WorldWideScience

Sample records for center unites species

  1. Fort Collins Science Center: Invasive Species Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlgren, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Invasive, non-native species of plants, animals, and disease organisms adversely affect the ecosystems they enter. Like "biological wildfires," they can quickly spread, and they affect nearly all terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Invasive species have become the greatest environmental challenge of the 21st century in terms of economic, environmental, and human health costs, with an estimated impact in the U.S. of over $138 billion per year. Managers of Department of the Interior and other public and private lands and waters rank invasive species as their top resource management problem.

  2. United States Data Center Energy Usage Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shehabi, Arman [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Smith, Sarah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sartor, Dale [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Brown, Richard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Herrlin, Magnus [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Koomey, Jonathan [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Masanet, Eric [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Horner, Nathaniel [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Azevedo, Inês [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lintner, William [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This report estimates historical data center electricity consumption back to 2000, relying on previous studies and historical shipment data, and forecasts consumption out to 2020 based on new trends and the most recent data available. Figure ES-1 provides an estimate of total U.S. data center electricity use (servers, storage, network equipment, and infrastructure) from 2000-2020. In 2014, data centers in the U.S. consumed an estimated 70 billion kWh, representing about 1.8% of total U.S. electricity consumption. Current study results show data center electricity consumption increased by about 4% from 2010-2014, a large shift from the 24% percent increase estimated from 2005-2010 and the nearly 90% increase estimated from 2000-2005. Energy use is expected to continue slightly increasing in the near future, increasing 4% from 2014-2020, the same rate as the past five years. Based on current trend estimates, U.S. data centers are projected to consume approximately 73 billion kWh in 2020.

  3. Regional distribution of introduced plant species in the forests of the Northeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beth Schulz; W. Keith Moser; Cassandra Olson; Katherine Johnson

    2013-01-01

    Many plant species have been introduced to the United States by humans since European settlement, sometimes deliberately and sometimes inadvertently, such as in contaminated crop seed or soil. Some species have successfully escaped cultivation and become invasive, spreading and establishing new populations distant from original population centers. Indeed, introduced...

  4. Making of a burn unit: SOA burn center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayant Kumar Dash

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Each year in India, burn injuries account for more than 6 million hospital emergency department visits; of which many require hospitalization and are referred to specialized burn centers. There are few burn surgeons and very few burn centers in India. In our state, Odisha, there are only two burn centers to cater to more than 5000 burn victims per year. This article is an attempt to share the knowledge that I acquired while setting up a new burn unit in a private medical college of Odisha.

  5. Driving Performance through Center of Government Delivery Units

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2010-01-01

    Several governments around the world have recently established delivery units at the center of government to drive performance improvements. This development may be in addition to whole-of-government reforms to improve performance, such as citizen charters, service agreements, or performance reporting. Given rising interest in public sector performance innovations, this note provides an ov...

  6. Geographic access to high capability severe acute respiratory failure centers in the United States

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wallace, David J; Angus, Derek C; Seymour, Christopher W; Yealy, Donald M; Carr, Brendan G; Kurland, Kristen; Boujoukos, Arthur; Kahn, Jeremy M

    2014-01-01

    .... We sought to measure geographic access to these centers in the United States. Cross-sectional analysis of geographic access to high capability severe acute respiratory failure centers in the United States...

  7. [Developmental centered care. Situation in Spanish neonatal units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Maestro, M; Melgar Bonis, A; de la Cruz-Bertolo, J; Perapoch López, J; Mosqueda Peña, R; Pallás Alonso, C

    2014-10-01

    Developmental centered care (DC) is focused on sensorineural and emotional development of the newborns. In Spain we have had information on the application of DC since 1999, but the extent of actual implementation is unknown. To determine the level of implementation of DC in Spanish neonatal units where more than 50 infants weighing under 1500g were cared for in 2012. A comparison was made with previous data published in 2006. A descriptive observational cross-sectional study was performed using a survey with seven questions as in the 2006 questionnaire. The survey was sent to 27 units. The response rate was 81% in 2012 versus 96% in 2006. Noise control measures were introduced in 73% of units in 2012 versus 11% in 2006 (P<.01). The use of saccharose was 50% in 2012 versus 46% in 2006 (P=.6). Parents free entry was 82% in 2012 versus 11% in 2006 (P<.01). Kangaroo care was used without restriction by 82% in 2012 compared to 31% in 2006 (P<.01). The implementation of the DC in Spain has improved. There is still room for improvement in areas, such as the use of saccharose or noise control. However, it is important to highlight the positive change that has occurred in relation to unrestricted parental visits. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. The Absent Interpreter in Administrative Detention Center Medical Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondeau-Lutz, Murielle; Weber, Jean-Christophe

    2017-03-01

    The particular situation of the French administrative detention center (ADC) medical units appears to be an exemplary case to study the difficulties facing medical practice. Indeed, the starting point of our inquiry was an amazing observation that needed to be addressed and understood: why are professional interpreters so seldom requested in ADC medical units, where one would expect that they would be "naturally" present? Aiming to fully explore the meanings of the "absent interpreter", this article takes into account the possible meanings of this situation: the recourse to professional interpreters in France is far from expected given cumulative evidence of its benefits; perceptions of illegal immigrants and medical habitus itself may both hamper the use of a third party; the ADCs are a very stressful place for healthcare professionals, with conflicting missions, political issues enmeshed with medical goals, and heavy affective burden that may lead to self-protection. Silencing voices of suffering others might be seen as the hidden indecent truth of the "absent interpreter". These reflections open a window to a larger issue with regard to the full range of medicine: what are the place, the role and the function of patient's words and narratives in contemporary medicine? The highly invested somatic perspective and its political corollary giving primacy to bare life harbor potential risks of obscuring speeches and undervaluing narratives.

  9. The Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health: tools and information available to support invasive species and forest health education

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.K. Douce; D.J. Moorhead; C.T. Bargeron; J.H. LaForest; K.A. Rawlins; J.E. Griffin

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health at the University of Georgia (www.bugwood.org) is to serve a lead role in developing, consolidating, and disseminating formation and programs focused on invasive species, forest health, natural resource and agricultural management through technology development, program implementation, training,...

  10. Vertebrate species introductions in the United States and its territories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary W. WITMER, Pam L. FULLER

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available At least 1,065 introduced vertebrate species have been introduced in the United States and its territories, including at least 86 mammalian, 127 avian, 179 reptilian/amphibian, and 673 fish species. Examples in each major taxonomic group include domestic cat, small Indian mongoose, red fox, goat, pig, rabbit, rats, house mouse, gray squirrel, nutria, starling, Indian common myna, red-vented bulbul, brown treesnake, red-eared slider, brown trout, tilapia, and grass carp. We briefly review some of these species and the types of damage they cause. We then review the basic types of methods used for control or eradication of each taxonomic group, including physical, chemical, biological, and cultural methods. We discuss some of the challenges in managing these species, including issues with the use of toxicants, land access, public attitudes, and monitoring difficulties. Finally, we list some ongoing research and future research needs, including improved detection methods, improved attractants, improved barriers, improved capture methods, fertility control, and risk assessment methods [Current Zoology 57 (5: 559–567, 2011].

  11. Predictors of intensive care unit refusal in French intensive care units: a multiple-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrouste-Orgeas, Maité; Montuclard, Luc; Timsit, Jean-François; Reignier, Jean; Desmettre, Thibault; Karoubi, Philippe; Moreau, Delphine; Montesino, Laurent; Duguet, Alexandre; Boussat, Sandrine; Ede, Christophe; Monseau, Yannick; Paule, Thierry; Misset, Benoit; Carlet, Jean

    2005-04-01

    To identify factors associated with granting or refusing intensive care unit (ICU) admission, to analyze ICU characteristics and triage decisions, and to describe mortality in admitted and refused patients. Observational, prospective, multiple-center study. Four university hospitals and seven primary-care hospitals in France. None. Age, underlying diseases (McCabe score and Knaus class), dependency, hospital mortality, and ICU characteristics were recorded. The crude ICU refusal rate was 23.8% (137/574), with variations from 7.1% to 63.1%. The reasons for refusal were too well to benefit (76/137, 55.4%), too sick to benefit (51/137, 37.2%), unit too busy (9/137, 6.5%), and refusal by the family (1/137). In logistic regression analyses, two patient-related factors were associated with ICU refusal: dependency (odds ratio [OR], 14.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.27-38.25; p refused patients, and 1.03 (95% CI, 0.28-1.75) for later-admitted patients. ICU refusal rates varied greatly across ICUs and were dependent on both patient and organizational factors. Efforts to define ethically optimal ICU admission policies might lead to greater homogeneity in refusal rates, although case-mix variations would be expected to leave an irreducible amount of variation across ICUs.

  12. Human-centered environment design in intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Albayrak, A.; Goossens, R.H.M.; Xiao, D.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Because of high risk and instability of the patients in Intensive care unit(ICU), the design of ICU is very difficult. ICU design, auxiliary building design, lighting design, noise control and other aspects can also enhance its management. In this paper, we compare ICU design in China and Holland

  13. Paragonimiasis acquired in the United States: native and nonnative species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, James H

    2013-07-01

    Paragonimiasis is a parasitic lung infection caused by lung flukes of the genus Paragonimus, with most cases reported from Asia and caused by P. westermani following consumption of raw or undercooked crustaceans. With the exception of imported P. westermani cases in immigrants, in travelers returning from areas of disease endemicity, and in clusters of acquired cases following consumption of imported Asian crabs, human paragonimiasis caused by native lung flukes is rarely described in the United States, which has only one indigenous species of lung fluke, Paragonimus kellicotti. Clinicians should inquire about the consumption of raw or undercooked freshwater crabs by immigrants, expatriates, and returning travelers, and the consumption of raw or undercooked crayfish in U.S. freshwater river systems where P. kellicotti is endemic when evaluating patients presenting with unexplained fever, cough, rales, hemoptysis, pleural effusions, and peripheral eosinophilia. Diagnostic evaluation by specific parasitological, radiological, serological, and molecular methods will be required in order to differentiate paragonimiasis from tuberculosis, which is not uncommon in recent Asian immigrants. All cases of imported and locally acquired paragonimiasis will require treatment with oral praziquantel to avoid any potential pulmonary and cerebral complications of paragonimiasis, some of which may require surgical interventions.

  14. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) One Month Probabilistic Precipitation Outlook for the Contiguous United States and Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues a probabilistic one-month precipitation outlook for the United States twice a month. CPC issues an initial monthly outlook...

  15. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Three Month Probabilistic Temperature Outlook for the Contiguous United States and Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues a series of thirteen probabilistic three-month temperature outlooks for the United States. CPC issues the thirteen...

  16. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Three Month Probabilistic Precipitation Outlook for the Contiguous United States and Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues a series of thirteen probabilistic three-month precipitation outlooks for the United States. CPC issues the thirteen...

  17. Gridded Population of the World, Version 4 (GPWv4): Administrative Unit Center Points with Population Estimates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gridded Population of the World, Version 4 (GPWv4) Administrative Unit Center Points with Population Estimates consists of UN-adjusted estimates of human population...

  18. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) One Month Probabilistic Temperature Outlook for the Contiguous United States and Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues a probabilistic one-month temperature outlook for the United States twice a month. CPC issues an initial monthly outlook...

  19. Species recovery in the United States: Increasing the effectiveness of the Endangered Species Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel M. Evans; Judy P. Che-Castaldo; Deborah Crouse; Frank W. Davis; Rebecca Epanchin-Niell; Curtis H. Flather; R. Kipp Frohlich; Dale D. Goble; Ya-Wei Li; Timothy D. Male; Lawrence L. Master; Matthew P. Moskwik; Maile C. Neel; Barry R. Noon; Camille Parmesan; Mark W. Schwartz; J. Michael Scott; Byron K. Williams

    2016-01-01

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) has succeeded in shielding hundreds of species from extinction and improving species recovery over time. However, recovery for most species officially protected by the ESA - i.e., listed species - has been harder to achieve than initially envisioned. Threats to species are persistent and pervasive, funding has been insufficient...

  20. The geography of private forests that support at-risk species in the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos D. Robles; Curtis H. Flather; Susan M. Stein; Mark D. Nelson; Andrew Cutko

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we present a coarse-scale, first approximation of the geographic areas where privately owned forests support at-risk species in the conterminous United States. At-risk species are defined as those species listed under the US Endangered Species Act or with a global conservation status rank of critically imperiled, imperiled, or vulnerable. Our results...

  1. The spatial pattern of species richness and diversity centers of gymnosperm in China

    OpenAIRE

    Guo Li; Zehao Shen; Tsunshen Ying; Jingyun Fang

    2009-01-01

    China has the richest flora of gymnosperm in the world, which is crucial for understanding the change of global distribution and phylogeny of gymnosperm. We mapped the geographical range of 202 native gymnosperm species in China with records of altitudinal range and horizontal distribution at the county level, and explored the spatial distribution characteristics of Chinese gymnosperm at the family, genus and species levels. The uniqueness and similarity among the richness centers were analyz...

  2. A descriptive survey of management and operations at selected sports medicine centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, D

    1996-11-01

    No uniform guidelines for operations or accreditation standards for sports medicine center were available and, at the time of this study, little information on the management and operation of sports medicine centers was available in the literature. The purpose of the study was to determine the management structure and function of selected sports medicine centers in the United States. Questionnaires were mailed to 200 randomly selected centers throughout the United State from a directory of sports medicine centers published in Physician and Sportsmedicine (1992) to gather descriptive information on eight areas, including 1) general background, 2) staffing, 3) services, facilities, and equipment, 4) billing, collections, and revenue, 5) clientele, caseloads, and referrals, 6) ownership and financing, 7) school and club outreach contracts, and 8) marketing strategies and future trends. A total of 71 surveys (35.5%) were returned in the allotted time frame. Data were analyzed using ranges, means, medians, modes, and percentages. Results yielded several conclusions about sports medicine centers. Nearly all (93%) of the centers employed physical therapists; physical therapists were clinical directors at 70.2% of centers; orthopaedists were most often medical directors; rehabilitation was the most frequently offered service (93%); physical therapy produced the highest revenue; sports injuries accounted for a mean 34.5% of patients, who were mostly recreational or high school athletes between 13-60 years of age; primary shareholders were most often physical therapists or physicians; most were involved in outreach services for schools; marketing strategies primarily involved communication with referral sources; and managed care was identified most frequently as a trend affecting the future of sports medicine centers. Findings identified common aspects of sports medicine centers and may assist in establishing guidelines for operations or accreditation of sports medicine

  3. A United States national prioritization framework for tree species vulnerability to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin M. Potter; Barbara S. Crane; William W. Hargrove

    2017-01-01

    Climate change is one of several threats that will increase the likelihood that forest tree species could experience population-level extirpation or species-level extinction. Scientists and managers from throughout the United States Forest Service have cooperated to develop a framework for conservation priority-setting assessments of forest tree species. This framework...

  4. Preliminary Survey on Parasites Infecting Some Amphibian and Reptilian Species from United Arab Emirates and Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Kardousha, Mahmoud M. [محمود محمود محمد كردوشة

    2002-01-01

    The common amphibian toad Bufo orientalis and four species of reptiles (Scincus muscatensis, Mabuya brevicolis, Uromastyx microlepis and Diplometopon zarudnyi) were collected from five localities in the United Arab Emirates and Qatar (The north eastern of Arabian Peninsula) and examined for parasites. Two protozoans, Haemogregarina sp. and Trypanosoma sp.; one digenean species, Paradistomoides magnum, two cestode species, Nematotaenia dispar and Oochoristica najdei; and three nematode species...

  5. Function of "nontrauma" surgeons in level I trauma centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, J W

    1997-06-01

    Although the general "trauma" surgeon is usually the team leader in level I trauma centers, the use of surgical subspecialists and nonsurgeons is frequently ill-defined. This study was done to gain data in regard to actual use of subspecialists in busy centers. First, a survey of the patterns of staffing in 140 trauma centers was elicited by mail questionnaire, supplemented by telephone cells. Second, records of 400 consecutive patients at the Elvis Presley Trauma Center were reviewed to determine the use of subspecialists during the first 24 hours of care of individual patients. There were differences in the use of surgical subspecialists and nonsurgeons at different centers: in receiving, admitting, operating, and critical care areas and in privileges for admission and attending of inpatients. Consultation "guidelines" are used for many specific injuries. At our center, a mean of 1.92 subspecialists, in addition to general surgeons, were involved in the early care of each patient. Problems exist in many centers regarding the use of subspecialists, especially for management of facial and chest injuries. In some centers nonsurgeons function in the intensive care unit, and as admitting and attending physicians of trauma patients.

  6. Rotational Spectroscopy of Reactive Species at the Center for Astrochemical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzi, Valerio; Spezzano, Silvia; Caselli, Paola

    2017-06-01

    The Center for Astrochemical Studies at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching, is a recently established group which collects scientists with very diverse backgrounds. In the same group observers, theoreticians, chemists and molecular astrophysicists join their efforts with the ultimate goal of properly interpreting observations with the new generation telescopes and unveiling our astrochemical/physical heritage. Among these tasks, the gas-phase spectroscopic characterisation of molecular species of astrophysical relevance is one of the main goals of the laboratory sub-group. This talk will mainly focus on the first experiment built in our center, the CASAC (CAS Absorption Cell) spectrometer: this experiment has been optimised on the production and probe of small molecular ions and radicals. The main laboratory techniques along with the more prominent outcomes of recent studies will be presented. Finally, a brief update on the status of the other instruments available in our center will be given, including their planned upgrades.

  7. Telemedicine use among burn centers in the United States: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Brennen; Faraklas, Iris; Theurer, Lou; Cochran, Amalia; Saffle, Jeffrey R

    2012-01-01

    Telemedicine has been increasingly used in a host of settings for over 20 years. Burns are well suited for evaluation by either synchronous ("interactive") video or asynchronous digital ("store and forward") imagery, but little information is available about telemedicine use in burn care. The authors surveyed U.S. burn center directors to assess their current use of, and interest in, telemedicine in clinical burn treatment. With Institutional Review Board approval, a web-based survey (surveymonkey.com) was created and sent to directors of 126 burn centers in the United States. Questions measured the use of telemedicine by burn centers and burn directors' attitudes toward telemedicine. Surveys were returned from 50 centers (40%). Directors of 42 units (84%) reported using telemedicine; 37 use it routinely. Interactive video communication was used by 18 centers, store and forward by 38 centers, and remote access to patient data by home computer or personal digital assistant in 41 centers. Uses included remote evaluation of acute burns for consultation, for help in determining the need for transfer, or for remote clinic follow-up. Users identified some problems with current telemedicine usage, including Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act/compliance, licensure, and billing/collection issues. Importantly, 40 respondents (80%) indicated that they would like programming on telemedicine to be available at American Burn Association's annual meetings. Use of telemedicine is fairly widespread among U.S. burn centers, with volume and type of usage varying widely. Significant interest in learning more about telemedicine suggests strongly that telemedicine should be included in the annual program at the American Burn Association.

  8. ESTIMATING REGIONAL SPECIES RICHNESS USING A LIMITED NUMBER OF SURVEY UNITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The accurate and precise estimation of species richness at large spatial scales using a limited number of survey units is of great significance for ecology and biodiversity conservation. We used the distribution data of native fish and resident breeding bird species compiled for ...

  9. Exotic annual Bromus invasions: Comparisons among species and ecoregions in the western United States [Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew L. Brooks; Cynthia S. Brown; Jeanne C. Chambers; Carla M. D' Antonio; Jon E. Keeley; Jayne Belnap

    2016-01-01

    Exotic annual Bromus species are widely recognized for their potential to invade, dominate, and alter the structure and function of ecosystems. In this chapter, we summarize the invasion potential, ecosystem threats, and management strategies for different Bromus species within each of five ecoregions of the western United States. We characterize invasion...

  10. Population genetics of invasive Bemisia tabaci cryptic species in the United States based on microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Bemisia tabaci cryptic species complex of whiteflies contains two species, MEAM1 and MED, that are highly invasive in supportive climates the world over. In the United States MEAM1 occurs both in the field and in the greenhouse, but MED is only found in the greenhouse. In order to make inference...

  11. Cost-income analysis of oral health units of health care centers in Yazd city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Fallahzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Increasing demands for health care's services on one hand and limited resources on the other hand brings about pressure over governments to find out a mechanism for fair and appropriate distribution of resources. Economic analysis is one of the appropriate tools for policy making on this priority. The aim of this study was to assess capital and consumption of oral health units of health care centers in Yazd city and comparing it with revenue of these centers and determining of cost effectiveness.Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross sectional study, all health care centers of Yazd city with active dentistry department were evaluated. The data has been extracted from current documents in health care center of county based issued receipts and daily information registers.Results: Expended cost for providing of oral hygiene services in second half of 2008 in 13 medical health centers of Yazd included active dentistry section was 557.887.500 Rials and revenue to cost ratio was about 34%. The most provided service was related to tooth extraction and the average of tooth restoration in each working day was 0.48.Conclusion: With attention to low tariffs of dentistry services in medical health centers and paying subsidy to target groups, expenses of oral hygiene are always more than its revenue.

  12. Measurement of Family-centered care perception and parental stress in a neonatal unit 1

    OpenAIRE

    Flávia Simphronio Balbino; Maria Magda Ferreira Gomes Balieiro; Myriam Aparecida Mandetta

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the effects of the implementation of the Patient and Family-Centered Care Model on parents and healthcare perceptions and parental stress. Method: a quasi-experimental study developed in a neonatal unit of a university hospital in the municipality of São Paulo, Brazil, with the implementation of this model of care. Data collection were performed by two sample groups, one using non-equivalent groups of parents, and another using equivalent groups of healthca...

  13. Stroke Legislation Impacts Distribution of Certified Stroke Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Ken; Man, Shumei; Schold, Jesse D; Katzan, Irene L

    2015-07-01

    The number of certified primary stroke centers (PSCs) have increased dramatically during the past decade in the United States We aimed to understand the factors affecting PSC distribution in the United States, including the impact of state stroke legislation. PSCs certified by national organization or state until December 2013 were searched from available databases. The proportion of PSC among short-term general hospitals in each state was calculated and factors affecting its distribution were analyzed. By the end of 2013, the proportion of PSC varied from 4% to 100% among the 50 states and District of Columbia. The 18 states that had legislation in designating stroke centers and regulating stroke triage had higher PSC percentages (median, 43%; range, 13%-100%) than the remaining states (median, 13%; range, 4%-75%; Plegislation, urbanization, state economic output, and larger hospital size independently increased the likelihood of a hospital to be stroke certified. From 2009 to 2013, states with stroke legislation had greater increase of PSC percentages when compared with the states without legislation (median increase, 16% versus 6%; P=0.0067). Among the 1505 stroke centers, 74% were certified by the Joint Commission, 20% by state, and 6% by other organizations. Stroke centers certified only by state were smaller in size by hospital bed count compared with those certified by the Joint Commission (Plegislation, a generalizable intervention, increased the number of certified stroke centers in the United States, potentially improving accessibility of standardized care for patients with acute ischemic stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Phylogenetic relationships among diploid Aegilops species inferred from 5S rDNA units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, B R; Edwards, T; Johnson, D A

    2009-10-01

    Relationships among the currently recognized 11 diploid species within the genus Aegilops have been investigated. Sequence similarity analysis, based upon 363 sequenced 5S rDNA clones from 44 accessions plus 15 sequences retrieved from GenBank, depicted two unit classes labeled the long AE1 and short AE1. Several different analytical methods were applied to infer relationships within haplomes, between haplomes and among the species, including maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses of consensus sequences, "total evidence" phylogeny analysis and "matrix representation with parsimony" analysis. None were able to depict suites of markers or unit classes that could discern among the seven haplomes as is observed among established haplomes in other genera within the tribe Triticeae; however, most species could be separated when displayed on gene trees. These results suggest that the haplomes currently recognized are so refined that they may be relegated as sub-haplomes or haplome variants. Amblyopyrum shares the same 5S rDNA unit classes with the diploid Aegilops species suggesting that it belongs within the latter. Comparisons of the Aegilops sequences with those of Triticum showed that the long AE1 unit class of Ae. tauschii shared the clade with the equivalent long D1 unit class, i.e., the putative D haplome donor, but the short AE1 unit class did not. The long AE1 unit class but not the short, of Ae. speltoides and Ae. searsii both share the clade with the previously identified long {S1 and long G1 unit classes meaning that both Aegilops species can be equally considered putative B haplome donors to tetraploid Triticum species. The semiconserved nature of the nontranscribed spacer in Aegilops and in Triticeae in general is discussed in view that it may have originated by processes of incomplete gene conversion or biased gene conversion or birth-and-death evolution.

  15. Unintentional injuries in child care centers in the United States: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashikawa, Andrew N; Newton, Manya F; Cunningham, Rebecca M; Stevens, Martha W

    2015-03-01

    The study systematically reviewed all types of unintentional injury and injury prevention research studies occurring within child care centers in the United States. A total of 2 reviewers searched 11 electronic databases to identify 53 articles meeting inclusion criteria. No studies used trauma registries or randomized control trials. Data were not pooled for further analysis because studies lacked standardized definitions for injury, rates, severity, exposure, and demographics. The following child care center injury rates were reported: (0.25-5.31 injuries per 100,000 child-hours); (11.3-18 injuries per 100 children per year); (6-49 injuries per 1000 child-years); (2.5-8.29 injuries per child-year); (2.6-3.3 injuries per child); (3.3-6.3 injuries per 100 observations); (635-835 medically attended injuries per year per 100,000 children and 271-364 child care center playground injuries per year per 100,000 children); and (3.8 injuries per child per 2000 exposure hours). Child care center injury rates were comparable to injury rates published for schools, playground, and summer camp. Most injuries were minor, while most severe injuries (fractures and concussions) were falls from playground structures. Future studies need to use standardized injury definitions and injury severity scales, focus efforts on preventing severe playground injuries in child care centers, and report child care parameters for inclusion in national injury databases. © The Author(s) 2013.

  16. Animal bites and stings reported by United States poison control centers, 2001-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Ricky L

    2008-01-01

    There is not a single data source for information on the extent of nonfatal injuries inflicted by animals. Although individuals bitten or stung by animals may not visit a health care provider, they may call poison control centers (PCCs) for information. These centers are one source of information on the frequency of occurrence of injuries from animals. The American Association of Poison Control Centers compiles an annual report of exposure calls to various agents, including chemicals, medications, animal bites and stings, plants, and use of antivenoms from their network of PCCs. An estimate of the severity of exposure for each call is also determined. This review examines summary data on different species of animal bites and stings reported by PCCs from 2001 to 2005. From 2001 to 2005 there were 472 760 reports of animal bites and stings, an average of 94,552 per year. There was a trend noted for increasing use of antivenom over this period. Twenty-seven deaths were recorded, most from snakebites. Poison control centers are a source of information for health care workers on management of animal bites and stings. The database maintained by the American Association of Poison Control Centers is another source of information on the magnitude and public health impact of injuries from animals.

  17. Species displacements are common to two invasive species of leafminer fly in China, Japan, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yulin; Lei, Zhongren; Abe, Yoshihisa; Reitz, Stuart R

    2011-12-01

    Under field conditions, species displacements have occurred in different directions between the same invasive species of leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae). Liriomyza sativae (Blanchard) was displaced by L. trifolii (Burgess) in the western United States, with evidence suggesting that lower insecticide susceptibility of L. trifolii is a factor. However, in Japan, the opposite has occurred, as L. trifolii was recently displaced by L. sativae. This displacement is probably because of the higher fecundity of L. sativae and differential effects of parasitoids on the two leafminer species. Here, we carried out long-term surveys of these same two invasive leafminer species during January through March in 1999, 2007, and 2011, as well as June through July in 2011, in eight locations (Sanya, Dongfang, Haikou, Leidong, Lingshui, Wuzhisan, Qionghai, and Danzhou) across Hainan Island of southern China. Our results indicate that, between 2007 and 2011, L. trifolii rapidly replaced L. sativae as the predominant leafminer of vegetables on Hainan Island, similar to the situation in the western United States. Further surveys of growers revealed that avermectins and cyromazine are the two most frequently used insecticides against leafminers on Hainan Island. Dose-mortality tests showed that L. trifolii populations from Hainan Island are less susceptible to avermectins and cyromazine compared with L. sativae populations. This lower insecticide susceptibility of L. trifolii may be associated with the displacement of L. sativae by L. trifolii, although additional ecological or environmental factors cannot be ruled out.

  18. Availability and Integration of Palliative Care at United States Cancer Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, David; Elsayem, Ahmed; De La Cruz, Maxine; Berger, Ann; Zhukovsky, Donna S.; Palla, Shana; Evans, Avery; Fadul, Nada; Palmer, J. Lynn; Bruera, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Context The current state of palliative care in cancer centers is not known. Objective We conducted a survey to determine the availability and degree of integration of palliative care services, and to compare between National Cancer Institute (NCI) and non-NCI cancer centers in the United States. Design, Setting, and Participants Between June and October 2009, we surveyed both executives and palliative care clinical program leaders, where applicable, of 71 NCI cancer centers and a random sample of 71 non-NCI centers regarding their palliative care services. Executives were also asked about their attitudes toward palliative care. Main Outcome Measure Availability of palliative care services in the cancer center, defined as the presence of at least one palliative care physician. Results We sent 142 and 120 surveys to executives and program leaders, with response rates of 71% and 82%, respectively. NCI cancer centers were significantly more likely to have a palliative care program (50/51 (98%) vs. 39/50 (78%), P=0.002), at least one palliative care physician (46/51 (90%) vs. 28/50 (56%), P=0.04), an inpatient palliative care consultation team (47/51 (92%) vs. 28/50 (56%), Ppalliative care clinic (30/51 (59%) vs. 11/50 (22%), Ppalliative care beds (23/101 (23%)) or an institution-operated hospice (37/101 (36%)). The median reported durations from referral to death were 7 (Q1–Q3 4–16), 7 (Q1–Q3 5–10), and 90 (Q1–Q3 30–120) days for inpatient consultation teams, inpatient units, and outpatient clinics, respectively. Research programs, palliative care fellowships, and mandatory rotations for oncology fellows were uncommon. Executives were supportive of stronger integration and increasing palliative care resources. Conclusion Most cancer centers reported a palliative care program, although the scope of services and the degree of integration varied widely. Further efforts to consolidate existing infrastructure and to integrate palliative care in cancer centers

  19. A new species of Niditinea (Tineidae: Tineinae) with a preference for bird nests and the known larval habitats of the species in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    We describe and illustrate Niditinea sabroskyi new species, a species mostly associated with bird nests. We provide diagnostic information to distinguish the new species from the other two species occurring in the United States, Niditinea fuscella (Linnaeus, 1758) and Niditinea orleansella (Chambers...

  20. Dialysis vascular access management by interventional nephrology programs at University Medical Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachharajani, Tushar J; Moossavi, Shahriar; Salman, Loay; Wu, Steven; Dwyer, Amy C; Ross, Jamie; Dukkipati, Ramanath; Maya, Ivan D; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Agarwal, Anil; Abreo, Kenneth D; Work, Jack; Asif, Arif

    2011-01-01

    The development of interventional nephrology has undoubtedly led to an improvement in patient care at many facilities across the United States. However, these services have traditionally been offered by interventional nephrologists in the private practice arena. While interventional nephrology was born in the private practice setting, several academic medical centers across the United States have now developed interventional nephrology programs. University Medical Centers (UMCs) that offer interventional nephrology face challenges, such as smaller dialysis populations, limited financial resources, and real or perceived political "turf" issues." Despite these hurdles, several UMCs have successfully established interventional nephrology as an intricate part of a larger nephrology program. This has largely been accomplished by consolidating available resources and collaborating with other specialties irrespective of the size of the dialysis population. The collaboration with other specialties also offers an opportunity to perform advanced procedures, such as application of excimer laser and endovascular ultrasound. As more UMCs establish interventional nephrology programs, opportunities for developing standardized training centers will improve, resulting in better quality and availability of nephrology-related procedures, and providing an impetus for research activities. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Vascular plant and vertebrate species richness in national parks of the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Jeffrey S.; Myrick, Kaci E.; Huston, Michael A.; Weckerly, Floyd W.; Green, M. Clay

    2013-01-01

    Given the estimates that species diversity is diminishing at 50-100 times the normal rate, it is critical that we be able to evaluate changes in species richness in order to make informed decisions for conserving species diversity. In this study, we examined the potential of vascular plant species richness to be used as a surrogate for vertebrate species richness in the classes of amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Vascular plants, as primary producers, represent the biotic starting point for ecological community structure and are the logical place to start for understanding vertebrate species associations. We used data collected by the United States (US) National Park Service (NPS) on species presence within parks in the eastern US to estimate simple linear regressions between plant species richness and vertebrate richness. Because environmental factors may also influence species diversity, we performed simple linear regressions of species richness versus natural logarithm of park area, park latitude, mean annual precipitation, mean annual temperature, and human population density surrounding the parks. We then combined plant species richness and environmental variables in multiple regressions to determine the variables that remained as significant predictors of vertebrate species richness. As expected, we detected significant relationships between plant species richness and amphibian, bird, and mammal species richness. In some cases, plant species richness was predicted by park area alone. Species richness of mammals was only related to plant species richness. Reptile species richness, on the other hand, was related to plant species richness, park latitude and annual precipitation, while amphibian species richness was related to park latitude, park area, and plant species richness. Thus, plant species richness predicted species richness of different vertebrate groups to varying degrees and should not be used exclusively as a surrogate for vertebrate

  2. [Breast Center--a virtual unit for the multidisciplinary care of breast patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Lázár, György; Lázár, Máté; Ormándi, Katalin; Pálka, Istvń dr; Thurzó, László

    2006-03-05

    Breast cancer, the most prevalent female malignancy represents a major health problem. Breast cancer mortality may be halved by high quality mammography screening and care. The most efficient screening and the best treatment of patients are available at the breast centers that are equipped with special facilities, expertise and significant experience via the treatment of a high number of patients. Breast center is a virtual unit based on the collaboration of various professionals; a tight institutional frame is not a must. In these comprehensive centers, 150 breast cancer patients per year at a minimum are treated, and the most efficient special treatment methods are available. The core members of the staff are the breast pathologists, the mammographists, the breast surgeons, the oncologists/oncoradiologists, the breast nurses, the technicians and the data managers. An easy access to the service of the non-core members, the plastic surgeons, the psychologists, the psychiatrists and the clinical geneticists is necessary. An optimal collaboration of the various experts may be achieved by a training of the members, regular multidisciplinary meetings and guidelines developed and accepted by all. The requirements of a breast center have been published by the European Society of Mastology (EUSOMA), and a directory of the accredited European breast centers is maintained. The Breast Unit of the University of Szeged has been found eligible by EUSOMA to be included in the directory of the European breast units. Two mammographists do screening-mammography and clinical examination, 2 pathologists perform cytopathological, histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. Three surgeons operate on more than 250 breast cancer patients per year, and apply wire or isotope (ROLL) localisation in case of non-palpable lesion. A plastic surgeon is available if necessary. In a half of all cases, sentinel mapping is performed with isotope- and blue dye-labelling. Two

  3. Phytophthora Species in Rivers and Streams of the Southwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamler, Rio A; Sanogo, Soumalia; Goldberg, Natalie P; Randall, Jennifer J

    2016-08-01

    Phytophthora species were isolated from rivers and streams in the southwestern United States by leaf baiting and identified by sequence analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA (rDNA). The major waterways examined included the Rio Grande River, Gila River, Colorado River, and San Juan River. The most prevalent species identified in rivers and streams were Phytophthora lacustris and P. riparia, both members of Phytophthora ITS clade 6. P. gonapodyides, P. cinnamomi, and an uncharacterized Phytophthora species in clade 9 were also recovered. In addition, six isolates recovered from the Rio Grande River were shown to be hybrids of P. lacustris × P. riparia Pathogenicity assays using P. riparia and P. lacustris failed to produce any disease symptoms on commonly grown crops in the southwestern United States. Inoculation of Capsicum annuum with P. riparia was shown to inhibit disease symptom development when subsequently challenged with P. capsici, a pathogenic Phytophthora species. Many Phytophthora species are significant plant pathogens causing disease on a large variety of crops worldwide. Closer examinations of streams, rivers, and forest soils have also identified numerous Phytophthora species that do not appear to be phytopathogens and likely act as early saprophytes in aquatic and saturated environments. To date, the Phytophthora species composition in rivers and streams of the southwestern United States has not been evaluated. This article details a study to determine the identity and prevalence of Phytophthora species in rivers and streams located in New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Utah, and Texas. Isolated species were evaluated for pathogenicity on crop plants and for their potential to act as biological control agents. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) 6 to 10 Day Probabilistic Temperature Outlook for the Contiguous United States and Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues 6 to 10 day probabilistic temperature outlooks for the United States. The 6-10 day Outlook gives the confidence that a...

  5. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) 8 to 14 Day Probabilistic Temperature Outlook for the Contiguous United States and Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues 8 to 14 day probabilistic temperature outlooks for the United States. The 8-14 day Outlook gives the confidence that a...

  6. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) 6 to 10 Day Probabilistic Precipitation Outlook for the Contiguous United States and Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues 6 to 10 day probabilistic precipitation outlooks for the United States. The 6-10 day Outlook gives the confidence that a...

  7. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) 8 to 14 Day Probabilistic Precipitation Outlook for the Contiguous United States and Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues 8 to 14 day probabilistic precipitation outlooks for the United States. The 8-14 day Outlook gives the confidence that a...

  8. United States academic medical centers: priorities and challenges amid market transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Irene M; Anason, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    United States academic medical centers (AMCs) have upheld their long-standing reputation for excellence by teaching and training the next generation of physicians, supporting medical research, providing world-class medical care, and offering breakthrough treatments for highly complex medical cases. In recent years, the pace and direction of change reshaping the American health care industry has created a set of new and profound challenges that AMC leaders must address in order to sustain their institutions. University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) is an alliance of 116 leading nonprofit academic medical centers and 276 of their affiliated hospitals, all of which are focused on delivering world-class patient care. Formed in 1984, UHC fosters collaboration with and among its members through its renowned programs and services in the areas of comparative data and analytics, performance improvement, supply chain management, strategic research, and public policy. Each year, UHC surveys the executives of its member institutions to understand the issues they view as most critical to sustaining the viability and success of their organizations. The results of UHC's most recent 2011 member survey, coupled with a 2012 Strategic Health Perspectives Harris Interactive presentation, based in parton surveys of major health care industry stakeholders reveal the most important and relevant issues and opportunities that hospital leaders face today, as the United States health care delivery system undergoes a period of unprecedented transformation.

  9. Disparities in Geographic Accessibility of National Cancer Institute Cancer Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanqing; Fu, Cong; Onega, Tracy; Shi, Xun; Wang, Fahui

    2017-11-11

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Centers form the backbone of the cancer care system in the United States since their inception in the early 1970s. Most studies on their geographic accessibility used primitive measures, and did not examine the disparities across urbanicity or demographic groups. This research uses an advanced accessibility method, termed "2-step floating catchment area (2SFCA)" and implemented in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), to capture the degree of geographic access to NCI Cancer Centers by accounting for competition intensity for the services and travel time between residents and the facilities. The results indicate that urban advantage is pronounced as the average accessibility is highest in large central metro areas, declines to large fringe metro, medium metro, small metro, micropolitan and noncore rural areas. Population under the poverty line are disproportionally concentrated in lower accessibility areas. However, on average Non-Hispanic White have the lowest geographic accessibility, followed by Hispanic, Non-Hispanic Black and Asian, and the differences are statistically significant. The "reversed racial disadvantage" in NCI Cancer Center accessibility seems counterintuitive but is consistent with an influential prior study; and it is in contrast to the common observation of co-location of concentration of minority groups and people under the poverty line.

  10. Exotic annual Bromus invasions: comparisons among species and ecoregions in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Matthew L.; Brown, Cynthia S.; Chambers, Jeanne C.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; Keeley, Jon E.; Belnap, Jayne

    2016-01-01

    Exotic annual Bromus species are widely recognized for their potential to invade, dominate, and alter the structure and function of ecosystems. In this chapter, we summarize the invasion potential, ecosystem threats, and management strategies for different Bromus species within each of five ecoregions of the western United States. We characterize invasion potential and threats in terms of ecosystem resistance to Bromus invasion and ecosystem resilience to disturbance with an emphasis on the importance of fi re regimes. We also explain how soil temperature and moisture regimes can be linked to patterns of resistance and resilience and provide a conceptual framework that can be used to evaluate the relative potential for invasion and ecological impact of the dominant exotic annual Bromus species in the western United States.

  11. In-Center Nutrition Practices of Clinics within a Large Hemodialysis Provider in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Debbie; Burgess, Mary; Stasios, Maria; Brosch, Becky; Wilund, Ken; Shen, Sa; Kistler, Brandon

    2016-05-06

    Eating during hemodialysis treatment remains a controversial topic. It is perceived that more restrictive practices in the United States contribute to poorer nutritional status and elevated mortality compared with some other parts of the world. However, in-center food practices in the United States have not been previously described. In 2011, we conducted a survey of clinic practices and clinician (dietitian, facility administrator, and medical director) opinions related to in-center food consumption within a large dialysis organization. After the initial survey, we provided clinicians with educational materials about eating during treatment. In 2014, we performed a follow-up survey. Differences in practices and opinions were analyzed using chi-squared tests and logistic regression. In 2011, 343 of 1199 clinics (28.6%) did not allow eating during treatment, 222 clinics (18.2%) did not allow drinking during treatment, and 19 clinics (1.6%) did not allow eating at the facility before or after treatment. In 2014, the proportion of clinics that did not allow eating during treatment had declined to 22.6% (321 of 1422 clinics), a significant shift in practice (Pnutritional status. Among clinicians, a higher percentage encouraged eating during treatment (53.1% versus 37.4%; P<0.05), and facility administrators and medical directors were less concerned about the seven reasons commonly cited for restricting eating during treatment in 2014 compared with 2011 (P<0.05 for all). We found that 28.6% and 22.6% of hemodialysis clinics within the United States restricted eating during treatment in 2011 and 2014, respectively, a rate more than double that found in an international cohort on which we previously published. However, practices and clinician opinions are shifting toward allowing patients to eat. Additional research is warranted to understand the effect that these practices have on patient outcomes and outline best practices. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of

  12. Chest Pain Centers: A Comparison of Accreditation Programs in Germany and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuckmann, Frank; Burt, David R; Melching, Kay; Erbel, Raimund; Heusch, Gerd; Senges, Jochen; Garvey, J Lee

    2015-06-01

    The implementation of chest pain centers (CPC)/units (CPU) has been shown to improve emergency care in patients with suspected cardiac ischemia. In an effort to provide a systematic and specific standard of care for patients with acute chest pain, the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care (SCPC) as well as the German Cardiac Society (GCS) introduced criteria for the accreditation of specialized units. To date, 825 CPCs in the United States and 194 CPUs in Germany have been successfully certified by the SCPC or GCS, respectively. Even though there are differences in the accreditation processes, the goals are quite similar, focusing on enhanced operational efficiencies in the care of the acute coronary syndrome patients, reduced time delays, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies using adapted standard operating procedures, and increased medical as well as community awareness by the implementation of nationwide standardized concepts. In addition to national efforts, both societies have launched international initiatives, accrediting CPCs/CPU in the Middle East and China (SCPC) and Switzerland (GCS). Enhanced collaboration among international bodies interested in promoting high quality care might extend the opportunity for accreditation of facilities that treat cardiovascular patients, with national programs designed to meet local needs and local healthcare system requirements.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of transfers to centers with neurological intensive care units after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jeffrey J; Kotagal, Vikas; Mammoser, Aaron; Peterson, Mark; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Burke, James F

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of transferring patients with intracerebral hemorrhage from centers without specialized neurological intensive care units (neuro-ICUs) to centers with neuro-ICUs. Decision analytic models were developed for the lifetime horizons. Model inputs were derived from the best available data, informed by a variety of previous cost-effectiveness models of stroke. The effect of neuro-ICU care on functional outcomes was modeled in 3 scenarios. A favorable outcomes scenario was modeled based on the best observational data and compared with moderately favorable and least-favorable outcomes scenarios. Health benefits were measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and costs were estimated from a societal perspective. Costs were combined with QALYs gained to generate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. One-way sensitivity analysis and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to test robustness of the model assumptions. Transferring patients to centers with neuro-ICUs yielded an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for the lifetime horizon of $47,431 per QALY, $91,674 per QALY, and $380,358 per QALY for favorable, moderately favorable, and least-favorable scenarios, respectively. Models were robust at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000 per QALY, with 95.5%, 75.0%, and 2.1% of simulations below the threshold for favorable, moderately favorable, and least-favorable scenarios, respectively. Transferring patients with intracerebral hemorrhage to centers with specialized neuro-ICUs is cost-effective if observational estimates of the neuro-ICU-based functional outcome distribution are accurate. If future work confirms these functional outcome distributions, then a strong societal rationale exists to build systems of care designed to transfer intracerebral hemorrhage patients to specialized neuro-ICUs. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Bariatric surgery outcomes: a single-center study in the United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abusnana S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Salah Abusnana,1 Sarah Abdi,1 Brigette Tagure,1 Murtada Elbagir,1 Almantas Maleckas2 1Rashid Center for Diabetes and Research, Ministry of Health, Ajman, United Arab Emirates; 2Kaunas University of Medicine, Kaunas, LithuaniaBackground: Bariatric surgery has become an attractive treatment for severe obesity over the last decade, due to its impacts on weight loss and remission of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. In the United Arab Emirates, a country where the rate of obesity is dramatically increasing bariatric surgery has gained popularity in recent years; however, published data on its outcomes in the Emirati population are lacking.Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 95 patients who underwent bariatric surgery (ie, laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass [RYGB] or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy at the Rashid Center for Diabetes and Research in Ajman, United Arab Emirates. Weight outcomes and metabolic marker data were abstracted at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively.Results: Laparoscopic RYGB was the main procedure performed by our bariatric unit. All variables demonstrated postoperative improvement. An average excess weight loss of 68% was observed at 12 months. Fat mass was the body component that decreased the most, with an average reduction of 46%. Additionally, lipid profiles were significantly different (P<0.01 at 12 months, with triglyceride levels improving by 27% and low-density lipoprotein levels improving by 21%. Similarly, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels decreased significantly (P<0.001 in patients with type 2 diabetes, with an average reduction of 73%.Conclusion: Our results show that a substantial short-term reduction in weight and significant improvements in metabolic markers followed bariatric surgery in severely obese Emirati patients. Our results are consistent with the outcomes of other internationally published studies. Additional studies are warranted to determine whether

  15. Does the United States economy affect heart failure readmissions? A single metropolitan center analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Keith A; Morrissey, Ryan P; Phan, Anita; Schwarz, Ernst R

    2012-08-01

    To determine the effects of the US economy on heart failure hospitalization rates. The recession was associated with worsening unemployment, loss of private insurance and prescription medication benefits, medication nonadherence, and ultimately increased rates of hospitalization for heart failure. We compared hospitalization rates at a large, single, academic medical center from July 1, 2006 to February 28, 2007, a time of economic stability, and July 1, 2008 to February 28, 2009, a time of economic recession in the United States. Significantly fewer patients had private medical insurance during the economic recession than during the control period (36.5% vs 46%; P = 0.04). Despite this, there were no differences in the heart failure hospitalization or readmission rates, length of hospitalization, need for admission to an intensive care unit, in-hospital mortality, or use of guideline-recommended heart failure medications between the 2 study periods. We conclude that despite significant effects on medical insurance coverage, rates of heart failure hospitalization at our institution were not significantly affected by the recession. Additional large-scale population-based research is needed to better understand the effects of fluctuations in the US economy on heart failure hospitalization rates. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Nosocomial infections in patients admitted in intensive care unit of a tertiary health center, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mythri, H; Kashinath, Kr

    2014-09-01

    Patients in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) are a significant subgroup of all hospitalized patients, accounting for about a quarter of all hospital infections. The aim was to study, the current status of nosocomial infection, rate of infection and distribution of infection among patients admitted in Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) of a District Hospital. Data were collected retrospectively from 130 patient's records presented with symptoms of nosocomial infection in MICU of a Tertiary Health Center, Tumkur from August 2012 to May 2013. Descriptive statistics using percentage was calculated. Incidence of nosocomial infections in MICU patients was 17.7% (23/130). Of which 34.8% (8/130) was urinary tract infection (UTI) being the most frequent; followed by pneumonia 21.7% (5/130), 17.4% (4/130) surgical site infection, 13.0% (3/130) gastroenteritis, 13.0% (3/130) blood stream infection and meningitis. The nosocomial infection was seen more in the 40-60 year of age. The male were more prone to nosocomial infections than the female. The most frequent nosocomial infections (urinary, respiratory, and surgical site) were common in geriatric patients in the MICU setting and are associated with the use of invasive device. Large-scale studies are needed to be carried out in Indian population to plan long-term strategies for prevention and management of nosocomial infections.

  17. Genetic Characterization of Fungi Isolated from the Environmental Swabs collected from a Compounding Center Known to Cause Multistate Meningitis Outbreak in United States Using ITS Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad M. Sulaiman

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A multistate fungal meningitis outbreak started in September of 2012 which spread in 20 states of the United States. The outbreak has been fatal so far, and has affected 751 individuals with 64 deaths among those who received contaminated spinal injections manufactured by a Compounding Center located in Massachusetts. In a preliminary study, Food and Drug Administration (FDA investigated the outbreak in collaboration with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, state and local health departments, and identified four fungal and several bacterial contaminations in the recalled unopened injection vials. This follow-up study was carried out to assess DNA sequencing of the ITS1 region of rRNA gene for rapid identification of fungal pathogens during public health outbreak investigations. A total of 26 environmental swabs were collected from several locations at the manufacturing premises of the Compounding Center known to have caused the outbreak. The swab samples were initially examined by conventional microbiologic protocols and a wide range of fungal species were recovered. Species-identification of these microorganisms was accomplished by nucleotide sequencing of ITS1 region of rRNA gene. Analysis of data confirmed 14 additional fungal species in the swabs analyzed.

  18. A family-centered "visitation" policy in the neonatal intensive care unit that welcomes parents as partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Parents are important partners in the neonatal intensive care unit, collaborating with staff in caregiving and decision making for their infants. These essential and mutually beneficial partnerships between families and staff are the cornerstone of family-centered care and require that parents are welcomed to be with their baby at any time. This concept is not new and, yet, many neonatal intensive care units continue to have "visitation" policies that restrict parent's access to their infants, failing to recognize parents as partners. Changing the "visitation" policy is part of a welcoming approach in the context of family-centered care. Neonatal intensive care unit nurses may be accustomed to a more strict policy, needing communication tools and strategies to collaborate with parents and implement a family-centered "visitation" or welcoming policy.

  19. Site index comparisons for forest species in the Upper Great Lakes area of the United States and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard H. Carmean; Jerold T. Hahn; Ronald E. McRoberts; D. Kaisershot

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes six studies that compare site index relations between 24 hardwood and conifer species in the Upper Great Lakes area of the United States and Canada. These six studies have many regression models and graphs for comparing site index between forest species thus providing tools for estimating site index for alternative tree species based on direct...

  20. Characteristics of Primary Care Physicians in Patient-centered Medical Home Practices: United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hing, Esther; Kurtzman, Ellen; Lau, Denys T; Taplin, Caroline; Bindman, Andrew B

    2017-02-01

    Objective-This report describes the characteristics of primary care physicians in patient-centered medical home (PCMH) practices and compares these characteristics with those of primary care physicians in non-PCMH practices. Methods-The data presented in this report were collected during the induction interview for the 2013 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, a national probability sample survey of nonfederal physicians who see patients in office settings in the United States. Analyses exclude anesthesiologists, radiologists, pathologists, and physicians in community health centers. In this report, PCMH status is self-defined as having been certified by one of the following organizations: Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, The Joint Commission, National Committee for Quality Assurance, URAC, or other certifying bodies. Estimates exclude physicians missing information on PCMH status. Sample data are weighted to produce national estimates of physicians and characteristics of their practices. Results-In 2013, 18.0% of office-based primary care physicians worked in practices certified as PCMHs. A higher percentage of primary care physicians in PCMH practices (68.8%) had at least one physician assistant, nurse practitioner, or certified nurse midwife on staff compared with non-PCMH practices (47.7%). A higher percentage of primary care physicians in PCMH practices reported electronic transmission (69.6%) as the primary method for receiving information on patients hospitalized or seen in emergency departments compared with non-PCMH practices (41.5%). The percentage of primary care physicians in practices reporting quality measures or quality indicators to payers or organizations monitoring health care quality was higher in PCMH practices (86.8%) compared with non-PCMH practices (70.2%). All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.

  1. Measurement of Family-centered care perception and parental stress in a neonatal unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbino, Flávia Simphronio; Balieiro, Maria Magda Ferreira Gomes; Mandetta, Myriam Aparecida

    2016-08-08

    to evaluate the effects of the implementation of the Patient and Family-Centered Care Model on parents and healthcare perceptions and parental stress. a quasi-experimental study developed in a neonatal unit of a university hospital in the municipality of São Paulo, Brazil, with the implementation of this model of care. Data collection were performed by two sample groups, one using non-equivalent groups of parents, and another using equivalent groups of healthcare professionals. The instruments Perceptions of Family-Centered Care-Parent Brazilian Version, Perceptions of Family-Centered Care-Staff Brazilian Version and Parental Stress Scale: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, were applied to 132 parents of newborns hospitalized and to 57 professionals. there was a statistically significant improvement in the perceptions of the parents in most items assessed (p ≤0,05) and for the staff in relation to the family welcome in the neonatal unit (p = 0.041) and to the comprehension of the family's experience with the infant´s hospitalization (p = 0,050). There was a reduction in the average scores of parental stress, with a greater decrease in the Alteration in Parental Role from 4,2 to 3,8 (p = 0,048). the interventions improved the perceptions of parents and healthcare team related to patient and family-centered care and contributed to reducing parental stress. avaliar os efeitos da implementação do Modelo do Cuidado Centrado no Paciente e Família na percepção de pais e profissionais de saúde e no estresse parental. Estudo quase experimental com grupos não equivalentes para avaliação dos efeitos da intervenção na percepção de pais; e com grupos equivalentes para a avaliação na percepção de profissionais de saúde, desenvolvido na unidade neonatal de um hospital universitário do município de São Paulo. Os instrumentos, Percepção do Cuidado Centrado na Família- Pais versão brasileira, Percepção do Cuidado Centrado na Família- Equipe vers

  2. Neonatal circumcision in severe haemophilia: a survey of paediatric haematologists at United States Hemophilia Treatment Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, S; Sharathkumar, A; Rodriguez, V; Chitlur, M; Valentino, L; Boggio, L; Gill, J

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal circumcision in patients with severe haemophilia has not been well studied. We performed a survey of paediatric haematologists from Hemophilia Treatment Centers (HTC) across the United States to better understand the attitudes toward and management of neonatal circumcision in haemophilia patients. Response rate to our survey was 40% (n = 64/159). Thirty-eight percent of respondents (n = 24) said that they would allow this procedure in the newborn period but in many cases this was against medical advice. The most reported concern regarding neonatal circumcision in haemophilia patients was the risk of development of an inhibitor (n = 25; 39%) followed by the concern for bleeding (n = 22; 34%) and issues related to vascular access in the neonate (n = 11; 17%). All respondents recommended at least one preprocedure dose of factor replacement. Twenty-two percent (n = 14) of respondents did not use more than one dose of factor replacement but 32% (n = 21) used 1-2 postoperative doses. The remainder of paediatric haematologists surveyed recommended between 3-5 (16%; n = 10) and 6-10 (3%, n = 2) additional days postoperatively. There was wide variation in both techniques of circumcision as well as adjuvant haemostatic agents used. Only 22% of respondents said that they had an established protocol for management of circumcision in the newborn haemophilia patient. These survey results highlight the need for evidence-based guidelines regarding the optimal management of circumcision in neonates with severe haemophilia. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Validity of Ski Skating Center-of-Mass Displacement Measured by a Single Inertial Measurement Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myklebust, Håvard; Gløersen, Øyvind; Hallén, Jostein

    2015-12-01

    In regard to simplifying motion analysis and estimating center of mass (COM) in ski skating, this study addressed 3 main questions concerning the use of inertial measurement units (IMU): (1) How accurately can a single IMU estimate displacement of os sacrum (S1) on a person during ski skating? (2) Does incorporating gyroscope and accelerometer data increase accuracy and precision? (3) Moreover, how accurately does S1 determine COM displacement? Six world-class skiers roller-ski skated on a treadmill using 2 different subtechniques. An IMU including accelerometers alone (IMU-A) or in combination with gyroscopes (IMU-G) were mounted on the S1. A reflective marker at S1, and COM calculated from 3D full-body optical analysis, were used to provide reference values. IMU-A provided an accurate and precise estimate of vertical S1 displacement, but IMU-G was required to attain accuracy and precision of < 8 mm (root-mean-squared error and range of displacement deviation) in all directions and with both subtechniques. Further, arm and torso movements affected COM, but not the S1. Hence, S1 displacement was valid for estimating sideways COM displacement, but the systematic amplitude and timing difference between S1 and COM displacement in the anteroposterior and vertical directions inhibits exact calculation of energy fluctuations.

  4. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Brachyspira Species Isolated from Swine Herds in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirajkar, Nandita S; Davies, Peter R; Gebhart, Connie J

    2016-08-01

    Outbreaks of swine dysentery, caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and the recently discovered "Brachyspira hampsonii," have reoccurred in North American swine herds since the late 2000s. Additionally, multiple Brachyspira species have been increasingly isolated by North American diagnostic laboratories. In Europe, the reliance on antimicrobial therapy for control of swine dysentery has been followed by reports of antimicrobial resistance over time. The objectives of our study were to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility trends of four Brachyspira species originating from U.S. swine herds and to investigate their associations with the bacterial species, genotypes, and epidemiological origins of the isolates. We evaluated the susceptibility of B. hyodysenteriae, B. hampsonii, Brachyspira pilosicoli, and Brachyspira murdochii to tiamulin, valnemulin, doxycycline, lincomycin, and tylosin by broth microdilution and that to carbadox by agar dilution. In general, Brachyspira species showed high susceptibility to tiamulin, valnemulin, and carbadox, heterogeneous susceptibility to doxycycline, and low susceptibility to lincomycin and tylosin. A trend of decreasing antimicrobial susceptibility by species was observed (B. hampsonii > B. hyodysenteriae > B. murdochii > B. pilosicoli). In general, Brachyspira isolates from the United States were more susceptible to these antimicrobials than were isolates from other countries. Decreased antimicrobial susceptibility was associated with the genotype, stage of production, and production system from which the isolate originated, which highlights the roles of biosecurity and husbandry in disease prevention and control. Finally, this study also highlights the urgent need for Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute-approved clinical breakpoints for Brachyspira species, to facilitate informed therapeutic and control strategies. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Occurrence of Ochroconis and Verruconis Species in Clinical Specimens from the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Alejandra; Sutton, Deanna A.; Samerpitak, Kittipan; de Hoog, G. Sybren; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Guarro, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Ochroconis is a dematiaceous fungus able to infect immunocompetent people. Recently, the taxonomy of the genus has been reevaluated, and the most relevant species, Ochroconis gallopava, was transferred to the new genus Verruconis. Due to the important clinical implications of these fungi and based on the recent classification, it was of interest to know the spectra of Ochroconis and Verruconis species in clinical samples received in a reference laboratory in the United States. A set of 51 isolates was identified morphologically and molecularly based on sequence analyses of the nuclear ribosomal RNA (nrRNA), actin, and β-tubulin genes. Verruconis gallopava was the most common species (68.6%), followed by Ochroconis mirabilis (21.5%). One isolate of Ochroconis cordanae was found, being reported for the first time in a clinical setting. The most common anatomical site of isolation was the lower respiratory tract (58.8%), followed by superficial and deep tissues at similar frequencies (21.6 and 19.6%, respectively). Interestingly, three new species were found, which are Ochroconis olivacea and Ochroconis ramosa from clinical specimens and Ochroconis icarus of an environmental origin. The in vitro antifungal susceptibilities of eight antifungal drugs against the Ochroconis isolates revealed that terbinafine and micafungin were the most active drugs. PMID:25232157

  6. It is just not fair: the Endangered Species Act in the United States and Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Olive

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The United States and the Canadian province of Ontario have enacted endangered species laws that regulate private land. The rationale for this is that the vast majority of endangered species in the two countries rely on private lands for survival. However, from a landowner perspective the law is deemed unfair. This paper presents analysis from 141 interviews with landowners in three U.S. states and Ontario. In recognition of distributive justice claims, both the U.S. government and the Ontario government have enacted programs aimed at increasing financial incentives for participation and compliance with the law. However, the law is still perceived as unfair. The central argument of this paper is that future amendments and new policies for endangered species should confront two other forms of environmental justice: procedural justice and justice-as-recognition. Landowners in both countries expressed not only concerns about compensation, but also a deep desire to be included in the protection and recovery process, as well as to be recognized by government and society as good stewards of the land. The paper concludes by stating that future policy amendments need to address justice-as-recognition if endangered species conservation on private lands is to be considered fair by landowners.

  7. Species of Aspergillus section Aspergillus from clinical samples in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, João P Z; Sutton, Deanna A; Gené, Josepa; García, Dania; Wiederhold, Nathan; Guarro, Josep

    2017-10-09

    The diversity of Aspergillus species in clinical samples is continuously increasing. Species under the former name Eurotium, currently accommodated in section Aspergillus of the genus Aspergillus, are xerophilic fungi widely found in the human environment and able to grow on substrates with low water activity. However, their prevalence in the clinical setting is poorly known. We have studied the presence of these species in a set of clinical samples from the United States using a multilocus sequence analysis based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the rRNA, and fragments of the genes β-tubulin (BenA), calmodulin (CaM), and polymerase II second largest subunit (RPB2). A total of 25 isolates were studied and identified as follows: A. montevidensis (44%), A. chevalieri (36%), A. pseudoglaucus (8%), and A. costiformis (4%). A new species Aspergillus microperforatus is also proposed, which represented 8% of the isolates studied and is characterized by uniseriate conidial heads, subglobose to pyriform vesicles, rough conidia, globose to subglobose cleistothecia, and lenticular and smooth ascospores. The in vitro antifungal activity of eight clinically available antifungals was also determined against these isolates, with the echinocandins and posaconazole having the most potent activity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. A Study of the Leadership Styles of Campus Based Women's Centers in Higher Education in the Southeast United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuz, Nikki

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the organizational and institutional variables that influence the leadership styles of directors of campus-based women's centers at public and private four-year universities in the southeast United States. The researcher examined the leadership frame (or frames), as measured by Bolman and Deal's (1990) Leadership Orientations…

  9. A Survey of Digital Humanities Centers in the United States. CLIR Publication No. 143

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorich, Diane M.

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for the 2008 Scholarly Communications Institute (SCI 6) focused on humanities research centers, the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) commissioned a survey of digital humanities centers (DHCs). The immediate goals of the survey were to identify the extent of these centers and to explore their financing,…

  10. The transplant center and business unit as a model for specialized care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, A Osama; Schwartz, Roberta L; Bernard, David P; Zylicz, Susan

    2013-12-01

    Transplant centers are valuable assets to a transplantation hospital and essential to organize the delivery of patient care. A transplant center defined around physicians and activities of caring for patients with organ failure creates a team better equipped to manage care across the continuum of the diseases treated by transplantation. Through monitoring of clinical and financial outcomes, the transplant center can better respond to the changing regulatory and financial landscape of health care. This article seeks to explain the major organizational challenges facing the transplant center and how a transplant center can best serve its patients and parent organization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management (ICIWaRM): The United States' Contribution to UNESCO IHP's Global Network of Water Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of a "category 2 center"—i.e., one that is closely affiliated with UNESCO, but not legally part of UNESCO—dates back many decades. However, only in the last decade has the concept been fully developed. Within UNESCO, the International Hydrological Programme (IHP) has led the way in creating a network of regional and global water-related centers.ICIWaRM—the International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management—is one member of this network. Approved by UNESCO's General Conference, the center has been operating since 2009. It was designed to fill a niche in the system for a center that was backed by an institution with on-the-ground water management experience, but that also had strong connections to academia, NGOs and other governmental agencies. Thus, ICIWaRM is hosted by the US Army Corps of Engineers' Institute for Water Resources (IWR), but established with an internal network of partner institutions. Three main factors have contributed to any success that ICIWaRM has achieved in its global work: A focus on practical science and technology which can be readily transferred. This includes the Corps' own methodologies and models for planning and water management, and those of our university and government partners. Collaboration with other UNESCO Centers on joint applied research, capacity-building and training. A network of centers needs to function as a network, and ICIWaRM has worked together with UNESCO-affiliated centers in Chile, Brazil, Paraguay, the Dominican Republic, Japan, China, and elsewhere. Partnering with and supporting existing UNESCO-IHP programs. ICIWaRM serves as the Global Technical Secretariat for IHP's Global Network on Water and Development Information in Arid Lands (G-WADI). In addition to directly supporting IHP, work through G-WADI helps the center to frame, prioritize and integrate its activities. With the recent release of the United Nation's 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, it is clear that

  12. Potential establishment of alien-invasive forest insect species in the United States: where and how many?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank H. Koch; Denys Yemshanov; Manuel Colunga-Garcia; Roger D. Magarey; William D. Smith

    2011-01-01

    International trade is widely acknowledged as a conduit for movement of invasive species, but few studies have directly quantified the invasion risk confronting individual locations of interest. This study presents estimates of the likelihood of successful entry for alien forest insect species at more than 3,000 urban areas in the contiguous United States (US). To...

  13. Potential effects of forestry operations and associated best management practices on riparian wildlife species in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke M. Warrington; W. Michael Aust; Scott M. Barrett; W. Mark Ford; M. Chad Bolding; Andy Dolloff

    2016-01-01

    The US Fish and Wildlife Service is considering the addition of 374 riparian and aquatic species in the southeastern United States to the federal Threated and Endangered Species List. This recommendation is a result of a 2011 petition, which recognized forest operations as having negative effects on 51 percent of the listed species, citing research conducted in the...

  14. Ambulatory Surgery Data From Hospitals and Ambulatory Surgery Centers: United States, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Margaret J; Schwartzman, Alexander; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Xiang

    2017-02-01

    Objectives-This report presents national estimates of surgical and nonsurgical ambulatory procedures performed in hospitals and ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) in the United States during 2010. Patient characteristics, including age, sex, expected payment source, duration of surgery, and discharge disposition are presented, as well as the number and types of procedures performed in these settings. Methods-Estimates in this report are based on ambulatory surgery data collected in the 2010 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS). NHAMCS has collected outpatient department and emergency department data since 1992 and began gathering ambulatory surgery data from both hospitals and ASCs in 2010. Sample data were weighted to produce annual national estimates. Results-In 2010, 48.3 million surgical and nonsurgical procedures were performed during 28.6 million ambulatory surgery visits to hospitals and ASCs combined. For both males and females, 39% of procedures were performed on those aged 45-64. For females, about 24% of procedures were performed on those aged 15-44 compared with 18% for males, whereas the percentage of procedures performed on those under 15 was lower for females than for males (4% compared with 9%). About 19% of procedures were performed on those aged 65-74, while about 14% were performed on those aged 75 and over. Private insurance was listed as the principal expected source of payment for 51% of ambulatory surgery visits, Medicare for 31% of visits, and Medicaid for 8% of visits. The most frequently performed procedures included endoscopy of large intestine (4.0 million), endoscopy of small intestine (2.2 million), extraction of lens (2.9 million), insertion of prosthetic lens (2.6 million), and injection of agent into spinal canal (2.9 million). Only 2% of visits with a discharge status were admitted to the hospital as an inpatient. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied

  15. A Framework for Developing Management Goals for Species at Risk and Application to Military Installations in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Westervelt, James D. [ERDC-CERL

    2009-01-01

    A decision framework for setting management goals for species at risk is presented. Species at risk are those whose potential future rarity is of concern. Listing these species as threatened or endangered could potentially result in significant restrictions to activities in resource management areas in order to maintain those species. The management areas in the example application are United States (US) military installations, which are concerned about potential restrictions to military training capacity if species at risk become regulated under the US Endangered Species Act. The decision framework, designed to foster proactive management, has nine steps: identify species at risk on and near the management area, describe available information and potential information gaps for each species, determine the potential distribution of species and their habitat, select metrics for describing species status, assess the status of local population or metapopulation, conduct threat assessment, set and prioritize management goals, develop species management plans, and develop criteria for ending special species management where possible. This framework will aid resource managers in setting management goals that minimally impact human activities while reducing the likelihood that species at risk will become rare in the near future. The benefits of the proactive management set forth in this formal decision framework are that it is impartial, provides a clear procedure, calls for identification of causal relationships that may not be obvious, provides a way to target the most urgent needs, reduces costs, enhances public confidence, and, most importantly, decreases the chance of species becoming more rare.

  16. Framework for Developing Management goals for Species at Risk and Application to Military Installations in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Westervelt, James D. [ERDC-CERL

    2009-01-01

    A decision framework for setting management goals for species at risk is presented. Species at risk are those whose potential future rarity is of concern. Listing these species as threatened or endangered could potentially result in significant restrictions to activities in resource management areas in order to maintain those species. The decision framework, designed to foster proactive management, has nine steps: identify species at risk on and near the management area, describe available information and potential information gaps for each species, determine the potential distribution of species and their habitat, select metrics for describing species status, assess the status of local population or metapopulation, conduct threat assessment, set and prioritize management goals, develop species management plans, and develop criteria for ending special species management where possible. This framework will aid resource managers in setting management goals that minimally impact human activities while reducing the likelihood that species at risk will become rare in the near future. The management areas in many of the examples are United States (US) military installations, which are concerned about potential restrictions to military training capacity if species at risk become regulated under the US Endangered Species Act. The benefits of the proactive management set forth in this formal decision framework are that it is impartial, provides a clear procedure, calls for identification of causal relationships that may not be obvious, provides a way to target the most urgent needs, reduces costs, enhances public confidence, and, most importantly, decreases the chance of species becoming more rare.

  17. Sterol composition of shellfish species commonly consumed in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine M. Phillips

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shellfish can be a component of a healthy diet due to a low fat and high protein content, but the cholesterol content of some species is often cited as a reason to limit their consumption. Data on levels of non-cholesterol sterols in commonly consumed species are lacking. Objective: Shellfish were sampled and analyzed to update sterol data in the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference. Design: Using a nationwide sampling plan, raw shrimp and sea scallops, canned clams, and steamed oysters, blue crab, and lobster were sampled from 12 statistically selected supermarkets across the United States in 2007-08. For each species, four composites were analyzed, each comprised of samples from three locations; shrimp and scallops from six single locations were also analyzed separately. Using validated analytical methodology, 14 sterols were determined in total lipid extracts after saponification and derivatization to trimethylsilyethers, using gas chromatography for quantitation and mass spectrometry for confirmation of components. Results: Crab, lobster, and shrimp contained significant cholesterol (96.2–27 mg/100 g; scallops and clams had the lowest concentrations (23.4–30.1 mg/100 g. Variability in cholesterol among single-location samples of shrimp was low. The major sterols in the mollusks were brassicasterol (12.6–45.6 mg/100 g and 24-methylenecholesterol (16.7–41.9 mg/100 g, with the highest concentrations in oysters. Total non-cholesterol sterols were 46.5–75.6 mg/100 g in five single-location scallops samples, but 107 mg/100 g in the sixth, with cholesterol also higher in that sample. Other prominent non-cholesterol sterols in mollusks were 22-dehydrocholesterol, isofucosterol, clionasterol, campesterol, and 24-norcholesta-5,22-diene-3β-ol (4–21 mg/100 g. Conclusions: The presence of a wide range of sterols, including isomeric forms, in shellfish makes the analysis

  18. Antibiotic susceptibility of Acinetobacter species in intensive care unit in Montenegro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijovic, Gordana; Pejakov, Ljubica; Vujosevic, Danijela

    2016-08-01

    The global increase in multidrug resistance of Acinetobacter has created widespread problems in the treatment of patients in intensive care units (ICUs). The aim of this study was to assess the current level of antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter species in ICU of Clinical Centre of Montenegro and determine their epidemiology. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested in 70 isolates of Acinetobacter collected from non-repeating samples taken from 40 patients. The first nine isolates were genotyped by repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR). Tigecycline was found to be the most active antimicrobial agent with 80.6% of susceptibility. All the isolates were multidrug resistant with fully resistance to cefalosporinas, piperacillin and piperacillin/tazobactam. More than half of them (58.5%) were probably extensively resistant. Seven out of nine examined strains were clonally related by rep-PCR. Our results showed extremely high rate of multidrug resistance (MDR) of Acinetobacter isolates and high percentage of its clonally spreading.

  19. Evaluation of Flagging Criteria of United States Kidney Transplant Center Performance: How to Best Define Outliers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schold, Jesse D; Miller, Charles M; Henry, Mitchell L; Buccini, Laura D; Flechner, Stuart M; Goldfarb, David A; Poggio, Emilio D; Andreoni, Kenneth A

    2017-06-01

    Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients report cards of US organ transplant center performance are publicly available and used for quality oversight. Low center performance (LP) evaluations are associated with changes in practice including reduced transplant rates and increased waitlist removals. In 2014, Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients implemented new Bayesian methodology to evaluate performance which was not adopted by Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). In May 2016, CMS altered their performance criteria, reducing the likelihood of LP evaluations. Our aims were to evaluate incidence, survival rates, and volume of LP centers with Bayesian, historical (old-CMS) and new-CMS criteria using 6 consecutive program-specific reports (PSR), January 2013 to July 2015 among adult kidney transplant centers. Bayesian, old-CMS and new-CMS criteria identified 13.4%, 8.3%, and 6.1% LP PSRs, respectively. Over the 3-year period, 31.9% (Bayesian), 23.4% (old-CMS), and 19.8% (new-CMS) of centers had 1 or more LP evaluation. For small centers (evaluations (52 vs 13 PSRs) for 1-year mortality with Bayesian versus new-CMS criteria. For large centers (>183 transplants/PSR), there were 3-fold additional LP evaluations for 1-year mortality with Bayesian versus new-CMS criteria with median differences in observed and expected patient survival of -1.6% and -2.2%, respectively. A significant proportion of kidney transplant centers are identified as low performing with relatively small survival differences compared with expected. Bayesian criteria have significantly higher flagging rates and new-CMS criteria modestly reduce flagging. Critical appraisal of performance criteria is needed to assess whether quality oversight is meeting intended goals and whether further modifications could reduce risk aversion, more efficiently allocate resources, and increase transplant opportunities.

  20. Preliminary study of Malaysian fruit bats species diversity in Lenggong Livestock Breeding Center, Perak: Potential risk of spill over infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Mikail

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Farms that are neighboring wildlife sanctuaries are at risk of spillover infection from wildlife, and the objective of this research is to examine the species diversity of Malaysian fruit bats in livestock farm in determining the possible risk of spill over infection to livestock. Materials and Methods: Fifty individual fruit bats were captured using six mists net, from May to July 2017. The nets were set at dusk (1830 h as bats emerge for foraging and monitored at every 30-min intervals throughout the night until dawn when they returned to the roost. The nets were closed for the day until next night, and captured bats were identified to species levels. Results: All the captured bats were mega chiropterans, and Cynopterus brachyotis was the highest captured species, representing 40% of the total capture. Shannon-Weiner index is 2.80, and Simpson index is 0.2. Our result suggests that there is a degree of species dominance with low diversity in Lenggong Livestock Breeding Center. Conclusion: We concluded that fruit bats are indeed, encroaching livestock areas and the species identified could be a potential source of infection to susceptible livestock. Hence, an active surveillance should be embarked on farms that border wildlife sanctuaries.

  1. Characteristics of invasive Acinetobacter species isolates recovered in a pediatric academic center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Avish L; Harding, Christian M; Assani, Kaivon; Shrestha, Chandra L; Haga, Mercedees; Leber, Amy; Munson, Robert S; Kopp, Benjamin T

    2016-07-22

    Acinetobacter species are associated with increasing mortality due to emerging drug-resistance. Pediatric Acinetobacter infections are largely undefined in developed countries and clinical laboratory identification methods do not reliably differentiate between members of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex, leading to improper identification. Therefore we aimed to determine risk factors for invasive Acinetobacter infections within an academic, pediatric setting as well as defining microbiologic characteristics of predominant strains. Twenty-four invasive Acinetobacter isolates were collected from 2009-2013. Comparative sequence analysis of the rpoB gene was performed coupled with phenotypic characterization of antibiotic resistance, motility, biofilm production and clinical correlation. Affected patients had a median age of 3.5 years, and 71 % had a central catheter infection source. rpoB gene sequencing revealed a predominance of A. pittii (45.8 %) and A. baumannii (33.3 %) strains. There was increasing incidence of A. pittii over the study. Two fatalities occurred in the A. pittii group. Seventeen percent of isolates were multi-drug resistant. A pittii and A. baumannii strains were similar in motility, but A pittii strains had significantly more biofilm production (P value = 0.018). A. pittii was the most isolated species highlighting the need for proper species identification. The isolated strains had limited acute mortality in children, but the occurrence of more multi-drug resistant strains in the future is a distinct possibility, justifying continued research and accurate species identification.

  2. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Stratospheric Sounding Unit Monthly Zonal Mean Temperature Anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — It is shown that radiance observations centered at four additional levels in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere can be synthesized utilizing the measured...

  3. The Intensive Care Unit Perspective of Becoming a Level I Trauma Center: Challenges of Strategy, Leadership, and Operations Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H Savel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of this narrative is to elucidate the numerous significant changes that occur at the intensive care unit (ICU level as a medical center pursues becoming a Level I trauma center. Specifically, we will focus on the following important areas: (1 leadership and strategy issues behind the decision to move forward with becoming a trauma center; (2 preparation needed to take a highly functioning surgical ICU and align it for the inevitable changes that happen as trauma go-live occurs; (3 intensivist staffing changes; (4 roles for and training of advanced practice practitioners; (5 graduate medical education issues; (6 optimizing interactions with closely related services; (7 nursing, staffing, and training issues; (8 bed allocation issues; and (9 reconciling the advantages of a “unified adult critical care service” with the realities of the central relationship between trauma and surgical critical care.

  4. Pediatric Care Provided at Urgent Care Centers in the United States: Compliance With Recommendations for Emergency Preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Robert; Olympia, Robert P; Dunnick, Jennifer; Brady, Jodi

    2016-02-01

    To describe the compliance of urgent care centers in the United States with pediatric care recommendations for emergency preparedness as set forth by the American Academy of Pediatrics. An electronic questionnaire was distributed to urgent care center administrators as identified by the American Academy of Urgent Care Medicine directory. A total of 122 questionnaires of the 872 distributed were available for analysis (14% usable response rate). The most common diagnoses reported for pediatric patients included otitis media (72%), upper respiratory illness (69%), strep pharyngitis (61%), bronchiolitis (30%), and extremity sprain/strain (28%). Seventy-one percent of centers have contacted community emergency medical services (EMS) to transport a critically ill or injured child to their local emergency department in the past year. Sixty-two percent of centers reported having an established written protocol with community EMS and 54% with their local emergency department or hospital. Centers reported the availability of the following essential medications and equipment: oxygen source (75%), nebulized/inhaled β-agonist (95%), intravenous epinephrine (88%), oxygen masks/nasal cannula (89%), bag-valve-mask resuscitator (81%), suctioning device (60%), and automated external defibrillator (80%). Centers reported the presence of the following written emergency plans: respiratory distress (40%), seizures (67%), dehydration/shock (69%), head injury (59%), neck injury (67%), significant fracture (69%), and blunt chest or abdominal injury (81%). Forty-seven percent of centers conduct formal reviews of emergent or difficult cases in a quality improvement format. Areas for improvement in urgent care center preparedness were identified, such as increasing the availability of essential medications and equipment, establishing transfer and transport agreements with local hospitals and community EMS, and ensuring a structured quality improvement program.

  5. Organizational structure and operation of defense/aerospace information centers in the United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, H. E.; Lushina, L. N.

    1983-01-01

    U.S. Government aerospace and defense information centers are addressed. DTIC and NASA are described in terms of their history, operational authority, information services provided, user community, sources of information collected, efforts under way to improve services, and external agreements regarding the exchange of documents and/or data bases. Contents show how DTIC and NASA provide aerospace/defense information services in support of U.S. research and development efforts. In a general introduction, the importance of scientific and technical information and the need for information centers to acquire, handle, and disseminate it are stressed.

  6. Bacteremia caused by antimicrobial resistant Campylobacter species at a medical center in Taiwan, 1998-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chun-Hsing; Chuang, Chia-Yunn; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Lee, Ping-Ing; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2012-11-01

    This study was intended to delineate the clinical and microbiological characteristics of patients with bacteremia caused by Campylobacter species. Twenty-four patients with Campylobacter bacteremia were treated at the National Taiwan University Hospital from 1998 to 2008. All isolates from the 24 patients were confirmed to the species level by multiplex PCR (cadF, hipO and asp gene) and 16S RNA gene sequencing. Bacteremia was caused by Campylobacter coli in 15 (62.5%) patients, Campylobacter fetus in 6 (25%), and Campylobacter jejuni in 3 (12.5%). Of the 24 patients, 16 were male. The major underlying conditions included chronic renal insufficiency (41.7%), liver cirrhosis (37.5%), malignancy (33.3%), and previous abdominal surgery (33.3%). The most common infections were intra-abdominal infection (54.2%), followed by primary bacteremia (41.7%), and cellulitis (4.2%). The mean Pittsburgh bacteremia score was 2.5 (range, 0-9). During the bacteremic episodes, six (25%) patients developed septic shock. Third-generation cephalosporins were administered to 12 (50%) patients as empirical therapy. All-cause mortality was 4.2% at 14 days and 12.5% at 30 days. The majority of the isolates were resistant to third-generation cephalosporins and quinolones, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC(90)) values of 32 mg/L for cefotaxime, 128 mg/L for ceftriaxone, and 32 mg/L for both ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. All isolates possessed a parC mutation (Arg-139-Gln) and 15 exhibited an additional gyrA mutation (Thr-86-Ile). Among these isolates, 20.8% were susceptible to erythromycin (MIC≤0.5 mg/L). Bacteremia caused by antimicrobial resistant Campylobacter species is alarming although the mortality rate is low. Copyright © 2012 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Penicillium cecidicola, a new species on cynipid insect galls on Quercus pacifica in the western United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, K.A.; Hoekstra, E.H.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2004-01-01

    A synnematous species of Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium was found inside emergence tunnels from insect galls (Cynipidae, Hymenoptera, the so-called gall wasps) on scrub oaks (Quercus pacifica Nixon & C.H. Muller) collected in the western United States. The fungus produces synnemata with white...... is a sister species to P. dendriticum, an Australian species with yellow synnemata that also sometimes occurs on insect galls. Notes are included on other Penicillium species we have isolated from insect galls....... isolates exposed to light after 10 days. The fungus produces the extrolite apiculide A and a series of unidentified extrolites also produced by P. panamense. The oak gall species is described here as Penicillium cecidicola and compared with similar species. An ITS phylogeny suggests that P. cecidicola...

  8. Antimicrobial strategies centered around reactive oxygen species - bactericidal antibiotics, photodynamic therapy and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatansever, Fatma; de Melo, Wanessa C.M.A.; Avci, Pinar; Vecchio, Daniela; Sadasivam, Magesh; Gupta, Asheesh; Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Karimi, Mahdi; Parizotto, Nivaldo A; Yin, Rui; Tegos, George P; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can attack a diverse range of targets to exert antimicrobial activity, which accounts for their versatility in mediating host defense against a broad range of pathogens. Most ROS are formed by the partial reduction of molecular oxygen. Four major ROS are recognized comprising: superoxide (O2•−), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical (•OH), and singlet oxygen (1O2), but they display very different kinetics and levels of activity. The effects of O2•− and H2O2 are less acute than those of •OH and 1O2, since the former are much less reactive and can be detoxified by endogenous antioxidants (both enzymatic and non-enzymatic) that are induced by oxidative stress. In contrast, no enzyme can detoxify •OH or 1O2, making them extremely toxic and acutely lethal. The present review will highlight the various methods of ROS formation and their mechanism of action. Antioxidant defenses against ROS in microbial cells and the use of ROS by antimicrobial host defense systems are covered. Antimicrobial approaches primarily utilizing ROS comprise both bactericidal antibiotics, and non-pharmacological methods such as photodynamic therapy, titanium dioxide photocatalysis, cold plasma and medicinal honey. A brief final section covers, reactive nitrogen species, and related therapeutics, such as acidified nitrite and nitric oxide releasing nanoparticles. PMID:23802986

  9. Antimicrobial strategies centered around reactive oxygen species--bactericidal antibiotics, photodynamic therapy, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatansever, Fatma; de Melo, Wanessa C M A; Avci, Pinar; Vecchio, Daniela; Sadasivam, Magesh; Gupta, Asheesh; Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Karimi, Mahdi; Parizotto, Nivaldo A; Yin, Rui; Tegos, George P; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can attack a diverse range of targets to exert antimicrobial activity, which accounts for their versatility in mediating host defense against a broad range of pathogens. Most ROS are formed by the partial reduction in molecular oxygen. Four major ROS are recognized comprising superoxide (O2•-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical (•OH), and singlet oxygen ((1)O2), but they display very different kinetics and levels of activity. The effects of O2•- and H2O2 are less acute than those of •OH and (1)O2, because the former are much less reactive and can be detoxified by endogenous antioxidants (both enzymatic and nonenzymatic) that are induced by oxidative stress. In contrast, no enzyme can detoxify •OH or (1)O2, making them extremely toxic and acutely lethal. The present review will highlight the various methods of ROS formation and their mechanism of action. Antioxidant defenses against ROS in microbial cells and the use of ROS by antimicrobial host defense systems are covered. Antimicrobial approaches primarily utilizing ROS comprise both bactericidal antibiotics and nonpharmacological methods such as photodynamic therapy, titanium dioxide photocatalysis, cold plasma, and medicinal honey. A brief final section covers reactive nitrogen species and related therapeutics, such as acidified nitrite and nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticles. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Color-center laser spectroscopy of transient species produced by excimer-laser flash photolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, H.; Hall, J.L.; Rusell, L.A.; Kasper, J.V.V.; Tittel, F.K.; Curl, R.F.,JR.

    1985-05-01

    Kinetic spectroscopy based on excimer-laser flash photolysis and color-center-laser (CCL) infrared probing is explored. In simiple absorption, the achievable signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) is not satisfactory even though the signal itself (corresponding to greater than 1 percent absorption) is fairly large. This is due to amplitude fluctuations of the CCL. By using a double-beam detection scheme to balance out these amplitude fluctuations the sensitivity can be improved to the extent that a 1 percent absorption gives a S/N approximately 100. In certain situations transient decreases in absorption of the precursor and transient increases in absorption due to final product formation can produce severe interferinng signals even in simple systems. This problem is overcome without a major loss in sensitivity by a recently developed 45 deg magnetic rotation scheme. These points are illustrated with spectra of Br, OH, and NH2. 21 references.

  11. Trends in antibacterial use in hospitalized pediatric patients in United States academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakyz, Amy L; Gurgle, Holly E; Ibrahim, Omar M; Oinonen, Michael J; Polk, Ronald E

    2009-06-01

    Trends in pediatric antibacterial use were examined in 20 academic health centers during the period 2002-2007. There was a significant increase in the use of linezolid (P macrolides (P = .001) and a significant decrease in the use of aminoglycosides (P < .001) and of first-generation cephalosporins (P < .001).

  12. Information Centers in the United States Army: Movement Toward Maturity Through Strategic Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    civilian retirement plans with those of government employees. C. AGE ()! THE INFORMATION CENTER September 1985 marked the birth of tb, Army information...SUPPORTED PRODUCT LOTUS -- DBASE II1+ ENABLE MULTIMATE *I WORDSTAR WORDPERFECT PROCOMM CROSSTALK - HARVARD GRAPHICS SMARTCOMM FREELANCE PLUS PAGEMAKER

  13. Evidence for Reduced Species Star Formation Rates in the Centers of Massive Galaxies at zeta = 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Intae; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Song, Mimi; Dickinson, Mark; Dekel, Avishai; Ferguson, Henry C.; Fontana, Adriano; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lu, Yu; Mobasher, Bahram; hide

    2017-01-01

    We perform the first spatially-resolved stellar population study of galaxies in the early universe z equals 3.5 -6.5, utilizing the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) imaging dataset over the GOODS-S field. We select a sample of 418 bright and extended galaxies at z less than or approximately equal to 3.5-6.5 from a parent sample of approximately 8000 photometric-redshift selected galaxies from Finkelstein et al. We first examine galaxies at 3.5 less than or equal to z less than or approximately equal to 4.0 using additional deep K-band survey data from the HAWK-I UDS and GOODS Survey (HUGS) which covers the 4000 Angstrom break at these redshifts. We measure the stellar mass, star formation rate, and dust extinction for galaxy inner and outer regions via spatially-resolved spectral energy distribution fitting based on a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. By comparing specific star formation rates (sSFRs) between inner and outer parts of the galaxies we find that the majority of galaxies with the high central mass densities show evidence for a preferentially lower sSFR in their centers than in their outer regions, indicative of reduced sSFRs in their central regions. We also study galaxies at z approximately equal to 5 and 6 (here limited to high spatial resolution in the rest-frame ultraviolet only), finding that they show sSFRs which are generally independent of radial distance from the center of the galaxies. This indicates that stars are formed uniformly at all radii in massive galaxies at z approximately equal to 5-6, contrary tomassive galaxies at z. less than approximately equal to 4.

  14. Notes from the Field: Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) Exposures Reported to Poison Centers - United States, 2010-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Mehruba; Law, Royal; Schier, Josh

    2016-07-29

    Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a plant consumed throughout the world for its stimulant effects and as an opioid substitute (1). It is typically brewed into a tea, chewed, smoked, or ingested in capsules (2). It is also known as Thang, Kakuam, Thom, Ketum, and Biak (3). The Drug Enforcement Administration includes kratom on its Drugs of Concern list (substances that are not currently regulated by the Controlled Substances Act, but that pose risks to persons who abuse them), and the National Institute of Drug Abuse has identified kratom as an emerging drug of abuse (3,4). Published case reports have associated kratom exposure with psychosis, seizures, and deaths (5,6). Because deaths have been attributed to kratom in the United States (7), some jurisdictions have passed or are considering legislation to make kratom use a felony (8). CDC characterized kratom exposures that were reported to poison centers and uploaded to the National Poison Data System (NPDS) during January 2010-December 2015. The NPDS is a national database of information logged by the country's regional poison centers serving all 50 United States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico and is maintained by the American Association of Poison Control Centers. NPDS case records are the result of call reports made by the public and health care providers.

  15. Tackling NCD in LMIC: Achievements and Lessons Learned From the NHLBI-UnitedHealth Global Health Centers of Excellence Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelgau, Michael M; Sampson, Uchechukwu K; Rabadan-Diehl, Cristina; Smith, Richard; Miranda, Jaime; Bloomfield, Gerald S; Belis, Deshiree; Narayan, K M Venkat

    2016-03-01

    Effectively tackling the growing noncommunicable disease (NCD) burden in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) is a major challenge. To address research needs in this setting for NCDs, in 2009, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and UnitedHealth Group (UHG) engaged in a public-private partnership that supported a network of 11 LMIC-based research centers and created the NHLBI-UnitedHealth Global Health Centers of Excellence (COE) Program. The Program's overall goal was to contribute to reducing the cardiovascular and lung disease burdens by catalyzing in-country research institutions to develop a global network of biomedical research centers. Key elements of the Program included team science and collaborative approaches, developing research and training platforms for future investigators, and creating a data commons. This Program embraced a strategic approach for tackling NCDs in LMICs and will provide capacity for locally driven research efforts that can identify and address priority health issues in specific countries' settings. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. A prolonged outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the burn unit of a tertiary medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, P A; Carter, C D; Wallace, S E; Hollis, R J; Pfaller, M A; Herwaldt, L A

    1996-12-01

    To report an outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in our burn unit and the steps we used to eradicate the organism. Outbreak investigation in the burn unit of a 900-bed tertiary-care medical center. Between March and June 1993, MRSA was isolated from 10 patients in our burn unit. All isolates had identical antibiograms and chromosomal DNA patterns. Infection control personnel encouraged healthcare workers to wash their hands after each patients contact. The unit cohorted all infected or colonized patients, placed each affected patient in isolation, and, if possible, transferred the patient to another unit. Despite these measures, new cases occurred. Infection control personnel obtained nares cultures from 56 healthcare workers, 3 of whom carried the epidemic MRSA strain. One healthcare worker cared for six affected patients, and one cared for five patients. We treated the three healthcare workers with mupirocin. Subsequently, no additional patients became colonized or infected with the epidemic MRSA strain. The outbreak ended after we treated healthcare workers who carried the epidemic strain with mupirocin. This approach is not appropriate in all settings. However, we felt it was justified in this case because of a persistent problem after less intrusive measures.

  17. Identification of Eastern United States Reticulitermes Termite Species via PCR-RFLP, Assessed Using Training and Test Data

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan C Garrick; Collins, Benjamin D.; Yi, Rachel N.; Rodney J. Dyer; Chaz Hyseni

    2015-01-01

    Reticulitermes termites play key roles in dead wood decomposition and nutrient cycling in forests. They also damage man-made structures, resulting in considerable economic loss. In the eastern United States, five species (R. flavipes, R. virginicus, R. nelsonae, R. hageni and R. malletei) have overlapping ranges and are difficult to distinguish morphologically. Here we present a molecular tool for species identification. It is based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a sectio...

  18. Endangered and Threatened Species at Kennedy Space Center Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdolfi, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Throughout my internship, I assisted with the long-term monitoring of the Florida Scrub- Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens), a threatened species endemic to Florida. The Florida Scrub Jay diet consists of insects and small vertebrates throughout most of the year; however, during the winter their primary diet is acorns because the insect population is low. Furthermore, the Florida Scrub-Jay is a habitat specialist that lives in a disappearing plant community called the scrub, which consists of sand live oak, myrtle oak and chapman oak. The Florida Scrub-Jay is considered threatened because its numbers are decreasing primarily due to the loss of habitat that it needs to survive. Scrub habitat is highly desirable for human development because it is high, dry, and sandy. Periodic controlled burns maintain the scrub in a low, open condition favored by Scrub-Jays. Florida Scrub-Jays build their nests approximately 3-5 feet (approximately 1.5 m) above the ground in shrubby oaks (Breininger 153), mate for life and are cooperative breeders; which means that the young jays remain in their natal territory for at least a year to help their parents defend their territory, feed the young, and mob predators. (Breininger 152). I assisted in conducting monthly censuses at long-term monitoring sites and a juvenile in July survey to determine reproductive success for the year. In addition, to Scrub-Jay monitoring, I also had the opportunity to assist with some long term monitoring of ecosystem recovery. Scrub is a fire maintained system. Fire maintains the structure of scrub necessary for many of the threatened species that reside in the scrub habitat.

  19. Adult moyamoya disease in an urban center in the United States is associated with a high burden of watershed ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Sahar F; Bershad, Eric M; Gildersleeve, Kasey L; Newmark, Michael E; Calvillo, Eusebia; Suarez, Jose I; Venkatasubba Rao, Chethan P

    2014-07-18

    Adult moyamoya disease is rare in the United States, and patients mostly present with cerebral ischemia. However, clinical and neurodiagnostic correlates of ischemia are not well known in this population. We sought to characterize the clinical and radiographic features of moyamoya disease in a large urban center in the United States, with a focus on angiographic and neuroimaging patterns of ischemia. We retrospectively reviewed charts of consecutive adult moyamoya disease patients evaluated at 2 centers in Houston, Texas from January 2002 to December 2011. We reviewed all available cerebral angiograms and neuroimaging studies to evaluate the Suzuki grades, presence of intracranial hemorrhage or ischemia, infarct patterns, and vascular territory distribution. Our analysis was mainly descriptive. We identified 31 adults with moyamoya disease who met our inclusion criteria. The female-to-male ratio was 2.4:1. The majority of patients were white, followed by Hispanic, black, and Asian. Most presented with ischemia (61%), followed by headaches, and intracranial hemorrhage. Of the 22 patients with available neuroimaging, 72.7% had ischemic findings, with the vast majority having a watershed pattern (81.3%). We observed a high burden of ischemia, mostly watershed pattern on neuroimaging in our adult moyamoya disease patients. Long-term monitoring of adult moyamoya disease patients in the United States would be useful to better understand the natural history of this condition. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  20. Streamflow alteration and habitat ramifications for a threatened fish species in the Central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.; Eng, Kenny; Carlisle, Daren M.; Wolock, David M.

    2017-01-01

    In the Central United States, the Arkansas darter (Etheostoma cragini) is listed as a threatened fish species by the State of Kansas. Survival of the darter is threatened by loss of habitat caused by changing streamflow conditions, in particular flow depletion. Future management of darter populations and habitats requires an understanding of streamflow conditions and how those conditions may have changed over time in response to natural and anthropogenic factors. In Kansas, streamflow alteration was assessed at 9 U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in 6 priority basins with no pronounced long-term trends in precipitation. The assessment was based on a comparison of observed (O) and predicted expected (E) reference conditions for 29 flow metrics. The O/E results indicated a likely or possible diminished flow condition in 2 basins; the primary cause of which is groundwater-level declines resulting from groundwater pumping for irrigated agriculture. In these 2 basins, habitat characteristics adversely affected by flow depletion may include stream connectivity, pools, and water temperature. The other 4 basins were minimally affected, or unaffected, by flow depletion and therefore may provide the best opportunity for preservation of darter habitat. Through the O/E analysis, anthropogenic streamflow alteration was quantified and the results will enable better-informed decisions pertaining to the future management of darters in Kansas.

  1. Yields and seasonal variation of phytochemicals from Juniperus species of the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    The ten most widespread and dominant species of Juniperus (juniper) in the United States were analyzed for their yields of hexane and methanol soluble phytochemicals from the leaves, bark/sapwood, and heartwood. The yields of volatile heartwood oils, a commercial commodity, varied from 4.92% to a low of 0.21%. The yields of hexane soluble components in the heartwood ranged from 0.44 to 7.6% dry weight, while the methanol soluble fraction varied from 2.8 to 6.8% dry weight. The yields from the bark/sapwood were comparable: the hexane fraction ranged from 0.46 to 4.4% dry weight; the methanol fraction varied from 2.4 to 6.2% dry weight. The majority of the extractable chemicals in the above-ground biomass were found in the leaves with the hexane extraction accounting for 5.4 to 16.7% dry weight and the methanol extraction yielding 23.8 to 35.2% dry weight. Seasonal examination of the leaves of Juniperus monosperma and J. osteosperma revealed that the hexane extractable components increase toward the end of the growing season, reaching a maximum during the winter and declining in the spring. The methanol extractables exhibited minor, but significant, changes throughout the year. (Refs. 16).

  2. Species richness and patterns of invasion in plants, birds, and fishes in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas J. Stohlgren; David T. Barnett; Curtis H. Flather; Pam L. Fuller; Bruce G. Peterjohn; John T. Kartesz; Lawrence L. Master

    2006-01-01

    We quantified broad-scale patterns of species richness and species density (mean # species/km2) for native and non-indigenous plants, birds, and fishes in the continental USA and Hawaii. We hypothesized that the species density of native and non-indigenous taxa would generally decrease in northern latitudes and higher elevations following...

  3. A Nutritional Survey of Children in Head Start Centers in Central United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Marie Z.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a questionnaire in evaluating the nutritional status of Head Start children in rural, small city, and urban areas in central United States. The questionnaire, which was primarily concerned with the food preferences of the children, was filled out by the mother of each of the 154…

  4. Does a single specialty intensive care unit make better business sense than a multi-specialty intensive care unit? A costing study in a trauma center in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Parmeshwar; Jithesh, Vishwanathan; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Though intensive care units (ICUs) only account for 10% of hospital beds, they consume nearly 22% of hospital resources. Few definitive costing studies have been conducted in Indian settings that would help determine appropriate resource allocation. To evaluate and compare the cost of intensive care delivery between multi-specialty and neurosurgery ICU in an apex trauma care facility in India. The study was conducted in a polytrauma and neurosurgery ICU at a 203 bedded level IV trauma care facility in New Delhi, India from May, 2012 to June 2012. The study was cross-sectional, retrospective, and record-based. Traditional costing was used to arrive at the cost for both direct and indirect cost estimates. The cost centers included in study were building cost, equipment cost, human resources, materials and supplies, clinical and nonclinical support services, engineering maintenance cost, and biomedical waste management. Fisher's two-tailed t-test. Total cost/bed/day for the multi-specialty ICU was Rs. 14,976.9/- and for the neurosurgery ICU was Rs. 14,306.7/-, manpower constituting nearly half of the expenditure in both ICUs. The cost center wise and overall difference in the cost among the ICUs were statistically significant. Quantification of expenditure in running an ICU in a trauma center would assist healthcare decision makers in better allocation of resources. Although multi-specialty ICUs are more expensive, other factors will also play a role in defining the kind of ICU that need to be designed.

  5. Analytical Call Center Model with Voice Response Unit and Wrap-Up Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Hampl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The last twenty years of computer integration significantly changed the process of service in a call center service systems. Basic building modules of classical call centers – a switching system and a group of humans agents – was extended with other special modules such as skills-based routing module, automatic call distribution module, interactive voice response module and others to minimize the customer waiting time and wage costs. A calling customer of a modern call center is served in the first stage by the interactive voice response module without any human interaction. If the customer requirements are not satisfied in the first stage, the service continues to the second stage realized by the group of human agents. The service time of second stage – the average handle time – is divided into a conversation time and wrap-up time. During the conversation time, the agent answers customer questions and collects its requirements and during the wrap-up time (administrative time the agent completes the task without any customer interaction. The analytical model presented in this contribution is solved under the condition of statistical equilibrium and takes into account the interactive voice response module service time, the conversation time and the wrap-up time.

  6. An Analysis of Information Technology Adoption by IRBs of Large Academic Medical Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shan; Botkin, Jeffrey R; Hurdle, John F

    2015-02-01

    The clinical research landscape has changed dramatically in recent years in terms of both volume and complexity. This poses new challenges for Institutional Review Boards' (IRBs) review efficiency and quality, especially at large academic medical centers. This article discusses the technical facets of IRB modernization. We analyzed the information technology used by IRBs in large academic institutions across the United States. We found that large academic medical centers have a high electronic IRB adoption rate; however, the capabilities of electronic IRB systems vary greatly. We discuss potential use-cases of a fully exploited electronic IRB system that promise to streamline the clinical research work flow. The key to that approach utilizes a structured and standardized information model for the IRB application. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Frequency and antimicrobial susceptibility of Shigella species isolated in Children Medical Center Hospital, Tehran, Iran, 2001-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Pourakbari

    Full Text Available Appropriate antimicrobial treatment of shigellosis depends on identifying its changing resistance pattern over time. We evaluated 15,255 stool culture submitted from July 2001 to June 2006 to the Laboratory of Children Medical Center Hospital. Specimen culture, bacterial identification, and disk diffusion susceptibility testing were performed according to National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards guidelines. From 15,255 stool samples, 682 (4.5% were positive for Shigella species. The most common species of Shigella were S. flexneri (48% and S. sonnei (45%; other results were S. dysenteriae (5% and S. boydii (2%. The rate of Sensitivity to ceftriaxone (95%, ceftizoxime (94%, and nalidixic acid (84% were among our isolates. Resistance to co-trimoxazole and ampicillin was 87% and 86%, respectively. S. flexneri was more multiresistant than other species (47.9%. Our isolates are overall most sensitive to ceftriaxone, ceftazidime, and nalidixic acid (> 84%. They were most resistant to co-trimoxazole and ampicillin (> 86%. Because resistance varies according to specific location, continuous local monitoring of resistance patterns is necessary for the appropriate selection of empirical antimicrobial therapy.

  8. The Role of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Simulation Training at Extracorporeal Life Support Organization Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Mark F; Friedlich, Philippe S; Nelson, Lara P; Rake, Alyssa J; Klee, Laura; Stein, James E; Stavroudis, Theodora A

    2017-08-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) requires a multidisciplinary healthcare team. The Extracorporeal Life Support Organization publishes training guidelines but leaves specific requirements up to each institution. Simulation training has shown promise, but it is unclear how many institutions have incorporated simulation techniques into ECMO training to date. We sent an electronic survey to ECMO coordinators at Extracorporeal Life Support Organization sites in the United States. Participants were asked about training practices and the use of simulation for ECMO training. Descriptive results were reported as the percentage of total responses for each question. Logistic regression was used to identify characteristics associated with simulation use. Of 94 responses (62% response rate), 46% had an ECMO simulation program, whereas 26% report a program is in development. Most (61%) have been in operation for 2 to 5 years. Sixty-three percent use simulation for summative assessment, and 76% have multidisciplinary training. Access to a simulation center [odds ratio (OR) = 4.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.7-12.5], annual ECMO caseload of greater than 20 (OR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.5-5.8), and having a pediatric cardiothoracic intensive care unit (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.2-6.7) are each associated with increased likelihood of mannequin-based ECMO simulation. Common scenarios include pump failure (93%), oxygenator failure (90%), and circuit rupture (76%). Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation simulation is growing but remains in its infancy. Centers with access to a simulation center, higher caseloads, and pediatric cardiothoracic intensive care units are more likely to have ECMO simulation programs. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation simulation is felt to be beneficial, and further work is needed to delineate best training practices for ECMO providers.

  9. Distribution of Clinical Isolates at Species Level and Their Antibiotic Susceptibilities in Intensive Care Units Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Barış

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Intensive care units are a hospital’s section where hospital infections and resistant microorganisms are most commonly seen. In this study it was aimed to determine the microorganisms which were isolated from various clinical specimens of the patients in intensive care units for a year and antibiotic susceptibility of the microorganisms. Materials and Methods: MALDI TOF MS and BD Phoenix system were used for the identification of bacteria, antibiotic sensitivities were evaluated by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method and BD Phoenix system in accordance with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. Results: In this study, a total of 1163 microorganisms were obtained; 575 (49.4% gram-negative bacteria (GNB, 556 (47.8% gram-positive bacteria (GPB and 32 Candida spp. (2.7%. Strains were produced from blood (488, urine (233, respiratory tract (224, sterile body fluid (88, wounds (68 and catheter samples (62. The most frequently isolated GNBs were found to be Acinetobacter baumannii 131 (11.2%, Klebsiella pneumoniae 109 (9.3%, Escherichia coli 91 (7.8% in order of frequency. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase production was observed in 16 E. coli, 29 Klebsiella spp. Carbapenem resistance was identified in 132 Acinetobacter spp., 27 Pseudomonas spp., 14 K. pneumoniae, 1 E. coli. For Pseudomonas strains, ciprofloxacin and amikacin; for Acinetobacter strains, amikacin and colistin; for Escherichia and Klebsiella strains, amikacin and imipenem were determined as the most effective antibiotics. The most frequently isolated GPBs were 351 (30% coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS (192 S. epidermidis, 111 (9.5% Enterococcus spp. (67 Enterococcus faecalis, 55 Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. While Methicillin resistance was determined in 7 S. aureus and 191 CNS; vancomycin resistance was detected in 3 Enterococcus faecium strains. The most effective antibiotics against S. aureus and Enterococcus spp. strains were

  10. Performance of Northeastern United States wood species treated with copper based preservatives: 10 year above-ground decking evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. T. Lebow; S. A. Halverson

    2015-01-01

    Research was conducted to evaluate the decking performance of northeastern United States wood species treated with copper based preservatives. Decking specimens were treated with one of four wood preservatives and exposed near Madison, Wisconsin. Specimens were evaluated for biological attack and dimensional stability. After 10 years, none of the preservative treated...

  11. Using FIA data to assess current and potential future tree species importance values in the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis Iverson; Anantha Prasad

    2002-01-01

    FIA data are extremely valuable for evaluating regional variation in forest distribution. We have processed and summarized FIA data to show four patterns across the Eastern United States: 1) the number and density of FIA forested plots by state, 2) current importance values and frequencies for several species within 20 x 20 km blocks, 3) tree diversity by block, and 4...

  12. Use of court-ordered supervised disulfiram therapy at DVA medical centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Brandon; Mangum, Laura; Beresford, Thomas P

    2005-01-01

    Having reported high adherence to court-mandated disulfiram treatment, we hypothesized that other Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) medical centers would report frequent use of this modality. Telephone interviews with DVA substance abuse clinics in 48 of the 50 states matched the national DVA frequencies. Phone survey responders reported disulfiram prescription as never/rarely 63%, sometimes 32%, and often 5%, while court-ordered disulfiram was used never/rarely 95%, sometimes 3%, and often 2%. Nationally, disulfiram prescriptions covered only 0.07% of all veterans seen. These data suggest a need for a re-evaluation of disulfiram as an underused treatment for alcohol dependence.

  13. First record of harpacticoid copepods from Lake Tahoe, United States: two new species of Attheyella (Harpacticoida, Canthocamptidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Woo Bang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Benthic harpacticoids were collected for the first time at Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada, United States. Two species were identified as members of the genus Attheyella Brady, 1880. The genus Attheyella comprises about 150 species within six subgenera, but only twelve species have previously been reported from North American freshwater habitats. The two new species of Attheyella described here have a 3-segmented endopod on P1 and 2-segmented P2–P4 endopods, the distal segment of exopod of P2–P4 has three outer spines, and the P5 has five setae on the exopod and six setae on the baseoendopod. Attheyella (Attheyella tahoensis sp. n. most closely resembles A. (A. idahoensis (Marsh, 1903 from Idaho, Montana, and Alaska (United States and A. (A. namkungi Kim, Soh & Lee, 2005 from Gosu Cave in South Korea. They differ mainly by the number of setae on the distal endopodal segment of P2–P4. In addition, intraspecific variation has been observed on the caudal rami. Attheyella (Neomrazekiella tessiae sp. n. is characterized by the extension of P5 baseoendopod, 2-segmented endopod of female P2–P3, and naked third seta of male P5 exopod. The two new species are likely endemic to Lake Tahoe, an isolated alpine lake within the Great Basin watershed in the western United States.

  14. First record of harpacticoid copepods from Lake Tahoe, United States: two new species of Attheyella (Harpacticoida, Canthocamptidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Hyun Woo; Baguley, Jeffrey G; Moon, Heejin

    2015-01-01

    Benthic harpacticoids were collected for the first time at Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada, United States. Two species were identified as members of the genus Attheyella Brady, 1880. The genus Attheyella comprises about 150 species within six subgenera, but only twelve species have previously been reported from North American freshwater habitats. The two new species of Attheyella described here have a 3-segmented endopod on P1 and 2-segmented P2-P4 endopods, the distal segment of exopod of P2-P4 has three outer spines, and the P5 has five setae on the exopod and six setae on the baseoendopod. Attheyella (Attheyella) tahoensissp. n. most closely resembles Attheyella (Attheyella) idahoensis (Marsh, 1903) from Idaho, Montana, and Alaska (United States) and Attheyella (Attheyella) namkungi Kim, Soh & Lee, 2005 from Gosu Cave in South Korea. They differ mainly by the number of setae on the distal endopodal segment of P2-P4. In addition, intraspecific variation has been observed on the caudal rami. Attheyella (Neomrazekiella) tessiaesp. n. is characterized by the extension of P5 baseoendopod, 2-segmented endopod of female P2-P3, and naked third seta of male P5 exopod. The two new species are likely endemic to Lake Tahoe, an isolated alpine lake within the Great Basin watershed in the western United States.

  15. The current status of robotic transaxillary thyroidectomy in the United States: an experience from two centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Nisar; Daskalaki, Despoina; Quadri, Pablo; Okoh, Alexis; Giulianotti, Pier Cristoforo; Berber, Eren

    2017-08-01

    Few studies exist regarding the state of robotic transaxillary thyroidectomy (RT) and its outcomes at high-volume institutions. Eighty-nine patients underwent RT between January 2009 and September 2015 at two tertiary centers. Data were collected from prospectively-maintained IRB-approved databases. Patient demographic and clinical data, and trends were evaluated. Indications for RT included biopsy-proven or suspicion for malignancy in 20.2%, atypical cells or follicular neoplasm in 27.7%, multinodular goiter in 26.6%, thyrotoxicosis in 8.5%, need for completion thyroidectomy in 5.3%, and non-diagnostic FNA in 3.2%. 56% underwent total thyroidectomy and 44% lobectomy. Operative time (OT) was 153.5 minutes for lobectomies and 192.6 minutes for total thyroidectomy. The complication rate was 11.7%: temporary RLN neuropraxia in 2 patients, permanent hypoparathyroidism in 1 patient, temporary hypoparathyroidism in 6 patients, flap seroma in 1 patient, and flap hematoma in 1 patient. Pathology showed malignancy in 43 patients. At a mean follow-up of 31.9 months, there were no recurrences. Since 2013, the number of RTs performed has risen. The number of out-of-state patients increased from 18% to 37% after 2011. RT was performed without compromising outcomes in selected patients. There remains interest among patients seeking this procedure in expert centers.

  16. Effects of tree species on soil properties in a forest of the Northeastern United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, F.A.

    2001-01-01

    Large differences in soil pH and available Ca in the surface soil exist among tree species growing in a mixed hardwood forest in northwestern Connecticut. The observed association between tree species and specific soil chemical properties within mixed-species stands implies that changes in

  17. [Primary Healthcare Reform in Portugal on two fronts: autonomous family healthcare units and management of groupings of Health Centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisco, Luis

    2011-06-01

    In 2005, Portugal began a reform of Primary Health Care. This reform process through to April 2010 is described and analyzed. During this period the Mission for Primary Health Care was responsible for conducting a profound reconfiguration. The main objectives for this reform were to improve accessibility, efficiency, quality and continuity of care and increase the satisfaction of professionals and citizens. The main features are voluntary adhesion, teamwork, mandatory information system, performance-sensitive payment, contracting and evaluation. The reconfiguration of health centers was two pronged. First, there was the formation of small autonomous functional units, known as Family Health Units (USF) providing services with proximity and quality. The second measure involved the aggregation of resources and management structures, groups of health centers (ACES), seeking to achieve efficiency and economies of scale. The FHU proved to offer simultaneously more efficiency, accessibility, better working environment, greater citizen satisfaction, namely better quality. The importance of strong political support, the creation of a structure responsible for the design and implementation of reform and good liaison with the media are stressed.

  18. Academic health centers and care of undocumented immigrants in the United States: servant leaders or uncourageous followers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, David A; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio

    2014-04-01

    Public dialogue and debate about the health care overhaul in the United States is centered on one contentious question: Is there a moral obligation to ensure that all people (including undocumented immigrants) within its borders have access to affordable health care? For academic health centers (AHCs), which often provide safety-net care to the uninsured, this question has moral and social implications. An estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States (80% of whom are Latino) are uninsured and currently prohibited from purchasing exchange coverage under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, even at full cost. The authors attempt to dispel the many misconceptions and distorted assumptions surrounding the use of health services by this vulnerable population. The authors also suggest that AHCs need to recalibrate their mission to focus on social accountability as well as the ethical and humanistic practice of medicine for all people, recognizing the significance of inclusion over exclusion in making progress on population health and health care. AHCs play a crucial role, both in educational policy and as a safety-net provider, in reducing health disparities that negatively impact vulnerable populations. Better health for all is possible through better alignment, collaboration, and partnering with other AHCs and safety-net providers. Through servant leadership, AHCs can be the leaders that this change imperative demands.

  19. 75 FR 48699 - Memorandum of Understanding Between United States Food and Drug Administration and the Centers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is providing notice of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between FDA and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), both part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The purpose of the MOU is to promote collaboration and enhance knowledge of efficiency by providing for the sharing of information and expertise between the Federal partners. The goals of the collaboration are to explore ways to further enhance information sharing efforts through more efficient and robust inter- agency activities; promote efficient utilization of tools and expertise for product analysis, validation, and risk identification; and build infrastructure and processes that meet the common needs for evaluating the safety, efficacy, utilization, coverage, payment, and clinical benefit of drugs, biologics, and medical devices.

  20. Elements of Family-Centered Care in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Claire A; Starks, Helene; O'Connor, M Rebecca; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2017-06-01

    This paper reports result from a systematic search and thematic analysis of qualitative literature to identify key issues related to family-centered care, behaviors, and communication skills that support the parental role and improve patient and family outcomes in the PICU. Five themes were identified: 1) sharing information; 2) hearing parental voices; 3) making decisions for or with parents; 4) negotiating roles; and 5) individualizing communication. These themes highlight several gaps between how parents want to be involved and perceive clinicians engage them in the care of their child. Parental preferences for involvement differ in the domains of information sharing, decision making, and power-sharing across a spectrum of parental roles from parents as care provider to care recipient. The PICU setting may place clinicians in a double bind trying to both engage families and protect them from distress. Asking families of critically ill children about their preferences for participation across these domains may improve clinician-family relationships.

  1. Does a single specialty intensive care unit make better business sense than a multi-specialty intensive care unit? A costing study in a trauma center in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmeshwar Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Though intensive care units (ICUs only account for 10% of hospital beds, they consume nearly 22% of hospital resources. Few definitive costing studies have been conducted in Indian settings that would help determine appropriate resource allocation. Aim: To evaluate and compare the cost of intensive care delivery between multi-specialty and neurosurgery ICU in an apex trauma care facility in India. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a polytrauma and neurosurgery ICU at a 203 bedded level IV trauma care facility in New Delhi, India from May, 2012 to June 2012. The study was cross-sectional, retrospective, and record-based. Traditional costing was used to arrive at the cost for both direct and indirect cost estimates. The cost centers included in study were building cost, equipment cost, human resources, materials and supplies, clinical and nonclinical support services, engineering maintenance cost, and biomedical waste management. Statistical Analysis: Fisher′s two-tailed t-test. Results: Total cost/bed/day for the multi-specialty ICU was Rs. 14,976.9/- and for the neurosurgery ICU was Rs. 14,306.7/-, manpower constituting nearly half of the expenditure in both ICUs. The cost center wise and overall difference in the cost among the ICUs were statistically significant. Conclusions: Quantification of expenditure in running an ICU in a trauma center would assist healthcare decision makers in better allocation of resources. Although multi-specialty ICUs are more expensive, other factors will also play a role in defining the kind of ICU that need to be designed.

  2. Tree demography suggests multiple directions and drivers for species range shifts in mountains of Northeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wason, Jay W; Dovciak, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Climate change is expected to lead to upslope shifts in tree species distributions, but the evidence is mixed partly due to land-use effects and individualistic species responses to climate. We examined how individual tree species demography varies along elevational climatic gradients across four states in the northeastern United States to determine whether species elevational distributions and their potential upslope (or downslope) shifts were controlled by climate, land-use legacies (past logging), or soils. We characterized tree demography, microclimate, land-use legacies, and soils at 83 sites stratified by elevation (~500 to ~1200 m above sea level) across 12 mountains containing the transition from northern hardwood to spruce-fir forests. We modeled elevational distributions of tree species saplings and adults using logistic regression to test whether sapling distributions suggest ongoing species range expansion upslope (or contraction downslope) relative to adults, and we used linear mixed models to determine the extent to which climate, land use, and soil variables explain these distributions. Tree demography varied with elevation by species, suggesting a potential upslope shift only for American beech, downslope shifts for red spruce (more so in cool regions) and sugar maple, and no change with elevation for balsam fir. While soils had relatively minor effects, climate was the dominant predictor for most species and more so for saplings than adults of red spruce, sugar maple, yellow birch, cordate birch, and striped maple. On the other hand, logging legacies were positively associated with American beech, sugar maple, and yellow birch, and negatively with red spruce and balsam fir - generally more so for adults than saplings. All species exhibited individualistic rather than synchronous demographic responses to climate and land use, and the return of red spruce to lower elevations where past logging originally benefited northern hardwood species indicates

  3. Management of neck metastases of unknown primary origin united in two European centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straetmans, Jos; Vent, Julia; Lacko, Martin; Speel, Ernst-Jan; Huebbers, Christian; Semrau, Robert; Hoebers, Frank; Mujagic, Zlatan; Klussmann, Jens-Peter; Preuss, Simon F; Kremer, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Combined analysis of diagnostic and therapeutic management of neck metastases of carcinoma of unknown primary origin ('true CUP') in two European tertiary referral centers (University Medical Centers of Maastricht, NL and Cologne, D) to contribute to the ongoing discussion on management in CUP. Retrospective analysis of 29 (Maastricht) and 22 (Cologne) true cervical CUP syndrome patients (squamous cell carcinoma). The diagnostic and therapeutic approaches were correlated with clinical follow-up data and HPV status. In total, 48 out of 51 true CUP patients received postsurgical adjuvant radiotherapy. In eight patients from Cologne, this was combined with concomitant platin-based chemotherapy. Neither in Cologne nor in Maastricht, radiotherapy of the pharyngeal mucosa was commonly performed (n = 6, 12.5 %) The percentage of patients who were irradiated ipsilaterally or bilaterally did not differ between both institutes (N = 21/27 in Maastricht vs. 11/21 in Cologne), nor did the 5-year overall survival differ significantly. Oncogenic HPV was only found in 4 out of 51 CUPs (7, 8 %). Therefore, no relation with overall and recurrence-free survival could be detected. No occult primary tumors were revealed during follow-up despite de-escalation of therapy by abandoning irradiation of the pharyngeal mucosa in both institutes. There were no significant differences between ipsilateral and bilaterally irradiated patients regarding overall and recurrence-free survival. The occurrence of distant metastases was more often noticed in ipsilaterally treated patients as compared to bilaterally radiated patients (8 vs. 2, p = 0.099). Those patients all had been classified N2b or higher. International guidelines still are not unified and there is an urgent need for a consented therapeutic regimen. Comparison of two international strategies on the management of CUP patients is presented and further research is recommended regarding the role of radiotherapy of the pharyngeal axis, the

  4. Development of a Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen at Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notardonato, W. U.

    NASA operations for handling cryogens in ground support equipment have not changed substantially in 50 years, despite major technology advances in the field of cryogenics. NASA loses approximately 50% of the hydrogen purchased because of a continuous heat leak into ground and flight vessels, transient chill down of warm cryogenic equipment, liquid bleeds, and vent losses. NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) needs to develop energy-efficient cryogenic ground systems to minimize propellant losses, simplify operations, and reduce cost associated with hydrogen usage. The GODU LH2 project will design, assemble, and test a prototype storage and distribution system for liquid hydrogen that represents an advanced end-to-end cryogenic propellant system for a ground launch complex. The project has multiple objectives and will culminate with an operational demonstration of the loading of a simulated flight tank with densified propellants. The system will be unique because it uses an integrated refrigeration and storage system (IRAS) to control the state of the fluid. The integrated refrigerator is the critical feature enabling the testing of the following three functions: zero-loss storage and transfer, propellant densification/conditioning, and on-site liquefaction. This paper will discuss the test objectives, the design of the system, and the current status of the installation.

  5. Adult sports-related traumatic brain injury in United States trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Ethan A; Yue, John K; Burke, John F; Chan, Andrew K; Dhall, Sanjay S; Berger, Mitchel S; Manley, Geoffrey T; Tarapore, Phiroz E

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Sports-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important public health concern estimated to affect 300,000 to 3.8 million people annually in the United States. Although injuries to professional athletes dominate the media, this group represents only a small proportion of the overall population. Here, the authors characterize the demographics of sports-related TBI in adults from a community-based trauma population and identify predictors of prolonged hospitalization and increased morbidity and mortality rates. METHODS Utilizing the National Sample Program of the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB), the authors retrospectively analyzed sports-related TBI data from adults (age ≥ 18 years) across 5 sporting categories-fall or interpersonal contact (FIC), roller sports, skiing/snowboarding, equestrian sports, and aquatic sports. Multivariable regression analysis was used to identify predictors of prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS), medical complications, inpatient mortality rates, and hospital discharge disposition. Statistical significance was assessed at α sports-related TBIs were documented in the NTDB, which represented 18,310 incidents nationally. Equestrian sports were the greatest contributors to sports-related TBI (45.2%). Mild TBI represented nearly 86% of injuries overall. Mean (± SEM) LOSs in the hospital or intensive care unit (ICU) were 4.25 ± 0.09 days and 1.60 ± 0.06 days, respectively. The mortality rate was 3.0% across all patients, but was statistically higher in TBI from roller sports (4.1%) and aquatic sports (7.7%). Age, hypotension on admission to the emergency department (ED), and the severity of head and extracranial injuries were statistically significant predictors of prolonged hospital and ICU LOSs, medical complications, failure to discharge to home, and death. Traumatic brain injury during aquatic sports was similarly associated with prolonged ICU and hospital LOSs, medical complications, and failure to be discharged to

  6. Pediatric sports-related traumatic brain injury in United States trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, John K; Winkler, Ethan A; Burke, John F; Chan, Andrew K; Dhall, Sanjay S; Berger, Mitchel S; Manley, Geoffrey T; Tarapore, Phiroz E

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children is a significant public health concern estimated to result in over 500,000 emergency department (ED) visits and more than 60,000 hospitalizations in the United States annually. Sports activities are one important mechanism leading to pediatric TBI. In this study, the authors characterize the demographics of sports-related TBI in the pediatric population and identify predictors of prolonged hospitalization and of increased morbidity and mortality rates. METHODS Utilizing the National Sample Program of the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB), the authors retrospectively analyzed sports-related TBI data from children (age 0-17 years) across 5 sports categories: fall or interpersonal contact (FIC), roller sports, skiing/snowboarding, equestrian sports, and aquatic sports. Multivariable regression analysis was used to identify predictors of prolonged length of stay (LOS) in the hospital or intensive care unit (ICU), medical complications, inpatient mortality rates, and hospital discharge disposition. Statistical significance was assessed at α sports-related TBIs were recorded in the NTDB, and these injuries represented 11,614 incidents nationally after sample weighting. Fall or interpersonal contact events were the greatest contributors to sports-related TBI (47.4%). Mild TBI represented 87.1% of the injuries overall. Mean (± SEM) LOSs in the hospital and ICU were 2.68 ± 0.07 days and 2.73 ± 0.12 days, respectively. The overall mortality rate was 0.8%, and the prevalence of medical complications was 2.1% across all patients. Severities of head and extracranial injuries were significant predictors of prolonged hospital and ICU LOSs, medical complications, failure to discharge to home, and death. Hypotension on admission to the ED was a significant predictor of failure to discharge to home (OR 0.05, 95% CI 0.03-0.07, p injury incurred during roller sports was independently associated with prolonged hospital LOS compared

  7. Clinical manifestations of pediatric psoriasis: Results of a multi-center study in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercy, Katherine; Kwasny, Mary; Cordoro, Kelly M.; Menter, Alan; Tom, Wynnis L.; Korman, Neil; Belazarian, Leah; Armstrong, April W.; Levy, Moise L.; Paller, Amy S.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Objectives The clinical features of pediatric psoriasis warrant further attention. A national study was completed to determine the prevalence of scalp and nail involvement, and history of guttate psoriasis at onset, according to age, sex, and disease severity. Materials and Methods 181 children, ages 5 to 17 years, with plaque psoriasis were enrolled in a multi-center, cross-sectional study. Subjects/guardians were asked about a history of scalp and nail involvement and whether the initial presentation was guttate. Peak psoriasis severity was assessed and defined historically as mild psoriasis (MP) or severe psoriasis (SP) according to Physician Global Assessment and Body Surface Area measures. Results 79.0% (n=143) of subjects reported a history of scalp involvement and 39.2% (n=71) described a history of nail involvement. Boys were less likely than girls to report a history of scalp involvement (OR= 0.40 (0.19-0.84)), but were more likely to have had nail involvement (OR=3.01 (1.62-5.60)). Scalp and nail involvement was not related to psoriasis severity. In contrast, SP subjects (35.9%) more often reported a history of guttate lesions than did MP subjects (21.8%) (p=0.017). Antecedent streptococcal infection was more common in children with guttate vs. plaque psoriasis at onset (p=0.02), but did not correlate with severity. Conclusions Gender-related differences in scalp and nail involvement suggest koebnerization. Preceding streptococcal infection predicts guttate morphology but not severity, and initial guttate morphology is associated with eventual greater severity of disease More aggressive monitoring and management should be considered for guttate psoriasis, given its later association with more severe disease. PMID:23360462

  8. Reticulitermes nelsonae, a New Species of Subterranean Termite (Rhinotermitidae) from the Southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Su Yee; Forschler, Brian T

    2012-01-06

    Reticulitermes nelsonae, a new species of Rhinotermitidae (Isoptera) is described based on specimens from Sapelo Island, GA, Thomasville, GA, Havelock, NC, and Branford, FL. Adult (alate) and soldier forms are described. Diagnostic characters are provided and incorporated into a supplemental couplet of a dichotomous key to the known species of Reticulitermes found in Georgia, USA.

  9. Reticulitermes nelsonae, a New Species of Subterranean Termite (Rhinotermitidae from the Southeastern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yee Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reticulitermes nelsonae, a new species of Rhinotermitidae (Isoptera is described based on specimens from Sapelo Island, GA, Thomasville, GA, Havelock, NC, and Branford, FL. Adult (alate and soldier forms are described. Diagnostic characters are provided and incorporated into a supplemental couplet of a dichotomous key to the known species of Reticulitermes found in Georgia, USA.

  10. 76 FR 50447 - Endangered and Threatened Species; 5-Year Reviews for 5 Evolutionarily Significant Units of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ...: Background Under the ESA, a list of endangered and threatened wildlife and plant species must be maintained. The list is published at 50 CFR 17.11 (for animals) and 17.12 (for plants). Section 4(c)(2)(A) of the... considered new genetic and biogeographic information related to each species' freshwater and estuarine...

  11. Polyphasic characterization of four new plant pathogenic Phyllosticta species from China, Japan, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nan; Chen, Qian; Carroll, George; Zhang, Ning; Shivas, Roger G; Cai, Lei

    2015-05-01

    The black rot disease of Vitis species and other host genera of Vitacease is caused by Phyllosticta ampelicida and allied taxa which is considered to be a species complex. In this paper, we introduce four new species of Phyllosticta, including two from the P. ampelicida complex, based on a polyphasic characterization including disease symptoms and host association, morphology, and molecular phylogeny. The phylogenetic analysis was conducted based on the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and a combined multi-locus alignment of the ITS, actin (ACT), partial translation elongation factor 1-alpha (TEF-1), and glyceraldehydes 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) gene regions. Our study confirms the phylogenetic distinctions of the four new species, as well as their phenotypic differences with known species in the genus. Copyright © 2014 The British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of Eastern United States Reticulitermes Termite Species via PCR-RFLP, Assessed Using Training and Test Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C. Garrick

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Reticulitermes termites play key roles in dead wood decomposition and nutrient cycling in forests. They also damage man-made structures, resulting in considerable economic loss. In the eastern United States, five species (R. flavipes, R. virginicus, R. nelsonae, R. hageni and R. malletei have overlapping ranges and are difficult to distinguish morphologically. Here we present a molecular tool for species identification. It is based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of a section of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene, followed by a three-enzyme restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP assay, with banding patterns resolved via agarose gel electrophoresis. The assay was designed using a large set of training data obtained from a public DNA sequence database, then evaluated using an independent test panel of Reticulitermes from the Southern Appalachian Mountains, for which species assignments were determined via phylogenetic comparison to reference sequences. After refining the interpretive framework, the PCR-RFLP assay was shown to provide accurate identification of four co-occurring species (the fifth species, R. hageni, was absent from the test panel, so accuracy cannot yet be extended to training data. The assay is cost- and time-efficient, and will help improve knowledge of Reticulitermes species distributions.

  13. Identification of Eastern United States Reticulitermes Termite Species via PCR-RFLP, Assessed Using Training and Test Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, Ryan C; Collins, Benjamin D; Yi, Rachel N; Dyer, Rodney J; Hyseni, Chaz

    2015-06-09

    Reticulitermes termites play key roles in dead wood decomposition and nutrient cycling in forests. They also damage man-made structures, resulting in considerable economic loss. In the eastern United States, five species (R. flavipes, R. virginicus, R. nelsonae, R. hageni and R. malletei) have overlapping ranges and are difficult to distinguish morphologically. Here we present a molecular tool for species identification. It is based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a section of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene, followed by a three-enzyme restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay, with banding patterns resolved via agarose gel electrophoresis. The assay was designed using a large set of training data obtained from a public DNA sequence database, then evaluated using an independent test panel of Reticulitermes from the Southern Appalachian Mountains, for which species assignments were determined via phylogenetic comparison to reference sequences. After refining the interpretive framework, the PCR-RFLP assay was shown to provide accurate identification of four co-occurring species (the fifth species, R. hageni, was absent from the test panel, so accuracy cannot yet be extended to training data). The assay is cost- and time-efficient, and will help improve knowledge of Reticulitermes species distributions.

  14. Species Profile: Eastern Indigo Snake (Drymarchon corals couperi) on Military Installations in the Southeastern United States

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hallam, Charlotte

    1998-01-01

    The eastern indigo snake (Dtymarchon corais couperi) is an uncommon, large-bodied snake occurring in the southeastern United States, primarily in southern Alabama and Georgia and most of Florida. The U.S...

  15. DUSTMS-D: DISPOSAL UNIT SOURCE TERM - MULTIPLE SPECIES - DISTRIBUTED FAILURE DATA INPUT GUIDE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2006-01-01

    Performance assessment of a low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility begins with an estimation of the rate at which radionuclides migrate out of the facility (i.e., the source term). The focus of this work is to develop a methodology for calculating the source term. In general, the source term is influenced by the radionuclide inventory, the wasteforms and containers used to dispose of the inventory, and the physical processes that lead to release from the facility (fluid flow, container degradation, wasteform leaching, and radionuclide transport). Many of these physical processes are influenced by the design of the disposal facility (e.g., how the engineered barriers control infiltration of water). The complexity of the problem and the absence of appropriate data prevent development of an entirely mechanistic representation of radionuclide release from a disposal facility. Typically, a number of assumptions, based on knowledge of the disposal system, are used to simplify the problem. This has been done and the resulting models have been incorporated into the computer code DUST-MS (Disposal Unit Source Term-Multiple Species). The DUST-MS computer code is designed to model water flow, container degradation, release of contaminants from the wasteform to the contacting solution and transport through the subsurface media. Water flow through the facility over time is modeled using tabular input. Container degradation models include three types of failure rates: (a) instantaneous (all containers in a control volume fail at once), (b) uniformly distributed failures (containers fail at a linear rate between a specified starting and ending time), and (c) gaussian failure rates (containers fail at a rate determined by a mean failure time, standard deviation and gaussian distribution). Wasteform release models include four release mechanisms: (a) rinse with partitioning (inventory is released instantly upon container failure subject to equilibrium partitioning (sorption) with

  16. [Invertebrate species variety and quantity for selected units, Fish Springs NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this survey was to determine if invertebrate species diversity and abundance were affected by a draw down. It was concluded that there was an inverse...

  17. Description of two new species of Clivina Latreille (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Clivinini from southeastern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Bousquet

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of the genus Clivina Latreille are described. One, C. choatei Bousquet & Skelley, belongs to the nominotypical subgenus and is known from six specimens collected in northern Florida. The species is structurally similar to C. myops Bousquet, known only from the holotype found in North Carolina, but differs among others by its smaller size and wider elytral striae. The second species, C. alabama Bousquet, belongs to the subgenus Antroforceps Barr and is known from two specimens collected in north-central Alabama. The species is structurally most similar to C. sasajii Ball, known only from Latimer County in Oklahoma, but differs among others in the absence of eyes and inthe pronotum and elytra proportionally wider.

  18. The Mortality Rate of Nosocomial Infection in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU of Taleghani Educational and Treatment Center, Tabriz, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Abbasian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : Information about nosocomial infections (NIs is necessary for both appropriate management and establishment of preventative measures in hospitals. Neonates admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU are at high-risk of developing nosocomial infection. The aim of this study was to determine the mortality rate of nosocomial infections and the distribution of pathogens among newborns who were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit in Taleghani educational and treatment center, Tabriz. Material and Methods : This was a cross-sectional study. The sampling method was census. The inclusion criteria were dead infants who developed signs of infection after 48 hours of hospitalization and those who had symptoms at the admission were excluded. Data were collected through hospital records and were analyzed using Excel software. Results: From 904 infants admitted to NICU, 39 (4.3% acquired hospital infection. Mortality from nosocomial infections in NICU was 20.5% that was 12% of the total deaths. Coagulase-negative staphylococcal Cook (37.5% and Escherichia coli (25% were the most commonly identified agents among dead neonates. Conclusion: For more reduction in nosocomial infection and its mortality rate, mercury hygiene principles and also optimizing bed spaces are recommended. ​

  19. Diverse Burkholderia Species Isolated from Soils in the Southern United States with No Evidence of B. pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Carina M; Busch, Joseph D; Shippy, Kenzie; Allender, Christopher J; Kaestli, Mirjam; Mayo, Mark; Sahl, Jason W; Schupp, James M; Colman, Rebecca E; Keim, Paul; Currie, Bart J; Wagner, David M

    2015-01-01

    The global distribution of the soil-dwelling bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, causative agent of melioidosis, is poorly understood. We used established culturing methods developed for B. pseudomallei to isolate Burkholderia species from soil collected at 18 sampling sites in three states in the southern United States (Arizona (n = 4), Florida (n = 7), and Louisiana (n = 7)). Using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) of seven genes, we identified 35 Burkholderia isolates from these soil samples. All species belonged to the B. cepacia complex (Bcc), including B. cenocepacia, B. cepacia, B. contaminans, B. diffusa, B. metallica, B. seminalis, B. vietnamiensis and two unnamed members of the Bcc. The MLST analysis provided a high level of resolution among and within these species. Despite previous clinical cases within the U.S. involving B. pseudomallei and its close phylogenetic relatives, we did not isolate any of these taxa. The Bcc contains a number of opportunistic pathogens that cause infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Interestingly, we found that B. vietnamiensis was present in soil from all three states, suggesting it may be a common component in southern U.S. soils. Most of the Burkholderia isolates collected in this study were from Florida (30/35; 86%), which may be due to the combination of relatively moist, sandy, and acidic soils found there compared to the other two states. We also investigated one MLST gene, recA, for its ability to identify species within Burkholderia. A 365bp fragment of recA recovered nearly the same species-level identification as MLST, thus demonstrating its cost effective utility when conducting environmental surveys for Burkholderia. Although we did not find B. pseudomallei, our findings document that other diverse Burkholderia species are present in soils in the southern United States.

  20. Putative extinction of two sawfish species in Mexico and the United States

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    Pablo del Monte-Luna

    Full Text Available All species of sawfish are listed by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN as endangered or critically endangered. In fact, the smalltooth sawfish Pristis pectinata, and the largetooth sawfish Pristis pristis, have been declared to be regionally and locally extinct from the US Atlantic coast and the Gulf of California, Mexico, respectively, likely due to overfishing. However, here we dispute these claims by illustrating how lack of existence of a given species within a region can be misconstrued as evidence for extinction.

  1. Airline Baggage as a Pathway for Alien Insect Species Invading the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew M. Liebhold; Timothy T. Work; Deborah G. McCullough; Joseph F. Cavey; Joseph F. Cavey

    2006-01-01

    Invasions by non-indigenous species are a problem of increasing magnitude and threaten the stability of the world's ecosystems and economies. Despite the enormity of this problem, relatively little is known about the importance of various invasion pathways. Using historical records of interceptions of alien insects in air passenger baggage by USDA inspectors, we...

  2. Occurrence of Ochroconis and Verruconis species in clinical specimens from the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giraldo Lopez, Dixie Alejandra; Sutton, Deanna A; Samerpitak, Kittipan; de Hoog, G Sybren; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Guarro, Josep; Gené, Josepa

    2014-01-01

    Ochroconis is a dematiaceous fungus able to infect immunocompetent people. Recently, the taxonomy of the genus has been reevaluated, and the most relevant species, Ochroconis gallopava, was transferred to the new genus Verruconis. Due to the important clinical implications of these fungi and based

  3. Vulnerability of freshwater native biodiversity to non-native species invasions across the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background/Question/Methods Non-native species pose one of the greatest threats to native biodiversity. The literature provides plentiful empirical and anecdotal evidence of this phenomenon; however, such evidence is limited to local or regional scales. Employing geospatial analy...

  4. The epidemiology and type of injuries seen at the accident and emergency unit of a Nigerian referral center

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    Adeyi A Adoga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A plethora of injuries present at any accident and emergency unit, but the pattern of the injuries varies from region to region especially in ours with the increased ethno-religious clashes and terrorist attacks. This study aims to determine the epidemiology and type of injuries presenting to our center with the possibility of developing injury surveillance initiatives in our center and Nigeria as a whole. Materials and Methods: Injured patients consecutively presenting to the accident and emergency department of the Jos University Teaching Hospital within the period February 2011 to January 2012 were prospectively recorded. Results: A total of 720 injured patients admitted with an age range of 8 months to 75 years (mean = 37.9; SD = ±52.4, which consists of 544 males and 176 females giving a male to female ratio of 3.1:1. Patients aged 20-29 years were in the majority (n = 220, 30.6% with peak incidences in the period of communal clashes. Injuries sustained from motorcycles were the highest (n = 248, 34.4%. Others were 160 (22.2% in other vehicular and pedestrian injuries, machete (n = 128, gunshots (n = 92, burns (n = 36, bomb blast injuries (n = 16, fall from heights (n = 32 and miscellaneous (n = 8. Injuries sustained in communal clashes and terrorist attacks accounted for 236 (32.8% presentations. The most common site of injury was the head (n = 30 4, 42.2%. Relatives, passersby and law enforcement agencies brought patients to the hospital with times between injury and presentation ranging from 1 h to 3 weeks. 40 (5.6% patients were brought in dead. Conclusion: A collective effort - on the part of the government and the citizenry is required to ensure better outcomes and a safer society for all.

  5. "The Patient Is Dying, Please Call the Chaplain": The Activities of Chaplains in One Medical Center's Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Philip J; Curlin, Farr A; Cox, Christopher E

    2015-10-01

    Patients and families commonly experience spiritual stress during an intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Although most patients report that they want spiritual support, little is known about how these issues are addressed by hospital chaplains. To describe the prevalence, timing, and nature of hospital chaplain encounters in ICUs. This was a retrospective cross-sectional study of adult ICUs at an academic medical center. Measures included days from ICU admission to initial chaplain visit, days from chaplain visit to ICU death or discharge, hospital and ICU lengths of stay, severity of illness at ICU admission and chaplain visit, and chart documentation of chaplain communication with the ICU team. Of a total of 4169 ICU admissions over six months, 248 (5.9%) patients were seen by chaplains. Of the 246 patients who died in an ICU, 197 (80%) were seen by a chaplain. There was a median of two days from ICU admission to chaplain encounter and a median of one day from chaplain encounter to ICU discharge or death. Chaplains communicated with nurses after 141 encounters (56.9%) but with physicians after only 14 encounters (5.6%); there was no documented communication in 55 encounters (22%). In the ICUs at this tertiary medical center, chaplain visits are uncommon and generally occur just before death among ICU patients. Communication between chaplains and physicians is rare. Chaplaincy service is primarily reserved for dying patients and their family members rather than providing proactive spiritual support. These observations highlight the need to better understand challenges and barriers to optimal chaplain involvement in ICU patient care. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Lived Experience of Caregivers of Family-Centered Care in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: "Evocation of Being at Home".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadian Shirazi, Zahra; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Rakhshan, Mahnaz; Pishva, Narjes; Jahanpour, Faezeh

    2016-10-01

    In recent decades, family-centered care (FCC) has come to be known, accepted, and reported as the best care strategy for admitted children and their families. However, in spite of the increasing application of this approach, the experiences of the caregivers have not yet been studied. The present study aimed at the description and interpretation of the FCC experience in two neonatal intensive care units (NICU) at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. This study was conducted through the hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 professional and familial caregivers, and their interactions were observed in three work shifts. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. After observations, field notes were also written. Finally, the data were analyzed through van Manen's methodology. One of the essential themes that emerged in this study was the "evocation of being at home" among familial and even professional caregivers. This theme had three subthemes: i.e., "meta-family interaction," "comprehensive support," and "reconstruction of a normal family." Accordingly, FCC eliminated borders between professional and non-professional caregivers and built close relationships among them in the NICU. It also provided for the needs of neonates, their families, and even professional caregivers through perceived and received support. Parents of the neonates admitted to the NICU experience hard moments. They not only play the role of primary caregivers, but they also receive the care. Focusing on the different meanings of this care from the caregivers' points of view and having managers provide certain requirements can guarantee the establishment of comprehensive care for clients and proper support for the staff in this unit.

  7. A new species of Percina (Perciformes: Percidae) from the Apalachicola River drainage, southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Mary C.; Freeman, B.J.; Burkhead, N.M.; Straight, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Percina crypta, the Halloween Darter, is described as a new species endemic to the Chattahoochee and Flint River systems in Georgia and Alabama. Percina crypta differs from sympatric Percina nigrofasciata in having narrowly separated dorsal saddles (inter-saddle spaces typically less than or equal to saddle width, compared to frequently wider than saddle width in P. nigrofasciata), in usually possessing a single modified scale between the pelvic bases (compared to two or more in P. nigrofasciata), and in having dark wide bands on pectoral-fin rays (versus pectoral fin clear, or with irregular dark marks or weak tessellations on fin rays in P. nigrofasciata). Phylogenetic relationships of P. crypta to other species of Percina are obscure. Percina crypta occurs in shoal and riffle habitats in the Chattahoochee and Flint River mainstems and in a few tributary systems, with the known extant range comprising four disjunct areas separated by mainstem impoundments and altered river reaches.

  8. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Brachyspira Species Isolated from Swine Herds in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Mirajkar, Nandita S.; Davies, Peter R.; Gebhart, Connie J.

    2016-01-01

    Outbreaks of swine dysentery, caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and the recently discovered “Brachyspira hampsonii,” have reoccurred in North American swine herds since the late 2000s. Additionally, multiple Brachyspira species have been increasingly isolated by North American diagnostic laboratories. In Europe, the reliance on antimicrobial therapy for control of swine dysentery has been followed by reports of antimicrobial resistance over time. The objectives of our study were to determi...

  9. Screening and characterizing oleaginous microalgal species from the southeastern United States. Final subcontract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadros, M.G.

    1985-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to select and characterize promising algal species which tolerate high light intensities, temperature variations and accumulate lipids. Samples have been collected from freshwater and saltwater locations in the State of Alabama and intertidal regions of the Gulf of Mexico. Samples were screened through a multi-step process. Selected species: Cyclotella, Nitzschia, Chlorella, Scenedesmus and Ankistrodesmus, have been examined for growth requirements. Approximate cellular composition of these species was determined. This report describes accomplishments from February 1984 to January 1985. During this period, collection trips were made to Dauphin Island near the Alabama coast in the summer of 1984. Over sixty strains were isolated, and of these six were ranked as good growers. Two diatoms were isolated that are of particular interest because of their ability to accumulate high lipids. Cyclotella tolerates high temperatures (30/sup 0/-35/sup 0/C), grows at moderate salinities (15-25 parts per thousand), and with nitrogen stress accumulates 42% of its dry weight as lipid. Hantzschia is a large diatom that also grows well at elevated temperatures and full strength seawater. Hantzschia can accumulate as much as 66% of its dry weight as lipid. 29 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. An outbreak of low pathogenic avian influenza in a mixed-species aviculture unit in Dubai in 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Jo; Bailey, Tom; Silvanose, Christu-Das; McKeown, Sean; Wernery, Ulrich; Kinne, Joerg; Manvell, Ruth

    2006-09-01

    This case describes an outbreak of low pathogenic hemagglutinin 9 neuraminidase 2 avian influenza virus (AIV) in two white-bellied bustards (Eupodotis senegalensis), one stone curlew (Burhinus oedicnemius), and a blacksmith plover (Antibyx armatus) in a private zoologic collection in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The four birds showed signs of respiratory disease, and all died as a result of disease or euthanasia. Attention has been paid to the diagnostic process and common differential diagnosis for upper respiratory tract disease in bustards, curlews, and plovers. To the knowledge of the authors, AIV has not been previously described in these species.

  11. Foundation species' overlap enhances biodiversity and multifunctionality from the patch to landscape scale in southeastern United States salt marshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, Christine; van der Heide, Tjisse; Griffin, John N; Morton, Joseph P; Derksen-Hooijberg, Marlous; Lamers, Leon P M; Smolders, Alfons J P; Silliman, Brian R

    2015-07-22

    Although there is mounting evidence that biodiversity is an important and widespread driver of ecosystem multifunctionality, much of this research has focused on small-scale biodiversity manipulations. Hence, which mechanisms maintain patches of enhanced biodiversity in natural systems and if these patches elevate ecosystem multifunctionality at both local and landscape scales remain outstanding questions. In a 17 month experiment conducted within southeastern United States salt marshes, we found that patches of enhanced biodiversity and multifunctionality arise only where habitat-forming foundation species overlap--i.e. where aggregations of ribbed mussels (Geukensia demissa) form around cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) stems. By empirically scaling up our experimental results to the marsh platform at 12 sites, we further show that mussels--despite covering only approximately 1% of the marsh surface--strongly enhance five distinct ecosystem functions, including decomposition, primary production and water infiltration rate, at the landscape scale. Thus, mussels create conditions that support the co-occurrence of high densities of functionally distinct organisms within cordgrass and, in doing so, elevate salt marsh multifunctionality from the patch to landscape scale. Collectively, these findings suggest that patterns in foundation species' overlap drive variation in biodiversity and ecosystem functioning within and across natural ecosystems.We therefore argue that foundation species should be integrated in our conceptual understanding of forces that moderate biodiversity--ecosystem functioning relationships, approaches for conserving species diversity and strategies to improve the multifunctionality of degraded ecosystems.

  12. The Obstacles against Nurse-Family Communication in Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: a Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Hadian Shirazi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Communication is one of the key principles in Family-Centered Care (FCC. Studies have shown some drawbacks in communication between families and nurses. Therefore, the present study aimed to recognize the obstacles against nurse-family communication in FCC in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted on 8 staff nurses in 2 NICUs affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences selected through purposive sampling. The data were collected using 8 deep semi-structured interviews and 3 observations. Then, they were analyzed through inductive content analysis. Results: Data analysis resulted in identification of 3 main categories and 7 subcategories. The first category was organizational factors with 2 subcategories of educational domain (inadequate education, lack of a system for nursing student selection, and poor professionalization and clinical domain (difficult working conditions, lack of an efficient system for ongoing education and evaluation, and authoritarian management. The second category was familial factors with socio-cultural, psychological, and economic subcategories. The last category was the factors related to nurses with socio-cultural and psycho-physical subcategories.Conclusion: Identification of the obstacles against nurse-family communication helps managers of healthcare systems to plan and eliminate the challenges of effective communication. Besides, elimination of these factors leads to appropriate strategies in NICUs for effective application of FCC.

  13. Experience with railroad injuries at a major urban trauma center serving the United States-Mexico border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattar-Cora, Deowall; Tutela, Rocco R; Daum, Allison N; Cromack, Douglas T

    2007-05-01

    In the United States (US), railroads are commonly used to transport humans and commerce, especially along the US-Mexico border. Some people will use freight trains to travel within the US. Some of these people will suffer a train-related injury with extensive soft tissue and bone trauma. There is little information about the demographics, injuries, or outcomes of these patients, and the financial expense of providing care for these individuals. We attempt to provide insight into some of these issues. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio from January 1996 to September 2003. Various demographic, total hospital costs, operative procedures, and outcomes were examined. Men were well represented (61 of 67 patients), and the overall mean age was 28.8 years. Hispanics (58 of 67 patients) were the main ethnic group and 61% were undocumented aliens (41 of 67 patients). Bony and soft tissue injuries were common, necessitating an amputation in 38 patients. The mean operative procedures per patient were 2.97. Follow-up was poor. Total hospital cost for all the patients was $2,468,004.47 with a mean of $36,835.89 ($1,305.00-$331, 452.74) per patient. Victims of train-related injuries were predominantly young and male. Many patients required an amputation. Multistaged and complex reconstructive procedures may not be realistic in a group of patients in whom follow-up is poor.

  14. Amatoxins and phallotoxins in Amanita species of the northeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yocum, R R; Simons, D M

    1977-01-01

    The amatoxin and phallotoxin content of some American specimens of green A. phalloides and white A. bisporigera, A. verna and A. virosa was determined. The analytical procedure consisted of extracting the toxins from dried mushroom tissue, defatting, fractionating the toxins by adsorption chromatography on Sephadex LH-20, desalting and running thin-layer chromatograms of appropriate fractions along with authentic toxin samples. One amatoxin, amanin, was identified by hydrolysis to its components amino acids. Except for some difference in relative amounts of toxins, American and European varieties of A. phalloides were quite similar. Neither phallotoxins nor amatoxins were present in three out of four collections of A. verna; the fourth contained only a trace of beta-amanitin. Amanin was the sole of amatoxin present in two out of four collections of A. virosa; alpha-amanitin was the chief amatoxin in the other two. None of the white Amanita species contained phallacidin. The taxonomy of the above species is discussed. A literature report that edible A. rubescens contains phallotixins was not confirmed.

  15. Talpid Mole Phylogeny Unites Shrew Moles and Illuminates Overlooked Cryptic Species Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kai; Shinohara, Akio; Helgen, Kristofer M; Springer, Mark S; Jiang, Xue-Long; Campbell, Kevin L

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian family Talpidae (moles, shrew moles, desmans) is characterized by diverse ecomorphologies associated with terrestrial, semi-aquatic, semi-fossorial, fossorial, and aquatic-fossorial lifestyles. Prominent specializations involved with these different lifestyles, and the transitions between them, pose outstanding questions regarding the evolutionary history within the family, not only for living but also for fossil taxa. Here, we investigate the phylogenetic relationships, divergence times, and biogeographic history of the family using 19 nuclear and 2 mitochondrial genes (∼16 kb) from ∼60% of described species representing all 17 genera. Our phylogenetic analyses help settle classical questions in the evolution of moles, identify an ancient (mid-Miocene) split within the monotypic genus Scaptonyx, and indicate that talpid species richness may be nearly 30% higher than previously recognized. Our results also uniformly support the monophyly of long-tailed moles with the two shrew mole tribes and confirm that the Gansu mole is the sole living Asian member of an otherwise North American radiation. Finally, we provide evidence that aquatic specializations within the tribes Condylurini and Desmanini evolved along different morphological trajectories, though we were unable to statistically reject monophyly of the strictly fossorial tribes Talpini and Scalopini. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Emergency Contraceptive Pills: A 10-Year Follow-up Survey of Use and Experiences at College Health Centers in the Mid-Atlantic United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura McKeller; Sawyer, Robin G.

    2006-01-01

    The authors conducted a 10-year follow-up study using a telephone survey to investigate the availability of emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) at college health centers in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. They also examined related issues, such as distribution procedure, existence of a written protocol, personnel involved,…

  17. Creating a Supportive Teaching Culture in the Research University Context: Strategic Partnering and Interdisciplinary Collaboration between a Teaching Center and Academic Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Marie Kendall; Ralston, Patricia A. S.; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; Schreck, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes 2 "strategic partnering" and "interdisciplinary collaboration" case studies between a Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) and an academic unit at a mid-sized metropolitan research university in the American Midwest. These faculty development partnerships were developed to meet the unique needs of faculty…

  18. Exposure to Alcoholism in the Family: United States, 1988. Advance Data from Vital and Health Statistics of the National Center for Health Statistics. Number 205.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenborn, Charlotte A.

    This report is based on data from the 1988 National Health Interview Survey on Alcohol (NHIS-Alcohol), part of the ongoing National Health Interview Survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics. Interviews for the NHIS are conducted in person by staff of the United States Bureau of the Census. Information is collected on each…

  19. Few highly abundant operational taxonomic units dominate within rumen methanogenic archaeal species in New Zealand sheep and cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedorf, Henning; Kittelmann, Sandra; Janssen, Peter H

    2015-02-01

    Sequencing and analyses of 16S rRNA gene amplicons were performed to estimate the composition of the rumen methanogen community in 252 samples from eight cohorts of sheep and cattle, separated into 16 different sample groups by diet, and to determine which methanogens are most prominent in the rumens of farmed New Zealand ruminants. Methanobacteriales (relative abundance ± standard deviation, 89.6% ± 9.8%) and Methanomassiliicoccales (10.4% ± 9.8%) were the two major orders and contributed 99.98% (±0.1%) to the rumen methanogen communities in the samples. Sequences from Methanobacteriales were almost entirely from only four different species (or clades of very closely related species). Each was detectable in at least 89% of the samples. These four species or clades were the Methanobrevibacter gottschalkii clade and Methanobrevibacter ruminantium clade with a mean abundance of 42.4% (±19.5% standard deviation) and 32.9% (±18.8%), respectively, and Methanosphaera sp. ISO3-F5 (8.2% ± 6.7%) and Methanosphaera sp. group5 (5.6% ± 5.7%). These four species or clades appeared to be primarily represented by only one or, in one case, two dominant sequence types per species or clade when the sequences were grouped into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 99% sequence identity. The mean relative abundance of Methanomassiliicoccales in the samples was relatively low but exceeded 40% in some of the treatment groups. Animal feed affected the apparent methanogen community structure of both orders, as evident from differences in relative abundances of the major OTUs in animals under different feeding regimens. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Identifying management units in non-endangered species: the example of the sloth Bradypus variegatus Schinz, 1825

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Moraes-Barros

    Full Text Available In this study we propose the analysis of genetic diversity of the common three-toed sloth, Bradypus variegatus, in an attempt to understand population structure, identify divergent intraspecific units, and contribute to the knowledge of biodiversity in the neotropical forests. We analyzed a 387 bp segment of the mitochondrial DNA control region in 28 individuals distributed in different localities of both Atlantic and Amazon forests. Our results demonstrated that the genetic diversity of B. variegatus is distributed in six management units, MUs. The observed MUs encompass six phylogenetic lineages and represent respectively north and south regions of Atlantic forest, three regions within the Amazon forest, and a transition region between these two biomes. Considering the fact that these MUs are concordant with phylogroups and endemism areas already described for other vertebrate species, we can say that the study of B. variegatus, a widely distributed and not endangered species, can help to identify areas for conservation biology purposes in neotropical rain forests.

  1. Trends in Cervical Cancer Screening in Title X-Funded Health Centers - United States, 2005-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Christina I; Saraiya, Mona; Moskosky, Susan B; Miller, Jacqueline W; Gable, Julia; Mautone-Smith, Nancy

    2017-09-22

    Cervical cancer screening is critical to early detection and treatment of precancerous cells and cervical cancer. In 2015, 83% of U.S. women reported being screened per current recommendations, which is below the Healthy People 2020 target of 93% (1,2). Disparities in screening persist for women who are younger (aged 21-30 years), have lower income, are less educated, are uninsured, lack a source of health care, or who self-identify as Asian or American Indian/Alaska Native (2). Women who are never screened or rarely screened are more likely to develop cancer and receive a cancer diagnosis at later stages than women who are screened regularly (3). In 2013, cervical cancer was diagnosed in 11,955 women in the United States, and 4,217 died from the disease (4). Aggregated administrative data from the Title X Family Planning Program were used to calculate the percentage of female clients served in Title X-funded health centers who received a Papanicolaou (Pap) test during 2005-2015. Trends in the percentage of Title X clients screened for cervical cancer were examined in relation to changes in cervical cancer screening guidelines, particularly the 2009 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) update that raised the age for starting cervical cancer screening to 21 years (5) and the 2012 alignment of screening guidelines from ACOG, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) and the American Cancer Society (ACS) on the starting age (21 years), screening interval (3 or 5 years), and type of screening test (6-8). During 2005-2015, the percentage of female clients screened for cervical cancer dropped continually, with the largest declines occurring in 2010 and 2013, notably a year after major updates to the recommendations. Although aggregated data contribute to understanding of cervical cancer screening trends in Title X centers, studies using client-level and encounter-level data are needed to assess the appropriateness of cervical cancer screening

  2. Klebocin typing of Klebsiella species isolated from nosocomial infection in intensive care unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal R

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Klebocin typing and antibiotic resistance have been studied for 518 strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae, [106 from intensive care unit (ICU sites, 182 from ICU staff flora, 192 from patient flora and 38 from clinical specimens]. The overall typability was 71.62%. The most common mnemonic types among various sources were 111, 211, and 112. Of the total strains tested, 28.37% strains were found to be untypable. These strains are labelled as "444". When klebocin typing was used in association with antibiogram, in 86.84% cases of clinical infection probable source of infection could be detected. Thus a combination of two typing methods poses a significant contribution in epidemiological studies.

  3. Crop Species Diversity Changes in the United States: 1978–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Jonathan; Gramig, Greta G.; Hendrickson, John R.; Archer, David W.; Forcella, Frank; Liebig, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotal accounts regarding reduced US cropping system diversity have raised concerns about negative impacts of increasingly homogeneous cropping systems. However, formal analyses to document such changes are lacking. Using US Agriculture Census data, which are collected every five years, we quantified crop species diversity from 1978 to 2012, for the contiguous US on a county level basis. We used Shannon diversity indices expressed as effective number of crop species (ENCS) to quantify crop diversity. We then evaluated changes in county-level crop diversity both nationally and for each of the eight Farm Resource Regions developed by the National Agriculture Statistics Service. During the 34 years we considered in our analyses, both national and regional ENCS changed. Nationally, crop diversity was lower in 2012 than in 1978. However, our analyses also revealed interesting trends between and within different Resource Regions. Overall, the Heartland Resource Region had the lowest crop diversity whereas the Fruitful Rim and Northern Crescent had the highest. In contrast to the other Resource Regions, the Mississippi Portal had significantly higher crop diversity in 2012 than in 1978. Also, within regions there were differences between counties in crop diversity. Spatial autocorrelation revealed clustering of low and high ENCS and this trend became stronger over time. These results show that, nationally counties have been clustering into areas of either low diversity or high diversity. Moreover, a significant trend of more counties shifting to lower rather than to higher crop diversity was detected. The clustering and shifting demonstrates a trend toward crop diversity loss and attendant homogenization of agricultural production systems, which could have far-reaching consequences for provision of ecosystem system services associated with agricultural systems as well as food system sustainability. PMID:26308552

  4. Groundwater geochemical and selected volatile organic compound data, Operable Unit 1, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Keyport, Washington, July 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Raegan L.

    2014-01-01

    Previous investigations indicate that concentrations of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) are substantial in groundwater beneath the 9-acre former landfill at Operable Unit 1, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Keyport, Washington. The U.S. Geological Survey has continued to monitor groundwater geochemistry to ensure that conditions remain favorable for contaminant biodegradation as specified in the Record of Decision for the site. This report presents groundwater geochemical and selected CVOC data collected at Operable Unit 1 by the U.S. Geological Survey during July 9–18, 2013, in support of longterm monitoring for natural attenuation. Groundwater samples were collected from 13 wells and 9 piezometers, as well as from 10 shallow groundwater passive-diffusion sampling sites in the nearby marsh. Samples from all wells and piezometers were analyzed for oxidation-reduction (redox) sensitive constituents and dissolved gases. Samples from all piezometers and four wells also were analyzed for CVOCs, as were all samples from the passive-diffusion sampling sites. In 2013, concentrations of redox-sensitive constituents measured at all wells and piezometers were consistent with those measured in previous years, with dissolved oxygen concentrations at all except an upgradient well 0.2 milligrams per liter or less; little to no detectable nitrate; abundant dissolved manganese, iron, and methane; and commonly detected sulfide. In the upper aquifer of the northern plantation in 2013, CVOC concentrations at all piezometers were similar to those measured in previous years, and concentrations of the reductive dechlorination byproducts ethane and ethene were slightly lower or the same as concentrations measured in 2012. In the upper aquifer of the southern plantation, CVOC concentrations measured in piezometers during 2013 continued to be variable as in previous years, and often very high, and reductive dechlorination byproducts were detected in two of the three

  5. Advanced Stirling Convertor Control Unit Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center in the Radioisotope Power Systems System Integration Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugala, Gina M.; Taylor, Linda M.; Kussmaul, Michael; Casciani, Michael; Brown, Gregory; Wiser, Joel

    2017-01-01

    Future NASA missions could include establishing Lunar or Martian base camps, exploring Jupiters moons and travelling beyond where generating power from sunlight may be limited. Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) provide a dependable power source for missions where inadequate sunlight or operational requirements make other power systems impractical. Over the past decade, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been supporting the development of RPSs. The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) utilized a pair of Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC). While flight development of the ASRG has been cancelled, much of the technology and hardware continued development and testing to guide future activities. Specifically, a controller for the convertor(s) is an integral part of a Stirling-based RPS. For the ASRG design, the controller maintains stable operation of the convertors, regulates the alternating current produced by the linear alternator of the convertor, provides a specified direct current output voltage for the spacecraft, synchronizes the piston motion of the two convertors in order to minimize vibration as well as manage and maintain operation with a stable piston amplitude and hot end temperature. It not only provides power to the spacecraft but also must regulate convertor operation to avoid damage to internal components and maintain safe thermal conditions after fueling. Lockheed Martin Coherent Technologies has designed, developed and tested an Engineering Development Unit (EDU) Advanced Stirling Convertor Control Unit (ACU) to support this effort. GRC used the ACU EDU as part of its non-nuclear representation of a RPS which also consists of a pair of Dual Advanced Stirling Convertor Simulator (DASCS), and associated support equipment to perform a test in the Radioisotope Power Systems System Integration Laboratory (RSIL). The RSIL was designed and built to evaluate hardware utilizing RPS technology. The RSIL provides insight into the electrical

  6. The Use of Traditional Vietnamese Medicine Among Vietnamese Immigrants Attending an Urban Community Health Center in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Long T; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Davis, Roger B; Nguyen, Giac; Pham, Van; Tringale, Stephen M; Loh, Yen Lin; Gardiner, Paula

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about Traditional Vietnamese Medicine (TVM) and its use among Vietnamese immigrants in the United States. This study aimed to characterize TVM and improve understanding of its use among Vietnamese outpatients attending an urban clinic. This cross-sectional observation study was performed by mailing bilingual surveys to a stratified random sample of 400 Vietnamese adult patients (≥18 years of age) who had visited a community health center in Boston, Massachusetts, at least once in the prior 12 months. The data were analyzed by using descriptive and multivariable regression statistics. The use of TVM and the factors influencing their use were reported. Among the 216 respondents, 68% reported using TVM. Of those users, the median age was 56 years and 68% were female, 51% had lived in the United States for less than 13 years, and 91% spoke English "not well or not at all." Among the 89% who reported using TVM of indigenous origin, 62% used "wind scraping," 35% used herbal pills/products, and 30% used "wind snatching." Sixty-one percent used therapies of foreign origin; of those, 51% used Asian-originated TVM (herbs, 25%; Eastern massage, 23%) and 38% used Western-influenced TVM (diet supplements, 28%; Western massage, 8%). TVM was mostly used for pain conditions (57%), "staying well" (38%), and cough/colds (27%). Forty-five percent ignored the question on revealing TVM use to providers; of those who answered, 57% said "no." Fifty-one percent of TVM users reported using Western medicine for the same problem, while 46% used TVM and Western medicine within 2 days of each other. Self-rated health (odds ratio [OR], 2.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.34-5.06), household size (OR, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.04-4.22), and education (OR, 2.65; 95% CI, 1.03-6.80) were associated with TVM use. TVM is an important component of the healthcare of urban Vietnamese and needs to be further investigated. Healthcare providers need to encourage open discussion to better care for

  7. Summer Research Program - 1997 Summer Faculty Research Program Volume 6 Arnold Engineering Development Center United States Air Force Academy Air Logistics Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Fracture Analysis of the F-5, 15%-Spar Bolt DR Devendra Kumar SAALC/LD 6- 16 CUNY-City College, New York, NY A Simple, Multiversion Concurrency Control...Program, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH. [3]AFGROW, Air Force Crack Propagation Analysis Program, Version 3.82 (1997) 15-8 A SIMPLE, MULTIVERSION ...Office of Scientific Research Boiling Air Force Base, DC and San Antonio Air Logistic Center August 1997 16-1 A SIMPLE, MULTIVERSION CONCURRENCY

  8. Dietary sources of methylated arsenic species in urine of the United States population, NHANES 2003-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Rey deCastro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arsenic is an ubiquitous element linked to carcinogenicity, neurotoxicity, as well as adverse respiratory, gastrointestinal, hepatic, and dermal health effects. OBJECTIVE: Identify dietary sources of speciated arsenic: monomethylarsonic acid (MMA, and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA. METHODS: Age-stratified, sample-weighted regression of NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2010 data (∼8,300 participants ≥6 years old characterized the association between urinary arsenic species and the additional mass consumed of USDA-standardized food groups (24-hour dietary recall data, controlling for potential confounders. RESULTS: For all arsenic species, the rank-order of age strata for median urinary molar concentration was children 6-11 years > adults 20-84 years > adolescents 12-19 years, and for all age strata, the rank-order was DMA > MMA. Median urinary molar concentrations of methylated arsenic species ranged from 0.56 to 3.52 µmol/mol creatinine. Statistically significant increases in urinary arsenic species were associated with increased consumption of: fish (DMA; fruits (DMA, MMA; grain products (DMA, MMA; legumes, nuts, seeds (DMA; meat, poultry (DMA; rice (DMA, MMA; rice cakes/crackers (DMA, MMA; and sugars, sweets, beverages (MMA. And, for adults, rice beverage/milk (DMA, MMA. In addition, based on US (United States median and 90th percentile consumption rates of each food group, exposure from the following food groups was highlighted: fish; fruits; grain products; legumes, nuts, seeds; meat, poultry; and sugars, sweets, beverages. CONCLUSIONS: In a nationally representative sample of the US civilian, noninstitutionalized population, fish (adults, rice (children, and rice cakes/crackers (adolescents had the largest associations with urinary DMA. For MMA, rice beverage/milk (adults and rice cakes/crackers (children, adolescents had the largest associations.

  9. Dietary sources of methylated arsenic species in urine of the United States population, NHANES 2003-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deCastro, B Rey; Caldwell, Kathleen L; Jones, Robert L; Blount, Benjamin C; Pan, Yi; Ward, Cynthia; Mortensen, Mary E

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is an ubiquitous element linked to carcinogenicity, neurotoxicity, as well as adverse respiratory, gastrointestinal, hepatic, and dermal health effects. Identify dietary sources of speciated arsenic: monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). Age-stratified, sample-weighted regression of NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) 2003-2010 data (∼8,300 participants ≥6 years old) characterized the association between urinary arsenic species and the additional mass consumed of USDA-standardized food groups (24-hour dietary recall data), controlling for potential confounders. For all arsenic species, the rank-order of age strata for median urinary molar concentration was children 6-11 years > adults 20-84 years > adolescents 12-19 years, and for all age strata, the rank-order was DMA > MMA. Median urinary molar concentrations of methylated arsenic species ranged from 0.56 to 3.52 µmol/mol creatinine. Statistically significant increases in urinary arsenic species were associated with increased consumption of: fish (DMA); fruits (DMA, MMA); grain products (DMA, MMA); legumes, nuts, seeds (DMA); meat, poultry (DMA); rice (DMA, MMA); rice cakes/crackers (DMA, MMA); and sugars, sweets, beverages (MMA). And, for adults, rice beverage/milk (DMA, MMA). In addition, based on US (United States) median and 90th percentile consumption rates of each food group, exposure from the following food groups was highlighted: fish; fruits; grain products; legumes, nuts, seeds; meat, poultry; and sugars, sweets, beverages. In a nationally representative sample of the US civilian, noninstitutionalized population, fish (adults), rice (children), and rice cakes/crackers (adolescents) had the largest associations with urinary DMA. For MMA, rice beverage/milk (adults) and rice cakes/crackers (children, adolescents) had the largest associations.

  10. Identity of Schizaphis species (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in the United Kingdom: are they a threat to crops?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kati, Amalia; Shufran, Kevin A; Taylor, Mark S; Barjadze, Shalva; Eastop, Victor F; Blackman, Roger L; Harrington, Richard

    2013-08-01

    The greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani), is a major pest of cereals in some parts of the world and is of particular concern because it can be resistant to some insecticides and overcome the resistance of crops. In the UK, it has never been found on crops, but two rather little-known and closely-related species (Schizaphis holci and Schizaphis agrostis) are associated with the wild grasses, Holcus lanatus and Agrostis stolonifera. Since 1987, winged (alate) aphids morphologically resembling the greenbug have been found in increasing numbers in 12.2 m high suction-trap samples of the Rothamsted Insect Survey (RIS); hence, studies were undertaken to establish their identity. Clones (=asexual lineages) established from populations collected from H. lanatus in southern England showed strong preference for Holcus over Agrostis and Hordeum in laboratory tests and produced sexual morphs when transferred to short-day conditions, the males being apterous, as expected for S. holci. Multivariate morphometric comparisons of alatae caught in UK RIS suction traps in 2007 and 2011 with named specimens from museum collections, including S. graminum from many countries, indicated that the suction-trapped alatae were mostly S. agrostis and S. holci. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) mtDNA obtained from 62 UK specimens from suction-traps had 95.4-100% sequence identity with US specimens of S. graminum. Two of the UK specimens had identical COI sequence to the US sorghum-adapted form of S. graminum, and these specimens also had 100% identity with a 640 bp fragment of nDNA CytC, indicating that this form of S. graminum may already be present in the UK. Present and future economic implications of these results are discussed.

  11. Assessment of variation in live donor kidney transplantation across transplant centers in the United States1 - 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Peter P.; Feldman, Harold I.; Bloom, Roy D.; Abt, Peter L.; Thomasson, Arwin; Shults, Justine; Grossman, Robert; Asch, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Transplant centers vary in the proportion of kidney transplants performed using live donors. Clinical innovations that facilitate live donation may drive this variation. Methods We assembled a cohort of renal transplant candidates at 194 US centers using registry data from 1999 – 2005. We measured magnitude of live donor transplant (LDKTx) through development of a standardized live donor transplant ratio (SLDTR) at each center that accounted for center population differences. We examined associations between center characteristics and the likelihood that individual transplant candidates underwent LDKTx. To identify practices through which centers increase LDKTx, we also examined center characteristics associated with consistently being in the upper three quartiles of SLDTR. Results The cohort comprised 148,168 patients, among whom 34,593 (23.3%) underwent LDKTx. In multivariable logistic regression, candidates had an increased likelihood of undergoing LDKTx at centers with greater use of “unrelated donors” (defined as non-spouses and non-first-degree family members of the recipient; OR 1.31 for highest versus lowest use, p=0.02) and at centers with programs to overcome donor-recipient incompatibility (OR 1.33, p=0.01.) Centers consistently in the upper three SLDTR quartiles were also more likely to use “unrelated” donors (OR 8.30 per tertile of higher use, p<0.01), to have incompatibility programs (OR 4.79, p<0.01), and to use laparoscopic nephrectomy (OR 2.53 per tertile of higher use, p=0.02). Conclusion Differences in center population do not fully account for differences in the use of LDKTx. To maximize opportunities for LDKTx, centers may accept more unrelated donors and adopt programs to overcome biological incompatibility. PMID:21562451

  12. Evaluation of a Client-Centered Linkage Intervention for Patients Newly Diagnosed with HIV at an Urban United States LGBT Center: The Linkage to Care Specialist Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendetson, Jesse; Dierst-Davies, Rhodri; Flynn, Risa; Beymer, Matthew R; Wohl, Amy R; Amico, K Rivet; Bolan, Robert K

    2017-07-01

    Linkage to care (LTC) is a key element of the HIV care continuum, and a crucial bridge from testing and diagnosis to receipt of antiretroviral therapies and viral suppression. In 2012, the Los Angeles LGBT Center hired a full-time LTC specialist (LTC-S), who developed a unique client-centered approach to LTC. This single-arm demonstration project was designed to systematically evaluate the LTC-S intervention. Individuals who were newly diagnosed with HIV between March 2014 and September 2015 were eligible for enrollment. The LTC-S draws heavily from principles of motivational interviewing and strengths-based case management, helping to normalize fears while guiding clients at a pace that reflects individual needs and resources. These tailored, targeted methods facilitate the rapid development of rapport, enabling the LTC-S to help clients address particular reactions and barriers to care more effectively. Of the 118 newly HIV-diagnosed individuals who enrolled, 111 (94.1%) saw an HIV primary care provider within 3 months of diagnosis; the LTC-S spent an average of 2.1 h working with each participant. Enrolled clients were a racially diverse, urban group composed primarily of young men who have sex with men. The LTC-S intervention was effective in promoting LTC among this sample. Our results demonstrate that client-centered, resiliency-based LTC services can be seamlessly integrated into an existing HIV testing program, thereby increasing the chances that newly diagnosed individuals will link to care.

  13. Womens Business Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Women's Business Centers (WBCs) represent a national network of nearly 100 educational centers throughout the United States and its territories, which are designed...

  14. Quality of life assessment in advanced cancer patients treated at home, an inpatient unit, and a day care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leppert W

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wojciech Leppert,1 Mikolaj Majkowicz,2 Maria Forycka,1 Eleonora Mess,3 Agata Zdun-Ryzewska2 1Department of Palliative Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2Department of Quality of Life Research, Gdansk Medical University, Gdansk, Poland; 3Palliative Care Nursing Department, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Aim of the study: To assess quality of life (QoL in cancer patients treated at home, at an in-patient palliative care unit (PCU, and at a day care center (DCC. Patients and methods: QoL was assessed in advanced cancer patients at baseline and after 7 days of symptomatic treatment using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15-Palliative Care (EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL, the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS, and the Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS scale. Results: A total of 129 patients completed the study, with 51 patients treated at home, 51 patients treated at the PCU, and 27 patients at DCC. In the EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL, improvement in functional and symptom scales was observed except in physical functioning and fatigue levels; patients at DCC had a better physical functioning, global QoL, appetite, and fatigue levels. In the ESAS, improvement in all items was found except for drowsiness levels, which was stable in patients treated at DCC and deteriorated in home and PCU patients. Higher activity, better appetite and well-being, and less drowsiness were observed in patients treated at DCC. KPS was better in DCC patients compared to those treated at home and at the PCU; the latter group deteriorated. Conclusions: QoL improved in all patient groups, with better results in DCC patients and similar scores in those staying at home and at the PCU. Along with clinical assessment, baseline age, KPS, physical and emotional functioning may be considered when assigning patients to care at a DCC, PCU, or at home. Keywords: oncology, patient care

  15. Groundwater geochemical and selected volatile organic compound data, Operable Unit 1, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Keyport, Washington, June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Raegan L.; Frans, L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Previous investigations indicate that concentrations of chlorinated volatile organic compounds are substantial in groundwater beneath the 9-acre former landfill at Operable Unit 1, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Keyport, Washington. Phytoremediation combined with ongoing natural attenuation processes was the preferred remedy selected by the U.S. Navy, as specified in the Record of Decision for the site. The U.S. Navy planted two hybrid poplar plantations on the landfill in spring 1999 to remove and to control the migration of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in shallow groundwater. The U.S. Geological Survey has continued to monitor groundwater geochemistry to ensure that conditions remain favorable for contaminant biodegradation as specified in the Record of Decision. This report presents groundwater geochemical and selected volatile organic compound data collected at Operable Unit 1 by the U.S. Geological Survey during June 20-22, 2011, in support of long-term monitoring for natural attenuation. In 2011, groundwater samples were collected from 13 wells and 9 piezometers. Samples from all wells and piezometers were analyzed for redox sensitive constituents and dissolved gases, and samples from 5 of 13 wells and all piezometers also were analyzed for chlorinated volatile organic compounds. Concentrations of redox sensitive constituents measured in 2011 were consistent with previous years, with dissolved oxygen concentrations all at 0.4 milligram per liter or less; little to no detectable nitrate; abundant dissolved manganese, iron, and methane; and commonly detected sulfide. The reductive declorination byproducts - methane, ethane, and ethene - were either not detected in samples collected from the upgradient wells in the landfill and the upper aquifer beneath the northern phytoremediation plantation or were detected at concentrations less than those measured in 2010. Chlorinated volatile organic compound concentrations in 2011 at most piezometers

  16. Efficacy of a novel oral formulation of sarolaner (Simparica™) against five common tick species infesting dogs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, Robert H; Everett, William R; Young, David R; Carter, Lori; Mahabir, Sean P; Honsberger, Nicole A; Myers, Melanie R; Holzmer, Susan; Chapin, Sara; Rugg, Jady J

    2016-05-30

    The efficacy of a single oral treatment with sarolaner (Simparica™, Zoetis), a novel isoxazoline compound, was evaluated against five tick species known to infest dogs in the United States. A total of 10 laboratory studies, two against each species, were conducted using adult purpose-bred mongrels or Beagle dogs. In each study, 16 dogs were randomly allocated to one of two treatment groups based on pre-treatment host-suitability tick counts. Dogs were infested with approximately 50 unfed adult Amblyomma americanum, Amblyomma maculatum, Dermacentor variabilis, Ixodes scapularis or Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks on Days -2, 5, 12, 19, 26 and 33. On Day 0, dogs were treated with a placebo or a sarolaner tablet providing a minimum dose of 2 mg/kg. Tick counts were conducted 48h after treatment and after each subsequent weekly re-infestation. There were no treatment-related adverse reactions during any of the studies. Dogs in the placebo-treated group maintained tick infestations throughout the studies. Geometric mean live tick counts were significantly lower (P≤0.0001) in the sarolaner-treated group compared to the tick counts in the placebo group at all timepoints. Treatment with sarolaner resulted in ≥99.6% efficacy against existing infestations of all five tick species within 48h. The efficacy against weekly post-treatment re-infestations of all tick species was ≥96.9% for at least 35 days after treatment. Thus, a single dose of sarolaner administered orally at the minimum dosage of 2mg/kg, resulted in excellent efficacy within 48h against existing tick infestations, and against weekly re-infestations for 35 days after treatment. These studies confirmed that administration of the minimum dose of sarolaner will provide rapid treatment of existing infestations and give at least one month of control against re-infestation by the common tick species affecting dogs in the US. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Multidrug resistance Acinetobacter species at the intensive care unit, Aseer Central Hospital, Saudi Arabia: A one year analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bshabshe, Ali; Joseph, Martin R P; Al Hussein, Ali; Haimour, Waleed; Hamid, Mohamed E

    2016-09-01

    To identify and to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) clinical isolates from ICU at Aseer Central Hospital. The study was conducted in the Intensive Care Unit, Aseer Central Hospital, Saudi Arabia over 13 months period (2014-2015). Acinetobacter species (n = 105) were isolated from various clinical samples. Isolates were identified using selected phenotypic criteria and confirmed using the Vitek 2 automated system. This system was used to determine the susceptibilities of 21 antimicrobial agents. Patients, isolates and drug data were analyzed using the SPSS statistical software package to determine some epidemiological and microbiological patterns. Of the 105 stains, A. baumannii accounted for 49 (46.67%), A. baumannii complex, 19 (18.09%), A. baumannii/haemolyticus 32 (30.47), Acinetobacter haemolyticus 4 (3.81%), Acinetobater lwoffii 1 (0.95%) and unidentified Acinetobater species 2 (1.3%). Of the 105 Acinetobacter strains, 103 (98.1%) were found multidrug resistant (MDR). A. baumannii strain were 100% sensitive to colistin and 74.5% to trimethoprim + sulfamethoxazole. The remaining 19 antimicrobial agents revealed low or no sensitivities: amikacin 16.3%; ampicillin 7.7%; ceftazidime, 7.3%. Distribution of similar sensitivities was shown by other Acinetobacter species. Mean number of isolates from males and females indicates no statistical variation (P = 0.867) whereas age groups showed significant differences (P = 0.008) as it is clear from the high percentage of infected individuals more than 60 years followed by those aged 20-29 years old (19.05%). Upper respiratory tract (30.48%), lower respiratory tract (47.65%) and subcutaneous tissue (9.5%) were the main sources of Acinetobacter spp. but mean numbers of isolates from these specimens indicate no discrepancy between specimens (P = 0.731). Acinetobacter species including A. baumannii were found MDR (98.1%) according to the current Acinetobacter

  18. Pyrosequencing as a tool for the detection of Phytophthora species: error rate and risk of false Molecular Operational Taxonomic Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettraino, A M; Bonants, P; Tomassini, A; Bruni, N; Vannini, A

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of pyrosequencing for the description of Phytophthora communities in terms of taxa identification and risk of assignment for false Molecular Operational Taxonomic Units (MOTUs). Pyrosequencing of Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1) amplicons was used to describe the structure of a DNA mixture comprising eight Phytophthora spp. and Pythium vexans. Pyrosequencing resulted in 16 965 reads, detecting all species in the template DNA mixture. Reducing the ITS1 sequence identity threshold resulted in a decrease in numbers of unmatched reads but a concomitant increase in the numbers of false MOTUs. The total error rate was 0·63% and comprised mainly mismatches (0·25%) Pyrosequencing of ITS1 region is an efficient and accurate technique for the detection and identification of Phytophthora spp. in environmental samples. However, the risk of allocating false MOTUs, even when demonstrated to be low, may require additional validation with alternative detection methods. Phytophthora spp. are considered among the most destructive groups of invasive plant pathogens, affecting thousands of cultivated and wild plants worldwide. Simultaneous early detection of Phytophthora complexes in environmental samples offers an unique opportunity for the interception of known and unknown species along pathways of introduction, along with the identification of these organisms in invaded environments. © 2012 The Authors Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Activity in Pediatric Cancer between 2008 and 2014 in the United States: A Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Pooja; Millard, Heather R; Thiel, Elizabeth; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Abraham, Allistair A; Auletta, Jeffery J; Boulad, Farid; Brown, Valerie I; Camitta, Bruce M; Chan, Ka Wah; Chaudhury, Sonali; Cowan, Morton J; Angel-Diaz, Miguel; Gadalla, Shahinaz M; Gale, Robert Peter; Hale, Gregory; Kasow, Kimberly A; Keating, Amy K; Kitko, Carrie L; MacMillan, Margaret L; Olsson, Richard F; Page, Kristin M; Seber, Adriana; Smith, Angela R; Warwick, Anne B; Wirk, Baldeep; Mehta, Parinda A

    2017-08-01

    This Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research report describes the use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in pediatric patients with cancer, 4408 undergoing allogeneic (allo) and3076 undergoing autologous (auto) HSCT in the United States between 2008 and 2014. In both settings, there was a greater proportion of boys (n = 4327; 57%), children reports of transplant practices in the United States. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Limited alpine climatic warming and modeled phenology advancement for three alpine species in the Northeast United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Kenneth D; Davis, Michael L; Weihrauch, Douglas M; Murray, Georgia L D; Rancourt, Kenneth

    2014-09-01

    • Most alpine plants in the Northeast United States are perennial and flower early in the growing season, extending their limited growing season. Concurrently, they risk the loss of reproductive efforts to late frosts. Quantifying long-term trends in northeastern alpine flower phenology and late-spring/early-summer frost risk is limited by a dearth of phenology and climate data, except for Mount Washington, New Hampshire (1916 m a.s.l.).• Logistic phenology models for three northeastern US alpine species (Diapensia lapponica, Carex bigelowii and Vaccinium vitis-idaea) were developed from 4 yr (2008-2011) of phenology and air temperature measurements from 12 plots proximate to Mount Washington's long-term summit meteorological station. Plot-level air temperature, the logistic phenology models, and Mount Washington's climate data were used to hindcast model yearly (1935-2011) floral phenology and frost damage risk for the focal species.• Day of year and air growing degree-days with threshold temperatures of -4°C (D. lapponica and C. bigelowii) and -2°C (V. vitis-idaea) best predicted flowering. Modeled historic flowering dates trended significantly earlier but the 77-yr change was small (1.2-2.1 d) and did not significantly increase early-flowering risk from late-spring/early-summer frost damage.• Modeled trends in phenological advancement and sensitivity for three northeastern alpine species are less pronounced compared with lower elevations in the region, and this small shift in flower timing did not increase risk of frost damage. Potential reasons for limited earlier phenological advancement at higher elevations include a slower warming trend and increased cloud exposure with elevation and/or inadequate chilling requirements. © 2014 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  1. Prevalence and species spectrum of both pulmonary and extrapulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria isolates at a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Umrao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective/background: Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM infection associated with pulmonary and extrapulmonary disease has been increasing globally. Despite an increase in incidence rate of NTM infection, its prevalence, species diversity, and circulation pattern in India is largely unknown. This study sought to investigate the overall burden and diversity of NTM among both pulmonary and extrapulmonary clinical isolates from a Northern Indian population. Methods: The study was conducted in the Department of Microbiology, from January 2013 to December 2015. A total of 4620 clinical samples were collected from patients suspected to have pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Preliminary diagnosis was performed using Ziehl–Neelsen staining followed by liquid culture in BacT/ALERT three-dimensional system. A total of 906 positive cultures obtained were differentiated as either NTM or Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex using a biochemical and MPT64 antigen test. Further identification of NTM species was confirmed with a line probe assay. Results: Out of 906 cultures isolates, 263 (29.0% were confirmed as NTM and 643 (71.0% were identified as Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. A total of 79.4% of the NTM were recovered from pulmonary and 18.2% from extrapulmonary specimens. The diversity of NTM species was high (13 species and predominated by Mycobacterium abscessus (31.3% followed by Mycobacterium fortuitum (22%, Mycobacterium intracellulare (13.6%, Mycobacterium chelonae (9.1%, however, M. abscessus and M. fortuitum were the predominant species in both types of clinical isolates. Men (60.4% and older patients aged greater than 55 years were the predominated risk group for NTM infection. Conclusion: The high prevalence and species diversity of NTM suggests the need for immediate and accurate characterization of NTM for proper treatment and management of patients.

  2. Prevalence and species spectrum of both pulmonary and extrapulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria isolates at a tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umrao, Jyoti; Singh, Dharamveer; Zia, Amreen; Saxena, Swati; Sarsaiya, Surendra; Singh, Shushma; Khatoon, Jahanarah; Dhole, Tapan N

    2016-09-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection associated with pulmonary and extrapulmonary disease has been increasing globally. Despite an increase in incidence rate of NTM infection, its prevalence, species diversity, and circulation pattern in India is largely unknown. This study sought to investigate the overall burden and diversity of NTM among both pulmonary and extrapulmonary clinical isolates from a Northern Indian population. The study was conducted in the Department of Microbiology, from January 2013 to December 2015. A total of 4620 clinical samples were collected from patients suspected to have pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Preliminary diagnosis was performed using Ziehl-Neelsen staining followed by liquid culture in BacT/ALERT three-dimensional system. A total of 906 positive cultures obtained were differentiated as either NTM or Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex using a biochemical and MPT64 antigen test. Further identification of NTM species was confirmed with a line probe assay. Out of 906 cultures isolates, 263 (29.0%) were confirmed as NTM and 643 (71.0%) were identified as Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. A total of 79.4% of the NTM were recovered from pulmonary and 18.2% from extrapulmonary specimens. The diversity of NTM species was high (13 species) and predominated by Mycobacterium abscessus (31.3%) followed by Mycobacterium fortuitum (22%), Mycobacterium intracellulare (13.6%), Mycobacterium chelonae (9.1%), however, M. abscessus and M. fortuitum were the predominant species in both types of clinical isolates. Men (60.4%) and older patients aged greater than 55years were the predominated risk group for NTM infection. The high prevalence and species diversity of NTM suggests the need for immediate and accurate characterization of NTM for proper treatment and management of patients. Copyright © 2016 Asian-African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Electronic-cigarette use by individuals in treatment for substance abuse: A survey of 24 treatment centers in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Gubner, Noah R.; Andrews, K. Blakely; Mohammad-Zadeh, Ana; Lisha, Nadra E.; Guydish, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Prevalence and reasons for using electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) was examined among patients enrolled in 24 substance abuse treatment centers in the United States (N=1,113). Prevalence of e-cigarette use was assessed for the full sample. Bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify characteristics associated with e-cigarette use among current cigarette smokers (the majority of e-cigarette users). Overall 55.5% of the sample reported lifetime use of e-ciga...

  4. Quality of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy in developing countries: a comparison of surgical and oncologic outcomes between a comprehensive cancer center in the United States and a cancer center in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Rene; Nick, Alpa M; Schmeler, Kathleen M; Frumovitz, Michael; Soliman, Pamela T; Buitrago, Carlos A; Borrero, Mauricio; Angel, Gonzalo; Reis, Ricardo Dos; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2012-05-01

    To help determine whether global collaborations for prospective gynecologic surgery trials should include hospitals in developing countries, we compared surgical and oncologic outcomes of patients undergoing laparoscopic radical hysterectomy at a large comprehensive cancer center in the United States and a cancer center in Colombia. Records of the first 50 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic radical hysterectomy at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston (between April 2004 and July 2007) and the first 50 consecutive patients who underwent the same procedure at the Instituto de Cancerología-Clínica las Américas in Medellín (between December 2008 and October 2010) were retrospectively reviewed. Surgical and oncologic outcomes were compared between the 2 groups. There was no significant difference in median patient age (US 41.9 years [range 23-73] vs. Colombia 44.5 years [range 24-75], P=0.09). Patients in Colombia had a lower median body mass index than patients in the US (24.4 kg/m(2) vs. 28.7 kg/m(2), P=0.002). Compared to patients treated in Colombia, patients who underwent surgery in the US had a greater median estimated blood loss (200 mL vs. 79 mL, P<0.001), longer median operative time (328.5 min vs. 235 min, P<0.001), and longer postoperative hospital stay (2 days vs. 1 day, P<0.001). Surgical and oncologic outcomes of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy were not worse at a cancer center in a developing country than at a large comprehensive cancer center in the United States. These results support consideration of developing countries for inclusion in collaborations for prospective surgical studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute Kidney Injury Treated with Dialysis outside the Intensive Care Unit: A Retrospective Observational Single-Center Study.

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    Hannelore Sprenger-Mähr

    Full Text Available The number of patients suffering from acute kidney injury requiring dialysis (AKI-D is increasing. Whereas causes and outcome of AKI-D in the intensive care unit (ICU are described extensively, few data exist about AKI-D patients treated outside the ICU. Aim of this study was to identify the causes of AKI-D, determine in-depth the comorbid conditions and outcome of this particular patient group and identify possibilities for its prevention.We retrospectively studied all AKI-D patients treated outside the ICU in a single nephrology referral center between January 2010 and June 2015. Data on comorbid conditions, renal function and drug therapy prior to AKI-D, and possible causal events were collected. Patients were grouped into those with renal hypoperfusion as the predominant cause of AKI-D (hemodynamic group and those with other causes (non-hemodynamic group.During 66 months 128 patients (57% male, mean age 69.3 years were treated. AKI-D was community-acquired in 70.3%. The most frequent comorbidities were hypertension (62.5%, chronic kidney disease (CKD (58.9%, coronary artery disease (CAD (46.1%, diabetes (35.9% and heart failure (34.1%. Most patients were prescribed diuretics (61.7% and inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RASI (57.8%; 46.1% had a combination of both. In the 88 patients with hemodynamic AKI-D (68.8% the most frequent initiating events were diarrhea (39.8%, infections (17.0% and acute heart failure (13.6%. In the 40 patients with non-hemodynamic AKI-D (31.2% interstitial nephritis (n = 15 was the prominent diagnosis. Patients with hemodynamic AKI-D were older (72.6 vs. 62.1 years, p = 0.001, suffered more often from CKD (68.2% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.003, CAD (54.5% vs. 27.5%, p = 0.004 and diabetes (42.0% vs. 22.5%, p = 0.033, and were more frequently on diuretics (75.0% vs. 32.5%, p<0.001, RASI (67.0% vs. 37.5%, p = 0.002 or their combination (58.0% vs. 20.0%, p<0.001. Twenty-two (17.2% patients died and 27 (21

  6. The United States' national accreditation program for breast centers: a model for excellence in breast disease evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, David P

    2016-06-01

    The evaluation and management of patients with breast disease have historically been disorganized and fragmented, leading to inefficiencies in patient flow and increased anxiety. The NAPBC was founded to address this deficiency and optimize the system. Evidence-based breast center standards were developed by a multinational, multidisciplinary Board and revised after pilot surveys. The Board defined 17 essential components in the continuum of care, available on site or referred. Physician surveyors were trained to conduct triennial site visits to assure compliance with standards. Correction of deficiencies is required within 12 months. Since the first accreditation award in late 2008, the NAPBC has grown rapidly. By the end of 2015, there will be 650 breast centers accredited by the NAPBC, with an additional 50 programs being scheduled for survey. Re-survey for continued accreditation occurs every 3 years. There has been minimal attrition. Survey results from our accredited centers indicate a high level of patient and facility satisfaction. Although only one foreign breast center has been NAPBC-accredited, and two scheduled for survey, the interest level is high. Thirty-two breast centers from 17 countries have requested information. The NAPBC provides an ideal model for facilities to render state of the art evaluation and treatment throughout the continuum of care for patients with breast disease. Accredited centers are afforded internal and external assessment of their performance based on recognized standards that demonstrate a commitment to quality care. The centers attain national recognition and public promotion. Patients, facilities and their providers are the ultimate beneficiaries.

  7. The Mortality Rate of Nosocomial Infection in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Taleghani Educational and Treatment Center, Tabriz, 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Parvin Abbasian; Mariye Mahmoodi Yegane; Mina karimi; Faezeh Ahmadi; khadijeh Pazani; Zohreh Tahmasbi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives : Information about nosocomial infections (NIs) is necessary for both appropriate management and establishment of preventative measures in hospitals. Neonates admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) are at high-risk of developing nosocomial infection. The aim of this study was to determine the mortality rate of nosocomial infections and the distribution of pathogens among newborns who were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit in Taleghani educatio...

  8. Transition to a New Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Positive Effects on Staff Working Environment and How the Physical Environment Facilitates Family-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Johannes; Bäck, Frida; Hed, Zara; Edvardsson, David

    To optimize family-centered care and the staff working environment, the physical care environment should be designed to meet the needs of the infants, their families, and staff. It is important to evaluate the effects of a purpose-built neonatal ward on staff perceptions of job strain, the psychosocial climate, and the appropriateness of the physical environment. This study collected information from staff at a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), before and after the ward was relocated to a new NICU. Effects were measured using the following variables: job strain, person-centered climate and appropriateness-of-the-physical-environment questionnaires. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures generalized estimating equations and factor analysis. After staff began to work in the new NICU, their job strain significantly increased. At the 2-year follow-up, staff stress levels had returned to preintervention levels. Participating staff perceived the purpose-built neonatal ward as being a significantly more appropriate physical environment for family-centered care of the infants and their families. The staff also perceived the psychosocial climate of the new NICU as significantly more person-centered in terms of having a more homey, comfortable, and everyday ambience and thus experienced as being more supportive. An NICU built according to recommended standards optimized the physical care environment for family-centered care and increased the staff working climate.

  9. Promotion of a Functional B Cell Germinal Center Response after Leishmania Species Co-Infection Is Associated with Lesion Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson-Corley, Katherine N.; Boggiatto, Paola M.; Bockenstedt, Marie M.; Petersen, Christine A.; Waldschmidt, Thomas J.; Jones, Douglas E.

    2012-01-01

    Co-infection of C3HeB/FeJ (C3H) mice with both Leishmania major and Leishmania amazonensis leads to a healed footpad lesion, whereas co-infection of C57BL/6 (B6) mice leads to non-healing lesions. This inability to heal corresponds to a deficiency in B cell stimulation of the macrophage-mediated killing of L. amazonensis in vitro and a less robust antibody response. The mechanism that leads to healing of these lesions is not completely known, although our studies implicate the B cell response as having an important effector function in killing L. amazonensis. To understand more completely this disparate clinical outcome to the same infection, we analyzed the draining lymph node germinal center B cell response between co-infected C3H and B6 mice. There were more germinal center B cells, more antibody isotype-switched germinal center B cells, more memory B cells, and more antigen-specific antibody-producing cells in co-infected C3H mice compared to B6 mice as early as 2 weeks postinfection. Interleukin (IL)-21 production and IL-21 receptor expression in both mouse strains, however, were similar at 2 weeks, suggesting that the difference in the anti-Leishmania response in these mouse strains may be due to differences in T follicular cell commitment or intrinsic B cell differences. These data support the idea that functional B cells are important for healing L. amazonensis in this infectious disease model. PMID:22429963

  10. [Species distribution of pathogens and prognostic factors for catheter-related bloodstream infections in intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Yu, Li; Yang, Junhui; Long, Ding; Zhang, Yuanchao; Bu, Xiaofen

    2015-03-10

    To explore the incidence and species distribution of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) in intensive care unit (ICU) at our hospital and analyze the risk factors for CRBSI. Hospitalized patients microbiologically diagnosed as CRBSI were recruited from January 2012 to June 2013. And the clinical data were collected retrospectively and analyzed by software IBM SPSS 19.0. Among 67 patients diagnosed as nosocomial CRBSI, 24 cases (35.8%) died while 43 survived. And a total of 81 strains were detected, including 42 Gram-positive (G⁺) bacteria (51.9%), 36 Gram-negative (G⁻) bacteria (44.4%) and 3 fungi (3.7%).The predominant pathogenic G⁺ and G⁻ bacteria were Staphylococcus epidermidis and Acinetobacter baumannii respectively. With multiple Logistic regressions, age ≥ 65 years, higher acute physiology & chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score and polymicrobial CRBSI were independent predictors of worse outcomes. The recent prevalent pathogens of CRBSI in ICU are S.epidermidis and A.baumannii. Advanced age, disease severity and polymicrobial CRBSI are significant independent risk factor of mortality for CRBSI patients in ICU.

  11. Revision of torrent mites (Parasitengona, Torrenticolidae, Torrenticola of the United States and Canada: 90 descriptions, molecular phylogenetics, and a key to species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ray Fisher

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The descriptive biology of torrent mites (Parasitengona: Torrenticolidae: Torrenticola of North America (north of Mexico is investigated using integrative methods. Material examined includes approximately 2,300 specimens from nearly 500 localities across the United States and Canada, and a few collections in Mexico and Central America. Species hypotheses are derived from a phylogenetic analysis of the barcoding region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI for 476 specimens and supported with morphology and biogeography. Relationships between species are examined with a combined analysis of COI and two expansion regions (D2–3 of the large ribosomal subunit (28S rDNA for 57 specimens. All previously described species from the US and Canada are examined. Our results indicate the need to synonymize four species: T. mercedensis (Marshall, 1943 is a junior synonym of T. sierrensis (Marshall, 1943; T. rectiforma Habeeb, 1974 is a junior synonym of T. ellipsoidalis (Marshall, 1943; T. neoconnexa Habeeb, 1957 is a junior synonym of T. magnexa Habeeb, 1955; and T. esbelta Cramer, 1992 is a junior synonym of T. boettgeri KO Viets, 1977. We describe 66 new species and re-describe all previously described regional species. Our findings indicate that total diversity of Torrenticola in the United States and Canada comprises 90 species, 57 known from the east and 33 from the west. We organize these species into four species complexes that include 13 identification groups. An additional 13 species do not fit within an identification group. The southern Appalachians are suspected to contain the highest concentration of remaining undescribed diversity. A key is provided to all known species in the US and Canada.

  12. Species as the basic units in evolution and biodiversity: How to define and delimit larger foraminiferal species in respect to paleogeography and biostratigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenegger, J.

    2012-04-01

    Many concepts have been developed for the base of taxonomy, the biological species. Still there is confusion in these concepts between the 'substance' of a species, e.g. which factors makes a species (definition) and how to detect or recognize a species (delimitation). Concepts like morphospecies and chronospecies (= palaeospecies) that are mainly used for fossil specimens, and all methods based on molecular genetic methods belong to the group of concepts for delimitating species. The species can be defined as a pool of contemporarily interconnected genotypes. This pool can be homogeneous or be divided into geographically separated sub-pools. Interconnectivity within such pools is given by the potential to transfer complete genomes or exchange genome parts through asexual or sexual reproduction. A change in genotype frequencies over successive generations is caused by preferred or restricted genome transfer due to evolutionary factors. After establishment of new adaptive zones, evolutionary factors leads to species differentiation. Depending on number, duration of the onset and the further role of the new adaptive zones (stable or continuously changing), various methods of speciation - grouped into split off and split up speciation - can be established. True speciation is characterized by a complete loss of the potential to transfer genomes between the new species without the possibility to fuse (hybridise) when their adaptive zones come in contact or overlap. In case of a broad geographical distribution, the area might be differentiated into several adaptive zones, where transferability between subgroups is restricted or even lost. Temporarily disconnected adaptive zones can again become combined, reinstalling transferability between sub-pools of genotypes. Genotypically and morphologically different subgroups preserving transferability are thus not species; taxonomically, these structurally distinct subgroups can be treated as subspecies. Due to this uncertainty

  13. Incidence of pathogens infections in a Romanian Intensive Care Unit and sensitivity to antibiotics. A prospective single center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedreag Ovidiu Horea

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nosocomial infections represent one of the biggest challenges faced by clinicians in the intensive care unit (ICU and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Infections in ICU are most often very serious and represent often the cause of hospitalization in intensive care clinics.

  14. Invasive wisteria in the Southeastern United StateS: genetic diversity, hybridization and the role of urban centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer L. Trusty; Leslie R. Goertzen; Wayne C. Zipperer; B Graeme Lockaby

    2007-01-01

    The increasing numbers and negative impacts of invasive species have prompted research on the relationship between human activities and the success of invasive horticultural plants. In this study, we use population genetic relationships to model the escape of a common garden vine, exotic Wisteria, into natural habitats. Urban and naturalized Wisteria populations in...

  15. Timing of femoral shaft fracture fixation following major trauma: A retrospective cohort study of United States trauma centers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Byrne

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Femoral shaft fractures are common in major trauma. Early definitive fixation, within 24 hours, is feasible in most patients and is associated with improved outcomes. Nonetheless, variability might exist between trauma centers in timeliness of fixation. Such variability could impact outcomes and would therefore represent a target for quality improvement. We evaluated variability in delayed fixation (≥24 hours between trauma centers participating in the American College of Surgeons (ACS Trauma Quality Improvement Program (TQIP and measured the resultant association with important clinical outcomes at the hospital level.A retrospective cohort study was performed using data derived from the ACS TQIP database. Adults with severe injury who underwent definitive fixation of a femoral shaft fracture at a level I or II trauma center participating in ACS TQIP (2012-2015 were included. Patient baseline and injury characteristics that might affect timing of fixation were considered. A hierarchical logistic regression model was used to identify predictors of delayed fixation. Hospital variability in delayed fixation was measured using 2 approaches. First, the random effects output of the hierarchical model was used to identify outlier hospitals where the odds of delayed fixation were significantly higher or lower than average. Second, the median odds ratio (MOR was calculated to quantify heterogeneity in delayed fixation between hospitals. Finally, complications (pulmonary embolism, deep vein thrombosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, pneumonia, decubitus ulcer, and death and hospital length of stay were compared across quartiles of risk-adjusted delayed fixation. We identified 17,993 patients who underwent definitive fixation at 216 trauma centers. The median injury severity score (ISS was 13 (interquartile range [IQR] 9-22. Median time to fixation was 15 hours (IQR 7-24 hours and delayed fixation was performed in 26% of patients. After adjusting

  16. Assessing the impact of palliative care in the intensive care unit through the lens of patient-centered outcomes research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslakson, Rebecca A; Bridges, John F P

    2013-10-01

    Professional organizations, consensus groups, and stakeholders are calling for better palliative care in acute care settings, particularly in ICUs. Our ability to deliver that care is dependent on the outcomes associated with palliative care in the ICU. This review provides a conceptual framework for these outcomes, discusses current and future challenges for work in this field, and advocates for better use of patient-centered outcomes in future studies. Previous studies of palliative care interventions in the ICU have used heterogeneous outcomes, conceptualized as: systems-related, content-related, clinician-related, or patient/family-related. Few outcomes were used in multiple studies and many studies had insufficient power and questionable generalizability and impact. Although nearly all previous studies incorporated family-related outcomes, not one incorporated patient-centered outcomes, such as health-related quality of life, patient symptom score, or consensus between patient goals and care provided. Delivery of palliative care in the ICU will be hampered until studies incorporate outcomes that are: responsive to and reflective of variations in care, and multi-faceted (with patient-centered components) to reflect the multi-dimensional nature of palliative care and the varied needs of different stakeholders.

  17. Surgical trends in the correction of female stress urinary incontinence in academic centers within the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Alexander B; Rothschild, Jennifer; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Gonzalez, Rafael; Kurzrock, Eric A

    2017-02-01

    There is a lack of data describing the current state of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) procedures in academic centers. Urologists, gynecologists, and urogynecologists perform these operations, but the relative volume each group accounts for is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the distribution of cases in academic centers between specialties and associated patient characteristics. A hospital consortium database was used to identify patients treated surgically for SUI between 2009 and 2014. Patient and surgeon variables were evaluated. Patient variables (age, region, insurance, race) and surgeon volume were analyzed. Sub-analysis was conducted to determine concomitant prolapse repairs. Of the 50,315 stress urinary incontinence procedures performed, 22% were performed by urologists. Overall volume dropped 39% and mean surgeon volumes for all three groups decreased with time. Average median volume for urogynecologists (29/year) differed from both urologists (3/year) and non-urogynecologists (2/year). There was a significant difference in rate of concomitant prolapse repairs performed by urogynecologists (56%), gynecologists (54%), and urologists (26%). These data portray the changing pattern of SUI procedure practice in academic centers. Academic urologists are performing less than 25% of SUI procedures, with an overall decline in number of procedures across all specialties. Urogynecologists and gynecologists are performing a significantly higher proportion of concomitant prolapse repairs. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:394-398, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Loss of biodiversity in a conservation unit of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest: the effect of introducing non-native fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoso-Moura, E N; Oporto, L T; Maia-Barbosa, P M; Barbosa, F A R

    2016-02-01

    The introduction of species has become an important problem for biodiversity and natural ecosystem conservation. The lake system of the middle Rio Doce (MG, Brazil) comprises c. 200 lakes at various conservation states, of which 50 are located within the Rio Doce State Park (PERD). Previous studies had verified several of these lakes suffered non-native fishes introductions and the presence of these species needs for the implementation of actions aiming at not only their control but also the preservation of the native species. This study discusses the effects of non-native fish species in the largest conservation unit of Atlantic Forest in Minas Gerais, southeast of Brazil, using data from 1983 to 2010 distributed as follow: data prior to 2006 were obtained from previous studies, and data from September 2006 to July 2010 were obtained in Lake Carioca at four sampling stations using gillnets, seine nets and sieve. A total of 17 fish species was collected (2006-2010) of which five were introduced species. Among the small to medium size native species (30 to 2000 mm standard length) seven had disappeared, two are new records and one was recaptured. The non-native species Cichla kelberi (peacock bass) and Pygocentrus nattereri (red piranha) are within the most abundant captured species. Integrated with other actions, such as those preventing new introductions, a selective fishing schedule is proposed as an alternative approach to improve the conservation management actions and the local and regional biodiversity maintenance.

  19. The Importance of Interspecific Interactions on the Present Range of the Invasive Mosquito Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) and Persistence of Resident Container Species in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fader, Joseph E

    2016-09-01

    Aedes albopictus (Skuse) established in the United States over 30 yr ago and quickly spread throughout the entire eastern half of the country. It has recently spread into western regions and projected climate change scenarios suggest continued expansion to the west and north. Aedes albopictus has had major impacts on, and been impacted by, a diverse array of resident mosquito species. Laying eggs at the edges of small, water-holding containers, hatched larvae develop within these containers feeding on detritus-based resources. Under limited resource conditions, Ae. albopictus has been shown to be a superior competitor to essentially all native and resident species in the United States. Adult males also mate interspecifically with at least one resident species with significant negative impacts on reproductive output for susceptible females. Despite these strong interference effects on sympatric species, competitor outcomes have been highly variable, ranging from outright local exclusion by Ae. albopictus, to apparent exclusion of Ae. albopictus in the presence of the same species. Context-dependent mechanisms that alter the relative strengths of inter- and intraspecific competition, as well as rapid evolution of satyrization-resistant females, may help explain these patterns of variable coexistence. Although there is a large body of research on interspecific interactions of Ae. albopictus in the United States, there remain substantial gaps in our understanding of the most important species interactions. Addressing these gaps is important in predicting the future distribution of this species and understanding consequences for resident species, including humans, that interact with this highly invasive mosquito. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. WellStar Paulding Hospital intensive care unit case study: achieving a research-based, patient-centered design using a collaborative process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Georgeann B; Hogue, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the processes and tools used by WellStar Paulding Hospital to plan and design a new intensive care unit (ICU) as part of a 108-bed replacement hospital on a new site. Seeking to create a culture of safety centered around patient care, quality, and efficiency, the team used multiple external resources to increase their effectiveness as participants in the design process and to ensure that the new ICU achieves the functional performance goals identified at the beginning of planning and design. Specific focus on evidence-based design was assisted through participation in the Center for Health Design's Pebble Project process as well as the Joint Commission International Safe Health Design Learning Academy Pilot Program.

  1. Putting the Family Back in the Center: A Teach-Back Protocol to Improve Communication During Rounds in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogue, Terri L; Mohr, Lynn

    2017-06-01

    Patient- and family-centered care is endorsed by leading health care organizations. To incorporate the family in interdisciplinary rounds in the pediatric intensive care unit, it is necessary to prepare the family to be an integral member of the child's health care team. When the family is part of the health care team, interdisciplinary rounds ensure that the family understands the process of interdisciplinary rounds and that it is an integral part of the discussion. An evidence-based protocol to provide understanding and support to families related to interdisciplinary rounds has significant impact on satisfaction, trust, and patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation and characterization of informal caregivers in patients admitted to Intensive Care Units of two Portuguese centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Miguel Graça Henriques

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aging of societies is an incontestable fact and Portugal is no exception. Although among the youngest countries of the European Union (in 1996, the aging index was 86 elderly for every 100 young people, while the European Union in the same proportion was 91 to 100, it is estimated that the aging population undergoes a progressive increase. The age structure is growing older, having low levels of fertility and mortality. Methods: This research aims to identify the sociodemographic characteristics of informal caregivers and users admitted to the Continuous Care Units of Entroncamento city, and Ourém city, Portugal; assess the level of dependency of clients admitted and determine the level of subjective burden, caregiver satisfaction and impact of care on informal caregivers of clients admitted to the Continuous Care Units of Entroncamento city, and Ourém city, Portugal. As research questions are: What are the sociodemographic characteristics of informal caregivers and users admitted to the Continuous Care Units of Entroncamento city, and Ourém city, Portugal; What is the level of dependency of clients admitted and What is the level of subjective burden, caregiver satisfaction and impact of care on informal caregivers of clients admitted to the Continuous Care Units of Entroncamento city, and Ourém city, Portugal. We used a descriptive correlational methodology, with a non-probability convenience sample of 32 informal caregivers and respective dependents admitted to the Continuing Care Unit. Demographic data were collected using a questionnaire. It was also applied to the Caregiver Assessment Scale, to measure the levels of subjective burden, caregiver satisfaction and impact of care on informal caregivers, and the Barthel Index to determine the functional dependence of the dependent institutionalized. Complex hypotheses have also been identified, non-directional, namely: Is there a statistically significant correlation

  3. Right place, wrong species: a 20-year review of rabies virus cross species transmission among terrestrial mammals in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M Wallace

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In the continental US, four terrestrial mammalian species are reservoirs for seven antigenic rabies virus variants. Cross species transmission (CST occurs when a rabies virus variant causes disease in non-reservoir species. METHODS: This study analyzed national surveillance data for rabies in terrestrial mammals. The CST rate was defined as: number of rabid non-reservoir animals/number of rabid reservoir animals. CST rates were analyzed for trend. Clusters of high CST rate counties were evaluated using space-time scanning statistics. RESULTS: The number of counties reporting a raccoon variant CST rate >1.0 increased from 75 in 1992 to 187 in 2011; counties with skunk variant CST rates >1.0 remained unchanged during the same period. As of 2011, for every rabid raccoon reported within the raccoon variant region, there were 0.73 cases of this variant reported in non-reservoir animals. Skunks were the most common non-reservoir animal reported with the raccoon rabies variant. Domestic animals were the most common non-reservoir animal diagnosed with a skunk rabies virus variant (n = 1,601. Cross species transmission rates increased fastest among domestic animals. CONCLUSIONS: Cross species transmission of rabies virus variants into non-reservoir animals increases the risk of human exposures and threatens current advances toward rabies control. Cross species transmission in raccoon rabies enzootic regions increased dramatically during the study period. Pet owners should vaccinate their dogs and cats to ensure against CST, particularly in regions with active foci of rabies circulation. Clusters of high CST activity represent areas for further study to better understand interspecies disease transmission dynamics. Each CST event has the potential to result in a rabies virus adapted for sustained transmission in a new species; therefore further understanding of the dynamics of CST may help in early detection or prevention of the emergence

  4. The structure of a ferrous heme-nitro species in the binuclear heme a3/CuB center of ba3-cytochrome c oxidase as determined by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loullis, Andreas; Noor, Mohamed Radzi; Soulimane, Tewfik; Pinakoulaki, Eftychia

    2015-01-01

    Members of the cytochrome c oxidase family exhibit nitrite reductase activity. In this work, we have characterized a ferrous heme a3-nitro species in ba3-oxidase by resonance Raman spectroscopy. This provides the first evidence for the structure of a nitrite-bound species in the binuclear heme/copper center of cytochrome c oxidases.

  5. SU-E-P-45: An Analytical Formula for Deriving Mechanical Iso-Center of Rotational Gantry Treatment Unit Rotational Gantry Treatment Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, X; Bues, M [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present an analytical formula for deriving mechanical isocenter (MIC) of a rotational gantry treatment unit. The input data to the formula is obtained by a custom-made device. The formula has been implemented and used in an operational proton therapy facility since 2005. Methods: The custom made device consisted of 3 mutually perpendicular dial indicators and 5 clinometers, to obtain displacement data and gantry angle data simultaneously. During measurement, a steel sphere was affixed to the patient couch, and the device was attached to the snout rotating with the gantry. The displacement data and angle data were obtained simultaneously at angular increments of less than 1 degree. The analytical formula took the displacement and angle as input and derived the positions of dial indicator tips (DIT) position in room-fixed coordinate system. The formula derivation presupposes trigonometry and 3-dimentional coordinate transformations. Due to the symmetry properties of the defining equations, the DIT position can be solved for analytically without using mathematical approximations. We define the mean of all points in the DIT trajectory as the MIC. The formula was implemented in computer code, which has been employed during acceptance test, commissioning, as well as routine QA practice in an operational proton facility since 2005. Results: It took one minute for the custom-made device to acquire the measurement data for a full gantry rotation. The DIT trajectory and MIS are instantaneously available after the measurement. The MIC Result agrees well with vendor’s Result, which came from a different measurement setup, as well as different data analysis algorithm. Conclusion: An analytical formula for deriving mechanical isocenter was developed and validated. The formula is considered to be absolutely accurate mathematically. Be analyzing measured data of radial displacements as function of gantry angle, the formula calculates the MI position in room

  6. Recommendations for using fluoride to prevent and control dental caries in the United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-17

    Widespread use of fluoride has been a major factor in the decline in the prevalence and severity of dental caries (i.e., tooth decay) in the United States and other economically developed countries. When used appropriately, fluoride is both safe and effective in preventing and controlling dental caries. All U.S. residents are likely exposed to some degree to fluoride, which is available from multiple sources. Both health-care professionals and the public have sought guidance on selecting the best way to provide and receive fluoride. During the late 1990s, CDC convened a work group to develop recommendations for using fluoride to prevent and control dental caries in the United States. This report includes these recommendations, as well as a) critical analysis of the scientific evidence regarding the efficacy and effectiveness of fluoride modalities in preventing and controlling dental caries, b) ordinal grading of the quality of the evidence, and c) assessment of the strength of each recommendation. Because frequent exposure to small amounts of fluoride each day will best reduce the risk for dental caries in all age groups, the work group recommends that all persons drink water with an optimal fluoride concentration and brush their teeth twice daily with fluoride toothpaste. For persons at high risk for dental caries, additional fluoride measures might be needed. Measured use of fluoride modalities is particularly appropriate during the time of anterior tooth enamel development (i.e., age <6 years). The recommendations in this report guide dental and other health-care providers, public health officials, policy makers, and the public in the use of fluoride to achieve maximum protection against dental caries while using resources efficiently and reducing the likelihood of enamel fluorosis. The recommendations address public health and professional practice, self-care, consumer product industries and health agencies, and further research. Adoption of these

  7. Rescue therapy in adult and pediatric patients with pH1N1 influenza infection: a tertiary center intensive care unit experience from April to October 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norfolk, Stephanie G; Hollingsworth, Caroline L; Wolfe, Cameron R; Govert, Joseph A; Que, Loretta G; Cheifetz, Ira M; Hollingsworth, John W

    2010-11-01

    Severe respiratory failure is a well-recognized complication of pH1N1 influenza infection. Limited data regarding the efficacy of rescue therapies, including high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, have been previously reported in the setting of pH1N1 influenza infection in the United States. Retrospective, single-center cohort study. Pediatric, cardiac, surgical, and medical intensive care units in a single tertiary care center in the United States. One hundred twenty-seven consecutive patients with confirmed influenza A infection requiring hospitalization between April 1, 2009, and October 31, 2009. Electronic medical records were reviewed for demographic and clinical data. The number of intensive care unit admissions appears inversely related to age with 39% of these admissions intensive care unit care was 10.0 days (4.0-24.0), and median duration of mechanical ventilation was 8.0 days (0.0-23.5). Rescue therapy (high-frequency oscillatory ventilation or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation) was used in 36% (12 of 33) of intensive care unit patients. The severity of respiratory impairment was determined by Pao²/Fio² ratio and oxygenation index. High-frequency oscillatory ventilation at 24 hrs resulted in improvements in median Pao²/Fio² ratio (71 [58-93] vs. 145 [126-185]; p parameters of oxygenation at both 2 hrs and 24 hrs after initiation of therapy. Despite the severity of oxygenation impairment, overall survival for both rescue therapies was 75% (nine of 12), 80% (four of five) for high-frequency oscillatory ventilation alone, and 71% (five of seven) for high-frequency oscillatory ventilation + extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. In critically ill adult and pediatric patients with pH1N1 infection and severe lung injury, the use of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation can result in significant improvements in Pao²/Fio² ratio, oxygenation index, and Fio². However, the

  8. Geographic Information System (GIS) representation of historical seagrass coverage in Perdido Bay from United States Geological Survey/National Wetlands Research Center (USGS/NWRC), 1979 (NODC Accession 0000605)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Historical seagrass coverage in Perdido Bay 1979 from United States Geological Survey/National Wetlands Research Center (USGS/NWRC).

  9. Nosocomial bloodstream infection in a neonatal intensive care unit of a medical center: a three-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ya-Chun; Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Wang, Jen-Hsien; Lin, Hsiao-Chuan; Lin, Hung-Chih; Su, Bai-Horng; Chiu, Hsiu-Hui

    2002-09-01

    Bloodstream infections are the most frequent nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units. This retrospective study surveyed the epidemiologic characteristics of nosocomial bloodstream infections which occurred in the neonatal intensive care unit from January 1, 1997 to December 31, 1999. The overall infection patient rate was 5.5% in the 3-year period, and the overall infection patient-day rate was 4.4 per 1000 patient-days. Low birth weight was a risk factor for bloodstream infections. The rate of infection for neonates with birth weight below 1000 g ranged from 36.6% to 45.8% (1997: 36.6%; 1998: 45.8% and 1999: 38.9%). The most common pathogens causing nosocomial bloodstream infection were: Staphylococcus aureus (18.5%) (with 92% oxacillin-resistant), Acinectobacter baumannii (16.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (11.9%), Escherichia coli (9.6%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8.1%). The mortality due to nosocomial bloodstream infection was highest among gram-negative bacteria, especially with P. aeruginosa (45.5%). Therefore, surveillance of nosocomial bloodstream infection and successful strategies to decrease nosocomial bloodstream infection, such as infection control and optimal antibiotic use, are warranted.

  10. A decade of public health genomics in the United States: centers for disease control and prevention 1997-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, M J; Bowen, S; Bradley, L A; Coates, R; Dowling, N F; Gwinn, M; Kolor, K; Moore, C A; St Pierre, J; Valdez, R; Yoon, P W

    2009-01-01

    Since 1997, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has collaborated with numerous partners to develop and chart the course of the multidisciplinary field of public health genomics in the USA and globally. During this period, CDC has developed major initiatives for the appropriate integration of genomics into public health research, policy and programs. In this paper, we review briefly the progress in public health genomics made over the past decade in the USA, including population research, the human genome epidemiology network (HuGENet(TM)), the evaluation of genomic applications in practice and prevention (EGAPP), the family history public health initiative, and efforts in building the public health genomics capacity. We also outline a vision for public health genomics for the next decade. Copyright © 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Variability of Post-Cardiac Arrest Care Practices Among Cardiac Arrest Centers: United States and South Korean Dual Network Survey of Emergency Physician Research Principal Investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppler, Patrick J; Sawyer, Kelly N; Youn, Chun Song; Choi, Seung Pill; Park, Kyu Nam; Kim, Young-Min; Reynolds, Joshua C; Gaieski, David F; Lee, Byung Kook; Oh, Joo Suk; Kim, Won Young; Moon, Hyung Jun; Abella, Benjamin S; Elmer, Jonathan; Callaway, Clifton W; Rittenberger, Jon C

    2017-03-01

    There is little consensus regarding many post-cardiac arrest care parameters. Variability in such practices could confound the results and generalizability of post-arrest care research. We sought to characterize the variability in post-cardiac arrest care practice in Korea and the United States. A 54-question survey was sent to investigators participating in one of two research groups in South Korea (Korean Hypothermia Network [KORHN]) and the United States (National Post-Arrest Research Consortium [NPARC]). Single investigators from each site were surveyed (N = 40). Participants answered questions based on local institutional protocols and practice. We calculated descriptive statistics for all variables. Forty surveys were completed during the study period with 30 having greater than 50% of questions completed (75% response rate; 24 KORHN and 6 NPARC). Most centers target either 33°C (N = 16) or vary the target based on patient characteristics (N = 13). Both bolus and continuous infusion dosing of sedation are employed. No single indication was unanimous for cardiac catheterization. Only six investigators reported having an institutional protocol for withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy (WLST). US patients with poor neurological prognosis tended to have WLST with subsequent expiration (N = 5), whereas Korean patients are transferred to a secondary care facility (N = 19). Both electroencephalography modality and duration vary between institutions. Serum biomarkers are commonly employed by Korean, but not US centers. We found significant variability in post-cardiac arrest care practices among US and Korean medical centers. These practice variations must be taken into account in future studies of post-arrest care.

  12. Characterization of infections with extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella species at a major military medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Michael; Demons, Samandra; Murray, Clinton; Mahlen, Steven; Schofield, Christina

    2014-07-01

    This study represents a review of the incidence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella species causing infections over a 7-year period and provides a comparison of patient demographics, comorbidities, and ESBL subtypes between community-associated (CA) versus health care-associated (HA) infections. All ESBL-producing bacterial isolates between 2003 and May 2011 at Madigan Army Medical Center were evaluated and reviewed. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ESBL subtypes TEM, SHV, and CTX-M was performed. Demographics and comorbidities associated with infection, ESBL subtype, and antibiotic susceptibility were compared for HA and CA infection. A total of 122 isolates were included in the analysis. From 2005 to 2010, incidence of ESBLs in E. coli increased from 0.13% to 1.0%, and incidence in Klebsiella species rose from 1.0% to 2.55%. CA infections were more likely in females (p < 0.01), age <60 (p < 0.01), urinary source (p < 0.01), and recurrent urinary tract infections (p = 0.02). 42% of CA infections had no associated comorbidity. CTX-M was the predominant subtype in CA infections. Coresistance was high in both HA and CA infection. These data emphasize the need for ongoing monitoring of local microbial epidemiologic trends as changes in prescribing practices may become necessary if resistance continues to spread. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  13. Critical analysis of the waste management performance of two uranium production units in Brazil--part II: Caetite production center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Horst Monken; Gomiero, Luiz Alberto; Peres, Valeska; Franklin, Mariza Ramalho; Simões Filho, F Fernando Lamego

    2008-09-01

    This paper discusses the environmental waste management of the Heap-Leach Uranium Production Facility of Caetité located in a semi-arid region in Brazil. A comparison is made with the first uranium production site of the country located in Poços de Caldas. It is demonstrated that differences in the operational process along with different environmental conditions can lead to different impacts. In the present case groundwater is the potential most sensitive environmental medium despite the well-established consensus in the literature that radon and aerosol emissions may turn-out to be the most relevant environmental aspects of an installation located at this type of region. Most of the (226)Ra content in the ore remains in the leached ore that is deposited with the waste rock. A lack in appropriate prediction of the hydrological balance has been causing unanticipated emissions of liquid effluents into the environment. Chemical treatment of this effluent may be needed. Contamination of groundwater in the short term by the waste ponds is not to be expected but it can be a relevant issue in the long term. As a consequence, careful closure schemes will need to be put in place. Finally, the overall costs with remediation in the Caetité production center are lower than those observed at the Poços de Caldas mining site.

  14. Notes from the field: calls to poison centers for exposures to electronic cigarettes--United States, September 2010-February 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatham-Stephens, Kevin; Law, Royal; Taylor, Ethel; Melstrom, Paul; Bunnell, Rebecca; Wang, Baoguang; Apelberg, Benjamin; Schier, Joshua G

    2014-04-04

    Electronic nicotine delivery devices such as electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are battery-powered devices that deliver nicotine, flavorings (e.g., fruit, mint, and chocolate), and other chemicals via an inhaled aerosol. E-cigarettes that are marketed without a therapeutic claim by the product manufacturer are currently not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In many states, there are no restrictions on the sale of e-cigarettes to minors. Although e-cigarette use is increasing among U.S. adolescents and adults, its overall impact on public health remains unclear. One area of concern is the potential of e-cigarettes to cause acute nicotine toxicity. To assess the frequency of exposures to e-cigarettes and characterize the reported adverse health effects associated with e-cigarettes, CDC analyzed data on calls to U.S. poison centers (PCs) about human exposures to e-cigarettes (exposure calls) for the period September 2010 (when new, unique codes were added specifically for capturing e-cigarette calls) through February 2014. To provide a comparison to a conventional product with known toxicity, the number and characteristics of e-cigarette exposure calls were compared with those of conventional tobacco cigarette exposure calls.

  15. The Immunization Coverage of Afghan Children at the Health Centers Supported by the United Nation Higher Commission in Kerman, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizallah Dehghan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Immunization is one of the most important health programs in first level prevention and is also one of the most cost-effective prevention programs in the entire world. This study evaluates the situation of immunization in fewer than one year old Afghan refugee children in Kerman, Iran. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Data was extracted from the records of the health centers supported by the higher commission of refuges in Kerman. The BCG, polio 0, DTP 3, polio 3, Hepatitis B 3 and MMR 1 was calculated and compared with the vaccine coverage in Iran and Afghanistan. Stata 11 and Excel 2007 and the chi-square statistics were used for the analysis. Results: The coverage of all BCG, Polio 0, DTP 3, Polio 3, Hepatitis B 3 and MMR 1 vaccines in the Afghan immigrants residing in Kerman between 2010 and 2012 was more than 95%. This coverage was not significantly different from the vaccine coverage of Iranian children, but was significantly higher than the vaccine coverage of children residing in Afghanistan. Conclusion: The vaccine coverage of Afghan children residing in Kerman is similar to Iranian children and is high and satisfactory. These results show part of The Islamic Republic of Iran’s commitment for providing health requirements for Afghan refugees residing in Iran.

  16. Dynamic genetic conservation in the presence of invasive insect and pathogen threats to forest tree species of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.L. Koch; R.A. Sniezko

    2017-01-01

    Ex-situ genetic conservation focused on collection and storage of seed can play an important role in conserving the genetic diversity of species under grave threat by biotic organisms or a changing climate. However, ex-situ genetic conservation is primarily a static activity and does not allow for evolution of the species under a continuing,...

  17. Osmia species (Hymenoptera, Megachilidae) from the southeastern United States with modified facial hairs: taxonomy, host plants, and conservation status

    Science.gov (United States)

    We describe females and males of Osmia (Melanosmia) calaminthae, new species, an apparent floral specialist on Calamintha ashei (Lamiaceae). Females of O. calaminthae have short, erect, simple facial hairs. The species is currently only known from sandy scrub at a number of sites in the southern La...

  18. A review of 29 incidents involving 4-aminopyridine in non-target species reported to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Mary Kay; Khan, Safdar

    2013-12-01

    4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) is an avicide used in products that are approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to control populations of various birds. Pharmaceutical 4-AP is also used in humans to treat neural and muscular dysfunctions associated with multiple sclerosis. Although strict restrictions for its use are in place, exposures to 4-AP bait by non-target species still occur. Twenty-nine exposures of 4-AP bait involving non-target species were identified and retrieved from the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center medical record database. Canines were the most commonly exposed (86 %) species followed by felines (10 %). The highest frequency of exposures was reported from Colorado (22 %). Most commonly reported clinical signs in canines were tremors, hypersalivation, seizures, tachycardia, and ataxia. The onset time of signs ranged from 5 to 300 min with an average of 89 min. Clinical signs lasted from 15 to 84 h with an average of 37 h. Patient outcome was known in six cases; one dog died 4 h after the exposure and five made full recovery with supportive care. Treatment of five surviving patients included administration of activated charcoal, use of anticonvulsants and muscle relaxants like diazepam and methocarbamol, and intravenous fluids. Diagnosis of 4-AP toxicosis can be supported by testing the gastric contents of the exposed patient. Due to the rapid absorption, samples need to be collected and frozen/chilled promptly. For successful patient outcome, treatment must be implemented quickly after an exposure.

  19. Predicting invasive fungal disease due to Candida species in non-neutropenic, critically ill, adult patients in United Kingdom critical care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, Jason; Allen, Elizabeth J; Patel, Krishna; Muskett, Hannah; Harvey, Sheila E; Edgeworth, Jonathan; Kibbler, Christopher C; Barnes, Rosemary A; Biswas, Sharmistha; Soni, Neil; Rowan, Kathryn M; Harrison, David A

    2016-09-09

    Given the predominance of invasive fungal disease (IFD) amongst the non-immunocompromised adult critically ill population, the potential benefit of antifungal prophylaxis and the lack of generalisable tools to identify high risk patients, the aim of the current study was to describe the epidemiology of IFD in UK critical care units, and to develop and validate a clinical risk prediction tool to identify non-neutropenic, critically ill adult patients at high risk of IFD who would benefit from antifungal prophylaxis. Data on risk factors for, and outcomes from, IFD were collected for consecutive admissions to adult, general critical care units in the UK participating in the Fungal Infection Risk Evaluation (FIRE) Study. Three risk prediction models were developed to model the risk of subsequent Candida IFD based on information available at three time points: admission to the critical care unit, at the end of 24 h and at the end of calendar day 3 of the critical care unit stay. The final model at each time point was evaluated in the three external validation samples. Between July 2009 and April 2011, 60,778 admissions from 96 critical care units were recruited. In total, 359 admissions (0.6 %) were admitted with, or developed, Candida IFD (66 % Candida albicans). At the rate of candidaemia of 3.3 per 1000 admissions, blood was the most common Candida IFD infection site. Of the initial 46 potential variables, the final admission model and the 24-h model both contained seven variables while the end of calendar day 3 model contained five variables. The end of calendar day 3 model performed the best with a c index of 0.709 in the full validation sample. Incidence of Candida IFD in UK critical care units in this study was consistent with reports from other European epidemiological studies, but lower than that suggested by previous hospital-wide surveillance in the UK during the 1990s. Risk modeling using classical statistical methods produced relatively simple risk

  20. Influence of echinocandin administration on hemodynamic parameters in medical intensive care unit patients: a single center prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmer, Tobias; Schnappauf, Christopher; Messer, Marlena; Rasch, Sebastian; Fekecs, Lisa; Beitz, Analena; Eser, Stefan; Schmid, Roland M; Huber, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    Fungal infections present a constant risk to critically ill and immunocompromised patients. Therefore, treatment guidelines recommend echinocandins as first-line antifungals in critically ill patients to improve patient outcomes. Echinocandins are usually well tolerated; nevertheless, rare adverse events can occur. There are reports of temporary deterioration of hemodynamic parameters during loading doses, especially in critically ill patients. The objective of this study is to analyze the hemodynamic changes during administration of the echinocandin antifungals, caspofungin and anidulafungin, in medical intensive care unit patients. A prospective study in medical ICU patients receiving echinocandins was monitored using single-indicator transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTD). TPTD measurements were performed immediately before, directly after, and 4 h after echinocandins on two following days. Mean arterial pressure and also diastolic blood pressure showed significant changes (p parameters as well as the TPTD-derived cardiac function parameters did not significantly change after echinocandin application at all. In patients with the need for norepinephrine therapy, the vasopressor dose was not statistically significantly altered. To conclude, administration of echinocandins in this observed study population is safe, even in severely critically ill patients if application rules of these agents are followed. However, adverse effects could be observed and practitioners should be cognizant of these effects. These observations can be optimized by high-level assessments, such as the pulse contour cardiac output monitoring, and clinicians should continue to be vigilant with cardiac monitoring of patients receiving echinocandin antifungals.

  1. Defining the Risk of Zika and Chikungunya Virus Transmission in Human Population Centers of the Eastern United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie A Manore

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent spread of mosquito-transmitted viruses and associated disease to the Americas motivates a new, data-driven evaluation of risk in temperate population centers. Temperate regions are generally expected to pose low risk for significant mosquito-borne disease; however, the spread of the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus across densely populated urban areas has established a new landscape of risk. We use a model informed by field data to assess the conditions likely to facilitate local transmission of chikungunya and Zika viruses from an infected traveler to Ae. albopictus and then to other humans in USA cities with variable human densities and seasonality. Mosquito-borne disease occurs when specific combinations of conditions maximize virus-to-mosquito and mosquito-to-human contact rates. We develop a mathematical model that captures the epidemiology and is informed by current data on vector ecology from urban sites. The model demonstrates that under specific but realistic conditions, fifty-percent of introductions by infectious travelers to a high human, high mosquito density city could initiate local transmission and 10% of the introductions could result in 100 or more people infected. Despite the propensity for Ae. albopictus to bite non-human vertebrates, we also demonstrate that local virus transmission and human outbreaks may occur when vectors feed from humans even just 40% of the time. Inclusion of human behavioral changes and mitigations were not incorporated into the models and would likely reduce predicted infections. This work demonstrates how a conditional series of non-average events can result in local arbovirus transmission and outbreaks of human disease, even in temperate cities.

  2. A rapid interview protocol supporting patient-centered quality improvement: hearing the parent's voice in a pediatric cancer unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobo, Elisa J; Billman, Glenn; Lim, Lillian; Murdock, J Wilken; Romero, Elvia; Donoghue, Donna; Roberts, William; Kurtin, Paul S

    2002-09-01

    The Institute of Medicine's 2001 report on quality delimits six dimensions of optimal care: safety, effectiveness, efficiency, timeliness, patient centeredness, and equity. In fall 2001 parents of pediatric cancer patients were interviewed to determine how well they thought these dimensions were addressed with respect to medication administration. Immediate goals were to identify system weaknesses and devise strategies to prevent future errors. A higher-order goal was to develop and demonstrate a model protocol for rapid-cycle interview assessments. Hematology/oncology directors worked with a research expert to develop a semistructured interview protocol. After training, which included directed reading, oral instruction, and role-playing, a convenience sample of 20 English- and Spanish-speaking parents of inpatients was recruited. Parents were asked to characterize current medication administration practices and to describe problems that they had experienced or witnessed. Rapid content analysis techniques were used to identify issues of importance to the parents. Parents' medication concerns centered on their children's comfort. Parents called for communication improvements, standardization of all nursing procedures and techniques, and a guide or an outline providing a clear understanding of what to expect when and from whom. Viewing these concerns in relation to the Institute of Medicine's quality domains allowed the department to frame an improvement action plan aligned with organizational and national priorities. With good supervision and limited focused training, inexperienced staff can successfully administer semistructured qualitative interviews and help analyze findings for rapid cycle improvement purposes. The protocol can be adapted for use in organizations interested in rapid qualitative assessments of patient and parent preferences.

  3. A multi-center Thai university-based surgical intensive care units study (THAI-SICU study): methodology and ICU characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittawatanarat, Kaweesak; Chaiwat, Onuma; Morakul, Sunthiti; Pipanmekaporn, Tanyong; Thawitsri, Thammasak; Wacharasint, Petch; Fuengfoo, Pusit; Chatmongkolchart, Sunisa; Akaraborworn, Osaree; Pathonsamit, Chompunoot; Poopipatpab, Sujaree; Chanthawong, Sarinya; Chau-In, Waraporn; Kusumaphanyo, Chaiyapruk; Buppha, Phakapan; Somrat, Charuluxananan; Kongsayreepong, Suneerat

    2014-01-01

    Although there were two large intra-operative observational studies on Thai surgical patients (THAI and THAI-AIMS), there has been no available study on critically ill surgical patients regarding their adverse events and outcomes. A THAI-Surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU) study has been established for monitoring the occurrence of these adverse events and outcomes in the SICU. The objective of this report is to describe the methodology of the THAI-SICU study and participating SICUs' characteristics as well as the early recruitment results on patients enrolled in the present study. The present study is designed as a multi-center, prospective, observational study. This report describes the method of case record form development and summarizes their collected parameters as well as the adverse event surveillance variables. All of nine SICU characteristics are described regarding their management systems, physicians' and nurses' work patterns. The final group of enrolled patients is reported. A total of nine university-based SICUs were included in the present study. All participating hospitals are residency training centers. Four of the SICUs, fulltime directors are anesthesiologists. Only one hospital's SICU is directed by a surgeon. Two SICUs were closed ICUs, three were mandatory consulting units, one was an elective consultation unit and the remaining three ICUs had no directors. Most of the participating SICUs had heterogeneity of surgical specialty patients. Six SICUs had regular resident rotations and only two of the SICUs had critical care fellowship training. There were significant differences regarding the nursing workload among the ICUs. The patient to registered nurse ratio ranged from 0.9-2.0. After a total of 19.7 months of a recruitment period, the total number of patient admissions was 6,548 (1,894 patients were excluded). A total cohort of 4,654 patients was included for further analytical processes. There were differences in ICU management systems

  4. Salvinia molesta D. S. Mitchell (Giant Salvinia) in the United States: A Review of Species Ecology and Approaches to Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McFarland, D

    2004-01-01

    .... Though innocuous within its native range, elsewhere this species is an aggressive menace that has had devastating ecological and socioeconomic impacts on aquatic systems in parts of Africa, Sri Lanka...

  5. Comparative assessment of in-hospital trauma mortality at a South African trauma center and matched patients treated in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Richard T; Scott, John W; Haider, Adil; Navsaria, Pradeep H; Nicol, Andrew J

    2017-09-01

    The unacceptably high rate of death and disability due to injury in Sub-Saharan Africa is alarming. The objective of this work was to compare mortality rates between severely injured trauma patients at a high-volume trauma center in South Africa with matched patients in the United States. Clinical databases from the Groote Schuur Hospital for patients treated in Cape Town, South Africa and the American College of Surgeon's National Trauma Databank for patients treated at large academic trauma centers in the United States were used. Coarsened exact matching identified the most comparable patient populations based on sex, age, intent, injury type, injury mechanism, Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Score, and systolic blood pressure. Conditional logistic regression generated odds ratios for mortality among the entire sample and clinically relevant subgroups. Coarsened exact matching matched 97.9% of the Groote Schuur Hospital patient sample, resulting in 3,206 matched-pairs between the Groote Schuur Hospital and National Trauma Databank cohorts. Conditional logistic regression revealed an odds ratio of mortality of 1.67 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-2.52) for patients at Groote Schuur Hospital compared with matched patients from the National Trauma Databank. Subset analyses revealed significantly increased odds of mortality among patients with blunt injuries (odds ratio 3.40, 95% confidence interval, 1.68-6.88) and patients with a Glasgow Coma Score of 8 or lower (odds ratio 4.33, 95% confidence interval, 2.10-8.95). No statistically significant difference was identified among patients with penetrating injuries or with a Glasgow Coma Score >8 (P value .90 and .39, respectively). International comparisons of interhospital variation in risk-adjusted outcomes following trauma can identify opportunities for quality improvement and have the potential to measure the impact of any corrective strategy implemented. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. NIH Clinical Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIH Clinical Center consists of two main facilities: The Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, which opened in 2005, houses inpatient units, day hospitals,...

  7. Implementation and evaluation of a nurse-centered computerized potassium regulation protocol in the intensive care unit - a before and after analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Horst Iwan CC

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Potassium disorders can cause major complications and must be avoided in critically ill patients. Regulation of potassium in the intensive care unit (ICU requires potassium administration with frequent blood potassium measurements and subsequent adjustments of the amount of potassium administrated. The use of a potassium replacement protocol can improve potassium regulation. For safety and efficiency, computerized protocols appear to be superior over paper protocols. The aim of this study was to evaluate if a computerized potassium regulation protocol in the ICU improved potassium regulation. Methods In our surgical ICU (12 beds and cardiothoracic ICU (14 beds at a tertiary academic center, we implemented a nurse-centered computerized potassium protocol integrated with the pre-existent glucose control program called GRIP (Glucose Regulation in Intensive Care patients. Before implementation of the computerized protocol, potassium replacement was physician-driven. Potassium was delivered continuously either by central venous catheter or by gastric, duodenal or jejunal tube. After every potassium measurement, nurses received a recommendation for the potassium administration rate and the time to the next measurement. In this before-after study we evaluated potassium regulation with GRIP. The attitude of the nursing staff towards potassium regulation with computer support was measured with questionnaires. Results The patient cohort consisted of 775 patients before and 1435 after the implementation of computerized potassium control. The number of patients with hypokalemia (5.0 mmol/L were recorded, as well as the time course of potassium levels after ICU admission. The incidence of hypokalemia and hyperkalemia was calculated. Median potassium-levels were similar in both study periods, but the level of potassium control improved: the incidence of hypokalemia decreased from 2.4% to 1.7% (P Conclusions Computerized potassium control

  8. Safety of physical therapy interventions in critically ill patients: a single-center prospective evaluation of 1110 intensive care unit admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sricharoenchai, Thiti; Parker, Ann M; Zanni, Jennifer M; Nelliot, Archana; Dinglas, Victor D; Needham, Dale M

    2014-06-01

    Critical illness survivors commonly have impaired physical functioning. Physical therapy interventions delivered in the intensive care unit can reduce these impairments, but the safety of such interventions within routine clinical practice requires greater investigation. We conducted a prospective observational study of routine physical therapy from July 2009 through December 2011 in the Johns Hopkins Hospital Medical Intensive Care Unit in Baltimore, MD. The incidence of 12 types of physiological abnormalities and potential safety events associated with physical therapy were monitored and evaluated for any additional treatment, cost, or length of stay. Of 1787 admissions of at least 24 hours, 1110 (62%) participated in 5267 physical therapy sessions conducted by 10 different physical therapists on 4580 patient-days. A total of 34 (0.6%) sessions had a physiological abnormality or potential safety event, with the most common being arrhythmia (10 occurrences, 0.2%) and mean arterial pressure greater than 140 mm Hg (8 occurrences; 0.2%) and less than 55 mm Hg (5 occurrences; 0.1%). Only 4 occurrences (0.1%) required minimal additional treatment or cost, without additional length of stay. In this large, single-center study, routine care physical therapy interventions were safe for critically ill patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A review of operations research models in invasive species management: state of the art, challenges, and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    İ. Esra Büyüktahtakın; Robert G. Haight

    2017-01-01

    Invasive species are a major threat to the economy, the environment, health, and thus human well-being. The international community, including the United Nations' Global Invasive Species Program (GISP), National Invasive Species Council (NISC), and Center for Invasive Species Management (CISM), has called for a rapid control of invaders in order to minimize their...

  10. Small Business Development Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs) provide assistance to small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs throughout the United States and its territories. SBDCs...

  11. Design and construction of coal/biomass to liquids (CBTL) process development unit (PDU) at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placido, Andrew [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Liu, Kunlei [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Challman, Don [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Andrews, Rodney [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Jacques, David [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2015-10-30

    This report describes a first phase of a project to design, construct and commission an integrated coal/biomass-to-liquids facility at a capacity of 1 bbl. /day at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) – specifically for construction of the building and upstream process units for feed handling, gasification, and gas cleaning, conditioning and compression. The deliverables from the operation of this pilot plant [when fully equipped with the downstream process units] will be firstly the liquid FT products and finished fuels which are of interest to UK-CAER’s academic, government and industrial research partners. The facility will produce research quantities of FT liquids and finished fuels for subsequent Fuel Quality Testing, Performance and Acceptability. Moreover, the facility is expected to be employed for a range of research and investigations related to: Feed Preparation, Characteristics and Quality; Coal and Biomass Gasification; Gas Clean-up/ Conditioning; Gas Conversion by FT Synthesis; Product Work-up and Refining; Systems Analysis and Integration; and Scale-up and Demonstration. Environmental Considerations - particularly how to manage and reduce carbon dioxide emissions from CBTL facilities and from use of the fuels - will be a primary research objectives. Such a facility has required significant lead time for environmental review, architectural/building construction, and EPC services. UK, with DOE support, has advanced the facility in several important ways. These include: a formal EA/FONSI, and permits and approvals; construction of a building; selection of a range of technologies and vendors; and completion of the upstream process units. The results of this project are the FEED and detailed engineering studies, the alternate configurations and the as-built plant - its equipment and capabilities for future research and demonstration and its adaptability for re-purposing to meet other needs. These are described in

  12. Habitat associations of saproxylic beetles in the southeastern United States: A comparison of forest types, tree species and wood postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Ulyshen; James Hanula

    2009-01-01

    Saproxylic beetles are highly sensitive to forest management practices that reduce the abundance and variety of dead wood. However, this diverse fauna continues to receive little attention in the southeastern United States even though this region supports some of the most diverse, productive and intensively managed forests in North America.

  13. The importance of forest type, tree species and wood posture to saproxylic wasp (Hymenoptera) communities in the southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Ulyshen; Thomas Pucci; James Hanula

    2011-01-01

    Although the forests of the southeastern United States are among the most productive and diverse in North America, information needed to develop conservation guidelines for the saproxylic (i.e., dependent on dead wood) fauna endemic to the region is lacking. Particularly little is known about the habitat associations and requirements of saproxylic parasitoids even...

  14. Chapter 6 - Links between land cover and lichen species richness at large scales in forested ecosystems across the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Will-Wolf; Randall S. Morin; Mark J. Ambrose; Kurt Riitters; Sarah Jovan

    2014-01-01

    Lichen community composition is well known for exhibiting response to air pollution, and to macroenvironmental and microenvironmental variables. Lichens are useful indicators of air quality impact, forest health, and forest ecosystem integrity across the United States (McCune 2000, reviews in Nimis and others 2002, USDA Forest Service 2007).

  15. Pyrosequencing as a tool for the detection of Phytophthora species: error rate and risk of false Molecular Operational Taxonomic Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vettraino, A.M.; Bonants, P.J.M.; Tomassini, A.; Bruni, N.; Vannini, A.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the accuracy of pyrosequencing for the description of Phytophthora communities in terms of taxa identification and risk of assignment for false Molecular Operational Taxonomic Units (MOTUs). Methods and Results: Pyrosequencing of Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1) amplicons was

  16. Species-level correlates of susceptibility to the pathogenic amphibian fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsy A. Bancroft; Barbara A. Han; Catherine L. Searle; Lindsay M. Biga; Deanna H. Olson; Lee B. Kats; Joshua J. Lawler; Andrew R. Blaustein

    2011-01-01

    Disease is often implicated as a factor in population declines of wildlife and plants. Understanding the characteristics that may predispose a species to infection by a particular pathogen can help direct conservation efforts. Recent declines in amphibian populations world-wide are a major conservation issue and may be caused in part by a fungal pathogen, ...

  17. Modeling broad-scale patterns of avian species richness across the Midwestern United States with measures of satellite image texture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick D. Culbert; Volker C. Radeloff; Veronique St-Louis; Curtis H. Flather; Chadwick D. Rittenhouse; Thomas P. Albright; Anna M. Pidgeon

    2012-01-01

    Avian biodiversity is threatened, and in order to prioritize limited conservation resources and conduct effective conservation planning a better understanding of avian species richness patterns is needed. The use of image texture measures, as a proxy for the spatial structure of land cover and vegetation, has proven useful in explaining patterns of avian abundance and...

  18. Multiple resource limitation: Non-equilibrium coexistence of species in a competition model using a synthesizing unit.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutta, P.S.; Kooi, B.W.; Feudel, U.

    2014-01-01

    During the last two decades, the simple view of resource limitation by a single resource has been changed due to the realization that co-limitation by multiple resources is often an important determinant of species growth. Hence, the multiple resource limitation hypothesis needs to be taken into

  19. Natural history of zoonotic Ehrlichia species in the United States and discovery of a novel ehrlichial pathogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loftis, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    Ehrlichia are obligate intracellular pathogens, transmitted by ixodid ticks, of both animals and humans. Ehrlichiae are emerging diseases in the USA, and the discovery of new species proceeds more rapidly than the development of models to study these agents. Laboratory animals were evaluated as

  20. Tuberculate ectomycorrhizae of angiosperms: The interaction between Boletus rubropunctus (Boletaceae) and Quercus species (Fagaceae) in the United States and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew E; Pfister, Donald H

    2009-09-01

    Tuberculate ectomycorrhizae (TECM) are unique structures in which aggregates of ectomycorrhizal roots are encased in a covering of fungal hyphae. The function of TECM is unknown, but they probably enhance the nitrogen nutrition and disease resistance of host plants. Trees in the Pinaceae form TECM with species of Rhizopogon and Suillus (Suillineae, Boletales). Similar tubercules are found with diverse angiosperms, but their mycobionts have not been phylogenetically characterized. We collected TECM in Mexico and the USA that were similar to TECM in previous reports. We describe these TECM and identify both the plant and fungal symbionts. Plant DNA confirms that TECM hosts are Quercus species. ITS sequences from tubercules and sclerotia (hyphal aggregations that serve as survival structures) matched sporocarps of Boletus rubropunctus. Phylogenetic analyses confirm that this fungus belongs to the suborder Boletineae (Boletales). This is the first published report of TECM formation in the Boletineae and of sclerotia formation by a Boletus species. Our data suggest that the TECM morphology is an adaptive feature that has evolved separately in two suborders of Boletales (Suillineae and Boletineae) and that TECM formation is controlled by the mycobiont because TECM are found on distantly related angiosperm and gymnosperm host plants.

  1. Training and Capacity Building in LMIC for Research in Heart and Lung Diseases: The NHLBI-UnitedHealth Global Health Centers of Excellence Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Gerald S; Xavier, Denis; Belis, Deshirée; Alam, Dewan; Davis, Patricia; Dorairaj, Prabhakaran; Ghannem, Hassen; Gilman, Robert H; Kamath, Deepak; Kimaiyo, Sylvester; Levitt, Naomi; Martinez, Homero; Mejicano, Gabriela; Miranda, J Jaime; Koehlmoos, Tracey Perez; Rabadán-Diehl, Cristina; Ramirez-Zea, Manuel; Rubinstein, Adolfo; Sacksteder, Katherine A; Steyn, Krisela; Tandon, Nikhil; Vedanthan, Rajesh; Wolbach, Tracy; Wu, Yangfeng; Yan, Lijing L

    2016-03-01

    Stemming the tide of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) worldwide requires a multipronged approach. Although much attention has been paid to disease control measures, there is relatively little consideration of the importance of training the next generation of health-related researchers to play their important role in this global epidemic. The lack of support for early stage investigators in low- and middle-income countries interested in the global NCD field has resulted in inadequate funding opportunities for research, insufficient training in advanced research methodology and data analysis, lack of mentorship in manuscript and grant writing, and meager institutional support for developing, submitting, and administering research applications and awards. To address this unmet need, The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-UnitedHealth Collaborating Centers of Excellence initiative created a Training Subcommittee that coordinated and developed an intensive, mentored health-related research experience for a number of early stage investigators from the 11 Centers of Excellence around the world. We describe the challenges faced by early stage investigators in low- and middle-income countries, the organization and scope of the Training Subcommittee, training activities, early outcomes of the early stage investigators (foreign and domestic) and training materials that have been developed by this program that are available to the public. By investing in the careers of individuals in a supportive global NCD network, we demonstrate the impact that an investment in training individuals from low- and middle-income countries can have on the preferred future of or current efforts to combat NCDs. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. When Do DCD Donors Die?: Outcomes and Implications of DCD at a High-volume, Single-center OPO in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalea, Joseph R; Redfield, Robert R; Rizzari, Michael D; Bennett, Ryan; Anderson, Michael E; Anderson, James E; Kaufman, Dixon B; Sollinger, Hans W; Fernandez, Luis A; D'Alessandro, Anthony M; Mezrich, Joshua

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the fate of patients who attempted to donate organs after circulatory death (DCD) using a standardized DCD protocol. Successful donation is not always possible after attempted DCD. Data were collected for all DCD donors between 1/2011 and 9/2014. DCDs were carried out using a uniform protocol at a single-center organ procurement organization. During the timeframe considered, DCD donation was attempted in 169 patients. In 46 patients (27.2%), no organs were recovered because the patients did not die within 2 hours. Successful donation was more likely if withdrawal of support occurred in the operating room versus the intensive care unit (P = 0.006). Time from extubation to death was available for 161/169 donors (95.3%). Of 161 donors, 111 (66.9%) died in under 1 hour. The mean time from withdrawal of support to patient death for unsuccessful donations was 33 hours, 37 minutes (range, 24 minutes-242 hours) versus 29 minutes (range, 5 minutes-2 hours, 4 minutes) for successful donations. Twenty-seven patients who unsuccessfully donated (67.5%) died within 24 hours. Were unsuccessful donations converted to successful donations, as many as 837 abdominal transplants could have been carried out in the United States, during the study period. DCD is an important form of organ donation. A large number of abdominal transplants are not possible due to unsuccessful DCD organ donation. It may be useful to explore DCD donor family satisfaction to identify other options for improving DCD donation.

  3. Avian mortality events in the United States caused by anticholinesterase pesticides: A retrospective summary of National Wildlife Health Center records from 1980 to 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischli, Margaret A.; Franson, J.C.; Thomas, N.J.; Finley, D.L.; Riley, Walter

    2004-01-01

    We reviewed the U.S. Geological Survey National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC) mortality database from 1980 to 2000 to identify cases of poisoning caused by organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides. From the 35,022 cases from which one or more avian carcasses were submitted to the NWHC for necropsy, we identified 335 mortality events attributed to anticholinesterase poisoning, 119 of which have been included in earlier reports. Poisoning events were classified as confirmed (n = 205) when supported by findings of ≥50% inhibition of cholinesterase (ChE) activity in brain tissue and the detection of a specific pesticide in the gastrointestinal contents of one or more carcasses. Suspected poisonings (n = 130) were defined as cases where brain ChE activity was ≥50% inhibited or a specific pesticide was identified in gastrointestinal contents. The 335 avian mortality events occurred in 42 states. Washington, Virginia, and Ohio had the highest frequency of events, with 24 (7.2%), 21 (6.3%), and 20 (6.0%) events, respectively. A total of 8877 carcasses of 103 avian species in 12 orders was recovered. Because carcass counts underestimate total mortality, this represents the minimum actual mortality. Of 24 different pesticides identified, the most frequent were famphur (n = 59; 18%), carbofuran (n = 52; 15%), diazinon (n = 40; 12%), and fenthion (n = 17; 5.1%). Falconiformes were reported killed most frequently (49% of all die-offs) but Anseriformes were found dead in the greatest numbers (64% of 8877 found dead). The majority of birds reported killed by famphur were Passeriformes and Falconiformes, with the latter found dead in 90% of famphur-related poisoning events. Carbofuran and famphur were involved in mortality of the greatest variety of species (45 and 33, respectively). Most of the mortality events caused by diazinon involved waterfowl.

  4. Implementation of the Nutrition Care Process and International Dietetics and Nutrition Terminology in a single-center hemodialysis unit: comparing paper vs electronic records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Megan; Campbell, Katrina Louise; Ferguson, Maree

    2014-01-01

    There is little doubt surrounding the benefits of the Nutrition Care Process and International Dietetics and Nutrition Terminology (IDNT) to dietetics practice; however, evidence to support the most efficient method of incorporating these into practice is lacking. The main objective of our study was to compare the efficiency and effectiveness of an electronic and a manual paper-based system for capturing the Nutrition Care Process and IDNT in a single in-center hemodialysis unit. A cohort of 56 adult patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis were followed for 12 months. During the first 6 months, patients received the usual standard care, with documentation via a manual paper-based system. During the following 6-month period (Months 7 to 12), nutrition care was documented by an electronic system. Workload efficiency, number of IDNT codes used related to nutrition-related diagnoses, interventions, monitoring and evaluation using IDNT, nutritional status using the scored Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment Tool of Quality of Life were the main outcome measures. Compared with paper-based documentation of nutrition care, our study demonstrated that an electronic system improved the efficiency of total time spent by the dietitian by 13 minutes per consultation. There were also a greater number of nutrition-related diagnoses resolved using the electronic system compared with the paper-based documentation (Pnutrition care and effectiveness related to patient outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Primary care and survival among American Indian patients with diabetes in the Southwest United States: Evaluation of a cohort study at Gallup Indian Medical Center, 2009-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Caroline; Atwood, Sidney; Brown, Chris; Nelson, Adrianne Katrina; Lozada, Mia; Wei, Jennie; Merino, Maricruz; Curley, Cameron; Muskett, Olivia; Sabo, Samantha; Gampa, Vikas; Orav, John; Shin, Sonya

    2017-12-08

    To evaluate the role of primary care healthcare delivery on survival for American Indian patients with diabetes in the southwest United States. Data from patients with diabetes admitted to Gallup Indian Medical Center between 2009 and 2016 were analyzed using a log-rank test and Cox Proportional Hazards analyses. Of the 2661 patients included in analysis, 286 patients died during the study period. Having visited a primary care provider in the year prior to first admission of the study period was protective against all-cause mortality in unadjusted analysis (HR (95% CI)=0.47 (0.31, 0.73)), and after adjustment. The log-rank test indicated there is a significant difference in overall survival by primary care engagement history prior to admission (pprimary care provider was 2322days versus 2158days for those who had not seen a primary care provider. Compared with those who did not see a primary care provider in the year prior to admission, having seen a primary care provider was associated with improved survival after admission. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Effectiveness and Safety of Magnesium Replacement in Critically Ill Patients Admitted to the Medical Intensive Care Unit in an Academic Medical Center: A Retrospective, Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Drayton A; Stojakovic, Jelena; Kathe, Niranjan; Tran, Julie; Clem, Oktawia A; Erbach, Kristina; King, Jarrod

    2017-01-01

    "Rules of thumb" for the replacement of electrolytes, including magnesium, in critical care settings are used, despite minimal empirical validation of their ability to achieve a target serum concentration. This study's purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety surrounding magnesium replacement in medically, critically ill patients with mild-to-moderate hypomagnesemia. This was a single-center, retrospective, observational evaluation of episodes of intravenous magnesium replacement ordered for patients with mild-to-moderate hypomagnesemia (1.0-1.9 mEq/L) admitted to a medical intensive care unit from May 2014 to April 2016. The primary effectiveness outcome, achievement of target serum magnesium concentration (≥2 mEq/L) compared to expected achievement using a "rule of thumb" estimation that 1 g intravenous magnesium sulfate raises the magnesium concentration 0.15 mEq/L, was tested using 1-sample z test. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess the effect of infusion rate on target achievement. Of 152 days on which magnesium replacements were provided for 72 patients, a follow-up serum magnesium concentration was checked within 24 hours in 89 (58.6%) episodes. Of these 89 episodes, serum magnesium concentration reached target in only 49 (59.8%) episodes compared to an expected 89 (100%; P rule of thumb" estimation predicted.

  7. Prevalence of neutralizing antibodies to rabies virus in serum of seven species of insectivorous bats from Colorado and New Mexico, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Richard A; O'Shea, Thomas J; Shankar, Vidya; Neubaum, Melissa A; Neubaum, Daniel J; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2013-04-01

    We determined the presence of rabies-virus-neutralizing antibodies (RVNA) in serum of 721 insectivorous bats of seven species captured, sampled, and released in Colorado and New Mexico, United States in 2003-2005. A subsample of 160 bats was tested for rabies-virus RNA in saliva. We sampled little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) at two maternity roosts in Larimer County, Colorado; big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) at three maternity roosts in Morgan County, Colorado; and big brown bats at five maternity roosts in Larimer County. We also sampled hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus) and silver-haired bats (Lasionycteris noctivagans) captured while drinking or foraging over water in Bernalillo County, New Mexico and at various locations in Larimer County. Big brown bats, little brown bats, long-legged myotis (Myotis volans), long-eared myotis (Myotis evotis), and fringed myotis (Myotis thysanodes) were also sampled over water in Larimer County. All species except long-eared myotis included individuals with RVNA, with prevalences ranging from 7% in adult female silver-haired bats to 32% in adult female hoary bats. None of the bats had detectable rabies-virus RNA in oropharyngeal swabs, including 51 bats of 5 species that had RVNA in serum. Antibody-positive bats were present in nine of the 10 maternity colonies sampled. These data suggest that wild bats are commonly exposed to rabies virus and develop a humoral immune response suggesting some degree of viral replication, but many infections fail to progress to clinical disease.

  8. Prevalence of neutralizing antibodies to rabies virus in serum of seven species of insectivorous bats from Colorado and New Mexico, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Richard A.; O'Shea, Thomas J.; Shankar, Vidya; Neubaum, Melissa A.; Neubaum, Daniel J.; Rupprecht, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    We determined the presence of rabies-virus-neutralizing antibodies (RVNA) in serum of 721 insectivorous bats of seven species captured, sampled, and released in Colorado and New Mexico, United States in 2003-2005. A subsample of 160 bats was tested for rabies-virus RNA in saliva. We sampled little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) at two maternity roosts in Larimer County, Colorado; big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) at three maternity roosts in Morgan County, Colorado; and big brown bats at five maternity roosts in Larimer County. We also sampled hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus) and silver-haired bats (Lasionycteris noctivagans) captured while drinking or foraging over water in Bernalillo County, New Mexico and at various locations in Larimer County. Big brown bats, little brown bats, long-legged myotis (Myotis volans), long-eared myotis (Myotis evotis), and fringed myotis (Myotis thysanodes) were also sampled over water in Larimer County. All species except long-eared myotis included individuals with RVNA, with prevalences ranging from 7% in adult female silver-haired bats to 32% in adult female hoary bats. None of the bats had detectable rabies-virus RNA in oropharyngeal swabs, including 51 bats of 5 species that had RVNA in serum. Antibody-positive bats were present in nine of the 10 maternity colonies sampled. These data suggest that wild bats are commonly exposed to rabies virus and develop a humoral immune response suggesting some degree of viral replication, but many infections fail to progress to clinical disease.

  9. Microendemicity in the northern Hajar Mountains of Oman and the United Arab Emirates with the description of two new species of geckos of the genus Asaccus (Squamata: Phyllodactylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Salvador; Simó-Riudalbas, Marc; Jayasinghe, Sithum; Wilms, Thomas; Els, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The Hajar Mountains of Oman and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) is the highest mountain range in Eastern Arabia. As a result of their old geological origin, geographical isolation, complex topography and local climate, these mountains provide an important refuge for endemic and relict species of plants and animals with strong Indo-Iranian affinities. Among vertebrates, the rock climbing nocturnal geckos of the genus Asaccus represent the genus with the highest number of endemic species in the Hajar Mountains. Recent taxonomic studies on the Zagros populations of Asaccus have shown that this genus is much richer than it was previously thought and preliminary morphological and molecular data suggest that its diversity in Arabia may also be underestimated. A total of 83 specimens originally classified as Asaccus caudivolvulus (including specimens of the two new species described herein), six other Asaccus species from the Hajar and the Zagros Mountains and two representatives of the genus Haemodracon were sequenced for up to 2,311 base pairs including the mitochondrial 12S and cytb and the nuclear c-mos, MC1R and ACM4 genes. Phylogenetic relationships were inferred using both Bayesian and maximum-likelihood approaches and the former method was also used to calibrate the phylogenetic tree. Haplotype networks and phylogenetic trees were inferred from the phased nuclear genes only. Sixty-one alcohol-preserved adult specimens originally classified as Asaccus caudivolvulus from the northern Hajar Mountains were examined for 13 morphometric and the five meristic variables using multivariate methods and were also used to diagnose and describe the two new species. The results of the molecular and morphological analyses indicate that the species originally classified as Asaccus caudivolvulus is, in fact, an assemblage of three different species that started diversifying during the Mid-Miocene. The molecular phylogenies consistently recovered the Hajar endemic A. montanus as

  10. Microendemicity in the northern Hajar Mountains of Oman and the United Arab Emirates with the description of two new species of geckos of the genus Asaccus (Squamata: Phyllodactylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Carranza

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background The Hajar Mountains of Oman and the United Arab Emirates (UAE is the highest mountain range in Eastern Arabia. As a result of their old geological origin, geographical isolation, complex topography and local climate, these mountains provide an important refuge for endemic and relict species of plants and animals with strong Indo-Iranian affinities. Among vertebrates, the rock climbing nocturnal geckos of the genus Asaccus represent the genus with the highest number of endemic species in the Hajar Mountains. Recent taxonomic studies on the Zagros populations of Asaccus have shown that this genus is much richer than it was previously thought and preliminary morphological and molecular data suggest that its diversity in Arabia may also be underestimated. Methods A total of 83 specimens originally classified as Asaccus caudivolvulus (including specimens of the two new species described herein, six other Asaccus species from the Hajar and the Zagros Mountains and two representatives of the genus Haemodracon were sequenced for up to 2,311 base pairs including the mitochondrial 12S and cytb and the nuclear c-mos, MC1R and ACM4 genes. Phylogenetic relationships were inferred using both Bayesian and maximum-likelihood approaches and the former method was also used to calibrate the phylogenetic tree. Haplotype networks and phylogenetic trees were inferred from the phased nuclear genes only. Sixty-one alcohol-preserved adult specimens originally classified as Asaccus caudivolvulus from the northern Hajar Mountains were examined for 13 morphometric and the five meristic variables using multivariate methods and were also used to diagnose and describe the two new species. Results The results of the molecular and morphological analyses indicate that the species originally classified as Asaccus caudivolvulus is, in fact, an assemblage of three different species that started diversifying during the Mid-Miocene. The molecular phylogenies consistently

  11. Microendemicity in the northern Hajar Mountains of Oman and the United Arab Emirates with the description of two new species of geckos of the genus Asaccus (Squamata: Phyllodactylidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Sithum; Wilms, Thomas; Els, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Background The Hajar Mountains of Oman and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) is the highest mountain range in Eastern Arabia. As a result of their old geological origin, geographical isolation, complex topography and local climate, these mountains provide an important refuge for endemic and relict species of plants and animals with strong Indo-Iranian affinities. Among vertebrates, the rock climbing nocturnal geckos of the genus Asaccus represent the genus with the highest number of endemic species in the Hajar Mountains. Recent taxonomic studies on the Zagros populations of Asaccus have shown that this genus is much richer than it was previously thought and preliminary morphological and molecular data suggest that its diversity in Arabia may also be underestimated. Methods A total of 83 specimens originally classified as Asaccus caudivolvulus (including specimens of the two new species described herein), six other Asaccus species from the Hajar and the Zagros Mountains and two representatives of the genus Haemodracon were sequenced for up to 2,311 base pairs including the mitochondrial 12S and cytb and the nuclear c-mos, MC1R and ACM4 genes. Phylogenetic relationships were inferred using both Bayesian and maximum-likelihood approaches and the former method was also used to calibrate the phylogenetic tree. Haplotype networks and phylogenetic trees were inferred from the phased nuclear genes only. Sixty-one alcohol-preserved adult specimens originally classified as Asaccus caudivolvulus from the northern Hajar Mountains were examined for 13 morphometric and the five meristic variables using multivariate methods and were also used to diagnose and describe the two new species. Results The results of the molecular and morphological analyses indicate that the species originally classified as Asaccus caudivolvulus is, in fact, an assemblage of three different species that started diversifying during the Mid-Miocene. The molecular phylogenies consistently recovered the Hajar

  12. Federal Agency and Federal Library Reports. Library of Congress; Center for the Book; Federal Library and Information Center Committee; National Commission on Libraries and Information Science; National Agricultural Library; National Library of Medicine;United States Government Printing Office; National Technical Information Service; National Archives and Records Administration; National Center for Education Statistics Library Statistics Program; National Library of Education; Educational Resources Information Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Audrey; Cole, John Y.; Tarr, Susan M.; Vlach, Rosalie B.; Carey, Len; Mehnert, Robert; Sherman, Andrew M.; Davis, Linda; Vecchiarelli, Marion H.; Chute, Adrienne; Dunn, Christina

    2002-01-01

    Includes reports from Library of Congress, Center for the Book, Federal Library and Information Center Committee, National Commission on Libraries and Information Science, National Agricultural Library, National Library of Medicine, Government Printing Office, National Technical Information Service, National Archives and Records Administration,…

  13. Mercury contamination in fish in midcontinent great rivers of the united states: Importance of species traits and environmental factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, D.M.; Blocksom, K.A.; Lazorchak, J.M.; Jicha, T.; Angradi, T.R.; Bolgrien, D.W.

    2010-01-01

    We measured mercury (Hg) concentrations in whole fish from the Upper Mississippi, Missouri, and Ohio Rivers to characterize the extent and magnitude of Hg contamination and to identify environmental factors influencing Hg accumulation. Concentrations were generally lower (80% of values between 20?200 ng g1 wet weight) than those reported for other regions (e.g., upper Midwest and Northeast U.S.). Mercury exceeded the risk threshold for belted kingfisher (Ceryle alcyon, the most sensitive species considered) in 33?75% of river length and 1?7% of river length for humans. Concentrations were lower in the Missouri than in the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers, consistent with continental-scale patterns in atmospheric Hg deposition. Body size and trophic guild were the best predictors of Hg concentrations, which were highest in large-bodied top predators. Site geochemical and landscape properties were weakly related with fish Hg. Moreover, relationships often ran contrary to conventional wisdom, and the slopes of the relationships (positive or negative) were inconsistent among fish guilds and rivers. For example, sulfate is positively associated with fish Hg concentrations but was negatively correlated with Hg in five of six regression models of tissue concentrations. Variables such as pH, acid neutralizing capacity, and total phosphorus did not occur at levels associated with high fish Hg concentrations, partially explaining the relatively low Hg values we observed. ?? 2010 American Chemical Society.

  14. Assessing the invasive potential of biofuel species proposed for Florida and the United States using the Australian Weed Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, D.R. [The Nature Conservancy, PO Box 118526, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Department of Biology, PO Box 118526, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Tancig, K.J. [PO Box 116455, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Onderdonk, D.A.; Gantz, C.A. [Department of Biology, PO Box 118526, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Twelve taxa under exploration as bioenergy crops in Florida and the U.S. were evaluated for potential invasiveness using the Australian Weed Risk Assessment system (WRA) modified for separate assessment at the state and national scales. When tested across a range of geographies, this system correctly identifies invaders 90%, and non-invaders 70% of the time, on average. Predictions for Florida were the same as for the U.S. Arundo donax, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Eucalyptus grandis, Jatropha curcas, Leucaena leucocephala, Pennisetum purpureum, and Ricinus communis were found to have a high probability of becoming invasive, while Miscanthus x giganteus, Saccharum arundinaceum, Saccharum officinarum, and the sweet variety of Sorghum bicolor have a low probability of becoming invasive. Eucalyptus amplifolia requires further evaluation before a prediction is possible. These results are consistent with reports on other tests of these taxa. Given the economic and ecological impacts of invasive species, including the carbon expended for mechanical and chemical control efforts, cultivation of taxa likely to become invasive should be avoided. (author)

  15. Groundwater geochemical and selected volatile organic compound data, Operable Unit 1, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Keyport, Washington, June and October 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations indicate that concentrations of chlorinated volatile organic compounds are substantial in groundwater beneath the 9-acre former landfill at Operable Unit 1, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Keyport, Washington. The U.S. Geological Survey has continued to monitor groundwater geochemistry to ensure that conditions remain favorable for contaminant biodegradation as specified in the Record of Decision for the site. This report presents groundwater geochemical and selected chlorinated volatile organic compound data collected at Operable Unit 1 by the U.S. Geological Survey during June and October 2012, in support of long-term monitoring for natural attenuation. Groundwater samples were collected from 13 wells and 9 piezometers, as well as from 10 shallow groundwater passive-diffusion sampling sites in the nearby marsh. Samples from all wells and piezometers were analyzed for oxidation-reduction (redox) sensitive constituents and dissolved gases. Samples from all piezometers also were analyzed for chlorinated volatile organic compounds, as were all samples from the passive-diffusion sampling sites. In 2012, concentrations of redox-sensitive constituents measured at all wells and piezometers were consistent with those measured in previous years, with dissolved oxygen concentrations all at 0.4 milligram per liter or less; little to no detectable nitrate; abundant dissolved manganese, iron, and methane; and commonly detected sulfide. In the upper aquifer of the northern plantation in 2012, chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) concentrations at all piezometers were similar to those measured in previous years, and concentrations of the reductive dechlorination byproducts ethane and ethene were slightly higher or the same as concentrations measured in 2011. In the upper aquifer of the southern plantation, CVOC concentrations measured in piezometers during 2012 continued to be extremely variable as in previous years, and often very high

  16. Groundwater geochemical and selected volatile organic compound data, Operable Unit 1, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Keyport, Washington, June and September 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Raegan L.

    2015-01-01

    Previous investigations indicate that concentrations of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) are substantial in groundwater beneath the 9-acre former landfill at Operable Unit 1, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Keyport, Washington. The U.S. Geological Survey has continued to monitor groundwater geochemistry to ensure that conditions remain favorable for contaminant biodegradation at the site. This report presents groundwater geochemical and selected CVOC data collected at Operable Unit 1 by the U.S. Geological Survey during June 23–25 and September 4, 2014, in support of long-term monitoring for natural attenuation. Groundwater samples were collected from 13 wells and 9 piezometers, as well as from 10 shallow groundwater passive-diffusion sampling sites in the nearby marsh. Samples from all wells and piezometers were analyzed for oxidation-reduction (redox) sensitive constituents and dissolved gases. Samples from all piezometers and four wells also were analyzed for CVOCs, as were all samples from the passive-diffusion sampling sites. In 2014, concentrations of redox-sensitive constituents measured at all wells and piezometers were consistent with those measured in previous years, with dissolved oxygen concentrations all less than 1 milligram per liter; little to no detectable nitrate; abundant dissolved manganese, iron, and methane; and commonly detected sulfide. In the upper aquifer of the northern plantation in 2014, CVOC concentrations at all piezometers were similar to those measured in previous years, and concentrations of the reductive dechlorination byproducts ethane and ethene were slightly lower or the same as concentrations measured in 2013. In the upper aquifer of the southern plantation, CVOC concentrations measured in piezometers during 2014 continued to be variable as in previous years, often high, and reductive dechlorination byproducts were detected in one of the three wells and in all but two piezometers. Beneath the marsh

  17. Determining fine-scale use and movement patterns of diving bird species in federal waters of the Mid-Atlantic United States using satellite telemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Caleb; Berlin, Alicia; Gilbert, Andrew; Gray, Carrie E.; Montevecchi, William; Stenhouse, Iain; Ford, Scott; Olsen, Glenn H.; Fiely, Jonathan; Savoy, Lucas; Goodale, M. Wing; Burke, Chantelle

    2017-01-01

    Offshore wind energy development in the United States is projected to expand in the upcoming decades to meet growing energy demands and reduce fossil fuel emissions. There is particular interest in commercial offshore wind development within Federal waters (i.e., > 3 nautical miles from shore) of the mid-Atlantic. In order to understand the potential for adverse effects on marine birds in this area, information on distribution and behavior (e.g., flight pathways, timing, etc.) is required for a broad suite of species. In areas where offshore wind development is likely to occur, such information can be used to identify high use areas during critical life stages, which can inform the siting of offshore facilities. It can also be used to provide baseline data for understanding broad changes in distributions that occur after offshore wind developments are constructed in a specific area.

  18. A new species of Isoperla (Insecta, Plecoptera from the Karawanken, with considerations on the Southern Limestone Alps as centers of endemism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Graf

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A new species of the genus Isoperla (Plecoptera, Perlodidae, belonging to the oxylepis species-group is described, and the male mating call is characterized. Its range falls within a small region of the Southern Limestone Alps which is well known to be one endemism-centre of aquatic insects.

  19. Butterfly fauna of Ženeva pond near Niška Banja spa center (Lepidoptera: Papilionideae & Hesperioideae with some notes on endangered species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić, J.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research of butterfly species at Ženeva pond near the river Nišava (SE Serbia. In all, the total of 45 species was recorded, representing 23% of Serbian butterfly fauna. Among species recorded, 4 are listed in Red data book of Serbian butterflies and are declared strictly protected in the country, while two are listed in European red list of butterfly and listed in Annex IV of the EU Habitats Directive, namely Lycaena dispar and Zerynthia polyxena.

  20. Patterns of scheduled follow-up appointments following hospitalization for heart failure: insights from an urban medical center in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal P

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Parag Goyal,1 Madeline R Sterling,2 Ashley N Beecy,2 John T Ruffino,2 Sonal S Mehta,3 Erica C Jones,1 Mark S Lachs,3 Evelyn M Horn1 1Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, 2Department of Medicine, 3Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, USA Objectives: Although postdischarge outpatient follow-up appointments after a hospitalization for heart failure represent a potentially effective strategy to prevent heart failure readmissions, patterns of scheduled follow-up appointments upon discharge are poorly described. We aimed to characterize real-world patterns of scheduled follow-up appointments among adult patients with heart failure upon hospital discharge.Patients and methods: This was a retrospective cohort study performed at a large urban academic center in the United States among adults hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of congestive heart failure between January 1, 2013, and December 31, 2014. Patient demographics, administrative data, clinical parameters, echocardiographic indices, and scheduled postdischarge outpatient follow-up appointments were collected.Results: Of the 796 patients hospitalized for heart failure, just over half of the cohort had a scheduled follow-up appointment upon discharge. Follow-up appointments were less likely among patients who were white and had heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and more likely among patients with Medicaid and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In an adjusted multivariable regression model, age ≥65 years was inversely associated with a scheduled follow-up appointment upon hospital discharge, despite higher rates of several cardiovascular and noncardiovascular comorbidities.Conclusion: Just half of the patients discharged home following a hospitalization for heart failure had a follow-up appointment scheduled, representing a missed opportunity to provide a recommended care transition intervention. Despite a greater

  1. Molecular Identification of Burkholderia Cepacia Complex and Species Distribution Among Cystic Fibrosis Patients Seen at the Reference Center in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Concli Leite

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc infections in cystic fibrosis (CF patients are associated with decline in lung function and reduced survival. The potential transmissibility of Bcc among CF patients has been reported, indicating that strict segregation of CF patients with Bcc is crucial. Aims: To standardize the PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay in order to identify Bcc species and to establish the prevalence of Bcc species and their susceptibility profile among CF patients seen at the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA. Methods: The classification of the clinical isolates recovered from respiratory tract specimens of CF patients as Bcc was achieved using the API-20NE® phenotypic commercial system. The identification of the Bcc species was performed using PCR-RFLP. The antimicrobial disk diffusion susceptibility testing was performed according to the CLSI (2006. Results: API-20NE® was able to identify Bcc isolates (244 specimens, such as B. cepacia, indicating that it was not able to distinguish among the Bcc species. The PCR-RFLP molecular method discriminated the eight reference Bcc species, thus validating the method for clinical isolates. Bcc prevalence determined by PCR-RFLP was 10.6% (26/244. The molecular analysis identified B. cenocepacia in 53.8% (14/26 of infected patients, B. multivorans in 15.4% (4/26, and B. vietnamiensis and B. ambifaria in 7.7% (2/26. The antibiotic resistance profile was variable among Bcc species. Conclusions: The PCR-RFLP method was validated for the identification of Bcc species. B. cenocepacia proved to be the most prevalent species among the CF patients seen at the HCPA.

  2. Prevalence of intestinal parasite, Shigella and Salmonella species among diarrheal children in Jimma health center, Jimma southwest Ethiopia: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyene, Getenet; Tasew, Haimanot

    2014-02-05

    Diarrheal disease continues to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality among young children in developing countries including Ethiopia. Globally, intestinal parasite, Shigella and Salmonella species remain major contributors to acute enteric infections. The study was aimed at determining the frequency of intestinal parasite, Shigella and Salmonella species identified from diarrheic children at Jimma Health Centre, Jimma south west Ethiopia. A health institution based cross sectional study was conducted from March to November 2012. A structured questionnaire was used for collection of data on socio- demographic characteristics. Parasite and bacteria identification as well as susceptibility testing was done using standard parasitological and bacteriological procedures. A total of 260 diarrheal children were included in the study. A total of 129 (49.6%) samples were positive for intestinal parasite, Shigella and Salmonella species. Of these, 107 (41.1%), 6 (2.3%) and 16 (6.2%) samples were positive for intestinal parasite, Shigella and Salmonella species respectively. The dominant isolated parasite was G. lamblia with prevalence of 13.5% followed by A. lumbricoides (11.5%). The least identified parasites were Schistosoma mansoni and Taenia species accounting 0.4% each. Multiple parasitic infections were observed in 19 (7.3%) patients. Shigella species showed hundred percent resistances to ampicillin, amoxacillin, and cotrimoxazole. All Salmonella isolates were resistant against amoxicillin. All Shigella and Salmonella species were susceptible to ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin and gentamycin. The presence of reasonably high amount of intestinal parasite and Salmonella and Shigella species that are drug resistance to the commonly prescribed drugs is a treat to the children and community at large. Therefore, measures including health education, improvement of safe water supply, sanitation facilities and continuous monitoring of microbiological and antimicrobial

  3. Monitoramento de fungos anemófilos e de leveduras em unidade hospitalar Monitoring of airborne fungus and yeast species in a hospital unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Nelson Martins-Diniz

    2005-06-01

    a monthly basis, at two different time periods, from the adult and pediatric intensive care units and surgical center of a hospital in Araraquara, Southeastern Brazil. Collection of airborne fungi was carried out using a simple-stage Andersen sample. The presence of yeasts was investigated in samples taken from the hands and oropharynx of staff members as well as from the surface of beds and doorknobs inside the critical areas. RESULTS: Thirty-two genera of airborne fungi and were recovered from the surgical center and 31 from the intensive care units. Genera most frequently isolated were Cladophialophora spp., Fusarium spp., Penicillium spp., Chrysosporium spp. e Aspergillus spp. During the study period, a new unit was built in the hospital, which coincided with an increase in Cladophialophora spp., Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium spp. colony counts. Yeasts were found in 39.4% of samples obtained from healthcare staff (16.7% from interdigital spaces, 12.1% from nailbeds, and 10.6% from oropharynx and in 44% of furniture samples, with a predominance of the Candida genus ((C. albicans, C. guilliermondii, C. parapsilosis e C. lusitaniae, followed by Trichosporon spp. CONCLUSIONS: We found a relatively high number of airborne fungi (potentially pathological in special areas and expressive levels of yeasts in both biotic and abiotic samples. Microbiological and environmental monitoring should be conducted, especially in special areas which include immunocompromised patients, who are more susceptible to the exposure to environmental and staff-derived pathogens.

  4. Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2009-01-01

    The Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center (NPWRC) conducts integrated research to fulfill the Department of the Interior's responsibilities to the Nation's natural resources. Located on 600 acres along the James River Valley near Jamestown, North Dakota, the NPWRC develops and disseminates scientific information needed to understand, conserve, and wisely manage the Nation's biological resources. Research emphasis is primarily on midcontinental plant and animal species and ecosystems of the United States. During the center's 40-year history, its scientists have earned an international reputation for leadership and expertise on the biology of waterfowl and grassland birds, wetland ecology and classification, mammalian behavior and ecology, grassland ecosystems, and application of statistics and geographic information systems. To address current science challenges, NPWRC scientists collaborate with researchers from other U.S. Geological Survey centers and disciplines (Biology, Geography, Geology, and Water) and with biologists and managers in the Department of the Interior (DOI), other Federal agencies, State agencies, universities, and nongovernmental organizations. Expanding upon its scientific expertise and leadership, the NPWRC is moving in new directions, including invasive plant species, restoration of native habitats, carbon sequestration and marketing, and ungulate management on DOI lands.

  5. Agriculture: About EPA's National Agriculture Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's National Agriculture Center (Ag Center), with the support of the United States Department of Agriculture, serves growers, livestock producers, other agribusinesses, and agricultural information/education providers.

  6. Evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility of Bacteroides, Prevotella and Fusobacterium species isolated from patients of the N. N. Blokhin Cancer Research Center, Moscow, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilnikova, Irina I; Dmitrieva, Natalia V

    2015-02-01

    In total 122 non-duplicate Bacteroides, Prevotella and Fusobacterium spp isolated from cancer patients between 2004 and 2014 were involved in this study. Most of the strains belonged to the B. fragilis group (55%), followed by Prevotella strains (34.4%) and Fusobacterium spp (10.6%). The species identification was carried out by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), and they were identified on species level with a log (score) >2.0. The most common isolates were B. fragilis, B. thetaiotaomicron, B. ovatus and B. vulgatus. Among Prevotella species, the most frequently isolated species were P. buccae, P. buccalis, P. oris, P. denticola and P. nigrescens, and most of the Fusobacterium spp. were F. nucleatum. Susceptibilities of the strains were determined by the E-test methodology. The percentage of the susceptibility of B. fragilis group isolates were: metronidazole (MIC ≤4 μg/ml), 97%; imipenem (MIC ≤2 μg/ml), 95.5%; amoxicillin/clavulanate (MIC ≤4 μg/ml), 95.5% and clindamycin (MIC ≤4 μg/ml), 77.6%. Three B. fragilis isolates proved to be multidrug-resistant (parallel resistance to imipenem, amoxicillin/clavulanate and metronidazole or clindamycin was observed). All Prevotella strains tested were susceptible to imipenem and amoxicillin/clavulanate, whereas 78.6% of the pigmented Prevotella species and 46.4% of the non-pigmented species were resistant to penicillin (MIC >0.5 μg/ml). The susceptibility to metronidazole and clindamycin were 93% and 88%, respectively. All Fusobacterium strains were sensitive to all tested antibiotics, including penicillin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. National Center on Family Homelessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home National Center on Family Homelessness Center A staggering 2.5 million children are ... raise awareness of the current state of child homelessness in the United States, documents the number of ...

  8. Implementation and evaluation of a nurse-centered computerized potassium regulation protocol in the intensive care unit - a before and after analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Miriam; Vogelzang, Mathijs; Drost, Jose T.; Janse, Marcel; Loef, Bert G.; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; Zijlstra, Felix; Nijsten, Maarten W. N.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Potassium disorders can cause major complications and must be avoided in critically ill patients. Regulation of potassium in the intensive care unit (ICU) requires potassium administration with frequent blood potassium measurements and subsequent adjustments of the amount of potassium

  9. Concept for a Common Performance Measurement System for Unit Training at the National Training Center (NTC) and with Simulation Networking (SIMNET) platoon-Movement to Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    Simulation Networking (SIMNET) Platoon-Movement to Contact James W. Kerins and Nancy K. Atwood BDM International, Inc. DTIC’ CTE SEP 2 6 190 Field Unit at...terrain search techniques. tiffed in the unit’s SOP are reviewed Engagement techniquesare reviewed and followed. and rehearsed: * "Two Football Field...34 technique for jet aircraft * "Half Football Field" technique for slow aircraft or helicopters • "Reference Point or Series of Reference Points

  10. Improving Response to Foodborne Disease Outbreaks in the United States: Findings of the Foodborne Disease Centers for Outbreak Response Enhancement (FoodCORE), 2010–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggerstaff, Gwen

    2015-01-01

    Context Each year foodborne diseases (FBD) affect approximately 1 in 6 Americans, resulting in 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths. Decreasing resources impact the ability of public health officials to identify, respond to, and control FBD outbreaks. Geographically dispersed outbreaks necessitate multijurisdictional coordination across all levels of the public health system. Rapid response depends on rapid detection. Objective Targeted resources were provided to state and local health departments to improve completeness and timeliness of laboratory, epidemiology, and environmental health (EH) activities for FBD surveillance and outbreak response. Design Foodborne Disease Centers for Outbreak Response Enhancement (FoodCORE) centers, selected through competitive award, implemented work plans designed to make outbreak response more complete and faster in their jurisdiction. Performance metrics were developed and used to evaluate the impact and effectiveness of activities. Participants Departments of Health in Connecticut, New York City, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, and Wisconsin. Results From the first year (Y1) of the program in October 2010 to the end of second year (Y2) in December 2012, the centers completed molecular subtyping for a higher proportion of Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, and Listeria (SSL) isolates (86% vs 98%) and reduced the average time to complete testing from a median of 8 to 4 days. The centers attempted epidemiologic interviews with more SSL case-patients (93% vs 99%) and the average time to attempt interviews was reduced from a median of 4 to 2 days. During Y2, nearly 200 EH assessments were conducted. FoodCORE centers began documenting model practices such as streamlining and standardizing case-patient interviewing. Conclusion Centers used targeted resources and process evaluation to implement and document practices that improve the completeness and timeliness of FBD surveillance and outbreak response activities

  11. Improving Response to Foodborne Disease Outbreaks in the United States: Findings of the Foodborne Disease Centers for Outbreak Response Enhancement (FoodCORE), 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggerstaff, Gwen Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Each year foodborne diseases (FBD) affect approximately 1 in 6 Americans, resulting in 128 000 hospitalizations and 3000 deaths. Decreasing resources impact the ability of public health officials to identify, respond to, and control FBD outbreaks. Geographically dispersed outbreaks necessitate multijurisdictional coordination across all levels of the public health system. Rapid response depends on rapid detection. Targeted resources were provided to state and local health departments to improve completeness and timeliness of laboratory, epidemiology, and environmental health (EH) activities for FBD surveillance and outbreak response. Foodborne Disease Centers for Outbreak Response Enhancement (FoodCORE) centers, selected through competitive award, implemented work plans designed to make outbreak response more complete and faster in their jurisdiction. Performance metrics were developed and used to evaluate the impact and effectiveness of activities. Departments of Health in Connecticut, New York City, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, and Wisconsin. From the first year (Y1) of the program in October 2010 to the end of the second year (Y2) in December 2012, the centers completed molecular subtyping for a higher proportion of Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, and Listeria (SSL) isolates (86% vs 98%) and reduced the average time to complete testing from a median of 8 to 4 days. The centers attempted epidemiologic interviews with more SSL case-patients (93% vs 99%), and the average time to attempt interviews was reduced from a median of 4 to 2 days. During Y2, nearly 200 EH assessments were conducted. FoodCORE centers began documenting model practices such as streamlining and standardizing case-patient interviewing. Centers used targeted resources and process evaluation to implement and document practices that improve the completeness and timeliness of FBD surveillance and outbreak response activities in several public health settings. Food

  12. Targeting the environmental assessment of veterinary drugs with the multi-species-soil system (MS{center_dot}3) agricultural soil microcosms: the ivermectin case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonell-Martin, G.; Pro-Gonzalez, J.; Aragones-Grunert, P.; Babib-Vich, M. M.; Fernandez-Rorija, C.; Tarazona-Lafarga, J. V.

    2011-07-01

    The environmental risk assessment of the veterinary pharmaceutical ivermectin is receiving significant attention. This paper assesses the capacity of the MS{center_dot}3 soil microcosm as a tool for targeting the environmental impact assessment of veterinary drugs, using ivermectin as model. Two screening MS{center_dot}3 were performed using different European soils; one with a soil collected in an agricultural station near to Madrid, Spain and a second with a soil collected in a farm area close to York, UK. Soils were fortified with ivermectin at the following ranges: 0.01-10 mg kg{sup -}1 and 0.1-100 mg kg{sup -}1 in the Madrid and York studies, respectively. The effects on earthworms, plants and soil microorganisms were assessed in the Madrid soil. Toxicity tests on aquatic organisms (algae, cladocerans and in vitro fish cell line RTLW1) were also conducted with the leachates. No effects were observed in earthworms and plants at any tested concentration; reduction in the respiration rate (< 5%) of soil microorganisms was detected. Earthworm/soil bioconcentration factors decreased with the increase in soil concentrations and were higher for the York soil. Effects on daphnids were observed in tested leachates; based on measured levels of ivermectin in the leachates an EC50 of about 0.5{mu}gL{sup -}1 can be estimated. Comparisons based on toxicity data and equilibrium partitioning confirmed that the main risk is expected to be related to the high sensitivity of cladocerans. The results confirm that MS{center_dot}3 systems are cost-effective tools for assessing the impact of veterinary pharmaceuticals when applied to agricultural land, as previously demonstrated for antimicrobials. (Author) 39 refs.

  13. A continuation of base-line studies for environmentally monitoring Space Transportation Systems (STS) at John F. Kennedy Space Center. Volume 4: Threatened and endangered species of the Kennedy Space Center. Part 1: Marine turtle studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhart, L. M.

    1980-01-01

    The status of marine turtle populations in the KSC area was studied using data from previous results from ground and aerial surveillance conducted from 1976 to April 1979. During ground surveillance, various data were recorded on emergent turtles such as: species, weight, tag number (if previously tagged), time discovered, activity at discovery and the location of discovery. Observations were also made on nesting and reproductive characteristics, population estimates, immigration and emigration and growth rate of the turtles. Mortality studies were additionally made and autopsies performed on dead turtles found in the area. It is concluded that further mortality documentation should be done just prior to and just after a future space launch operation in order to accurately assess the cause and effect relationship of such a launch on the turtle population.

  14. Emergency Contraceptive Pill (ECP) Use and Experiences at College Health Centers in the Mid-Atlantic United States: Changes since ECP Went Over-the-Counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the availability of emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) at college health centers since ECP went over-the-counter (OTC) in 2006. Related issues, such as distribution procedure, existence of a written protocol, personnel involved, contraindications, follow-up procedures, methods of advertising, and staff attitudes, were…

  15. Perceptions of Northeastern United States Recreation Directors regarding the Impact of Recreation Centers on Students, the Campus Community, and Institutional Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Recreation center growth on college campuses has garnered national attention. According to Reisberg (2001), today's students have grown accustomed to utilizing elaborate workout facilities and have begun to demand that their college or university of choice provide that space. Through investing money into recreation facilities, college and…

  16. VITICULTURAL POTENTIAL ASSESSMENT AND NATURAL TERROIR UNITS DELINIATION USING ENVINRONMENTAL CRITERIA SPECIFIC TO ROMANIAN VITICULTURE. CASE STUDY: URLAŢI WINE-GROWING CENTER, DEALUL MARE VINEYARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quenol Herve

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The study area is Urlaţi wine growing centre - Dealul Mare vineyard (Prahova County, Romania. The aim of the research is the assessment of viticultural potential and delineation of natural terroir units by using a new GIS based multicriteria methodology that includes environmental criteria specific to Romanian viticulture. The viticultural potential revealed by the methodology is expressed as types of wines that can be produced in a given area in accordance with its ecological suitability. The spatial distribution of the environmental parameters and the computation of their joint influence were achieved by using GIS. The results show that Urlaţi wine-growing centre has the viticultural potential to produce red and white quality wines. The wine production directions revealed by the research are similarl to those traditionally practised in Urlaţi wine growing centre that validates the methodology. The map of viticultural potential reveals the existence of three distinct natural terroir units: a natural terroir unit suitable for red quality wines production (73.16% from the assessed area; a natural terroir unit suitable for white quality wines and red table wines production (25.41% from the assessed area; a natural terroir unit suitable exclusively for white quality wines production (1.42% from the assessed area.

  17. The business of palliative medicine--part 4: Potential impact of an acute-care palliative medicine inpatient unit in a tertiary care cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Declan

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a hematology/oncology computerized discharge database was qualitatively and quantitatively reviewed using an empirical methodology. The goal was to identify potential patients for admission to a planned acute-care, palliative medicine inpatient unit. Patients were identified by the International Classifications of Disease (ICD-9) codes. A large heterogenous population, comprising up to 40 percent of annual discharges from the Hematology/Oncology service, was identified. If management decided to add an acute-care, palliative medicine unit to the hospital, these are the patients who would benefit. The study predicted a significant change in patient profile, acuity, complexity, and resource utilization in current palliative care services. This study technique predicted the actual clinical load of the acute-care unit when it opened and was very helpful in program development. Our model predicted that 695 patients would be admitted to the acute-care palliative medicine unit in the first year of operation; 655 patients were actually admitted during this time.

  18. A Nationwide Survey of Quality of End-of-Life Cancer Care in Designated Cancer Centers, Inpatient Palliative Care Units, and Home Hospices in Japan: The J-HOPE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Sato, Kazuki; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    End-of-life (EOL) cancer care in general hospitals and home care has not previously been evaluated in Japan. This study aimed to evaluate EOL cancer care from the perspective of bereaved family members in nationwide designated cancer centers, inpatient palliative care units (PCUs), and home hospices in Japan. We conducted a cross-sectional, anonymous, self-report questionnaire survey for bereaved family members of cancer patients in March 2008 for 56 designated cancer centers and in June 2007 for 100 PCUs and 14 home hospices. Outcomes were overall care satisfaction, structure and process of care (Care Evaluation Scale), and achievement of a good death (Good Death Inventory). In designated cancer centers, PCUs, and home hospices, 2794 (response rate 59%), 5312 (response rate 69%), and 292 (response rate 67%) bereaved family members participated, respectively. Mean scores for overall care satisfaction were high for all places of death, at 4.3 ± 1.2 for designated cancer centers, 5.0 ± 1.2 for PCUs, and 5.0 ± 1.0 for home hospices. Designated cancer centers showed significantly lower ratings than PCUs and home hospices for structure and process of care and achievement of a good death (P = 0.0001 each). Home hospices were rated significantly higher than PCUs for achievement of a good death (P = 0.0001). The main findings of this study were: (1) overall, bereaved family members were satisfied with end-of-life care in all three places of death; (2) designated cancer centers were inferior to PCUs and home hospices and had more room for improvement; and 3) home hospices were rated higher than PCUs for achieving a good death, although home hospices remain uncommon in Japan. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Understanding the importance of medical student clerkships in poor health outcome regions served by Area Health Education Centers (AHECs) in impoverished locations of Southern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashruta

    2017-01-01

    Area Health Education Centers provide health professional students the opportunity to explore the benefits of practicing in a rural and underserved location. The status of health conditions in chronic disease patients residing in impoverished regions of the US provides the chance to understand the factors that are responsible for constant inadequate outcomes in underserved and rural communities. Many limiting barriers to positive health outcomes occur in disproportionate numbers in the Southern Black Belt. Students should consider participating in rural and underserved clerkships, and ultimately a career as a health care provider in a poor health outcome region. In addition, promising programs (e.g. telemedicine, community health workers) to help implement patient-centered evidence-based interventions can tackle current chronic disease issues commonly encountered by health professionals who work with diverse patient populations.

  20. United States Army Aviation Technology Center of Excellence (ATCoE) to the NASA/Army Systems and Software Engineering Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    Consortium / Presentation - Von Braun Center for Science & Innovation, Inc - NACRA - DOD TECHMATCH Investigation “Where we‟re going” 7U.S. Army Aviation...efficient  Entry point for the right solution at the right time by key stakeholders.  Future improved collaboration with Navy COE, ( NACRA : http...www.navair.navy.mil/ nacra /) current DoD Technology activities, and others as they are identified U.S. Army Aviation & Missile Life Cycle Management

  1. Occurrence of TEM, SHV and CTX-M β lactamases in clinical isolates of Proteus species in a tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaubey, Mohit; Shenoy, Suchitra

    2017-04-25

    Extended spectrum beta lactamases (ESBL) are responsible for increased resistance to third generation cephalosporins. Proteus species is an important cause of both community acquired and nosocomial infections. The Proteus spp is usually susceptible to beta lactam drugs but there is progressive increase in beta lactam resistance and recently ESBLs are also fast spreading to this species. This study was conducted to study ESBL production and occurrence of TEM, SHV and CTX M beta lactamases in clinical isolates of Proteus spp in a tertiary care centre. This prospective hospital based study was carried out in Microbiology, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore over 9 months. All non-duplicate consecutive proteus isolates were identified and antibiotic susceptibility testing done. ESBL detection was done by double disk synergy method and TEM, SHV, CTX M genes were detected by PCR. 84 proteus isolates from urine (29), blood (1), respiratory secretions (2), tissue (20) and exudates (47) were included in the study. 20.2% (17) were ESBL positive by disk synergy method. CTX M was present in 6, TEM in 2 and both in 9 isolates. SHV was not present in any isolate. Our findings showed that 20% of clinical isolates of proteus spp were ESBL producers. 52% of ESBL positive isolates carried both TEM and CTX M genes followed by CTX M alone (35%) and only 11% had TEM alone. This stresses on the fact that ESBL detection should be done routinely in proteus isolates and the genotype surveyed periodically for better management. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Design and implementation of the Molecular Imaging Unit for large animals at the National Center for Cardiovascular Research; Diseno y puesta en marcha de la Unidad de Imagen Molecular para animales grandes del Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, G.; Delgado Alberquilla, R.; Moreno Lopez, J.; Escudero Toro, R.

    2011-07-01

    in this paper describes the most important imaging techniques to be used with the latest equipment as well as the future of PET-MRI combination, its application in research on large animals and the implications for the design of the units, shielding calculation management sources of radiation and waste. This has required value and integrate the specific requirements of a research center in terms of bio security, care of large animals (pigs), health status of animals in an environment of highly demanding conditions PR.

  3. Perencanaan Perawatan Mesin pada Unit Pembangkit Listrik Tenaga Diesel dengan Metode Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) di PT. PLN (Persero) Pembangkitan Sumatera Utara Titi Kuning Medan

    OpenAIRE

    Hutabarat, David

    2015-01-01

    Pembangkit Listrik Tenaga Diesel (PLTD) merupakan suatu stasiun pembangkit tenaga. Permasalahan yang dihadapi PLTD Titi Kuning Medan dimana sering terjadi kendala pada proses electricity production yang disebabkan tidak bekerjanya sistem pada mesin pembangkit listrik yang diakibatkan kerusakan pada mesin dengan tiba-tiba. Kerusakan yang paling sering terjadi pada mesin pembangkit adalah pada mesin unit IV dan sistem perawatannya lebih bersifat corrective maintenance. Berdasarkan kondisi in...

  4. Effects of early physiotherapy with respect to severity of pneumonia of elderly patients admitted to an intensive care unit: a single center study in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Chigira, Yusuke; Takai, Tomoko; Igusa, Hironobu; Dobashi, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We performed early physiotherapy for elderly patients with pneumonia admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), and examined the effects of this early physiotherapy on the severity of pneumonia. [Subjects and Methods] Patients for whom physiotherapy was started the day after admission to the ICU (acute phase) were assigned to the early intervention group and compared with patients in the standard intervention group. All patients were divided into three groups (Groups I, II, and III) ...

  5. Specific Antigens by Federal Entity in Patients at the Transplant Unit of Specialities Hospital, National Medical Center Twenty-First Century, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Rivera, J C H; Ibarra Villanueva, A; Espinoza Pérez, R; Cancino López, J D; Silva Rueda, I R; Rodríguez Gómez, R; García Covarrubias, L; Reyes Díaz, E; Pérez López, M J; Salazar Mendoza, M

    2016-03-01

    The study of the kidney transplant involves understanding the immunologic basis, such as histocompatibility and the genetic basis of a population. In Mexico, the study of the genetic basis has led to a genetic map by federal entities. We performed an HLA study with 1,276 kidney transplant patients (recipients and donors) in the Hospital of the National Medical Center Twenty-First Century, determining HLA class I (A, B, and Cw) and class II (DRβ1 and DQβ1) antigens with the use of SSOP-PCR. A descriptive analysis was conducted with measures of central tendency (mean, SD). Of 1,276 HLA patients studied, we obtained 2,552 results for each class by the composition of the 2 haplotypes, and for HLA-Cw we processed 796 patients, for a total of 1,592 antigens for this class. We found antigens specific to each federal entity, and it was found that the Federal District had the highest number of specific antigens (10) followed by Morelos (7), Querétaro and Mexico State (3 each), and Tamaulipas, Aguascalientes, Michoacán, Guerrero, Puebla, and Oaxaca (1 each). The genetic map allows us to know proportions of antigens in every state in the center and south of Mexico owing to the diversity and area of influence of the National Medical Center XXIst Century, as well as the wide number of patients. Furthermore, there are still preserved proportionally distinct genetic roots in every entity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Implementation Costs of an Enhanced Recovery After Surgery Program in the United States: A Financial Model and Sensitivity Analysis Based on Experiences at a Quaternary Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Alexander B; Grant, Michael C; Pio Roda, Claro; Hobson, Deborah; Pawlik, Timothy; Wu, Christopher L; Wick, Elizabeth C

    2016-03-01

    Despite positive results from several international Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) protocols, the United States has been slow to adopt ERAS protocols, in part due to concern regarding the expenses of such a program. We sought to evaluate the potential annual net cost savings of implementing a US-based ERAS program. Using data from existing publications and experience with an ERAS program, a model of net financial costs was developed for surgical groups of escalating numbers of annual cases. Our example scenario provided a financial analysis of the implementation of an ERAS program at a United States academic institution based on data from the ERAS Program for Colorectal Surgery at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Based on available data from the United States, ERAS programs lead to reductions in lengths of hospital stay that range from 0.7 to 2.7 days and substantial direct cost savings. Using example data from a quaternary hospital, the considerable cost of $552,783 associated with implementation of an ERAS program was offset by even greater savings in the first year of nearly $948,500, yielding a net savings of $395,717. Sensitivity analysis across several caseload and direct cost scenarios yielded similar savings in 20 of the 27 projections. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery protocols have repeatedly led to reduction in length of hospital stay and improved surgical outcomes. A financial model, based on published data and experience, projects that investment in an ERAS program can also lead to net financial savings for US hospitals. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical Application of the Quick Sepsis-Related Organ Failure Assessment Score at Intensive Care Unit Admission in Patients with Bacteremia: A Single-Center Experience of Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Jung Na

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background We evaluated the clinical usefulness of the quick Sepsis-Related Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA score (based on the 2016 definition of sepsis at intensive care unit admission in Korean patients with bacteremia. Methods We retrospectively analyzed clinical data from 236 patients between March 2011 and February 2016. In addition to the qSOFA, the Modified Early Warning score (MEWS and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS criteria were calculated. Results The patients’ median age was 69 years, and 61.0% were male. Of the patients, 127 (53.8% had a qSOFA score ≥2 points. They had significantly higher rates of septic shock, thrombocytopenia, and hyperlactatemia, and increased requirements for ventilator care, neuromuscular blocking agents, vasopressors, and hemodialysis within 72 hours after intensive care unit admission. They also had a significantly higher 28-day mortality rate. When analyzed using common thresholds (MEWS ≥5 and ≥2 SIRS criteria, patients with a MEWS ≥5 had the same results as those with a qSOFA score ≥2 (P < 0.05. However, patients with ≥2 SIRS criteria showed no significant differences. Conclusions Our results show that a qSOFA score ≥2 at admission is a useful screening tool for predicting disease severity and medical resource usage within 72 hours after admission, and for predicting 28-day mortality rates in patients with bacteremia. In addition, qSOFA scores may be more useful than SIRS criteria in terms of prognostic utility.

  8. The United States Army Logistics Center Historical Summary. (RCS-HIS-6 (R2)). 1 October 1976 to 30 September 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-10

    5 August 1977 Operations and Administration COL D.G. Smaw III until 31 August 1978 Directorate COL P.C. Hains 6 September 1978 Evaluation and Test...Relocation of USALOGC PAC to Ft Lee, VA; Ltr, COL Smaw to Cdr, US Army Quartermaster Center and Ft Lee, 17 Feb 78, subj: Relocation of USALOGC PAC to Fort...from COL Smaw . 87. C&D, S-AHFR, FY 78-2, pp. 4-7. 88. Ibid., FY 78-1, p. 14; FY 78-2, p. 10; See also LOGCAB VI, 19-20 Oct 76, pp. 4-1 to 4-5. 89. C&D, S

  9. Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome requiring tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit: impact on managing uncertainty for patient-centered communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert F; Gustin, Jillian

    2013-09-01

    A case of acute lung injury (ALI) progressing to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation (ETMV) is presented. The palliative medicine service was asked to address concerns expressed by the patient's spouse reflecting uncertainty regarding outcome expectations. Acknowledging and confronting the uncertainties of a critical illness is an essential component of patient-centered communication. Addressing and managing uncertainty for the case scenario requires consideration of both short- and long-term outcomes including mortality, ventilator independence, and adverse effects on quality of life for survivors. In this paper, ALI/ARDS requiring ETMV in the ICU was used as a focal point for preparing a prognostic assessment incorporating these issues. This assessment was based on a review of recently published literature regarding mortality and ventilator independence of survivors for adult patients receiving ETMV for ALI/ARDS in the ICU. In the studies reviewed, long-term survival reported at 60 days to 1 year was 50-73% with greater than 84% of the survivors in each study breathing independently. Selected articles discussing outcomes other than mortality or recovery of respiratory function, particularly quality of life implications for ALI/ARDS survivors, were also reviewed. A case of of ALI/ARDS requiring ETMV in the ICU is used to illustrate the situation of an incapacitated critically ill patient where the outcome is uncertain. Patient-centered communication should acknowledge and address this uncertainty. Managing uncertainty consists of effectively expressing a carefully formulated prognostic assessment and using sound communication principles to alleviate the distress associated with the uncertain outcome probabilities.

  10. EnviroAtlas - NatureServe Analysis of Imperiled or Federally Listed Species by HUC-12 for the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset includes analysis by NatureServe of species that are Imperiled (G1/G2) or Listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA) by 12-digit...

  11. Risk Factors and Outcomes Related to Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Admission after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Single-Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, Marta; Amigoni, Angela; Contin, Annaelena; Cattelan, Manuela; Carraro, Elisa; Campagnano, Emiliana; Tumino, Manuela; Calore, Elisabetta; Marzollo, Antonio; Mainardi, Chiara; Boaro, Maria Paola; Nizzero, Marta; Pettenazzo, Andrea; Basso, Giuseppe; Messina, Chiara

    2017-08-01

    To describe incidence, causes, and outcomes related to pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), we investigated the risk factors predisposing to PICU admission and prognostic factors in terms of patient survival. From October 1998 to April 2015, 496 children and young adults (0 to 23 years) underwent transplantation in the HSCT unit. Among them, 70 (14.1%) were admitted to PICU. The 3-year cumulative incidence of PICU admission was 14.3%. The main causes of PICU admission were respiratory failure (36%), multiple organ failure (16%), and septic shock (13%). The overall 90-day cumulative probability of survival after PICU admission was 34.3% (95% confidence interval, 24.8% to 47.4%). In multivariate analysis, risk factors predisposing to PICU admission were allogeneic HSCT (versus autologous HSCT, P = .030) and second or third HSCT (P = .018). Characteristics significantly associated with mortality were mismatched HSCT (P = .011), relapse of underlying disease before PICU admission (P < .001), acute respiratory distress syndrome at admission (P = .012), hepatic failure at admission (P = .021), and need for invasive ventilation during PICU course (P < .001). Our data indicate which patients have a high risk for PICU admission after HSCT and for dismal outcomes after PICU stay. These findings may provide support for the clinical decision-making process on the opportunity of PICU admission for severely compromised patients after HSCT. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Early treatment of imported falciparum malaria in the intermediate and intensive care unit setting: an 8-year single-center retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwake, Lukas; Streit, Judith Pamela; Edler, Lutz; Encke, Jens; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Junghanss, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Imported falciparum malaria is characterized by a broad spectrum of potentially life-threatening complications that may arise even after initiation of appropriate antimalarial drug therapy. Hence, at Heidelberg University Hospital, all patients with newly diagnosed falciparum malaria are initially treated in the intermediate care unit (IMC) or intensive care unit (ICU). The present study was undertaken to evaluate critically the benefit of this strategy, which includes daily consultation with senior specialists in tropical medicine. We conducted a retrospective cohort study at the 14-bed combined IMC/ICU of a 1,685-bed university hospital. A cohort of 122 patients with imported falciparum malaria admitted from 1 January 1996 to 31 December 2003 was included. Thirty-four patients (27.9%) developed complications, defined according to the current World Health Organization classification. Most patients (80.3%) studied did not take the recommended chemoprophylaxis against malaria. The majority of patients (89.3% [n = 109]) could be adequately treated in the IMC. Life-threatening complications requiring ICU support occurred in 13 patients (10.7%). All complications were successfully managed. Fifty-five patients (45.1%) fulfilling recently published criteria for outpatient treatment had an excellent therapeutic response and did not require ICU support. This retrospective evaluation demonstrated favourable therapeutic results in hospitalized patients with imported falciparum malaria. Both initial treatment in the medical IMC/ICU and close collaboration between intensivists and specialists in tropical medicine may improve disease outcome among affected patients. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

  13. Outcomes of pediatric severe traumatic brain injury patients treated in adult trauma centers with and without added qualifications in pediatrics - United States, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle, Fernando; Xu, Likang; Pearson, William S; Spelke, Bridget; Sugerman, David E

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important public health problem and little is known about site of care and outcomes of children with severe TBI. Across the country, most injured children are treated in adult trauma centers (ATCs). Recent literature suggests that ATCs with added qualifications in pediatrics (ATC-AQs) can have improved outcomes for pediatric trauma patients overall. This study characterizes the population of pediatric severe TBI patients treated at ATCs and investigates the effect of treatment at ATC-AQs versus ATCs on mortality. Using the 2009 National Trauma Data Bank, pediatric (age 0-17 years old) severe TBI (head Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥3) patient visits at level I and II ATCs and ATC-AQs were analyzed for patient and hospital characteristics. The primary outcome was in-patient mortality. Multivariate analysis was performed on propensity score weighted populations to investigate effect of treatment at ATC-AQs versus ATCs on survival. A total of 7,057 pediatric severe TBI patient visits in 398 level I and II trauma centers were observed, with 3,496 (49.5%) at ATC-AQs and 3,561 (50.5%) at ATCs. The mortality rate was 8.6% at ATC-AQs versus 10.3% at ATCs (p =0.0144). After adjusting for differences in case mix, patient, and hospital characteristics, mortality was not significantly different for patients treated in ATC-AQs versus ATCs (aOR = 0.896, 95% CI = 0.629-1.277). Mortality was significantly associated with age, length of hospital stay, firearm injury, GCS score, and head AIS (p pediatric severe TBI patients treated at ATC-AQs versus ATCs. Being younger, uninsured, and having severe injuries was associated with increased mortality. This study is limited by the exclusion of transferred patients and potentially underestimates differences in outcomes. Further research is needed to clarify the role of ATC additional pediatric qualifications in the treatment of severe TBI.

  14. Three-year clinical outcomes of relapsing multiple sclerosis patients treated with dimethyl fumarate in a United States community health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoot, Kyle; Spinelli, Kateri J; Stuchiner, Tamela; Lucas, Lindsay; Chen, Chiayi; Grote, Lois; Baraban, Elizabeth; Kresa-Reahl, Kiren; Cohan, Stanley

    2017-05-01

    Following approval of dimethyl fumarate (DMF), we established a registry of relapsing multiple sclerosis (RMS) patients taking DMF at our community MS center. To track DMF patients' tolerability, disease progression, and lymphopenia. Patients prescribed DMF for RMS from March 2013 to March 2016 were prospectively enrolled ( N = 412). Baseline data, clinical relapses, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) activity, discontinuation, and lymphocyte counts were captured through chart review. The mean age of patients starting DMF was 49.4 ± 12.0 years and 70% transitioned from a previous disease-modifying therapy (DMT). Of the patients, 38% discontinued DMF, 76% of whom discontinued due to side effects. Clinical relapse and MRI activity were low. Comparing patients who transitioned from interferon-β (IFN), glatiramer acetate (GA), or natalizumab (NTZ), patients previously on NTZ had higher rates of relapse than those previously on GA (annualized relapse rate p = 0.039, percent relapse p = 0.021). Grade III lymphopenia developed in 11% of patients. Lymphopenia was associated with older age ( p < 0.001) and longer disease duration ( p < 0.001). Given the high rates of lymphopenia and discontinuation, it has become our clinical practice to more closely scrutinize older patients and those with a longer disease duration who are potential candidates for initiating DMF therapy.

  15. Adherence to guideline-directed venous thromboembolism prophylaxis among medical and surgical inpatients at 33 academic medical centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleyer, Anneliese M; Schreuder, Astrid B; Jarman, Kenneth M; Logerfo, James P; Goss, J Richard

    2011-01-01

    This study's purpose was to describe compliance with established venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis guidelines in medical and surgical inpatients at US academic medical centers (AMCs). Data were collected for a 2007 University HealthSystem Consortium Deep Vein Thrombosis/Pulmonary Embolism (DVT/PE) Benchmarking Project that explored VTE in AMCs. Prophylaxis was considered appropriate based on 2004 American College of Chest Physicians guidelines. A total of 33 AMCs from 30 states participated. In all, 48% of patients received guideline-directed prophylaxis-59% were medical and 41% were surgical patients. VTE history was more common among medical patients with guideline-directed prophylaxis. Surgical patients admitted from the emergency department and with higher illness severity were more likely to receive appropriate prophylaxis. Despite guidelines, VTE prophylaxis remains underutilized in these US AMCs, particularly among surgical patients. Because AMCs provide the majority of physician training and should reflect and set care standards, this appears to be an opportunity for practice and quality improvement and for education.

  16. [Epidemiologic descriptive study of the clinical characteristics of acute bronchiolitis in patients hospitalized at the pediatric unit of the Manatí Medical Center Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón Blanco, Zidnia M; Colón Rivera, Christian S; Matos González, Migdalis; Pérez Valentín, Brenda L; Rivera Fernández, Renato; Santiago Méndez, Isamir; Cintron, Vielka

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections are the main reason for pediatric visits both to physician's offices and emergency departments. Bronchiolitis is an acute viral respiratory disease that affects about 10% of infants each year and mostly those under age two. The aim of this study was to identify demographic, epidemiological characteristics and risk factors associated with cases of bronchiolitis admitted to the Manati Medical Center (MMC). In addition, we tried to establish the basis for the development of strategies to prevent of hospitalizations and complications in our Institution. A retrospective descriptive study was conducted in the pediatric wing of MMC in Manati, Puerto Rico between January and December 2009. A total of 508 children were included, 58 % of them male. The average age and weight were 12 +/- 5.3 months and 8.1 +/- 1.4 kg, respectively. We observed a higher predisposition among males as well as a statistically significant relationship between breastfeeding and protection from the disease. No relationship was observed between preterm birth and the parents' smoking habit and the development of the disease. However, the latter factor influences the length of hospital stay. The risk of bronchiolitis was seasonal with a peak between October and November. The presence of respiratory syncitial virus was confirmed in 67 % of the cases.

  17. Multilocus phylogeny reveals an association of agriculturally important Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) 11, and clinically important FSSC 5 and FSSC 3 + 4 with soybean roots in the north central United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitrampalam, P; Nelson, B

    2016-02-01

    The Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) includes important root pathogens of soybean in the United States, but the evolutionary lineages associated with soybean root rot are unknown. A multilocus phylogeny based on 93 isolates from soybean and pea roots from North Dakota and Minnesota revealed that root rot was associated with three known phylogenetic species, FSSC 3 + 4 (=Fusarium falciforme) (3 % of isolates), FSSC 5 (60 %), FSSC 11 (34 %), and one unknown species, FSSC X (2 %). Of these species FSSC 5 and FSSC 3 + 4 are clinically important while FSSC 11 is a plant pathogen. Isolates from FSSC 11 were pathogenic on soybean, dry bean, pea and lentil, and did not grow at 37 °C. However, isolates from FSSC 5 were weakly to non-pathogenic, but grew at 37 °C. Isolates from both FSSC 5 and FSSC 11 were highly resistant to fludioxonil in vitro. This is the first study revealing the pathogenic robustness of FSSC 11 in causing root rot among Fabaceae crops and also the association of clinically important members of the FSSC with roots of a widely grown field crop in the United States.

  18. Evaluation of Admission Indications, Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Obstetric Patients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of a Teaching Hospital Center: A Five-Year Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzi, Farnoush; Mirmansouri, Ali; Atrkar Roshan, Zahra; Naderi Nabi, Bahram; Biazar, Gelareh; Yazdipaz, Shima

    2017-06-01

    Care of obstetric patients has always been a challenge for critical care physicians, because in addition to their complex pregnancy-related disease, fetal viability is considered. The aim of this study was to review the admission indications, clinical characteristics and outcomes of obstetric patients, admitted to the intensive care unit of Alzzahra teaching hospital affiliated to Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran. This retrospective cohort study was conducted on pregnant /post-partum (up to 6 weeks) patients admitted to the ICU over a 5-year period from April 2009 to April, 2014. Data from 1019 subjects were analyzed. Overall, 90.1% of the patients were admitted in the postpartum period. The most common indications for admission were pregnancy related hypertensive disorders (27.5%) and obstetric hemorrhage (13.5%). Epilepsy (5.4%) and cardiac disease (5.2%) were the most common non-obstetric indications. Pregnancy-related hypertensive disorders and obstetric hemorrhage were the main reasons for admission, and epilepsy and cardiac disease were the most common non-obstetric indications. Efforts must be concentrated on increasing antenatal care.

  19. Effects of early physiotherapy with respect to severity of pneumonia of elderly patients admitted to an intensive care unit: a single center study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigira, Yusuke; Takai, Tomoko; Igusa, Hironobu; Dobashi, Kunio

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] We performed early physiotherapy for elderly patients with pneumonia admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), and examined the effects of this early physiotherapy on the severity of pneumonia. [Subjects and Methods] Patients for whom physiotherapy was started the day after admission to the ICU (acute phase) were assigned to the early intervention group and compared with patients in the standard intervention group. All patients were divided into three groups (Groups I, II, and III) based on the severity of pneumonia. We evaluated the ICU admission period, hospitalization period, and activities of daily living (ADL) before and after admission. [Results] With respect to the severity of pneumonia, Group II showed significant differences in the ICU admission period and rates of change in the operating range, cognitive domain, and Functional Independence Measure (FIM). Group III showed significant differences in the ICU admission period and rate of change in the cognitive domain (FIM item). The results were more favorable in the early intervention group than in the standard intervention group. [Conclusion] The ICU admission period was shorter and a reduction in the ADL level was prevented in Groups II, and III compared to Group I. This may have occurred because of the early rehabilitation.

  20. Joint China-United States Report for Year 1 Insulation Materials and Systems Project Area Clean Energy Research Center Building Energy Efficiency (CERC-BEE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Song, Bo [China Academy of Building Research; Zhang, Sisi [China Academy of Building Research

    2012-08-01

    In November of 2009, the presidents of China and the U.S. announced the establishment of the Clean Energy Research Center (CERC). This broad research effort is co-funded by both countries and involves a large number of research centers and universities in both countries. One part of this program is focused on improving the energy efficiency of buildings. One portion of the CERC-BEE was focused on building insulation systems. The research objective of this effort was to Identify and investigate candidate high performance fire resistant building insulation technologies that meet the goal of building code compliance for exterior wall applications in green buildings in multiple climate zones. A Joint Work Plan was established between researchers at the China Academy of Building Research and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Efforts in the first year under this plan focused on information gathering. The objective of this research program is to reduce building energy use in China via improved building insulation technology. In cold regions in China, residents often use inefficient heating systems to provide a minimal comfort level within inefficient buildings. In warmer regions, air conditioning has not been commonly used. As living standards rise, energy consumption in these regions will increase dramatically unless significant improvements are made in building energy performance. Previous efforts that defined the current state of the built environment in China and in the U.S. will be used in this research. In countries around the world, building improvements have typically followed the implementation of more stringent building codes. There have been several changes in building codes in both the U.S. and China within the last few years. New U.S. building codes have increased the amount of wall insulation required in new buildings. New government statements from multiple agencies in China have recently changed the requirements for buildings in terms of energy efficiency and

  1. Management of Hypertension in Primary Care Safety-Net Clinics in the United States: A Comparison of Community Health Centers and Private Physicians' Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontil, Valy; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Nguyen, Oanh Kieu; Guzman, David; Goldman, Lauren Elizabeth

    2017-04-01

    To examine adherence to guideline-concordant hypertension treatment practices at community health centers (CHCs) compared with private physicians' offices. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 2006 to 2010. We examined four guideline-concordant treatment practices: initiation of a new medication for uncontrolled hypertension, use of fixed-dose combination drugs for patients on multiple antihypertensive medications, use of thiazide diuretics among patients with uncontrolled hypertension on ≥3 antihypertensive medications, and use of aldosterone antagonist for resistant hypertension, comparing use at CHC with private physicians' offices overall and by payer group. We identified visits of nonpregnant adults with hypertension at CHCs and private physicians' offices. Medicaid patients at CHCs were as likely as privately insured individuals to receive a new medication for uncontrolled hypertension (AOR 1.0, 95 percent CI: 0.6-1.9), whereas Medicaid patients at private physicians' offices were less likely to receive a new medication (AOR 0.3, 95 percent CI: 0.1-0.6). Use of fixed-dose combination drugs was lower at CHCs (AOR 0.6, 95 percent CI: 0.4-0.9). Thiazide use for patients was similar in both settings (AOR 0.8, 95 percent CI: 0.4-1.7). Use of aldosterone antagonists was too rare (2.1 percent at CHCs and 1.5 percent at private clinics) to allow for statistically reliable comparisons. Increasing physician use of fixed-dose combination drugs may be particularly helpful in improving hypertension control at CHCs where there are higher rates of uncontrolled hypertension. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  2. [Perinatal mortality at the Medical Care Units of the IMSS (Mexico Social Security Institute), National Medical Center of Torreón].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez y Enríquez de Rivera, F C; Velázquez Trejo, M L; Roís Hernández, J

    1998-07-01

    To describe the situation of perinatal mortality during 1994 year in General Hospitals with Family Medicine number 16 and 18 of IMSS (Social Security Mexican Institut) National Medical Center in Torreón Coah. It was realized a retrospective study, were included 199 files of perinatal deaths occurred from January 1st to December 31 of 1994. The variables obtained were number of death for step, period, age, sex, weight and the cause of the cause of the death. Were eliminated the files without data of interest. For the analysis our utilized descriptive statistics. The rate of perinatal mortality was 20.17 per 1000 live birth, fetal death rate 9.58 by 1000 and the rate of neonatal death 12.97 per 1,000 live birth, fetal death rate 8.68 and neonatal death rate 12.30. The majority were in the perinatal period one with a rate of 16.71 by 1,000 live birth. Were most common in a male sex (53%) in pregnancies from 28 to 32 weeks (33.91%) and in babies with less of 1000 gr of weight (33.86%). The causes more frequents of deaths were the respiratory difficult syndrome (41.77%), the anomalies (19.62%) and hypoxia (9.49%). The perinatal mortality in our study was similar that in the rest of the country and is acorde with the literature. The perinatal mortality were in the perinatal period one. Is important to conduce a prospective studies.

  3. Redox activation of Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and Fe(III)-bleomycin by thioredoxin reductase: specificity of enzymatic redox centers and analysis of reactive species formation by ESR spin trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Judith M.; Cheng, Qing; Antholine, William E.; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Arnér, ArnerElias S.J.; Myers, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Thiosemicarbazones such as triapine (Tp) and Dp44mT are tridentate iron (Fe) chelators that have well-documented anti-neoplastic activity. While Fe-thiosemicarbazones can undergo redox-cycling to generate reactive species that may have important roles in their cytotoxicity, there is only limited insight into specific cellular agents that can rapidly reduce Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and thereby promote their redox activity. Here we report that thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1) and glutathione reductase (GR) have this activity, and that there is considerable specificity to the interactions between specific redox centers in these enzymes and different Fe(III) complexes. Site-directed variants of TrxR1 demonstrate that the selenocysteine (Sec) of the enzyme is not required, whereas the C59 residue and the flavin have important roles. While TrxR1 and GR have analogous C59/flavin motifs, TrxR is considerably faster than GR. For both enzymes, Fe(III)(Tp)2 is reduced faster than Fe(III)(Dp44mT)2. This reduction promotes redox cycling and the generation of hydroxyl radical (HO•) in a peroxide-dependent manner, even with low μM levels of Fe(Tp)2. TrxR also reduces Fe(III)-bleomycin and this activity is Sec-dependent. TrxR cannot reduce Fe(III)-EDTA at significant rates. Our findings are the first to demonstrate pro-oxidant reductive activation of Fe(III)-based antitumor thiosemicarbazones by interactions with specific enzyme species. The marked elevation of TrxR in many tumors could contribute to the selective tumor toxicity of these drugs by enhancing the redox activation of Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and the generation of reactive oxygen species such as HO• PMID:23485585

  4. Redox activation of Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and Fe(III)-bleomycin by thioredoxin reductase: specificity of enzymatic redox centers and analysis of reactive species formation by ESR spin trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Judith M; Cheng, Qing; Antholine, William E; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Arnér, Elias S J; Myers, Charles R

    2013-07-01

    Thiosemicarbazones such as Triapine (Tp) and Dp44mT are tridentate iron (Fe) chelators that have well-documented antineoplastic activity. Although Fe-thiosemicarbazones can undergo redox cycling to generate reactive species that may have important roles in their cytotoxicity, there is only limited insight into specific cellular agents that can rapidly reduce Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and thereby promote their redox activity. Here we report that thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1) and glutathione reductase (GR) have this activity and that there is considerable specificity to the interactions between specific redox centers in these enzymes and various Fe(III) complexes. Site-directed variants of TrxR1 demonstrate that the selenocysteine (Sec) of the enzyme is not required, whereas the C59 residue and the flavin have important roles. Although TrxR1 and GR have analogous C59/flavin motifs, TrxR is considerably faster than GR. For both enzymes, Fe(III)(Tp)2 is reduced faster than Fe(III)(Dp44mT)2. This reduction promotes redox cycling and the generation of hydroxyl radical (HO) in a peroxide-dependent manner, even with low-micromolar levels of Fe(Tp)2. TrxR also reduces Fe(III)-bleomycin and this activity is Sec-dependent. TrxR cannot reduce Fe(III)-EDTA at significant rates. Our findings are the first to demonstrate pro-oxidant reductive activation of Fe(III)-based antitumor thiosemicarbazones by interactions with specific enzyme species. The marked elevation of TrxR1 in many tumors could contribute to the selective tumor toxicity of these drugs by enhancing the redox activation of Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and the generation of reactive oxygen species such as HO. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Threatened & Endangered Species Occurrences

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The database consists of a single statewide coverage of location records for 54 species contained in the Kansas Natural Heritage Inventory database of the Kansas...

  6. Structure, Process, and Culture of Intensive Care Units Treating Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Survey of Centers Participating in the American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Aziz S; McCredie, Victoria A; Mainprize, Todd G; Gomez, David; Nathens, Avery B

    2017-10-01

    Outcome after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) differs substantially between hospitals. Explaining this variation begins with understanding the differences in structures and processes of care, particularly at intensive care units (ICUs) where acute TBI care takes place. We invited trauma medical directors (TMDs) from 187 centers participating in the American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program (ACS TQIP) to complete a survey. The survey domains included ICU model, type, availability of specialized units, staff, training programs, standard protocols and order sets, approach to withdrawal of life support, and perceived level of neurosurgeons' engagement in the ICU management of TBI. One hundred forty-two TMDs (76%) completed the survey. Severe TBI patients are admitted to dedicated neurocritical care units in 52 hospitals (37%), trauma ICUs in 44 hospitals (31%), general ICUs in 34 hospitals (24%), and surgical ICUs in 11 hospitals (8%). Fifty-seven percent are closed units. Board-certified intensivists directed 89% of ICUs, whereas 17% were led by neurointensivists. Sixty percent of ICU directors were general surgeons. Thirty-nine percent of hospitals had critical care fellowships and 11% had neurocritical care fellowships. Fifty-nine percent of ICUs had standard order sets and 61% had standard protocols specific for TBI, with the most common protocol relating to intracranial pressure management (53%). Only 43% of TMDs were satisfied with the current level of neurosurgeons' engagement in the ICU management of TBI; 46% believed that neurosurgeons should be more engaged; 11% believed they should be less engaged. In the largest survey of North American ICUs caring for TBI patients, there is substantial variation in the current approaches to ICU care for TBI, highlighting multiple opportunities for comparative effectiveness research.

  7. Improving intensive care unit-based palliative care delivery: a multi-center, multidisciplinary survey of critical care clinician attitudes and beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysham, Nicholas G.; Hua, May; Hough, Catherine L.; Gundel, Stephanie; Docherty, Sharron L.; Jones, Derek M.; Reagan, Owen; Goucher, Haley; Mcfarlin, Jessica; Galanos, Anthony; Knudsen, Nancy; Cox, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Addressing the quality gap in intensive care unit (ICU)-based palliative care is limited by uncertainty about acceptable models of collaborative specialist and generalist care. Therefore, we characterized the attitudes of physicians and nurses about palliative care delivery in an ICU environment. Design Mixed-methods study. Setting Medical and surgical ICUs at three large academic hospitals. Participants 303 nurses, intensivists, and advanced practice providers. Measurements and main results Clinicians completed written surveys that assessed attitudes about specialist palliative care presence and integration into the ICU setting, as well as acceptability of 23 published palliative care prompts (‘triggers’) for specialist consultation. Most (n=225, 75%) reported that palliative care consultation was underutilized. Prompting consideration of eligibility for specialist consultation by electronic health record searches for triggers was most preferred (n=123, 41%); only 17 (6%) felt current processes were adequate. The most acceptable specialist triggers were metastatic malignancy, unrealistic goals of care, end of life decision making, and persistent organ failure. Advanced age, length of stay, and duration of life support were the least acceptable. Screening led by either specialists or ICU teams was equally preferred. Central themes derived from qualitative analysis of 65 written responses to open-ended items included concerns about the roles of physicians and nurses, implementation, and impact on ICU team-family relationships. Conclusions Integration of palliative care specialists in the ICU is broadly acceptable and desired. However, the most commonly used current triggers for prompting specialist consultation were among the least well accepted, while more favorable triggers are difficult to abstract from electronic health record systems. There is also disagreement about the role of ICU nurses in palliative care delivery. These findings provide

  8. The influence of intensive care unit-acquired central line-associated bloodstream infection on in-hospital mortality: A single-center risk-adjusted analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S W; Gantner, D; McGloughlin, S; Leong, T; Worth, L J; Klintworth, G; Scheinkestel, C; Pilcher, D; Cheng, A C; Udy, A A

    2016-05-01

    To explore the risk-adjusted association between intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) and in-hospital mortality. Retrospective observational study. Forty-five-bed adult ICU. All non-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation ICU admissions between July 1, 2008, and April 30, 2014, requiring a central venous catheter (CVC), with a length of stay > 48 hours, were included. Data were extracted from our infection prevention and ICU databases. A multivariable logistic regression model was constructed to identify independent risk factors for ICU-acquired CLABSI. The propensity toward developing CLABSI was then included in a logistic regression of in-hospital mortality. Six thousand three hundred fifty-three admissions were included. Forty-six cases of ICU-acquired CLABSI were identified. The overall CLABSI rate was 1.12 per 1,000 ICU CVC-days. Significant independent risk factors for ICU-acquired CLABSI included: double lumen catheter insertion (odds ratio [OR], 2.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-5.77), CVC exposure > 7 days (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.06-4.04), and CVC insertion before 2011 (OR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.22-3.97). ICU-acquired CLABSI was crudely associated with greater in-hospital mortality, although this was attenuated once the propensity to develop CLABSI was adjusted for (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 0.54-2.68). A greater propensity toward ICU-acquired CLABSI was independently associated with higher in-hospital mortality, although line infection itself was not. The requirement for prolonged specialized central venous access appears to be a key risk factor for ICU-acquired CLABSI, and likely informs mortality as a marker of persistent organ dysfunction. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Evaluation of the Level of Hand Hygiene in Intensive Care Unit personnel of Kamkar Education, Research and Treatment Center of Qom in 2014, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Ziasheikholeslami

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Compliance of hand hygiene among staffs is one of the most important ways of hospital infection control. Existance of a uniform method for the measurement of hand hygiene in hospitals could have a major impact on the prevention of infection. In this study, the rate of hand hygiene in ICU personnel of Kamkar hospital, was investigated.                                                                                                                                                Methods: This study was conducted as a descriptive cross-sectional study on all ICU personnel of Kamkar Education, Research and Treatment Center of Qom in 2014. To collect the data, a checklist sent from the Ministry of Health (recommended by the World Health Organization was used. Results: In this study, the mean compliance of hand hygiene in ICU was 44.5%, of which the highest percentage was allocated to the nurses. Also, use of alcohol solution for hand rubbing was more than water and soap, and the highest rate of hand hygiene compliance was reported for situations after exposure to blood and patient’s body fluids. The least compliance was related to the situations before contact with patient. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, It is necessary that more trainings be given to improve hand hygiene compliance, some arrangements be made to avoid overwork of personnel, and the equipments needed for this health behavior be provided.

  10. Uncommon Species and Other Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department's Natural Heritage Inventory (NHI) maintains a database of uncommon, rare, threatened and endangered species and natural...

  11. Aluminum solubility and mobility in relation to organic carbon in surface soils affected by six tree species of the northeastern United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, F.A.; Fitzhugh, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    We compared Al solubility and mobility in surface soils among six tree species (sugar maple [Acer saccharum], white ash [Fraxinus americana], red maple [Acer rubrum, L.], American beech [Fagus grandifolia, Ehrh.], red oak [Quercus rubra, L.], and hemlock [Tsuga canadensis, Carr.]) in a mixed

  12. Growing and marketing woody species to support pollinators: An emerging opportunity for forest, conservation, and native plant nurseries in the Northeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas Dumroese; Tara Luna

    2016-01-01

    The decline of insects that pollinate flowers is garnering more attention by land managers, policymakers, and the general public. Nursery managers who grow native trees, shrubs, and woody vines have a promising opportunity to showcase these species, marketing their contributions to pollinator health and other ecosystem services in urban and wild landscapes....

  13. Modeling potential future individual tree-species distributions in the eastern United States under a climate change scenario: a case study with Pinus virginiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis R. Iverson; Anantha Prasad; Mark W. Schwartz; Mark W. Schwartz

    1999-01-01

    We are using a deterministic regression tree analysis model (DISTRIB) and a stochastic migration model (SHIFT) to examine potential distributions of ~66 individual species of eastern US trees under a 2 x CO2 climate change scenario. This process is demonstrated for Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana).

  14. Potential impacts of climate change on birds and trees of the eastern United States: newest climate scenarios and species abundance modelling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    L.R. Iverson; A.M. Prasad; S.N. Matthews; M.P. Peters

    2007-01-01

    Climate change is affecting an increasing number of species the world over, and evidence is mounting that these changes will continue to accelerate. There have been many studies that use a modelling approach to predict the effects of future climatic change on ecological systems, including by us (Iverson et al. 1999, Matthews et al. 2004); this modelling approach uses a...

  15. A new species of Aculops (Acari: Prostigmata: Eriophyidae) from Serbia on Dipsacus laciniatus L. (Dipsacaceae), a weed target of classical biological control in the United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    The new eriophyid mite species Aculops dipsaci n. sp. (Acari: Prostigmata: Eriophyidae) collected from Dipsacus laciniatus L. (Dipsacaceae) in northern Serbia is described and illustrated. Differential diagnosis is provided in comparison with Aculops salixis Xue, Song and Hong. This is the first e...

  16. PCR multiplexes discriminate Fusarium symbionts of invasive Euwallacea ambrosia beetles that inflict damage on numerous tree species throughout the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asian Euwallacea ambrosia beetles vector Fusarium mutualists. The ambrosial fusaria are all members of the Ambrosia Fusarium Clade (AFC) within the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC). Several Euwallacea-Fusarium mutualists have been introduced into non-native regions and have caused varying degr...

  17. Usage Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinaltenkamp, Michael; Plewa, Carolin; Gudergan, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    -actor value cocreation, this paper is the first to comprehensively andcoherently conceptualize the notion of a usage center. In doing so, the authorsbuild an important foundation for future theorizing related to the potentialemergence of usage centers as well as the cocreation of individual andcollective...

  18. Species and speciation in the fossil record

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allmon, Warren D; Yacobucci, Margaret M

    2016-01-01

    "Although the species is one of the fundamental units of biological classification, there is remarkably little consensus among biologists about what defines a species, even within distinct subdisciplines...

  19. Australian tiger snake (Notechis scutatus) and mexican coral snake (Micruris species) antivenoms prevent death from United States coral snake (Micrurus fulvius fulvius) venom in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Michael S; Hill, Robert E; Havey, Joshua M; Bogdan, Gregory M; Dart, Richard C

    2003-01-01

    Wyeth-Ayerst has discontinued production of Antivenin (Micrurus fulvius). Currently, there is no other approved coral snake antivenom available in the United States. This study was a randomized, placebo-controlled and blinded determination of the ability of a Mexican Micrurus (coral snake) antivenom and an Australian Notechis (tiger snake) antivenom to prevent lethality from a United States Micrurus fulvius fulvius venom in a mouse model. Venom dosing was based on an LD50 determined for this experiment. Our comparison groups included: (1) M. f. fulvius venom + Micrurus antivenom, (2) M. f. fulvius venom + Notechis antivenom, (3) M. f. fulvius venom + protein control, (4) 0.9% normal saline + protein control, (5) saline + Notechis antivenom, (6) saline + Micrurus antivenom. Venom dose was 5 times the determined LD50. The antivenom amounts were capable of neutralizing 10 times the venom injected (50 times the LD50). The LD50 of M. f. fulvius venom was determined to be 0.85 mg/kg. All mice in both antivenom test groups were protected from lethality for the entire 24-hour observation period. Six of the 7 mice in the venom test group died, with a survival time of 349 +/- 382 minutes (mean +/- s.d.) after the venom injection. All three groups of control mice survived the entire 24-hour observation period. Mexican Micrurus antivenom and Australian Notechis antivenom provide protection from lethality in mice envenomated with a United States M. f. filvius venom.

  20. Molecular approaches for blood meal analysis and species identification of mosquitoes (Insecta: Diptera: Culicidae) in rural locations in southern England, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Triana, Luis Miguel; Brugman, Victor Albert; Prosser, Sean Williams John; Weland, Chris; Nikolova, Nadya; Thorne, Leigh; Marco, Mar Fernández DE; Fooks, Anthony Richard; Johnson, Nicholas

    2017-04-03

    Thirty-four species of Culicidae are present in the UK, of which 15 have been implicated as potential vectors of arthropod-borne viruses such as West Nile virus. Identification of mosquito feeding preferences is paramount to the understanding of vector-host-pathogen interactions which, in turn, would assist in the control of disease outbreaks. Results are presented on the application of DNA barcoding for vertebrate species identification in blood-fed female mosquitoes in rural locations. Blood-fed females (n = 134) were collected in southern England from rural sites and identified based on morphological criteria. Blood meals from 59 specimens (44%) were identified as feeding on eight hosts: European rabbit, cow, human, barn swallow, dog, great tit, magpie and blackbird. Analysis of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I mtDNA barcoding region and the internal transcribed spacer 2 rDNA region of the specimens morphologically identified as Anopheles maculipennis s.l. revealed the presence of An. atroparvus and An. messeae. A similar analysis of specimens morphologically identified as Culex pipiens/Cx. torrentium showed all specimens to be Cx. pipiens (typical form). This study demonstrates the importance of using molecular techniques to support species-level identification in blood-fed mosquitoes to maximize the information obtained in studies investigating host feeding patterns.

  1. Tax Unit Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Statewide GIS Tax Unit boundary file was created through a collaborative partnership between the State of Kansas Department of Revenue Property Valuation...

  2. Factors influencing densities of non-indigenous species in the ballast water of ships arriving at ports in Puget Sound, Washington, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordell, J.R.; Lawrence, D.J.; Ferm, N.C.; Tear, L.M.; Smith, S.S.; Herwig, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    Oceanographic characteristics and the presence of international shipping in Puget Sound, Washington, USA contribute to its vulnerability to non-indigenous species (NIS) invasions. To evaluate NIS arriving in ballast water, zooplankton was sampled in 380 ballast tanks of ships after they entered Puget Sound. Taxa were classified into a higher risk group of coastal organisms (including known NIS), and a lower risk group of largely oceanic species. Most ships reported conducting mid-ocean ballast water exchange (BWE). However, despite state regulations requiring BWE, and apparent compliance by ship operators, most sampled tanks from both transpacific and coastal routes had coastal zooplankton densities exceeding internationally proposed discharge standards. BWE efficiency models and controlled before-and-after BWE experiments indicate that BWE consistently removes most coastal zooplankton. However, this study found that although the empty-refill method of BWE significantly reduced coastal plankton compared with un-exchanged tanks, the flow-through method did not, and in either case remaining coastal plankton densities presented appreciable risks of introducing NIS. Densities of high risk taxa were consistently and significantly higher from US domestic trips dominated by tank ships carrying ballast water from California, and lower in samples from trans-Pacific trips dominated by container ships and bulk carriers with ballast from Asia. These findings are probably a result of the dense and diverse NIS assemblages present in California and other US west coast estuaries and the comparatively short transit times between them and Puget Sound. While it appears that BWE can effectively replace NIS with less risky ocean species, new reporting, verification, and operational procedures may be necessary to enhance BWE efficacy. In the long-term, the introduction of ballast water treatment technologies may be required to significantly reduce the discharge of risky organisms from

  3. Invasive Species Science Branch: research and management tools for controlling invasive species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Robert N.; Walters, Katie D.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive, nonnative species of plants, animals, and disease organisms adversely affect the ecosystems they enter. Like “biological wildfires,” they can quickly spread and affect nearly all terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Invasive species have become one of the greatest environmental challenges of the 21st century in economic, environmental, and human health costs, with an estimated effect in the United States of more than $120 billion per year. Managers of the Department of the Interior and other public and private lands often rank invasive species as their top resource management problem. The Invasive Species Science Branch of the Fort Collins Science Center provides research and technical assistance relating to management concerns for invasive species, including understanding how these species are introduced, identifying areas vulnerable to invasion, forecasting invasions, and developing control methods. To disseminate this information, branch scientists are developing platforms to share invasive species information with DOI cooperators, other agency partners, and the public. From these and other data, branch scientists are constructing models to understand and predict invasive species distributions for more effective management. The branch also has extensive herpetological and population biology expertise that is applied to harmful reptile invaders such as the Brown Treesnake on Guam and Burmese Python in Florida.

  4. Development of a decision aid for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit employing user-centered design and a wiki platform for rapid prototyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisance, Ariane; Witteman, Holly O; LeBlanc, Annie; Kryworuchko, Jennifer; Heyland, Daren Keith; Ebell, Mark H; Blair, Louisa; Tapp, Diane; Dupuis, Audrey; Lavoie-Bérard, Carole-Anne; McGinn, Carrie Anna; Légaré, France; Archambault, Patrick Michel

    2018-01-01

    Upon admission to an intensive care unit (ICU), all patients should discuss their goals of care and express their wishes concerning life-sustaining interventions (e.g., cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)). Without such discussions, interventions that prolong life at the cost of decreasing its quality may be used without appropriate guidance from patients. To adapt an existing decision aid about CPR to create a wiki-based decision aid individually adapted to each patient's risk factors; and to document the use of a wiki platform for this purpose. We conducted three weeks of ethnographic observation in our ICU to observe intensivists and patients discussing goals of care and to identify their needs regarding decision making. We interviewed intensivists individually. Then we conducted three rounds of rapid prototyping involving 15 patients and 11 health professionals. We recorded and analyzed all discussions, interviews and comments, and collected sociodemographic data. Using a wiki, a website that allows multiple users to contribute or edit content, we adapted the decision aid accordingly and added the Good Outcome Following Attempted Resuscitation (GO-FAR) prediction rule calculator. We added discussion of invasive mechanical ventilation. The final decision aid comprises values clarification, risks and benefits of CPR and invasive mechanical ventilation, statistics about CPR, and a synthesis section. We added the GO-FAR prediction calculator as an online adjunct to the decision aid. Although three rounds of rapid prototyping simplified the information in the decision aid, 60% (n = 3/5) of the patients involved in the last cycle still did not understand its purpose. Wikis and user-centered design can be used to adapt decision aids to users' needs and local contexts. Our wiki platform allows other centers to adapt our tools, reducing duplication and accelerating scale-up. Physicians need training in shared decision making skills about goals of care and in using the

  5. Endangered Species. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mark; And Others

    This unit is intended to examine the causes of the endangerment of Florida's plant and animal species with a detailed look at varied ecological systems. Individual lessons are designed to be used either by individual students progressing at their own rate or by small groups. Units may be modified for use by large groups. (Author/RE)

  6. Eastern North America as an independent center of plant domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bruce D

    2006-08-15

    The status of eastern North America as an independent center of plant domestication has recently been called into question by a number of genetic and archaeological studies, which suggest that the region may not have witnessed the independent domestication of local crop plants, but rather may have been on the receiving end of domesticated crop plants introduced from Mexico. Here, I provide a synthesis of the currently available archaeological and genetic evidence from both eastern North America and Mexico regarding the spatial and temporal context of initial domestication of the four plant species identified as potential eastern North American domesticates: marshelder (Iva annua), chenopod (Chenopodium berlandieri), squash (Cucurbita pepo), and sunflower (Helianthus annuus). Genetic and archaeological evidence provides strong support for the independent domestication of all four of these plant species in the eastern United States and reconfirms the region as one of the world's independent centers of domestication.

  7. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Williams, Randall; McLaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This analysis is a survey of control center architectures of the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures have similarities in basic structure, and differences in functional distribution of responsibilities for the phases of operations: (a) Launch vehicles in the international community vary greatly in configuration and process; (b) Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific configurations; (c) Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site, however the flight operations may be a different control center than the launch center; and (d) The engineering support centers are primarily located at the design center with a small engineering support team at the launch site.

  8. Exotic "Gill Lice" Species (Copepoda: Lernaeopodidae: Salmincola SPP.) Infect Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in the Southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Carlos F; Rash, Jacob M; Besler, Doug A; Roberts, Jackson R; Warren, Micah B; Arias, Cova R; Bullard, Stephen A

    2017-08-01

    Salmincola californiensis infected 25 of 31 (prevalence 0.8; intensity 2-35 [mean 6.6 ± standard deviation 7.7; n = 25]) rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, from a private trout farm connected to the Watauga River, North Carolina. Salmincola edwardsii infected all of 9 (1.0; 2-43 [9.3 ± 13.0; 9]) brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, from Big Norton Prong, a tributary of the Little Tennessee River, North Carolina. Both lernaeopodids are well-known salmonid pathogens, but neither is native to, nor has been previously taxonomically confirmed from, the southeastern United States. Herein, we (1) use light and scanning electron microscopy to identify and provide supplemental morphological observations of these lernaeopodids, (2) furnish complementary molecular sequence data from the 28S rDNA (28S), and (3) document the pathological effects of gill infections. We identified and differentiated these lernaeopodids by the second antenna (exopod tip with large [S. californiensis] vs. slender [S. edwardsii] spines; endopod terminal segment with subequal ventral processes shorter than [S. californiensis] vs. longer than or equal to [S. edwardsii] dorsal hook), maxilliped palp (length typically ≤1/3 [S. californiensis] vs. 1/3-1/2 [S. edwardsii] subchela length exclusive of claw), and bulla (sub-circular and concave on manubrium's side [S. californiensis] vs. non-stellate [S. edwardsii]). Analysis of the 28S rDNA sequences confirmed our taxonomic assignments as demonstrated by 100% sequence similarity among the sympatric, morphologically-conspecific isolates. Histopathology revealed focal gill epithelial hyperplasia, obstruction of interlamellar water channels, lamellar fusion, and crypting of gill filaments. High intensity infections by either lernaeopodid are surveillance-worthy because they are potentially pathogenic to trout in the southeastern United States.

  9. Endangered Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Endangered Species Protection Program helps promote recovery of listed species. The ESPP determines if pesticide use in a geographic area may affect any listed species. Find needed limits on pesticide use in Endangered Species Protection Bulletins.

  10. Terrestrial animals as invasive species and as species at risk from invasions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah M. Finch; Dean Pearson; Joseph Wunderle; Wayne Arendt

    2010-01-01

    Including terrestrial animal species in the invasive species strategy plan is an important step in invasive species management. Invasions by nonindigenous species threaten nearly 50 percent of imperiled native species in the United States and are the Nation's second leading cause of species endangerment. Invasion and conversion of native habitats by exotic species...

  11. Specialty education in periodontics in Japan and the United States: comparison of programs at Nippon Dental University Hospital and the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Ginko; Nakaya, Hiroshi; Mealey, Brian L; Kalkwarf, Kenneth; Cochran, David L

    2014-03-01

    Japan has institutions that train qualified postdoctoral students in the field of periodontics; however, Japan does not have comprehensive advanced periodontal programs and national standards for these specialty programs. To help Japanese programs move toward global standards in this area, this study was designed to describe overall differences in periodontics specialty education in Japan and the United States and to compare periodontics faculty members and residents' characteristics and attitudes in two specific programs, one in each country. Periodontal faculty members and residents at Nippon Dental University (NDU) and the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) Dental School participated in the survey study: four faculty members and nine residents at NDU; seven faculty members and thirteen residents at UTHSCSA. Demographic data were collected as well as respondents' attitudes toward and assessment of their programs. The results showed many differences in curriculum structure and clinical performance. In contrast to the UTHSCSA respondents, for example, the residents and faculty members at NDU reported that they did not have enough subject matter and time to learn clinical science. Although the residents at NDU reported seeing more total patients in one month than those at UTHSCSA, they were taught fewer varieties of periodontal treatments. To provide high-quality and consistent education for periodontal residents, Japan needs to establish a set of standards that will have positive consequences for those in Japan who need periodontal treatment.

  12. Survey on current hydrotherapy use among North American burn centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Peter G; Loiselle, Frederick B; Nickerson, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    The authors have reviewed hydrotherapy practices in North American burn centers and described the epidemiology of hydrotherapy-associated nosocomial infections. A web-based survey was distributed to the directors of all burn care facilities listed by the American Burn Association. Questions addressed aspects of practice, including the method, additives, disposable liners, decontamination practices, nosocomial pathogens, and perceptions regarding the "ideal" method of hydrotherapy. The response rate was 44%, 59 of 142 centers, or 827 of 1900 beds. Hydrotherapy is regularly used by 83% of centers. Among these centers, 10% use exclusively immersion hydrotherapy (IH), 54% use exclusively shower cart hydrotherapy (SCH), and 35% use a combination of IH and SCH. Disposable liners are used at 80% of centers. Tap water alone is used by 51% of centers, 27% add detergent, 16% chlorhexidine, and 7% povidone-iodine. The majority of centers (57%) do not routinely culture their hydrotherapy equipment, 20% culture weekly, 7% monthly, and 17% less than once per month. Directors believe that Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus are the most common nosocomial pathogens, followed by Acinetobacter species and Candida albicans. The relative frequency of occurrence of the first three pathogens did not vary with regard to the hydrotherapy method used. Given the opportunity to redesign, 45% of burn unit directors would implement SCH only, 42% a combination of SCH and IH, 2% exclusively IH, and 11% no hydrotherapy or bedside irrigation only. The prevalence of hydrotherapy use at North American burn centers has decreased since 1990 (83% vs 95%), yet continues to be used at the majority of centers. The use of IH has also declined (55% vs 81%). The trend away from the exclusive use of IH will likely continue, because more centers incorporate showering methods.

  13. Microbiological safety of sandwiches from hospitals and other health care establishments in the United Kingdom with a focus on Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, C L; Barrett, N J; Grant, K; McLauchlin, J

    2008-02-01

    In the United Kingdom between 1999 and 2004, there were four outbreaks of Listeria monocytogenes infection associated with sandwiches purchased from or provided in hospitals. Elderly or immunocompromised individuals and pregnant women are particularly vulnerable to infection; therefore, the focus of this study was on sandwiches served in health care establishments. Of 3,249 sandwich samples collected between April 2005 and March 2006, 3.3% were of unsatisfactory microbiological quality because of high levels of Enterobacteriaceae (2.0%; > or = 10(4) CFU/g for sandwiches not containing salad), Escherichia coli (0.8%; > or = 10(2) CFU/g), Staphylococcus aureus (0.6%; > or = 10(2) CFU/g), and/or Listeria spp. (0.1%; two samples with L. welshimeri at 1.8 x 10(2) and 7.4 x 10(3) CFU/g and one sample with L. seeligeri at 1.8 x 10(3) CFU/g). Overall, 7.6% of sandwiches were contaminated with Listeria spp. L. monocytogenes was detected in 2.7% (88) of samples: 87 samples at Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes was found in sandwiches collected from hospital cafeterias, shops, or wards and in sandwiches stored and/or displayed at temperatures higher than 8 degrees C. The presence of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes also was associated with sandwiches that (i) were supplied from outside the establishment, (ii) were prepacked, (iii) had a main sandwich filling of poultry meat, or (iv) contained salad ingredients, soft cheese, and/or mayonnaise. Control of L. monocytogenes in sandwich manufacturing and within health care establishments is essential to minimize the potential for consumption of this bacterium at levels hazardous to health. The findings from this study support the proposal that manufacturers supplying sandwiches to health care establishments should follow the British Sandwich Association recommended guidelines of complete absence of L. monocytogenes in sandwiches at the point of production.

  14. Prevalence and level of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species in selected retail ready-to-eat foods in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, C L; Sagoo, S K; Gillespie, I A; Grant, K; McLauchlin, J

    2009-09-01

    Although listeriosis is a rare cause of human disease in the United Kingdom, an increase in the number of cases has been observed since 2001, almost exclusively in persons older than 60 years. This increase prompted this study on the microbiological safety of ready-to-eat (RTE) foods, which included those types potentially linked to cases of listeriosis. Between May 2006 and April 2007, 6,984 RTE foods were sampled (2,168 sliced meats, 1,242 hard cheese, 1,088 sandwiches, 878 butter, 725 spreadable cheese, 515 confectionery products containing cream, and 368 probiotic drinks). The food types with the highest prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes were sandwiches (7.0%) and sliced meats (3.7% within shelf life, 4.2% end of shelf life). L. monocytogenes at > 100 CFU/g (exceeding the European Commission's food safety criteria limit) only occurred in sandwiches (0.4%) and sliced meats (0.7% within shelf life, 1.0% end of shelf life). Contamination with L. monocytogenes at >100 CFU/g was more frequent in meats that were prepacked and/or of pack size > or = 300 g and in sandwiches that were supplied prepacked that contained salad vegetables as an ingredient. Satisfactory microbiological quality was associated with premises on which the management was trained in food hygiene and those that complied with hazard analysis and critical control point principles. This study provides important information about the microbiological safety of RTE foods and demonstrates that the control of L. monocytogenes in such foods, and in particular sandwiches and sliced meats, is essential in order to minimize the risk of this bacterium being present at levels hazardous to health at the point of consumption.

  15. African Centered Knowledge: A British Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Considers the impact of African centered knowledge within the United Kingdom. Recent development of African Diaspora studies has forged links between various black Atlantic communities. The United Kingdom has experienced positive grassroots community response to the work of noted African centered scholars, yet within the British academy,…

  16. Quantum Redirection of Antenna Absorption to Photosynthetic Reaction Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Schroeder, Christopher A; Autenrieth, Caroline; Pick, Arne; Ghosh, Robin; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B

    2017-12-04

    The early steps of photosynthesis involve the photoexcitation of reaction centers (RCs) and light-harvesting (LH) units. Here, we show that the historically overlooked excitonic delocalization across RC and LH pigments results in a redistribution of absorption amplitudes that benefits the absorption cross section of the optical bands associated with the RC of several species. While we prove that this redistribution is robust to the microscopic details of the dephasing between these units in the purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum, we are able to show that the redistribution witnesses a more fragile, but persistent, coherent population dynamics which directs excitations from the LH toward the RC units under incoherent illumination and physiological conditions. Even though the redirection does not seem to affect importantly the overall efficiency in photosynthesis, stochastic optimization allows us to delineate clear guidelines and develop simple analytic expressions in order to amplify the coherent redirection in artificial nanostructures.

  17. Protonation of an oxo-bridged diiron unit gives two different iron centers: synthesis and structure of a new class of diiron(III)-μ-hydroxo bisporphyrins and the control of spin states by using counterions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Susovan; Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Layek, Samar; Verma, Harish Chandra; Rath, Sankar Prasad

    2012-10-08

    Reported herein is a hitherto unknown family of diiron(III)-μ-hydroxo bisporphyrins in which two different spin states of Fe are stabilized in a single molecular framework, although both cores have identical molecular structures. Protonation of the oxo-bridged dimer (2) by using strong Brønsted acids, such as HI, HBF(4), and HClO(4), produce red μ-hydroxo complexes with I(3)(-) (3), BF(4)(-) (4), and ClO(4)(-) (5) counterions, respectively. The X-ray structure of the molecule reveals that the Fe-O bond length increases on going from the μ-oxo to the hydroxo complex, whereas the Fe-O(H)-Fe unit becomes more bent, which results in the smallest known Fe-O(H)-Fe angles of 142.5(2) and 141.2(1)° for 3 and 5, respectively. In contrast, the Fe-O(H)-Fe angle remains unaltered in 4 from the corresponding μ-oxo complex. The close approach of two rings in a molecule results in unequal core deformations in 3 and 4, whereas the cores are deformed almost equally but to a lesser extent in 5. Although 3 was found to have nearly high-spin and admixed intermediate Fe spin states in cores I and II, respectively, two admixed intermediate spin states were observed in 4. Even though the cores have identical chemical structures, crucial bond parameters, such as the Fe-N(p), Fe-O, and Fe⋅⋅⋅Ct(p) bond lengths and the ring deformations, are all different between the two Fe(III) centers in 3 and 4, which leads to an eventual stabilization of two different spin states of Fe in each molecule. In contrast, the two Fe centers in 5 are equivalent and assigned to high and intermediate spin states in the solid and solution states, respectively. The spin states are thus found to be dependent on the counterions and can also be reversibly interconverted. Upon protonation, the strong antiferromagnetic coupling in the μ-oxo dimer (J, -126.6 cm(-1)) is attenuated to almost zero in the μ-hydroxo complex with the I(3)(-) counterion, whereas the values of J are -36 and -42 cm(-1

  18. Identification of host fruit volatiles from three mayhaw species (Crataegus series Aestivales) attractive to mayhaw-origin Rhagoletis pomonella flies in the southern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Dong H; Powell, Thomas H Q; Feder, Jeffrey L; Linn, Charles E

    2011-09-01

    The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella, infests several hawthorn species in the southern USA. Here, we tested the hypothesis that these populations could serve as reservoirs for fruit odor discrimination behaviors facilitating sympatric host race formation and speciation, specifically the recent shift from downy hawthorn (Crataegus mollis) to domestic apple (Malus domestica) in the northern USA. Coupled gas chromatography and electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD), gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and flight tunnel bioassays were used to identify the behaviorally active natal fruit volatile blends for three of the five major southern hawthorns: C. opaca (western mayhaw), C. aestivalis (eastern mayhaw), and C. rufula (a possible hybrid between C. opaca and C. aestivalis). A 6-component blend was developed for C. opaca (3-methylbutan-1-ol [44%], pentyl acetate [6%], butyl butanoate [6%], propyl hexanoate [6%], butyl hexanoate [26%], and hexyl butanoate [12%]); an 8-component blend for C. aestivalis (3-methylbutan-1-ol [2%], butyl acetate [47%], pentyl acetate [2%], butyl butanoate [12%], propyl hexanoate [1%], butyl hexanoate [25%], hexyl butanoate [9%], and pentyl hexanoate [2%]); and a 9-component blend for C. rufula (3-methylbutan-1-ol [1%], butyl acetate [57%], 3-methylbutyl acetate [3%], butyl butanoate [5%], propyl hexanoate [1%], hexyl propionate [1%], butyl hexanoate [23%], hexyl butanoate [6%], and pentyl hexanoate [3%]). Crataegus aestivalis and C. opaca-origin flies showed significantly higher levels of upwind directed flight to their natal blend in flight tunnel assays compared to the non-natal blend and previously developed apple, northern downy hawthorn, and flowering dogwood blends. Eastern and western mayhaw flies also were tested to the C. rufula blend, with eastern flies displaying higher levels of upwind flight compared with the western flies, likely due to the presence of butyl acetate in the C. aestivalis and C. rufula

  19. Resistance patterns and outcomes in intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired pneumonia. Validation of European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) classification of multidrug resistant organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Torres, Antonio; Rinaudo, Mariano; Terraneo, Silvia; de Rosa, Francesca; Ramirez, Paula; Diaz, Emili; Fernández-Barat, Laia; Li Bassi, Gian Luigi; Ferrer, Miquel

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial resistance has become a major public health problem. To validate the definition of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO) based on the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) classification. Prospective, observational study in six medical and surgical Intensive-Care-Units (ICU) of a University hospital. Three-hundred-and-forty-three patients with ICU-acquired pneumonia (ICUAP) were prospectively enrolled, 140 patients had no microbiological confirmation (41%), 82 patients (24%) developed ICUAP for non-MDRO, whereas 121 (35%) were MDROs. Non-MDRO, MDRO and no microbiological confirmation patients did not present either a significant different previous antibiotic use (p 0.18) or previous hospital admission (p 0.17). Appropriate antibiotic therapy was associated with better ICU survival (105 [92.9%] vs. 74 [82.2%]; p = 0.03). An adjusted multivariate regression logistic analysis identified that only MDRO had a higher ICU-mortality than non-MDRO and no microbiological confirmation patients (OR 2.89; p < 0.05; 95% CI for Exp [β]. 1.02-8.21); Patients with MDRO ICUAP remained in ICU for a longer period than MDRO and no microbiological confirmation respectively (p < 0.01) however no microbiological confirmation patients had more often antibiotic consumption than culture positive ones. Patients who developed ICUAP due to MDRO showed a higher ICU-mortality than non-MDRO ones and use of ICU resources. No microbiological confirmation patients had more often antibiotic consumption than culture positive patients. Risk factors for MDRO may be important for the selection of initial antimicrobial therapy, in addition to local epidemiology. Copyright © 2014 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Trends in Stranding and By-Catch Rates of Gray and Harbor Seals along the Northeastern Coast of the United States: Evidence of Divergence in the Abundance of Two Sympatric Phocid Species?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Johnston

    Full Text Available Harbor seals and gray seals are sympatric phocid pinnipeds found in coastal waters of the temperate and sub-Arctic North Atlantic. In the Northwest Atlantic, both species were depleted through a combination of subsistence hunts and government supported bounties, and are now re-occupying substantial portions of their original ranges. While both species appear to have recovered during the past 2 decades, our understanding of their population dynamics in US waters is incomplete. Here we describe trends in stranding and bycatch rates of harbor and gray seals in the North East United States (NEUS over the past 16 years through an exploratory curve-fitting exercise and structural break-point analysis. Variability in gray seal strandings in Southern New England and bycatch in the Northeast Sink Gillnet Fishery were best described by fitting positive exponential and linear models, and exhibited rates of increase as high as 22%. In contrast, neither linear nor exponential models fit the oscillation of harbor seal strandings and bycatch over the study period. However, a breakpoint Chow test revealed that harbor seal strandings in the Cape Cod, Massachusetts region and harbor seal bycatch in the Northeast Sink Gillnet Fishery increased in the 1990s and then started declining in the early to mid-2000s. Our analysis indicates that ongoing variation in natural and anthropogenic mortality rates of harbor and gray seals in the NEUS is not synchronous, and likely represents diverging trends in abundance of these species as they assume new roles in the marine ecosystems of the region.

  1. Development of a Decision Aid for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Involving Intensive Care Unit Patients' and Health Professionals' Participation Using User-Centered Design and a Wiki Platform for Rapid Prototyping: A Research Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisance, Ariane; Witteman, Holly O; Heyland, Daren Keith; Ebell, Mark H; Dupuis, Audrey; Lavoie-Bérard, Carole-Anne; Légaré, France; Archambault, Patrick Michel

    2016-02-11

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an intervention used in cases of cardiac arrest to revive patients whose heart has stopped. Because cardiac arrest can have potentially devastating outcomes such as severe neurological deficits even if CPR is performed, patients must be involved in determining in advance if they want CPR in the case of an unexpected arrest. Shared decision making (SDM) facilitates discussions about goals of care regarding CPR in intensive care units (ICUs). Patient decision aids (DAs) are proven to support the implementation of SDM. Many patient DAs about CPR exist, but they are not universally implemented in ICUs in part due to lack of context and cultural adaptation. Adaptation to local context is an important phase of implementing any type of knowledge tool such as patient DAs. User-centered design supported by a wiki platform to perform rapid prototyping has previously been successful in creating knowledge tools adapted to the needs of patients and health professionals (eg, asthma action plans). This project aims to explore how user-centered design and a wiki platform can support the adaptation of an existing DA for CPR to the local context. The primary objective is to use an existing DA about CPR to create a wiki-based DA that is adapted to the context of a single ICU and tailorable to individual patient's risk factors while employing user-centered design. The secondary objective is to document the use of a wiki platform for the adaptation of patient DAs. This study will be conducted in a mixed surgical and medical ICU at Hôtel-Dieu de Lévis, Quebec, Canada. We plan to involve all 5 intensivists and recruit at least 20 alert and oriented patients admitted to the ICU and their family members if available. In the first phase of this study, we will observe 3 weeks of daily interactions between patients, families, intensivists, and other allied health professionals. We will specifically observe 5 dyads of attending intensivists and alert

  2. Next generation traffic management centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Traffic management centers (TMCs) are critical to providing mobility to millions of people travelling on high-volume roadways. In Virginia, as with most regions of the United States, TMCs were aggressively deployed in the late 1990s and early 2000s. ...

  3. Invasive Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasive species have significantly changed the Great Lakes ecosystem. An invasive species is a plant or animal that is not native to an ecosystem, and whose introduction is likely to cause economic, human health, or environmental damage.

  4. NASA New England Outreach Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA New England Outreach Center in Nashua, New Hampshire was established to serve as a catalyst for heightening regional business awareness of NASA procurement, technology and commercialization opportunities. Emphasis is placed on small business participation, with the highest priority given to small disadvantaged businesses, women-owned businesses, HUBZone businesses, service disabled veteran owned businesses, and historically black colleges and universities and minority institutions. The Center assists firms and organizations to understand NASA requirements and to develop strategies to capture NASA related procurement and technology opportunities. The establishment of the NASA Outreach Center serves to stimulate business in a historically underserved area. NASA direct business awards have traditionally been highly present in the West, Midwest, South, and Southeast areas of the United States. The Center guides and assists businesses and organizations in the northeast to target opportunities within NASA and its prime contractors and capture business and technology opportunities. The Center employs an array of technology access, one-on-one meetings, seminars, site visits, and targeted conferences to acquaint Northeast firms and organizations with representatives from NASA and its prime contractors to learn about and discuss opportunities to do business and access the inventory of NASA technology. This stimulus of interaction also provides firms and organizations the opportunity to propose the use of their developed technology and ideas for current and future requirements at NASA. The Center provides a complement to the NASA Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center in developing prospects for commercialization of NASA technology. In addition, the Center responds to local requests for assistance and NASA material and documents, and is available to address immediate concerns and needs in assessing opportunities, timely support to interact with NASA Centers on

  5. Oxidized amino acid residues in the vicinity of Q(A and Pheo(D1 of the photosystem II reaction center: putative generation sites of reducing-side reactive oxygen species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie K Frankel

    Full Text Available Under a variety of stress conditions, Photosystem II produces reactive oxygen species on both the reducing and oxidizing sides of the photosystem. A number of different sites including the Mn4O5Ca cluster, P680, PheoD1, QA, QB and cytochrome b559 have been hypothesized to produce reactive oxygen species in the photosystem. In this communication using Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry we have identified several residues on the D1 and D2 proteins from spinach which are oxidatively modified and in close proximity to QA (D1 residues (239F, (241Q, (242E and the D2 residues (238P, (239T, (242E and (247M and PheoD1 (D1 residues (130E, (133L and (135F. These residues may be associated with reactive oxygen species exit pathways located on the reducing side of the photosystem, and their modification may indicate that both QA and PheoD1 are sources of reactive oxygen species on the reducing side of Photosystem II.

  6. Probing the nitrite and nitric oxide reductase activity of cbb3 oxidase: resonance Raman detection of a six-coordinate ferrous heme-nitrosyl species in the binuclear b3/CuB center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loullis, Andreas; Pinakoulaki, Eftychia

    2015-12-21

    In this work we report the first spectroscopic evidence demonstrating that cbb3 oxidase catalyzes the reduction of nitrite to nitrous oxide under reducing anaerobic conditions. The reaction proceeds through the formation of a ferrous six-coordinate heme b3-nitrosyl species that has been characterized by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  7. Tax_Units_2011_Final

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Statewide GIS Tax Unit boundary file was created through a collaborative partnership between the State of Kansas Department of Revenue Property Valuation...

  8. Center for Beam Physics, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    The Center for Beam Physics is a multi-disciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation and focusing of energy. Dedicated to exploring the frontiers of the physics of (and with) particle and photon beams, its primary mission is to promote the science and technology of the production, manipulation, storage and control systems of charged particles and photons. The Center serves this mission via conceptual studies, theoretical and experimental research, design and development, institutional project involvement, external collaborations, association with industry and technology transfer. This roster provides a glimpse at the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up this team and a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1993.

  9. Wound care centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... wound care center; Diabetic ulcer - wound care center; Surgical wound - wound center; Ischemic ulcer - wound center ... types of non-healing wounds include: Pressure sores Surgical wounds Radiation sores Foot ulcers due to diabetes , poor ...

  10. The species in primatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Biologists of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries all bandied about the term "species," but very rarely actually said what they meant by it. Often, however, one can get inside their thinking by piecing together some of their remarks. One of the most nearly explicit-appropriately, for the man who wrote a book called The Origin of Species - was Charles Darwin: "Practically, when a naturalist can unite two forms together by others having intermediate characters, he treats the one as a variety of the other… He later translated this into evolutionary terms: "Hereafter, we shall be compelled to acknowledge that the only distinction between species and well-marked varieties is, that the latter are known, or believed, to be connected at the present day by intermediate gradations, whereas species were formerly thus connected"(1:484-5.) Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Characteristics of Public and Bureau of Indian Education Elementary and Secondary School Library Media Centers in the United States: Results From the 2007-08 Schools and Staffing Survey. NCES 2009-322

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldring, Rebecca; Gruber, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    This report presents selected findings from the school library media center data files of the 2007-08 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS). SASS is a nationally representative sample survey of public, private, and Bureau of Indian Education-funded (BIE) K-12 schools, principals, and teachers in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The public…

  12. Characteristics of Public Elementary and Secondary School Library Media Centers in the United States: Results from the 2011-12 Schools and Staffing Survey. First Look. NCES 2013-315

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitterman, Amy; Gray, Lucinda; Goldring, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    This report presents selected findings from the Public School Library Media Center Data File of the 2011-12 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS). SASS is a nationally representative sample survey of public and private K-12 schools, principals, and teachers in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. School districts associated with public schools…

  13. Invasive species

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of management activities and research related to invasive species on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge between 1992 and 2009. As part of the...

  14. Chapter 20: Data Center IT Efficiency Measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Robert [Cadmus Group, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States); Masanet, Eric [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Data centers use about 2% of the electricity in the United States; a typical data center has 100 to 200 times the energy use intensity of a commercial building. Data centers present tremendous opportunities--energy use can be reduced as much as 80% between inefficient and efficient data centers. Data center efficiency measures generally fall into the following categories: power infrastructure (e.g., more efficient uninterruptible power supplies, power distribution units); cooling (e.g., free cooling, variable-speed drives, temperature and humidity set points); airflow management (e.g., hot aisle/cold aisle, containment, grommets); and information technology efficiency (e.g., server virtualization, efficient servers, efficient data storage).

  15. 75 FR 49946 - National Drug Intelligence Center: Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Extension...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... National Drug Intelligence Center: Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Extension With Change... Response System. The United States Department of Justice (DOJ), National Drug Intelligence Center (NDIC... Intelligence Center, Fifth Floor, 319 Washington Street, Johnstown, PA 15901. Written comments and suggestions...

  16. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, ... Install one and check its batteries regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips ...

  17. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the "Invisible ...

  18. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  19. Aquatic Nuisance Species Locator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data in this map has been collected by the United States Geological Survey's Nonindigenous Aquatic Species program located in Gainesville, Florida (http://nas.er.usgs.gov/default.aspx). This dataset may have some inaccuracies and is only current to June 15, 2012. The species identified in this dataset are not inclusive of all aquatic nuisance species, but rather a subset identified to be at risk for transport by recreational activities such as boating and angling. Additionally, the locations where organisims have been identified are also not inclusive and should be treated as a guide. Organisms are limited to the following: American bullfrog, Asian clam, Asian shore crab, Asian tunicate, Australian spotted jellyfish, Chinese mitten crab, New Zealand mudsnail, Colonial sea squirt, Alewife, Bighead carp, Black carp, Flathead catfish, Grass carp, Green crab, Lionfish, Northern snakehead, Quagga mussel, Round Goby, Ruffe, Rusty crayfish, Sea lamprey, Silver carp, Spiny water flea, Veined rapa whelk, Zebra mussel

  20. The Economic and Risk Constraints in the Feasibility Analysis of Wireless Communications in Marine Corps Combat Operation Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    TOC Tactical Operations Center UOC Unit Operations Center USMC United States Marine Corps VLAN Virtual Local Area Network WIDS Wireless Intrusion...Marine Corps COC CapSets. The Combat Operations Center (COC), originally known as the unit operations center ( UOC ) when it first came out, is

  1. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OnSafety Blog Safety Education Centers Neighborhood Safety Network Community Outreach Resource Center Toy ... Research & Statistics Technical Reports Injury Statistics NEISS ...

  2. Southern California Particle Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At the Southern California Particle Center, center researchers will investigate the underlying mechanisms that produce the health effects associated with exposure to...

  3. Novel multilocus sequence typing scheme reveals high genetic diversity of human pathogenic members of the Fusarium incarnatum-F. equiseti and F. chlamydosporum species complexes within the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Donnell, K.; Sutton, D.A.; Rinaldi, M.G.; Gueidan, C.; Crous, P.W.; Geiser, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Species limits within the clinically important Fusarium incarnatum-F. equiseti and F. chlamydosporum species complexes (FIESC and FCSC, respectively) were investigated using multilocus DNA sequence data. Maximum-parsimony and maximum-likelihood analyses of aligned DNA sequences from four loci

  4. Fort Collins Science Center-Fiscal year 2009 science accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Juliette T.

    2010-01-01

    Public land and natural resource managers in the United States are confronted with increasingly complex decisions that have important ramifications for both ecological and human systems. The scientists and technical professionals at the U.S. Geological Survey Fort Collins Science Center?many of whom are at the forefront of their fields?possess a unique blend of ecological, socioeconomic, and technological expertise. Because of this diverse talent, Fort Collins Science Center staff are able to apply a systems approach to investigating complicated ecological problems in a way that helps answer critical management questions. In addition, the Fort Collins Science Center has a long record of working closely with the academic community through cooperative agreements and other collaborations. The Fort Collins Science Center is deeply engaged with other U.S. Geological Survey science centers and partners throughout the Department of the Interior. As a regular practice, we incorporate the expertise of these partners in providing a full complement of ?the right people? to effectively tackle the multifaceted research problems of today's resource-management world. In Fiscal Year 2009, the Fort Collins Science Center's scientific and technical professionals continued research vital to Department of the Interior's science and management needs. Fort Collins Science Center work also supported the science needs of other Federal and State agencies as well as non-government organizations. Specifically, Fort Collins Science Center research and technical assistance focused on client and partner needs and goals in the areas of biological information management and delivery, enterprise information, fisheries and aquatic systems, invasive species, status and trends of biological resources (including human dimensions), terrestrial ecosystems, and wildlife resources. In the process, Fort Collins Science Center science addressed natural-science information needs identified in the U

  5. Molecular image in biomedical research. Molecular imaging unit of the National Cancer Research Center; Imagen molecular an investigation biomedica. La Unidad de Imagen Molecular del Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Bruzon, J.; Mulero Anhiorte, F.

    2010-07-01

    This article has two basic objectives. firstly, it will review briefly the most important imaging techniques used in biomedical research indicting the most significant aspects related to their application in the preclinical stage. Secondly, it will present a practical application of these techniques in a pure biomedical research centre (not associated to a clinical facility). Practical aspects such as organisation, equipment, work norms, shielding of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) Imaging Unit will be shown. This is a pioneering facility in the application of these techniques in research centres without any dependence or any direct relationship with other hospital Nuclear Medicine services. (Author) 7 refs.

  6. Combination between [B-α-SiW9O34] unit and triangular inorganic Ni6 core under hydrothermal conditions: from monomer to rare dimer with malposed dodeca-nickel centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Huo, Yu; Niu, Jingyang

    2013-01-14

    The hydrothermal reactions of α-K(4)SiW(12)O(40) with NiCl(2)·6H(2)O yielded two unprecedented silicotungstates containing a triangular inorganic Ni(6) core. Furthermore, Na(2)[Ni(6)(μ(3)-OH)(3)(H(2)O)(9)SiW(9)O(34)](2)·17H(2)O (1) presents a rare dimer, in which two SiW(9) units sandwich double Ni(6) cores by W-O-Ni linking instead of conventional Ni-O-Ni.

  7. "Who Did Archaeology in the United States Before There Were Archaeologists and Why? Preprofessional Archaeologies of the Nineteenth Century." by Thomas C. Patterson. In Processual and Postprocessual Archaeologies, edited by Robert W. Preucel, Center for A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice B. Kehoe

    1992-05-01

    Full Text Available Patterson's paper is a condensation of two he had presented in 1988 and 1989, at conferences previous to the Carbondale Visiting Scholar Conference of 1989. He characterizes the early United States as harboring two contrasting political philosophies, agrarian versus mercantile capitalism. The agrarians, of whom Thomas Jefferson is of course the most illustrious example, followed the physiocrats in believing agricultural land to be the foundation of societies, therefore the manifest destiny of the new Republic was to conquer, and colonize more land. The mercantilists, primarily in Boston, emphasized civilization as the refinement of technologies, social order, and tastes. Both philosophies were cast in Enlightenment terms.

  8. Processing of Pheromone Information in Related Species of Heliothine Moths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bente G. Berg

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In heliothine moths, the male-specific olfactory system is activated by a few odor molecules, each of which is associated with an easily identifiable glomerulus in the primary olfactory center of the brain. This arrangement is linked to two well-defined behavioral responses, one ensuring attraction and mating behavior by carrying information about pheromones released by conspecific females and the other inhibition of attraction via signal information emitted from heterospecifics. The chance of comparing the characteristic properties of pheromone receptor proteins, male-specific sensory neurons and macroglomerular complex (MGC-units in closely-related species is especially intriguing. Here, we review studies on the male-specific olfactory system of heliothine moths with particular emphasis on five closely related species, i.e., Heliothis virescens, Heliothis subflexa, Helicoverpa zea, Helicoverpa assulta and Helicoverpa armigera.

  9. 76 FR 53885 - Patent and Trademark Resource Centers Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office Patent and Trademark Resource Centers Metrics ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request. SUMMARY: The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), as part of its... following methods: E-mail: [email protected] . Include ``Patent and Trademark Resource Centers...

  10. The NIH-NIAID Filariasis Research Reagent Resource Center.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Michalski

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Filarial worms cause a variety of tropical diseases in humans; however, they are difficult to study because they have complex life cycles that require arthropod intermediate hosts and mammalian definitive hosts. Research efforts in industrialized countries are further complicated by the fact that some filarial nematodes that cause disease in humans are restricted in host specificity to humans alone. This potentially makes the commitment to research difficult, expensive, and restrictive. Over 40 years ago, the United States National Institutes of Health-National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIH-NIAID established a resource from which investigators could obtain various filarial parasite species and life cycle stages without having to expend the effort and funds necessary to maintain the entire life cycles in their own laboratories. This centralized resource (The Filariasis Research Reagent Resource Center, or FR3 translated into cost savings to both NIH-NIAID and to principal investigators by freeing up personnel costs on grants and allowing investigators to divert more funds to targeted research goals. Many investigators, especially those new to the field of tropical medicine, are unaware of the scope of materials and support provided by the FR3. This review is intended to provide a short history of the contract, brief descriptions of the fiilarial species and molecular resources provided, and an estimate of the impact the resource has had on the research community, and describes some new additions and potential benefits the resource center might have for the ever-changing research interests of investigators.

  11. SALMONELLA SPECIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    e. Biochemical screening and serological tests for Salmonellae. Identification of Salmonella species was done biochemically. Triple sugar Iron (TSI) agar motility, urease and citrate utilization tests were also used to screen the isolates before serologic testing was performed. (Cheesbrough, 2002; Perilla, 2003). Triple sugar ...

  12. Phytoplankton specie..

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    each Station, samples for diversity data were collected by plankton net, which was towed at the surface water, while those for Spatial distribution and abundance were collected using a l l Van. Dorn water Sampler. A total of 13 Species belonging to 52 different genera were identified. Cyanobacteria were the most diverse ...

  13. Low energy intake during the first week in an emergency intensive care unit is associated with reduced duration of mechanical ventilation in critically ill, underweight patients: a single-center retrospective chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimaru, Satomi; Fujiwara, Hidetoshi; Amagai, Teruyoshi; Atsumi, Takahiro

    2014-06-01

    Although nutrition support is essential in intensive care units, optimal energy intake remains unclear. Here, we assessed the influence of energy intake on outcomes of critically ill, underweight patients. A retrospective chart review was conducted in patients with body mass index (BMI) of intensive care unit (EICU). Patients were categorized into 4 groups by initial Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score (I-SOFA) and average daily energy intake during the first week: group M-1, I-SOFA ≤8 and 8 and 8 and ≥16 kcal/kg/d. The study included 51 patients with a median age of 69 years. No significant differences were noted in all-cause mortality and length of stay in the EICU and hospital between groups M-1 and M-2 or groups S-1 and S-2. The mechanical ventilation duration (MVD) was significantly shorter in group M-1 than M-2 (2.7 [1.0-5.7] vs 9.2 [4.2-17.4] days; P = .040) and in group S-1 than S-2 (3.1 [0.7-6.0] vs 8.8 [6.1-23.1] days; P = .006). The number of patients who underwent tracheostomy in hospital was significantly lower in group S-1 than in S-2 (20% vs 32%; P = .002). Multivariable analyses to adjust for confounders revealed that average energy intake during the first week in EICU was a significant factor independently associated with MVD but not with the requirement of tracheostomy. Reduced energy intake during the first week in EICU was associated with a reduced MVD in clinically ill patients with BMI <20.0 kg/m(2).

  14. Generating Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Generating Units are any combination of physically connected generators, reactors, boilers, combustion turbines, and other prime movers operated together to produce...

  15. House dust mite, cat, and cockroach allergen concentrations in daycare centers in Tampa, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Caldas, E; Codina, R; Ledford, D K; Trudeau, W L; Lockey, R F

    2001-09-01

    Allergen exposure in early childhood is a risk factor for sensitization and the development of asthma. Studies performed in Europe, New Zealand, and Singapore indicated the presence of indoor allergens in childcare centers and schools. However, the importance of indoor allergens in daycare centers in humid and warm regions of the world is not known. To measure total mite counts, Der p 1, Der f 1, Fel d 1, and Per a 1 allergens in dust samples and mite allergen airborne concentrations in daycare centers in Tampa, Florida, United States. Twenty daycare centers were surveyed for mite, cat, and cockroach allergens in Tampa, FL. One dust and two air samples (one during the day and one during the night) were collected in each center. Dust samples were extracted and analyzed for mite (Der p 1 and Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), and cockroach (Per a 1) allergens. Mite airborne allergen concentrations were analyzed by RAST inhibition and expressed in standardized mite allergen units per m3 of air (AU/m3). Mites were identified in 15 samples, and concentrations ranged from 10 to 1,200 mites/g (298 +/- 355.2). The most prevalent mite species was Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus ( Der p 1). Der p 1 and/or Der f 1 were detected in 10 daycare centers. Der p 1 was detected in eight centers and ranged from I to 21.8 microg/g of dust (5.4 +/- 6.9); Der f 1 was detected in 3 centers and ranged from 0.2 to 2.1 microg/g of dust (1.3 +/- 0.9). Per a 1 and Fel d 1 were detected in all centers in small quantities; Per a 1 ranged from 8 to 1,806 ng/g (263.1 +/- 449.7) and Fel d 1 from 0.2 to 120 U/g of dust (16.6 +/- 31.7), respectively. Airborne mite allergen was detected in 18 centers and ranged from 0.01 to 2.7 AU/m3 during the day (0.2 +/- 0.6) and from 0.01 to 0.12 AU/m3 during the night (0.06 +/- 0.03), P = 0.001. Mite, cat, and cockroach allergens are present in daycare centers in Tampa, FL. Mite allergen concentrations exceeded levels that have been associated with sensitization and

  16. Fort Collins Science Center - Fiscal Year 2008 Science Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Juliette T.

    2009-01-01

    Public land and natural resource managers in the United States are confronted with increasingly complex decisions that have important ramifications for both ecological and human systems. The scientists and technical professionals at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) contribute a unique blend of ecological, socioeconomic, and technological expertise to investigating complicated ecological problems that address critical management questions. In Fiscal Year 2008 (FY08), FORT's scientific and technical professionals continued research vital to the science and management needs of U.S. Department of the Interior agencies and other entities. This annual report describes select FY08 accomplishments in research and technical assistance involving biological information management and delivery; aquatic, riparian, and managed-river ecosystems; invasive species; status and trends of biological resources (including human dimensions and social science); terrestrial ecosystems; and fish and wildlife resources.

  17. Trauma Center Staffing, Infrastructure, and Patient Characteristics that Influence Trauma Center Need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faul, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most effective use of trauma center resources helps reduce morbidity and mortality, while saving costs. Identifying critical infrastructure characteristics, patient characteristics and staffing components of a trauma center associated with the proportion of patients needing major trauma care will help planners create better systems for patient care.   Methods: We used the 2009 National Trauma Data Bank-Research Dataset to determine the proportion of critically injured patients requiring the resources of a trauma center within each Level I-IV trauma center (n=443. The outcome variable was defined as the portion of treated patients who were critically injured. We defined the need for critical trauma resources and interventions (“trauma center need” as death prior to hospital discharge, admission to the intensive care unit, or admission to the operating room from the emergency department as a result of acute traumatic injury. Generalized Linear Modeling (GLM was used to determine how hospital infrastructure, staffing Levels, and patient characteristics contributed to trauma center need.     Results: Nonprofit Level I and II trauma centers were significantly associated with higher levels of trauma center need. Trauma centers that had a higher percentage of transferred patients or a lower percentage of insured patients were associated with a higher proportion of trauma center need.  Hospital infrastructure characteristics, such as bed capacity and intensive care unit capacity, were not associated with trauma center need. A GLM for Level III and IV trauma centers showed that the number of trauma surgeons on staff was associated with trauma center need. Conclusion: Because the proportion of trauma center need is predominantly influenced by hospital type, transfer frequency, and insurance status, it is important for administrators to consider patient population characteristics of the catchment area when planning the

  18. The Unit of Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Boeck, William L.; Christian, Hugh J.

    1999-01-01

    For the past century, scientists have made quantitative measurements of lightning discharges. In the process, they refined the definition of a lightning unit, or basic quantum of lightning, in order to base it on observable parameters. Although many components of a lightning discharge have been identified, lightning usually occur in groups of discharges or pulses that, although complex, can be organized into units of flashes. This unit definition is based mainly on measurements of lightning from electric field, video, and ground flash lightning locating networks. More recent instrumentation with various combinations of high sensitivity, high temporal, or high spatial resolution often measure signals produced by lightning that do not cleanly divide into flashes. The data from these systems indicate the need or a more fundamental unit for lightning. Such a unit would be of benefit for both basic understanding of lightning and comparing lightning information between instruments. Without a common lightning unit definition, intercomparisons are difficult. For an example, the Lightning Detection And Ranging system (LDAR) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have detected ,flash' rates as high as 600 per minute while analysis based on the Advanced Ground Based Field Mill network (AGBFM) detect only 33 "flashes" per minute in the same area and time periods. The satellite based Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) sometimes see single "flashes" that last longer than 10 seconds. Such long duration flashes are not found in electric field records or ground strike location system data sets. The unit of lightning should be based on the fundamental components of the lightning discharge. This should make the unit as generally applicable as possible. For example, studies of NO(x) production by lightning depend on parameters of the individual lightning channels and not the summary flash characteristics. For such studies, the best unit of lightning may be

  19. ITMO Photonics: center of excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voznesenskaya, Anna; Bougrov, Vladislav; Kozlov, Sergey; Vasilev, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    ITMO University, the leading Russian center in photonics research and education, has the mission to train highlyqualified competitive professionals able to act in conditions of fast-changing world. This paradigm is implemented through creation of a strategic academic unit ITMO Photonics, the center of excellence concentrating organizational, scientific, educational, financial, laboratory and human resources. This Center has the following features: dissemination of breakthrough scientific results in photonics such as advanced photonic materials, ultrafast optical and quantum information, laser physics, engineering and technologies, into undergraduate and graduate educational programs through including special modules into the curricula and considerable student's research and internships; transformation of the educational process in accordance with the best international educational practices, presence in the global education market in the form of joint educational programs with leading universities, i.e. those being included in the network programs of international scientific cooperation, and international accreditation of educational programs; development of mechanisms for the commercialization of innovative products - results of scientific research; securing financial sustainability of research in the field of photonics of informationcommunication systems via funding increase and the diversification of funding sources. Along with focusing on the research promotion, the Center is involved in science popularization through such projects as career guidance for high school students; interaction between student's chapters of international optical societies; invited lectures of World-famous experts in photonics; short educational programs in optics, photonics and light engineering for international students; contests, Olympics and grants for talented young researchers; social events; interactive demonstrations.

  20. Acute kidney injury is an independent risk factor for pediatric intensive care unit mortality, longer length of stay and prolonged mechanical ventilation in critically ill children: a two-center retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkandari, Omar; Eddington, K Allen; Hyder, Ayaz; Gauvin, France; Ducruet, Thierry; Gottesman, Ronald; Phan, Véronique; Zappitelli, Michael

    2011-06-10

    In adults, small (intensive care units (PICUs) for at least one night in Montreal, QC, Canada. The AKI definition was based on the Acute Kidney Injury Network staging system, excluding the requirement of SCr increase within 48 hours, which was impossible to evaluate on the basis of our data set. We estimated bSCr two ways: (1) the lowest SCr level in the three months before admission or the average age- and gender-based norms (the standard method) or (2) by using average norms in all patients. Outcomes were PICU mortality and length of stay as well as required mechanical ventilation. We used multiple logistic regression analysis to evaluate AKI risk factors and the association between AKI and mortality. We used multiple linear regression analysis to evaluate the effect of AKI on other outcomes. We calculated diagnostic characteristics for early SCr increase (mechanical ventilation, documented infection and having a bSCr measurement were independent predictors of AKI development. AKI was associated with increased mortality (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 3.7, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 2.1 to 6.4, using the standard bSCr method; OR = 4.5, 95% CI = 2.6 to 7.9, using normative bSCr values in all patients). AKI was independently associated with longer PICU stay and required mechanical ventilation. In children with no admission AKI, the initial percentage SCr increase predicted AKI development (area under the curve = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.60 to 0.74). AKI is associated with increased mortality and morbidity in critically ill children, regardless of the bSCr used. Paying attention to small early SCr increases may contribute to early AKI diagnosis in conjunction with other new AKI biomarkers.

  1. The functional biogeography of species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Daniel W.; Dalsgaard, Bo; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2013-01-01

    Biogeographical systems can be analyzed as networks of species and geographical units. Within such a biogeographical network, individual species may differ fundamentally in their linkage pattern, and therefore hold different topological roles. To advance our understanding of the relationship...... and a wide altitudinal range-span are related to a wide distribution on many islands and across several biogeographical modules. On the other hand, species restricted to interior forest are mainly characterized as peripherals and, thus, have narrow and localized distributions within biogeographical modules...

  2. Effectiveness of transcranial magnetic stimulation in clinical practice post-FDA approval in the United States: results observed with the first 100 consecutive cases of depression at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, K Ryan; Helmer, Amanda; Cristancho, Mario A; Cristancho, Pilar; O'Reardon, John P

    2012-04-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD) in patients who have not responded to 1 adequate antidepressant trial in the current episode. In a retrospective cohort study, we examined the effectiveness and safety of TMS in the first 100 consecutive patients treated for depression (full DSM-IV criteria for major depressive episode in either major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder) at an academic medical center between July 21, 2008, and March 25, 2011. TMS was flexibly dosed in a course of up to 30 sessions, adjunctive to current medications, for 85 patients treated for acute depression. The primary outcomes were response and remission rates at treatment end point as measured by the Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement scale (CGI-I) at 6 weeks. Secondary outcomes included change in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS); Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology, self-report (QIDS-SR); Beck Depression Inventory (BDI); Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI); and the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS). Enduring benefit was assessed over 6 months in patients receiving maintenance TMS treatment. Data from 12 patients who received TMS as maintenance or continuation treatment after prior electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) or TMS given in a clinical trial setting were also reviewed. The clinical cohort was treatment resistant, with a mean of 3.4 failed adequate trials in the current episode. Thirty-one individuals had received prior lifetime ECT, and 60% had a history of psychiatric hospitalization. The CGI-I response rate was 50.6% and the remission rate was 24.7% at 6 weeks. The mean change was -7.8 points in HDRS score, -5.4 in QIDS-SR, -11.4 in BDI, -5.8 in BAI, and -6.9 in SDS. The HDRS response and remission rates were 41.2% and 35.3%, respectively. Forty-two patients (49%) entered 6 months of maintenance TMS treatment. Sixty-two percent (26/42 patients) maintained their responder

  3. Find a Health Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — HRSA Health Centers care for you, even if you have no health insurance – you pay what you can afford based on your income. Health centers provide services that...

  4. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) explores the unique properties of materials and processes at the nanoscale. The CFN is a user-oriented research center...

  5. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the "Invisible Killer" because it's a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas. ...

  6. MARYLAND ROBOTICS CENTER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Maryland Robotics Center is an interdisciplinary research center housed in the Institute for Systems Research (link is external)within the A. James Clark School...

  7. Hydrologic Engineering Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC), an organization within the Institute for Water Resources, is the designated Center of Expertise for the U.S. Army Corps of...

  8. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  9. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Skip to main content Languages 简体中文 English Bahasa ... Blog Safety Education Centers Neighborhood Safety Network Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster ...

  10. Poison Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1222 immediately. Name State American Association of Poison Control Centers Address AAPCC Central Office NOT A POISON ... not for emergency use. Arkansas ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Address 1717 S. Philo Road, Suite 36 Urbana, ...

  11. RSW Cell Centered Grids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New cell centered grids are generated to complement the node-centered ones uploaded. Six tarballs containing the coarse, medium, and fine mixed-element and pure tet....

  12. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources OnSafety Blog Safety Education Centers Neighborhood Safety Network Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster Contest Pool Safely Business & Manufacturing Business & Manufacturing Business Education Small Business Resources ...

  13. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon ... All CO Safety Guides ")); jQuery(".node-type-safety-education-center ... Camping Equipment Home Heating Equipment On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More ...

  14. Turnley Unit

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facilities at this unit include cattle working pens, hydraulic squeeze chute and electronic scale, a maintenance building, and four hay storage sheds. There is one...

  15. Detector Unit

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Original detector unit of the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) BOL project. This detector unit shows that silicon detectors for nuclear physics particle detection were already developed and in use in the 1960's in Amsterdam. Also the idea of putting 'strips' onto the silicon for high spatial resolution of a particle's impact on the detector were implemented in the BOL project which used 64 of these detector units. The IKO BOL project with its silicon particle detectors was designed, built and operated from 1965 to roughly 1977. Detector Unit of the BOL project: These detectors, notably the ‘checkerboard detector’, were developed during the years 1964-1968 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by the Natuurkundig Laboratorium of the N.V. Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken. This was done in close collaboration with the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) where the read-out electronics for their use in the BOL Project was developed and produced.

  16. Man...An Endangered Species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior, Washington, DC.

    The general theme of this 1968 yearbook is that man is a threatened species, facing overpopulation and unbridled technology - both self induced. The presentation is broad, relating to many aspects of conservation and natural resources in the United States in a descriptive, non-technical style. The yearbook is divided into major topics: Land…

  17. [Estimation of species diversity of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated in hospitals of Russian Federation in 2009-2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, O L; Kunda, M S; Dmitrienko, O A; Liubasovskaia, L A; Kovalishena, O V; Popov, D A; Lunin, V G

    2011-01-01

    Comparative analysis of species diversity of sample of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) isolated in hospitals of different specializations. For identification of 102 CNS strains, biochemical systems manufactured by NPO "Diagnostic Systems", VITEK 2 Compact, and BBL Crystal as well as sequencing of fragments of tuf and gap genes were used. Greater differentiating capability of genotyping compared with phenotyping methods for species identification of staphylococci was demonstrated. Six CNS species were identified in the sample: S. epidermidis, S. haemolyticus, S. hominis, S. warneri, S. capitis, and S. pasteuri. The largest species diversity was noted for strains from maternity hospitals in Nizhny Novgorod and Kulakov Scientific Center for Obstetrics, Gynecology and Perinatology. Strains isolated from blood of patients in Bakulev Center for Cardiovascular Surgery were represented mostly by S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus. Differences in species diversity of CNS--causative agents of neonatal conjunctivitis and omphalitis--were observed. Two species of CNS: S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus pose special threat as nosocomial pathogens both in hospitals for adults and obstetrical facilities. Additionally, in neonatal units it is necessary to control such species as S. warneri, S. capitis, S. pasteuri.

  18. EFFECT OF FSH β-SUB UNIT AND FSHR GENES POLYMORPHISMS ON SUPEROVULATORY RESPONSE TRAITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Andreas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH is a pituitary expressed glycoprotein hormone that regulatesreproduction in mammals which composed of α and β-sub unit. The β-sub unit dictates its bindingspecificity with their receptor (FSHR. This study aimed to identify polymorphism of FSH β-sub unitand FSHR genes, and its effect to superovulatory response traits on superovulated cows. Study was doneon 32 cows including Angus, Friesian Holstein (FH, Limousin, Simmental and Brahman in CipelangLivestock Embryo Center. Cows used have been treated superovulation and mated by artificialinsemination. Superovulation response (SR, ovulation rate (OR, fertilization percentage (FP andviable transfer embryo percentage (VP were analyzed to investigate the effect of FSH β-sub unit andFSHR polymorphism. Allele frequency of FSH β-sub unit|PstI and FSH|AluI were opposite withinspecies. Mostly B allele and C allele for FSH β-sub unit and FSHR respectively have a high number inBos taurus species while those were in contrast in Bos indicus species. The highest heterozygosity wasfound in FH cattle (0.250 for FSH β-sub unit and Brahman (0.333 for FSHR. Significant effect was found between FSHR gene polymorphism with ovulation rate where CC genotype was higher (P<0.05than CG and GG genotypes.

  19. Institutional Research at (and for) Academic Health Centers: Who's Doing What? AIR 1992 Annual Forum Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Irving; Dailey, Don E.

    A study was done of the characteristics of institutional research in 51 academic health centers. Overall, slightly less than half of the centers had an identifiable institutional research unit. In general, the more autonomous the center from its parent campus, the more likely it was that it would have a separate institutional research unit. The…

  20. Eastern forest environmental threat assessment center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Research Station. USDA Forest Service

    2010-01-01

    The Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center (EFETAC) provides the latest research and expertise concerning threats to healthy forests – such as insects and disease, wildland loss, invasive species, wildland fire, and climate change – to assist forest landowners, managers and scientists throughout the East. Established in 2005, EFETAC is a joint effort of...

  1. Tax_Units_Certification_2013_0301

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Statewide GIS Tax Unit boundary file was created through a collaborative partnership between the State of Kansas Department of Revenue Property Valuation...

  2. Tax_Unit_Certification_Final_2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Statewide GIS Tax Unit boundary file was created through a collaborative partnership between the State of Kansas Department of Revenue Property Valuation...

  3. United States Stateplane Zones - NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — U.S. State Plane Zones (NAD 1983) represents the State Plane Coordinate System (SPCS) Zones for the 1983 North American Datum within United States.

  4. United States Stateplane Zones - NAD27

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — U.S. State Plane Zones (NAD 1927) represents the State Plane Coordinate System (SPCS) Zones for the 1927 North American Datum within United States.

  5. Mineral operations outside the United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Mineral facilities and operations outside the United States compiled by the National Minerals Information Center of the USGS. This representation combines source...

  6. Norovirus in the United States

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-09

    Dr. Aron Hall, a CDC epidemiologist specializing in norovirus, discusses the impact of norovirus in the United States.  Created: 9/9/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 9/17/2013.

  7. Cholera in the United States

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-08

    Anna Newton, Surveillance Epidemiologist at CDC, discusses cholera that was brought to the United States during an outbreak in Haiti and the Dominican Republic (Hispaniola).  Created: 11/8/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/8/2011.

  8. Electrosurgical units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Electrosurgical units (ESUs) have been used for decades for surgical cutting and hemostasis. In this study, we evaluate eight full-featured, high-power, solid-state ESUs from four suppliers. We examined these units--all of which can be used for the vast majority of electrosurgical applications--for performance and safety, human factors design, and maintenance and durability. We found that all the evaluated units performed well in our testing and met our safety requirements; thus, we rated them all Acceptable. We did, however, identify a few noteworthy differences that separated some of the evaluated units from each other, as well as from the majority of units that have been in use for a decade or more. The most important of these factors were (i) the availability of new types of output modes (e.g., non-power-controlled modes, low-voltage modes) that produce differences in surgical effect and (2) the presence of certain characteristics and features (e.g., cutting modes with a broad power curve, programmable settings-memory features) that users indicated were helpful. Although we considered these distinguishing factors to be significant, we recognize that the full clinical impact of these developments has not yet been realized. And the ability of an institution to take advantage of any benefits such developments could offer will depend to a large degree on user technique. In this Evaluation, we also present a comprehensive overview of ESU technology; a Technology Management Guide, in which we offer strategies for managing the risks associated with electrosurgery; and an ESU Purchasing Guide, in which we offer guidance for determining the type and model of ESU that will best meet an institution's needs. In a future issue of Health Devices (scheduled for early 1998), we will be publishing an Evaluation of several moderate-power ESUs. These devices can be used for most of the same applications as the high-power units, but they cost much less.

  9. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R. B. [PPPL; Gobbin, M. [Euratom-ENEA Association

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  10. 77 FR 68809 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... conducted by the applicant over a 5-year period. Applicant: Utah's Hogle Zoo, Salt Lake City, UT; PRT-680356... Species Center, South Africa, for the purpose of enhancement of the survival of the species. Applicant... captive-bred female cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) from the De Wildt Cheetah Breeding Center, South Africa...

  11. [Conservation Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Each of the six instructional units deals with one aspect of conservation: forests, water, rangeland, minerals (petroleum), and soil. The area of the elementary school curriculum with which each correlates is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the…

  12. Test Control Center (TCC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Test Control Center (TCC) provides a consolidated facility for planning, coordinating, controlling, monitoring, and analyzing distributed test events. ,The TCC...

  13. Electron Microscopy Center (EMC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those...

  14. Center for Deployment Psychology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Deployment Psychology was developed to promote the education of psychologists and other behavioral health specialists about issues pertaining to the...

  15. Great Lakes Science Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Since 1927, Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC) research has provided critical information for the sound management of Great Lakes fish populations and other important...

  16. Environmental Modeling Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Modeling Center provides the computational tools to perform geostatistical analysis, to model ground water and atmospheric releases for comparison...

  17. Chemical Security Analysis Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In 2006, by Presidential Directive, DHS established the Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAC) to identify and assess chemical threats and vulnerabilities in the...

  18. Audio Visual Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Audiovisual Services Center provides still photographic documentation with laboratory support, video documentation, video editing, video duplication, photo/video...

  19. Motor vehicle intrusion alone does not predict trauma center admission or use of trauma center resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, Derek; Cone, David C; Vaca, Federico E

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published its Guidelines for Field Triage of Injured Patients in 2009. These CDC guidelines define criteria for the triage of trauma patients to trauma centers, and include physiologic, anatomic, and high-risk mechanism-of-injury criteria. One of the mechanism criteria used for motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) is intrusion >12 inches at the occupant site or >18 inches at any site. Objective. We hypothesized that motor vehicle intrusion, as the sole criterion for transport to a trauma center, is neither sensitive nor specific for predicting which patients will utilize trauma center resources. This was a retrospective, observational study of a cohort of MVC victims transported to a single trauma center. The authors extracted MVC characteristics, patient demographics, and final diagnoses from emergency medical services (EMS) and emergency department (ED) charts. Two outcomes were examined: admission to the trauma center for a traumatic injury and use of trauma center resources, defined as in-hospital death, admission to an intensive care unit, operative intervention of any type, spinal injury, or intracranial hemorrhage. During the 18-month study period, 608 patients met the inclusion criteria in our study; 36 patients met the trauma center triage criteria based solely on intrusion. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) of intrusion were 38.9%, 92.8%, and 25.5%, respectively, for trauma center admission, and 58.3%, 91.9%, and 12.7%, respectively, for trauma center resource utilization. We conducted one post hoc adjustment to modify intrusion to entrapment. This change greatly increased the PPV of the CDC guidelines for both trauma center admissions and trauma center utilization, without any reduction in sensitivity. Motor vehicle intrusion alone is a poor predictor of the need for trauma center admission or trauma center resource utilization. A modest change to the CDC guidelines from

  20. Dengue Fever in the United States

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-09

    Dr. Amesh Adalja, an associate at the Center for Biosecurity and clinical assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh School, of Medicine, discusses dengue fever outbreaks in the United States.  Created: 4/9/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/16/2012.

  1. Theoretical microbial ecology without species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Mikhail

    2017-09-01

    Ecosystems are commonly conceptualized as networks of interacting species. However, partitioning natural diversity of organisms into discrete units is notoriously problematic and mounting experimental evidence raises the intriguing question whether this perspective is appropriate for the microbial world. Here an alternative formalism is proposed that does not require postulating the existence of species as fundamental ecological variables and provides a naturally hierarchical description of community dynamics. This formalism allows approaching the species problem from the opposite direction. While the classical models treat a world of imperfectly clustered organism types as a perturbation around well-clustered species, the presented approach allows gradually adding structure to a fully disordered background. The relevance of this theoretical construct for describing highly diverse natural ecosystems is discussed.

  2. Trichosporon species isolated from human respiratory system

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Dynowska

    2014-01-01

    The research included clinical material collected from the patients of the Specialist Medical Unit for Tubereles. Lung Diseases and Oncology in Olsztyn with particular consideration to the respiratory system and to Trichosporon species. In total 3 species were isolated: Trichosporon beigelii Vuillemin, Trichosporon capitatum Diddens et Lodder and Trichosporon pullulans Diddens et Lodder. T. beigelii dominated in the materiał examined.

  3. Virginia Tech's Cook Counseling Center receives international counseling accreditation

    OpenAIRE

    DeLauder, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Tech Thomas E. Cook Counseling Center has been accredited by the International Association of Counseling Services, Inc., an organization of United States, Canadian, and Australian counseling agencies based in Alexandria, Va.

  4. University of Nebraska Medical Center | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principal investigator: Michael (Tony) A. Hollingsworth, PhD Institution: Research Unit - University of Nebraska Medical Center Title of the PCDC Project This page is under construction. Please check back at a later date. |

  5. Intelligent Tinkering: the Endangered Species Act and Resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda Harm. Benson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Endangered Species Act (ESA is one of the most powerful and controversial environmental laws in the United States. As a result of its uncompromising position against biodiversity loss, the ESA has become the primary driver of many ecological restoration efforts in the United States. This article explains why the ESA has become the impetus for so many of these efforts and assesses the strengths and weaknesses of the ESA as a primary driver from a resilience-based perspective. It argues that in order to accommodate resilience theory, several changes to ESA implementation and enforcement should be made. First and foremost, there is a need to shift management strategies from a species-centered to a systems-based approach. Chief among the shifts required will be a more integrated approach to governance that includes a willingness to reassess demands placed on ecological systems by our social systems. Building resilience will also require more proactive management efforts that support the functioning of system processes before they are endangered and on the brink of regime change. Finally, resilience thinking requires a reorientation of management away from goals associated with achieving preservation, restoration, and optimization and toward goals associated with fostering complexity and adaptive capacity.

  6. NSIDC Data Center: Energy Reduction Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-05-01

    The Green Data Center Project was a successful effort to significantly reduce the energy use of the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). Through a full retrofit of a traditional air conditioning system, the cooling energy required to meet the data center’s constant load has been reduced by over 70% for summer months and over 90% for cooler winter months. This significant reduction is achievable through the use of airside economization and a new indirect evaporative cooling cycle. One of the goals of this project was to create awareness of simple and effective energy reduction strategies for data centers. Although this particular project was able to maximize the positive effects of airside economization and indirect evaporative cooling because of its geographic location, similar strategies may also be relevant for many other sites and data centers in the United States.

  7. Call Center Capacity Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Bang

    The main topics of the thesis are theoretical and applied queueing theory within a call center setting. Call centers have in recent years become the main means of communication between customers and companies, and between citizens and public institutions. The extensively computerized infrastructu...

  8. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... main content Languages 简体中文 English Bahasa Indonesia 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase ... Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as ...

  9. Dimensioning large call centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Borst (Sem); A. Mandelbaum; M.I. Reiman

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe develop a framework for asymptotic optimization of a queueing system. The motivation is the staffing problem of call centers with 100's of agents (or more). Such a call center is modeled as an M/M/N queue, where the number of agents~$N$ is large. Within our framework, we determine the

  10. HRSA: Find a Health Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Seasonal Head Start Center (MSHS) HELP: HRSA Contact Center is available at 877-464-4772, 8 a. ... p.m. ET, weekdays (except federal holidays) HRSA Contact Center Close × Center Name Close Close Panel OPOs Transplant ...

  11. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Locator Hospitals and Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Search Enter your ... Clinic Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Contact Us FAQs ...

  12. Unitizing worker expertise and maximizing the brain reward centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Anthony Bert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    People are experts when it comes to the work they do; unfortunately their expertise is not utilized as frequently as it could be. More opportunities need to be provided that allow people to participate in the design of their work including: accident investigations, job planning, and process improvements. Many employers use some form of job hazard analysis process to identify and document hazards and controls, but the front line worker is rarely involved. This presentation will show the core principles supporting employee involvement, provide examples where workers had brilliant ideas but no one listened, and provide examples where workers were given the opportunity to use their expertise to improve occupational safety. According to Abraham Maslow's Hierarch of Needs model, one essential human need is to be innovative and solve problems. Advances in brain science have proven, through functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, the brain reward pathway is activated when people are recognized for their intellectual contributions. As people contribute their expertise to improve occupational safety more frequently they will feel a sense of gratification. In addition, safety professionals will have more time to spend on strategic planning of emerging occupational safety issues. One effect of the current global recession is that SH&E professionals are asked to do more with less. Therefore, to be successful it is essential that SH&E professionals incorporate worker expertise in job planning. This will be illustrated in the presentation through an example where a worker had the answer to a difficult decision on appropriate personal protective equipment for a job but no one asked the worker for his idea during the job planning phase. Fortunately the worker was eventually consulted and his recommendation for the appropriate personal protective equipment for the job was implemented before work began. The goal of this presentation is to expand the awareness and knowledge of SH&E professionals on the benefits and opportunities for leveraging brain science. This will include an overview of the components of the brain reward pathway and the biological mechanisms that make workers feel a sense of gratification when they contribute their ideas toward improving occupational safety. On-the-job examples where it is hypothesized that the brain reward pathway was activated in workers will be provided. Finally, the presentation will include a model illustrating the importance of empowering workers to participate in occupational safety programs. SH&E professionals can use this model to maintain a robust safety and health program with limited resources. The model will also help SH&E professionals prepare for challenges in the SH&E fields by showing them how to allocate more time for strategic planning of emerging issues. Many recent best selling business books such as Wikinomics, Crowdsourcing, and Sway, illustrate how the benefit of harnessing the collective knowledge of employees is a key to company success. Companies like Google and Pixar have mastered the ability to capture empFoyee knowledge in terms of technology. Why should occupational safety be any different? Workers know how to improve safety in their workplace. SH&E professionals can harness this collective safety knowledge just as top companies do with technology, and workers will feel grateful for contributing.

  13. Organizational Analysis of the United States Army Evaluation Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    ATEC). As a result of BRAC 2005, Headquarters U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command (ATEC), U.S. Army Developmental Test Command ( DTC ), and U.S. Army...Evaluation Command (ATEC) ..............................11  III.  DESCRIPTION OF AEC AS A SYSTEM USING THE OSF MODEL .............15  A.  INPUTS...Test and Evaluation Command , 2013, p. 24). .......................................38  Figure 9.  Evaluation Activities during Materiel Solution Analysis

  14. United States Military Academy Photonics Research Center, 2009 Program Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    output data can be viewed as a two dimensional array like a regular digital photo . HSI has several advantages over point spectrometer or color...Creighton CDT Katie Fenton CDT Jesse Teahon CDT Jenn Vanecek CDT Claire Heid CDT Blake Rulison CDT Kyle Johnson Acknowledgements Funding from the...by a photo detector and sampled using a high-speed analog-to-digital converter. The three-dimensional image of a 1 x 1 x 2 mm scanned area is

  15. The Wetland and Aquatic Research Center strategic science plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2017-02-02

    IntroductionThe U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Wetland and Aquatic Research Center (WARC) has two primary locations (Gainesville, Florida, and Lafayette, Louisiana) and field stations throughout the southeastern United States and Caribbean. WARC’s roots are in U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and National Park Service research units that were brought into the USGS as the Biological Research Division in 1996. Founded in 2015, WARC was created from the merger of two long-standing USGS biology science Centers—the Southeast Ecological Science Center and the National Wetlands Research Center—to bring together expertise in biology, ecology, landscape science, geospatial applications, and decision support in order to address issues nationally and internationally. WARC scientists apply their expertise to a variety of wetland and aquatic research and monitoring issues that require coordinated, integrated efforts to better understand natural environments. By increasing basic understanding of the biology of important species and broader ecological and physiological processes, this research provides information to policymakers and aids managers in their stewardship of natural resources and in regulatory functions.This strategic science plan (SSP) was developed to guide WARC research during the next 5–10 years in support of Department of the Interior (DOI) partnering bureaus such as the USFWS, the National Park Service, and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, as well as other Federal, State, and local natural resource management agencies. The SSP demonstrates the alignment of the WARC goals with the USGS mission areas, associated programs, and other DOI initiatives. The SSP is necessary for workforce planning and, as such, will be used as a guide for future needs for personnel. The SSP also will be instrumental in developing internal funding priorities and in promoting WARC’s capabilities to both external cooperators and other groups within the USGS.

  16. Processor Units Reduce Satellite Construction Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    As part of the effort to build the Fast Affordable Science and Technology Satellite (FASTSAT), Marshall Space Flight Center developed a low-cost telemetry unit which is used to facilitate communication between a satellite and its receiving station. Huntsville, Alabama-based Orbital Telemetry Inc. has licensed the NASA technology and is offering to install the cost-cutting units on commercial satellites.

  17. Espaces centrés et pouvoirs décentrés : l’exemple des fédérations villageoises dogon au XIXe siècle Centered territorial units and decentered powers: Dogon village federations in the 19th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éric Jolly

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Au xixe siècle, le Sud du pays dogon se caractérisait par un paysage politique singulier avec une mosaïque de petites fédérations villageoises regroupant chacune, sur un même territoire, une douzaine de localités non apparentées. Selon les indices rassemblés, la création de ces formations originales remonterait à la seconde moitié du xviiie siècle et résulterait d’un nouveau rapport à l’espace imposé à la fois par la multiplication des guerres ou des razzias et par un peuplement local de plus en plus dense et diversifié. Face à la pression militaire des États voisins, l’objectif des groupes résidents n’est plus de s’approprier un territoire, mais de le défendre en construisant son unité au centre, à l’endroit présumé de sa fondation. Carrefour politico-religieux, ce centre prenait la forme d’une place publique servant de lieu de rassemblement unitaire, mais aussi d’axe de distribution égalitaire des pouvoirs entre tous les villages installés sur le même territoire.In the 19th century, the southern part of the land of the Dogon stood out owing to its unusual political landscape, a mosaic of small village federations each of which grouped, in a territorial unit, a dozen or so localities unrelated by kinship. These original federations emerged out of a new relation to space during the second half of the 18th century as a result of increasing warfare and raiding in the context of a denser, more diversified local population. Given mounting military pressure from neighboring states, resident groups no longer sought to appropriate a territory but to defend it by establishing its unity in the center, at the presumed place of foundation. As a political and religious crossroads, this center was not only a public meeting place expressing unity but also the axis of an egalitarian distribution of power between all villages located in the same territory.

  18. Energy efficient data centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-03-30

    Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to California's economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to California's industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commission's PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research ''roadmap'' defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency. Although there are many opinions concerning the energy intensity of data centers and the aggregate effect on California's electrical power systems, there is very little publicly available information. Through this project, actual energy consumption at its end use was measured in a number of data centers. This benchmark data was documented in case study reports, along with site-specific energy efficiency recommendations. Additionally, other data center energy benchmarks were obtained through synergistic projects, prior PG&E studies, and industry contacts. In total, energy benchmarks for sixteen data centers were obtained. For this project, a broad definition of ''data center'' was adopted which included internet hosting, corporate, institutional, governmental, educational and other miscellaneous data centers. Typically these facilities require specialized infrastructure to provide high quality power and cooling for IT equipment. All of these data center types were considered in the development of an estimate of the total power consumption in California. Finally, a research ''roadmap'' was developed

  19. Center for beam physics 1996-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    The Center for Beam Physics (CBP) is a multidisciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation, transport, and focusing of energy and information. Special features of the Center`s program include addressing R&D issues needing long development time and providing a platform for conception, initiation, and support of institutional projects based on beams. The Center brings to bear a significant amount of diverse, complementary, and self-sufficient expertise in accelerator physics, synchrotron radiation, advanced microwave techniques, plasma physics, optics, and lasers on the forefront R&D issues in particle and photon beam research. In addition to functioning as a clearinghouse for novel ideas and concepts and related R&D (e.g., various theoretical and experimental studies in beam physics such as nonlinear dynamics, phase space control, laser-beam-plasma interaction, free-electron lasers, optics, and instrumentation), the Center provides significant support to Laboratory facilities and initiatives. This roster and annual report provides a glimpse of the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up the CBP`s outstanding team and gives a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1996 and 1997.

  20. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Text Size: Decrease Font Increase Font Contact CPSC Consumers: Businesses: Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses United States CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Search ...

  1. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Consumers: Businesses: Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses United ... Statements Safety Education Safety Education Safety Education Resources OnSafety Blog Safety ...

  2. Engineering Technical Support Center Annual Report Fiscal Year 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or Agency) Office of Research and Development (ORD) created the Engineering Technical Support Center (ETSC) in 1987, one of several technical support centers created as part of the Technical Support Project (TSP). ETSC provid...

  3. The Puente Learning Center: A Building and a Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kelly R.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the People United To Enrich the Neighborhood through Education (Puente) Learning Center, a nonprofit center in Los Angeles (California) providing programs in literacy, English-as-a-Second-Language, study skills, job training, and computer skills for people who traditionally have had limited access to education and technology. (SLD)

  4. 75 FR 43031 - National Sheep Industry Improvement Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... Service 7 CFR Part 63 National Sheep Industry Improvement Center AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service... regulations establishing a National Sheep Industry Improvement Center (NSIIC) program, consistent with the... production and marketing of sheep or goat products in the United States; (2) Optimize the use of available...

  5. 75 FR 75867 - National Sheep Industry Improvement Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... Service 7 CFR Part 63 National Sheep Industry Improvement Center AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service... National Sheep Industry Improvement Center (NSIIC) program, consistent with the Food, Conservation, and... to strengthen and enhance production and marketing of sheep or goat products in the United States; (2...

  6. The Establishment of a Volunteer Center and the Current Activity

    OpenAIRE

    富田, 恵子; 大山, さく子; 南條, 正人; Keiko, TOMITA; Sakuko, OHYAMA; Masato, NANJO; 仙台大学; 仙台大学; 仙台大学; Sendai College; Sendai College; Sendai College

    2004-01-01

    Sendai College in Miyagi, Japan established the Volunteer Center in April 2003. The purposes for starting this rogram are for university students to enrich their social experiences, to develop their leadership skills and to help deepen their understanding of human experiences. It is the universitys hope that the center serves a role expected by the community as well. The students volunteers acquire curricular units after one year of their participation. One year after opening the center, out ...

  7. Relative Lyapunov Center Bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Claudia; Schilder, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Relative equilibria (REs) and relative periodic orbits (RPOs) are ubiquitous in symmetric Hamiltonian systems and occur, for example, in celestial mechanics, molecular dynamics, and rigid body motion. REs are equilibria, and RPOs are periodic orbits of the symmetry reduced system. Relative Lyapunov...... center bifurcations are bifurcations of RPOs from REs corresponding to Lyapunov center bifurcations of the symmetry reduced dynamics. In this paper we first prove a relative Lyapunov center theorem by combining recent results on the persistence of RPOs in Hamiltonian systems with a symmetric Lyapunov...

  8. Transport Reactor Development Unit Modification to Provide a Syngas Slipstream at Elevated Conditions to Enable Separation of 100 LB/D of Hydrogen by Hydrogen Separation Membranes Year - 6 Activity 1.15 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlasner, Steven

    2012-03-01

    Gasification of coal when associated with carbon dioxide capture and sequestration has the potential to provide low-cost as well as low-carbon hydrogen for electric power, fuels or chemicals production. The key element to the success of this concept is inexpensive, effective separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide in synthesis gas. Many studies indicate that membrane technology is one of the most, if not the most, economical means of accomplishing separation; however, the advancement of hydrogen separation membrane technology is hampered by the absence of experience or demonstration that the technology is effective economically and environmentally at larger scales. While encouraging performance has been observed at bench scale (less than 12 lb/d hydrogen), it would be imprudent to pursue a largescale demonstration without testing at least one intermediate scale, such as 100 lb/d hydrogen. Among its many gasifiers, the Energy & Environmental Research Center is home to the transport reactor demonstration unit (TRDU), a unit capable of firing 200—500 lb/hr of coal to produce 400 scfm of synthesis gas containing more than 200 lb/d of hydrogen. The TRDU and associated downstream processing equipment has demonstrated the capability of producing a syngas over a wide range of temperatures and contaminant levels — some of which approximate conditions of commercial-scale gasifiers. Until this activity, however, the maximum pressure of the TRDU’ s product syngas was 120 psig, well below the 400+ psig pressures of existing large gasifiers. This activity installed a high-temperature compressor capable of accepting the range of TRDU products up to 450°F and compressing them to 500 psig, a pressure comparable to some large scale gasifiers. Thus, with heating or cooling downstream of the TRDU compressor, the unit is now able to present a near-raw to clean gasifier synthesis gas containing more than 100 lb/d of hydrogen at up to 500 psig over a wide range of temperatures

  9. Managing Messaging and Data Processing Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    requesting authorities. 15.10. Keep a current list of ML assignments with related ML information. 15.11. Coordinate with the regional service manager (RSM...Global Control Center GSM—Global Service Manager HD—Help Desk HQ AFCA—Headquarters Air Force Communications Agency HQ SSG—Headquarters Standard Systems...Publication LAN—Local Area Network LCC—Local Control Center 30 AFI33-113 1 MARCH 1998LRU—Line Replaceable Unit LSM—Local Service Manager MAJCOM—Major

  10. United States Military Presence in Central Asia: Implications of United States Basing for Central Asian Stability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dockery, Jr, Leon W

    2006-01-01

    ... became available in Afghanistan. The primary methodology of this thesis centers on case studies of the military presence of the Soviet Union/Russia and the United States in Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, and Afghanistan...

  11. Analysis of Serbian Military Riverine Units Capability for Participation in the United Nations Peacekeeping Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Radojevic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses required personnel, training capacities and equipment for participation in the United Nations peacekeeping operations with the riverine elements. In order to meet necessary capabilities for engagement in United Nations peacekeeping operations, Serbian military riverine units have to be compatible with the issued UN requirements. Serbian Armed Forces have the potential to reach such requirements with the River Flotilla as a pivot for the participation in UN missions. Serbian Military Academy adopted and developed educational and training program in accordance with the provisions and recommendations of the IMO conventions and IMO model courses. Serbian Military Academy has opportunities for education and training military riverine units for participation in the United Nations peacekeeping operations. Moreover, Serbia has Multinational Operations Training Center and Peacekeeping Operations Center certified to provide selection, training, equipping and preparations of individuals and units to the United Nations multinational operations.

  12. Center Innovation Fund Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To stimulate and encourage creativity and innovation within the NASA Centers. The activities are envisioned to fall within the scope of NASA Space Technology or...

  13. FEMA Disaster Recovery Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This is a search site for FEMA's Disaster Recovery Centers (DRC). A DRC is a readily accessible facility or mobile office set up by FEMA where applicants may go for...

  14. Center for Contaminated Sediments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Center for Contaminated Sediments serves as a clearinghouse for technology and expertise concerned with contaminated sediments. The...

  15. National Automotive Center - NAC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Encouraged by the advantages of collaboration, the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) worked with the Secretary of the...

  16. Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC) began as the Cooperative Game Fish Tagging Program (GTP) at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI) in 1954. The GTP was...

  17. HUD Homeownership Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD Homeownership Centers (HOCs) insure single family Federal Housing Administration (FHA) mortgages and oversee the selling of HUD homes. FHA has four Homeownership...

  18. Children's cancer centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... workers Mental health experts Therapists Child life workers Teachers Clergy Centers also offer many specific benefits such ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  19. USU Patient Simulation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — he National Capital Area (NCA) Medical Simulation Center is a state-of-the-art training facility located near the main USU campus. It uses simulated patients (i.e.,...

  20. Center for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The main goals of this project were to (1) Establish a Center for Hydrogen Storage Research at Delaware State University for the preparation and characterization of selected complex metal hydrides and the determination their suitability for hydrogen ...

  1. Advanced Missile Signature Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Missile Signature Center (AMSC) is a national facility supporting the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and other DoD programs and customers with analysis,...

  2. Mobility Data Analytics Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Mobility Data Analytics Center aims at building a centralized data engine to efficiently manipulate : large-scale data for smart decision making. Integrating and learning the massive data are the key to : the data engine. The ultimate goal of underst...

  3. World Trade Center

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Esilinastus katastroofifilm "World Trade Center" : stsenarist Andrea Berloff : režissöör Oliver Stone : kunstnik Jan Roelfs : osades Nicholas Cage, Michael Pena, Stephen Dorff jpt : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2006. Ka filmi prototüüpidest

  4. Mental Health Screening Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Releases & Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression Screening for Adult Depression Screening for ...

  5. Global Hydrology Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GHRC is the data management and user services arm of the Global Hydrology and Climate Center. It encompasses the data and information management, supporting...

  6. Facility Focus: Athletic Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Planning & Management, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the designs of the Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium at Ohio State University and the fitness center of Scottsdale Community College in Arizona. Discusses design goals and unique features and includes photographs. (EV)

  7. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Search CPSC Search Menu Home Recalls Recall List CPSC Recall API Recall Lawsuits ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information ...

  8. Accredited Birth Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Birthing Center-Cedar Park Accredited 1130 Cottonwood Creek Trail Building D Suite 2 Cedar Park, TX 78613 ... Health Accredited 29135 Ellensburg Avenue PO Box 1710 Gold Beach, OR 97444 541-425-5311 Accredited since ...

  9. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster Contest Pool Safely Business & Manufacturing Business & Manufacturing Business ... Featured Resources CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest Video View the blog Clues You Can ...

  10. United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Bernow

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents and discusses an integrated set of policies designed to reduce U.S. carbon emissions over the next four decades. This innovation path also aims to promote environmental quality, particularly by reducing emissions of criteria air pollutants, to reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil, and to induce technological innovation and diffusion in energy production and consumption. The innovation path would reduce economy-wide carbon emissions by 26% below baseline projections for 2010 and by 62% below baseline projections for 2030; this translates into 10% below 1990 levels in 2010 and 45% below 1990 levels in 2030. Emissions of criteria pollutants also would be significantly reduced, as would petroleum imports by the United States. Moreover, the innovation path would yield cumulative net savings for the United States of $218 billion (1993 dollars through 2010, or $19 billion on a leveled annual basis, and would result in 800,000 additional jobs nationwide by 2010. Although the overall findings from the innovation path analysis are robust, the results should be taken as indicative, rather than precisely predictive, owing to uncertainties in future costs, prices, technology performance, and consumer behavior.

  11. Beringin Youth Center

    OpenAIRE

    Putra, Yogi Pratama

    2016-01-01

    Development Kualanamu International Airport will have an impact on the growth of a region. Regional growth requires improving the quality of human resources in the area. Beringin Youth Development Center in addition to a youth facility and infrastructure is also useful to improve the quality of the resource the youth, with youth activities are creative. In addition to local youth activities, Beringin Youth Center can be used to perform youth international scale, with mess facil...

  12. Centering device for casings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulzade, A.M.G.; Aliyev, R.K.; Karash, E.B.; Mamedov, T.R.G.; Puzanov, A.N.; Yakobashvili, M.V.

    1982-01-01

    A centering device is proposed for casings consisting of 2 rings connected by spring planks, and bushing with support element. In order to improve operating reliability of the centering device in the twisted well, the support element of the bushing is made in a cross section in the form of an ellipse and on the outer surface has spiral slits. A support element can be made of elastic material.

  13. Heart Center nursing research: a team effort. Heart Center Nursing Research Work Group Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullwood, J; Granger, B B; Bride, W; Taylor, M C

    1999-01-01

    Our Heart Center staff identified a need to become more involved in nursing research and evidence based practice. A lack of awareness of the research process and current Heart Center nursing research studies resulted in low patient enrollment. To overcome these challenges a Heart Center Nursing Research Work Group (HCNRWG) was created with support of management. Staff nurses from each unit within the Heart Center participated, and sessions were facilitated by an Assistant Nurse Manager and Clinical Nurse Specialist. Advanced Practice Nurses functioned as consultants. The goal was to support nurses in developing a greater understanding of research and promote nursing research and visibility. Results included the development of research notebooks, inclusive of medical, nursing, and collaborative research projects, "Ask Me About Nursing Research" buttons, and mechanisms for study enrollment for each unit. Writing workshops were held to assist nurses with the preparation of abstracts, manuscripts, and research. A "hot line" was established to answer questions and informational packets and newsletters were distributed to staff and leadership quarterly. An increased awareness of research among the health care team has ensued. Meeting attendance has tripled, more nursing abstracts have been submitted to national conferences and there are ongoing research studies on all heart center units with increased patient enrollment.

  14. Midwest Clean Energy Application Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttica, John; Haefke, Cliff

    2013-12-31

    The Midwest Clean Energy Application Center (CEAC) was one of eight regional centers that promoted and assisted in transforming the market for combined heat and power (CHP), waste heat to power (WHP), and district energy (DE) technologies and concepts throughout the United States between October 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013. The key services the CEACs provided included: Market Opportunity Analyses – Supporting analyses of CHP market opportunities in diverse markets including industrial, federal, institutional, and commercial sectors. Education and Outreach – Providing information on the energy and non-energy benefits and applications of CHP to state and local policy makers, regulators, energy end-users, trade associations and others. Information was shared on the Midwest CEAC website: www.midwestcleanergy.org. Technical Assistance – Providing technical assistance to end-users and stakeholders to help them consider CHP, waste heat to power, and/or district energy with CHP in their facility and to help them through the project development process from initial CHP screening to installation. The Midwest CEAC provided services to the Midwest Region that included the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

  15. Actinomyces Species Isolated from Breast Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, A U; Loh, S F; Morris, T; Hughes, H; Dixon, J M; Helgason, K O

    2015-10-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic infection caused by Actinomyces species characterized by abscess formation, tissue fibrosis, and draining sinuses. The spectrum of infections caused by Actinomyces species ranges from classical invasive actinomycosis to a less invasive form of superficial skin and soft tissue infection. We present a review detailing all Actinomyces species isolated from breast infections in NHS Lothian between 2005 and 2013, Actinomyces species isolated from breast infections referred to the United Kingdom Anaerobe Reference Unit between 1988 and 2014, and cases describing Actinomyces breast infections published in the medical literature since 1994. Actinomyces species are fastidious organisms which can be difficult to identify and are likely to be underascertained as a cause of breast infections. Due to improved diagnostic methods, they are increasingly associated with chronic, recurrent breast infections and may play a more significant role in these infections than has previously been appreciated. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. A Standards-Based Thematic Unit: "Cuadros de Familia"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvis-Condon, Katia; Kleinman, Donna; Brown, Joseph; Roa, Angela

    1998-01-01

    This unit was created as a result of a summer institute sponsored by the National K-12 Foreign Language Resource Center at Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa. The Center's goal is to improve student learning of foreign languages in kindergarten through twelfth grade (K-12). In the summer of 1996, the Center offered the Culture and Children's…

  17. United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    This summary of the people, geography, history, economy, government, defense and foreign affairs of the United Kingdom includes England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. The area contains 56.4 million inhabitants, with a negligible growth rate, one of the most densely populated regions in Europe, especially so in the southeast portion of England. The history of British unification, colonial expansion and industrialization is presented. Currently the British colonies are becoming independent members of the Commonwealth, retaining many British institutions, such as the parliamentary system of government. Slower economic growth recently has prompted privatization of previously nationalized industries by the conservative government in power. Britain's only natural resources are coal and North Sea oil and gas; her economy depends on manufacturing. Britain donates significant funds to developing countries, 70% of that going to Commonwealth nations. Her present military emphasis is on Europe and NATO commitments.

  18. Mechanisms of aquatic species invasions across the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Amy J.; Stith, Bradley M.; Engel, Victor C.

    2016-12-15

    Invasive species are a global issue, and the southeastern United States is not immune to the problems they present. Therefore, various analyses using modeling and exploratory statistics were performed on the U.S. Geological Survey Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) Database with the primary objective of determining the most appropriate use of presence-only data as related to invasive species in the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (SALCC) region. A hierarchical model approach showed that a relatively small amount of high-quality data from planned surveys can be used to leverage the information in presence-only observations, having a broad spatial coverage and high biases of observer detection and in site selection. Because a variety of sampling protocols can be used in planned surveys, this approach to the analysis of presence-only data is widely applicable. An important part of the management of natural landscapes is the preservation of designated protected areas. When the hydrologic connection was considered in this analysis, the number of potential invaders that could spread to each protected area within the SALCC region was greatly increased, with a mean exceeding 30 species and the maximum reaching 57 species. Nearly all protected areas are hydrologically connected to at least 20 nonindigenous aquatic species. To examine possible factors which may contribute to nonindigenous aquatic species richness in the SALCC region, a set of exploratory statistics was employed. The best statistical model that included a combination of three anthropogenic variables (densities of housing, roads, and reservoirs) and two environmental variables (elevation range and longitude) explained approximately 62 percent of the variation in introduced species richness. Highest nonindigenous aquatic species richness occurred in the more upland, mountainous regions, where elevation range favored reservoirs and attracted urban centers. Lastly, patterns seen in a diffusion

  19. "Infotonics Technology Center"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzemeier, L. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States); Boysel, M. B. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States); Smith, D. R. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States)

    2004-09-30

    During this grant period July 15, 2002 thru September 30, 2004, the Infotonics Technology Center developed the critical infrastructure and technical expertise necessary to accelerate the development of sensors, alternative lighting and power sources, and other specific subtopics of interest to Department of Energy. Infotonics fosters collaboration among industry, universities and government and operates as a national center of excellence to drive photonics and microsystems development and commercialization. A main goal of the Center is to establish a unique, world-class research and development facility. A state-of-the-art microsystems prototype and pilot fabrication facility was established to enable rapid commercialization of new products of particular interest to DOE. The Center has three primary areas of photonics and microsystems competency: device research and engineering, packaging and assembly, and prototype and pilot-scale fabrication. Center activities focused on next generation optical communication networks, advanced imaging and information sensors and systems, micro-fluidic systems, assembly and packaging technologies, and biochemical sensors. With targeted research programs guided by the wealth of expertise of Infotonics business and scientific staff, the fabrication and packaging facility supports and accelerates innovative technology development of special interest to DOE in support of its mission and strategic defense, energy, and science goals.

  20. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Decrease Font Increase Font Contact CPSC Consumers: Businesses: Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses United States CONSUMER ... Court Orders & Decisions Research & Statistics Research & Statistics Technical Reports Injury Statistics NEISS Injury Data Consumer Opinion Surveys ...

  1. Pancreas Center Data Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Acrobat Reader Viewers & Players Connect Public Comment Join Public Comment Mailing List Make a Data Request Order Publications Privacy Policy Questions? Contact Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network United Network for Organ Sharing ...

  2. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Alarm Can Save Your Life Working CO alarms matter. Install one and check its batteries regularly. View ... gov is an official website of the United States government. Website Feedback Connect with Us: Facebook Instagram ...

  3. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unites States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning associated with consumer products, including ... CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  4. Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC) is committed to quality testing and inspection services that are delivered on time and...

  5. Exposing Problems Teaching Students Morphological Species Identification

    OpenAIRE

    Stamper, Trevor; Weidner, Lauren; Nigoghosian, Gregory; Nunes, Ludmila D

    2017-01-01

    When dealing with physical remains, morphological assessment for species is a traditional approach to entomological specimen identification. A dichotomous key guides the user through taxa determination for a specimen by providing a series of dual-choice nodes that center around morphological differences. Each nodal choice leads to either a new set of dichotomous choices or a taxa decision. We evaluated student’s ability to utilize a dichotomous key down to species for a limited set of taxa, b...

  6. Center for Beam Physics: 1994--95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The Center for Beam Physics is a multidisciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California. At the heart of the Center`s mission is a fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation, transport, and focusing of energy and information. Dedicated to exploring the frontiers of particle and photon beam physics, its primary mission is to promote the science and technology of the production, manipulation, storage, and control of systems of charged particles and photons. This roster and annual report provides a glimpse of the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up the CBP`s team and gives a brief review of the multifaceted activities during 1994 and 1995.

  7. Organization of a Regional Hemodialysis Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Dantsiger

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a concept of formation and development of interregional, regional, and equated centers, interregional specialized units set up on the basis of therapeutic-and-prophylactic institutions on the basis of a multileveled multistage health care system. Large multidisciplinary clinical hospital One (Novokuznetsk was used as an example to consider the mechanism of integration of innovation technology of organizing a specialized medical aid. Analysis of the needs of the region’s population for dialysis care for patients with acute and chronic renal failure has revealed the barest necessity of setting up a regional hemodyalisis center under a multidisciplinary clinical hospital. The setting up of a hemodialysis center substantially has quantitatively and qualitatively improved health care delivered to patients with acute and chronic renal failure.

  8. Entanglement with centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Chen-Te [Department of Physics and Center for Theoretical Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617 (China)

    2016-01-13

    Entanglement is a physical phenomenon that each state cannot be described individually. Entanglement entropy gives quantitative understanding to the entanglement. We use decomposition of the Hilbert space to discuss properties of the entanglement. Therefore, partial trace operator becomes important to define the reduced density matrix from different centers, which commutes with all elements in the Hilbert space, corresponding to different entanglement choices or different observations on entangling surface. Entanglement entropy is expected to satisfy the strong subadditivity. We discuss decomposition of the Hilbert space for the strong subadditivity and other related inequalities. The entanglement entropy with centers can be computed from the Hamitonian formulations systematically, provided that we know wavefunctional. In the Hamitonian formulation, it is easier to obtain symmetry structure. We consider massless p-form theory as an example. The massless p-form theory in (2p+2)-dimensions has global symmetry, similar to the electric-magnetic duality, connecting centers in ground state. This defines a duality structure in centers. Because it is hard to exactly compute the entanglement entropy from partial trace operator, we propose the Lagrangian formulation from the Hamitonian formulation to compute the entanglement entropy with centers. From the Lagrangian method and saddle point approximation, the codimension two surface term (leading order) in the Einstein gravity theory or holographic entanglement entropy should correspond to non-tensor product decomposition (center is not identity). Finally, we compute the entanglement entropy of the SU(N) Yang-Mills lattice gauge theory in the fundamental representation using the strong coupling expansion in the extended lattice model to obtain spatial area term in total dimensions larger than two for N>1.

  9. Entanglement with centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chen-Te

    2016-01-01

    Entanglement is a physical phenomenon that each state cannot be described individually. Entanglement entropy gives quantitative understanding to the entanglement. We use decomposition of the Hilbert space to discuss properties of the entanglement. Therefore, partial trace operator becomes important to define the reduced density matrix from different centers, which commutes with all elements in the Hilbert space, corresponding to different entanglement choices or different observations on entangling surface. Entanglement entropy is expected to satisfy the strong subadditivity. We discuss decomposition of the Hilbert space for the strong subadditivity and other related inequalities. The entanglement entropy with centers can be computed from the Hamitonian formulations systematically, provided that we know wavefunctional. In the Hamitonian formulation, it is easier to obtain symmetry structure. We consider massless p-form theory as an example. The massless p-form theory in (2 p + 2)-dimensions has global symmetry, similar to the electric-magnetic duality, connecting centers in ground state. This defines a duality structure in centers. Because it is hard to exactly compute the entanglement entropy from partial trace operator, we propose the Lagrangian formulation from the Hamitonian formulation to compute the entanglement entropy with centers. From the Lagrangian method and saddle point approximation, the codimension two surface term (leading order) in the Einstein gravity theory or holographic entanglement entropy should correspond to non-tensor product decomposition (center is not identity). Finally, we compute the entanglement entropy of the SU( N) Yang-Mills lattice gauge theory in the fundamental representation using the strong coupling expansion in the extended lattice model to obtain spatial area term in total dimensions larger than two for N > 1.

  10. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Us FAQs Ask a Question Toll Free Numbers Homeless Veterans Chat VA » Health Care » PTSD: National Center ... Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless Veterans Returning Service Members Rural Veterans Seniors & Aging ...

  11. Vet Centers. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-02

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts as final an interim final rule that amends its medical regulation that governs Vet Center services. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (the 2013 Act) requires Vet Centers to provide readjustment counseling services to broader groups of veterans, members of the Armed Forces, including a member of a reserve component of the Armed Forces, and family members of such veterans and members. This final rule adopts as final the regulatory criteria to conform to the 2013 Act, to include new and revised definitions.

  12. User Centered Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egbert, Maria; Matthews, Ben

    2012-01-01

    The interdisciplinary approach of User Centered Design is presented here with a focus on innovation in the design and use of hearing technologies as well as on the potential of innovation in interaction. This approach is geared towards developing new products, systems, technologies and practices...... based on an understanding of why so few persons with hearing loss use the highly advanced hearing technologies. In integrating Conversation Analysis (“CA”), audiology and User Centered Design, three disciplines which are collaborating together for the first time, we are addressing the following...

  13. Reforma da Atenção Primária em Portugal em duplo movimento: unidades assistenciais autónomas de saúde familiar e gestão em agrupamentos de Centros de Saúde Primary Healthcare Reform in Portugal on two fronts: autonomous family healthcare units and management of groupings of Health Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Pisco

    2011-06-01

    of small autonomous functional units, known as Family Health Units (USF providing services with proximity and quality. The second measure involved the aggregation of resources and management structures, groups of health centers (ACES, seeking to achieve efficiency and economies of scale. The FHU proved to offer simultaneously more efficiency, accessibility, better working environment, greater citizen satisfaction, namely better quality. The importance of strong political support, the creation of a structure responsible for the design and implementation of reform and good liaison with the media are stressed.

  14. Data Analysis and Assessment Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The DoD Supercomputing Resource Center (DSRC) Data Analysis and Assessment Center (DAAC) provides classified facilities to enhance customer interactions with the ARL...

  15. Food Plants of 19 butterflies species (Lepidoptera from Loreto, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Vásquez Bardales

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the food plants utilized by 19 species of butterflies from Allpahuayo-Mishana Research Center and the Community of San Rafael, Loreto, Peru. We report 23 plant species and one hybrid of angiosperms used by the butterflies. Larval host plants were 21 species and five were adult nectar sources. Two species were both host plant and nectar source: Passiflora coccinea Aubl. and Passiflora edulis Sims. The most frequently used plant families were Solanaceae, Passifloraceae, Fabaceae and Aristolochiaceae.

  16. Species using red-cockaded woodpecker cavities in eastern Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard N. Conner; D. Craig Rudolph; Daniel Saenz; Richard R. Schaefer

    1997-01-01

    Because of its ability to excavate cavities in living pines, the Red-cockaded Woodpecker (Picoides borealis) is a keystone species in the tire-disclimax, pine ecosystems of the southeastern United States. Many species representing multiple taxonomic classes are dependent on this woodpecker species for the cavities it creates. We examined the...

  17. How complex is the Bufo bufo species group?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arntzen, J.W.; Recuero, E.; Canestrelli, D.; Martínez-Solano, I.

    2013-01-01

    Species delineation remains one of the most challenging tasks in the study of biodiversity, mostly owing to the application of different species concepts, which results in contrasting taxonomic arrangements. This has important practical consequences, since species are basic units in fields like

  18. A cross-sectional study of the differences in diabetes knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and self-care practices as related to assessment of chronic illness care among people with diabetes consulting in a family physician-led hospital-based first line health service and local government health unit-based health centers in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Grace Marie V; Kegels, Guy

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in diabetes knowledge, attitudes and perceptions (KAP), self-care practices as related to assessment of chronic illness care among people with diabetes consulting in a family physician-led tertiary hospital-based out-patient clinic versus local government health unit-based health centers in the Philippines. People with diabetes consulting in the said primary care services were interviewed making use of questionnaires adapted from previously tested and validated KAP questionnaires and the patients' assessment of chronic illness care (PACIC) questionnaire. Adherence to medications, diabetes diet, and exercise and the number of diabetes consultations were asked. Analysis of variance was used to determine differences in KAP, self-care practices, and PACIC and regression analysis was used to determine any associations of the abovementioned variables to the PACIC ratings. A total of 549 respondents were included in the study. Differences in knowledge, attitudes, perceptions, PACIC, utilization of health services, and adherence to medications and exercise were all statistically significant. Ratings for diabetes knowledge, positive attitudes, and the perceptions of support attitudes and the abilities to perform self care, and the proportions of those properly utilizing health services and adhering to medications and exercise were higher while ratings for negative attitudes, perceived support needs, perceived support received and PACIC were lower among those consulting in the family physician-led health service. Combining family medicine-based approaches with culturally competent diabetes care may improve knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and self-care practices of and collaborative care with people with diabetes.

  19. Statistical study of the activity developed in the Unit of Environmental Dosimetry and Personnel of the Radioprotection Service of the National Center of Environmental Health; Estudio estadístico de la actividad desarrollada en la Unidad de Dosimetría Ambiental y Personal del Servicio de Radioprotección del Centro Nacional de Sanidad Ambiental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Gimeno, G.; Moracho, J.; Sánchez, L.; Ballesteros, G.; Medina, P.; Castro, J.

    2016-07-01

    The service of radiation protection of the National Center for Environmental Health, which belongs to the Institute of Health Carlos III, began its activities in the 80’s. This study shows the dosimetry data of professionals working in the fields of health, research and/ or education, and the industry in radioactive installations controlled by the unit between 1992 and 2013. This work presents the different kinds of dosimeter and the evolution of the number of controlled people in the diverse activity fields during these 22 years, the trend of the average annual doses and the highest received doses, as well as the effect of the administrative doses. Finally a summary of the conclusions from these data is presented. [Spanish] El Servicio de Radioprotección (SRP) del Centro Nacional de Sanidad Ambiental, perteneciente al Instituto de Salud Carlos III, inició sus actividades en la década de los 80. Este estudio contiene los datos dosimétricos de los profesionales, que desarrollaron su actividad en instalaciones radiactivas controladas dosimétricamente por la unidad desde el año 1992 hasta 2013, dentro de los campos sanitario, de investigación y/o docencia, e industrial. En él se presenta los tipos de dosímetros utilizados y la evolución durante estos 22 años del número de personas controladas en las distintas ramas de actividad, la tendencia de las dosis individuales medias anuales y las dosis más altas recibidas, así como la incidencia de las dosis administrativas. Finalmente se hace un resumen de las conclusiones obtenidas a partir de estos datos.

  20. Center for Infrastructure Defense

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Includes an image of the main page on this date and compressed file containing additional web pages. The Center for Infrastructure Defense (CID) focuses on the continued operation of critical military and civilian infrastructure in the presence of accident, failure, and attack. Operations Research (OR) Department in the Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences at the Naval Postgraduate School.