radiation production of the D Dmacr , D* Dmacr , and D* Dmacr * systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; da Costa, J. Firmino; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Gioi, L. Li; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.

    2009-05-01

    We perform a study of the exclusive production of D Dmacr , D* Dmacr , and D* Dmacr * in initial-state-radiation events, from e+e- annihilations at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, to search for charmonium and possible new resonances. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 384fb-1 and was recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II storage rings. The D Dmacr , D* Dmacr , and D* Dmacr * mass spectra show clear evidence of several ψ resonances. However, there is no evidence for Y(4260)→D* Dmacr or Y(4260)→D* Dmacr *.

  11. Radiation Load Optimization in the Final Focus System of FCC-hh

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Roman; Cerutti, Francesco; Tomás, Rogelio

    2016-01-01

    With a center-of-mass energy of up to 100 TeV, FCC-hh will produce highly energetic collision debris at the Interaction Point (IP). Protecting the final focus quadrupoles from this radiation is challenging, since the required amount of shielding placed inside the magnets will reduce the free aperture, thereby limiting the β^{*} reach and luminosity. Hence, radiation mitigation strategies that make best use of the available aperture are required. In this paper, we study the possibility to split the first quadrupole Q1 into two quadrupoles with individual apertures, in order to distribute the radiation load more evenly and reduce the peak dose.

  12. Average Angular Velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Essén, H

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the separation of rotational and internal motion. It introduces the concept of average angular velocity as the moment of inertia weighted average of particle angular velocities. It extends and elucidates the concept of Jellinek and Li (1989) of separation of the energy of overall rotation in an arbitrary (non-linear) $N$-particle system. It generalizes the so called Koenig's theorem on the two parts of the kinetic energy (center of mass plus internal) to three parts: center of mass, rotational, plus the remaining internal energy relative to an optimally translating and rotating frame.

  13. Auxiliary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systems included under the heading ''Reactor Auxillary Systems'' are those immediately involved with the reactor operation. These include the systems for dosing and letdown of reactor coolant, as well as for the chemical dosing, purification and treatment of the reactor coolant and the cooling system in the controlled area. The ancillary systems are mainly responsible for liquid and gaseous treatment and the waste treatment for final storage. (orig.)

  14. Systems effectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Habayeb, A R

    1987-01-01

    Highlights three principal applications of system effectiveness: hardware system evaluation, organizational development and evaluation, and conflict analysis. The text emphasizes the commonality of the system effectiveness discipline. The first part of the work presents a framework for system effectiveness, partitioning and hierarchy of hardware systems. The second part covers the structure, hierarchy, states, functions and activities of organizations. Contains an extended Appendix on mathematical concepts and also several project suggestions.

  15. Existence of a ground state for the confined hydrogen atom in non-relativistic QED

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amour, Laurent; Faupin, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    We consider a system of a hydrogen atom interacting with the quantized electromagnetic field. Instead of fixing the nucleus, we assume that the system is confined by its center of mass. This model is used in theoretical physics to explain the Lamb-Dicke effect. After a brief review of the...

  16. Tracking POG plot results on 2015 data

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The new conditions of Run II with respect to Run I (center of mass energy and bunch spacing) call for a complete characterization of the detectors from the beginning, in order re-calibrate the whole system and verify its performances. The plots shown below focus on the performance analysis of the CMS tracking system from both direct and indirect measurements.

  17. Degeneracy of Multi-Component Quantum Hall States Satisfying Periodic Boundary Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, I. A.

    1994-01-01

    In systems subject to periodic boundary conditions, Haldane has shown that states at arbitrary filling fraction possess a degeneracy with respect to center of mass translations. An analysis is carried out for multi-component electron systems and extra degeneracies are shown to exist. Their application to numerical studies is discussed.

  18. Stem system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shajmardanova L.R.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the stem cells from the point of view of systemic anatomy, where they are united into an entire stem system. This integration shows various advantages for better understanding the stem cells role in the body. Authors, considering functions and action mechanism of stem cells, phylogeny, ontogeny, regulation of functions, explain the base for stem cells system existance. The definition and terminology, age peculiarities, relationship with other systems of organs and differences are offered. The theoretical proof of primary-integrative role of stem system is provided for all other systems in body. Of particular importance is the role of stem system as a link between neural and endocrine systems. The work helps to sistematize data on investigations of stem cells, their entire-system perception, that will ease the goals determining for further research and their clinical use.

  19. Operational GPS Imaging System at Multiple Scales for Earth Science and Monitoring of Geohazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewitt, Geoffrey; Hammond, William; Kreemer, Corné

    2016-04-01

    Toward scientific targets that range from slow deep Earth processes to geohazard rapid response, our operational GPS data analysis system produces smooth, yet detailed maps of 3-dimensional land motion with respect to our Earth's center of mass at multiple spatio-temporal scales with various latencies. "GPS Imaging" is implemented operationally as a back-end processor to our GPS data processing facility, which uses JPL's GIPSY OASIS II software to produce positions from 14,000 GPS stations in ITRF every 5 minutes, with coordinate precision that gradually improves as latency increases upward from 1 hour to 2 weeks. Our GPS Imaging system then applies sophisticated signal processing and image filtering techniques to generate images of land motion covering our Earth's continents with high levels of robustness, accuracy, spatial resolution, and temporal resolution. Techniques employed by our GPS Imaging system include: (1) similarity transformation of polyhedron coordinates to ITRF with optional common-mode filtering to enhance local transient signal to noise ratio, (2) a comprehensive database of ~100,000 potential step events based on earthquake catalogs and equipment logs, (3) an automatic, robust, and accurate non-parametric estimator of station velocity that is insensitive to prevalent step discontinuities, outliers, seasonality, and heteroscedasticity; (4) a realistic estimator of velocity error bars based on subsampling statistics; (5) image processing to create a map of land motion that is based on median spatial filtering on the Delauney triangulation, which is effective at despeckling the data while faithfully preserving edge features; (6) a velocity time series estimator to assist identification of transient behavior, such as unloading caused by drought, and (7) a method of integrating InSAR and GPS for fine-scale seamless imaging in ITRF. Our system is being used to address three main scientific focus areas, including (1) deep Earth processes, (2

  20. Auxiliary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a undisturbed reactor operation, the various Auxiliary and Ancillary Systems must function perfectly with the Reactor Coolant System together. While the Auxiliary Systems are directly connected to the Reactor Coolant System and therefore have contact with the Reactor Coolant, the Ancillary Systems perform tasks which do not directly influence reactor operation and in part are necessary exclusively for environment protection. The design criteria of the individual systems are a result of these tasks, especially in relation to availability, operational readiness and probability of failure. (orig.)

  1. Intelligent Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The autonomous systems (AS) project, led by NASA Ames, is developing software for system operation automation. AS technology will help astronauts make more...

  2. Retrofitting Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    This report gives an overview of the different retrofitting possibilities that are available today. The report looks at both external and internal systems for external wall constructions, roof constructions, floor constructions and foundations. All systems are described in detail in respect to use...... and methods, and the efficiency of the different systems are discussed....

  3. Systems Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerano, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This short course provides information on what systems engineering is and how the systems engineer guides requirements, interfaces with the discipline leads, and resolves technical issues. There are many system-wide issues that either impact or are impacted by the thermal subsystem. This course will introduce these issues and illustrate them with real life examples.

  4. Operating systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tsichritzis, Dionysios C; Rheinboldt, Werner

    1974-01-01

    Operating Systems deals with the fundamental concepts and principles that govern the behavior of operating systems. Many issues regarding the structure of operating systems, including the problems of managing processes, processors, and memory, are examined. Various aspects of operating systems are also discussed, from input-output and files to security, protection, reliability, design methods, performance evaluation, and implementation methods.Comprised of 10 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of what constitutes an operating system, followed by a discussion on the definition and pr

  5. Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Ingolfsdottir, Anna; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand;

    A reactive system comprises networks of computing components, achieving their goals through interaction among themselves and their environment. Thus even relatively small systems may exhibit unexpectedly complex behaviours. As moreover reactive systems are often used in safety critical systems......, the need for mathematically based formal methodology is increasingly important. There are many books that look at particular methodologies for such systems. This book offers a more balanced introduction for graduate students and describes the various approaches, their strengths and weaknesses, and when...... into account. The book has arisen from various courses taught in Denmark and Iceland and is designed to give students a broad introduction to the area, with exercises throughout....

  6. Cryogenic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoyama, Kenji

    2002-02-01

    In this lecture we discuss the principle of method of cooling to a very low temperature, i.e. cryogenic. The "gas molecular model" will be introduced to explain the mechanism cooling by the expansion engine and the Joule-Thomson expansion valve. These two expansion processes are normally used in helium refrigeration systems to cool the process gas to cryogenic temperature. The reverse Carnot cycle will be discussed in detail as an ideal refrigeration cycle. First the fundamental process of liquefaction and refrigeration cycles will be discussed, and then the practical helium refrigeration system. The process flow of the system and the key components; -compressor, expander, and heat exchanger- will be discussed. As an example of an actual refrigeration system, we will use the cryogenic system for the KEKB superconducting RF cavity. We will also discuss the liquid helium distribution system, which is very important, especially for the cryogenic systems used in accelerator applications. 1 Principles of Cooling and Fundamental Cooling Cycle 2 Expansion engine, Joule-Thomson expansion, kinetic molecular theory, and enthalpy 3 Liquefaction Systems 4 Refrigeration Systems 5 Practical helium liquefier/refrigeration system 6 Cryogenic System for TRISTAN Superconducting RF Cavity

  7. Development of the digital read-out system for the CERN Alice pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Grassi, Tullio

    In order to gain new experimental insight at the TeV energy scale, CERN (Geneva) will build the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a new collider machine operating at a maximum center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV (in the p+/p+ interactions). The accelerator can operate in a heavy ion collision mode achieving a center-of-mass energy of ~5.5 TeV. The experimental environment at LHC is characterized by a high crossing rate of the particle bunches (one every 25 ns for p+/p+) and high levels of radiation. Therefore stringent requirements are imposed on the performance of detectors at LHC. Such a particle physics environment calls for dedicated hardware/software solutions with specific constraints, such as radiation tolerance, limited amount of material and limited power dissipation. One of the particle physics experiments carried out in LHC is ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment). The ALICE detector will face a very high density of tracks of particles (a multiplicity of 8000 charged particles per unit of rapidity, that i...

  8. A systemic risk warning system

    OpenAIRE

    Sibert, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Economists largely neglected systemic risk in the financial sector. This column discusses how governments should gather data about systemic risk and assess its implications. It says the new European Systemic Risk Board is far from the ideal – it is too big, too homogeneous, and lacks independence.

  9. Luminosity monitoring and calibration of BLM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛镇; 蔡啸; 俞伯祥; 方建; 孙希磊; 石峰; 王志刚; 交正华; 孙丽君; 刘宏邦; 章爱武; 许咨宗; 王晓东; 汪晓莲; 胡涛; 王至勇; 傅成栋; 鄢文标; 吕军光; 周莉

    2011-01-01

    The BEPC II Luminosity Monitor (BLM) monitors relative luminosity per bunch. The counting rates of gamma photons, which are proportional to the luminosities from the BLM at the center of mass system energy of the φ(3770) resonance, are obtained with a sta

  10. Effect of deuteron density distribution on the deduction of screening potential from the D(d,p)T reaction in Be metals%Effect of deuteron density distribution on the deduction of screening potential from the D(d,p)T reaction in Be metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕会议; 王铁山; 韩运成; 方开洪; 蒙萱; 何庆华; 关兴彩; 兰明聪

    2011-01-01

    The D(d,p)T reaction in Be metal environments has been measured to investigate the electron screening effect in metals in an energy region of from 5.5 keV to 10 keV in a center of mass system (CMS) at a temperature of 121 K. The depth distribution of deut

  11. On calculations of dipole moments of HCl+ and DCl+ molecular ions

    CERN Document Server

    Gurin, V S

    2015-01-01

    Dipole moment functions of isotopomeric molecular ions, HCl+ and DCl+, are considered in the two coordinate systems, center of mass of nuclei and center of nuclear charges, both through simple analytical derivations and ab initio calculations of electronic structure at various interatomic separations. An origin of the different values for dipole moments of the isotopomers is discussed and demonstrated by the calculation data.

  12. Accuracy of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame origin and Earth expansion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, X.; Collilieux, X.; Altamimi, Z.; Vermeersen, L.L.A.; Gross, R.S.; Fukumori, I.

    2011-01-01

    The International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) is a fundamental datum for high‐precision orbit tracking, navigation, and global change monitoring. Accurately realizing and maintaining ITRF origin at the mean Earth system center of mass (CM) is critical to surface and spacecraft based geodetic

  13. Computer program /P1-GAS/ calculates the P-0 and P-1 transfer matrices for neutron moderation in a monatomic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, G.; Gibson, G.

    1968-01-01

    FORTRAN 4 program /P1-GAS/ calculates the P-O and P-1 transfer matrices for neutron moderation in a monatomic gas. The equations used are based on the conditions that there is isotropic scattering in the center-of-mass coordinate system, the scattering cross section is constant, and the target nuclear velocities satisfy a Maxwellian distribution.

  14. Electronically driven adsorbate excitation mechanism in femtosecond-pulse laser desorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandbyge, Mads; Hedegård, Per; Heinz, T. F.;

    1995-01-01

    Femtosecond-pulse laser desorption is a process in which desorption is driven by a subpicosecond temperature pulse of order 5000 K in the substrate-adsorbate electron system, whose energy is transferred into the adsorbate center-of-mass degrees of freedom by a direct coupling mechanism. We presen...

  15. Vibration Based Crack Detection in a Rotating Disk. Part 1; An Analytical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the analytical results concerning the detection of a crack in a rotating disk. The concept of the approach is based on the fact that the development of a disk crack results in a distorted strain field within the component. As a result, a minute deformation in the disk's geometry as well as a change in the system s center of mass occurs. Finite element analyses were conducted concerning a notched disk in order to define the sensitivity of the method. The notch was used to simulate an actual crack and will be the method utilized for upcoming experiments. Various notch sizes were studied. The geometric deformations and shifts of center of mass were documented as a function of rotational speed. In addition, a rotordynamic analysis of a 2-bearing, disk and shaft system was conducted. The overall response of the system was required in order to design the experimental system for operation beyond the first critical. The results of the FE analyses of the disk indicated that the overall changes in the disk s geometry and center of mass were rather small. The difference between the maximum centrifugal radial displacements between the undamaged and damaged disks at 8000 RPM was 0.00014 in. for a 0.963 in. notch length. The shift in center of mass was also of this magnitude. The next step involves running experiments to verify the analysis.

  16. Laboratory Density Functionals

    OpenAIRE

    Giraud, B. G.

    2007-01-01

    We compare several definitions of the density of a self-bound system, such as a nucleus, in relation with its center-of-mass zero-point motion. A trivial deconvolution relates the internal density to the density defined in the laboratory frame. This result is useful for the practical definition of density functionals.

  17. Recommender systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kembellec, Gérald; Saleh, Imad

    2014-01-01

    Acclaimed by various content platforms (books, music, movies) and auction sites online, recommendation systems are key elements of digital strategies. If development was originally intended for the performance of information systems, the issues are now massively moved on logical optimization of the customer relationship, with the main objective to maximize potential sales. On the transdisciplinary approach, engines and recommender systems brings together contributions linking information science and communications, marketing, sociology, mathematics and computing. It deals with the understan

  18. Material Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Brath; Mortensen, Henrik Rubæk; Mullins, Michael;

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes and reflects upon the results of an investigative project which explores the setting up of a material system - a parametric and generative assembly consisting of and taking into consideration material properties, manufacturing constraints and geometric behavior. The project...... approaches the subject through the construction of a logic-driven system aiming to explore the possibilities of a material system that fulfills spatial, structural and performative requirements concurrently and how these are negotiated in situations where they might be conflicting....

  19. Cognitive Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The tutorial will discuss the definition of cognitive systems as the possibilities to extend the current systems engineering paradigm in order to perceive, learn, reason and interact robustly in open-ended changing environments. I will also address cognitive systems in a historical perspective and its relation and potential over current artificial intelligence architectures. Machine learning models that learn from data and previous knowledge will play an increasingly important role in all lev...

  20. Energetic Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetic Systems Division provides full-spectrum energetic engineering services (project management, design, analysis, production support, in-service support,...

  1. Intelligent systems

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, J David

    2011-01-01

    Technology has now progressed to the point that intelligent systems are replacing humans in the decision making processes as well as aiding in the solution of very complex problems. In many cases intelligent systems are already outperforming human activities. Artificial neural networks are not only capable of learning how to classify patterns, such images or sequence of events, but they can also effectively model complex nonlinear systems. Their ability to classify sequences of events is probably more popular in industrial applications where there is an inherent need to model nonlinear system

  2. Systemic darwinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Rasmus Grønfeldt

    2008-08-19

    Darwin's 19th century evolutionary theory of descent with modification through natural selection opened up a multidimensional and integrative conceptual space for biology. We explore three dimensions of this space: explanatory pattern, levels of selection, and degree of difference among units of the same type. Each dimension is defined by a respective pair of poles: law and narrative explanation, organismic and hierarchical selection, and variational and essentialist thinking. As a consequence of conceptual debates in the 20th century biological sciences, the poles of each pair came to be seen as mutually exclusive opposites. A significant amount of 21st century research focuses on systems (e.g., genomic, cellular, organismic, and ecological/global). Systemic Darwinism is emerging in this context. It follows a "compositional paradigm" according to which complex systems and their hierarchical networks of parts are the focus of biological investigation. Through the investigation of systems, Systemic Darwinism promises to reintegrate each dimension of Darwin's original logical space. Moreover, this ideally and potentially unified theory of biological ontology coordinates and integrates a plurality of mathematical biological theories (e.g., self-organization/structure, cladistics/history, and evolutionary genetics/function). Integrative Systemic Darwinism requires communal articulation from a plurality of perspectives. Although it is more general than these, it draws on previous advances in Systems Theory, Systems Biology, and Hierarchy Theory. Systemic Darwinism would greatly further bioengineering research and would provide a significantly deeper and more critical understanding of biological reality.

  3. Detecting triple systems with gravitational wave observations

    CERN Document Server

    Meiron, Yohai; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) has recently discovered gravitational waves (GWs) emitted by merging black hole binaries. We examine whether future GW detections may identify triple companions of merging binaries. Such a triple companion causes variations in the GW signal due to (1) the varying path length along the line of sight during the orbit around the center of mass, (2) relativistic beaming, Doppler, and gravitational redshift, and (3) the variation of the "light"-travel time in the gravitational field of the triple companion, known respectively as Roemer-, Einstein-, and Shapiro-delays in pulsar binaries. We find that the prospects for detecting the triple companion are the highest for low-mass compact object binaries which spend the longest time in the LIGO frequency band with circular orbits. In particular, for merging neutron star binaries, LIGO may detect a white dwarf or M-dwarf perturber at signal to noise ratio of 8, if it is within 0.4 solar radius distance from ...

  4. cardiovascular system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    6.1 Cardiac arrhythmias 2006037 Electroanatomical systems guided circumferential pulmonary veins ablation for atrial fibrillation: initial experience from comparison between the EnSite -NavX and CARTO system LIU Xu(刘旭 ), et al. Dept Cardiol, Shanghai Chest Hosp, Shanghai, 200030, China. Chin J Cardiol 2005; 33 (22): 975 -978.

  5. Power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickam, Christopher Dale

    2008-03-18

    A power system includes a prime mover, a transmission, and a fluid coupler having a selectively engageable lockup clutch. The fluid coupler may be drivingly connected between the prime mover and the transmission. Additionally, the power system may include a motor/generator drivingly connected to at least one of the prime mover and the transmission. The power-system may also include power-system controls configured to execute a control method. The control method may include selecting one of a plurality of modes of operation of the power system. Additionally, the control method may include controlling the operating state of the lockup clutch dependent upon the mode of operation selected. The control method may also include controlling the operating state of the motor/generator dependent upon the mode of operation selected.

  6. Creative Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manelius, Anne-Mette; Beim, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Opsamling af diskussioner på konferencen og udstillingen Creative Systems i september/oktober 2007. Konferencen og Udstillingen Creative Systems sætter fokus på systemer som en positiv drivkraft i den kreative skabelsesproces. CINARK inviterede fire internationale kapaciteter, som indenfor hver...... deres felt har beskæftiget sig med udviklingen af systemer. Kieran Timberlake, markant amerikansk tegnestue; Mark West, Professor på University of Manitoba, Canada, og pioner indenfor anvendelse af tekstilforskalling til betonstøbninger; Matilda McQuaid, Arkitekturhistoriker og kurator på udstillingen...... om Extreme Textiles på amerikanske Cooper Hewit Design Museum, samt Professor Ludger Hovestadt, ved ETH, Zürich der fokuserer på udvikling og anvendelse af logaritmiske systemtilgange. Udstillingen diskuterede ud fra deres meget forskellige arbejder, det kreative potentiale i anvendelsen af systemer...

  7. Water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes the coolant chemistry and its consequences for 1300 MWsub(e) KWU PWR plants. Some selected systems, i.e. primary heat transport system, steam water cycle and cooling water arrangements, are chosen for this description. Various aspects of coolant chemistry regarding general corrosion, selective types of corrosion and deposits on heat transfer surfaces have been discussed. The water supply systems necessary to fulfill the requirements of the coolant chemistry are discussed as well. It has been concluded that a good operating performance can only be achieved when - beside other factors - the water chemistry has been given sufficient consideration. (orig./RW)

  8. Water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes the coolant chemistry and its consequences for 1300 MWsub(e) KWU PWR plants. Some selected systems, i.e. primary heat transport system, steam water cycle and cooling water arrangements, are chosen for this description. Various aspects of coolant chemistry regarding general corrosion, selective types of corrosion and deposits on heat transfer surface have been discussed. The water supply systems necessary to fulfill the requirements of the coolant chemistry are discussed as well. It has been concluded that a good operating performance can only be achieved when - beside other factors - the water chemistry has been given sufficient consideration. (orig./RW)

  9. Hematopoietic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008557 Role of multiple myeloma cells on normal endothelial cells in co-culture system. WANG Yadan(王雅丹),et al. Instit Hematol,Union Hosp,Tongji Med Coll,Huazhong Univ Sci Technol,Wuhan 430022. Chin J Hematol 2008;29(10):658-661. Objective To study the influence of multiple myeloma(MM)cells on normal endothelial cells in co-culture system in vitro. Methods A co-culture system of human MM cell line RPMI8226 w

  10. Physical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Belkind, Ori

    2012-01-01

    Based on the concept of a physical system, this book offers a new philosophical interpretation of classical mechanics and the Special Theory of Relativity. According to Belkind's view the role of physical theory is to describe the motions of the parts of a physical system in relation to the motions of the whole. This approach provides a new perspective into the foundations of physical theory, where motions of parts and wholes of physical systems are taken to be fundamental, prior to spacetime, material properties and laws of motion. He defends this claim with a constructive project, deriving b

  11. Kaonic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oset E.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available I make a short review of the situation of the kaonic systems, with novel information supporting the two Λ(1405 states from the K-d → nπΣ reaction. A review is made of the K¯$ar K$NN system with recent calculations converging to smaller bindings and larger widths. Novel systems involving two kaons and one nucleon or three kaons are also reported and finally a short discussion is made of the analogous state DNN for which recent studies find a large binding and a small width.

  12. Creative systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    2007-01-01

    At udvikle systemer har altid været et væsentligt element i den arkitektoniske skabelsesproces. Systemer er ikke nødvendigvis begrænsninger, men kan ses som positive faktorer i skabelses og fremstillinsprocessen. Center for Industriel Arkitektur, Cinark, har afholdt en international konference, en...... workshop og en udstilling under overskriften; Creative Systems. Artiklen præsenterer de fire oplægsholdere Matilda McQuaid, Mark West, Stephen Kieran og Ludger Hovestadt og en række diskussionstemaer....

  13. Dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sternberg, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Celebrated mathematician Shlomo Sternberg, a pioneer in the field of dynamical systems, created this modern one-semester introduction to the subject for his classes at Harvard University. Its wide-ranging treatment covers one-dimensional dynamics, differential equations, random walks, iterated function systems, symbolic dynamics, and Markov chains. Supplementary materials offer a variety of online components, including PowerPoint lecture slides for professors and MATLAB exercises.""Even though there are many dynamical systems books on the market, this book is bound to become a classic. The the

  14. AEG System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The AEG System is used to create, revise, approve, and distribute text of the AEGS and Flight Standard Board (FSB)/Type Rating Report. The MMEL specifies under what...

  15. Avionics Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.M. Soundar Rajan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ‘Avionics’ systems, over the decades, have grown from simple communication radios and navigation equipments to complex integrated equipments primarily infiuenced by dominance of digital technology. Continuous growth in integrated circuit technology, functional integration of complete system on chip, very high speed communication channels and fault tolerant communication protocols have brought remarkable advancements in avionics systems. Further Mechanical and Pneumatic functional blocks are being replaced by digital systems progressively and decisively. New generation aircraft are being built around powerful avionics assets to provide stress free cockpit to the pilot.Defence Science Journal, 2013, 63(2, pp.129-130, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.63.4269

  16. Bubble systems

    CERN Document Server

    Avdeev, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a systematic analysis of bubble system mathematics, using the mechanics of two-phase systems in non-equilibrium as the scope of analysis. The author introduces the thermodynamic foundations of bubble systems, ranging from the fundamental starting points to current research challenges. This book addresses a range of topics, including description methods of multi-phase systems, boundary and initial conditions as well as coupling requirements at the phase boundary. Moreover, it presents a detailed study of the basic problems of bubble dynamics in a liquid mass: growth (dynamically and thermally controlled), collapse, bubble pulsations, bubble rise and breakup. Special emphasis is placed on bubble dynamics in turbulent flows. The analysis results are used to write integral equations governing the rate of vapor generation (condensation) in non-equilibrium flows, thus creating a basis for solving a number of practical problems. This book is the first to present a comprehensive theory of boil...

  17. Expert Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, P.J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Expert systems mimic the problem-solving activity of human experts in specialized domains by capturing and representing expert knowledge. Expert systems include a knowledge base, an inference engine that derives conclusions from the knowledge, and a user interface. Knowledge may be stored as if-then rules, orusing other formalisms such as frames and predicate logic. Uncertain knowledge may be represented using certainty factors, Bayesian networks, Dempster-Shafer belief functions, or fuzzy se...

  18. Systems Thinkers

    OpenAIRE

    Ramage, Magnus; Shipp, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Systems Thinkers presents a biographical history of the field of systems thinking, by examining the life and work of thirty of its major thinkers. It discusses each thinker's key contributions, the way this contribution was expressed in practice and the relationship between their life and ideas. This discussion is supported by an extract from the thinker's own writing, to give a flavour of their work and to give readers a sense of which thinkers are most relevant to their own interests. ...

  19. System zeros

    OpenAIRE

    Smagina, Ye. M.

    2006-01-01

    The present book is the first publication in English considered the modern problems of control theory and analysis connected with a concept of system zeros. The previous book by Ye.M. Smagina (1990) had been written in Russian and it is inaccessible to English speaking researchers. The purpose of the offered book is to systematize and consistently to state basic theoretical results connected with properties of multivariable system zeros. Different zeros definitions and different types of zero...

  20. Multi-Discipline Analytical Modeling of a Cracked Disk in a Turbine Engine: Applied to TF41 Experiment at China Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    2003-01-01

    The investigated crack detection method is based on the fact that the development of a disk crack results in a distorted strain field within the component. As a result, a minute deformation in the disk's geometry as well as a change in the system's center of mass occurs. Finite element analyses were conducted concerning a notched disk in order to define the sensitivity of the method. The notch was used to simulate an actual crack and will be the method utilized for upcoming experiments. Various notch sizes were studied and the geometric deformations and shifts of center of mass were documented as a function of rotational speed. In addition, a rotordynamic analysis of a two-bearing, disk and shaft system was conducted. The results of the FE analyses of the disk indicated that the overall changes in the disk's geometry and center of mass were rather small. Comparing the 9.25 in. disk's maximum radial displacements due centrifugal forces at 8000 RPM between an un-notched and a 0.962 in. notched disk, the difference was on the order of 0.00014 in. The shift in center of mass was also of this magnitude. The next step involves running experiments to verify the analysis.

  1. On relativistic quantum mechanics in the rest-frame instant form of dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of a new relativistic classical mechanics for N-particle systems compatible with relativistic bound states. It is formulated in global non-inertial frames in Minkowski space-time by means of parametrized Minkowski theories and then restricted to the intrinsic inertial rest frame of the isolated system. There is a complete control on the relativistic collective variables (Newton-Wigner center of mass, Fokker-Pryce center of inertia, M/oller center of energy) and on the realization of the Poincare' algebra (with the explicit form of the interaction-dependent Lorentz boosts). The particle world-lines are found to correspond to the ones of predictive mechanics and localization problems are clarified. The model can be consistently quantized avoiding the instantaneous spreading of the center-of-mass wave packets (Hegerfeldt theorem), because the non-local non-covariant center of mass is a non-measurable quantity. This implies that the Hilbert space must be the tensor product of the center-of-mass Hilbert space with the one of relative motions. This spatial non-separability (due to the Lorentz signature of space-time) makes relativistic entanglement much more involved than the non-relativistic one.

  2. Nanorobotic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixin Dong

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Two strategies towards the realization of nanotechnology have been presented, i.e., top-down and bottom up. The former one is mainly based on nanofabrication and includes technologies such as nano-lithography, nano-imprint, and etching. Presently, they are still 2D fabrication processes with low resolution. The later one is an assembly-based technique. At present, it includes such items as self-assembly, dip-pen lithography, and directed self-assembly. These techniques can generate regular nano patterns in large scales. To fabricate 3D complex nano devices there are still no effective ways by so far. Here we show our effort on the development of a nano laboratory, a prototype nanomanufacturing system, based on nanorobotic manipulations. In which, we take a hybrid strategy as shown in Fig. 1. In this system, nano fabrication and nano assembly can be performed in an arbitrary order to construct nano building blocks and finally nano devices. The most important feature in this system is that the products can be fed back into the system to shrink the system part by part leading to nanorobots. Property characterization can be performed in each intermediate process. Due to the nanorobotic manipulation system, dynamic measurement can be performed rather than conventional static observations.

  3. System-of-Systems Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Kopetz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The global availability of communication services makes it possible to interconnect independently developed systems, called constituent systems, to provide new synergistic services and more efficient economic processes. The characteristics of these new Systems-of-Systems are qualitatively different from the classic monolithic systems. In the first part of this presentation we elaborate on these differences, particularly with respect to the autonomy of the constituent systems, to dependability, continuous evolution, and emergence. In the second part we look at a SoS from the point of view of cognitive complexity. Cognitive complexity is seen as a relation between a model of an SoS and the observer. In order to understand the behavior of a large SoS we have to generate models of adequate simplicity, i.e, of a cognitive complexity that can be handled by the limited capabilities of the human mind. We will discuss the importance of properly specifying and placing the relied-upon message interfaces between the constituent systems that form an open SoS and discuss simplification strategies that help to reduce the cognitive complexity.

  4. Systems studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Systems Studies Activity had two objectives: (1) to investigate nontechnical barriers to the deployment of biomass production and supply systems and (2) to enhance and extend existing systems models of bioenergy supply and use. For the first objective, the Activity focused on existing bioenergy markets. Four projects were undertaken: a comparative analysis of bioenergy in Sweden and Austria; a one-day workshop on nontechnical barriers jointly supported by the Production Systems Activity, the development and testing of a framework for analyzing barriers and drivers to bioenergy markets; and surveys of wood pellet users in Sweden, Austria and the U.S.A. For the second objective, two projects were undertaken. First, the Activity worked with the Integrated Bioenergy Systems (IBS) Activity of IEA Bioenergy Task XIII to enhance the BioEnergy Assessment Model (BEAM). This model is documented in the final report of the IBS Activity. The Systems Studies Activity contributed to enhancing the feedstock portion of the model by developing a coherent set of willow, poplar, and switchgrass production modules relevant to both the U.S.A. and the U.K. The Activity also developed a pretreatment module for switchgrass. Second, the Activity sponsored a three-day workshop on modelling bioenergy systems with the objectives of providing an overview of the types of models used to evaluate bioenergy and promoting communication among bioenergy modelers. There were nine guest speakers addressing different types of models used to evaluate different aspects of bioenergy, ranging from techno-economic models based on the ASPEN software to linear programming models to develop feedstock supply curves for the U.S.A. The papers from this workshop have been submitted to Biomass and Bioenergy and are under editorial review 8 refs, 10 tabs

  5. Systems Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, R.L.

    1998-03-17

    The Systems Studies Activity had two objectives: (1) to investigate nontechnical barriers to the deployment of biomass production and supply systems and (2) to enhance and extend existing systems models of bioenergy supply and use. For the first objective, the Activity focused on existing bioenergy markets. Four projects were undertaken: a comparative analysis of bioenergy in Sweden and Austria; a one-day workshop on nontechnical barriers jointly supported by the Production Systems Activity; the development and testing of a framework for analyzing barriers and drivers to bioenergy markets; and surveys of wood pellet users in Sweden, Austria and the US. For the second objective, two projects were undertaken. First, the Activity worked with the Integrated BioEnergy Systems (TBS) Activity of TEA Bioenergy Task XIII to enhance the BioEnergy Assessment Model (BEAM). This model is documented in the final report of the IBS Activity. The Systems Studies Activity contributed to enhancing the feedstock portion of the model by developing a coherent set of willow, poplar, and switchgrass production modules relevant to both the US and the UK. The Activity also developed a pretreatment module for switchgrass. Second, the Activity sponsored a three-day workshop on modeling bioenergy systems with the objectives of providing an overview of the types of models used to evaluate bioenergy and promoting communication among bioenergy modelers. There were nine guest speakers addressing different types of models used to evaluate different aspects of bioenergy, ranging from technoeconomic models based on the ASPEN software to linear programming models to develop feedstock supply curves for the US. The papers from this workshop have been submitted to Biomass and Bioenergy and are under editorial review.

  6. Rigid elements and their application in dynamics of multibody systems%刚体单元及其在多体系统动力学中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐朝晖; 方慧青

    2011-01-01

    In many multi-body software based on the traditional theories of dynamics of multibody systems,parameters such as the mass,the center of mass and the moments of inertia of a body usually have to be given artificially,which results in many difficulties in practice applications,because these parameters are not easy to obtain especially when bodies are complicated in shape.This paper presented a methodology enables to overcome these difficulties.The main idea is to divide a body into many pieces with regular shape called rigid elements.Two kinds of element,the rigid beam element and the rigid tetrahedron element are constructed in this paper,with the consideration of their ability to represent any solid body.Based on the new methodology,a software with mesh generator was developed,which can obtain the inertia parameters of bodies with any shape automatically.The correctness of present rigid elements was verified by numerical examples.%多体系统动力学分析软件要求人工输入形状复杂物体的质量、质心位置和转动惯量,而实际上这些参量并不容易获得。本文探索了一种以组成物体的刚体单元为基本要素的新方法,并结合实际需要具体构造了刚性四面体和刚性梁单元。以刚体单元为基础并内嵌网格剖分模块的分析软件能够自动获得这些参数,从而具备处理任何复杂系统的能力。仿真结果的对比分析验证了单元构造的正确性。

  7. Systemic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Rachel E; Martin, Christina Gamache; Smith, Carly Parnitzke

    2014-01-01

    Substantial theoretical, empirical, and clinical work examines trauma as it relates to individual victims and perpetrators. As trauma professionals, it is necessary to acknowledge facets of institutions, cultures, and communities that contribute to trauma and subsequent outcomes. Systemic trauma-contextual features of environments and institutions that give rise to trauma, maintain it, and impact posttraumatic responses-provides a framework for considering the full range of traumatic phenomena. The current issue of the Journal of Trauma & Dissociation is composed of articles that incorporate systemic approaches to trauma. This perspective extends conceptualizations of trauma to consider the influence of environments such as schools and universities, churches and other religious institutions, the military, workplace settings, hospitals, jails, and prisons; agencies and systems such as police, foster care, immigration, federal assistance, disaster management, and the media; conflicts involving war, torture, terrorism, and refugees; dynamics of racism, sexism, discrimination, bullying, and homophobia; and issues pertaining to conceptualizations, measurement, methodology, teaching, and intervention. Although it may be challenging to expand psychological and psychiatric paradigms of trauma, a systemic trauma perspective is necessary on both scientific and ethical grounds. Furthermore, a systemic trauma perspective reflects current approaches in the fields of global health, nursing, social work, and human rights. Empirical investigations and intervention science informed by this paradigm have the potential to advance scientific inquiry, lower the incidence of a broader range of traumatic experiences, and help to alleviate personal and societal suffering.

  8. Systemic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Rachel E; Martin, Christina Gamache; Smith, Carly Parnitzke

    2014-01-01

    Substantial theoretical, empirical, and clinical work examines trauma as it relates to individual victims and perpetrators. As trauma professionals, it is necessary to acknowledge facets of institutions, cultures, and communities that contribute to trauma and subsequent outcomes. Systemic trauma-contextual features of environments and institutions that give rise to trauma, maintain it, and impact posttraumatic responses-provides a framework for considering the full range of traumatic phenomena. The current issue of the Journal of Trauma & Dissociation is composed of articles that incorporate systemic approaches to trauma. This perspective extends conceptualizations of trauma to consider the influence of environments such as schools and universities, churches and other religious institutions, the military, workplace settings, hospitals, jails, and prisons; agencies and systems such as police, foster care, immigration, federal assistance, disaster management, and the media; conflicts involving war, torture, terrorism, and refugees; dynamics of racism, sexism, discrimination, bullying, and homophobia; and issues pertaining to conceptualizations, measurement, methodology, teaching, and intervention. Although it may be challenging to expand psychological and psychiatric paradigms of trauma, a systemic trauma perspective is necessary on both scientific and ethical grounds. Furthermore, a systemic trauma perspective reflects current approaches in the fields of global health, nursing, social work, and human rights. Empirical investigations and intervention science informed by this paradigm have the potential to advance scientific inquiry, lower the incidence of a broader range of traumatic experiences, and help to alleviate personal and societal suffering. PMID:24617751

  9. Research on a bandwidth-limited active control system for commercial vehicle cab suspension based on the fuzzy theory%基于模糊控制的商用车驾驶室悬置有限带宽主动控制系统研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷飞; 杨红波

    2014-01-01

    建立了含驾驶室的商用车十自由度整车数学模型,对安装了驾驶室有限带宽主动悬置的商用车进行模糊控制系统设计,该控制系统全面考虑了驾驶室质心处垂直、俯仰、侧倾方向振动,并采用遗传算法对模糊控制器增益因子进行优化。以积分白噪声随机路面输入作为激励进行振动仿真,仿真结果表明采用本文设计的驾驶室有限带宽主动悬置模糊控制系统相对全浮式悬置系统有效降低了驾驶室质心垂直、俯仰和侧倾加速度,一定程度上提高了商用车行驶平顺性和乘坐舒适性。%A ten-degree-of-freedom mathematical model of a commercial vehicle including the cab was established .Based on fuzzy control theory ,a bandwidth-limited active control system for the commercial vehicle's cab suspension was designed .The vibrations of center of mass were investi-gated in directions of heave ,pith and roll . The gain factor of fuzzy controller was optimized through genetic algorithm and the vibration was simulated using integral white noise random road as input .The results show that by employing the bandwidth-limited active control system pro-posed ,the heave angular acceleration ,pith angular acceleration and roll angular acceleration are distinctly reduced when compared with that adopted full floating suspension system .Meantime , the ride performance and comfortability of the commercial vehicle are improved .

  10. Memory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolk, David A; Budson, Andrew E

    2010-08-01

    Converging evidence from patient and neuroimaging studies suggests that memory is a collection of abilities that use different neuroanatomic systems. Neurologic injury may impair one or more of these memory systems. Episodic memory allows us to mentally travel back in time and relive an episode of our life. Episodic memory depends on the hippocampus, other medial temporal lobe structures, the limbic system, and the frontal lobes, as well as several other brain regions. Semantic memory provides our general knowledge about the world and is unconnected to any specific episode of our life. Although semantic memory likely involves much of the neocortex, the inferolateral temporal lobes (particularly the left) are most important. Procedural memory enables us to learn cognitive and behavioral skills and algorithms that operate at an automatic, unconscious level. Damage to the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and supplementary motor area often impair procedural memory. PMID:22810510

  11. Turbine system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahan, Kevin Weston; Dillard, Daniel Jackson

    2016-05-03

    A turbine system is disclosed. The turbine system includes a transition duct having an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The turbine system further includes a turbine section connected to the transition duct. The turbine section includes a plurality of shroud blocks at least partially defining a hot gas path, a plurality of buckets at least partially disposed in the hot gas path, and a plurality of nozzles at least partially disposed in the hot gas path. At least one of a shroud block, a bucket, or a nozzle includes means for withstanding high temperatures.

  12. Dynamics and Control of a Disordered System in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.

    2013-01-01

    , each grain is considered to be a highly miniaturized spacecraft which has limited size and mass, hence it has limited actuation, limited propulsive capability, limited power, limited sensing, limited communication, limited computational resources, limited range of motion, limited lifetime, and may be expendable. The modeling and dynamics of clouds of vehicles is more challenging than with conventional vehicles because we are faced with a probabilistic vehicle composed of a large number of physically disconnected vehicles. First, different scales of motion occur simultaneously in a cloud: translations and rotations of the cloud as a whole (macro-dynamics), relative rotation and translation of one cloud member with respect to another (meso-dynamics), and individual cloud member dynamics (micro-dynamics). Second, the control design needs to be tolerant of the system complexity, of the system architecture (centralized vs. decentralized large scale system control) as well as robust to un-modeled dynamics and noise sources. Figure 1, top left, shows the kinematic parameters of a 1000 element cloud in orbit. The motion of the system is described with respect to a local vertical-local horizontal (LV-LH) orbiting reference frame (x,y,z)=F(sub ORF) of origin O(sub ORF) which rotates with mean motion omega and orbital semi-major axis R(sub 0). The orbital geometry at the initial time is defined in terms of its six orbital elements, and the orbital dynamics equation for point O(sub ORF) is propagated forward in time under the influence of the gravitational field of the primary and other external perturbations, described below. The origin of this frame coincides with the initial position of the center of mass of the system, and the coordinate axes are z along the local vertical, x toward the flight direction, and y in the orbit normal direction. The assumptions we used to model the dynamics are as follows: 1) The inertial frame is fixed at Earth's center. 2) The orbiting Frame ORF

  13. Kreative systemer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manelius, Anne-Mette

    2007-01-01

    Artikel med eksempler på armerede teglhvælv produceret i hængende tekstiler ud fra kædebueprincipper og inspireret af Eladio Dieste. Beskriver desuden konferencen og udstillingen Creative Systems på KA september 2007......Artikel med eksempler på armerede teglhvælv produceret i hængende tekstiler ud fra kædebueprincipper og inspireret af Eladio Dieste. Beskriver desuden konferencen og udstillingen Creative Systems på KA september 2007...

  14. Computer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Lola

    1992-01-01

    In addition to the discussions, Ocean Climate Data Workshop hosts gave participants an opportunity to hear about, see, and test for themselves some of the latest computer tools now available for those studying climate change and the oceans. Six speakers described computer systems and their functions. The introductory talks were followed by demonstrations to small groups of participants and some opportunities for participants to get hands-on experience. After this familiarization period, attendees were invited to return during the course of the Workshop and have one-on-one discussions and further hands-on experience with these systems. Brief summaries or abstracts of introductory presentations are addressed.

  15. System Description:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schürmann, Carsten; Poswolsky, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Delphin is a functional programming language [Adam Poswolsky and Carsten Schürmann. Practical programming with higher-order encodings and dependent types. In European Symposium on Programming (ESOP), 2008] utilizing dependent higher-order datatypes. Delphin's two-level type-system cleanly separates...... data from computation, allowing for decidable type checking. The data level is LF [Robert Harper, Furio Honsell, and Gordon Plotkin. A framework for defining logics. Journal of the Association for Computing Machinery, 40(1):143-184, January 1993], which allows for the specification of deductive systems...

  16. Microbiology System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Technology originating in a NASA-sponsored study of the measurement of microbial growth in zero gravity led to the development of Biomerieux Vitek, Inc.'s VITEK system. VITEK provides a physician with accurate diagnostic information and identifies the most effective medication. Test cards are employed to identify organisms and determine susceptibility to antibiotics. A photo-optical scanner scans the card and monitors changes in the growth of cells contained within the card. There are two configurations - VITEK and VITEK JR as well as VIDAS, a companion system that detects bacteria, viruses, etc. from patient specimens. The company was originally created by McDonnell Douglas, the NASA contractor.

  17. Communication systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives a survey of the field of data communication. The topics covered are: Types of communication, protocols, communication control systems, communication equipment and techniques, and types of data nets. Further, some of the data nets in use today, and the techniques applied in their implementation, are described. The intent of the paper is not to give an in-depth analysis of the various data communication techniques; rather, to describe the principles and problems involved in the construction of a state-of-the-art communication system. (Auth.)

  18. Lindenmayer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkala, Juha

    The theory of Lindenmayer systems studies free monoid morphisms, free monoid substitutions and their iterations. In this chapter, we discuss similar ideas in a more general framework. Instead of a free monoid, we consider the free semi-algebra S consisting of polynomials with non-commuting variables in Σ and coefficients in a semiring S and we study the iteration of endomorphisms of S. We allow various modes of iteration and we consider various classes of morphisms. Classical L systems are obtained as special cases by taking S to be the Boolean semiring. Our approach also generalizes the theory of algebraic series in noncommuting variables.

  19. Neuromodulatory Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard eWerner

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We examine the interactions and interdependencies between Neuroglia, the Brain-Cell Microenvironment, and the processes commonly subsumed under Neuromodulation. The interactions of the component processes covering a wide spectrum of frequencies are designated as Neuromodulatory Systems (NMS. This implies NMS's scale-invariance as the capacity of linking actions across many time scales, and self-similarity at any scale. These features endow NMS with the ability to respond adaptively to neural impulse traffic of an unpredictably wide frequency spectrum. In this preliminary perspective, the components of NMS are only outlined based on concepts of Complex Systems Dynamics. However, their interactions must be formally elaborated in further investigations.

  20. Superpave System

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    The Superpave is the acronym for 'SUperior PERforming Asphalt PAVEments' system. It was developed by Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP) to give highway engineers and contractors the tools they need to design asphalt pavements that will perform better under extremes of temperature and heavy traffic loads.

  1. Solar system

    CERN Document Server

    Homer, Charlene

    2007-01-01

    Thrill young astronomers with a journey through our Solar System. Find out all about the Inner and Outer Planets, the Moon, Stars, Constellations, Asteroids, Meteors and Comets. Using simplified language and vocabulary, concepts such as planetary orbits, the asteroid belt, the lunar cycle and phases of the moon, and shooting stars are all explored.

  2. Hierarchical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    The thesis addresses the long-term dynamical evolution of hierarchical multiple systems. First, we consider the evolution of orbits of stars orbiting a supermassive black hole (SBH). We study the long-term evolution and compute tidal disruption rates of stars by the SBH. Such disruption events revea

  3. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  4. Transport system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenth, K.F.

    1999-01-01

    The transport system comprises at least one road surface (2) and at least one vehicle (4) on wheels (6). The road surface (2) has a substantially bowl-shaped cross section and the vehicle (4) is designed so that the wheels (6) run directly on the road surface (2) while the road surface (2) acts as a

  5. Cognitive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    for automatic extraction and organization of meaning, purpose, and intentions in interplay with the environment (machines, artifacts and users) beyond current systems with build-in semantic representations and ontologies—in particular in terms of the interaction with users (users-in-the-loop models) through...

  6. System Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morecroft, John

    System dynamics is an approach for thinking about and simulating situations and organisations of all kinds and sizes by visualising how the elements fit together, interact and change over time. This chapter, written by John Morecroft, describes modern system dynamics which retains the fundamentals developed in the 1950s by Jay W. Forrester of the MIT Sloan School of Management. It looks at feedback loops and time delays that affect system behaviour in a non-linear way, and illustrates how dynamic behaviour depends upon feedback loop structures. It also recognises improvements as part of the ongoing process of managing a situation in order to achieve goals. Significantly it recognises the importance of context, and practitioner skills. Feedback systems thinking views problems and solutions as being intertwined. The main concepts and tools: feedback structure and behaviour, causal loop diagrams, dynamics, are practically illustrated in a wide variety of contexts from a hot water shower through to a symphony orchestra and the practical application of the approach is described through several real examples of its use for strategic planning and evaluation.

  7. Irrigation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Under contract with Marshall Space Flight Center, Midwest Research Institute compiled a Lubrication Handbook intended as a reference source for designers and manufacturers of aerospace hardware and crews responsible for maintenance of such equipment. Engineers of Lindsay Manufacturing Company learned of this handbook through NASA Tech Briefs and used it for supplemental information in redesigning gear boxes for their center pivot agricultural irrigation system.

  8. Impact response of US Army and National Football League helmet pad systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, W C; King, M J

    2011-02-18

    experimental helmet impact certification tests performed by USAARL, who provided data for comparison. The goal of this set of simulations was to demonstrate the overall validity of LLNL's computational analyses and methods and understand the general physics of helmet impacts. In these tests and the corresponding simulations, an inverted ACH containing pads and a head-form are dropped onto a hemispherical anvil, at 10 and 14.14 ft/s impact velocities. The simulations predicted peak accelerations (the metric used by USAARL for comparing the performance of pad systems), rebound velocities, and impact durations consistent with the experimental data, thus demonstrating the validity and relevance of the simulation methods. Because the NFL pad systems are approximately double the thickness of the U.S. Army pads, they do not fit into the ACH. As a result, the NFL pads could not be simply placed into an ACH shell in either a simulation or an experiment without modifying their size and shape. Since impact mitigation depends critically on the available stopping distance and the area over which the stopping force is applied, it is important to consider identically shaped pads in order to compare their performance in a fair and meaningful manner. Consequently, the second set of simulations utilized a simplified simulation geometry consisting of a 5 kg cylindrical impactor (equal in mass to a head) striking equally sized pads from each manufacturer. The simulated bilayer foam pads had the same proportions of hard and soft foam as the actual pad systems, while the Xenith pads were simulated as a bilayer foam pad with material properties adjusted to give the same response as the actual Xenith pads. The effects of trapped air were included in the simulations of the Team Wendy and Oregon Aero pads. All simulations used material properties derived from the experiments conducted at LLNL. The acceleration history of the center of mass of the impactor was used to calculate the Head Injury

  9. Systemic Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poletto, Marco; Pasquero, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    This is a manual investigating the subject of urban ecology and systemic development from the perspective of architectural design. It sets out to explore two main goals: to discuss the contemporary relevance of a systemic practice to architectural design, and to share a toolbox of informational...... design protocols developed to describe the city as a territory of self-organization. Collecting together nearly a decade of design experiments by the authors and their practice, ecoLogicStudio, the book discusses key disciplinary definitions such as ecologic urbanism, algorithmic architecture, bottom......-up or tactical design, behavioural space and the boundary of the natural and the artificial realms within the city and architecture. A new kind of "real-time world-city" is illustrated in the form of an operational design manual for the assemblage of proto-architectures, the incubation of proto...

  10. [Systemic sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinke, Susanne; Riemekasten, Gabriela

    2016-04-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a challenging and heterogeneous disease due to the involvement of multiple organs and the high impact on morbidity and quality of life. Lung fibrosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and cardiac manifestations are main causes of systemic sclerosis-related deaths. In addition, patients suffer from a various range of co-morbidities such as malnutrition, depression, osteoporosis, malignancies, which are increased in these patients and have to be identified and treated. Early assessment of organ damage is a key to therapeutic success. The discovery of pathogenic autoantibodies combined with increased evidence of effective immunosuppressive and vasoactive treatment strategies are major developments in the therapy of the disease. At present, several clinical studies are ongoing and some of the biological therapies are promising.

  11. TUBO system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings recently incorporated to TUBO system like the seismic analysis and the stress verification acccording to ASME-Boiler Rule and Pressure Vessel Code-section III are presented. The seismic analysis comprehend the consideration of uniform motion of the support, its multiple excitation, and the attainment of the spectral response for both cases. The module for stress verification uses stresses resulting fromthe combination of the loads specified by the user, in the automatic verification of permissible stresses for the pipings class 1 and 2, based on criteria NB-3650 and NC-3650 of ASME. The implementation of these proceedings in the TUBO system are discussed and a numerical example that covers the different phases of a stress analysis in a piping is presented

  12. Bilateral system. The ABACC system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After relating the antecedents of the creation of the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for the Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC), the paper describes the common system of accounting and control set up by Argentina and Brazil. The organization of ABACC is also outlined

  13. Systems paleobiology

    OpenAIRE

    Knoll, Andrew Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Systems paleobiology seeks to interpret the history of life within the framework of Earth’s environmental history, using physiology as the conceptual bridge between paleontological and geochemical data sets. In some cases, physiological performance can be estimated directly and quantitatively from fossils—this is commonly the case for vascular plant remains. In other instances, statistical inferences about physiology can be made on the basis of phylogenetic relationships. Examples from resear...

  14. Italgrip System

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    The ever increasing number of registered vehicles has resulted in, up until the present time, a parallel increase in the number of road accidents. One of the reasons for this is that the quality of the road surface has not adequately kept pace with the increased volume of traffic. The Italgrip System increases skid resistance, reduces hydroplaning risk, reduces noise, and reduces salt consumption and can be applied to asphalt, concrete, or steel surfaces. It has been applied to several roadwa...

  15. Neuromodulatory systems

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Gerhard; Mitterauer, Bernhard J.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the interactions and interdependencies between Neuroglia, the Brain-Cell Microenvironment, and the processes commonly subsumed under Neuromodulation. The interactions of the component processes covering a wide spectrum of frequencies are designated as Neuromodulatory Systems (NMS). This implies NMS's scale-invariance as the capacity of linking actions across many time scales, and self-similarity at any scale. These features endow NMS with the ability to respond adaptively to neural...

  16. Neuromodulatory Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gerhard eWerner; Mitterauer, Bernhard J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We examine the interactions and interdependencies between Neuroglia, the Brain-Cell Microenvironment, and the processes commonly subsumed under Neuromodulation. The interactions of the component processes covering a wide spectrum of frequencies are designated as Neuromodulatory Systems (NMS). This implies NMS's scale-invariance as the capacity of linking actions across many time scales, and self-similarity at any scale. These features endow NMS with the ability to respond adaptively ...

  17. Organizational Systems

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Kirk A. Astroth: So...You Want to Serve on The NAE4-HA Board! Marilyn Corbin: Diversity in Action: Promising Practices of CASD. Teresa Hogue: Can Extension Programs Afford Not to Invest in Business Plans? Dallas L. Holmes: FOCIS an Extension Web-Based Accountability in Action Reporting System. Maureen Hosty: 4-H Wildlife Stewards- Unleashing the Force and Vitality of Communities. Beverly Kelbaugh: Identifying Professional Development Needs of Extension Personnel. Jane E. Keyser: Property Tax ...

  18. Security system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Mark J.; Kuca, Michal; Aragon, Mona L.

    2016-02-02

    A security system includes a structure having a structural surface. The structure is sized to contain an asset therein and configured to provide a forceful breaching delay. The structure has an opening formed therein to permit predetermined access to the asset contained within the structure. The structure includes intrusion detection features within or associated with the structure that are activated in response to at least a partial breach of the structure.

  19. Systemic amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechalekar, Ashutosh D; Gillmore, Julian D; Hawkins, Philip N

    2016-06-25

    Tissue deposition of protein fibrils causes a group of rare diseases called systemic amyloidoses. This Seminar focuses on changes in their epidemiology, the current approach to diagnosis, and advances in treatment. Systemic light chain (AL) amyloidosis is the most common of these conditions, but wild-type transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis (ATTRwt) is increasingly being diagnosed. Typing of amyloid fibrils, a critical determinant of therapy, has improved with the wide availability of laser capture and mass spectrometry from fixed histological tissue sections. Specific and accurate evaluation of cardiac amyloidosis is now possible using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac repurposing of bone scintigraphy tracers. Survival in AL amyloidosis has improved markedly as novel chemotherapy agents have become available, but challenges remain in advanced disease. Early diagnosis, a key to better outcomes, still remains elusive. Broadening the amyloid-specific therapeutic landscape to include RNA inhibitors, fibril formation stabilisers and inhibitors, and immunotherapeutic targeting of amyloid deposits holds promise to transform outcomes in systemic amyloidoses. PMID:26719234

  20. Complex Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum instanton (QI approximation is recently proposed for the evaluations of the chemical reaction rate constants with use of full dimensional potential energy surfaces. Its strategy is to use the instanton mechanism and to approximate time-dependent quantum dynamics to the imaginary time propagation of the quantities of partition function. It thus incorporates the properties of the instanton idea and the quantum effect of partition function and can be applied to chemical reactions of complex systems. In this paper, we present the QI approach and its applications to several complex systems mainly done by us. The concrete systems include, (1 the reaction of H+CH4→H2+CH3, (2 the reaction of H+SiH4→H2+SiH3, (3 H diffusion on Ni(100 surface; and (4 surface-subsurface transport and interior migration for H/Ni. Available experimental and other theoretical data are also presented for the purpose of comparison.

  1. Impact response of US Army and National Football League helmet pad systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, W C; King, M J

    2011-02-18

    experimental helmet impact certification tests performed by USAARL, who provided data for comparison. The goal of this set of simulations was to demonstrate the overall validity of LLNL's computational analyses and methods and understand the general physics of helmet impacts. In these tests and the corresponding simulations, an inverted ACH containing pads and a head-form are dropped onto a hemispherical anvil, at 10 and 14.14 ft/s impact velocities. The simulations predicted peak accelerations (the metric used by USAARL for comparing the performance of pad systems), rebound velocities, and impact durations consistent with the experimental data, thus demonstrating the validity and relevance of the simulation methods. Because the NFL pad systems are approximately double the thickness of the U.S. Army pads, they do not fit into the ACH. As a result, the NFL pads could not be simply placed into an ACH shell in either a simulation or an experiment without modifying their size and shape. Since impact mitigation depends critically on the available stopping distance and the area over which the stopping force is applied, it is important to consider identically shaped pads in order to compare their performance in a fair and meaningful manner. Consequently, the second set of simulations utilized a simplified simulation geometry consisting of a 5 kg cylindrical impactor (equal in mass to a head) striking equally sized pads from each manufacturer. The simulated bilayer foam pads had the same proportions of hard and soft foam as the actual pad systems, while the Xenith pads were simulated as a bilayer foam pad with material properties adjusted to give the same response as the actual Xenith pads. The effects of trapped air were included in the simulations of the Team Wendy and Oregon Aero pads. All simulations used material properties derived from the experiments conducted at LLNL. The acceleration history of the center of mass of the impactor was used to calculate the Head Injury

  2. Ration System

    OpenAIRE

    Vymazalova, Hana

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of rations can be found in documents from different period of the Egyptian history but the general features of the ration system is not easy to trace. Most of the sources are the more or less fragmentary lists of wages/payments that reflect various conditions, such as status of the recipients, period to which the payment corresponds etc, that are not always known to us. Other documents provide us with categories of allowances ascribed to the workmen and officials who particip...

  3. Sterilization System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Cox Sterile Products, Inc.'s Rapid Heat Transfer Sterilizer employs a heat exchange process that induces rapid air movement; the air becomes the heat transfer medium, maintaining a uniform temperature of 375 degrees Fahrenheit. It features pushbutton controls for three timing cycles for different instrument loads, a six-minute cycle for standard unpackaged instruments, eight minutes for certain specialized dental/medical instruments and 12 minutes for packaged instruments which can then be stored in a drawer in sterile condition. System will stay at 375 degrees all day. Continuous operation is not expensive because of the sterilizer's very low power requirements.

  4. Bearing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapich, Davorin D.

    1987-01-01

    A bearing system includes backup bearings for supporting a rotating shaft upon failure of primary bearings. In the preferred embodiment, the backup bearings are rolling element bearings having their rolling elements disposed out of contact with their associated respective inner races during normal functioning of the primary bearings. Displacement detection sensors are provided for detecting displacement of the shaft upon failure of the primary bearings. Upon detection of the failure of the primary bearings, the rolling elements and inner races of the backup bearings are brought into mutual contact by axial displacement of the shaft.

  5. Linear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bourlès, Henri

    2013-01-01

    Linear systems have all the necessary elements (modeling, identification, analysis and control), from an educational point of view, to help us understand the discipline of automation and apply it efficiently. This book is progressive and organized in such a way that different levels of readership are possible. It is addressed both to beginners and those with a good understanding of automation wishing to enhance their knowledge on the subject. The theory is rigorously developed and illustrated by numerous examples which can be reproduced with the help of appropriate computation software. 60 exe

  6. Nuclear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Todreas, Neil E

    2011-01-01

    Principal Characteristics of Power ReactorsIntroductionPower CyclesPrimary Coolant SystemsReactor CoresFuel AssembliesAdvanced Water- and Gas-Cooled Reactors (Generation III And III+)Advanced Thermal and Fast Neutron Spectrum Reactors (Generation IV)ReferencesProblemsThermal Design Principles and ApplicationIntroductionOverall Plant Characteristics Influenced by Thermal Hydraulic ConsiderationsEnergy Production and Transfer ParametersThermal Design LimitsThermal Design MarginFigures of Merit for Core Thermal PerformanceThe Inverted Fuel ArrayThe Equivalent Annulus ApproximationReferencesProble

  7. EDITORIAL: Focus on Mechanical Systems at the Quantum Limit FOCUS ON MECHANICAL SYSTEMS AT THE QUANTUM LIMIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspelmeyer, Markus; Schwab, Keith

    2008-09-01

    diverse backgrounds and approaches of the researchers. As diverse as the approaches are the manifold of goals and perspectives for operating mechanical systems close to or within the quantum regime. Already now, nanomechanical sensors achieve single-molecule mass detection and magnetic resonance force detection from single-electron spins although they are operated far from quantum. Quantum-limited mechanical devices promise a new technology with hitherto unachieved performance for high-resolution sensing. This is also of high relevance for macroscopic mechanical resonators used in gravitational wave detectors. Furthermore, the increasing capability to couple mechanical modes to individual quantum systems raises the interesting question of whether mechanics can serve as a quantum bus in hybrid implementations of quantum information processing. Finally, the possibility of generating quantum superposition states that involve displacements of a massive macroscopic object (such as the center of mass of a mechanical beam) provides a completely new parameter regime for testing quantum theory over the amazing range from nanomechanical objects of several picograms up to gram-scale mirrors used in gravitational wave interferometers. We are looking forward to these fascinating developments! This Focus Issue is intended to highlight the present status of the field and to provide both introduction and motivation for students and researchers who want to get familiar with this exciting area or even want to join it. It also complements the conference activities of our community during the last year, where a series of dedicated invited sessions at several international conferences (APS March Meeting 2008, CLEO/QELS 2008, OSA Frontiers in Optics 2008, PQE 2008/2009 etc) culminated in the first Gordon Conference on 'Mechanical Systems at the Quantum Limit'. Given the fast development of the field it was not surprising to see that during the collection of the following contributions new

  8. System update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Laser Experiments Analysis Facility consists of two DEC computers - PDP-11/34 and a VAX/VMS-11/780; and a Perkin-Elmer 1010GM microdensitometer - a photodigitizing system (PDS). The PDP-11/34 is a dedicated machine used to control the PDS, and the VAX is used for storage and analysis of ICF data and for general purpose computing. A one-way, fiber-optic link connects the LEAF VAX to the Nova VAX for transfer of shot data. Over the past year, major improvements were made in the hardware, system software, and applications codes. The VAX hardware was modernized by the addition of two high-speed tape drives and four Winchester disks. The disks have a combined capacity of over 4 gigabytes. A number of special peripherals were also added: an array processor, an IBM Personal Computer (PC), a Versatec Random Element Processor (REP), a high-resolution color monitor, and two 1000-line-per-minute Versatec printer/plotters. Currently on order is an upgrade to the VAX central processing unit (CPU) that will increase its computing speed by about 50%

  9. Expert Systems: What Is an Expert System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Beverly K.; Main, Linda

    1994-01-01

    Describes expert systems and discusses their use in libraries. Highlights include parts of an expert system; expert system shells; an example of how to build an expert system; a bibliography of 34 sources of information on expert systems in libraries; and a list of 10 expert system shells used in libraries. (Contains five references.) (LRW)

  10. System analysis and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book deals with information technology and business process, information system architecture, methods of system development, plan on system development like problem analysis and feasibility analysis, cases for system development, comprehension of analysis of users demands, analysis of users demands using traditional analysis, users demands analysis using integrated information system architecture, system design using integrated information system architecture, system implementation, and system maintenance.

  11. Turbocompound system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, L.D.

    1986-05-06

    A turbocompound system is described for improving the performance of an internal combustion engine without substantially increasing an end viewed profile of the engine to which it is mounted in use. The system consists of: (a) an exhaust driven turbocharger means having an exhaust manifold means extending in an axial direction for collecting exhaust gases from engine cylinders and delivering the gases to an outlet end thereof, exhaust turbine means for extracting energy from the exhaust gases, the exhaust turbine means being provided with an inlet connected to the outlet end of the manifold and an outlet for discharging the exhaust gases, compressor means coupled to the exhaust turbine means for providing a supply of charge air under pressure to an air outlet thereof for delivery to air intake means of an internal combustion engine in use; (b) a power turbine means for extracting additional energy from the exhaust gases, the power turbine means having an intake connected to the outlet of the exhaust turbine means, and mounting means on a side of the power turbine means facing in a direction parallel to the axial direction of the exhaust manifold means that is constructed for being mounted, in use, on an end of an engine adjacent one end of a crankshaft of the engine; and (c) coupling means connected to the power turbine means for transferring mechanical energy produced by the power turbine means, the coupling means extending from the power turbine means to a power take-off end in a direction parallel to the axial length of the exhaust manifold means by an amount that is sufficient for enabling the power take-off end to be connected, in use, to an opposite end of the engine crankshaft from the one end thereof in a manner for transferring the mechanical energy produced by the power turbine means adjacent the one end of the crankshaft to the opposite end of the crankshaft without having to pass therethrough.

  12. Binding energies and scattering observables in the $^{4}He_{3}$ atomic system

    CERN Document Server

    Motovilov, A K; Sofianos, S A; Kolganova, E A

    2001-01-01

    The $^4$He$_3$ bound states and the scattering of a $^4$He atom off a $^4$He dimer at ultra-low energies are investigated using a hard-core version of the Faddeev differential equations. Various realistic $^4$He-$^4$He interactions were employed, amomg them the LM2M2 potential by Aziz and Slaman and the recent TTY potential by Tang, Toennies and Yiu. The ground state and the excited (Efimov) state obtained are compared with other results. The scattering lengths and the atom-diatom phase shifts were calculated for center of mass energies up to 2.45 mK. It was found that the LM2M2 and TTY potentials, although of quite different structure, give practically the same bound-state and scattering results.

  13. Study of the Exclusive Initial-State-Radiation Production of the DDbar System

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Graugès-Pous, E; López, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes-Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabé, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schröder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Bequilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Bailey, D; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; De La Vaissière, C; Hamon, O; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pérez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A

    2007-01-01

    A search for charmonium and other new states is performed in a study of exclusive initial-state-radiation production of D Dbar events from electron-positron annihilations at a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 384 fb-1 and was recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II storage ring. The D Dbar mass spectrum shows clear evidence of the psi(3770) plus other structures near 3.9, 4.1, and 4.4 GeV/c^2. No evidence for Y(4260) -> D Dbar is observed, leading to an upper limit of B(Y(4260) -> D Dbar)/B(Y(4260) -> J/psi pi+ pi-) < 1.0 at 90 % confidence level.

  14. Systems engineering simplified

    CERN Document Server

    Cloutier, Robert; Bone, Mary Alice

    2015-01-01

    IntroductionOverviewDiscussion of Common TerminologyThe Case for Systems EngineeringA Brief History of Systems EngineeringSystem ExamplesSummaryThe System Life CycleManaging System Development-The Vee ModelSystem ProductionSystem Utilization and SupportSystem Retirement and DisposalOther Systems Engineering Development ModelsSpiral ModelAgile Model for Systems EngineeringSystem of InterestAbstraction and DecompositionIntegrationDeveloping and Managing RequirementsCyclone Requiremen

  15. Chem systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that world styrene demand, paced by a near doubling of combined requirements in East Asia and Oceania, could reach 19.3 million metric tons by 2000, an average growth rate of 3.7%/year. So concludes Chem Systems Inc., Tarrytown, N.Y., in a study of world styrene markets through the end of the century. Pacific Rim styrene production and consumption throughout the 1990s are predicted to make up increasingly larger shares of world markets, while demand and production lag in the U.S. and western Europe. Demand and capacity in other parts of the world will grow in real terms, increasing combined market shares only slightly. Most of the increase will be driven by demand in East Asia and Oceania, where consumption by century's end is expected to increase 4.48 million metric tons from 2.25 million tons in 1991. Meantime, Japan's styrene demand in 2000 is projected at 2.64 million tons, a 500,000 ton increase from 1991 demand but a net market loss of 1.9%

  16. Cardiovascular System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    7.1 Heart failure2007175 Effects of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide on aldosterone and endothelin-1 in treatment of heart failure. FU Yao(付尧),et al. Dept Cardiol, 1st Affili Hosp, China Med Univ, Shenyang 110001. Chin Cir J 2007;22(1):35-37. Obiective To study the efficacy and the effects of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide(rhBNP) on aldosterone and endothelin-1 in the treatment of congestive heart failure(CHF).Methods A randomized, open, controlled clinical trial was conducted in 35 patients with CHF. Eighteen received rhBNP and 17 were treated with nitroglycerin as controls. The changes hemodynamic indexes, the plasma concentrations of K+, Na+, aldo-sterone(ALD) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) in order to examine the efficacy and mechanism of rhBNP. Results Between experiment and control groups significant differences were found in the decreasing of PCWP, PAP and plasma concentration of Na+, ALD, ET-1, and in the increasing of plasma concentration of K+ (P<0.05~0.01). Conclusion The mechanism of rhBNP may be associated with the overactivation of renin-angiotension-aldosterone system, and the inhibited production of endothelin-1.

  17. Endocrine System (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Endocrine System KidsHealth > For Teens > Endocrine System Print A A ... called the endocrine system . What Is the Endocrine System? Although we rarely think about the endocrine system, ...

  18. Prosthetic Knee Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of fluid control systems — pneumatic (using air) and hydraulic (using fluid). Pneumatic control. These systems: compress air ... control than friction systems are less effective than hydraulic systems. Hydraulic control. These systems: use liquid (usually ...

  19. System safety education focused on system management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grose, V. L.

    1971-01-01

    System safety is defined and characteristics of the system are outlined. Some of the principle characteristics include role of humans in hazard analysis, clear language for input and output, system interdependence, self containment, and parallel analysis of elements.

  20. Respiratory System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    8.1 Respiratory failure2007204 Comparison of the effects of BiPAP ventilation combined with lung recruitment maneuvers and low tidal volume A/C ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. WANG Xiaozhi(王晓芝),et al. Dept Respir & Intensive Care Unit, Binzhou Med Coll, Binzhou 256603. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2007;30(1):44-47. Objective To compare the effects of BiPAP ventilation combined with lung recruitment maneuvers(LRM) with low tidal volume A/C ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Methods A prospective, randomized comparison of BiPAP mechanical ventilation combined with lung recruitment maneuvers(test group) with low tidal volume A/C ventilation (control group) was conducted in 28 patients with ARDS. FiO2/PaO2 ratio, respiratory system compliance(Cs), central venous pressure (CVP), duration of ventilation support were recorded at 0 h, 48 h and 72 h separately. The ventilation associated lung injury and mortality at 28 d were also recorded. Results The FiO2/PaO2 ratio were (298±16) and (309±16) cm H2O, Cs were (38.4±2.2) and (42.0±1.3) ml/cm H2O, CVP were (13.8±0.8) and (11.6±0.7) cm H2O in the test group at 48 h and 72 h separately. In the control group, FiO2/PaO2 ratio were (212±12) and (246±17) cm H2O, Cs were (29.5±1.3) and (29.0±1.0) ml/cm H2O, CVP were 18.6±1.1 and (16.8±1.0) cm H2O. The results were better in the test group as compared with the control group (t=10.03-29. 68, all P<0.01). The duration of ventilation support in the test group was shorter than the control group [(14±3) d vs (19±3)d, t=4.80, P<0.01]. The mortality in 28 d and ventilation associated lung injury were similar in the two groups. Conclusion The results show that combination of LRM with BiPAP mode ventilation, as compared with the control group, contributes to the improved FiO2/PaO2 ratio, pulmonary compliance, stable homodynamic and shorter duration of ventilation support in patients with ARDs.

  1. Design, dynamics and control of an Adaptive Singularity-Free Control Moment Gyroscope actuator for microspacecraft Attitude Determination and Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Sasi Prabhakaran

    Design, dynamics, control and implementation of a novel spacecraft attitude control actuator called the "Adaptive Singularity-free Control Moment Gyroscope" (ASCMG) is presented in this dissertation. In order to construct a comprehensive attitude dynamics model of a spacecraft with internal actuators, the dynamics of a spacecraft with an ASCMG, is obtained in the framework of geometric mechanics using the principles of variational mechanics. The resulting dynamics is general and complete model, as it relaxes the simplifying assumptions made in prior literature on Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs) and it also addresses the adaptive parameters in the dynamics formulation. The simplifying assumptions include perfect axisymmetry of the rotor and gimbal structures, perfect alignment of the centers of mass of the gimbal and the rotor etc. These set of simplifying assumptions imposed on the design and dynamics of CMGs leads to adverse effects on their performance and results in high manufacturing cost. The dynamics so obtained shows the complex nonlinear coupling between the internal degrees of freedom associated with an ASCMG and the spacecraft bus's attitude motion. By default, the general ASCMG cluster can function as a Variable Speed Control Moment Gyroscope, and reduced to function in CMG mode by spinning the rotor at constant speed, and it is shown that even when operated in CMG mode, the cluster can be free from kinematic singularities. This dynamics model is then extended to include the effects of multiple ASCMGs placed in the spacecraft bus, and sufficient conditions for non-singular ASCMG cluster configurations are obtained to operate the cluster both in VSCMG and CMG modes. The general dynamics model of the ASCMG is then reduced to that of conventional VSCMGs and CMGs by imposing the standard set of simplifying assumptions used in prior literature. The adverse effects of the simplifying assumptions that lead to the complexities in conventional CMG design, and

  2. Feasibility study of multipoint based laser alignment system for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, G; Mainaud-Durand, H; Piedigrossi, D; Geiger, A

    2012-01-01

    CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) is a study for a future electron-positron collider that would allow physicists to explore a new energy region beyond the capabilities oftoday’s particle accelerators. Alignment is one of the major challenges within the CLIC study in order to achieve the high requirement of a multi-TeV center of mass colliding beam energy range (nominal 3 TeV). To reach this energy in a realistic and cost efficient scenario all accelerator components have to be aligned with an accuracy of 10 μm over a sliding window of 200 m. The demand for a straight line reference is so far based on stretched wires coupled with Wire Positioning Sensors (WPS). These solutions are currently further developed inorder to reduce the drawbacks which are mainly given by their costs and difficult implementation. However, it should be validated through inter-comparison with a solution ideally based on a different physical principle. Therefore, a new metrological approach is proposed using a laser beam as straight lin...

  3. PERIODIC MOTIONS OF SPINNING RIGID SPACECRAFT UNDER INFLUENCE OF GRAVITATIONAL AND MAGNETIC FIELDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yehia A. Abdel-aziz; M.H. Yehia; F. A. Abd El-Salam; M. Radwan

    2006-01-01

    The motion of a magnetized axisymmetric spacecraft about its center of mass in a circular orbit is considered, taking the gravitational and magnetic effects of the central body into account. Equations of motion of the reduced system are transformed to equations of plane motion of a charged particle under the action of electric and magnetic fields. Stationary motions of the system are determined and periodic motions near to them are constructed using the Lyapounoff theorem of the holomorphic integral.

  4. Accuracy of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame origin and Earth expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, X; Collilieux, X.; Altamimi, Z.; L. L. A. Vermeersen; Gross, R.S.; Fukumori, I.

    2011-01-01

    The International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) is a fundamental datum for high‐precision orbit tracking, navigation, and global change monitoring. Accurately realizing and maintaining ITRF origin at the mean Earth system center of mass (CM) is critical to surface and spacecraft based geodetic measurements including those of sea level rise and its sources. Although ITRF combines data from satellite laser ranging (SLR), Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), Global Positioning System (...

  5. Geoinformation Systems as Automated Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Pavlov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes geoinformation systems (GIS development as management systems, highlights the basic principles of decision-making in GIS, describes GIS storage systems and decision-making systems, discloses the use of GIS for the territory management and briefly describes the use of GIS for transport management and monitoring.

  6. Information Systems in the Polish Payment System

    OpenAIRE

    Murowaniecki, Łukasz; Woźniacki, Konrad

    2007-01-01

    The paper focuses on computerised information systems responsible for payment information exchange in Polish payment system. Firstly some terms, connected with the topic of funds transfer system, are ordered. Then, relying on the taxonomy, the paper presents a comprehensive view of domestic payment system.

  7. Geoinformation Systems as Automated Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Andrey Pavlov

    2013-01-01

    The article analyzes geoinformation systems (GIS) development as management systems, highlights the basic principles of decision-making in GIS, describes GIS storage systems and decision-making systems, discloses the use of GIS for the territory management and briefly describes the use of GIS for transport management and monitoring.

  8. Square conservation systems and Hamiltonian systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王斌; 曾庆存; 季仲贞

    1995-01-01

    The internal and external relationships between the square conservation scheme and the symplectic scheme are revealed by a careful study on the interrelation between the square conservation system and the Hamiltonian system in the linear situation, thus laying a theoretical basis for the application and extension of symplectic schemes to square conservations systems, and of those schemes with quadratic conservation properties to Hamiltonian systems.

  9. Networked control of microgrid system of systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Magdi S.; Rahman, Mohamed Saif Ur; AL-Sunni, Fouad M.

    2016-08-01

    The microgrid has made its mark in distributed generation and has attracted widespread research. However, microgrid is a complex system which needs to be viewed from an intelligent system of systems perspective. In this paper, a network control system of systems is designed for the islanded microgrid system consisting of three distributed generation units as three subsystems supplying a load. The controller stabilises the microgrid system in the presence of communication infractions such as packet dropouts and delays. Simulation results are included to elucidate the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy.

  10. Understanding Patterns for System of Systems Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazman, Rick; Schmid, Klaus; Nielsen, Claus Ballegård;

    2013-01-01

    Architecting systems of systems is well known to be a formidable challenge. A major aspect in this is defining the integration among the systems that constitute the system of systems. In this paper, we aim to support the SoS architect by systematically developing a way to characterize system...... of systems integration patterns. These characteristics at the same time support the architecting process by highlighting important issues a SoS architect needs to consider. We discuss the consolidated template and illustrate it with an example pattern. We also discuss the integration of this novel pattern...

  11. Concept and System of Personification Control System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai,Fengshuang; Yin,Yixin; Tu,Xuyan; Zhang,Ying

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides the system and conception of the Personification Control System (PCS) on the basis of Intelligent Control System based on Artificial life (ICS/AL), Artificial Emotion, Humanoid Control, and Intelligent Control System based on Field bus. According to system science and deciding of organize of biology, the Pyramid System of PCS are created. Then Pyramid System of PCS which is made up of PCS1/H, PCS1/S, PCS1/O, PCS1/C and PCS1/G is described.

  12. Systems design of long-life systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, R. F., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A long-life system is defined as a system which cannot be life-tested in its operational environment. Another restriction is that preventive maintenance and repair shall be either impossible or economically disadvantageous. Examples of such systems include planetary spacecraft, communication satellites, undersea telephone cables, and nuclear power plants. The questions discussed are related to the implementation of system functions, approaches to determine the required level of system reliability, and aspects of tradeoffs between requirements and reliability.

  13. Systems Engineering Management Education in Embedded System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Masahiro

    Engineers with system architecture design and project management abilities are required in the field of embedded system development. In university, however, educations are mainly focused on computer science and programming; systems engineering and project management education have been disregard. We implemented educational curriculum of systems engineering and project management in embedded system for graduate program. In this paper the course design, execution and evaluation are described.

  14. Your Digestive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Digestive System KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Digestive System Print A ... flush we were talking about! Dig That Digestive System You can help your digestive system by drinking ...

  15. Male Reproductive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Male Reproductive System KidsHealth > For Teens > Male Reproductive System Print A ... reproductive systems. continue What Is the Male Reproductive System? Most species have two sexes: male and female. ...

  16. Multiple System Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multiple System Atrophy Information Page Condensed from Multiple System Atrophy ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Multiple System Atrophy? Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a progressive ...

  17. Situation awareness with systems of systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tretmans, Jan; Borth, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book discusses various aspects, challenges, and solutions for developing systems-of-systems for situation awareness, using applications in the domain of maritime safety and security.  Topics include advanced, multi-objective visualization methods for situation awareness, stochastic outlier selection, rule-based anomaly detection, an ontology-based event model for semantic reasoning, new methods for semi-automatic generation of adapters bridging communication gaps, security policies for systems-of-systems, trust assessment, and methods to deal with the dynamics of systems-of-systems in run-time monitoring, testing, and diagnosis. Architectural considerations for designing information-centric systems-of-systems such as situation awareness systems, and an integrated demonstrator implementing many of the investigated aspects, complete the book.

  18. System of systems modeling and analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, James E.; Anderson, Dennis James; Longsine, Dennis E. (Intera, Inc., Austin, TX); Shirah, Donald N.

    2005-01-01

    This report documents the results of an LDRD program entitled 'System of Systems Modeling and Analysis' that was conducted during FY 2003 and FY 2004. Systems that themselves consist of multiple systems (referred to here as System of Systems or SoS) introduce a level of complexity to systems performance analysis and optimization that is not readily addressable by existing capabilities. The objective of the 'System of Systems Modeling and Analysis' project was to develop an integrated modeling and simulation environment that addresses the complex SoS modeling and analysis needs. The approach to meeting this objective involved two key efforts. First, a static analysis approach, called state modeling, has been developed that is useful for analyzing the average performance of systems over defined use conditions. The state modeling capability supports analysis and optimization of multiple systems and multiple performance measures or measures of effectiveness. The second effort involves time simulation which represents every system in the simulation using an encapsulated state model (State Model Object or SMO). The time simulation can analyze any number of systems including cross-platform dependencies and a detailed treatment of the logistics required to support the systems in a defined mission.

  19. Computer System Design System-on-Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Flynn, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The next generation of computer system designers will be less concerned about details of processors and memories, and more concerned about the elements of a system tailored to particular applications. These designers will have a fundamental knowledge of processors and other elements in the system, but the success of their design will depend on the skills in making system-level tradeoffs that optimize the cost, performance and other attributes to meet application requirements. This book provides a new treatment of computer system design, particularly for System-on-Chip (SOC), which addresses th

  20. Exclusive Initial-State-Radiation Production of the DDbar,D*Dbar, and D*D*bar Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-06-19

    We perform a study of the exclusive production of D{bar D}, D*{bar D}, and D*{bar D}* in initial-state-radiation events, from e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, to search for charmonium and possible new resonances. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 384 fb{sup -1} and was recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II storage rings. The D{bar D}, D*{bar D}, and D*{bar D}* mass spectra show clear evidence of several {psi} resonances. However, there is no evidence for Y(4260) {yields} D*{bar D} or Y(4260) {yields} D*{bar D}*.

  1. Intelligent systems technology infrastructure for integrated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Henry, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Significant advances have occurred during the last decade in intelligent systems technologies (a.k.a. knowledge-based systems, KBS) including research, feasibility demonstrations, and technology implementations in operational environments. Evaluation and simulation data obtained to date in real-time operational environments suggest that cost-effective utilization of intelligent systems technologies can be realized for Automated Rendezvous and Capture applications. The successful implementation of these technologies involve a complex system infrastructure integrating the requirements of transportation, vehicle checkout and health management, and communication systems without compromise to systems reliability and performance. The resources that must be invoked to accomplish these tasks include remote ground operations and control, built-in system fault management and control, and intelligent robotics. To ensure long-term evolution and integration of new validated technologies over the lifetime of the vehicle, system interfaces must also be addressed and integrated into the overall system interface requirements. An approach for defining and evaluating the system infrastructures including the testbed currently being used to support the on-going evaluations for the evolutionary Space Station Freedom Data Management System is presented and discussed. Intelligent system technologies discussed include artificial intelligence (real-time replanning and scheduling), high performance computational elements (parallel processors, photonic processors, and neural networks), real-time fault management and control, and system software development tools for rapid prototyping capabilities.

  2. Language as a System of Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, J. W. F.; Hervey, S. G. J.

    1975-01-01

    Based on Mulder's previous classification of all semiotic systems designed to describe the system of discrete features in human languages, this article explores a further subclassification of the genus language into species. (CLK)

  3. Modeling Flocks and Prices: Jumping Particles with an Attractive Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Balazs, Marton; Toth, Balint

    2011-01-01

    We introduce and investigate a new model of a finite number of particles jumping forward on the real line. The jump lengths are independent of everything, but the jump rate of each particle depends on the relative position of the particle compared to the center of mass of the system. The rates are higher for those left behind, and lower for those ahead of the center of mass, providing an attractive interaction keeping the particles together. We prove that in the fluid limit, as the number of particles goes to infinity, the evolution of the system is described by a mean field equation that exhibits traveling wave solutions. A connection to extreme value statistics is also provided.

  4. Modeling Flocks and Prices: Jumping Particles with an Attractive Interaction (shortened version)

    CERN Document Server

    Balazs, Marton; Toth, Balint

    2011-01-01

    We introduce and investigate a new model of a finite number of particles jumping forward on the real line. The jump lengths are independent of everything, but the jump rate of each particle depends on the relative position of the particle compared to the center of mass of the system. The rates are higher for those left behind, and lower for those ahead of the center of mass, providing an attractive interaction keeping the particles together. We prove that in the fluid limit, as the number of particles goes to infinity, the evolution of the system is described by a mean field equation that exhibits traveling wave solutions. A connection to extreme value statistics is also provided.

  5. Operating System Performance Analyzer for Embedded Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Shahzada Khayyam Nisar; Maqsood Ahmed; Huma Ayub; Iram Baig

    2011-01-01

    RTOS provides a number of services to an embedded system designs such as case management, memory management, and Resource Management to build a program. Choosing the best OS for an embedded system is based on the available OS for system designers and their previous knowledge and experience. This can cause an imbalance between the OS and embedded systems. RTOS performance analysis is critical in the design and integration of embedded software to ensure that limits the application meet at runti...

  6. LCLS XTOD Attenuator System System Concept Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishiyama, K; Roeben, M; Trent, J; Ryutov, D; Shen, S

    2006-04-12

    The attenuator system for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray Transport, Optics and Diagnostics (XTOD) system has been configured and analyzed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's New Technologies Engineering Division (NTED) as requested by the SLAC/LCLS program. The system layout, performance analyses and selection of the vacuum components are presented in this System Conceptual Review (SCR) report. Also included are the plans for prototype, procurement, mechanical integration, and the cost estimates.

  7. Game Information System

    OpenAIRE

    Spits Warnars

    2010-01-01

    In this Information system age many organizations consider information system as their weapon to compete or gain competitive advantage or give the best services for non profit organizations. Game Information System as combining Information System and game is breakthrough to achieve organizations' performance. The Game Information System will run the Information System with game and how game can be implemented to run the Information System. Game is not only for fun and entertainment, but will ...

  8. Designing information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Blethyn, Stanley G

    2014-01-01

    Designing Information Systems focuses on the processes, methodologies, and approaches involved in designing information systems. The book first describes systems, management and control, and how to design information systems. Discussions focus on documents produced from the functional construction function, users, operators, analysts, programmers and others, process management and control, levels of management, open systems, design of management information systems, and business system description, partitioning, and leveling. The text then takes a look at functional specification and functiona

  9. System Design of the SWRL Financial System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masumi

    To produce various management and accounting reports in order to maintain control of SWRL (Southwest Regional Laboratory) operational and financial activities, a computer-based SWRL financial system was developed. The system design is outlined, and various types of system inputs described. The kinds of management and accounting reports generated…

  10. Non linear system become linear system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petre Bucur

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper refers to the theory and the practice of the systems regarding non-linear systems and their applications. We aimed the integration of these systems to elaborate their response as well as to highlight some outstanding features.

  11. Modeling learning technology systems as business systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avgeriou, Paris; Retalis, Symeon; Papaspyrou, Nikolaos

    2003-01-01

    The design of Learning Technology Systems, and the Software Systems that support them, is largely conducted on an intuitive, ad hoc basis, thus resulting in inefficient systems that defectively support the learning process. There is now justifiable, increasing effort in formalizing the engineering o

  12. Optical system defect propagation in ABCD systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKinley, W.G.; Yura, H.T.; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    1988-01-01

    We describe how optical system defects (tilt/jitter, decenter, and despace) propagate through an arbitrary paraxial optical system that can be described by an ABCD ray transfer matrix. A pedagogical example is given that demonstrates the effect of alignment errors on a typical optical system...

  13. The complement system in systemic autoimmune disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Min; Daha, Mohamed R.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2010-01-01

    Complement is part of the innate immune system. Its major function is recognition and elimination of pathogens via direct killing and/or stimulation of phagocytosis. Activation of the complement system is, however, also involved in the pathogenesis of the systemic autoimmune diseases. Activation via

  14. Linking Political Systems and War Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

    2009-01-01

    military coercion to be the appropriate mean. Using the system theory and the theory of systemic risks displayed by the German sociologist Niklas Luhmann the article demonstrates how military systems due to their own autonomy and autopoiesis do not fit into the idea of political government...

  15. Expert Systems for auditing management information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheroghe Popescu

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Expert systems are built with the help of: specialised programming languages or expert system generators (shell. But this structure was reached after tens of years of work and research, because expert systems are nothing but pragmatic capitalisation of the results of research carried out in artificial intelligence and theory of knowledge.

  16. Information Systems: Towards a System of Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Saleh, Majd; Abel, Marie-Helene

    2015-01-01

    International audience Information Systems are viewed as a set of services creating a workflow of information directed to specific groups and members. This allows individuals to share ideas and their talents with other members. In such manner , tasks can be carried out both efficiently and effectively. Due to the nature of Information Systems that revolves around creating information useful to users , and in some higher forms of Information Systems creating knowledge , management of inform...

  17. Operating System Security

    CERN Document Server

    Jaeger, Trent

    2008-01-01

    Operating systems provide the fundamental mechanisms for securing computer processing. Since the 1960s, operating systems designers have explored how to build "secure" operating systems - operating systems whose mechanisms protect the system against a motivated adversary. Recently, the importance of ensuring such security has become a mainstream issue for all operating systems. In this book, we examine past research that outlines the requirements for a secure operating system and research that implements example systems that aim for such requirements. For system designs that aimed to

  18. Psychology of system design

    CERN Document Server

    Meister, D

    2014-01-01

    This is a book about systems, including: systems in which humans control machines; systems in which humans interact with humans and the machine component is relatively unimportant; systems which are heavily computerized and those that are not; and governmental, industrial, military and social systems. The book deals with both traditional systems like farming, fishing and the military, and with systems just now tentatively emerging, like the expert and the interactive computer system. The emphasis is on the system concept and its implications for analysis, design and evaluation of these many di

  19. Biomedical signals and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tranquillo, Joseph V

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical Signals and Systems is meant to accompany a one-semester undergraduate signals and systems course. It may also serve as a quick-start for graduate students or faculty interested in how signals and systems techniques can be applied to living systems. The biological nature of the examples allows for systems thinking to be applied to electrical, mechanical, fluid, chemical, thermal and even optical systems. Each chapter focuses on a topic from classic signals and systems theory: System block diagrams, mathematical models, transforms, stability, feedback, system response, control, time

  20. Lighting system with thermal management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Stecher, Thomas Elliot; Seeley, Charles Erklin; Kuenzler, Glenn Howard; Wolfe, Jr, Charles Franklin; Utturkar, Yogen Vishwas; Sharma, Rajdeep; Prabhakaran, Satish; Icoz, Tunc

    2016-10-11

    Lighting systems having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system is configured to provide an air flow, such as a unidirectional air flow, through the housing structure in order to cool the light source. The driver electronics are configured to provide power to each of the light source and the thermal management system.

  1. Lighting system with thermal management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton; Stecher, Thomas; Seeley, Charles; Kuenzler, Glenn; Wolfe, Jr., Charles; Utturkar, Yogen; Sharma, Rajdeep; Prabhakaran, Satish; Icoz, Tunc

    2013-05-07

    Lighting systems having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system is configured to provide an air flow, such as a unidirectional air flow, through the housing structure in order to cool the light source. The driver electronics are configured to provide power to each of the light source and the thermal management system.

  2. Anticipatory Postural Control of Stability during Gait Initiation Over Obstacles of Different Height and Distance Made Under Reaction-Time and Self-Initiated Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiou, Eric; Artico, Romain; Teyssedre, Claudine A.; Labaune, Ombeline; Fourcade, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Despite the abundant literature on obstacle crossing in humans, the question of how the central nervous system (CNS) controls postural stability during gait initiation with the goal to clear an obstacle remains unclear. Stabilizing features of gait initiation include anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) and lateral swing foot placement. To answer the above question, 14 participants initiated gait as fast as possible in three conditions of obstacle height, three conditions of obstacle distance and one obstacle-free (control) condition. Each of these conditions was performed with two levels of temporal pressure: reaction-time (high-pressure) and self-initiated (low-pressure) movements. A mechanical model of the body falling laterally under the influence of gravity and submitted to an elastic restoring force is proposed to assess the effect of initial (foot-off) center-of-mass position and velocity (or “initial center-of-mass set”) on the stability at foot-contact. Results showed that the anticipatory peak of mediolateral (ML) center-of-pressure shift, the initial ML center-of-mass velocity and the duration of the swing phase, of gait initiation increased with obstacle height, but not with obstacle distance. These results suggest that ML APAs are scaled with swing duration in order to maintain an equivalent stability across experimental conditions. This statement is strengthened by the results obtained with the mechanical model, which showed how stability would be degraded if there was no adaptation of the initial center-of-mass set to swing duration. The anteroposterior (AP) component of APAs varied also according to obstacle height and distance, but in an opposite way to the ML component. Indeed, results showed that the anticipatory peak of backward center-of-pressure shift and the initial forward center-of-mass set decreased with obstacle height, probably in order to limit the risk to trip over the obstacle, while the forward center-of-mass velocity at foot

  3. Anticipatory Postural Control of Stability during Gait Initiation Over Obstacles of Different Height and Distance Made Under Reaction-Time and Self-Initiated Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiou, Eric; Artico, Romain; Teyssedre, Claudine A.; Labaune, Ombeline; Fourcade, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Despite the abundant literature on obstacle crossing in humans, the question of how the central nervous system (CNS) controls postural stability during gait initiation with the goal to clear an obstacle remains unclear. Stabilizing features of gait initiation include anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) and lateral swing foot placement. To answer the above question, 14 participants initiated gait as fast as possible in three conditions of obstacle height, three conditions of obstacle distance and one obstacle-free (control) condition. Each of these conditions was performed with two levels of temporal pressure: reaction-time (high-pressure) and self-initiated (low-pressure) movements. A mechanical model of the body falling laterally under the influence of gravity and submitted to an elastic restoring force is proposed to assess the effect of initial (foot-off) center-of-mass position and velocity (or “initial center-of-mass set”) on the stability at foot-contact. Results showed that the anticipatory peak of mediolateral (ML) center-of-pressure shift, the initial ML center-of-mass velocity and the duration of the swing phase, of gait initiation increased with obstacle height, but not with obstacle distance. These results suggest that ML APAs are scaled with swing duration in order to maintain an equivalent stability across experimental conditions. This statement is strengthened by the results obtained with the mechanical model, which showed how stability would be degraded if there was no adaptation of the initial center-of-mass set to swing duration. The anteroposterior (AP) component of APAs varied also according to obstacle height and distance, but in an opposite way to the ML component. Indeed, results showed that the anticipatory peak of backward center-of-pressure shift and the initial forward center-of-mass set decreased with obstacle height, probably in order to limit the risk to trip over the obstacle, while the forward center-of-mass velocity at foot

  4. Systems Intelligence Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törmänen, Juha; Hämäläinen, Raimo P.; Saarinen, Esa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Systems intelligence (SI) (Saarinen and Hämäläinen, 2004) is a construct defined as a person's ability to act intelligently within complex systems involving interaction and feedback. SI relates to our ability to act in systems and reason about systems to adaptively carry out productive actions within and with respect to systems such as…

  5. Collaborative Systems Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocatilu, Paul; Ciurea, Cristian

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative systems are widely used today in various activity fields. Their complexity is high and the development involves numerous resources and costs. Testing collaborative systems has a very important role for the systems' success. In this paper we present taxonomy of collaborative systems. The collaborative systems are classified in many…

  6. Mapping biological systems to network systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rathore, Heena

    2016-01-01

    The book presents the challenges inherent in the paradigm shift of network systems from static to highly dynamic distributed systems – it proposes solutions that the symbiotic nature of biological systems can provide into altering networking systems to adapt to these changes. The author discuss how biological systems – which have the inherent capabilities of evolving, self-organizing, self-repairing and flourishing with time – are inspiring researchers to take opportunities from the biology domain and map them with the problems faced in network domain. The book revolves around the central idea of bio-inspired systems -- it begins by exploring why biology and computer network research are such a natural match. This is followed by presenting a broad overview of biologically inspired research in network systems -- it is classified by the biological field that inspired each topic and by the area of networking in which that topic lies. Each case elucidates how biological concepts have been most successfully ...

  7. Resonances of the confined hydrogen atom and the Lamb-Dicke effect in non-relativistic qed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faupin, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    We study a model describing a system of one dynamical nucleus and one electron confined by their center of mass and interacting with the quantized electromagnetic field. We impose an ultraviolet cutoff and assume that the fine-structure constant is sufficiently small. Using a renormalization group...... method (based on [3, 4]), we prove that the unperturbed eigenvalues turn into resonances when the nucleus and the electron are coupled to the radiation field. This analysis is related to the Lamb–Dicke effect....

  8. Full $\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha)$ electroweak radiative corrections to $t \\bar{t} \\gamma$ and $e^-e^+\\gamma$ productions at ILC with GRACE-Loop

    CERN Document Server

    Khiem, P H; Fujimoto, J; Igarashi, M; Ishikawa, T; Kaneko, T; Kato, K; Nakazawa, N; Shimizu, Y; Tobimatsu, K; Ueda, T; Vermaseren, J A M; Yasui, Y

    2013-01-01

    The full $\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha)$ electroweak radiative corrections to $t \\bar{t} \\gamma$ and $e^-e^+\\gamma$ productions at the International Linear Collider (ILC) are presented in this paper. The computation is performed with the help of GRACE-Loop system. In the physical results, we discuss on the cross section, electroweak corrections, and the top quark forward-backward asymmetry ($A_{FB}$) which are the function of the center-of-mass energy.

  9. Vision based control for Humanoid robots

    OpenAIRE

    Dune, Claire; Herdt, Andrei; Marchand, Eric; Stasse, Olivier; Wieber, Pierre-Brice; Yoshida, Eiichi

    2011-01-01

    International audience This paper presents a visual servoing scheme to control humanoid dynamic walk. Whereas most of the existing approaches follow a perception-decision-action scheme, we hereby introduce a method that uses the on-line information given by an on-board camera. This close looped approach allows the system to react to changes in its environment and adapt to modelling error. Our approach is based on a new reactive pattern generator which modifies footsteps, center of mass and...

  10. Opportunities with top quarks at future circular colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Fuks, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    We describe various studies relevant for top physics at future circular collider projects currently under discussion. We show how highly-massive top-antitop systems produced in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 100 TeV could be observed and employed for constraining top dipole moments, investigate the reach of future proton-proton and electron-positron machines to top flavor-changing neutral interactions, and discuss top parton densities.

  11. The relevance of clinical balance assessment tools to differentiate balance deficits

    OpenAIRE

    Mancini, Martina; Horak, Fay B.

    2010-01-01

    Control of balance is complex and involves maintaining postures, facilitating movement, and recovering equilibrium. Balance control consists of controlling the body center of mass over its limits of stability. Clinical balance assessment can help assess fall risk and/or determine the underlying reasons for balance disorders. Most functional balance assessment scales assess fall risk and the need for balance rehabilitation but do not differentiate types of balance deficits. A system approach t...

  12. Theoretical analysis and numerical solution of laser pulse transformation for satellite laser ranging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The processes of the pulse transformation in satellite laser ranging (SLR) are analyzed,the analytical expressions of the transformation are deduced,and the effects of the transformation on Center-of-Mass corrections of satellite and ranging precision are discussed.The numerical solution of the transformation and its effects are also given.The results reveal the rules of pulse transformation affected by different kinds of factors.These are significant for designing the SLR system with millimeter accuracy.

  13. Average Angular Velocity

    OpenAIRE

    Van Essen, H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the separation of rotational and internal motion. It introduces the concept of average angular velocity as the moment of inertia weighted average of particle angular velocities. It extends and elucidates the concept of Jellinek and Li (1989) of separation of the energy of overall rotation in an arbitrary (non-linear) $N$-particle system. It generalizes the so called Koenig's theorem on the two parts of the kinetic energy (center of mass plus internal) to th...

  14. Towards Relativistic Atomic Physics and Post-Minkowskian Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Luca LusannaINFN

    2009-01-01

    A review is given of the formulation of relativistic atomic theory, in which there is an explicit realization of the Poincare' generators, both in the inertial and in the non-inertial rest-frame instant form of dynamics in Minkowski space-time. This implies the need to solve the problem of the relativistic center of mass of an isolated system and to describe the transitions from different conventions for clock synchronization, namely for the identifications of instantaneous ...

  15. Torsional optomechanics of a levitated nonspherical nanoparticle

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, Thai M.; Ma, Yue; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon; Robicheaux, F.; Yin, Zhang-qi; Li, Tongcang

    2016-01-01

    An optically levitated nanoparticle in vacuum is a paradigm optomechanical system for sensing and studying macroscopic quantum mechanics. While its center-of-mass motion has been investigated intensively, its torsional vibration has only been studied theoretically in limited cases. Here we report the first experimental observation of the torsional vibration of an optically levitated nonspherical nanoparticle in vacuum. We achieve this by utilizing the coupling between the spin angular momentu...

  16. Manned systems technology discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretoi, Remus

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on manned systems technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: crew-systems interfaces and interactions; crew training; on-board systems maintenance and support; habitability and environment; and computational human factors.

  17. Immune System Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more! Email * Zipcode The Immune System and Psoriatic Disease What is an autoimmune disease? ... and painful joints and tendons. Treating the immune system The immune system is not only the key ...

  18. Immune System Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System Print A A A Text Size How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! View Survey ...

  19. Female Reproductive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Female Reproductive System KidsHealth > For Parents > Female Reproductive System Print A ... or sperm. continue Components of the Female Reproductive System Unlike the male, the human female has a ...

  20. Brain and Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Brain and Nervous System KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain and Nervous System Print ... is quite the juggler. Anatomy of the Nervous System If you think of the brain as a ...

  1. Lungs and Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Lungs and Respiratory System KidsHealth > For Parents > Lungs and Respiratory System Print ... have taken at least 600 million breaths. Respiratory System Basics All of this breathing couldn't happen ...

  2. What Are Expert Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Agapeyeff, A.

    1986-01-01

    Intended for potential business users, this paper describes the main characteristics of expert systems; discusses practical use considerations; presents a taxonomy of the systems; and reviews several expert system development projects in business and industry. (MBR)

  3. Calo trigger acquisition system

    CERN Multimedia

    Franchini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Calo trigger acquisition system - Evolution of the acquisition system from a multiple boards system (upper, orange cables) to a single board one (below, light blue cables) where all the channels are collected in a single board.

  4. for hybrid dynamical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wassim M. Haddad

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop a unified dynamical systems framework for a general class of systems possessing left-continuous flows; that is, left-continuous dynamical systems. These systems are shown to generalize virtually all existing notions of dynamical systems and include hybrid, impulsive, and switching dynamical systems as special cases. Furthermore, we generalize dissipativity, passivity, and nonexpansivity theory to left-continuous dynamical systems. Specifically, the classical concepts of system storage functions and supply rates are extended to left-continuous dynamical systems providing a generalized hybrid system energy interpretation in terms of stored energy, dissipated energy over the continuous-time dynamics, and dissipated energy over the resetting events. Finally, the generalized dissipativity notions are used to develop general stability criteria for feedback interconnections of left-continuous dynamical systems. These results generalize the positivity and small gain theorems to the case of left-continuous, hybrid, and impulsive dynamical systems.

  5. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating of your heart ... breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result ...

  6. Small test SDHW systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejen, Niels Kristian

    1999-01-01

    Three small test SDHW systems was tested in a laboratory test facility.The three SDHW systems where all based on the low flow principe and a mantle tank but the design of the systems where different.......Three small test SDHW systems was tested in a laboratory test facility.The three SDHW systems where all based on the low flow principe and a mantle tank but the design of the systems where different....

  7. Law System in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Andreea Lorena Ponaru

    2007-01-01

    This article attempts to present and explain the main features of the japanese law system. Japanese Law system was reformed during the domination of Tokugawa shogun family. In 1870, Foreign Governmental Systems Study Office was founded. By judicial sentences many french laws were introduced in Japanese law system. Roma-Tokyo-Berlin Alliance (1936) introduced a strong German influence in the law system. The Japanese judicial system has known five periods. In the first (1869-1888) were introduc...

  8. Gas transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state of work on the Vivitron gas transfer system and the system functions are summarized. The system has to: evacuate the Vivitron reservoir; transfer gas from storage tanks to the Vivitron; recirculate gas during operation; transfer gas from the Vivitron to storage tanks; and assure air input. The system is now being installed. Leak alarms are given by SF6 detectors, which set off a system of forced ventilation. Another system continuously monitors the amount of SF6 in the tanks

  9. Battery systems engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Rahn, Christopher D

    2012-01-01

    A complete all-in-one reference on the important interdisciplinary topic of Battery Systems Engineering Focusing on the interdisciplinary area of battery systems engineering, this book provides the background, models, solution techniques, and systems theory that are necessary for the development of advanced battery management systems. It covers the topic from the perspective of basic electrochemistry as well as systems engineering topics and provides a basis for battery modeling for system engineering of electric and hybrid electric vehicle platforms. This original

  10. Bridge Management Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper bridge management systems are discussed with special emphasis on management systems for reinforced concrete bridges. Management systems for prestressed concrete bridges, steel bridges, or composite bridges can be developed in a similar way.......In this paper bridge management systems are discussed with special emphasis on management systems for reinforced concrete bridges. Management systems for prestressed concrete bridges, steel bridges, or composite bridges can be developed in a similar way....

  11. Airports Geographic Information System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Airports Geographic Information System maintains the airport and aeronautical data required to meet the demands of the Next Generation National Airspace System....

  12. Control system design method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David G.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2012-02-21

    A control system design method and concomitant control system comprising representing a physical apparatus to be controlled as a Hamiltonian system, determining elements of the Hamiltonian system representation which are power generators, power dissipators, and power storage devices, analyzing stability and performance of the Hamiltonian system based on the results of the determining step and determining necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the Hamiltonian system, creating a stable control system based on the results of the analyzing step, and employing the resulting control system to control the physical apparatus.

  13. Neural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As part of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and The Institute for System Research, the Neural Systems Laboratory studies the functionality of the...

  14. Aeronautical Information System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Aeronautical Information System (AIS) is a leased weather automated system that provides a means of collecting and distributing aeronautical weather information...

  15. Cognitive Medical Multiagent Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barna Iantovics

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of efficient and flexible agent-based medical diagnosis systems represents a recent research direction. Medical multiagent systems may improve the efficiency of traditionally developed medical computational systems, like the medical expert systems. In our previous researches, a novel cooperative medical diagnosis multiagent system called CMDS (Contract Net Based Medical Diagnosis System was proposed. CMDS system can solve flexibly a large variety of medical diagnosis problems. This paper analyses the increased intelligence of the CMDS system, which motivates its use for different medical problem’s solving.

  16. RECURSIVE SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han-Fu Chen

    2009-01-01

    Most of existing methods in system identification with possible exception of those for linear systems are off-line in nature, and hence are nonrecursive.This paper demonstrates the recent progress in recursive system identification.The recursive identifi-cation algorithms are presented not only for linear systems (multivariate ARMAX systems) but also for nonlinear systems such as the Hammerstein and Wiener systems, and the non-linear ARX systems.The estimates generated by the algorithms are online updated and converge a.s.to the true values as time tends to infinity.

  17. Credit Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Credit Management System. Outsourced Internet-based application. CMS stores and processes data related to USAID credit programs. The system provides information...

  18. Integrated Systems Health Management for Intelligent Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Melcher, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. It is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive at an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. In this paper, concepts, procedures, and approaches are presented as a foundation for implementing an intelligent systems ]relevant ISHM capability. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system. Both ground-based (remote) and on-board ISHM capabilities are compared and contrasted. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems.

  19. Vibration Based Crack Detection in a Rotating Disk. Part 2; Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Martin, Richard E.; Haase, Wayne C.; Baaklini, George

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental results concerning the detection of a crack in a rotating disk. The goal was to utilize blade tip clearance and shaft vibration measurements to monitor changes in the system's center of mass and/or blade deformation behaviors. The concept of the approach is based on the fact that the development of a disk crack results in a distorted strain field within the component. As a result, a minute deformation in the disk's geometry as well as a change in the system's center of mass occurs. Here, a notch was used to simulate an actual crack. The vibration based experimental results failed to identify the existence of a notch when utilizing the approach described above, even with a rather large, circumferential notch (l.2 in.) located approximately mid-span on the disk (disk radius = 4.63 in. with notch at r = 2.12 in.). This was somewhat expected, since the finite element based results in Part 1 of this study predicted changes in blade tip clearance as well as center of mass shifts due to a notch to be less than 0.001 in. Therefore, the small changes incurred by the notch could not be differentiated from the mechanical and electrical noise of the rotor system. Although the crack detection technique of interest failed to identify the existence ofthe notch, the vibration data produced and captured here will be utilized in upcoming studies that will focus on different data mining techniques concerning damage detection in a disk.

  20. Risk-based systems configuration monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the work done in the frame of the Research Contract No. 6993/RB - ''Risk based systems configuration monitoring system'' part of the coordinated programme ''Development of safety related expert systems''. The aim of this contract was to develop the prototype of an expert system based on PSA technology to be use for controlling the plant systems configuration taking into account the risk. The software prototype implementation was done using Visual Basic language, under Windows environment. The implemented prototype has the following features: store data/knowledge about components and human factor; store data/knowledge about the plant system and systems components, providing facilities to modify/search data/knowledge, based on the general knowledge; generate the logic model of the system; provide minimal cut sets and path sets determination; provide information to be used by the user for configuration risk management; provide user friendly interface (graphical interface under windows). The prototype can be independently used as an operator support system or for other on-line or off-line applications. After the testing of the prototype, some of the conclusions are: the developed software can be one of the most useful tools to be used by designers, PSA analysts, operators and regulatory for evaluation of the safety and reliability of the plant systems; the structure of the General Knowledge Base included into the prototype offers the possibility to combine knowledge introduced by different users. This feature can be the basis for the development of a knowledge acquisition system; the developed software and methodology can offer the basis for the risk-based data collection system development. (author). 12 refs, 30 figs

  1. Test System Impact on System Availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pau, L. F.

    1987-01-01

    The specifications are presented for an imperfect automatic test system (ATS) (test frequency distribution, reliability, false alarm rate, nondetection rate) in order to account for the availability, readiness, mean time between unscheduled repairs (MTBUR), reliability, and maintenance...... of the system subject to monitoring and test. A time-dependent Markov model is presented, and applied in three cases, with examples of numerical results provided for preventive maintenance decisions, design of an automatic test system, buffer testing in computers, and data communications....

  2. L-system fractals

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, Jibitesh

    2007-01-01

    The book covers all the fundamental aspects of generating fractals through L-system. Also it provides insight to various researches in this area for generating fractals through L-system approach & estimating dimensions. Also it discusses various applications of L-system fractals. Key Features: - Fractals generated from L-System including hybrid fractals - Dimension calculation for L-system fractals - Images & codes for L-system fractals - Research directions in the area of L-system fractals - Usage of various freely downloadable tools in this area - Fractals generated from L-System including hybrid fractals- Dimension calculation for L-system fractals- Images & codes for L-system fractals- Research directions in the area of L-system fractals- Usage of various freely downloadable tools in this area

  3. Forming different planetary systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Lin Zhou; Ji-Wei Xie; Hui-Gen Liu; Hui Zhang; Yi-Sui Sun

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing number of detected exoplanet samples,the statistical properties of planetary systems have become much clearer.In this review,we summarize the major statistical results that have been revealed mainly by radial velocity and transiting observations,and try to interpret them within the scope of the classical core-accretion scenario of planet formation,especially in the formation of different orbital architectures for planetary systems around main sequence stars.Based on the different possible formation routes for different planet systems,we tentatively classify them into three major catalogs:hot Jupiter systems,standard systems and distant giant planet systems.The standard systems can be further categorized into three sub-types under different circumstances:solar-like systems,hot Super-Earth systems,and subgiant planet systems.We also review the theory of planet detection and formation in binary systems as well as planets in star clusters.

  4. Site systems engineering: Systems engineering management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grygiel, M.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-05-03

    The Site Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) is the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) implementation document for the Hanford Site Systems Engineering Policy, (RLPD 430.1) and Systems Engineering Criteria Document and Implementing Directive, (RLID 430.1). These documents define the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) processes and products to be used at Hanford to implement the systems engineering process at the site level. This SEMP describes the products being provided by the site systems engineering activity in fiscal year (FY) 1996 and the associated schedule. It also includes the procedural approach being taken by the site level systems engineering activity in the development of these products and the intended uses for the products in the integrated planning process in response to the DOE policy and implementing directives. The scope of the systems engineering process is to define a set of activities and products to be used at the site level during FY 1996 or until the successful Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC) is onsite as a result of contract award from Request For Proposal DE-RP06-96RL13200. Following installation of the new contractor, a long-term set of systems engineering procedures and products will be defined for management of the Hanford Project. The extent to which each project applies the systems engineering process and the specific tools used are determined by the project`s management.

  5. Hot Spot Removal System: System description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    Hazardous wastes contaminated with radionuclides, chemicals, and explosives exist across the Department of Energy complex and need to be remediated due to environmental concerns. Currently, an opportunity is being developed to dramatically reduce remediation costs and to assist in the acceleration of schedules associated with these wastes by deploying a Hot Spot Removal System. Removing the hot spot from the waste site will remove risk driver(s) and enable another, more cost effective process/option/remedial alternative (i.e., capping) to be applied to the remainder of the site. The Hot Spot Removal System consists of a suite of technologies that will be utilized to locate and remove source terms. Components of the system can also be used in a variety of other cleanup activities. This Hot Spot Removal System Description document presents technologies that were considered for possible inclusion in the Hot Spot Removal System, technologies made available to the Hot Spot Removal System, industrial interest in the Hot Spot Removal System`s subsystems, the schedule required for the Hot Spot Removal System, the evaluation of the relevant technologies, and the recommendations for equipment and technologies as stated in the Plan section.

  6. Hot Spot Removal System: System description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazardous wastes contaminated with radionuclides, chemicals, and explosives exist across the Department of Energy complex and need to be remediated due to environmental concerns. Currently, an opportunity is being developed to dramatically reduce remediation costs and to assist in the acceleration of schedules associated with these wastes by deploying a Hot Spot Removal System. Removing the hot spot from the waste site will remove risk driver(s) and enable another, more cost effective process/option/remedial alternative (i.e., capping) to be applied to the remainder of the site. The Hot Spot Removal System consists of a suite of technologies that will be utilized to locate and remove source terms. Components of the system can also be used in a variety of other cleanup activities. This Hot Spot Removal System Description document presents technologies that were considered for possible inclusion in the Hot Spot Removal System, technologies made available to the Hot Spot Removal System, industrial interest in the Hot Spot Removal System''s subsystems, the schedule required for the Hot Spot Removal System, the evaluation of the relevant technologies, and the recommendations for equipment and technologies as stated in the Plan section

  7. Recommender Systems for Social Tagging Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Balby Marinho, Leandro

    2012-01-01

    Social Tagging Systems are web applications in which users upload resources (e.g., bookmarks, videos, photos, etc.) and annotate it with a list of freely chosen keywords called tags. This is a grassroots approach to organize a site and help users to find the resources they are interested in. Social tagging systems are open and inherently social; features that have been proven to encourage participation. However, with the large popularity of these systems and the increasing amount of user-contributed content, information overload rapidly becomes an issue. Recommender Systems are well known appl

  8. Novel central nervous system drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, Jocelyn; Abdi, Nabiha; Lu, Xiaofan; Maheshwari, Oshin; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2014-05-01

    For decades, biomedical and pharmaceutical researchers have worked to devise new and more effective therapeutics to treat diseases affecting the central nervous system. The blood-brain barrier effectively protects the brain, but poses a profound challenge to drug delivery across this barrier. Many traditional drugs cannot cross the blood-brain barrier in appreciable concentrations, with less than 1% of most drugs reaching the central nervous system, leading to a lack of available treatments for many central nervous system diseases, such as stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, and brain tumors. Due to the ineffective nature of most treatments for central nervous system disorders, the development of novel drug delivery systems is an area of great interest and active research. Multiple novel strategies show promise for effective central nervous system drug delivery, giving potential for more effective and safer therapies in the future. This review outlines several novel drug delivery techniques, including intranasal drug delivery, nanoparticles, drug modifications, convection-enhanced infusion, and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. It also assesses possible clinical applications, limitations, and examples of current clinical and preclinical research for each of these drug delivery approaches. Improved central nervous system drug delivery is extremely important and will allow for improved treatment of central nervous system diseases, causing improved therapies for those who are affected by central nervous system diseases.

  9. Power system protection 2 systems and methods

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    The worldwide growth in demand for electricity has forced the pace of developments in electrical power system design to meet consumer needs for reliable, secure and cheap supplies. Power system protection, as a technology essential to high quality supply, is widely recognised as a specialism of growing and often critical importance, in which power system needs and technological progress have combined to result in rapid developments in policy and practice in recent years. In the United Kingdom, the need for appropriate training in power system protection was recognised in the early 1960s with t

  10. Conserved Quantities of harmonic asymptotic initial data sets

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Po-Ning

    2014-01-01

    In the first half of this article, we survey the new quasi-local and total angular momentum and center of mass defined in [9] and summarize the important properties of these definitions. To compute these conserved quantities involves solving a nonlinear PDE system (the optimal isometric embedding equation), which is rather difficult in general. We found a large family of initial data sets on which such a calculation can be carried out effectively. These are initial data sets of harmonic asymptotics, first proposed by Corvino and Schoen to solve the full vacuum constraint equation. In the second half of this article, the new total angular momentum and center of mass for these initial data sets are computed explicitly.

  11. Properties of W + jet events in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drucker, R. B. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1993-11-22

    W boson + QCD Jet events, produced in 1.8 TeV proton-antiproton collisions and measured by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), were used to measure the center-of-mass production angle of the W + jet system, and were also used to place limits on the production of excited quark states. The center-of-mass production angular distribution agrees well with leading order and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. Excited quark states were searched for in the reaction q + g {yields} q* {yields} q + W. Upper limits on the q* cross section, as a function of the q* mass, are shown. Comparison with a theoretical prediction for q* production excludes excited quark states with a mass in the range 150--530 GeV/c{sup 2}, at 95% confidence.

  12. Relegation of the proper rotation in the orbital-attitude motion of a spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas, Mercedes; Elipe, Antonio

    An analytical approach is taken to study the attitude of a spacecraft on an orbit around a planet assimilated to a mass point. In the Hamiltonian representing this dynamical system, we identify the principal term (of order 0) as made of two parts: the part describing the motion of the center of mass of the satellite about the planet is expressed in terms of the Whittaker variables, and the part accounting for the rotation of the satellite about its center of mass in the absence of external forces which is expressed in terms of the Serret-Andoyer variables. We propose to build a Lie transformation to remove the angle g from the potential of the perturbation by applying the 'relegation of the node' technique.

  13. Commissioning of the Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS Detector at the LHC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Sune

    To determine the total cross section and absolute luminosity in the ATLAS detector at the LHC via pp scattering under very small angles, a dedicated sub-detector called ALFA has been made. Several performance evaluation tests including a test beam campaign lead to improvements of the detector...... at center of mass energy 7 TeV using special high β* beam optics. The measurement was later repeated and extended at center of mass energy 8 TeV. A major conceptual upgrade of the ALFA trigger system was made in the winter shutdown 2011-2012 which potentially doubled the data taking time useful for physics...... in all runs after. Beam induced heating (impedance heating) was observed on the ALFA detectors and tests revealed that the detectors were in danger of overheating with massive degradation as a consequence. A short term solution was found and implemented and the implementation of a long term solution...

  14. On the deformation twinning of Mg AZ31B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdolvand, Hamidreza; Majkut, Marta; Oddershede, Jette;

    2015-01-01

    variants was non-negligible. The CPFE simulation indicates that there is a small variation in the stress within each grain in the elastic regime, which increases drastically upon the onset of plasticity. One of the significant outcomes of this work is the new statistical information on the interaction...... extension twinning as a deformation mode due to the lack of easy-slip systems. In this work, experiments were devised to study extension twinning in a polycrystalline Mg alloy AZ31B with a strong basal rolling texture by tensile deformation parallel to the plate normal. Three-dimensional synchrotron X......-ray diffraction (3DXRD) was used to map the center-of-mass positions, volumes, orientations, elastic strains, and stress tensors of over 1400 grains in-situ up to a true strain of 1.4%. More than 700 tensile twins were observed to form in the mapped volume under deformation. The measured center-of-mass positions...

  15. Is dark energy an artifact of decoherence?

    CERN Document Server

    Fields, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Within the quantum Darwinist framework introduced by W. H. Zurek ({\\em Nat. Phys.}, 5:181-188, 2009), observers obtain pointer-state information about quantum systems by interacting with the surrounding environment, e.g. the ambient photon field. This framework is applied to the observation of stellar center-of-mass positions, which are assumed to be encoded in a way that is uniformly accessible to all observers regardless of their location. Assuming Landauer's Principle, constructing such environmental encodings requires $\\sim$ kT per bit. For 10$^{25}$ stars and a binary encoding of center-of-mass positions into 10 km$^{3}$ voxels, the free energy required at T = 2.7 K is $\\sim$ 5 $\\cdot$ 10$^{-27}$ kg $\\cdot$ m$^{-3}$, in striking agreement with the observed value of $\\Omega_{\\Lambda} \\rho_{c}$. Decreasing the voxel size to $l_{P}^{3}$ results in a free energy requirement 10$^{117}$ times larger.

  16. Time dilation in relativistic two-particle interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Shields, B T; Ware, M R; Su, Q; Stefanovich, E V; Grobe, R

    2013-01-01

    We study the orbits of two interacting particles described by a fully relativistic classical mechanical Hamiltonian. We use two sets of initial conditions. In the first set (dynamics 1) the system's center of mass is at rest. In the second set (dynamics 2) the center of mass evolves with velocity V. If dynamics 1 is observed from a reference frame moving with velocity -V, the principle of relativity requires that all observables must be identical to those of dynamics 2 seen from the lab frame. Our numerical simulations demonstrate that kinematic Lorentz space-time transformations fail to transform particle observables between the two frames. This is explained as a result of the inevitable interaction-dependence of the boost generator in the instant form of relativistic dynamics. In spite of general inaccuracies of Lorentz formulas, the orbital periods are correctly predicted by the Einstein's time dilation factor for all interaction strengths.

  17. Nonelastic nuclear reactions induced by light ions with the BRIEFF code

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, H

    2010-01-01

    The intranuclear cascade (INC) code BRIC has been extended to compute nonelastic reactions induced by light ions on target nuclei. In our approach the nucleons of the incident light ion move freely inside the mean potential of the ion in its center-of-mass frame while the center-of-mass of the ion obeys to equations of motion dependant on the mean nuclear+Coulomb potential of the target nucleus. After transformation of the positions and momenta of the nucleons of the ion into the target nucleus frame, the collision term between the nucleons of the target and of the ion is computed taking into account the partial or total breakup of the ion. For reactions induced by low binding energy systems like deuteron, the Coulomb breakup of the ion at the surface of the target nucleus is an important feature. Preliminary results of nucleon production in light ion induced reactions are presented and discussed.

  18. Torsional optomechanics of a levitated nonspherical nanoparticle

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Thai M; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon; Robicheaux, F; Yin, Zhang-Qi; Li, Tongcang

    2016-01-01

    An optically levitated nanoparticle in vacuum is a paradigm optomechanical system for sensing and studying macroscopic quantum mechanics. While its center-of-mass motion has been investigated intensively, its torsional vibration has only been studied theoretically in limited cases. Here we report the first experimental observation of the torsional vibration of an optically levitated nonspherical nanoparticle in vacuum. We achieve this by utilizing the coupling between the spin angular momentum of photons and the torsional vibration of a nonspherical nanoparticle whose polarizability is a tensor. The torsional vibration frequency can be one order of magnitude higher than its center-of-mass motion frequency, which is promising for ground state cooling. With an ellipsoidal model, we propose a simple yet novel scheme to achieve ground state cooling of its torsional vibration with a linearly-polarized Gaussian cavity mode. A levitated nonspherical nanoparticle in vacuum will also be an ultrasensitive nanoscale tor...

  19. CDMA systems capacity engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kiseon

    2004-01-01

    This new hands-on resource tackles capacity planning and engineering issues that are crucial to optimizing wireless communication systems performance. Going beyond the system physical level and investigating CDMA system capacity at the service level, this volume is the single-source for engineering and analyzing systems capacity and resources.

  20. Hybrid intelligent engineering systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, L C; Adelaide, Australia University of

    1997-01-01

    This book on hybrid intelligent engineering systems is unique, in the sense that it presents the integration of expert systems, neural networks, fuzzy systems, genetic algorithms, and chaos engineering. It shows that these new techniques enhance the capabilities of one another. A number of hybrid systems for solving engineering problems are presented.

  1. Expert Systems: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiga, Sadashiv

    1984-01-01

    Discusses: (1) the architecture of expert systems; (2) features that distinguish expert systems from conventional programs; (3) conditions necessary to select a particular application for the development of successful expert systems; (4) issues to be resolved when building expert systems; and (5) limitations. Examples of selected expert systems…

  2. Modelling of Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Hausman, Halina

    1982-01-01

    The article discusses selected problems in methodology of designing comprehensive information systems. Main emphasis has been laid on modelling of information systems for companies. Presentation of bases for construction of models and description of their main types provides a basis allowing the author to draw conclusions concerning their application. Modelling of information systems is treated as one of stages in designing information systems.

  3. Design an Information System

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Libor

    2016-01-01

    Main object of this thesis is design information system for warehouse management for Fi & Ho Trading Company, which will be accessible through web. Warehouse will be based on portal technology and connected with E-shop. In this thesis will be described elements of information system, resources used for realization, processes coverage by information system and complex evaluation of this information system.

  4. Information Systems Security Audit

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe Popescu; Veronica Adriana Popescu; Cristina Raluca Popescu

    2007-01-01

    The article covers:Defining an information system; benefits obtained by introducing new information technologies; IT management;Defining prerequisites, analysis, design, implementation of IS; Information security management system; aspects regarding IS security policy; Conceptual model of a security system; Auditing information security systems and network infrastructure security.

  5. Measuring Systemic Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acharya, Viral V.; Heje Pedersen, Lasse; Philippon, Thomas;

    We present a simple model of systemic risk and we show that each financial institution's contribution to systemic risk can be measured as its systemic expected shortfall (SES), i.e., its propensity to be undercapitalized when the system as a whole is undercapitalized. SES increases...

  6. Microsphere insulation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Mark S. (Inventor); Willen, Gary S. (Inventor); Mohling, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A new insulation system is provided that contains microspheres. This insulation system can be used to provide insulated panels and clamshells, and to insulate annular spaces around objects used to transfer, store, or transport cryogens and other temperature-sensitive materials. This insulation system provides better performance with reduced maintenance than current insulation systems.

  7. Information Systems Security Audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Popescu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The article covers:Defining an information system; benefits obtained by introducing new information technologies; IT management;Defining prerequisites, analysis, design, implementation of IS; Information security management system; aspects regarding IS security policy; Conceptual model of a security system; Auditing information security systems and network infrastructure security.

  8. Medical imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-06-25

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

  9. System Elements Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav A. Kuja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the features of the systematic approach development, shows that the systematic approach lacks the definition of system elements divisibility. This fact simplifies the system description. The article shows that, depending on the selection of the criterion of divisibility, different types of elements with different properties are got. Depending on the selection of the criterion of divisibility, the system structure becomes multidimensional. The paper recommends to indicate the criterion of the system divisibility during the systems research. It increases the certainty of the description of a complex system and characterizes the system elements.

  10. On generalized Volterra systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambides, S. A.; Damianou, P. A.; Evripidou, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    We construct a large family of evidently integrable Hamiltonian systems which are generalizations of the KM system. The algorithm uses the root system of a complex simple Lie algebra. The Hamiltonian vector field is homogeneous cubic but in a number of cases a simple change of variables transforms such a system to a quadratic Lotka-Volterra system. We present in detail all such systems in the cases of A3, A4 and we also give some examples from higher dimensions. We classify all possible Lotka-Volterra systems that arise via this algorithm in the An case.

  11. Hybrid Action Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronkko, Mauno; Ravn, Anders P.

    1997-01-01

    An action system framework is a predicate transformer based method for modelling and analysing distributed and reactive systems. The actions in action systems are statements in Dijkstra's guarded command language, and their semantics is given by predicate transformers. Recently, we introduced...... a differential action, which allows differential equations as primitive actions. The extension allows us to model hybrid systems with both continuous and discrete behaviour. The main result of this paper is an extension of such a hybrid action system with parallel composition. The extension does not change...... the original meaning of the parallel composition, and therefore also the ordinary action systems can be composed in parallel with the hybrid action systems....

  12. Efficient Evaluation System for Learning Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavus, Nadire

    2009-01-01

    A learning management system (LMS) provides the platform for web-based learning environment by enabling the management, delivery, tracking of learning, testing, communication, registration process and scheduling. There are many LMS systems on the market that can be obtained for free or through payment. It has now become an important task to choose…

  13. Beam alignment system for laser welding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The patent describes a beam alignment system for laser welding work pieces, such as fuel rod grids for nuclear fuel assemblies. The apparatus for performing various laser-machining comprises a beam alignment system including alignment target means, as well as means for emitting, directing and focusing the laser beam. (U.K.)

  14. Performance, Performance System, and High Performance System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hwan Young

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes needed transitions in the field of human performance technology. The following three transitions are discussed: transitioning from training to performance, transitioning from performance to performance system, and transitioning from learning organization to high performance system. A proposed framework that comprises…

  15. The Solar System as an Exoplanetary System

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Rebecca G

    2015-01-01

    With the availability of considerably more data, we revisit the question of how special our Solar System is, compared to observed exoplanetary systems. To this goal, we employ a mathematical transformation that allows for a meaningful, statistical comparison. We find that the masses and densities of the giant planets in our Solar System are very typical, as is the age of the Solar System. While the orbital location of Jupiter is somewhat of an outlier, this is most likely due to strong selection effects towards short-period planets. The eccentricities of the planets in our Solar System are relatively small compared to those in observed exosolar systems, but still consistent with the expectations for an 8-planet system (and could, in addition, reflect a selection bias towards high-eccentricity planets). The two characteristics of the Solar System that we find to be most special are the lack of super-Earths with orbital periods of days to months and the general lack of planets inside of the orbital radius of Me...

  16. Applications of membrane systems in distributed systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aneta Binder; Rudolf Freund; Georg Lojka; Marion Oswald

    2007-01-01

    Based on the biological model of cell-to-cell communication proposed by A. Rustom et al. (Science, 2004, 303: 1007-1010), we investigate the possibilities to apply P systems with dynamic channels transporting membrane vesicles for describing processes in distributed systems.

  17. Dynamical system synchronization

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Albert C J

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical System Synchronization (DSS) meticulously presents for the first time the theory of dynamical systems synchronization based on the local singularity theory of discontinuous dynamical systems. The book details the sufficient and necessary conditions for dynamical systems synchronizations, through extensive mathematical expression. Techniques for engineering implementation of DSS are clearly presented compared with the existing techniques.  This book also:  Presents novel concepts and methods for dynamical system synchronization Extends beyond the Lyapunov theory for dynamical system synchronization Introduces companion and synchronization of discrete dynamical systems Includes local singularity theory for discontinuous dynamical systems Covers the invariant domains of synchronization Features more than 75 illustrations Dynamical System Synchronization is an ideal book for those interested in better understanding new concepts and methodology for dynamical system synchronization, local singularity...

  18. Type Systems for Bigraphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsborg, Ebbe; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Sangiorgi, Davide

    We propose a novel and uniform approach to type systems for (process) calculi, which roughly pushes the challenge of designing type systems and proving properties about them to the meta-model of bigraphs. Concretely, we propose to define type systems for the term language for bigraphs, which...... of controls and a set of reaction rules, collectively a bigraphical reactive system (BRS). Possible advantages of developing bigraphical type systems include: a deeper understanding of a type system itself and its properties; transfer of the type systems to the concrete family of calculi that the BRS models......; and the possibility of modularly adapting the type systems to extensions of the BRS (with new controls). As proof of concept we present a model of a pi-calculus, develop an i/o-type system with subtyping on this model, prove crucial properties (including subject reduction) for this type system, and transfer...

  19. GAME INFORMATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spits Warnars

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this Information system age many organizations consider information system as their weapon tocompete or gain competitive advantage or give the best services for non profit organizations. GameInformation System as combining Information System and game is breakthrough to achieveorganizations’ performance. The Game Information System will run the Information System with gameand how game can be implemented to run the Information System. Game is not only for fun andentertainment, but will be a challenge to combine fun and entertainment with Information System. TheChallenge to run the information system with entertainment, deliver the entertainment with informationsystem all at once. Game information system can be implemented in many sectors as like the informationsystem itself but in difference’s view. A view of game which people can joy and happy and do theirtransaction as a fun things.

  20. Intrusion Detection System: Security Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ShabnamNoorani,

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An intrusion detection system (IDS is an ad hoc security solution to protect flawed computer systems. It works like a burglar alarm that goes off if someone tampers with or manages to get past other security mechanisms such as authentication mechanisms and firewalls. An Intrusion Detection System (IDS is a device or a software application that monitors network or system activities for malicious activities or policy violations and produces reports to a management station.Intrusion Detection System (IDS has been used as a vital instrument in defending the network from this malicious or abnormal activity..In this paper we are comparing host based and network based IDS and various types of attacks possible on IDS.

  1. Local hospital systems: forerunners of regional systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, R D

    1992-01-01

    Over the past several decades, the hospital industry has been undergoing a major organizational change that has until now been little examined. Local hospital systems (LHSs) are combinations of two or more hospitals that are in the same company and located in or around the same metropolitan areas in this country. This article presents the first detailed examination of the 402 such systems that have been identified to date. LHSs offer great potential for achieving the cost, quality, and access benefits that are often attributable to regional systems. The degree to which LHSs have attained some basic structural features expected of regional systems are examined. Differences are compared within ownership categories. Issues and challenges facing leaders in the field, should they hope to achieve the potential of regional systems, are discussed. PMID:10122669

  2. Photovoltaic systems and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    Abstracts are given of presentations given at a project review meeting held at Albuquerque, NM. The proceedings cover the past accomplishments and current activities of the Photovoltaic Systems Research, Balance-of-System Technology Development and System Application Experiments Projects at Sandia National Laboratories. The status of intermediate system application experiments and residential system analysis is emphasized. Some discussion of the future of the Photovoltaic Program in general, and the Sandia projects in particular is also presented.

  3. Systems Thinking About Purpose

    OpenAIRE

    Gaye Lewis

    2002-01-01

    This paper argues that in the context of human activity systems, the concept of purpose is critically important and that giving purpose a central role in the development and management of human activity systems can lead to more flexible, effective and autonomous systems. The systems thinking literature is reviewed in order to consolidate and assess current thinking about purpose. The importance of intrinsic purpose is highlighted. Implications for practice in terms of information systems desi...

  4. Discourses of systems engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Akeel, U. U.; Bell, S J

    2013-01-01

    Systems engineering is unique in being characterised by its methods rather than its artefacts. Consequently, the scope of systems engineering is difficult to define. While some systems engineers contend that systems engineering is capable of addressing sociotechnical problems, including climate change and terrorism, others argue that it is strictly a technical field. The paper presents the results of a discourse analysis of systems engineering textbooks, journal articles, and a...

  5. Systems interface biology

    OpenAIRE

    Francis J Doyle; Stelling, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    The field of systems biology has attracted the attention of biologists, engineers, mathematicians, physicists, chemists and others in an endeavour to create systems-level understanding of complex biological networks. In particular, systems engineering methods are finding unique opportunities in characterizing the rich behaviour exhibited by biological systems. In the same manner, these new classes of biological problems are motivating novel developments in theoretical systems approaches. Henc...

  6. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  7. Combustion gas scrubbing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlstrom, D.A.; Ellison, W.; Wilhelm, J.H.

    1979-04-03

    In a cooperative combination of two scrubbing systems, the first scrubbing system operates upon combustion gases with an aqueous solution to remove hydrogen chloride gas and other chlorine components. The second scrubbing system subsequently operates upon the combustion gases with a sodium-base solution to absorb sulfur oxides. The products of the two scrubbing systems are treated in combination to form a material for disposal and to generate the aqueous scrubbing solution for the chloride scrubbing system.

  8. A distribution management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verho, P.; Jaerventausta, P.; Kaerenlampi, M.; Paulasaari, H. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland); Partanen, J. [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The development of new distribution automation applications is considerably wide nowadays. One of the most interesting areas is the development of a distribution management system (DMS) as an expansion of the traditional SCADA system. At the power transmission level such a system is called an energy management system (EMS). The idea of these expansions is to provide supporting tools for control center operators in system analysis and operation planning. The needed data for new applications is mainly available in some existing systems. Thus the computer systems of utilities must be integrated. The main data source for the new applications in the control center are the AM/FM/GIS (i.e. the network database system), the SCADA, and the customer information system (CIS). The new functions can be embedded in some existing computer system. This means a strong dependency on the vendor of the existing system. An alternative strategy is to develop an independent system which is integrated with other computer systems using well-defined interfaces. The latter approach makes it possible to use the new applications in various computer environments, having only a weak dependency on the vendors of the other systems. In the research project this alternative is preferred and used in developing an independent distribution management system

  9. A System of Systems Approach to the EU Energy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jess, Tom; Madani, Kaveh; Mahlooji, Maral; Ristic, Bora

    2016-04-01

    Around the world, measures to prevent dangerous climate change are being adopted and may change energy systems fundamentally. The European Union (EU) is committed to reducing greenhouse gas emission by 20% by 2020 and by 80-95% by 2050. In order to achieve this, EU member states aim to increase the share of renewables in the energy mix to 20% by 2020. This commitment comes as part of a series of other aims, principles, and policies to reform the EU's energy system. Cost-efficiency in the emissions reductions measures as well as strategic goals under the Resource Efficient Europe flagship initiative which would include a more prudent approach to other natural resources such as water and land. Using the "System of Systems Approach", as from Hadian and Madani (2015), energy sources' Relative Aggregate Footprints (RAF) in the EU are evaluated. RAF aggregates across four criteria: carbon footprint, water footprint, land footprint, and economic cost. The four criteria are weighted by resource availability across the EU and for each Member State. This provides an evaluation of the overall resource use efficiency of the EU's energy portfolio and gives insight into the differences in the desirability of energy sources across Member States. Broadly, nuclear, onshore wind, and geothermal are most desirable under equal criteria weights and EU average weighting introduces only small changes in the relative performance of only few technologies. The member state specific weightings show that most countries have similar energy technology preferences. However, the UK deviates most strongly from the average, with an even stronger preference for nuclear and coal. Sweden, Malta and Finland also deviate from the typical preferences indicating the complexity in play in reforming the EU energy system. Reference Hadian S, Madani K (2015) A System of Systems Approach to Energy Sustainability Assessment: Are All Renewables Really Green? Ecological Indicators, 52, 194-206.

  10. Theory of optical transitions in conjugated polymers. I. Ideal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barford, William, E-mail: william.barford@chem.ox.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Marcus, Max [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Magdalen College, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 4AU (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-28

    We describe a theory of linear optical transitions in conjugated polymers. The theory is based on three assumptions. The first is that the low-lying excited states of conjugated polymers are Frenkel excitons coupled to local normal modes, described by the Frenkel-Holstein model. Second, we assume that the relevant parameter regime is ℏω ≪ J, i.e., the adiabatic regime, and thus the Born-Oppenheimer factorization of the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom is generally applicable. Finally, we assume that the Condon approximation is valid, i.e., the exciton-polaron wavefunction is essentially independent of the normal modes. Using these assumptions we derive an expression for an effective Huang-Rhys parameter for a chain (or chromophore) of N monomers, given by S(N) = S(1)/IPR, where S(1) is the Huang-Rhys parameter for an isolated monomer. IPR is the inverse participation ratio, defined by IPR = (∑{sub n}|Ψ{sub n}|{sup 4}){sup −1}, where Ψ{sub n} is the exciton center-of-mass wavefunction. Since the IPR is proportional to the spread of the exciton center-of-mass wavefunction, this is a key result, as it shows that S(N) decreases with chain length. As in molecules, in a polymer S(N) has two interpretations. First, ℏωS(N) is the relaxation energy of an excited state caused by its coupling to the normal modes. Second, S(N) appears in the definition of an effective Franck-Condon factor, F{sub 0v}(N) = S(N){sup v}exp ( − S(N))/v! for the vth vibronic manifold. We show that the 0 − 0 and 0 − 1 optical intensities are proportional to F{sub 00}(N) and F{sub 01}(N), respectively, and thus the ratio of the 0 − 1 to 0 − 0 absorption and emission intensities are proportional to S(N). These analytical results are checked by extensive DMRG calculations and found to be generally valid, particularly for emission. However, for large chain lengths higher-lying quasimomentum exciton states become degenerate with the lowest vibrational excitation of the

  11. Modeling Power Systems as Complex Adaptive Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassin, David P.; Malard, Joel M.; Posse, Christian; Gangopadhyaya, Asim; Lu, Ning; Katipamula, Srinivas; Mallow, J V.

    2004-12-30

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today's most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This report explores the state-of-the-art physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and deriving stable and robust control strategies for using them. We review and discuss applications of some analytic methods based on a thermodynamic metaphor, according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood. We apply these methods to the question of how power markets can be expected to behave under a variety of conditions.

  12. Micro Information Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulslev Pedersen, Rasmus; Kühn Pedersen, Mogens

    2014-01-01

    such as medical and manufacturing. These new sensor applications have implications for information systems (IS) and, the authors visualize this new class of information systems as fractals growing from an established class of systems; namely that of information systems (IS). The identified applications...... and implications are used as an empirical basis for creating a model for these small new information systems. Such sensor systems are called embedded systems in the technical sciences, and the authors want to couple it with general IS. They call the merger of these two important research areas (IS and embedded...... systems) for micro information systems (micro-IS). It is intended as a new research field within IS research. An initial framework model is established, which seeks to capture both the possibilities and constraints of this new paradigm, while looking simultaneously at the fundamental IS and ICT aspects...

  13. Rover waste assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, D.W.; Stoots, C.M.; Kraft, N.C.; Marts, D.J. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched {sup 235}U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for {sup 137}Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Rover waste assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched 235U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for 137Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Embedded systems handbook networked embedded systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zurawski, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Considered a standard industry resource, the Embedded Systems Handbook provided researchers and technicians with the authoritative information needed to launch a wealth of diverse applications, including those in automotive electronics, industrial automated systems, and building automation and control. Now a new resource is required to report on current developments and provide a technical reference for those looking to move the field forward yet again. Divided into two volumes to accommodate this growth, the Embedded Systems Handbook, Second Edition presents a comprehensive view on this area

  16. VIRTUAL SYSTEM METHOD FOR SYSTEM TREE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENGZHONGGUO

    1995-01-01

    A machine,or other type of “system”,can often be divided into several subsystems(components) and these subsystems again can be divided into sevreral subsystems(second generation).This process forms a system tree.To assess the reliability of the machine based on data from the trials of components of the machine,virtual system method is employed.It is proved in the paper that the lower confident limit of the reliability of the machine set by the virtual system method is level consistent and asymptotically optimal while the one set by Lindstrom-Maddens method is not.

  17. Nonlinearity of colloid systems oxyhydrate systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sucharev, Yuri I

    2008-01-01

    The present monograph is the first systematic study of the non-linear characteristic of gel oxy-hydrate systems involving d- and f- elements. These are the oxyhydrates of rare-earth elements and oxides - hydroxides of d- elements (zirconium, niobium, titanium, etc.) The non-linearity of these gel systems introduces fundamental peculiarities into their structure and, consequently, their properties. The polymer-conformational diversity of energetically congenial gel fragments, which continu-ously transform under the effect of, for instance, system dissipation heat, is central to the au-thor's hy

  18. Expert systems and computer based industrial systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Framentec is the artificial intelligence subsidiary of FRAMATOME. It is involved in expert-system activities of Shells, developments, methodology and software for maintenance (Maintex) and consulting and methodology. Specific applications in the nuclear field are presented. The first is an expert system to assist in the piping support design prototype, the second is an expert system that assists an ultrasonic testing operator in determining the nature of a welding defect and the third is a welding machine diagnosis advisor. Maintex is a software tool to provide assistance in the repair of complex industrial equipment. (author)

  19. Flash evaporator systems test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    A flash evaporator heat rejection system representative of that proposed for the space shuttle orbiter underwent extensive system testing at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to determine its operational suitability and to establish system performance/operational characteristics for use in the shuttle system. During the tests the evaporator system demonstrated its suitability to meet the shuttle requirements by: (1) efficient operation with 90 to 95% water evaporation efficiency, (2) control of outlet temperature to 40 + or - 2 F for partial heat load operation, (3) stability of control system for rapid changes in Freon inlet temperature, and (4) repeated dormant-to-active device operation without any startup procedures.

  20. Generalized L systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆汝钤; 张文妍

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes the concept of generalized L systems, GL systems for short, which can describe asynchronized concurrent phenomena. We have proved that the GL systems are proper extensions of the traditional L systems. We have also defined a classification of GL systems and proved a sufficient and necessary condition for the equivalence of two subclasses of GL systems: two quivalent, iff k = j and there exists a common divisor g of all mr and a common divisor h of all ni such that i: mi/g = ni/h.