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Sample records for center mississippi state

  1. Mississippi State University Sustainable Energy Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, W. Glenn [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2014-09-26

    The Sustainable Energy Research Center (SERC) project at Mississippi State University included all phases of biofuel production from feedstock development, to conversion to liquid transportation fuels, to engine testing of the fuels. The feedstocks work focused on non-food based crops and yielded an increased understanding of many significant Southeastern feedstocks. an emphasis was placed on energy grasses that could supplement the primary feedstock, wood. Two energy grasses, giant miscanthus and switchgrass, were developed that had increased yields per acre. Each of these grasses was patented and licensed to companies for commercialization. The fuels work focused on three different technologies that each led to a gasoline, diesel, or jet fuel product. The three technologies were microbial oil, pyrolysis oil, and syngas-to liquid-hydrocarbons

  2. Mississippi Technology Transfer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The Mississippi Technology Transfer Center at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., was officially dedicated in 1987. The center is home to several state agencies as well as the Center For Higher Learning.

  3. Mississippi State University Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mago, Pedro [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Newell, LeLe [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2014-01-31

    Between 2008 and 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy funded the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center located at Mississippi State University. The overall objective of this project was to enable micro-CHP (micro-combined heat and power) utilization, to facilitate and promote the use of CHP systems and to educate architects, engineers, and agricultural producers and scientists on the benefits of CHP systems. Therefore, the work of the Center focused on the three areas: CHP system modeling and optimization, outreach, and research. In general, the results obtained from this project demonstrated that CHP systems are attractive because they can provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits. Some of these benefits include the potential to reduce operational cost, carbon dioxide emissions, primary energy consumption, and power reliability during electric grid disruptions. The knowledge disseminated in numerous journal and conference papers from the outcomes of this project is beneficial to engineers, architects, agricultural producers, scientists and the public in general who are interested in CHP technology and applications. In addition, more than 48 graduate students and 23 undergraduate students, benefited from the training and research performed in the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center.

  4. Experiments in Social Welfare: An Empirical Evaluation of the "Mississippi Project". Mississippi State University, Social Science Research Center Report 38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Kenneth P.; Ross, Peggy J.

    Focusing on a 2-county rural area of Mississippi, 230 female Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) recipients were divided into 4 groups to ascertain the differential effects that additions of higher levels of financial assistance and/or services over a period of a year (1967-68) would have on life styles and potentials for upward…

  5. Micro Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center, Mississippi State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louay Chamra

    2008-09-26

    Initially, most micro-CHP systems will likely be designed as constant-power output or base-load systems. This implies that at some point the power requirement will not be met, or that the requirement will be exceeded. Realistically, both cases will occur within a 24-hour period. For example, in the United States, the base electrical load for the average home is approximately 2 kW while the peak electrical demand is slightly over 4 kW. If a 3 kWe micro- CHP system were installed in this situation, part of the time more energy will be provided than could be used and for a portion of the time more energy will be required than could be provided. Jalalzadeh-Azar [6] investigated this situation and presented a comparison of electrical- and thermal-load-following CHP systems. In his investigation he included in a parametric analysis addressing the influence of the subsystem efficiencies on the total primary energy consumption as well as an economic analysis of these systems. He found that an increase in the efficiencies of the on-site power generation and electrical equipment reduced the total monthly import of electricity. A methodology for calculating performance characteristics of different micro-CHP system components will be introduced in this article. Thermodynamic cycles are used to model each individual prime mover. The prime movers modeled in this article are a spark-ignition internal combustion engine (Otto cycle) and a diesel engine (Diesel cycle). Calculations for heat exchanger, absorption chiller, and boiler modeling are also presented. The individual component models are then linked together to calculate total system performance values. Performance characteristics that will be observed for each system include maximum fuel flow rate, total monthly fuel consumption, and system energy (electrical, thermal, and total) efficiencies. Also, whether or not both the required electrical and thermal loads can sufficiently be accounted for within the system

  6. Mississippi: State Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This brief is one in a series highlighting state policies, regulations, practices, laws, or other tools intended to create the necessary conditions for school and/or district turnaround. Each brief includes an overview of the relevant turnaround tool, its development process, its impact, and lessons learned that could assist other education…

  7. An Analysis of Corporal Punishment Practices in the State of Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Damond, Twyla A.

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this research mainly centers on a quantitative descriptive overview of corporal punishment practices in the state of Mississippi, but this study also includes a legal document analysis component. This study forms the Mississippi portion of a comprehensive analysis of the demographics of corporal punishment in the public schools of the…

  8. Mississippi State Biodiesel Production Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafael Hernandez; Todd French; Sandun Fernando; Tingyu Li; Dwane Braasch; Juan Silva; Brian Baldwin

    2008-03-20

    Biodiesel is a renewable fuel conventionally generated from vegetable oils and animal fats that conforms to ASTM D6751. Depending on the free fatty acid content of the feedstock, biodiesel is produced via transesterification, esterification, or a combination of these processes. Currently the cost of the feedstock accounts for more than 80% of biodiesel production cost. The main goal of this project was to evaluate and develop non-conventional feedstocks and novel processes for producing biodiesel. One of the most novel and promising feedstocks evaluated involves the use of readily available microorganisms as a lipid source. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities (MWWTF) in the USA produce (dry basis) of microbial sludge annually. This sludge is composed of a variety of organisms, which consume organic matter in wastewater. The content of phospholipids in these cells have been estimated at 24% to 25% of dry mass. Since phospholipids can be transesterified they could serve as a ready source of biodiesel. Examination of the various transesterification methods shows that in situ conversion of lipids to FAMEs provides the highest overall yield of biodiesel. If one assumes a 7.0% overall yield of FAMEs from dry sewage sludge on a weight basis, the cost per gallon of extracted lipid would be $3.11. Since the lipid is converted to FAMEs, also known as biodiesel, in the in Situ extraction process, the product can be used as is for renewable fuel. As transesterification efficiency increases the cost per gallon drops quickly, hitting $2.01 at 15.0% overall yield. An overall yield of 10.0% is required to obtain biodiesel at $2.50 per gallon, allowing it to compete with soybean oil in the marketplace. Twelve plant species with potential for oil production were tested at Mississippi State, MS. Of the species tested, canola, rapeseed and birdseed rape appear to have potential in Mississippi as winter annual crops because of yield. Two perennial crops were investigated, Chinese

  9. Mississippi State Biodiesel Production Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafael Hernandez; Todd French; Sandun Fernando; Tingyu Li; Dwane Braasch; Juan Silva; Brian Baldwin

    2008-03-20

    Biodiesel is a renewable fuel conventionally generated from vegetable oils and animal fats that conforms to ASTM D6751. Depending on the free fatty acid content of the feedstock, biodiesel is produced via transesterification, esterification, or a combination of these processes. Currently the cost of the feedstock accounts for more than 80% of biodiesel production cost. The main goal of this project was to evaluate and develop non-conventional feedstocks and novel processes for producing biodiesel. One of the most novel and promising feedstocks evaluated involves the use of readily available microorganisms as a lipid source. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities (MWWTF) in the USA produce (dry basis) of microbial sludge annually. This sludge is composed of a variety of organisms, which consume organic matter in wastewater. The content of phospholipids in these cells have been estimated at 24% to 25% of dry mass. Since phospholipids can be transesterified they could serve as a ready source of biodiesel. Examination of the various transesterification methods shows that in situ conversion of lipids to FAMEs provides the highest overall yield of biodiesel. If one assumes a 7.0% overall yield of FAMEs from dry sewage sludge on a weight basis, the cost per gallon of extracted lipid would be $3.11. Since the lipid is converted to FAMEs, also known as biodiesel, in the in Situ extraction process, the product can be used as is for renewable fuel. As transesterification efficiency increases the cost per gallon drops quickly, hitting $2.01 at 15.0% overall yield. An overall yield of 10.0% is required to obtain biodiesel at $2.50 per gallon, allowing it to compete with soybean oil in the marketplace. Twelve plant species with potential for oil production were tested at Mississippi State, MS. Of the species tested, canola, rapeseed and birdseed rape appear to have potential in Mississippi as winter annual crops because of yield. Two perennial crops were investigated, Chinese

  10. Customer Satisfaction Perceptions of Dislocated Workers Served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Dava Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of satisfaction of dislocated workers served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium. Four WIN Job Centers participated in this study: Northeast Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Corinth, Northwest Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Oxford,…

  11. Customer Satisfaction Perceptions of Dislocated Workers Served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Dava Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of satisfaction of dislocated workers served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium. Four WIN Job Centers participated in this study: Northeast Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Corinth, Northwest Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Oxford,…

  12. 2015 State Geodatabase for Mississippi

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The 2015 TIGER Geodatabases are extracts of selected nation based and state based geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master...

  13. The proposed Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory, Mississippi State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize Mississippi State University (MSU) to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL). DOE grant funds are available to the University for the limited purpose of performing preliminary studies, including analysis necessary to conduct this environmental assessment. The proposed facility would be located in the Mississippi Research and Technology Park, adjacent to the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Experiment Station campus in Starkville, Mississippi. Total project cost is estimated at $7,953,600. This proposed laboratory would be designed to conduct research into combustion devices related to waste management and environmental restoration that is of importance to industry and government. The proposed facility`s role would be to develop diagnostic instrumentation capabilities in the area of combustion and related processes.

  14. State of Mississippi Campuses Step Up to the Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, Jack

    2010-01-01

    Making the right decisions at the right time is critical. Following through on those decisions is challenging and can take courage. One example of a group of institutions and facility management professionals stepping up to the task and having the courage to challenge the status quo is the State of Mississippi Institutions of Higher Learning…

  15. Mississippi State University Center for Air Sea Technology. FY93 and FY 94 Research Program in Navy Ocean Modeling and Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-30

    model to the Navy. The Co-Principal Investigators are CAST researchers Dr. David E. Dietrich and Mr. Alberto Mestas - Nunez. With the Navy’s new...Applications Mr. Alberto Mestas -Nunez An Evaluation of ECMWF-Based 20 May 93 College of Oceanic Sci. Climatological Wind Stress Fields Oregon State...to assist in data browser applications. Oregon State UniversiLy. CAST employed graduate student Mr. Alberto Mestas - Nunez to assist in ocean modeling

  16. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Bushby; Kimberly Woodruff; Jake Shivley

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary First initiated in 1995 to provide veterinary students with spay/neuter experience, the shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine has grown to be comprehensive in nature incorporating spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Junior veterinary students spend five days in shelters; senior veterinary students spend 2-weeks visiting shelters in mobile veterinary u...

  17. 77 FR 38191 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Mississippi; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... and in May 2007, the State Air Directors from the Visibility Improvement State and Tribal Association... programs considered by Mississippi (e.g., Industrial Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology, the... improvements from BART using ``presumptive BART rather than actual BART;'' EPA did not consider...

  18. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Bushby

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education.

  19. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushby, Philip; Woodruff, Kimberly; Shivley, Jake

    2015-04-24

    The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association's Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education.

  20. 77 FR 58131 - Cross-Media Electronic Reporting: Authorized Program Revision Approval, State of Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Cross-Media Electronic Reporting: Authorized Program Revision Approval, State of Mississippi... allow electronic reporting. DATES: EPA's approval is effective on September 19, 2012. FOR FURTHER...

  1. Mississippi State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-08-01

    The Mississippi State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state an federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Mississippi. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Mississippi. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Mississippi.

  2. The Mississippi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭豪

    2005-01-01

    The Mississippi (密西西比河) is one of the world's great continental rivers. Gathering its waters from two - thirds of the United States, the Mississippi flows some 6,400 kilometers from its northern sources(源头) in the Rocky Mountains to the Gulf of Mexico,which makes it one of the world's longest waterways.

  3. Full-Scale Incineration System Demonstration at the Naval Construction Battalion Center, Gulfport, Mississippi. Volume 1. Project Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    AD-A252 956 VL FULL-SCALE INCINE AT ION SYST72Z DEMIONSTRAT ION AT THE NAVAL C071, * *STRUCTION BATTALION CENTER, ~*~GULFPORT, MISSISSIPPI -VOL!1...however, EPA OSW would not make a delisting determinacion at that time. 3. Incinerator Performance The MWP-2000 incinerator system demonstrated that

  4. A Tale Of Two States: Mississippi, West Virginia, And Exemptions To Compulsory School Vaccination Laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgrove, James; Lowin, Abigail

    2016-02-01

    School-based compulsory vaccination laws have provoked debates over the legitimacy of government coercion versus the scope of parental rights. A key point of contention in these school vaccination laws are provisions known as exemption clauses that allow some parents to enroll their children in school unimmunized for reasons other than medical conditions. For more than three decades Mississippi and West Virginia stood apart as the only two US states that did not offer nonmedical exemptions to school vaccination laws. But other states seem to be moving in this direction, such as California, which in 2015 eliminated nonmedical exemptions following the Disneyland measles outbreak. The apparent shift creates an opportune moment to look at the experiences of Mississippi and West Virginia. Through a review of legislative histories, legal rulings, media accounts, and interviews with health officials in the two states, we consider the reasons for and consequences of their allowing only medical exemptions and the prospects their approach holds out for other states that may wish to emulate it. The experiences of these two states suggest that contrary to conventional wisdom, it may be politically tenable to limit exemptions to only medical reasons without damaging either the stature of public health or the immunization system.

  5. Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer in the states of Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi, and...

  6. Spatial variability in nutrient transport by HUC8, state, and subbasin based on Mississippi/Atchafalaya River Basin SPARROW models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Dale M.; Saad, David A.; Schwarz, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loading from the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River Basin (MARB) has been linked to hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. With geospatial datasets for 2002, including inputs from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), and monitored loads throughout the MARB, SPAtially Referenced Regression On Watershed attributes (SPARROW) watershed models were constructed specifically for the MARB, which reduced simulation errors from previous models. Based on these models, N loads/yields were highest from the central part (centered over Iowa and Indiana) of the MARB (Corn Belt), and the highest P yields were scattered throughout the MARB. Spatial differences in yields from previous studies resulted from different descriptions of the dominant sources (N yields are highest with crop-oriented agriculture and P yields are highest with crop and animal agriculture and major WWTPs) and different descriptions of downstream transport. Delivered loads/yields from the MARB SPARROW models are used to rank subbasins, states, and eight-digit Hydrologic Unit Code basins (HUC8s) by N and P contributions and then rankings are compared with those from other studies. Changes in delivered yields result in an average absolute change of 1.3 (N) and 1.9 (P) places in state ranking and 41 (N) and 69 (P) places in HUC8 ranking from those made with previous national-scale SPARROW models. This information may help managers decide where efforts could have the largest effects (highest ranked areas) and thus reduce hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico.

  7. Tooth Loss in Appalachia and the Mississippi Delta Relative to Other Regions in the United States, 1999–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsuch, Marina Mileo; Sanders, Seth G.; Wu, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined regional variation in tooth loss in the United States from 1999 to 2010. Methods. We used 6 waves of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and data on county characteristics to describe regional trends in tooth loss and decompose diverging trends into the parts explained by individual and county components. Results. Appalachia and the Mississippi Delta had higher levels of tooth loss than the rest of the country in 1999. From 1999 to 2010, tooth loss declined in the United States. However, Appalachia did not converge toward the US average, and the Mississippi Delta worsened relative to the United States. Socioeconomic status explained the largest portion of differences between regions in 1999, but a smaller portion of the trends. The Mississippi Delta is aging more quickly than the rest of the country, which explains 17% of the disparity in the time trend. Conclusions. The disadvantage in tooth loss is persistent in Appalachia and growing in the Mississippi Delta. The increasing disparity is partly explained by changes in the age structure but is also associated with behavioral and environmental factors. PMID:24524527

  8. Mississippi State Axion Search: A Light Shining though a Wall ALP Search

    CERN Document Server

    Mohanmurthy, Prajwal; Formaggio, Joseph; Fowler, Nicholas; Gaerlan, Mikhail; Jiang, Yipeng; Madsen, John; Oblath, Noah; Powers, Adam; Ray, Amy; Riehle, Robertson

    2015-01-01

    The elegant solutions to the strong CP problem predict the existence of a particle called axion. Thus, the search for axion like particles (ALP) has been an ongoing endeavor. The possibility that these axion like particles couple to photons in presence of magnetic field gives rise to a technique of detecting these particles known as light shining through a wall (LSW). Mississippi State Axion Search (MASS) is an experiment employing the LSW technique in search for axion like particles. The apparatus consists of two radio frequency (RF) cavities, both under the influence of strong magnetic field and separated by a lead wall. While one of the cavities houses a strong RF generator, the other cavity houses the detector systems. The MASS apparatus looks for excesses in RF photons that tunnel through the wall as a signature of candidate axion-like particles. The concept behind the experiment as well as the projected sensitivities are presented here.

  9. Earthquakes in Mississippi and vicinity 1811-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dart, Richard L.; Bograd, Michael B.E.

    2011-01-01

    This map summarizes two centuries of earthquake activity in Mississippi. Work on the Mississippi map was done in collaboration with the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, Office of Geology. The earthquake data plotted on the map are from several sources: the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, the Center for Earthquake Research and Information, the National Center for Earthquake Engineering Research, and the Arkansas Geological Survey. In addition to earthquake locations, other materials include seismic hazard and isoseismal maps and related text. Earthquakes are a legitimate concern in Mississippi and parts of adjacent States. Mississippi has undergone a number of felt earthquakes since 1811. At least two of these events caused property damage: a magnitude 4.7 earthquake in 1931, and a magnitude 4.3 earthquake in 1967. The map shows all historical and instrumentally located earthquakes in Mississippi and vicinity between 1811 and 2010. The largest historic earthquake in the vicinity of the State was an intensity XI event, on December 16, 1811; the first earthquake in the New Madrid sequence. This violent event and the earthquakes that followed caused considerable damage to the then sparsely settled region.

  10. 78 FR 64397 - Mississippi Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... 503(a) of the Act permits a State to assume primacy for the regulation of surface coal mining and....regulations.gov . A. Mississippi Surface Coal Mining Regulations Sec. 105. Definitions Mississippi proposed to... revisions. C. Mississippi Surface Coal Mining Regulations Sec. 2902. Lands Eligible for Remining Mississippi...

  11. Libraries in Mississippi: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/mississippi.html Libraries in Mississippi To use the sharing features on ... Jackson G. V. (Sonny) Montgomery VA Medical Center Library Service (142D) 1500 E. Woodrow Wilson Jackson, MS ...

  12. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Mississippi. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  13. Wildfire Risk Mapping over the State of Mississippi: Land Surface Modeling Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, William H. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Mostovoy, Georgy [Mississippi State University (MSU); Anantharaj, Valentine G [ORNL; Jolly, W. Matt [USDA Forest Service

    2012-01-01

    Three fire risk indexes based on soil moisture estimates were applied to simulate wildfire probability over the southern part of Mississippi using the logistic regression approach. The fire indexes were retrieved from: (1) accumulated difference between daily precipitation and potential evapotranspiration (P-E); (2) top 10 cm soil moisture content simulated by the Mosaic land surface model; and (3) the Keetch-Byram drought index (KBDI). The P-E, KBDI, and soil moisture based indexes were estimated from gridded atmospheric and Mosaic-simulated soil moisture data available from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS-2). Normalized deviations of these indexes from the 31-year mean (1980-2010) were fitted into the logistic regression model describing probability of wildfires occurrence as a function of the fire index. It was assumed that such normalization provides more robust and adequate description of temporal dynamics of soil moisture anomalies than the original (not normalized) set of indexes. The logistic model parameters were evaluated for 0.25 x0.25 latitude/longitude cells and for probability representing at least one fire event occurred during 5 consecutive days. A 23-year (1986-2008) forest fires record was used. Two periods were selected and examined (January mid June and mid September December). The application of the logistic model provides an overall good agreement between empirical/observed and model-fitted fire probabilities over the study area during both seasons. The fire risk indexes based on the top 10 cm soil moisture and KBDI have the largest impact on the wildfire odds (increasing it by almost 2 times in response to each unit change of the corresponding fire risk index during January mid June period and by nearly 1.5 times during mid September-December) observed over 0.25 x0.25 cells located along the state of Mississippi Coast line. This result suggests a rather strong control of fire risk indexes on fire occurrence probability

  14. 76 FR 19996 - Cooperative Agreement With the University of Mississippi's National Center for Natural Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ... National Center for Natural Products Research (U01) To Develop and Disseminate Botanical Natural Product... and dissemination of natural products research and science and the programs developed under the... develop and disseminate botanical natural product research with an emphasis on public safety according...

  15. Relaxed excited states of color centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldacchini, G.

    1992-12-31

    Color centers in alkali halides display an optical cycle which has been, and it is still today, a model case for similar processes in other materials. Moreover, the luminescence of some color centers is so efficient that it has been used in laser applications. However, the quantum state from which the emission of light is originated, the so called relaxed excited state (RES), is not very well known. Indeed, in spite of the wealth of experimental results collected and of the theoretical approaches attempted, an exact description of the RES is still missing. This paper, confined mainly to F centers which are the simplest point defects in crystals, contains a review of the main experimental evidences which has some light on the nature of the RES, with special emphasis on the latest magneto-optical experiments. Also, a description of the theoretical models is attempted whenever required by a particular argument.

  16. Mississippi Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Report. A snap shot of related activities in the state of Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, Sumesh M. [Mississippi Technology Alliance, Jackson, MS (United States); Linton, Joseph A. [Mississippi Technology Alliance, Jackson, MS (United States)

    2011-05-11

    In recent years, due to concerns over national security from both economic and military standpoints, increased attention has been given to the production of renewable energy in order to reduce American dependence on foreign supplies of energy. These concerns, along with those related to the effect of fossil fuels on the environment, have served to heighten the enthusiasm for finding replacements for traditional energy sources, along with helping to highlight the need for energy efficiency in American homes and businesses. Throughout the nation, this has been exemplified in an increased entrepreneurial activity to produce liquid fuels, thermal energy and electricity from a vast range of sources such as plants, trees, bacteria, the sun, wind, waves and the Earth itself. Coupled with tax subsidies, loan guarantees, renewable fuel standards, and various other government incentives and legislative encouragements we have seen a big jump in the production of renewable energy in the United States in the last ten years. But we are just getting started!

  17. Mississippi State University’s Geoscience Education and Geocognition Research Program in the Department of Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, K.; Clary, R. M.; Sherman-Morris, K.; Kirkland, B.; Gillham, D.; Moe-Hoffman, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Department of Geosciences at Mississippi State University offers both a MS in Geosciences and a PhD in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, with the possibility of a concentration in geoscience education. The department offers broad research opportunities in the geoscience sub-disciplines of Geology, Meteorology, GIS, and Geography. Geoscience education research is one of the research themes emphasized in the department and focuses on geoscience learning in traditional, online, field-based, and informal educational environments. Approximately 20% of the faculty are actively conducting research in geoscience education and incorporate both qualitative and quantitative research approaches in areas including: the investigation of effective teaching strategies, the implementation and evaluation of geoscience teacher professional development programs and diversity enhancement programs, the study of the history and philosophy of science in geoscience teaching, the exploration of student cognition and understanding of complex and dynamic earth systems, and the investigation of using visualizations to enhance learning in the geosciences. The inception and continued support of an active geoscience education research program is derived from a variety of factors including: (1) the development of the on-line Teachers in Geosciences (TIG) Masters Degree Program which is the primary teaching appointment for the majority of the faculty conducting geoscience education research, (2) the securing of federal funds to support geoscience education research, (3) the publication of high-quality peer-reviewed research papers in both geoscience education and traditional research domains, (4) the active contribution of the geoscience education faculty in their traditional research domains, (5) a faculty that greatly values teaching and recognizes the research area of geoscience education as a sub-domain of the broader geoscience disciplines, (6) the involvement of university faculty, outside

  18. Evidence for divergence in cuticular hydrocarbon sex pheromone between California and Mississippi (United States of America) populations of bark beetle parasitoid Roptrocerus xylophagorum (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Sullivan; Nadir Erbilgin

    2014-01-01

    Roptrocerus xylophagorum (Ratzeburg) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) is a common Holarctic parasitoid of the larvae and pupae of bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scotytinae). In no-choice laboratory bioassays, we found that male wasps derived either from northern California or southwestern Mississippi, United States of America more frequently displayed sexual...

  19. Establishing Consistent Fish Sampling Methods for Biological Assessments on Inter-state Great Rivers: A Case Study on the Upper Mississippi River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of Indices of Biotic Integrity (IBI) to assess aquatic waters has become an acceptable practice for many Clean Water Act (CWA) agencies. For states that share waters such as Minnesota and Wisconsin along the Mississippi River, the states’ respective IBIs may show vastly d...

  20. Ecosystem effects in the Lower Mississippi River Basin: Chapter L in 2011 Floods of the Central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnipseed, D. Phil; Allen, Yvonne C.; Couvillion, Brady R.; McKee, Karen L.; Vervaeke, William C.

    2014-01-01

    The 2011 Mississippi River flood in the Lower Mississippi River Basin was one of the largest flood events in recorded history, producing the largest or next to largest peak streamflow for the period of record at a number of streamgages on the lower Mississippi River. Ecosystem effects include changes to wetlands, nutrient transport, and land accretion and sediment deposition changes. Direct effects to the wetland ecosystems in the Lower Mississippi River Basin were minimized because of the expansive levee system built to pass floodwaters. Nutrients carried by the Mississippi River affect water quality in the Lower Mississippi River Basin. During 2011, nutrient fluxes in the lower Mississippi River were about average. Generally, nutrient delivery of the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers contributes to the size of the hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico. Based on available limited post-flood satellite imagery, some land expansion in both the Wax Lake and Atchafalaya River Deltas was observed. A wetland sediment survey completed in June 2011 indicated that recent sediment deposits were relatively thicker in the Atchafalaya and Mississippi River (Birdsfoot) Delta marshes compared to marshes farther from these rivers.

  1. The Mississippi CCS Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doug Cathro

    2010-09-30

    The Mississippi CCS Project is a proposed large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) project which would have demonstrated advanced technologies to capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. Specifically, the Mississippi CCS Project was to accelerate commercialization of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage from industrial sources by leveraging synergy between a proposed petcoke to Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) plant that is selected for a Federal Loan Guarantee and would be the largest integrated anthropogenic CO{sub 2} capture, transport, and monitored sequestration program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region. The Mississippi CCS Project was to promote the expansion of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana region which would supply greater energy security through increased domestic energy production. The capture, compression, pipeline, injection, and monitoring infrastructure would have continued to sequester CO{sub 2} for many years after the completion of the term of the DOE agreement. The objectives of this project were expected to be fulfilled through two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive project basis for a competitive Renewal Application process to proceed into Phase 2 - Design, Construction and Operations. Phase 1 included the studies that establish the engineering design basis for the capture, compression and transportation of CO{sub 2} from the MG SNG Project, and the criteria and specifications for a monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) plan at the Soso oil field in Mississippi. The overall objective of Phase 2, was to execute design, construction and operations of three capital projects: the CO{sub 2} capture and compression equipment, the Mississippi CO{sub 2} Pipeline to Denbury's Free State Pipeline, and an MVA system at the Soso oil field.

  2. Solar heating system at Security State Bank, Starkville, Mississippi. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-08-01

    Information is provided on the Solar Energy Heating System (airtype) installed at the branch bank building, northwest corner of Highway 12 and Spring Street, Starkville, Mississippi. This installation was completed in June, 1979. The 312 square feet of Solaron flat plate air collectors provide for 788 square feet of space heating, an estimated 55 percent of the heating load. Solar heated air is distributed to the 96 cubic foot steel cylinder, which contains two inch diameter rocks. An air handler unit moves the air over the collector and into the steel cylinder. Four motorized dampers and two gravity dampers are also part of the system. A Solaron controller which has sensors located at the collectors, rock storage, and at the return air, automatically controls the system. Auxiliary heating energy is provided by electric resistance duct heaters. This project is part of the US Department of Energy's Solar Demonstration Program with the government sharing $14,201 of the $17,498 solar energy system installation cost. This system was acceptance tested February, 1980, and the demonstration period ends in 1985.

  3. Potentiometric Surface in the Sparta-Memphis Aquifer of the Mississippi Embayment, Spring 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, T.P.

    2008-01-01

    The most widely used aquifer for industry and public supply in the Mississippi embayment in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee is the Sparta-Memphis aquifer. Decades of pumping from the Sparta-Memphis aquifer have affected ground-water levels throughout the Mississippi embayment. Regional assessments of water-level data from the aquifer are important to document regional water-level conditions and to develop a broad view of the effects of ground-water development and management on the sustainability and availability of the region's water supply. This information is useful to identify areas of water-level declines, identify cumulative areal declines that may cross State boundaries, evaluate the effectiveness of ground-water management strategies practiced in different States, and identify areas with substantial data gaps that may preclude effective management of ground-water resources. A ground-water flow model of the northern Mississippi embayment is being developed by the Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study (MERAS) to aid in answering questions about ground-water availability and sustainability. The MERAS study area covers parts of eight states including Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee and covers approximately 70,000 square miles. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality Office of Land and Water Resources measured water levels in wells completed in the Sparta-Memphis aquifer in the spring of 2007 to assist in the MERAS model calibration and to document regional water-level conditions. Measurements by the USGS and the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality Office of Land and Water Resources were done in cooperation with the Arkansas Natural Resources Commission; the Arkansas Geological Survey; Memphis Light, Gas and Water; Shelby County, Tennessee; and the city of Germantown, Tennessee. In 2005, total water use from the Sparta

  4. State Data Centers: improving access to census information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, M

    1986-01-01

    "The U.S. Bureau of the Census created the State Data Center program in 1978 to improve public access to census information. This article discusses the background, structure, and services of that program; the role of libraries in the program; and future directions in State Data Center/library relationships. The appendix lists contact person names, as well as addresses and telephone numbers for State Data Center lead agencies."

  5. Projects to expand energy sources in the western states: an update of Information Circular 8719. [24 states west of the Mississippi River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich, C.H. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    This report is an expansion and update of BM-IC-8719 and comprises maps and tables listing the name, location, and other pertinent data concerning certain fuel-related projects. The maps show the locations of the planned or proposed facilities. The tables include information on projects involving the proposed or planned development of fuel resources, as well as the development of storage, transportation, and conversion facilities. The report covers the 24 states west of the Mississippi River including Alaska and Hawaii. Of the 808 projects for which information is provided, 219 concern coal mines, 246 concern electric generating plants, and 115 concern uranium mines; Energy Supply and Environmental Coordination Act coal conversion notices are also included. Because of the dynamic nature of the energy industry, many uncertainties exist and some of the listed projects may never become realities. Also, no attempt has been made to determine the degree of certainty or viability of each project.

  6. United States Data Center Energy Usage Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shehabi, Arman [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Smith, Sarah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sartor, Dale [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Brown, Richard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Herrlin, Magnus [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Koomey, Jonathan [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Masanet, Eric [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Horner, Nathaniel [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Azevedo, Inês [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lintner, William [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This report estimates historical data center electricity consumption back to 2000, relying on previous studies and historical shipment data, and forecasts consumption out to 2020 based on new trends and the most recent data available. Figure ES-1 provides an estimate of total U.S. data center electricity use (servers, storage, network equipment, and infrastructure) from 2000-2020. In 2014, data centers in the U.S. consumed an estimated 70 billion kWh, representing about 1.8% of total U.S. electricity consumption. Current study results show data center electricity consumption increased by about 4% from 2010-2014, a large shift from the 24% percent increase estimated from 2005-2010 and the nearly 90% increase estimated from 2000-2005. Energy use is expected to continue slightly increasing in the near future, increasing 4% from 2014-2020, the same rate as the past five years. Based on current trend estimates, U.S. data centers are projected to consume approximately 73 billion kWh in 2020.

  7. Center for Catalysis at Iowa State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, George A.

    2006-10-17

    The overall objective of this proposal is to enable Iowa State University to establish a Center that enjoys world-class stature and eventually enhances the economy through the transfer of innovation from the laboratory to the marketplace. The funds have been used to support experimental proposals from interdisciplinary research teams in areas related to catalysis and green chemistry. Specific focus areas included: • Catalytic conversion of renewable natural resources to industrial materials • Development of new catalysts for the oxidation or reduction of commodity chemicals • Use of enzymes and microorganisms in biocatalysis • Development of new, environmentally friendly reactions of industrial importance These focus areas intersect with barriers from the MYTP draft document. Specifically, section 2.4.3.1 Processing and Conversion has a list of bulleted items under Improved Chemical Conversions that includes new hydrogenation catalysts, milder oxidation catalysts, new catalysts for dehydration and selective bond cleavage catalysts. Specifically, the four sections are: 1. Catalyst development (7.4.12.A) 2. Conversion of glycerol (7.4.12.B) 3. Conversion of biodiesel (7.4.12.C) 4. Glucose from starch (7.4.12.D) All funded projects are part of a soybean or corn biorefinery. Two funded projects that have made significant progress toward goals of the MYTP draft document are: Catalysts to convert feedstocks with high fatty acid content to biodiesel (Kraus, Lin, Verkade) and Conversion of Glycerol into 1,3-Propanediol (Lin, Kraus). Currently, biodiesel is prepared using homogeneous base catalysis. However, as producers look for feedstocks other than soybean oil, such as waste restaurant oils and rendered animal fats, they have observed a large amount of free fatty acids contained in the feedstocks. Free fatty acids cannot be converted into biodiesel using homogeneous base-mediated processes. The CCAT catalyst system offers an integrated and cooperative catalytic

  8. The Social Work Research Center at Colorado State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winokur, Marc A.; Valentine, Deborah P.; Drendel, James M.

    2009-01-01

    The Social Work Research Center is an innovative university-community partnership within the School of Social Work in the College of Applied Human Sciences at Colorado State University. The center is focused on working with county and state child welfare agencies to generate applied research that translates into evidence-based practice for serving…

  9. The Upper Mississippi River System—Topobathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Jayme M.; Hanson, Jenny L.; Sattler, Stephanie R.

    2017-03-23

    The Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS), the navigable part of the Upper Mississippi and Illinois Rivers, is a diverse ecosystem that contains river channels, tributaries, shallow-water wetlands, backwater lakes, and flood-plain forests. Approximately 10,000 years of geologic and hydrographic history exist within the UMRS. Because it maintains crucial wildlife and fish habitats, the dynamic ecosystems of the Upper Mississippi River Basin and its tributaries are contingent on the adjacent flood plains and water-level fluctuations of the Mississippi River. Separate data for flood-plain elevation (lidar) and riverbed elevation (bathymetry) were collected on the UMRS by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ (USACE) Upper Mississippi River Restoration (UMRR) Program. Using the two elevation datasets, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) developed a systemic topobathy dataset.

  10. The SPICE Center at Bluefield State College. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David Harrill

    The writing center at Bluefield State College (West Virginia) is called the SPICE Center, SPICE being an acronym for Self Paced Instruction for Competency in English. In addition to emphasizing skill acquisition and flexibility, it stresses face-to-face evaluation of written work, and places heavy emphasis on writing as process instead of writing…

  11. Environmental Finance Center Serving EPA's Region 8 States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Rural Water Association, headquartered in Duncan Oklahoma, has been selected through a competitive grants process to establish a regional Environmental Finance Center (EFC) serving EPA Region 8 states.

  12. Louisiana State Penitentiary Levee, Mississippi River. Main Report and Final Environmental Impact Statement and Appendixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    deep-water areas providing suitable breeding habitat for the American alligator . 12. Recommendations of the Reporting Officer. The District Comander...would provide suitable habitat for courtship and breeding for the American alligator . Audubon Society Blue List. Plan A would not significantly affect any...Suitable spawning areas B-14 • • | I .. . * FINAL EIWVIRO"NTAL IMPACT .STATEMENT LOUISMAN STATE PENI ~fTEARY LEVE 11111W E M fjRER LUIM WEST , k

  13. A Case History Study of the Recycling Efforts from the United States Army Corps of Engineers Hurricane Katrina Debris Removal Mission in Mississippi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Leroy Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In support of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE managed the removal of Hurricane Katrina storm debris in several states. This paper focuses on the debris removal practices in 16 southern Mississippi counties and the recycling efforts. Debris was removed from public and private property. The debris included vegetation, construction material, electronic waste, vehicles, and vessels. The scope of the USACE mission was expanded several times. The scope within the respective counties varied from vegetation only to the removal of every eligible form of debris. The recommendations proposed should enhance recycling efforts during future debris removal missions.

  14. Odonates of North Mississippi Refuges Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Contains a list of dragonflies and damsel flies captures on the refuge complex in about 2003 or 2004 by graduate student Jason Bried, Mississippi State Univeristy,...

  15. Ferromagnetic Ground States in Face-Centered Cubic Hubbard Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, T. X. R.; Macedo, C. A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the ground state energies of face-centered cubic Hubbard clusters are analyzed using the Lanczos method. Examination of the ground state energy as a function of the number of particle per site n showed an energy minimum for face-centered cubic structures. This energy minimum decreased in n with increasing coulombic interaction parameter U. We found that the ground state energy had a minimum at n = 0.6, when U = 3W, where W denotes the non-interacting energy bandwidth and the face-centered cubic structure was ferromagnetic. These results, when compared with the properties of nickel, shows strong similarity with other finite temperature analyses in the literature and supports the Hirsh’s conjecture that the interatomic direct exchange interaction dominates in driving the system into a ferromagnetic phase. PMID:27583653

  16. State Aquifer Recharge Atlas Plates, Geographic NAD83, LDEQ (1999) [aquifer_recharge_potential_LDEQ_1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a polygon dataset depicting the boundaries of aquifer systems in the state of Louisiana and adjacent areas of Texas, Arkansas and a portion of Mississippi....

  17. Freshwater Mussels (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae) of the Upper Mississippi River: Observations at Selected Sites Within the 9-Foot Navigation Channel Project for the St. Paul District, United States Army Corps of Engineers, 1977 - 1979. Volume I. Text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-10

    Platyhelminthes : Trematoda). This point somewhat coun- ters the idea of this population’s viability. Partially reviewed by Fuller (1974), Nearctic...materials. phylogeny ( phylogenies ), phylogenetic--the history of the evolu- tion of a taxon. PL--United States federal Public Law. plankter (plankters...infestation with flukes, a group of parasitic flatworms ( Platyhelminthes : Trematoda). UM -- Upper Mississippi. Unionicolidae, unionicolid -- the

  18. Cybersecurity Challenges Present Opportunities for State and Local Fusion Centers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrew F Coffey

    2016-01-01

    ... that public agencies are expected to comprehend and address. Securing the nation's cyber infrastructure hinges on sharing relevant threat information both within the government and among outside organizations responsible for shielding against cyberthreats. This represents a distinct opportunity for state and local fusion centers, which...

  19. Final Report on the Mississippi Project CLEAR Voice Teacher Working Conditions Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Barnett; Fuller, Ed

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, the state of Mississippi conducted a web-based survey of all school-based licensed educators in which they were asked to share their perceptions of the state of teacher working conditions in Mississippi. This report of the Mississippi Teacher Working Conditions Survey, Project CLEAR Voice (Cultivate Learning Environments to Accelerate…

  20. The quality of our Nation's waters: water quality in the Mississippi embayment-Texas coastal uplands aquifer system and Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer, south-central United States, 1994-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsbury, James A.; Barlow, Jeannie R.; Katz, Brian G.; Welch, Heather L.; Tollett, Roland W.; Fahlquist, Lynne S.

    2015-01-01

    About 8 million people rely on groundwater from the Mississippi embayment—Texas coastal uplands aquifer system for drinking water. The Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer also provides drinking water for domestic use in rural areas but is of primary importance to the region as a source of water for irrigation. Irrigation withdrawals from this aquifer are among the largest in the Nation and play a key role in the economy of the area, where annual crop sales total more than $7 billion. The reliance of the region on both aquifers for drinking water and irrigation highlights the importance of long-term management to sustain the availability and quality of these resources.

  1. Mississippi – Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law and Documentation of Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Sears, Brad

    2009-01-01

    Mississippi has no current or pending state or local statutes recognizing sexual orientation or gender identity as protected classes of citizens. More generally, Mississippi is not welcoming socially or in its laws to LGBT people. Mississippi custody courts consider homosexuality negatively in determining custody disputes. In 2001, Mississippi banned adoption by same-sex couples. In 2004, eighty-six percent (86%) of Mississippians voted in favor of an amendment to the state constitution banni...

  2. Mississippi – Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law and Documentation of Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Sears, Brad

    2009-01-01

    Mississippi has no current or pending state or local statutes recognizing sexual orientation or gender identity as protected classes of citizens. More generally, Mississippi is not welcoming socially or in its laws to LGBT people. Mississippi custody courts consider homosexuality negatively in determining custody disputes. In 2001, Mississippi banned adoption by same-sex couples. In 2004, eighty-six percent (86%) of Mississippians voted in favor of an amendment to the state constitution banni...

  3. 1989 Aquatic Areas - Upper Mississippi River System - Open River 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  4. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  5. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 25

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  6. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 11

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  7. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  8. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 26

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  9. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  10. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Brandon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  11. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 24

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  12. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 16

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  13. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 20

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  14. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 14

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  15. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Alton

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  16. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Dresden

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  17. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  18. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 19

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  19. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  20. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  1. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 13

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  2. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 21

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  3. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- La Grange

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  4. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  5. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Lockport

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  6. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  7. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 18

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  8. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Minnesota

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  9. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 12

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  10. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  11. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 15

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  12. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  13. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 17

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  14. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 22

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  15. 77 FR 58900 - Mississippi Disaster #MS-00060

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... ADMINISTRATION Mississippi Disaster MS-00060 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center... Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite 6050, Washington,...

  16. Groundwater availability of the Mississippi embayment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brian R.; Hart, Rheannon M.; Gurdak, Jason J.

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater is an important resource for agricultural and municipal uses in the Mississippi embayment. Arkansas ranks first in the Nation for rice and third for cotton production, with both crops dependent on groundwater as a major source of irrigation requirements. Multiple municipalities rely on the groundwater resources to provide water for industrial and public use, which includes the city of Memphis, Tennessee. The demand for the groundwater resource has resulted in groundwater availability issues in the Mississippi embayment including: (1) declining groundwater levels of 50 feet or more in the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer in parts of eastern Arkansas from agricultural pumping, (2) declining groundwater levels of over 360 feet over the last 90 years in the confined middle Claiborne aquifer in southern Arkansas and northern Louisiana from municipal pumping, and (3) litigation between the State of Mississippi and a Memphis water utility over water rights in the middle Claiborne aquifer. To provide information to stakeholders addressing the groundwater-availability issues, the U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Resources Program supported a detailed assessment of groundwater availability through the Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study (MERAS). This assessment included (1) an evaluation of how these resources have changed over time through the use of groundwater budgets, (2) development of a numerical modeling tool to assess system responses to stresses from future human uses and climate trends, and (3) application of statistical tools to evaluate the importance of individual observations within a groundwater-monitoring network. An estimated 12 million acre-feet per year (11 billion gallons per day) of groundwater was pumped in 2005 from aquifers in the Mississippi embayment. Irrigation constitutes the largest groundwater use, accounting for approximately 10 million acre-feet per year (9 billion gallons per day) in 2000 from the Mississippi

  17. New Mexico State University Arrowhead Center PROSPER Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peach, James

    2012-12-31

    This document is the final technical report of the Arrowhead Center Prosper Project at New Mexico State University. The Prosper Project was a research and public policy initiative funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The Prosper project (DOE Grant Number DE-NT0004397) began on October 1, 2008 (FY2009, Quarter 1) and ended on December 31, 2012 (FY2013, Quarter 1). All project milestones were completed on time and within the budget. This report contains a summary of ten technical reports resulting from research conducted during the project. This report also contains a detailed description of the research dissemination and outreach activities of the project including a description of the policy impacts of the project. The report also describes project activities that will be maintained after the end of the project.

  18. Mississippi: Taking Stock and Pushing Forward. 2014 State Progress Report on the Challenge to Lead 2020, Goals for Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Taking Stock and Pushing Forward" (2014) reports states' progress toward the Challenge to Lead 2020 Goals for Education. State-specific documents report on student achievement as well as essential state policies to improve it. Among the many metrics: how states are improving achievement on NAEP [National Assessment of Educational…

  19. Mosquito Larvae in Tires from Mississippi, United States: The Efficacy of Abiotic and Biotic Parameters in Predicting Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Mosquito Populations and Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Donald A; Abuzeineh, Alisa A; Ezeakacha, Nnaemeka F; Schelble, Stephanie S; Glasgow, William C; Flanagan, Stephen D; Skiff, Jeffrey J; Reeves, Ashton; Kuehn, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    Container systems, including discarded vehicle tires, which support populations of mosquitoes, have been of interest for understanding the variables that produce biting adults that serve as both nuisances and as public health threats. We sampled tires in six sites at three times in 2012 across the state of Mississippi to understand the biotic and abiotic variables responsible for explaining patterns of larvae of common species, species richness, and total abundance of mosquitoes. From 498 tires sampled, we collected >58,000 immatures representing 16 species, with the most common species including Aedes albopictus (Skuse), Culex quinquefasciatus (L.), Orthopodomyia signifera (Coquillett), Aedes triseriatus (Say), Toxorhynchites rutilus septentrionalis (Coquillett), and Culex territans (Walker) accounting for ∼97% of all larvae. We also documented 32 new county records for resident species and recent arrivals in the state, including Aedes japonicus japonicus (Theobald) and Culex coronator (Dyar & Knab). Cluster analysis, which was used to associate sites and time periods based on similar mosquito composition, did reveal patterns across the state; however, there also were more general patterns between species and genera and environmental factors. Broadly, Aedes was often associated with factors related to detritus, whereas Culex was frequently associated with habitat variables (e.g., tire size and water volume) and microorganisms. Some Culex did lack factors connecting variation in early and late instars, suggesting differences between environmental determinants of oviposition and survival. General patterns between the tire environment and mosquito larvae do appear to exist, especially at the generic level, and point to inherent differences between genera that may aid in predicting vector locations and populations.

  20. Space Monitoring Data Center at Moscow State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalegaev, Vladimir; Bobrovnikov, Sergey; Barinova, Vera; Myagkova, Irina; Shugay, Yulia; Barinov, Oleg; Dolenko, Sergey; Mukhametdinova, Ludmila; Shiroky, Vladimir

    Space monitoring data center of Moscow State University provides operational information on radiation state of the near-Earth space. Internet portal http://swx.sinp.msu.ru/ gives access to the actual data characterizing the level of solar activity, geomagnetic and radiation conditions in the magnetosphere and heliosphere in the real time mode. Operational data coming from space missions (ACE, GOES, ELECTRO-L1, Meteor-M1) at L1, LEO and GEO and from the Earth’s surface are used to represent geomagnetic and radiation state of near-Earth environment. On-line database of measurements is also maintained to allow quick comparison between current conditions and conditions experienced in the past. The models of space environment working in autonomous mode are used to generalize the information obtained from observations on the whole magnetosphere. Interactive applications and operational forecasting services are created on the base of these models. They automatically generate alerts on particle fluxes enhancements above the threshold values, both for SEP and relativistic electrons using data from LEO orbits. Special forecasting services give short-term forecast of SEP penetration to the Earth magnetosphere at low altitudes, as well as relativistic electron fluxes at GEO. Velocities of recurrent high speed solar wind streams on the Earth orbit are predicted with advance time of 3-4 days on the basis of automatic estimation of the coronal hole areas detected on the images of the Sun received from the SDO satellite. By means of neural network approach, Dst and Kp indices online forecasting 0.5-1.5 hours ahead, depending on solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field, measured by ACE satellite, is carried out. Visualization system allows representing experimental and modeling data in 2D and 3D.

  1. Stennis Visitors Center and Administrative Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    This aerial view shows the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center and main Administrative complex. The Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Mississippi is NASA's lead center for rocket propulsion testing and for commercial remote sensing.

  2. Mississippi graduate DOE EPSCor trainee project. First annual summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wertz, D.L.

    1992-08-01

    The promotion of an aggressive energy research initiative was identified as a goal of the Mississippi Research Consortium (MRC) from its inception in 1986. The Department of Energy EPSCOR Program has provided opportunities to address the needs and enhance the interactive programs of energy-related research in the State of Mississippi. The Mississippi DOE EPSCOR Graduate Traineeships Project is a program of education and research which will (1) increase the number of trained professionals in the energy sciences and technology, particularly those from groups traditionally under-represented in the field, and (2) interface with existing networks of universities, industry, federal, and state institutions involved in energy-related activities.

  3. Mississippi graduate DOE EPSCor trainee project. [First Annual Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wertz, D.L.

    1992-08-01

    The promotion of an aggressive energy research initiative was identified as a goal of the Mississippi Research Consortium (MRC) from its inception in 1986. The Department of Energy EPSCOR Program has provided opportunities to address the needs and enhance the interactive programs of energy-related research in the State of Mississippi. The Mississippi DOE EPSCOR Graduate Traineeships Project is a program of education and research which will (1) increase the number of trained professionals in the energy sciences and technology, particularly those from groups traditionally under-represented in the field, and (2) interface with existing networks of universities, industry, federal, and state institutions involved in energy-related activities.

  4. The Jackson State University Honors Dormitory: An Evaluation of Design, Construction, and Maintenance. Report to the Mississippi Legislature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This report assesses: (1) whether the Jackson State University (JSU) Honors Dormitory required nearly $1 million in repairs two years after it was built because of inappropriate design, construction, and maintenance; and (2) if the state or university has legal recourse to recover damages resulting from inferior design and/or construction…

  5. Current State of Agile User-Centered Design: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Zahid; Slany, Wolfgang; Holzinger, Andreas

    Agile software development methods are quite popular nowadays and are being adopted at an increasing rate in the industry every year. However, these methods are still lacking usability awareness in their development lifecycle, and the integration of usability/User-Centered Design (UCD) into agile methods is not adequately addressed. This paper presents the preliminary results of a recently conducted online survey regarding the current state of the integration of agile methods and usability/UCD. A world wide response of 92 practitioners was received. The results show that the majority of practitioners perceive that the integration of agile methods with usability/UCD has added value to their adopted processes and to their teams; has resulted in the improvement of usability and quality of the product developed; and has increased the satisfaction of the end-users of the product developed. The top most used HCI techniques are low-fidelity prototyping, conceptual designs, observational studies of users, usability expert evaluations, field studies, personas, rapid iterative testing, and laboratory usability testing.

  6. Katrina Effect on Mathematics Achievement in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, John; Lewis, Mark; Gross, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina caused severe physical damage to the Gulf Coast states of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. Homes and businesses were destroyed. Natural habitats were annihilated, and many Americans were displaced for days, weeks, and even years. This study investigated the within-subject effects and contrasts of poverty, rurality, and…

  7. Forest statistics for North Mississippi counties - 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joanne L. Faulkner; Patrick E. Miller; Andrew J. Hartsell; Jack D. London

    1993-01-01

    Tabulated results were derived from data obtained during a 1994 forest inventory of north Mississippi counties (fig. 1). Field work was conducted from December 1992 to May 1993. Core tables 1 through 25 were compatible among Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) units in the Eastern United States, Supplemental tables 26 through 44 provide information beyond that provided...

  8. Forest statistics for Southwest Mississippi counties - 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joanne L. Faulkner; Andrew J. Hartsell; Jack D. London

    1995-01-01

    Tabulated results were derived from data obtained during a 1994 forest inventory of southwest Mississippi counties (fig. I). These data are considered preliminary. Field work was conducted from February to august 1994. Core tables 1 through 25 are compatible among forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) units in the Eastern United States. Supplemental tables 26 through 44...

  9. Carboniferous sediment dispersal in the Appalachian-Ouachita juncture: Provenance of selected late Mississippian sandstones in the Black Warrior Basin, Mississippi, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiangyang; O'Connor, Patrick M.; Alsleben, Helge

    2016-08-01

    The Black Warrior Basin is one of several Carboniferous foreland basins along the Appalachian-Ouachita fold-thrust belt in the southeastern United States. Sediment dispersal within the Black Warrior Basin has been a long-debated topic because of a complex tectonic history and the potential interaction between the Appalachian and Ouachita orogenic belts, as well as far field sediment sources. Three dispersal patterns have been proposed, including dispersal routes from the craton, dispersal via the Appalachian foreland, and dispersal from the arc side of the Ouachita suture, but sediment dispersal in the Black Warrior Basin remains inconclusive. In this study, sandstone modal analysis and U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology are used to document the provenance and potential dispersal patterns for selected Mississippian sandstone units in the Black Warrior Basin, Missouri, USA. Results show that the majority of the Lewis, Evans, Sanders, and Carter sandstones are sublitharenite to mature quartzarenite and fall within the Cratonic Interior field on Q-F-L diagrams. U-Pb detrital zircon analyses of the Lewis, Sanders, and Carter sandstones show that there are four distinctive age clusters, including a prominent Paleozoic age cluster (~ 350-500 Ma), a broad Grenville age cluster (~ 900-1350 Ma), and two minor age clusters of the Granite-Rhyolite (~ 1360-1600 Ma) and the Yavapai-Mazatzal (~ 1600-1800 Ma) provinces. All Mississippian sandstones have similar age distributions except for the Lewis sandstone, which lacks zircon grains from the Superior province (>~2500 Ma). Based on the compositional maturity, similarity of age distributions, and changes of relative abundance among different age groups, we conclude that the Late Mississippian sandstone units analyzed during this study were derived from the Laurussian craton and the northern part of the Appalachian foreland through a major axial drainage that occupied the Mississippi Valley Graben.

  10. 34 CFR 464.1 - What is the State Literacy Resource Centers Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE LITERACY RESOURCE CENTERS PROGRAM... Program assists State and local public and private nonprofit efforts to eliminate illiteracy through a...

  11. AgraPure Mississippi Biomass Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackwell,D.A; Broadhead, L.W.; Harrell, W.J.

    2006-03-31

    The AgraPure Mississippi Biomass project was a congressionally directed project, initiated to study the utilization of Mississippi agricultural byproducts and waste products in the production of bio-energy and to determine the feasibility of commercialization of these agricultural byproducts and waste products as feedstocks in the production of energy. The final products from this project were two business plans; one for a Thermal plant, and one for a Biodiesel/Ethanol plant. Agricultural waste fired steam and electrical generating plants and biodiesel plants were deemed the best prospects for developing commercially viable industries. Additionally, oil extraction methods were studied, both traditional and two novel techniques, and incorporated into the development plans. Mississippi produced crop and animal waste biomasses were analyzed for use as raw materials for both industries. The relevant factors, availability, costs, transportation, storage, location, and energetic value criteria were considered. Since feedstock accounts for more than 70 percent of the total cost of producing biodiesel, any local advantages are considered extremely important in developing this particular industry. The same factors must be evaluated in assessing the prospects of commercial operation of a steam and electrical generation plant. Additionally, the access to the markets for electricity is more limited, regulated and tightly controlled than the liquid fuel markets. Domestically produced biofuels, both biodiesel and ethanol, are gaining more attention and popularity with the consuming public as prices rise and supplies of foreign crude become less secure. Biodiesel requires no major modifications to existing diesel engines or supply chain and offers significant environmental benefits. Currently the biodiesel industry requires Federal and State incentives to allow the industry to develop and become self-sustaining. Mississippi has available the necessary feedstocks and is

  12. Biosurveillance at the United States Meat Animal Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mission of the 50 scientists and 165 support staff at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (USMARC) is to develop new technologies to increase the efficiency of livestock production and improve meat safety, quality, and animal health to benefit consumers worldwide. The facilities include 35,000 ...

  13. Decentralized State/Federal Level Emergency Evacuation Management Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    management centers would assume responsihility for activities and coordination not provided by norma ; government or private organizations. They would operate...relocation ,s to no’ se the 3-6 ’I relocatees in public congregate care facilities (e.g., schools, churches, hotels , motels), rather than in private

  14. The Mississippi River: A place for fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Harold; Ickes, Brian; Chen, Yushun; Chapman, Duane C.; Jackson, John; Chen, Daqing; Li, Zhongjie; Kilgore, Jack; Phelps, Quinton; Eggleton, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Mississippi River flows 3,734 km from its source at Lake Itasca, Minnesota to its outlet at the Gulf of Mexico. Along its course, it collects water from portions of two Canadian provinces and 41 % of the conterminous United States. Although greatly altered for navigation and flood control throughout much of its length, the Mississippi River remains an important fishery resource that provides habitat for 188 species of fishes and recreational and commercial fishing opportunities. The objectives of this chapter are to describe the contemporary fisheries habitat throughout the Mississippi River, identify how management to achieve human benefits influences the fishes and their habitats, and summarize efforts to conserve and enhance fish habitat. The 826-km headwater reach is entirely in Minnesota and remains largely unaltered. The reaches that extend 1,059 km from St. Anthony Falls, Minnesota to above the confluence with the Missouri River near St. Louis, Missouri have been altered by impoundment that has affected floodplain function, increased sedimentation of backwaters, and homogenized the formerly diverse aquatic habitats. After the confluence with the Missouri River, the Mississippi River flows freely for 1,849 km to the Gulf of Mexico. The alterations of the free-flowing reaches of greatest significance to the fisheries resource are reducing the duration and height of the flood pulse as a consequence of shortening the river channel, disconnection of the river from its historic and present floodplain, and loss of secondary channel-island complexes. Engineering features to improve commercial navigation have also added habitat and, when wisely manipulated, can be used to rehabilitate habitat. Some aspects of water quality have improved, but legacy chemicals and nutrient-laden inflows and sediments remain problems. Although true restoration in the sense of restoring all environmental conditions to an unaltered state is unlikely, the future value of the

  15. The Effect Of Diversity Mandates: The Case Of Mississippi Institutions Of Higher Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Hochradel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available After more than 40 years since the University of Mississippi integrated its student body and the passage of civil rights and affirmative action legislation throughout the United States, universities are confronting the issue of developing not only a diverse student body, but also a diverse faculty, staff, and administration.  In the intervening years, much research has been conducted in the area of diversity within universities.  Past research focused on the attitudes towards diversity, necessity and benefits of diversity, and student initiatives to address these issues.  However, the vast majority of diversity research centers on human resources issues.  In 2006, Commissioner Tom Meredith of the Mississippi Institutions of Higher Learning (IHL charged the Mississippi higher education institutions with increasing the diversity of faculty, staff, and students.  The purpose of this study is to investigate the diversity among these institutions and to determine the effect of the mandate by the IHL on the diversity of employees and students at these universities.  Data analysis includes a report of the current diversity status and analysis of change based on the mandate.  This study concludes with a discussion of the results, implications of these results, and directions for future research.

  16. Monitoring of levees, bridges, pipelines, and other critical infrastructure during the 2011 flooding in the Mississippi River Basin: Chapter J in 2011 floods of the central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, Brenda K.; Burton, Bethany L.; Dietsch, Benjamin J.; Cannia, James C.; Huizinga, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    During the 2011 Mississippi River Basin flood, the U.S. Geological Survey evaluated aspects of critical river infrastructure at the request of and in support of local, State, and Federal Agencies. Geotechnical and hydrographic data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey at numerous locations were able to provide needed information about 2011 flood effects to those managing the critical infrastructure. These data were collected and processed in a short time frame to provide managers the ability to make a timely evaluation of the safety of the infrastructure and, when needed, to take action to secure and protect critical infrastructure. Critical infrastructure surveyed by the U.S. Geological Survey included levees, bridges, pipeline crossings, power plant intakes and outlets, and an electrical transmission tower. Capacitively coupled resistivity data collected along the flood-protection levees surrounding the Omaha Public Power District Nebraska City power plant (Missouri River Levee Unit R573), mapped the near-subsurface electrical properties of the levee and the materials immediately below it. The near-subsurface maps provided a better understanding of the levee construction and the nature of the lithology beneath the levee. Comparison of the capacitively coupled resistivity surveys and soil borings indicated that low-resistivity value material composing the levee generally is associated with lean clay and silt to about 2 to 4 meters below the surface, overlying a more resistive layer associated with sand deposits. In general, the resistivity structure becomes more resistive to the south and the southern survey sections correlate well with the borehole data that indicate thinner clay and silt at the surface and thicker sand sequences at depth in these sections. With the resistivity data Omaha Public Power District could focus monitoring efforts on areas with higher resistivity values (coarser-grained deposits or more loosely compacted section), which typically are

  17. Solid State Welding Development at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.; Walker, Bryant

    2012-01-01

    What is TSW and USW? TSW is a solid state weld process consisting of an induction coil heating source, a stir rod, and non-rotating containment plates Independent heating, stirring and forging controls Decouples the heating, stirring and forging process elements of FSW. USW is a solid state weld process consisting of an induction coil heating source, a stir rod, and a non-rotating containment plate; Ultrasonic energy integrated into non-rotating containment plate and stir rod; Independent heating, stirring and forging controls; Decouples the heating, stirring and forging process elements of FSW.

  18. 2010/11 Aquatic Areas - Upper Mississippi River System - Pool 04

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  19. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Pool 19

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  20. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Dresden Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  1. 2010/11 Aquatic Areas - Upper Mississippi River System - Pool 13

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  2. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Brandon Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  3. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  4. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 14

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  5. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  6. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 22

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  7. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Marseillies Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  8. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  9. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  10. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Lockport Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  11. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Open River 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  12. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  13. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  14. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 25

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  15. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 15

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  16. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Open River 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  17. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 11

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  18. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Peoria Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  19. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 5a

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  20. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 13

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  1. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 18

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  2. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  3. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Dresden Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  4. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 24

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  5. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  6. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 26

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  7. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 16

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  8. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  9. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--LaGrange Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  10. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 17

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  11. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  12. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 20

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  13. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--St Croix River

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  14. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Starved Rock Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  15. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Alton Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  16. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 19

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  17. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Pool 18

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  18. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Alton Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  19. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Pool 07

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  20. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 12

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  1. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 19

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  2. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  3. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  4. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--St Croix River

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  5. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 18

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  6. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 22

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  7. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 20

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  8. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  9. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  10. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Open River 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  11. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  12. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Peoria Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  13. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  14. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  15. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Open River 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  16. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Dresden Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  17. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 5a

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  18. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 26

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  19. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 14

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  20. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 17

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  1. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Marseillies Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  2. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Alton Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  3. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  4. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 15

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  5. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 24

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  6. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 13

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  7. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 16

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  8. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 25

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  9. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Brandon Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  10. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  11. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--LaGrange Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  12. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 11

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  13. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi...

  14. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Brandon Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  15. 1989 Land Cover/Use Data for the Upper Mississippi River System--Pool 12

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  16. 2002 Land Cover/Use Data for Pool 8 - Upper Mississippi River

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created a high-resolution land cover/use data set for Mississippi River...

  17. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Pool 8 Color Infrared

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  18. 2000 Aerial Photo Mosaics - Upper Mississippi River System -- Open River 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) collects aerial photography of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) floodplain...

  19. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Peoria Pool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  20. 2010/11 Aquatic Areas - Upper Mississippi River System - Pool 08

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  1. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Pool 17

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  2. 1989-91 Aquatic Habitats - Upper Mississippi River System - Pool 25

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has created high-resolution land cover/use data sets for the Upper Mississippi River...

  3. The center core in ego state therapy and other hypnotically facilitated psychotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Claire

    2013-07-01

    Center core phenomena have been utilized in the practice of ego state therapy and other forms of hypnotically facilitated psychotherapy for nearly 40 years. Despite the frequency with which they are employed, many confusions, contradictions, and questions remain concerning them. In this article relevant center core phenomena literature is reviewed and an essential differentiation between two different kinds of center core phenomena is clarified. Psychodynamic explanations are offered for the therapeutic benefits of archetypal center core experiences such as inner strength and inner wisdom. The information provided offers clinicians a sturdier platform from which to decide whether to incorporate center core experiences into clinical practice. The persistent question of whether center core phenomena are ego states is revisited and addressed.

  4. Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, K.J.; Kaminski, R.M.; Moorhead, D.J.; Hodges, J.D.; Nasser, J.R.; Smith, L.M.; Pederson, R.L.; Kaminski, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Available data are summarized according to the following major topics: (1) characteristics of the Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MAV); (2) waterfowl populations associated with the MAV; (3) habitat requirements of migrating and wintering waterfowl in the MAV; (4) current habitat management practices in the MAV, including croplands, moist-soil impoundments, and forested wetlands; (5) status and classification of winter habitat in the MAV; and (6) research and management information needs.

  5. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Three Month Probabilistic Precipitation Outlook for the Contiguous United States and Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues a series of thirteen probabilistic three-month precipitation outlooks for the United States. CPC issues the thirteen...

  6. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) One Month Probabilistic Precipitation Outlook for the Contiguous United States and Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues a probabilistic one-month precipitation outlook for the United States twice a month. CPC issues an initial monthly outlook...

  7. Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center's Landsat State Mosaics Gallery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center manages the this gallery of images of the 50 U.S. states plus Puerto Rico as derived by Landsat data.

  8. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Three Month Probabilistic Temperature Outlook for the Contiguous United States and Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues a series of thirteen probabilistic three-month temperature outlooks for the United States. CPC issues the thirteen...

  9. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) One Month Probabilistic Temperature Outlook for the Contiguous United States and Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues a probabilistic one-month temperature outlook for the United States twice a month. CPC issues an initial monthly outlook...

  10. Graduate trainee fellowships for energy research in Mississippi. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Mississippi DOE EPSCoR Project has been a program of education and research which has (1) increased the number of trained professionals in the energy sciences and technology, particularly those from groups traditionally under-represented in the field and (2) interfaced with existing networks of universities, industry, federal, and state institutions involved in energy-related activities. Key project activities that have been accomplished are shown below: (1) Statewide conference on energy related research held; (2) HBCU pipeline issue addressed; (3) Research preceptors/problems selected; (4) Trainees screened and accepted; (5) Research initiated; and (6) Practicums organized. Mississippi`s three comprehensive universities -- The University of Mississippi, Mississippi State University, and the University of Southern Mississippi -- and the urban institution, Jackson State University have provided a foundation for the expansion of energy-related education and research in the state. The activities of the Mississippi DOE EPSCoR program have been executed under a management strategy developed to establish statewide coordination of research and education programs, i.e., the Mississippi Research Consortium. The Consortium has served as the steering committee for the DOE EPSCoR Program Consortium.

  11. The Production, Communication, and Contestation of Physical Education Policy: The Cases of Mississippi and Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Ben; Wright, Paul M.; Amis, John; Ferry, Hugh; Vardaman, James M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the production, communication, interpretation and contestation of new physical education (PE) and physical activity (PA) policy initiatives introduced in Mississippi and Tennessee for the academic year 2006-2007. These states provide a relevant context to study such issues, since Mississippi has the highest…

  12. Community and academia partnerships: a description of the lower mississippi delta nutrition intervention research initiative project

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) region of Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi is among the poorest and most disadvantaged areas of the United States. The diets of the people in the LMD are high in fat, and consumption of fruits and vegetables is low. Chronic conditions such as hypertension, cardi...

  13. Employment Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Mississippi

    OpenAIRE

    Mallory, Christy; Sears, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 34,800 LGBT workers in Mississippi are not explicitly protected from discrimination under state or local laws. Discrimination against LGBT employees has been documented in surveys, media reports, and court cases. Many corporate employers and public opinion in Mississippi support protections for LGBT people in the workplace. 

  14. 77 FR 55219 - Mississippi; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Mississippi; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster... notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Mississippi (FEMA-4081-DR), dated August 29,...

  15. 78 FR 14320 - Mississippi; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... Services; 97.034, Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Mississippi; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster... notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Mississippi (FEMA-4101-DR), dated February...

  16. 76 FR 41195 - National Forests In Mississippi, Tombigbee and Holly Springs Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... Forest Service National Forests In Mississippi, Tombigbee and Holly Springs Resource Advisory Committee... National Forests Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Starkville, MS. The committee is meeting as... Forest Resources, Tulley Auditorium, Thompson Hall, 775 Stone Blvd., Mississippi State, MS, 39762-9690...

  17. 76 FR 41196 - National Forests in Mississippi, Tombigbee and Holly Springs Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... Forest Service National Forests in Mississippi, Tombigbee and Holly Springs Resource Advisory Committee... National Forests Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Starkville, MS. The committee is meeting as... Forest Resources, Tulley Auditorium, Thompson Hall, 775 Stone Blvd., Mississippi State, MS 39762-9690...

  18. Multi-Center Electronic Structure Calculations for Plasma Equation of State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B G; Johnson, D D; Alam, A

    2010-12-14

    We report on an approach for computing electronic structure utilizing solid-state multi-center scattering techniques, but generalized to finite temperatures to model plasmas. This approach has the advantage of handling mixtures at a fundamental level without the imposition of ad hoc continuum lowering models, and incorporates bonding and charge exchange, as well as multi-center effects in the calculation of the continuum density of states.

  19. 77 FR 58903 - Mississippi Disaster Number MS-00059

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... ADMINISTRATION Mississippi Disaster Number MS-00059 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment...: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort... Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite 6050, Washington, DC 20416. SUPPLEMENTARY...

  20. 77 FR 58902 - Mississippi Disaster Number MS-00059

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... ADMINISTRATION Mississippi Disaster Number MS-00059 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment... applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road.... Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite 6050, Washington, DC 20416....

  1. Environment Assessment for the Construction of a Visitor/Education Center at NASA Stennis Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Carolyn D.

    2006-01-01

    This document is an environmental assessment that examines the environmental impacts of a proposed plan to clear land and to construct a building for the operation of a Visitor/Education Center at a location next to the Mississippi Welcome Center on Interstate 10 along highway 607 in Hancock County Mississippi.

  2. Post-Closure Inspection, Sampling, and Maintenance Report for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Calendar Year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-03-01

    This report summarizes the 2012 annual inspection, sampling, measurement, and maintenance activities performed at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site (Salmon site). The draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (DOE 2007) specifies the submittal of an annual report of site activities with the results of sample analyses. A revised plan is in preparation. The Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site is intended for release in 2013. The Salmon site consists of 1,470 acres. The site is located in Lamar County, Mississippi, approximately 10 miles west of Purvis, Mississippi, and about 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, Mississippi The State of Mississippi owns the surface real estate subject to certain restrictions related to subsurface penetration. The State is the surface operator; the Mississippi Forestry Commission is its agent. The federal government owns the subsurface real estate (including minerals and some surface features), shares right-of-entry easements with the State, and retains rights related to subsurface monitoring. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM), a successor agency to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, is responsible for the long-term surveillance of the subsurface real estate

  3. Obesity and Health Risk of Children in the Mississippi Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Abigail; Waddell, Dwight; Ford, M. Allison; Bentley, John P.; Woodyard, Catherine D.; Hallam, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mississippi (MS) Delta adults and youth report obesity rates far exceeding those of the state and nation. State law requires in-school physical activity and nutrition practices to address childhood obesity but does not require evaluation of outcomes, specifically the impact on weight-related outcomes. This paper offers 3 things: (1)…

  4. Quantum-State Engineering of Multiple Trapped Ions for Center-of-Mass Mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Hao-Sheng; KUANG Le-Man; ZHU Xi-Wen; GAO Ke-Lin

    2001-01-01

    We propose a scheme to generate a superposition of coherent states with arbitrary coeffcients on a line in phase space for the center-of-mass vibrational mode of N ions by means of isolating all other spectator vibrational modes from the center-of-mass mode. It can be viewed as the generalization of previous methods for preparing motional states of one ion. For a large number of ions, only one cyclic operation enables one to generate such a superposition of many coherent states.``

  5. Cybersecurity: Utilizing Fusion Centers to Protect State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Entities Against Cyber Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    UU NSN 7540-01-280-5500 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std . 239-18 ii THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK iii...http://fcw.com/Articles/2010/03/16/Web-cyber-threat-fusion-center.aspx?p=1. 11 United States as the fusion centers in Delaware , Virginia, Maryland...8461dd77befa9b1506273a976c5c2b15.html. 157 Ibid. 55 In addition to the state of Washington, five other states (Missouri, Maryland, Delaware , Utah

  6. A descriptive survey of management and operations at selected sports medicine centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, D

    1996-11-01

    No uniform guidelines for operations or accreditation standards for sports medicine center were available and, at the time of this study, little information on the management and operation of sports medicine centers was available in the literature. The purpose of the study was to determine the management structure and function of selected sports medicine centers in the United States. Questionnaires were mailed to 200 randomly selected centers throughout the United State from a directory of sports medicine centers published in Physician and Sportsmedicine (1992) to gather descriptive information on eight areas, including 1) general background, 2) staffing, 3) services, facilities, and equipment, 4) billing, collections, and revenue, 5) clientele, caseloads, and referrals, 6) ownership and financing, 7) school and club outreach contracts, and 8) marketing strategies and future trends. A total of 71 surveys (35.5%) were returned in the allotted time frame. Data were analyzed using ranges, means, medians, modes, and percentages. Results yielded several conclusions about sports medicine centers. Nearly all (93%) of the centers employed physical therapists; physical therapists were clinical directors at 70.2% of centers; orthopaedists were most often medical directors; rehabilitation was the most frequently offered service (93%); physical therapy produced the highest revenue; sports injuries accounted for a mean 34.5% of patients, who were mostly recreational or high school athletes between 13-60 years of age; primary shareholders were most often physical therapists or physicians; most were involved in outreach services for schools; marketing strategies primarily involved communication with referral sources; and managed care was identified most frequently as a trend affecting the future of sports medicine centers. Findings identified common aspects of sports medicine centers and may assist in establishing guidelines for operations or accreditation of sports medicine

  7. Final priority; Technical Assistance on State Data Collection--IDEA Data Management Center. Final priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-05

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) announces a priority under the Technical Assistance on State Data Collection program. The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2014 and later years. We take this action to fund a cooperative agreement to establish and operate an IDEA Data Management Center (Center) that will provide technical assistance (TA) to improve the capacity of States to meet the data collection requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

  8. Exploration and Production of Hydrocarbon Resources in Coastal Alabama and Mississippi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    temporary bases ( Weston , o 1978). For instance, Delta operations have been staged from a dock owned by a mud supplier at the Port of Mobile. It is...In Sixth Annual Conference on Wetlands Restoration and Creation, Symposium, Tampa, FL. Tolson, j.S., C.W. Copeland , and B.L. Bearden. 1983...Availability of Additional Grotndwater Supplies in the Pascagoula Area, Mississippi. Mississippi Research and Development Center, Jackson, MS. Weston , R.F

  9. Water resources investigations in Mississippi, 1984-85

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamonds, A.G.; Moss, Carol

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the activities of the Water Resources Division in Mississippi. It summarizes progress made in water-resources investigations and related activities in the current fiscal year ending September 30, 1984, and outlines the work to be accomplished during the fiscal year ending September 30, 1985. Its specific purpose is to inform cooperating State, local, and other Federal agencies about all activities of this Division in water investigations in Mississippi and to give those cooperators a better understanding of how their participation fits into the total USGS program of water resources investigations. (USGS)

  10. New York State Health Foundation grant helps health centers win federal expansion funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman, David; Cozine, Maureen

    2012-11-01

    With approximately 1.2 million New Yorkers poised to gain health insurance coverage as a result of federal health reform, demand for primary care services is likely to increase greatly. The Affordable Care Act includes $11 billion in funding to enhance primary care access at community health centers. Recognizing a need and an opportunity, in August 2010 the New York State Health Foundation made a grant of nearly $400,000 to the Community Health Care Association of New York State to work with twelve health centers to develop successful proposals for obtaining and using these federal funds. Ultimately, eleven of the twelve sites are expected to receive $25.6 million in federal grants over a five-year period-a sixty-four-fold return on the foundation's investment. This article describes the strategy for investing in community health centers; identifies key project activities, challenges, and lessons; and highlights its next steps for strengthening primary care.

  11. Fishery Management Plan: Lake Onalaska Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fishery management planning on the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge provides the framework for cooperative management with state agencies...

  12. Landform-Sediment Assemblages Units of the Upper Mississippi River Valley

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Wisconsinan and Holocene Landform-Sediment Assemblages of the Upper Mississippi River Valley. Knowledge of the spatial distribution of natural and cultural resources...

  13. Insects Collected at the Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge by the Mississippi Entomological Museum in 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Mississippi Entomological Museum (MEM) has been surveying the insect fauna of the southeastern United States for the last 29 years. This ongoing research is...

  14. 1983 (mid-Dec) all goose survey : Mississippi Flyway- Southeastern Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This dataset provides results of the 1983 mid-December goose survey in the Mississippi Flyway states of Region 4 of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  15. 1984 (mid-Dec) all goose survey : Mississippi Flyway- Southeastern Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This dataset provides results of the 1984 mid-December goose survey in the Mississippi Flyway states of Region 4 of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  16. State Primary Stroke Center Policies in the US: Rural Health Issues.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slade, C.; O'Toole, L.J.; Rho, E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between state primary stroke center (PSC) designation policy implementation and access to optimal stroke care for residents of rural areas. Materials and Methods: Primary data were collected during the period September 2008–August 2009. Following content analys

  17. State Primary Stroke Center Policies in the US: Rural Health Issues.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slade, C.; O'Toole, Laurence J.; Rho, E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between state primary stroke center (PSC) designation policy implementation and access to optimal stroke care for residents of rural areas. Materials and Methods: Primary data were collected during the period September 2008–August 2009. Following content

  18. Two center shell model with Woods-Saxon potentials: adiabatic and diabatic states in fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz-Torres, A; Diaz-Torres, Alexis; Scheid, Werner

    2005-01-01

    A realistic two-center shell model for fusion is proposed, which is based on two spherical Woods-Saxon potentials and the potential separable expansion method. This model describes the single-particle motion in a fusing system. A technique for calculating stationary diabatic states is suggested which makes use of the formal definition of those states, i.e., they minimize the radial nonadiabatic coupling between the adiabatic states. As an example the system $^{16}$O + $^{40}$Ca $\\to$ $^{56}$Ni is discussed.

  19. Spin state transition in the active center of the hemoglobin molecule: DFT + DMFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoselov, D.; Korotin, Dm. M.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    An ab initio study of electronic and spin configurations of the iron ion in the active center of the human hemoglobin molecule is presented. With a combination of the Density Functional Theory (DFT) method and the Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT) approach, the spin state transition description in the iron ion during the oxidation process is significantly improved in comparison with previous attempts. It was found that the origin of the iron ion local moment behavior both for the high-spin and for the low-spin states in the hemoglobin molecule is caused by the presence of a mixture of several atomic states with comparable statistical probability.

  20. Use of NASA Satellite Data in Aiding Mississippi Barrier Island Restoration Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, Marco; Spruce, Joseph; Kalcic, Maria; Fletcher, Rose

    2009-01-01

    This presentation discusses a NASA Stennis Space Center project in which NASA-supported satellite and aerial data is being used to aid state and federal agencies in restoring the Mississippi barrier islands. Led by the Applied Science and Technology Project Office (ASTPO), this project will produce geospatial information products from multiple NASA-supported data sources, including Landsat, ASTER, and MODIS satellite data as well as ATLAS multispectral, CAMS multispectral, AVIRIS hyperspectral, EAARL, and other aerial data. Project objectives include the development and testing of a regional sediment transport model and the monitoring of barrier island restoration efforts through remote sensing. Barrier islands provide invaluable benefits to the State of Mississippi, including buffering the mainland from storm surge impacts, providing habitats for valuable wildlife and fisheries habitat, offering accessible recreational opportunities, and preserving natural environments for educating the public about coastal ecosystems and cultural resources. Unfortunately, these highly valued natural areas are prone to damage from hurricanes. For example, Hurricane Camille in 1969 split Ship Island into East and West Ship Island. Hurricane Georges in 1998 caused additional land loss for the two Ship Islands. More recently, Hurricanes Ivan, Katrina, Rita, Gustav, and Ike impacted the Mississippi barrier islands. In particular, Hurricane Katrina caused major damage to island vegetation and landforms, killing island forest overstories, overwashing entire islands, and causing widespread erosion. In response, multiple state and federal agencies are working to restore damaged components of these barrier islands. Much of this work is being implemented through federally funded Coastal Impact Assessment and Mississippi Coastal Improvement programs. One restoration component involves the reestablishment of the island footprints to that in 1969. Our project will employ NASA remote sensing

  1. Use of NASA Satellite Data in Aiding Mississippi Barrier Island Restoration Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, Marco; Spruce, Joseph; Kalcic, Maria; Fletcher, Rose

    2009-01-01

    This presentation discusses a NASA Stennis Space Center project in which NASA-supported satellite and aerial data is being used to aid state and federal agencies in restoring the Mississippi barrier islands. Led by the Applied Science and Technology Project Office (ASTPO), this project will produce geospatial information products from multiple NASA-supported data sources, including Landsat, ASTER, and MODIS satellite data as well as ATLAS multispectral, CAMS multispectral, AVIRIS hyperspectral, EAARL, and other aerial data. Project objectives include the development and testing of a regional sediment transport model and the monitoring of barrier island restoration efforts through remote sensing. Barrier islands provide invaluable benefits to the State of Mississippi, including buffering the mainland from storm surge impacts, providing habitats for valuable wildlife and fisheries habitat, offering accessible recreational opportunities, and preserving natural environments for educating the public about coastal ecosystems and cultural resources. Unfortunately, these highly valued natural areas are prone to damage from hurricanes. For example, Hurricane Camille in 1969 split Ship Island into East and West Ship Island. Hurricane Georges in 1998 caused additional land loss for the two Ship Islands. More recently, Hurricanes Ivan, Katrina, Rita, Gustav, and Ike impacted the Mississippi barrier islands. In particular, Hurricane Katrina caused major damage to island vegetation and landforms, killing island forest overstories, overwashing entire islands, and causing widespread erosion. In response, multiple state and federal agencies are working to restore damaged components of these barrier islands. Much of this work is being implemented through federally funded Coastal Impact Assessment and Mississippi Coastal Improvement programs. One restoration component involves the reestablishment of the island footprints to that in 1969. Our project will employ NASA remote sensing

  2. Constructing diabatic states from adiabatic states: Extending generalized Mulliken-Hush to multiple charge centers with Boys localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subotnik, Joseph E.; Yeganeh, Sina; Cave, Robert J.; Ratner, Mark A.

    2008-12-01

    This article shows that, although Boys localization is usually applied to single-electron orbitals, the Boys method itself can be applied to many electron molecular states. For the two-state charge-transfer problem, we show analytically that Boys localization yields the same charge-localized diabatic states as those found by generalized Mulliken-Hush theory. We suggest that for future work in electron transfer, where systems have more than two charge centers, one may benefit by using a variant of Boys localization to construct diabatic potential energy surfaces and extract electronic coupling matrix elements. We discuss two chemical examples of Boys localization and propose a generalization of the Boys algorithm for creating diabatic states with localized spin density that should be useful for Dexter triplet-triplet energy transfer.

  3. Constructing diabatic states from adiabatic states: extending generalized Mulliken-Hush to multiple charge centers with boys localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subotnik, Joseph E; Yeganeh, Sina; Cave, Robert J; Ratner, Mark A

    2008-12-28

    This article shows that, although Boys localization is usually applied to single-electron orbitals, the Boys method itself can be applied to many electron molecular states. For the two-state charge-transfer problem, we show analytically that Boys localization yields the same charge-localized diabatic states as those found by generalized Mulliken-Hush theory. We suggest that for future work in electron transfer, where systems have more than two charge centers, one may benefit by using a variant of Boys localization to construct diabatic potential energy surfaces and extract electronic coupling matrix elements. We discuss two chemical examples of Boys localization and propose a generalization of the Boys algorithm for creating diabatic states with localized spin density that should be useful for Dexter triplet-triplet energy transfer.

  4. Baseline Capabilities for State and Major Urban Area Fusion Centers. A Supplement to the Fusion Center Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Enforcement Training Center Nlets Nlets—The International Justice and Public Safety Network NOC National Operations Center NPD National Preparedness...Profile and Architecture Implementation Strategy http://www.ise.gov/docs/eaf/ISE-PAIS.pdf National Integration Center ( NIC ) Incident Management Systems

  5. Near-infrared-enhanced charge state conversion for low power optical nanoscopy with nitrogen vacancy center in diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xiang-Dong; Shen, Ao; Dong, Yang; Dong, Chun-Hua; Guo, Guang-Can; Sun, Fang-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) optical pumped photophysics of nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond was experimentally studied by considering both the charge state conversion and stimulated emission. We found that the NIR laser can help to highly enhance the charge state conversion rate, which can be applied to improve the performance of charge state depletion nanoscopy. Using a doughnut-shaped visible laser beam and a Gaussian-shaped NIR laser beam for charge state manipulation, we developed a low power charge state depletion nanoscopy for NV center. A spatial resolution of 14 nm was achieved with the depletion laser intensity approximately three orders lower than that used for the stimulated emission depletion nanoscopy with NV center. With high spatial resolution and low laser power, the nanoscopy can be used for nanoscale quantum sensing with NV center. And our study on the charge state conversion can help to further optimize the NV center spin state initialization and detection.

  6. The Current State of Poison Control Centers in Pakistan and the Need for Capacity Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Khan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemical exposure is a major health problem globally. Poison control centers (PCCs play a leading role both in developed and developing countries in the prevention and control of poisonous chemical exposures. In this study, we aimed to assess the current state of PCCs in Pakistan and highlight capacity building needs in these centers. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of the two registered PCCs was done during August – December 2011. Necessary services of the PCCs were evaluated and the data were recorded on a predesigned checklist. Results: Both PCCs are affiliated to a tertiary care hospital. Clinical services to poisoned patients were available 24 hours a day / 7 days a week. Information on common local products was available to poison center staff. Both centers were involved in undergraduate and post graduate teaching. Telephone poison information service was not available in either of centers. There was a limited capacity for qualitative and analytical toxicology. Common antidotes were available. There were limited surveillance activities to capture toxic risks existing in the community and also a deficiency was observed in chemical disaster planning. Conclusion: PCCs in Pakistan need capacity building for specialized training in toxicology, toxicovigilance, chemical disaster planning, analytical laboratory tests and telephone service for consultation in poisoning cases.   How to cite this article: Khan NU, Mir MU, Khan UR, Khan AR, Ara J, Raja K, et al. The Current State of Poison Control Centers in Pakistan and the Need for Capacity Building. Asia Pac J Med Toxicol 2014;3:31-5.

  7. Radium isotopes in the lower Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, T. F.; Curwick, P. B.

    1991-02-01

    Radium isotopes have been measured in Mississippi River water at several locations between St. Francisville and Venice, Louisiana. Measured activities averaged 11.1 dpm/100 L (disintegrations per minute per 100 L) for dissolved 226Ra with a 228Ra/226Ra activity ratio of 1.04 and a 224Ra/228Ra activity ratio of 1.06 for the section of river above a phosphogypsum waste-discharge input. Down river from this site, the dissolved 226Ra activity averaged 22.4 dpm/100 L with a 228Ra/226Ra activity ratio of 0.55 and a 224Ra/228Ra activity ratio of 0.87. Chemical and isotopic reequilibration of the radium in the waste with that in the river water and suspended sediments occurs very rapidly. Fluxes of 226Ra are calculated to be 2.44×1014 dpm/yr (disintegrations per minute per year) for the main stem of the Mississippi during phosphogypsum disposal compared to 0.98×1014 dpm/yr when no phosphogypsum disposal is occurring. 28Ra flux is calculated to be 1.06×1014 dpm/yr during disposal and 1.01×1014 dpm/yr in the absence of disposal. The radium flux is estimated to be 45% in the dissolved state and 55% in the adsorbed state.

  8. A theoretical study of electronic excited states of photosynthetic reaction center in Rhodopseudomonas viridis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The electronic singlet vertical excited states of photosynthetic reaction center (PSRC) in Rhodopseudomonas (Rps.) viridis were investigated by ZINDO and INDO/S methods. The effects of the interactions of pigment-pigment and pigment-protein on the electronic excitations were examined. The calculation results showed that the interactions of pigment-pigment and pigment-protein play an important role in reasonably assigning the experimental absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectra of PSRC in Rps. virids. By comparing the theoretically computed excited states with the experimental absorption and CD spectra, satisfactory assignments of the experimental spectroscopic peaks were achieved.

  9. Public Health Potential of Farmers’ Markets on Medical Center Campuses: A Case Study From Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Rovniak, Liza S.

    2011-01-01

    There are currently 7175 farmers’ markets in the United States, and these organizations are increasingly viewed as one facet of the solution to national health problems. There has been a recent trend toward establishing markets on medical center campuses, and such partnerships can augment a medical center's ability to serve community health. However, to our knowledge no studies have described the emergence of a market at a medical center, the barriers and challenges such an initiative has faced, or the nature of programming it may foster. We provide a qualitative description of the process of starting a seasonal, once-a-week, producers-only market at the Pennsylvania State Hershey Medical Center, and we call for greater public health attention to these emerging community spaces. PMID:22021298

  10. Public health potential of farmers' markets on medical center campuses: a case study from Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Daniel R; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L; Rovniak, Liza S

    2011-12-01

    There are currently 7175 farmers' markets in the United States, and these organizations are increasingly viewed as one facet of the solution to national health problems. There has been a recent trend toward establishing markets on medical center campuses, and such partnerships can augment a medical center's ability to serve community health. However, to our knowledge no studies have described the emergence of a market at a medical center, the barriers and challenges such an initiative has faced, or the nature of programming it may foster. We provide a qualitative description of the process of starting a seasonal, once-a-week, producers-only market at the Pennsylvania State Hershey Medical Center, and we call for greater public health attention to these emerging community spaces.

  11. Jackson State University's Center for Spatial Data Research and Applications: New facilities and new paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bruce E.; Elliot, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    Jackson State University recently established the Center for Spatial Data Research and Applications, a Geographical Information System (GIS) and remote sensing laboratory. Taking advantage of new technologies and new directions in the spatial (geographic) sciences, JSU is building a Center of Excellence in Spatial Data Management. New opportunities for research, applications, and employment are emerging. GIS requires fundamental shifts and new demands in traditional computer science and geographic training. The Center is not merely another computer lab but is one setting the pace in a new applied frontier. GIS and its associated technologies are discussed. The Center's facilities are described. An ARC/INFO GIS runs on a Vax mainframe, with numerous workstations. Image processing packages include ELAS, LIPS, VICAR, and ERDAS. A host of hardware and software peripheral are used in support. Numerous projects are underway, such as the construction of a Gulf of Mexico environmental data base, development of AI in image processing, a land use dynamics study of metropolitan Jackson, and others. A new academic interdisciplinary program in Spatial Data Management is under development, combining courses in Geography and Computer Science. The broad range of JSU's GIS and remote sensing activities is addressed. The impacts on changing paradigms in the university and in the professional world conclude the discussion.

  12. Water quality monitoring and data collection in the Mississippi sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runner, Michael S.; Creswell, R.

    2002-01-01

    The United States Geological Survey and the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources are collecting data on the quality of the water in the Mississippi Sound of the Gulf of Mexico, and streamflow data for its tributaries. The U.S. Geological Survey is collecting continuous water-level data, continuous and discrete water-temperature data, continuous and discrete specific-conductance data, as well as chloride and salinity samples at two locations in the Mississippi Sound and three Corps of Engineers tidal gages. Continuous-discharge data are also being collected at two additional stations on tributaries. The Mississippi Department of Marine Resources collects water samples at 169 locations in the Gulf of Mexico. Between 1800 and 2000 samples are collected annually which are analyzed for turbidity and fecal coliform bacteria. The continuous data are made available real-time through the internet and are being used in conjunction with streamflow data, weather data, and sampling data for the monitoring and management of the oyster reefs, the shrimp fishery and other marine species and their habitats.

  13. Dialysis vascular access management by interventional nephrology programs at University Medical Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachharajani, Tushar J; Moossavi, Shahriar; Salman, Loay; Wu, Steven; Dwyer, Amy C; Ross, Jamie; Dukkipati, Ramanath; Maya, Ivan D; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Agarwal, Anil; Abreo, Kenneth D; Work, Jack; Asif, Arif

    2011-01-01

    The development of interventional nephrology has undoubtedly led to an improvement in patient care at many facilities across the United States. However, these services have traditionally been offered by interventional nephrologists in the private practice arena. While interventional nephrology was born in the private practice setting, several academic medical centers across the United States have now developed interventional nephrology programs. University Medical Centers (UMCs) that offer interventional nephrology face challenges, such as smaller dialysis populations, limited financial resources, and real or perceived political "turf" issues." Despite these hurdles, several UMCs have successfully established interventional nephrology as an intricate part of a larger nephrology program. This has largely been accomplished by consolidating available resources and collaborating with other specialties irrespective of the size of the dialysis population. The collaboration with other specialties also offers an opportunity to perform advanced procedures, such as application of excimer laser and endovascular ultrasound. As more UMCs establish interventional nephrology programs, opportunities for developing standardized training centers will improve, resulting in better quality and availability of nephrology-related procedures, and providing an impetus for research activities.

  14. Evaluating post-Katrina recovery in Mississippi using repeat photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Christopher; Mitchell, Jerry T; Cutter, Susan L

    2011-07-01

    Hurricane Katrina of August 2005 had extensive consequences for the state of Mississippi in the United States. Widespread infrastructure and property damage, massive social dislocation, and ecological loss remain among the many challenges faced by communities as they work towards 'normalcy'. This study employs repeat photography to understand differential recovery from Hurricane Katrina in Mississippi. Revealing change with conventional landscape photography, a process known as repeat photography, is common in the natural sciences. Simply stated, repeat photography is the practice of re-photographing the same scene as it appears in an earlier photograph. Photographs were taken at 131 sites every six months over a three-year period. Each photograph was assigned a recovery score and a spatially interpolated recovery surface was generated for each time period. The mapped and graphed results show disparities in the progression of recovery: some communities quickly entered the rebuilding process whereas others have lagged far behind.

  15. Mississippi River Valley Alluvial Aquifer, Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee; 2006-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Outcrop and subcrop extent of the Mississippi River Valley Alluvial Aquifer in Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee.

  16. HT-Paxos: High Throughput State-Machine Replication Protocol for Large Clustered Data Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paxos is a prominent theory of state-machine replication. Recent data intensive systems that implement state-machine replication generally require high throughput. Earlier versions of Paxos as few of them are classical Paxos, fast Paxos, and generalized Paxos have a major focus on fault tolerance and latency but lacking in terms of throughput and scalability. A major reason for this is the heavyweight leader. Through offloading the leader, we can further increase throughput of the system. Ring Paxos, Multiring Paxos, and S-Paxos are few prominent attempts in this direction for clustered data centers. In this paper, we are proposing HT-Paxos, a variant of Paxos that is the best suitable for any large clustered data center. HT-Paxos further offloads the leader very significantly and hence increases the throughput and scalability of the system, while at the same time, among high throughput state-machine replication protocols, it provides reasonably low latency and response time.

  17. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in Mississippi River suspended sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raff, J.; Hites, R. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2004-09-15

    The Mississippi River Basin drains water from 41% of the conterminous U.S. and is a valuable resource that supplies food, transportation, and irrigation to more than 95 million people of the region. Discharge and runoff from industry, agriculture, and population centers have increased the loads of anthropogenic organic compounds in the river. There has been growing concern over the rising levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in air, sediment, biota, and humans, but there have been no studies to measure the concentrations of these chemicals in North America's largest river system. The goal of this study was to investigate the occurrence of PBDEs (15 congeners including BDE-209) and to identify possible sources within the Mississippi River Basin. We found PBDEs to be widespread throughout the region, rivaling PCBs in their extent and magnitude of contamination. We have also calculated the total amount of PBDEs released to the Gulf of Mexico in 2002.

  18. State and local fiscal impacts associated with nuclear energy centers: some initial considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjornstad, D.J.

    1976-04-01

    The concept of the nuclear energy center is designed to consolidate a number of electrical power reactors and/or related fuel cycle activities on a single site. Such a siting strategy would concentrate a great deal of economic activity in one area and, as a consequence, generate significant impacts on state and local governments by increasing tax bases and public service demands and by altering intergovernmental fiscal relations. This study was designed to place rough empirical measures on relevant impact variables and to highlight areas for which a need for further research was indicated.

  19. Center for Space Telemetering and Telecommunications Systems, New Mexico State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Stephen; DeLeon, Phillip; Borah, Deva; Lyman, Ray

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Center for Space Telemetering and Telecommunications Systems activities at New Mexico State University. Presentations cover the following topics: (1) small satellite communications, including nanosatellite radio and virtual satellite development; (2) modulation and detection studies, including details on smooth phase interpolated keying (SPIK) spectra and highlights of an adaptive turbo multiuser detector; (3) decoupled approaches to nonlinear ISI compensation; (4) space internet testing; (4) optical communication; (5) Linux-based receiver for lightweight optical communications without a laser in space, including software design, performance analysis, and the receiver algorithm; (6) carrier tracking hardware; and (7) subband transforms for adaptive direct sequence spread spectrum receivers.

  20. Topological Phases in Graphene Nanoribbons: Junction States, Spin Centers, and Quantum Spin Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ting; Zhao, Fangzhou; Louie, Steven G.

    2017-08-01

    We show that semiconducting graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) of different width, edge, and end termination (synthesizable from molecular precursors with atomic precision) belong to different electronic topological classes. The topological phase of GNRs is protected by spatial symmetries and dictated by the terminating unit cell. We have derived explicit formulas for their topological invariants and shown that localized junction states developed between two GNRs of distinct topology may be tuned by lateral junction geometry. The topology of a GNR can be further modified by dopants, such as a periodic array of boron atoms. In a superlattice consisting of segments of doped and pristine GNRs, the junction states are stable spin centers, forming a Heisenberg antiferromagnetic spin 1 /2 chain with tunable exchange interaction. The discoveries here not only are of scientific interest for studies of quasi-one-dimensional systems, but also open a new path for design principles of future GNR-based devices through their topological characters.

  1. Geodatabase of the datasets used to represent the six subunits of the Texas Coastal Uplands and Mississippi Embayment aquifer system, Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, and Texas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase includes spatial datasets that represent the Texas Coastal Uplands and Mississippi Embayment aquifer system in the States of Alabama, Arkansas,...

  2. United States academic medical centers: priorities and challenges amid market transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Irene M; Anason, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    United States academic medical centers (AMCs) have upheld their long-standing reputation for excellence by teaching and training the next generation of physicians, supporting medical research, providing world-class medical care, and offering breakthrough treatments for highly complex medical cases. In recent years, the pace and direction of change reshaping the American health care industry has created a set of new and profound challenges that AMC leaders must address in order to sustain their institutions. University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) is an alliance of 116 leading nonprofit academic medical centers and 276 of their affiliated hospitals, all of which are focused on delivering world-class patient care. Formed in 1984, UHC fosters collaboration with and among its members through its renowned programs and services in the areas of comparative data and analytics, performance improvement, supply chain management, strategic research, and public policy. Each year, UHC surveys the executives of its member institutions to understand the issues they view as most critical to sustaining the viability and success of their organizations. The results of UHC's most recent 2011 member survey, coupled with a 2012 Strategic Health Perspectives Harris Interactive presentation, based in parton surveys of major health care industry stakeholders reveal the most important and relevant issues and opportunities that hospital leaders face today, as the United States health care delivery system undergoes a period of unprecedented transformation.

  3. Triplet state in photosystem II reaction centers as studied by 130 GHz EPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashenko, S.V.; Proskuryakov, I.I.; Germano, M.; Gorkom, H.J. van; Gast, P

    2003-11-01

    The triplet state in the reaction centers of photosystem II was studied by high-field/high-frequency (130 GHz) EPR in the temperature range 50-90 K. At 50 K, the zero-field splitting parameters of the EPR spectrum correspond well to those of a chlorophyll monomer, in agreement with earlier studies. In the high magnetic field of 4.6 T employed in this study, the g-anisotropy of the triplet state becomes apparent and leads to a shift of the canonical positions of the triplet EPR spectrum. Assuming that triplet g- and zero-field tensors are coaxial, the principal values of the triplet g-tensor are determined to be 2.00324, 2.00306 and 2.00231 with an error of {+-}0.00004. Lifting this assumption results in higher g-anisotropy. At higher temperatures, the shape of the spectra changes significantly. Triplet excitation hopping involving the accessory chlorophyll B{sub A} and P{sub A} or P{sub B} (equivalents of the special pair bacteriochlorophylls of the bacterial reaction centers) can partially explain those changes, but the most prominent features indicate that also the electron acceptor I{sub A} (a pheophytin molecule) must be involved.

  4. Water quality data associated with paddlefish habitats on the Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge, Mississippi February to September, 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Aquaculture, Mississippi State University, on behalf of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), collected water quality...

  5. Distribution of male infertility specialists in relation to the male population and assisted reproductive technology centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nangia, Ajay K; Likosky, Donald S; Wang, Dongmei

    2010-07-01

    To describe the spatial distribution of assisted reproductive technology (ART) centers and male infertility specialists by location, driving distance from ART center, and potential male population in need of these resources. Cross-sectional study. Male population in the reproductive years (20-49 years old) based on U.S. Census Bureau data in 2000. Urology male infertility specialists as defined by 2005 specialty society membership directories. ART centers registered with the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology in 2005. Male population and male infertility specialists within the service area served by in-state and neighboring-state ART centers, as defined by a 60-minute travel time. One hundred ninety-seven male infertility specialists and 390 ART centers were identified. On a state level, the highest male population in the reproductive years was seen in California, Texas, and Florida. The highest male populations per male specialist were found in Oregon, Tennessee, and Oklahoma. The highest number of ART centers per male specialist was found in Tennessee. The highest proximities of male specialists within the 60-minute driving service area of different ART centers were found in the North East and Southern California. The Midwest to Northwest had the least. A disparity of urology male infertility specialists exists in the United States, with large areas of the country being underserved and overserved based on the location of ART centers. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Environmental Assessment and Management (TEAM) Guide: Mississippi Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Yes 1 Oreoneetes validus A Crayfish Yes 3 Proeambarus ablusus A Crayfish Yes 2 Proeambarus barbiger Jackson Prairie Crayfish Yes Yes 1...recreational area) Pearl River, from the Barnett Reservoir to the City of Jackson Water Intake Tennessee River, from the Mississippi-Alabama state line...Magees Creek Turkey Fork Reservoir Davis Lake Strong River Beaverdam Creek Lake Lamar Bruce Clear Springs Lake Red Creek Lake Lowndes Percy Quinn

  7. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) 8 to 14 Day Probabilistic Temperature Outlook for the Contiguous United States and Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues 8 to 14 day probabilistic temperature outlooks for the United States. The 8-14 day Outlook gives the confidence that a...

  8. Effectiveness of Cognitive-behavioral Therapy in the Treatment of Iranian Male Drug Addicts at a State Rehabilitation Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parvizifard, Aliakbar; Haji Ahmad, Haji Jamaludin Bin; Sulaiman, Tajularipin; Binti Baba, Maznah; Sadeghi, Kheirollah; Parsa Moghadam, Arash

    2016-01-01

    .... An experimental research design was adopted in the current study in which the participants consisted of 75 male drug addicts who were consecutively admitted as outpatients at a state rehabilitation center...

  9. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) 8 to 14 Day Probabilistic Precipitation Outlook for the Contiguous United States and Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues 8 to 14 day probabilistic precipitation outlooks for the United States. The 8-14 day Outlook gives the confidence that a...

  10. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) 6 to 10 Day Probabilistic Precipitation Outlook for the Contiguous United States and Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues 6 to 10 day probabilistic precipitation outlooks for the United States. The 6-10 day Outlook gives the confidence that a...

  11. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) 6 to 10 Day Probabilistic Temperature Outlook for the Contiguous United States and Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues 6 to 10 day probabilistic temperature outlooks for the United States. The 6-10 day Outlook gives the confidence that a...

  12. Charge state dynamics of the nitrogen vacancy center in diamond under near-infrared excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Peng; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev

    2016-05-01

    The negatively charged NV defect center (NV-) in diamond has become prominent for applications in quantum information, nanoscale magnetic and electric field sensing, and fluorescent biological markers. Switching between NV- and neutral charge states (NV0) have been extensively studied and modeled using exciting laser wavelengths that are shorter than the NV- zero-phonon line (ZPL), and typically result in decreased fluorescence from the NV- state. In this work, we report on the experimental observation that NV0 converts to NV- under excitation with near-infrared (1064 nm) light, resulting in increased fluorescence from the NV- state. We have observed this effect in both ensembles of NVs in bulk diamond, and in diamond nanocrystals, and find that it is robust both at room and low temperature. We carried out microwave and two-color excitation combined with spectral and time-resolved experimental studies. We used rate-equation modeling and find evidence for competition between one-photon and two-photon processes for hole and electron ionization. This finding may help elucidate the study of the NV energy level structure, and impact recently emerging research in single-shot measurement of the NV- spin state via spin-to-charge conversion.

  13. Test Facilities Capability Handbook: Volume 1 - Stennis Space Center (SSC); Volume 2 - Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensarling, Paula L.

    2007-01-01

    The John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) is located in Southern Mississippi near the Mississippi-Louisiana state line. SSC is chartered as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Center of Excellence for large space transportation propulsion system testing. This charter has led to many unique test facilities, capabilities and advanced technologies provided through the supporting infrastructure. SSC has conducted projects in support of such diverse activities as liquid, and hybrid rocket testing and development; material development; non-intrusive plume diagnostics; plume tracking; commercial remote sensing; test technology and more. On May 30, 1996 NASA designated SSC the lead center for rocket propulsion testing, giving the center total responsibility for conducting and/or managing all NASA rocket engine testing. Test services are now available not only for NASA but also for the Department of Defense, other government agencies, academia, and industry. This handbook was developed to provide a summary of the capabilities that exist within SSC. It is intended as a primary resource document, which will provide the reader with the top-level capabilities and characteristics of the numerous test facilities, test support facilities, laboratories, and services. Due to the nature of continually evolving programs and test technologies, descriptions of the Center's current capabilities are provided. Periodic updates and revisions of this document will be made to maintain its completeness and accuracy.

  14. Learning to Lead School Turnaround: The Mississippi LEADS Professional Development Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Clifford

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this paper is on a systematic principal professional development program called “Mississippi LEADS,” which is designed to provide current school principals the technical and practical knowledge that they need to enact comprehensive school turnaround efforts. The Mississippi LEADS professional development program is a year-long training experience that includes executive coaching and establishes a state-wide and district-wide professional support system for principals. The goal of Mississippi LEADS is to turnaround chronically low performing schools by investing in leadership development, rather than replacing the school principal. Although many turnaround efforts begin by replacing principals, Mississippi LEADS administrators view principal replacement as impractical for many rural, impoverished school districts that face educator recruitment challenges. The Mississippi LEADS program theory of action is discussed, which includes formalized classroom work, enactment of ambitious school improvement plans, one-on-one executive coaching, and data monitoring. Early data from the evaluation study indicates that Mississippi LEADS is having expected impacts.

  15. Variance in Dominant Grain Size Across the Mississippi River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. L.; Chamberlain, E. L.; Esposito, C. R.; Wagner, R. W.; Mohrig, D. C.

    2016-02-01

    Proposals to restore coastal Louisiana often center on Mississippi River diversion projects wherein water and sediment are routed into wetlands and shallow waters in an effort to build land. Successful design and implementation of diversions will include consideration of behavior and characteristics of sediment, both in the river and in the receiving basin. The Mississippi River sediment load is primarily mud (roughly 75%), with the remainder being very-fine to medium sand or organic detritus. The dominance of muds leads many to suggest that diversions should focus on capturing the mud fraction despite the smaller size and longer settling times required for these particles compared to sand; others believe that sand should be the focus. We present a systemic analysis of the texture of land-building sediment in the Mississippi Delta using borehole data from various depositional environments representing a range of spatial scales, system ages, and fluvial and basin characteristics. We include subdelta-scale data from the incipient Wax Lake Delta and from the distal plain of the abandoned Lafourche subdelta, as well as crevasse-scale data from modern Cubit's Gap and the Attakapas splay, an inland Lafourche crevasse. Comparison of these sites demonstrates a large variance in the volumetric mud to sand ratios across the system. We consider the differences to be emblematic of the various forcings on each lobe as it formed and suggest that the most efficient building block for a diversion is a function of the receiving basin and is not uniform across the entire delta.

  16. Excited state dynamics in photosynthetic reaction center and light harvesting complex 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strümpfer, Johan; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-08-01

    Key to efficient harvesting of sunlight in photosynthesis is the first energy conversion process in which electronic excitation establishes a trans-membrane charge gradient. This conversion is accomplished by the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) that is, in case of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides studied here, surrounded by light harvesting complex 1 (LH1). The RC employs six pigment molecules to initiate the conversion: four bacteriochlorophylls and two bacteriopheophytins. The excited states of these pigments interact very strongly and are simultaneously influenced by the surrounding thermal protein environment. Likewise, LH1 employs 32 bacteriochlorophylls influenced in their excited state dynamics by strong interaction between the pigments and by interaction with the protein environment. Modeling the excited state dynamics in the RC as well as in LH1 requires theoretical methods, which account for both pigment-pigment interaction and pigment-environment interaction. In the present study we describe the excitation dynamics within a RC and excitation transfer between light harvesting complex 1 (LH1) and RC, employing the hierarchical equation of motion method. For this purpose a set of model parameters that reproduce RC as well as LH1 spectra and observed oscillatory excitation dynamics in the RC is suggested. We find that the environment has a significant effect on LH1-RC excitation transfer and that excitation transfers incoherently between LH1 and RC.

  17. A Comparison of Patient-Centered Care in Pharmacy Curricula in the United States and Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes-da-Cunha, Ines; Arguello, Blanca; Martinez, Fernando Martinez; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To compare United States and European Higher Education Area (EHEA) undergraduate pharmacy curricula in terms of patient-centered care courses. Methods. Websites from all pharmacy colleges or schools in the United States and the 41 countries in the EHEA were retrieved from the FIP Official World List of Pharmacy Schools and investigated. A random sample of schools was selected and, based on analyses of course descriptions from syllabi, each course was classified into the following categories: social/behavioral/administrative pharmacy sciences, clinical sciences, experiential, or other/basic sciences. Results. Of 147 schools of pharmacy, 59 were included (23 in US and 36 in the EHEA). Differences existed in the percentages of credits/hours in all of the four subject area categories. Conclusion. Institutions in EHEA countries maintain a greater focus on basic sciences and a lower load of clinical sciences in pharmacy curricula compared to the United States. These differences may not be in accordance with international recommendations to educate future pharmacists focused on patient care.

  18. A comprehensive palliative care center implementation in S.B. Ulus State Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayla Kabalak

    2012-06-01

    Every people wants to best care and to die painless in their end-stage of life. This is a human right. Therefore, end-of-life care is considered an indicator of health quality all over the world. The ultimate goal of palliative care is to relieve the suffering of patients and their families by the comprehensive assessment and treatment of physical, psychosocial, and spiritual symptoms experienced by patients. After the patient\\s death, palliative care focuses primarily on bereavement of the family. T.C. Ministry of Health to find a solution of this important issue as a first step, the preparations for the establishment of palliative care centers and units, training of health personnel started. S.B. Ulus State Hospital as a team we have set out to open a comprehensive palliative care center. Our goal is to contribute on take place of palliative care organization in health system and to the spread across the country. [J Contemp Med 2012; 2(2.000: 122-126

  19. Proton Therapy At Siteman Cancer Center: The State Of The Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Charles

    2011-06-01

    Barnes-Jewish Hospital is on the verge of offering proton radiation therapy to its patients. Those treatments will be delivered from the first Monarch 250, a state-of-the-art cyclotron produced by Still River Systems, Inc., Littleton, MA. The accelerator is the world's first superconducting synchrocyclotron, with a field-strength of 10 tesla, providing the smallest accelerator for high-energy protons currently available. On May 14, 2010 it was announced that the first production unit had successfully extracted 250 MeV protons. That unit is scheduled for delivery to the Siteman Cancer Center, an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center at Washington University School of Medicine. At a weight of 20 tons and with a diameter of less than 2 meters the compact cyclotron will be mounted on a gantry, another first for proton therapy systems. The single-energy system includes 3 contoured scatterers and 14 different range modulators to provide 24 distinct beam delivery configurations. This allows proton fields up to 25 cm in diameter, with a maximum range from 5.5 to 32 cm and spread-out-Bragg-peak extent up to 20 cm. Monte Carlo simulations have been run using MCNPX to simulate the clinical beam properties. Those calculations have been used to commission a commercial treatment planning system prior to final clinical measurements. MCNPX was also used to calculate the neutron background generated by protons in the scattering system and patient. Additional details of the facility and current status will be presented.

  20. A University-based Forensics Training Center as a Regional Outreach, Education, and Research activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayford B. Vaughn

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a university-based Forensics Training Center (FTC established by a Department of Justice grant for the purpose of improving the ability of state and local law enforcement in the Southeastern part of the United States to address the rising incidence of computer based crime. The FTC effort is described along with supporting evidence of its need. The program is not only a service activity, but also contributes to the Mississippi State University (MSU security program pedagogy, and research effort.

  1. Reconnaissance level study Mississippi storm surge barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ledden, M.; Lansen, A.J.; De Ridder, H.A.J.; Edge, B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a reconnaissance level study of a storm surge barrier in the Mississippi River. Historical hurricanes have shown storm surge of several meters along the Mississippi River levees up to and upstream of New Orleans. Future changes due to sea level rise and subsidence will further

  2. Reconnaissance level study Mississippi storm surge barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ledden, M.; Lansen, A.J.; De Ridder, H.A.J.; Edge, B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a reconnaissance level study of a storm surge barrier in the Mississippi River. Historical hurricanes have shown storm surge of several meters along the Mississippi River levees up to and upstream of New Orleans. Future changes due to sea level rise and subsidence will further inc

  3. Final priority; technical assistance to improve state data capacity--National Technical Assistance Center to improve state capacity to accurately collect and report IDEA data. Final priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority under the Technical Assistance to Improve State Data Capacity program. The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2013 and later years. We take this action to focus attention on an identified national need to provide technical assistance (TA) to States to improve their capacity to meet the data collection and reporting requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). We intend this priority to establish a TA center to improve State capacity to accurately collect and report IDEA data (Data Center).

  4. Operational control of radiation conditions in Space Monitoring Data Center of Moscow State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalegaev, Vladimir; Shugay, Yulia; Bobrovnikov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Nikolay; Barinova, Vera; Myagkova, Irina; Panasyuk, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Space Monitoring Data Center (SMDC) of Moscow State University provides mission support for Russian satellites and give operational analysis of radiation conditions in space. SMDC Web-sites (http://smdc.sinp.msu.ru/ and http://swx.sinp.msu.ru/) give access to current data on the level of solar activity, geomagnetic and radiation state of Earth's magnetosphere and heliosphere in near-real time. For data analysis the models of space environment factors working online have been implemented. Interactive services allow one to retrieve and analyze data at a given time moment. Forecasting applications including solar wind parameters, geomagnetic and radiation condition forecasts have been developed. Radiation dose and SEE rate control are of particular importance in practical satellite operation. Satellites are always under the influence of high-energy particle fluxes during their orbital flight. The three main sources of particle fluxes: the Earth's radiation belts, the galactic cosmic rays, and the solar energetic particles (SEP), are taken into account by SMDC operational services to estimate the radiation dose caused by high-energy particles to a satellite at LEO orbits. ISO 15039 and AP8/AE8 physical models are used to estimate effects of galactic cosmic rays and radiation belt particle fluxes. Data of geosynchronous satellites (GOES or Electro-L1) allow to reconstruct the SEP fluxes spectra at a given low Earth orbit taking into account the geomagnetic cut-off depending on geomagnetic activity level.

  5. Chlamydia screening and positivity in juvenile detention centers, United States, 2009-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterwhite, Catherine Lindsey; Newman, Daniel; Collins, Dayne; Torrone, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    An estimated 2.9 million new chlamydia infections occur in the United States each year. Among women, chlamydia can lead to serious adverse outcomes, including pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility. Chlamydia prevalence is highest among females aged 15-19 years. Despite long-standing recommendations directed at young, sexually active females, screening remains sub-optimal. Juvenile detention centers (JDCs) are uniquely situated to screen and treat high-risk adolescents. From 2009-2011, performance measure data on chlamydia screening coverage (proportion of eligible females screened) and positivity (proportion of females tested who were positive) were available from 126 geographically-dispersed JDCs in the United States. These facilities reported screening 55.2% of females entering the facilities (149,923), with a facility-specific median of 66.4% (range: 0-100%). Almost half (44.4%) of facilities had screening coverage levels of 75-100%. This screening resulted in the detection of 12,305 chlamydial infections, for an overall positivity of 14.7% (facility-specific median = 14.9%, range: 0-36.9%). In linear regression analysis, chlamydia positivity was inversely associated with screening coverage: as coverage increased, positivity decreased. The burden of chlamydia in JDCs is substantial; facilities should continue to deliver recommended chlamydia screening and treatment to females and identify mechanisms to increase coverage.

  6. Hurricane Public Health Research Center at Louisiana State University a Case of Academia Being Prepared

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerden, I. L.

    2006-12-01

    Recent floods along the Atlantic and Gulf seaboards and elsewhere in the world before Katrina had demonstrated the complexity of public health impacts including trauma; fires; chemical, sewerage, and corpse contamination of air and water; and diseases. We realized that Louisiana's vulnerability was exacerbated because forty percent of the state is coastal zone in which 70% of the population resides. Ninety percent of this zone is near or below sea level and protected by man-made hurricane-protection levees. New Orleans ranked among the highest in the nation with respect to potential societal, mortality, and economic impacts. Recognizing that emergency responders had in the past been unprepared for the extent of the public health impacts of these complex flooding disasters, we created a multi-disciplinary, multi-campus research center to address these issues for New Orleans. The Louisiana Board of Regents, through its millennium Health Excellence Fund, awarded a 5-year contract to the Center in 2001. The research team combined the resources of natural scientists, social scientists, engineers, and the mental health and medical communities. We met annually with a Board of Advisors, made up of federal, state, local government, and non-governmental agency officials, first responders and emergency managers. Their advice was invaluable in acquiring various datasets and directing aspects of the various research efforts. Our center developed detailed models for assessment and amelioration of public health impacts due to hurricanes and major floods. Initial research had showed that a Category 3 storm would cause levee overtopping, and that most levee systems were unprotected from the impacts of storm-induced wave erosion. Sections of levees with distinct sags suggested the beginnings of foundation and subsidence problems. We recognized that a slow moving Cat 3 could flood up to the eaves of houses and would have residence times of weeks. The resultant mix of sewage, corpses

  7. The Mississippi River in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧阳

    2014-01-01

    In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Mississippi River is not just to provide a general background, but to consti-tute the center image of the novel. It gives“form”to the whole novel, all the adventures in the book begins with the river and ends with the river. This paper talks about the important river. It is a symbol of freedom and maternity, and it has deep meaning of life and regeneration, purification and sublimation. The symbols and senses of this river deepen the theme of the novel, and prop up its broad and profound metaphorical world.

  8. “Camellia house, Jackson, Mississippi, post-1936”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl A. McHaney

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available “Camellia house, Jackson, Mississippi, post-1936,” Eudora Welty as Photographer, p. 51, with the gracious permission of the Eudora Welty Foundation“Camellia house” illustrates Welty’s aesthetic awareness of the capabilities of the camera to transform light. The black and white lines of the shadows, ceiling boards, and sky pull our eyes to the white square at the photograph’s center. Yet we are simultaneously aware of the upright poles wrapped in barbershop shadow stripes and of the gently cur...

  9. Practices And Opinions On In-Center Food Consumption Across 1,223 Facilities In The United States

    OpenAIRE

    Deborah Benner; Marcia Davis; Maria Stasios; Mary Burgess

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, the practices and opinions of healthcare providers regarding eating on dialysis are unknown. The purpose of this study was to understand healthcare provider opinions and in-center hemodialysis patient practices regarding eating while at the dialysis center. In June 2011, over 1200 registered dietitians within a large dialysis organization in the US were surveyed on current practices and opinions of patient food consumption during dialysis treatment using an online survey...

  10. Mississippi Ethanol Gasification Project, Final Scientific / Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, Larry, E.

    2007-04-30

    The Mississippi Ethanol (ME) Project is a comprehensive effort to develop the conversion of biomass to ethanol utilizing a proprietary gasification reactor technology developed by Mississippi Ethanol, LLC. Tasks were split between operation of a 1/10 scale unit at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) of Mississippi State University (MSU) and the construction, development, and operation of a full scale pilot unit located at the ME facility in Winona, Mississippi. In addition to characterization of the ME reactor gasification system, other areas considered critical to the operational and economic viability of the overall ME concept were evaluated. These areas include syngas cleanup, biological conversion of syngas to alcohol, and effects of gasification scale factors. Characterization of run data from the Pre-Pilot and Pilot Units has allowed development of the factors necessary for scale-up from the small unit to the larger unit. This scale range is approximately a factor of 10. Particulate and tar sampling gave order of magnitude values for preliminary design calculations. In addition, sampling values collected downstream of the ash removal system show significant reductions in observed loadings. These loading values indicate that acceptable particulate and tar loading rates could be attained with standard equipment additions to the existing configurations. Overall operation both the Pre-Pilot and Pilot Units proceeded very well. The Pilot Unit was operated as a system, from wood receiving to gas flaring, several times and these runs were used to address possible production-scale concerns. Among these, a pressure feed system was developed to allow feed of material against gasifier system pressure with little or no purge requirements. Similarly, a water wash system, with continuous ash collection, was developed, installed, and tested. Development of a biological system for alcohol production was conducted at Mississippi State University with

  11. An Emerging Typology of Academic Interdisciplinary Gerontology Centers in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Judith E.; Douglass, Carolinda; Johnson, Angela; Richmond, Shirley S.

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the organization, characteristics or services offered by academic interdisciplinary gerontology centers located in higher education institutions. This article presents a description and an emerging typology of academic interdisciplinary gerontology centers based on information collected from the Websites of 47 centers. The…

  12. A Survey of Digital Humanities Centers in the United States. CLIR Publication No. 143

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorich, Diane M.

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for the 2008 Scholarly Communications Institute (SCI 6) focused on humanities research centers, the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) commissioned a survey of digital humanities centers (DHCs). The immediate goals of the survey were to identify the extent of these centers and to explore their financing,…

  13. EPR characterisation of the triplet state in photosystem II reaction centers with singly reduced primary acceptor Q(A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feikema, W Onno; Gast, Peter; Klenina, Irina B; Proskuryakov, Ivan I

    2005-09-05

    The triplet states of photosystem II core particles from spinach were studied using time-resolved cw EPR technique at different reduction states of the iron--quinone complex of the reaction center primary electron acceptor. With doubly reduced primary acceptor, the well-known photosystem II triplet state characterised by zero-field splitting parameters |D|=0.0286 cm(-1), |E|=0.0044 cm(-1) was detected. When the primary acceptor was singly reduced either chemically or photochemically, a triplet state of a different spectral shape was observed, bearing the same D and E values and characteristic spin polarization pattern arising from RC radical pair recombination. The latter triplet state was strongly temperature dependent disappearing at T=100 K, and had a much faster decay than the former one. Based on its properties, this triplet state was also ascribed to the photosystem II reaction center. A sequence of electron-transfer events in the reaction centers is proposed that explains the dependence of the triplet state properties on the reduction state of the iron--quinone primary acceptor complex.

  14. Isoetes mississippiensis: A new quillwort from Mississippi, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W. Schafran

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Isoetes mississippiensis S.W. Leonard, W.C. Taylor, L.J. Musselman and R.D. Bray (Isoetaceae, Lycopodiophyta is a new species known from two sites along tributaries of the Pearl River in southern Mississippi. This species is distinguished from other species in the southeastern United States by a combination of character states including a basic diploid (2n=22 chromosome count, laevigate megaspores, and a narrow velum covering less than one-third of the adaxial sporangium wall.

  15. Isoetes mississippiensis: A new quillwort from Mississippi, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafran, Peter W.; Leonard, Steven W.; Bray, Rebecca D.; Taylor, W. Carl; Musselman, Lytton J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Isoetes mississippiensis S.W. Leonard, W.C. Taylor, L.J. Musselman and R.D. Bray (Isoetaceae, Lycopodiophyta) is a new species known from two sites along tributaries of the Pearl River in southern Mississippi. This species is distinguished from other species in the southeastern United States by a combination of character states including a basic diploid (2n=22) chromosome count, laevigate megaspores, and a narrow velum covering less than one-third of the adaxial sporangium wall. PMID:28127238

  16. Madumycin II inhibits peptide bond formation by forcing the peptidyl transferase center into an inactive state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterman, Ilya A.; Khabibullina, Nelli F.; Komarova, Ekaterina S.; Kasatsky, Pavel; Kartsev, Victor G.; Bogdanov, Alexey A.; Dontsova, Olga A.; Konevega, Andrey L.; Sergiev, Petr V.; Polikanov, Yury S. (InterBioScreen); (UIC); (MSU-Russia); (Kurchatov)

    2017-05-13

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria is limiting the effectiveness of commonly used antibiotics, which spurs a renewed interest in revisiting older and poorly studied drugs. Streptogramins A is a class of protein synthesis inhibitors that target the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) on the large subunit of the ribosome. In this work, we have revealed the mode of action of the PTC inhibitor madumycin II, an alanine-containing streptogramin A antibiotic, in the context of a functional 70S ribosome containing tRNA substrates. Madumycin II inhibits the ribosome prior to the first cycle of peptide bond formation. It allows binding of the tRNAs to the ribosomal A and P sites, but prevents correct positioning of their CCA-ends into the PTC thus making peptide bond formation impossible. We also revealed a previously unseen drug-induced rearrangement of nucleotides U2506 and U2585 of the 23S rRNA resulting in the formation of the U2506•G2583 wobble pair that was attributed to a catalytically inactive state of the PTC. The structural and biochemical data reported here expand our knowledge on the fundamental mechanisms by which peptidyl transferase inhibitors modulate the catalytic activity of the ribosome.

  17. Viral Agents of Diarrhea in Young Children in Two Primary Health Centers in Edo State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imade, Paul Erhunmwunse; Eghafona, Nosakhare Odeh

    2015-01-01

    Enteric viruses have been shown to be responsible for diarrhea among children during their early childhood. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of rotavirus, adenovirus, and norovirus infection in young children with diarrhea in two primary health centers in Edo State, Nigeria. A total of 223 stool specimens were collected from children aged 0-36 months with clinical signs of diarrhea and 59 apparently healthy age-matched children as control. These specimens were investigated for three viral agents using immunochromatographic technique (ICT). The overall results showed that at least one viral agent was detected in 95/223 (42.6%) of the children with diarrhea while the control had none. The prevalence of rotavirus was 28.3%, adenovirus 19.3%, and norovirus 3.6%. There was a significant association between age group and infection (P < 0.0001). Seasonal pattern of enteric viruses was not statistically significant (P = 0.17). The overall coinfection rate was 7.6% and rotavirus-adenovirus coinfection had the highest with 5.4%. Rotavirus was the most prevalent viral agent. Coinfections are not uncommon among the population studied. The most commonly associated clinical symptom of viral diarrhea in this study was vomiting. Viral diagnostic tests are advocated for primary health care facilities in this locality.

  18. Neonatal circumcision in severe haemophilia: a survey of paediatric haematologists at United States Hemophilia Treatment Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, S; Sharathkumar, A; Rodriguez, V; Chitlur, M; Valentino, L; Boggio, L; Gill, J

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal circumcision in patients with severe haemophilia has not been well studied. We performed a survey of paediatric haematologists from Hemophilia Treatment Centers (HTC) across the United States to better understand the attitudes toward and management of neonatal circumcision in haemophilia patients. Response rate to our survey was 40% (n = 64/159). Thirty-eight percent of respondents (n = 24) said that they would allow this procedure in the newborn period but in many cases this was against medical advice. The most reported concern regarding neonatal circumcision in haemophilia patients was the risk of development of an inhibitor (n = 25; 39%) followed by the concern for bleeding (n = 22; 34%) and issues related to vascular access in the neonate (n = 11; 17%). All respondents recommended at least one preprocedure dose of factor replacement. Twenty-two percent (n = 14) of respondents did not use more than one dose of factor replacement but 32% (n = 21) used 1-2 postoperative doses. The remainder of paediatric haematologists surveyed recommended between 3-5 (16%; n = 10) and 6-10 (3%, n = 2) additional days postoperatively. There was wide variation in both techniques of circumcision as well as adjuvant haemostatic agents used. Only 22% of respondents said that they had an established protocol for management of circumcision in the newborn haemophilia patient. These survey results highlight the need for evidence-based guidelines regarding the optimal management of circumcision in neonates with severe haemophilia.

  19. Does the United States economy affect heart failure readmissions? A single metropolitan center analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Keith A; Morrissey, Ryan P; Phan, Anita; Schwarz, Ernst R

    2012-08-01

    To determine the effects of the US economy on heart failure hospitalization rates. The recession was associated with worsening unemployment, loss of private insurance and prescription medication benefits, medication nonadherence, and ultimately increased rates of hospitalization for heart failure. We compared hospitalization rates at a large, single, academic medical center from July 1, 2006 to February 28, 2007, a time of economic stability, and July 1, 2008 to February 28, 2009, a time of economic recession in the United States. Significantly fewer patients had private medical insurance during the economic recession than during the control period (36.5% vs 46%; P = 0.04). Despite this, there were no differences in the heart failure hospitalization or readmission rates, length of hospitalization, need for admission to an intensive care unit, in-hospital mortality, or use of guideline-recommended heart failure medications between the 2 study periods. We conclude that despite significant effects on medical insurance coverage, rates of heart failure hospitalization at our institution were not significantly affected by the recession. Additional large-scale population-based research is needed to better understand the effects of fluctuations in the US economy on heart failure hospitalization rates. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Excited-State Spin Manipulation and Intrinsic Nuclear Spin Memory using Single Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Gregory

    2011-03-01

    Nitrogen vacancy (NV) center spins in diamond have emerged as a promising solid-state system for quantum information processing and precision metrology at room temperature. Understanding and developing the built-in resources of this defect center for quantum logic and memory is critical to achieving these goals. In the first case, we use nanosecond duration microwave manipulation to study the electronic spin of single NV centers in their orbital excited-state (ES). We demonstrate ES Rabi oscillations and use multi-pulse resonant control to differentiate between phonon-induced dephasing, orbital relaxation, and coherent electron-nuclear interactions. A second resource, the nuclear spin of the intrinsic nitrogen atom, may be an ideal candidate for a quantum memory due to both the long coherence of nuclear spins and their deterministic presence. We investigate coherent swaps between the NV center electronic spin state and the nuclear spin state of nitrogen using Landau-Zener transitions performed outside the asymptotic regime. The swap gates are generated using lithographically fabricated waveguides that form a high-bandwidth, two-axis vector magnet on the diamond substrate. These experiments provide tools for coherently manipulating and storing quantum information in a scalable solid-state system at room temperature. We gratefully acknowledge support from AFOSR, ARO, and DARPA.

  1. The Connecticut Mental Health Center: Celebrating 50 Years of a Successful Partnership Between the State and Yale University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Jeanne L; Anez-Nava, Luis; Baranoski, Madelon; Cole, Robert; Davidson, Larry; Delphin-Rittmon, Miriam; Dike, Charles; DiLeo, Paul J; Duman, Ronald S; Kirk, Thomas; Krystal, John; Malison, Robert T; Rohrbaugh, Robert M; Sernyak, Michael J; Srihari, Vinod; Styron, Thomas; Tebes, Jacob K; Woods, Scott; Zonana, Howard; Jacobs, Selby C

    2016-12-01

    September 28, 2016, marked the 50th anniversary of the Connecticut Mental Health Center, a state-owned and state-operated joint venture between the state and Yale University built and sustained with federal, state, and university funds. Collaboration across these entities has produced a wide array of clinical, educational, and research initiatives, a few of which are described in this column. The missions of clinical care, research, and education remain the foundation for an organization that serves 5,000 individuals each year who are poor and who experience serious mental illnesses and substance use disorders.

  2. Proposed Construction of the Madera County Educational Center in the State Center Community College District. A Report to the Governor and Legislature in Response to a Request from the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    In this report, the California Postsecondary Education Commission responds to a request by the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges to review the need for and location of a new educational center, the Madera County Educational Center, north of Fresno within the State Center Community College District. The report contains nine…

  3. Bioassessment of Hollis Creek, Oktibbeha County, Mississippi

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Physical, chemical and biological components at five stations on Hollis Creek, Oktibbeha County, Mississippi were evaluated using Rapid Bioassessment Protocols (RBP)...

  4. Middle Mississippi River Sturgeon Preliminary Contaminants Investigation

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We examined the health of forty-one wild caught sturgeon from a reach of the Mississippi River with an organochlorine consumption advisory and a reference site. The...

  5. U. Mississippi program ups physics interests

    CERN Multimedia

    Carrington, E

    2002-01-01

    The University of Mississippi is one of the 44 national sites taking part in QuarkNet, a national program that provides high school teachers with the opportunity to work with university researchers on physics research (1/2 page).

  6. Mississippi Sandhill Crane NWR Forest Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Mississippi Sandhill Crane NWR Forest Management Plan is a general plan which outlines the Refuge management objectives, forest description, forest management...

  7. North Mississippi Refuges Complex: 2001 annual narrative

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for North Mississippi Refgues (including Dahomey NWR, Tallahatchie NWR, and Coldwater River NWR) outlines activities and accomplishments...

  8. Continuing Education in Nursing Comes to Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Avis B.

    1971-01-01

    Discusses the growth and development of the Continuing Education in Nursing Department, a part of the School of Nursing at the University of Southern Mississippi. Curriculum development inservice programs, workshops, conferences. (RB)

  9. Bioassessment of Black Creek, Holmes County, Mississippi

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Physical, chemical and biological components at four stations on Black Creek and one station on Harland Creek (reference site), Holmes County, Mississippi were...

  10. Advancing user experience research to facilitate and enable patient-centered research: current state and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Philip R O

    2013-01-01

    Human-computer interaction and related areas of user experience (UX) research, such as human factors, workflow evaluation, and data visualization, are thus essential to presenting data in ways that can further the analysis of complex data sets such as those used in patient-centered research. However, a review of available data on the state of UX research as it relates to patient-centered research demonstrates a significant underinvestment and consequently a large gap in knowledge generation. In response, this report explores trends in funding and research productivity focused on UX and patient-centered research and then presents a set of recommendations to advance innovation at this important intersection point. Ultimately, the aim is to catalyze a community-wide dialogue concerning future directions for research and innovation in UX as it applies to patient-centered research.

  11. Statewide CBT Training for Clinicians and Supervisors Treating Youth: The New York State Evidence Based Treatment Dissemination Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleacher, Alissa A.; Nadeem, Erum; Moy, Amanda J.; Whited, Andria L.; Albano, Anne Marie; Radigan, Marleen; Wang, Rui; Chassman, Janet; Myrhol-Clarke, Britt; Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, several states have undertaken efforts to disseminate evidence-based treatments to agencies and clinicians in their children's service system. In New York, the Evidence Based Treatment Dissemination Center adopted a unique translation-based training and consultation model in which an initial 3-day training was combined with a year…

  12. What Can States Learn about College and Career Readiness Accountability Measures from Alternative Education? Ask the CCRS Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeds, Carinne; Malter, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    This "Ask the CCRS Center Brief" provides an overview of the accountability measures used by states and districts to assess the college and career readiness of students who are educated in alternative programs and schools (defined hereafter as "alternative settings"). Alternative settings are designed to serve at-risk students…

  13. ICA-based artifact removal diminishes scan site differences in multi-center resting-state fMRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Feis (Rogier A.); S.M. Smith (Stephen); N. Filippini (Nicola); G. Douaud (Gwenaëlle); E.G.P. Dopper (Elise); V. Heise (Verena); A.J. Trachtenberg (Aaron J.); J.C. van Swieten (John); M.A. van Buchem (Mark); S.A.R.B. Rombouts (Serge); C.E. Mackay (Clare E.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractResting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) has shown considerable promise in providing potential biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and drug response across a range of diseases. Incorporating R-fMRI into multi-center studies is becoming increasingly popular, imposing technical challenges on data acqui

  14. Fusion 2.0: The Next Generation of Fusion in California: Aligning State and Regional Fusion Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    support to the RTTACs and other stakeholders. b. Role As stated earlier in this chapter, part of the author’s selection criteria for analyzing Florida...again and bring their friends.” (Walt Disney ) Succinctly put, the way fusion centers can maintain support and sustainability in today’s political

  15. Innovation in patient-centered care: lessons from a qualitative study of innovative health care organizations in Washington State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Peter

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growing interest in the promise of patient-centered care has led to numerous health care innovations, including the patient-centered medical home, shared decision-making, and payment reforms. How best to vet and adopt innovations is an open question. Washington State has been a leader in health care reform and is a rich laboratory for patient-centered innovations. We sought to understand the process of patient-centered care innovation undertaken by innovative health care organizations – from strategic planning to goal selection to implementation to maintenance. Methods We conducted key-informant interviews with executives at five health plans, five provider organizations, and ten primary care clinics in Washington State. At least two readers of each interview transcript identified themes inductively; final themes were determined by consensus. Results Innovation in patient-centered care was a strategic objective chosen by nearly every organization in this study. However, other goals were paramount: cost containment, quality improvement, and organization survival. Organizations commonly perceived effective chronic disease management and integrated health information technology as key elements for successful patient-centered care innovation. Inertia, resource deficits, fee-for-service payment, and regulatory limits on scope of practice were cited as barriers to innovation, while organization leadership, human capital, and adaptive culture facilitated innovation. Conclusions Patient-centered care innovations reflected organizational perspectives: health plans emphasized cost-effectiveness while providers emphasized health care delivery processes. Health plans and providers shared many objectives, yet the two rarely collaborated to achieve them. The process of innovation is heavily dependent on organizational culture and leadership. Policymakers can improve the pace and quality of patient-centered innovation by setting targets

  16. Innovation in patient-centered care: lessons from a qualitative study of innovative health care organizations in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Peter; Conrad, Douglas A; Hernandez, Susan E; Watts, Carolyn; Marcus-Smith, Miriam

    2012-12-14

    Growing interest in the promise of patient-centered care has led to numerous health care innovations, including the patient-centered medical home, shared decision-making, and payment reforms. How best to vet and adopt innovations is an open question. Washington State has been a leader in health care reform and is a rich laboratory for patient-centered innovations. We sought to understand the process of patient-centered care innovation undertaken by innovative health care organizations - from strategic planning to goal selection to implementation to maintenance. We conducted key-informant interviews with executives at five health plans, five provider organizations, and ten primary care clinics in Washington State. At least two readers of each interview transcript identified themes inductively; final themes were determined by consensus. Innovation in patient-centered care was a strategic objective chosen by nearly every organization in this study. However, other goals were paramount: cost containment, quality improvement, and organization survival. Organizations commonly perceived effective chronic disease management and integrated health information technology as key elements for successful patient-centered care innovation. Inertia, resource deficits, fee-for-service payment, and regulatory limits on scope of practice were cited as barriers to innovation, while organization leadership, human capital, and adaptive culture facilitated innovation. Patient-centered care innovations reflected organizational perspectives: health plans emphasized cost-effectiveness while providers emphasized health care delivery processes. Health plans and providers shared many objectives, yet the two rarely collaborated to achieve them. The process of innovation is heavily dependent on organizational culture and leadership. Policymakers can improve the pace and quality of patient-centered innovation by setting targets and addressing conditions for innovation.

  17. A microtomography beamline at the Louisiana State University Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Kyungmin; Jin, Hua; Butler, Leslie G.; Kurtz, Richard L.

    2002-03-01

    A microtomography beamline has been recently assembled and is currently operating at the Louisiana State University's Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices synchrotron (CAMD). It has been installed on a bending magnet white-light beamline at port 7A. With the storage ring operating at 1.5 GeV, this beamline has a maximum usable x-ray energy of ˜15 keV. The instrumentation consists of computer-controlled positioning stages for alignment and rotation, a CsI(Tl) phosphor screen, a reflecting mirror, a microscope objective (1:1, 1:4), and Linux/LabVIEW-controlled charge coupled device. With the 1:4 objective, the maximum spatial resolution is 2.25 μm. The positioning and image acquisition computers communicate via transfer control protocol/internet protocol (TCP/IP). A small G4/Linux cluster has been installed for the purpose of on-site reconstruction. Instrument, alignment and reconstruction programs are written in MATLAB, IDL, and C. The applications to date are many and we present several examples. Several biological samples have been studied as part of an effort on biological visualization and computation. Future improvements to this microtomography station include the addition of a double-multilayer monochromator, allowing one to evaluate the three-dimensional elemental composition of materials. Plans also include eventual installation at the CAMD 7 T wiggler beamline, providing x rays in excess of 50 keV to provide better penetration of higher mass-density materials.

  18. Between Technological Endorsement and Resistance: The State of Online Writing Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neaderhiser, Stephen; Wolfe, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    Over the past two decades, writing centers have steadily been expanding services and materials they offer online. The way students write and communicate about their writing continues to change, and the writing center has increasingly been looked upon as a site through which technology and writing have the ability to converge in the form of…

  19. Lead, Allergen, and Pesticide Levels in Licensed Child Care Centers in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The First National Environmental Health Survey of Child Care Centers was conducted to provide information about lead, allergens, and pesticide levels in licensed U.S. child care centers. Lead levels were measured in settled dust, paint, and play area soil; indoor allergen levels ...

  20. Solid state laser employing diamond having color centers as a laser active material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rand, S.C.; De Shazer, L.G.

    1987-01-20

    A laser is described comprising: resonant cavity means for supporting coherent radiation; a diamond containing color centers as a laser active material; means for exciting the color centers to emit coherent radiation; and optical path means for providing an exit path for the radiation from the resonant cavity means.

  1. Current tobacco use trends among Mississippi public high school students: 1993-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhen; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Bo; Hirsch, Erica E; May, Warren; Hart, Roy; Bishop, Melanie; Vargas, Rodolfo L

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates trends in tobacco use based on gender, race, and grade level among Mississippi public high school students during 1993-2009. Data were obtained by combining eight weighted Mississippi Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBS). Current tobacco use (cigarette, smokeless, and cigar) was selected for investigation. During 1993-2009, the prevalence of current cigarette and cigar use among Mississippi public high school students showed a significant linear decrease (p tobacco use. Male students were more likely to be current tobacco users. White students were more likely to use cigarettes and smokeless tobacco. Programs that target male and white students on certain products such as smokeless tobacco are needed to further decrease overall tobacco use in the state.

  2. Mississippi Medical Reserve Corps: Moving Mississippi From Emergency Planning to Response Ready.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Lisa C; Fifolt, Matthew; Mercer, Caroline; Pevear, Jesse; Wilson, Jonathan

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that might impact a Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) volunteer's decision to respond to an emergency event. The 2 primary goals of this survey were to (1) establish realistic planning assumptions regarding the use of volunteers in health care emergency responses, and (2) determine whether barriers to volunteer participation could be addressed by MRC units to improve volunteer response rates. An anonymous online survey instrument was made available via Qualtrics through a customized URL. For the purpose of distribution, the Mississippi State Department of Health sent an electronic message that included the survey link to all MRC volunteers who were registered with the Mississippi Responder Management System (MRMS) as of September 2014. Approximately 15% of those surveyed indicated they would be available and able to deploy within 24 hours. The most common factors reported in terms of respondent decisions to deploy included risk to personal health (61.2%), length of deployment (58.8%), and the security of the deployment area (55.3%). In addition, 67% of respondents indicated that extended periods of deployment would have a negative financial impact on their lives. Respondents who have had training or previous deployment experience reported having greater knowledge of potential response roles, increased comfort in their ability to respond with the MRC, and increased confidence in responding to differing public health emergencies. Barriers to MRC volunteers being able to deploy should be addressed by each MRC unit. Issues such as risk to personal safety while on deployment, site security, and length of deployment should be considered by planners and those solutions communicated to MRC members during trainings. Emergency plans utilizing MRC volunteers will require significant evaluation to assess the risk of relying on an expected resource that could be severely limited during an actual emergency.

  3. Geodatabase of the datasets used to represent the four subunits of the Southeastern Coastal Plain aquifer system, Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Tennessee

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase includes spatial datasets that represent the Southeastern Coastal Plain aquifer system in the States of Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, South...

  4. Step-based translation of physical activity guidelines in the Lower Mississippi Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine how many steps/day equate to current moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) guidelines in a population from the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) of the United States, 58 overweight adults wore an Actigraph accelerometer (GT3X) for up to two weeks. Minutes/day in MVPA was a good pred...

  5. Mississippi Communities for Healthy Living: Results of a 6-month nutrition education comparative effectiveness trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) region suffers from high prevalence of chronic health conditions with nutritional etiologies, including obesity, high cholesterol, hypertension, and diabetes. Responding to the need for effective nutrition interventions in the LMD, a 2-arm, 6-month, n...

  6. Productivity, Oil Content and Composition of Two Spearmint Species in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    'Scotch’ (Mentha x gracilis Sole) and ‘Native’ (Mentha spicata L.) spearmints are grown in the northern United States, but have not been evaluated in the Southeast. Two-year field studies were conducted in Mississippi at two locations (Verona and Stoneville) to evaluate the effects of N application ...

  7. Longitudinal variation and response to anthropogenic stress in diatom assemblages of the Lower Mississippi River, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Lower Mississippi River (LMR), below the confluence with the Ohio River, drains over 40% of the continental United States and is an important resource for anthropogenic and biotic use, both within the system and in the receiving Gulf of Mexico. As part of the National Rivers ...

  8. First Report of Soybean Pest, Euschistus quadrator (Hempitera: Pentatomidae) in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we report on the first state and county record of Euschistus quadrator Ralston (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in Washington County, Mississippi. The species has been documented from Honduras to Virginia primarily on soybeans, cotton, various row crops, fruit, and non-crop hosts. The local impact...

  9. Yield and Oil Composition of Thirty-Eight Basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) Accessions Grown in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) has been grown as an essential oil crop in many countries; however, the herbage yield, oil content, composition, and bioactivity of basil grown in Mississippi and other Southern U.S. states has not been explored. The hypothesis of this study was that certain basil ...

  10. 2005 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Cosmetology. (Program CIP: 12.0401 - Cosmetology/Cosmetologist, General)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanon, Rouser; Farmer, Helen

    2005-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  11. Hypoxia Adjacent to the Mississippi River Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabalais, N. N.; Turner, R. E.

    2005-05-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico receives the freshwater and constituent flux from the Mississippi River, which integrates 40% of the lower 48 United States. In the last half of the 20th century, the flux of nitrogen tripled, phosphorus concentration appears to have increased, and silicate concentration decreased. These changes result from landscape alterations over two centuries with an intensification of human activities that increased the flux of nitrogen and phosphorus particularly in the 1960s to 1980s. Evidence for eutrophication in the coastal ecosystem includes an increase in algal biomass, carbon accumulation from nutrient-enhanced production, worsening oxygen deficiency in the lower water column, and shifts in food web structure. The extent of the oxygen deficiency reaches 20,000 km2 of the inner continental shelf over long periods in summer with the potential for affecting commercially important fisheries in the Gulf. There is daily, weekly and seasonal variability in currents and stratification on the shelf and, therefore, no simple description of the couplings between nutrient delivery, carbon production in surface waters and delivery to and cycling in bottom waters. There are, however, multiple lines of evidence to implicate changes in riverine nutrient loads with overall primary and secondary production, carbon accumulation at the seabed, and low oxygen conditions on the shelf. The change in nutrient loads and responses of the northern Gulf coastal ecosystem, including widespread, severe seasonal hypoxia, parallel similar conditions in the coastal ocean on a global scale.

  12. Effects of non-idealities and quantization of the center of mass motion on symmetric and asymmetric collective states in a collective state atomic interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Resham; Kim, May E.; Fang, Renpeng; Tu, Yanfei; Shahriar, Selim M.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the behavior of an ensemble of ? non-interacting, identical atoms excited by a laser. In general, the ?-th atom sees a Rabi frequency ?, an initial position dependent laser phase ?, and a motion induced Doppler shift of ?. When ? or ? is distinct for each atom, the system evolves into a superposition of ? intercoupled states, of which there are ? symmetric and ? asymmetric collective states. For a collective state atomic interferometer (COSAIN), we recently proposed, it is important to understand the behavior of all the collective states under various conditions. In this paper, we show how to formulate the properties of these states under various non-idealities, and use this formulation to understand the dynamics thereof. We also consider the effect of treating the center of mass degree of freedom of the atoms quantum mechanically on the description of the collective states, illustrating that it is indeed possible to construct a generalized collective state, as needed for the COSAIN, when each atom is assumed to be in a localized wave packet. The analysis presented in this paper is important for understanding the dynamics of the COSAIN, and will help advance the analysis and optimization of spin squeezing in the presence of practically unavoidable non-idealities as well as in the domain where the center of mass motion of the atoms is quantized.

  13. Luminescence and excited state dynamics of Bi{sup 3+} centers in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babin, V. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16200 Prague (Czech Republic); Chernenko, K., E-mail: nuclearphys@yandex.ru [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University, Polytekhnicheskaya 29, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lipińska, L. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wólczyńska 133, 01919 Warsaw (Poland); Mihokova, E.; Nikl, M. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16200 Prague (Czech Republic); Schulman, L.S. [Physics Department, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699-5820 (United States); Shalapska, T. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Suchocki, A. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Physics, University of Bydgoszcz, Weyssenhoffa 11, 85072 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Zazubovich, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Zhydachevskii, Ya. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Lviv Polytechnic National University, Bandera 12, 79646 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2015-11-15

    Photoluminescence of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Bi nanopowder synthesized by the modified sol–gel method is studied using time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy in the 4.2–300 K temperature range. Bi{sup 3+} ions are substituted for Y{sup 3+} ions in two different crystal lattice sites, one having S{sub 6} symmetry (Bi(S{sub 6})) and the other C{sub 2} symmetry (Bi(C{sub 2})). The luminescence characteristics of these two centers are found to have strongly different electron–phonon interactions. The luminescence of Bi(S{sub 6}) and Bi(C{sub 2}) centers peak at 3.04 eV and 2.41 eV, respectively, and arise from the radiative decay of the triplet relaxed excited state (RES) of Bi{sup 3+} ions. The model and structure of the RES, responsible for the luminescence of Bi(S{sub 6}) and Bi(C{sub 2}) centers in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Bi, as well as radiative and nonradiative processes, taking place in the excited states of these centers, are investigated. The parameters of the triplet RES (the separation between the metastable and radiative levels and probabilities of radiative and nonradiative transitions from these levels) are determined. Low-temperature quenching of the triplet luminescence of these centers is explained by nonradiative quantum tunneling transitions from the metastable minima of their triplet RES to closely located defect- or exciton-related levels. - Highlights: • Photoluminescence of Bi{sup 3+} centers of two types in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Bi is investigated. • Bi(S{sub 6}) and Bi(C{sub 2}) centers reveal strongly different electron–phonon interaction. • Radiative and nonradiative processes in their triplet excited states are clarified. • Low-temperature luminescence quenching in Bi(S{sub 6}) and Bi(C{sub 2}) centers is studied. • New fast weak ≈2.9 eV emission is suggested to arise from Bi(C{sub 2}) centers.

  14. A Survey of Intravenous Remifentanil Use for Labor Analgesia at Academic Medical Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaronson, Jaime; Abramovitz, Sharon; Smiley, Richard; Tangel, Virginia; Landau, Ruth

    2017-04-01

    Remifentanil is most commonly offered when neuraxial labor analgesia is contraindicated. There is no consensus regarding the optimal administration, dosing strategy, or requirements for maternal monitoring, which may pose a patient safety issue. This exploratory survey evaluated the current practices regarding remifentanil use for labor analgesia at academic centers in the United States. Of 126 obstetric anesthesia directors surveyed, 84 (67%) responded. In 2014 to 2015, an estimated 36% (95% confidence interval: 25.7-46.3) of centers used remifentanil, most of which did so less than 5 times. Some serious maternal and neonatal respiratory complications occurred, emphasizing that clinical protocols and adequate monitoring are key to ensure maternal and neonatal safety.

  15. Planning and acquiring a national center for the United States Geological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, William A.

    1993-01-01

    In August 1973, the U.S. Geological Survey moved its first group of employees into the John Wesley Powell Federal Building of its newly constructed National Center at Reston, Virginia. The move signaled the fruition of more than 20 years of dedicated planning and work following World War II, to consolidate the agency's widespread activities into one location, which could truly serve as a national center.

  16. Sensitivity of Hurricane Storm Surge to Land Cover and Topography Under Various Sea Level Rise Scenarios Along the Mississippi Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilskie, M. V.; Hagen, S. C.; Medeiros, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Major Gulf hurricanes have a high probability of impacting the northern Gulf of Mexico, especially coastal Mississippi (Resio, 2007). Due to the wide and flat continental shelf, this area provides near-perfect geometry for high water levels under tropical cyclone conditions. Literature suggests with 'very high confidence that global sea level will rise at least 0.2 m and no more than 2.0 m by 2011' (Donoghue, 2011; Parris et al., 2012). Further, it is recognized that the Mississippi barrier islands are highly susceptible to a westward migration and retreating shoreline. With predictions for less frequent, more intense tropical storms, rising sea levels, and a changing landscape, it is important to understand how these changes may affect inundation extent and flooding due to hurricane storm surge. A state-of-the-art SWAN+ADCIRC hydrodynamic model of coastal Mississippi was utilized to simulate Hurricane Katrina with present day sea level conditions. Using present day as a base scenario, past (1960) and future (2050) sea level changes were simulated. In addition to altering the initial sea state, land use land cover (LULC) was modified for 1960 and 2050 based on historic data and future projections. LULC datasets are used to derive surface roughness characteristics, such as Manning's n, and wind reduction factors. The topography along the barrier islands and near the Pascagoula River, MS was also altered to reflect the 1960 landscape. Storm surge sensitivity to topographic change were addressed by comparing model results between two 1960 storm surge simulations; one with current topography and a second with changes to the barrier islands. In addition, model responses to changes in LULC are compared. The results will be used to gain insight into adapting present day storm surge models for future conditions. References Donoghue, J. (2011). Sea level history of the northern Gulf of Mexico coast and sea level rise scenarios for the near future. Climatic Change, 107

  17. ICA-based artifact removal diminishes scan site differences in multi-center resting-state fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogier Alexander Feis

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI has shown considerable promise in providing potential biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and drug response across a range of diseases. Incorporating R-fMRI into multi-center studies is becoming increasingly popular, imposing technical challenges on data acquisition and analysis, as fMRI data is particularly sensitive to structured noise resulting from hardware, software and environmental differences. Here, we investigated whether a novel clean up tool for structured noise was capable of reducing center-related R-fMRI differences between healthy subjects.We analyzed 3 Tesla R-fMRI data from 72 subjects, half of whom were scanned with eyes closed in a Philips Achieva system in The Netherlands, and half of whom were scanned with eyes open in a Siemens Trio system in the UK. After pre-statistical processing and individual Independent Component Analysis (ICA, FMRIB’s ICA-based X-noiseifier (FIX was used to remove noise components from the data. GICA and dual regression were run and non-parametric statistics were used to compare spatial maps between groups before and after applying FIX.Large significant differences were found in all resting-state networks between study sites before using FIX, most of which were reduced to non-significant after applying FIX. The between-center difference in the medial/primary visual network, presumably reflecting a between-center difference in protocol, remained statistically different.FIX helps facilitate multi-center R-fMRI research by diminishing structured noise from R-fMRI data. In doing so, it improves combination of existing data from different centers in new settings and comparison of rare diseases and risk genes for which adequate sample size remains a challenge.

  18. ICA-based artifact removal diminishes scan site differences in multi-center resting-state fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feis, Rogier A.; Smith, Stephen M.; Filippini, Nicola; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Dopper, Elise G. P.; Heise, Verena; Trachtenberg, Aaron J.; van Swieten, John C.; van Buchem, Mark A.; Rombouts, Serge A. R. B.; Mackay, Clare E.

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) has shown considerable promise in providing potential biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and drug response across a range of diseases. Incorporating R-fMRI into multi-center studies is becoming increasingly popular, imposing technical challenges on data acquisition and analysis, as fMRI data is particularly sensitive to structured noise resulting from hardware, software, and environmental differences. Here, we investigated whether a novel clean up tool for structured noise was capable of reducing center-related R-fMRI differences between healthy subjects. We analyzed three Tesla R-fMRI data from 72 subjects, half of whom were scanned with eyes closed in a Philips Achieva system in The Netherlands, and half of whom were scanned with eyes open in a Siemens Trio system in the UK. After pre-statistical processing and individual Independent Component Analysis (ICA), FMRIB's ICA-based X-noiseifier (FIX) was used to remove noise components from the data. GICA and dual regression were run and non-parametric statistics were used to compare spatial maps between groups before and after applying FIX. Large significant differences were found in all resting-state networks between study sites before using FIX, most of which were reduced to non-significant after applying FIX. The between-center difference in the medial/primary visual network, presumably reflecting a between-center difference in protocol, remained statistically significant. FIX helps facilitate multi-center R-fMRI research by diminishing structured noise from R-fMRI data. In doing so, it improves combination of existing data from different centers in new settings and comparison of rare diseases and risk genes for which adequate sample size remains a challenge. PMID:26578859

  19. ATM Coastal Topography-Mississippi, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Mississippi coastline, from Lakeshore to Petit Bois Island, acquired September 9-10, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative scanning lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS

  20. Preliminary assessment of nuclear energy centers and energy systems complexes in the western United States. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottlieb, P.; Robinson, J.H.; Smith, D.R.

    1978-02-01

    The Nuclear Energy Center siting opportunities in the eleven western states have been systematically examined. The study area has been divided into 10-mile by 10-mile grid cells, and each cell has been evaluated in terms of overall suitability and site-related costs. Composite suitability consists of a weighted sum of ten important nuclear power plant siting issues; the particular weights used for this study were decided by a Delphi session of twenty individuals with energy facility siting expertise, with at least one representative from each of the eleven western states. Site-related costs consist of the additional expenditures required for seismic hardening (in seismically active areas), electric power transmission lines (for sites significantly far from load centers), and wet/dry cooling system costs (limited water availability and/or high summer temperatures).

  1. Organizational structure and operation of defense/aerospace information centers in the United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, H. E.; Lushina, L. N.

    1983-01-01

    U.S. Government aerospace and defense information centers are addressed. DTIC and NASA are described in terms of their history, operational authority, information services provided, user community, sources of information collected, efforts under way to improve services, and external agreements regarding the exchange of documents and/or data bases. Contents show how DTIC and NASA provide aerospace/defense information services in support of U.S. research and development efforts. In a general introduction, the importance of scientific and technical information and the need for information centers to acquire, handle, and disseminate it are stressed.

  2. 76 FR 336 - Notice of NEPA Public Scoping Meeting Information for the Great Lakes and Mississippi River...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... conducting a feasibility study of the options and technologies that could be applied to prevent aquatic.... Thursday, February 10, 2011: Vicksburg Convention Center, 1600 Mulberry Street, Vicksburg, MS. Please see... Lakes and Mississippi River Interbasin Study (``GLMRIS'') AGENCY: Department of the Army, U.S. Army...

  3. Evaluation of the Color Me Healthy Program in Influencing Nutrition and Physical Activity in Mississippi Preschool Child Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huye, Holly F.; Bankston, Sarah; Speed, Donna; Molaison, Elaine F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the level of implementation and perceived value in creating knowledge and behavior change from the Color Me Healthy (CMH) training program in child care centers, family day carehomes, or Head Start facilities throughout Mississippi. Methods: A two-phase survey was used to initially…

  4. Modeling the Response of Primary Production and Sedimentation to Variable Nitrate Loading in the Mississippi River Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-06

    USA d Department of Marine Science, University of Southern Mississippi, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529, USA ARTICLE INFO ABSTRACT Article history ...The non-diatom KNH, + +H phytoplanktonic group covers all non-siliceous forms including cyanobacteria , flagellates, and dinoflagellates, although in the

  5. ICA-based artifact removal diminishes scan site differences in multi-center resting-state fMRI

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) has shown considerable promise in providing potential biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and drug response across a range of diseases. Incorporating R-fMRI into multi-center studies is becoming increasingly popular, imposing technical challenges on data acquisition and analysis, as fMRI data is particularly sensitive to structured noise resulting from hardware, software, and environmental differences. Here, we investigated whether a novel clean up tool for structu...

  6. ICA-based artifact removal diminishes scan site differences in multi-center resting-state fMRI.

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) has shown considerable promise in providing potential biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and drug response across a range of diseases. Incorporating R-fMRI into multi-center studies is becoming increasingly popular, imposing technical challenges on data acquisition and analysis, as fMRI data is particularly sensitive to structured noise resulting from hardware, software and environmental differences. Here, we investigated whether a novel clean up tool for structur...

  7. Attitudes and Behavior of Nurses in State and Private Hospitals with Respect to Family-Centered Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şadiye Dur

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The study was conducted as descriptive research for purpose of comparing the attitudes of nurses working at private and state hospitals with respect to the concept of having parents participate in the care of their children. Materials and Methods: The universe of the descriptive research comprised 70 nurses working at two state hospitals and one private hospital in city center of Istanbul, between the dates May 1-June 30, 2013. As data collection tools, two forms, namely a Nurses Information Form and a Parent Participation Attitude Scale (PPAS were used in the research. The lowest possible score on the scale is 24; the highest 120. The higher scores on the scale indicate more positive attitudes about having parents participate in the care given to their children. The data were analyzed in terms of numbers, percentages and means. Results: The nurses in the study were found to have similar identifying characteristics (p>0.05. They were asked whether they knew about family-centered care, 64.3% said they were familiar with the subject; when the source of their knowledge was queried, 34.8% stated that they had been informed through scientific publications and courses they took during their professional training. Of the nurses, 54.3% were found to display total parent participation attitude scores of 84 and above. In the evaluation of the PPAS scores of the nurses in terms of the hospital they worked, the scores of nurses working at state hospitals (85.67±6.17 were significantly more positive than the scores of the nurses working at the private hospital (81.88±5.26 (p<0.05. Conclusions: The accepting attitudes of nurses regarding the family-centered care approach indicated that nurses with higher level of education had opportunity to benefit from the focus placed on family-centered care in graduate nursing school programs and that had positive effect on their attitudes.

  8. The Center for the Holographic Arts Begins a New Artist Workshop and Residency Program in Conjunction with Ohio State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrongovius, Martina; Kagan, Harris; Moree, Sam

    2013-02-01

    This year the Center for the Holographic Arts (Holocenter) kicked off a new Artist Workshop and Residency Program in conjunction with Ohio State University. The newly renovated holography facility houses the Holocenter's pulse laser camera and two recording tables with continuous wave lasers. This facility is being utilized for undergraduate and postgraduate courses in Art and Technology as well as the Artist Workshop and Residency Program.

  9. 75 FR 5071 - Mississippi L&D 21, LLC, Mississippi River No. 21 Hydropower Company Lock + TM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Mississippi L&D 21, LLC, Mississippi River No. 21 Hydropower Company Lock... No. 21 Hydropower Company (Hydropower Company) filed an application for a preliminary permit for the proposed Mississippi River No. 21 Hydropower Project No. 13637. On January 8, 2010, Lock + TM Hydro Friends...

  10. The state of client-centered public service delivery in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; de Vries, Sjoerd A.; van der Geest, Thea; van Dijk, Johannes A.G.M.; Arendsen, R.; Wimmer, Maria A.; Scholl, Hans J.; Janssen, Marijn; Traunmüller, Roland

    2009-01-01

    Businesses and citizens demand a better and more client-centered way of service delivery from public organizations. As society becomes more complex, dynamic and diverse, public organizations need to adapt to this demand. Conversely, our perception is that public organizations might still treat their

  11. The state of client-centered public service delivery in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Jurjen; Vries, de Sjoerd; Geest, van der Thea; Dijk, van Jan; Wimmer, Maria A.; Scholl, Hans J.; Janssen, Marijn; Traunmüller, Roland

    2009-01-01

    Businesses and citizens demand a better and more client-centered way of service delivery from public organizations. As society becomes more complex, dynamic and diverse, public organizations need to adapt to this demand. Conversely, our perception is that public organizations might still treat their

  12. Information Centers in the United States Army: Movement Toward Maturity Through Strategic Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    civilian retirement plans with those of government employees. C. AGE ()! THE INFORMATION CENTER September 1985 marked the birth of tb, Army information...SUPPORTED PRODUCT LOTUS -- DBASE II1+ ENABLE MULTIMATE *I WORDSTAR WORDPERFECT PROCOMM CROSSTALK - HARVARD GRAPHICS SMARTCOMM FREELANCE PLUS PAGEMAKER

  13. Responses of Bats to Forest Fragmentation in the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley, Arkansas, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Risch, Thomas S.; Karen F. Gaines; Connior, Matthew B.; Rex E. Medlin

    2010-01-01

    Intense conversion of bottomland hardwood forests to rice and soybeans in the Mississippi River Valley of Arkansas has restricted the remaining forest to isolated fragments. Habitat fragmentation has proven to be detrimental to population sustainability of several species, and is the subject of intense study with often species and latitude specific responses. We compared both coarse land area classes and landscape fragmentation metrics from six 30 km × 30 km subsets centered on publicly owned...

  14. Perceptions versus Realities: Exploring Needs and Science Learning Outcomes In the Mississippi Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitts, Lacey S.

    The Mississippi Delta (MS Delta) is a high-poverty region in northwestern Mississippi located between the Mississippi and Yazoo rivers. The Delta is home to sixteen rural counties with over seventy failing or underperforming schools. Many of these schools lack the resources necessary to ensure adequate opportunities for all students. Learning outcomes for the state are among the lowest in the nation, and scores in the rural Delta are far below the state average. Graduating seniors take the ACT college entrance exam, with about 10% of Mississippi seniors scoring as "college-ready" in science. The region has a critical shortage of science teachers, and many schools do not offer advanced science courses. This study assessed teachers' needs, identified key characteristics of the secondary science programs in which they teach, and sought to understand conditions affecting science learning outcomes. An inventory of science teachers' needs was administered to teachers in the region. The greatest needs were material resources, high quality training, and strategies for improving poor reading and problem-solving skills of students. Of the factors examined, the percentage of students receiving free lunch had the strongest correlation with science learning outcomes in the school, higher than access to resources, number of science courses offered, and level of self-reported teacher need. A three-tiered approach to improving science learning outcomes has been developed, emphasizing community relationships, targeted professional development, and relevant science curriculum.

  15. Stennis Space Center observes 2009 Energy Awareness Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Stennis Space Center employees Maria Etheridge (l to r), Linda Sauland Maurice Prevost visit a Coast Electric Power Association display featuring energy-efficient light bulbs during 2009 Energy Awareness Day activities on Oct. 20. The exhibit was one of several energy-efficiency and energy-awareness displays on-site for employees to visit. Vendors included Mississippi Power Company, Coast Electric Power Association, Mississippi Development Authority - Energy Division,Jacobs FOSC Environmental, Southern Energy Technologies, and Siemens Building Technologies.

  16. Center for information management and intelligence of the School of Public Legal Defense of the State of Bahia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Coelho Neves

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experience report about the implementation of the Center for Information Management and Intelligence administered by the Library of the Public Defender of the State of Bahia. The Center aims to corroborate the information stock, based on capturing the tacit knowledge of public Defenders of DPE. Aspires to social inclusion and the preservation of memory used in human rights activities defensoriais developed. The biggest benefit of creating the Center for Information Management and Intelligence is to provide the availability of information gained by the defenders in a structured way, to all persons interested in the topics defensoriais seized through legal experiences, conferences, training courses, seminars, workshops , Among others. The Center for Information Management and Intelligence of the DPE Library is an important way to efficiently connect "those who know" with those who "need to know" and converting personal knowledge into the organization's memory. For this, the proposal develops the collection, storage, management and dissemination of knowledge with a methodology based on models of the authors Nonaka and Takeuchi, with the help of teenagers "apprentices" in fulfillment of socio-educational measure the Mother City Foundation.

  17. Comparison of mental health, happiness, and emotion control with adolescents’ residential centers of state welfare organization and family reared adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Bawi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Many research indicated that adolescents’ residential centers have the high possibility to diagnose with psychological disorders. Therefore, the aim of this study was investigated the mental health, happiness and emotion control among adolescents’ residential centers of state welfare organization.Materials and Methods: This research is a causal –comparative research. The 80 adolescents’ residential centers were chosen through available sampling and 80 adolescents of schools of Alborz city were selected through cluster method. Statistical analysis was conducted by using the independent t-test. The research instruments were Emotion Control Questionnaire (ECQ, General Health Questionnaire (GHQ, Goldenberg, and Oxford Happiness Inventory (OHI.Results: The significantly different was observed in mental health, happiness and emotion control between two adolescents groups (p<0.05.Conclusion: The results indicate that the institutional-reared decrease the level of mental health, happiness and emotion control in adolescents. Thus, counselors should be considered these factors in therapeutic intervention to enhancing the mental health of adolescents’ residential centers.

  18. Notes from the Field: Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) Exposures Reported to Poison Centers - United States, 2010-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Mehruba; Law, Royal; Schier, Josh

    2016-07-29

    Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a plant consumed throughout the world for its stimulant effects and as an opioid substitute (1). It is typically brewed into a tea, chewed, smoked, or ingested in capsules (2). It is also known as Thang, Kakuam, Thom, Ketum, and Biak (3). The Drug Enforcement Administration includes kratom on its Drugs of Concern list (substances that are not currently regulated by the Controlled Substances Act, but that pose risks to persons who abuse them), and the National Institute of Drug Abuse has identified kratom as an emerging drug of abuse (3,4). Published case reports have associated kratom exposure with psychosis, seizures, and deaths (5,6). Because deaths have been attributed to kratom in the United States (7), some jurisdictions have passed or are considering legislation to make kratom use a felony (8). CDC characterized kratom exposures that were reported to poison centers and uploaded to the National Poison Data System (NPDS) during January 2010-December 2015. The NPDS is a national database of information logged by the country's regional poison centers serving all 50 United States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico and is maintained by the American Association of Poison Control Centers. NPDS case records are the result of call reports made by the public and health care providers.

  19. Potential for Photovoltaic Solar Installation in Non-Irrigated Corners of Center Pivot Irrigation Fields in the State of Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, B.

    2011-07-01

    The State of Colorado expressed an interest in assessing the potential for photovoltaic (PV) solar installations on non-irrigated corners of center-pivot irrigation (CPI) fields throughout the state. Using aerial imagery and irrigated land data available from the Colorado Water Conservation Board, an assessment of potentially suitable sites was produced. Productivity estimates were calculated from that assessment. The total area of non-irrigated corners of CPI fields in Colorado was estimated to be 314,674 acres, which could yield 223,418 acres of installed PV panels assuming 71% coverage in triangular plots. The total potential annual electricity production for the state was estimated to be 56,821 gigawatt hours (GWH), with an average of 1.3 GWH per available plot.

  20. Planning and creating a new bi-state nursing workforce center through unique partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Susan R; McEniry, Mary; Cox, Karen S; Olney, Adrienne

    2009-09-01

    Multiple strategies are needed to address the complex issues related to the nursing shortage. It is not enough to focus on increasing the number of students in the pipeline unless this is met with complimentary work to improve the professional practice environments of nursing staff. In addition, nurse-driven improvement projects that address specific patient and organizational outcomes will elevate the role of nurses from trusted professional to quality agents. The authors describe a partnership that has launched a new type of workforce center with core missions to create work environment improvements and point-of-care change led by staff nurses.

  1. Endoparasites of horses from the Formiga city, located in center-west region of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weslen Fabricio Pires Teixeira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of studying the endoparasite fauna of horses from the Formiga city, located in center-west region of the state of Minas Gerais, 25 animals that were naturally infected with helminths were evaluated. By means of parasitological necropsies, different endoparasites were found. The subfamily Cyathostominae presented the highest incidence, followed by Trichostrongylus axei, Oxyuris equi, Triodontophorus serratus, Strongyloides westeri, Strongylus edentatus, Habronema muscae, Parascaris equorum, Probstmayria vivipara, Strongylus vulgaris, Gasterophilus nasalis, Anoplocephala magna and Anoplocephala perfoliata. In the present study, if the species Probstmayria vivipara was not considered in the prevalence, the frequency of Cyathostominae was equivalent to 94.85%. The results obtained in this study allowed us to detect and identify different species of helminths in horses, and confirmed the high incidence of nematodes belonging to the subfamily Cyathostominae in the center-west region of Minas Gerais.

  2. An Analysis of Information Technology Adoption by IRBs of Large Academic Medical Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shan; Botkin, Jeffrey R; Hurdle, John F

    2015-02-01

    The clinical research landscape has changed dramatically in recent years in terms of both volume and complexity. This poses new challenges for Institutional Review Boards' (IRBs) review efficiency and quality, especially at large academic medical centers. This article discusses the technical facets of IRB modernization. We analyzed the information technology used by IRBs in large academic institutions across the United States. We found that large academic medical centers have a high electronic IRB adoption rate; however, the capabilities of electronic IRB systems vary greatly. We discuss potential use-cases of a fully exploited electronic IRB system that promise to streamline the clinical research work flow. The key to that approach utilizes a structured and standardized information model for the IRB application.

  3. State of spirituality-infused mental health services in Los Angeles County wellness and client-run centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Ann-Marie; Subica, Andrew M; Kim, Min Ah; Van Nguyen, Kevin; Lim, Caroline S; Mancuso, Laura L

    2014-11-01

    Spiritual coping is associated with positive mental health outcomes for individuals with serious mental illness, yet spirituality-infused services are seldom offered in public sector mental health agencies. The Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health introduced a policy addressing spirituality in 2012. This study explored the breadth and degree to which spirituality-infused activities were being offered in 53 Los Angeles wellness and recovery centers after the policy was widely disseminated. More than 98 % of the centers offered options for spirituality-infused activities; one-third offered spirituality-focused groups. Los Angeles's progress may guide implementation of spirituality-infused services in other state or local public mental health systems.

  4. Emergency Operations Center ribbon cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Center Director Gene Goldman and special guests celebrate the opening of the site's new Emergency Operations Center on June 2. Participants included (l t r): Steven Cooper, deputy director of the National Weather Service Southern Region; Tom Luedtke, NASA associate administrator for institutions and management; Charles Scales, NASA associate deputy administrator; Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour; Gene Goldman, director of Stennis Space Center; Jack Forsythe, NASA assistant administrator for the Office of Security and Program Protection; Dr. Richard Williams, NASA chief health and medical officer; and Weldon Starks, president of Starks Contracting Company Inc. of Biloxi.

  5. Future Earth Coasts: The Mississippi and Yangtze Rivers as Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Elia, C.; Xu, K.; Chen, Z.; Day, J.; Le Tissier, M.

    2016-02-01

    Deltas and estuaries are productive and fertile links between the land and the sea. Deltas occupy only about 5% of the Earth's surface but sustain over a half billion people all around the world. Many river deltas are endangered because of extensive dam and levee construction, declining sediment supply, groundwater withdrawal, relative sea level rise and severe coastal erosion, leading to a variety of threats to natural, economic and social systems. About 630 million people now live at an elevation of 10 m or less above mean sea level, and maintaining sustainable land with a rising sea will be a challenging problem for many major deltaic coasts and cities in the next century. Stemming from 20 years of LOICZ (Land-Ocean Interactions in the Coastal Zone), Future Earth Coasts is a new global initiative that seeks to enable the scientific and social scientific communities to build knowledge through collaborative processes to better understand and address the profound and urgent changes occurring in vulnerable coastal zones. The topics of this comparative study are the Mississippi and Yangtze (Changjiang) Rivers, the largest in the United States and China, respectively. We use these two rivers as examples to evaluate current conditions and catalyze future discussion. The Mississippi and Yangtze both have had long-term observations of physical and biological processes that affect human activities, making it possible to quantify both natural and anthropogenic impacts. We also consider the limits to concept of sustainability for the Earth's biosphere and human civilization, and emphasize biophysical constraints and demographic challenges.

  6. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Mississippi and Florida airborne survey, Helena quadrangle of Arkansas, Mississippi and Tennessee. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    The Helena quadrangle covers a region largely within the Mississippi River flood plain in the extreme northern Gulf Coastal Province. Tertiary sediments in this area are relatively thick, and overlie a Paleozoic basin gradually shoaling to the northeast. The Oachita Tectonic Zone strikes southeasterly through the center of the quadrangle. The exposed sequence is almost entirely Quaternary sediments of the flood plain area. Older Cenozoic deposits crop out in upland areas on the west side of the river valley. A search of available literature revealed no known uranium deposits. Sixty uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly. None were considered significant, and all appeared to occur as the result of cultural and/or weather effects. Magnetic data appear to be in agreement with existing structural interpretations of the region.

  7. 78 FR 25336 - Mississippi Disaster # MS-00066

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Mississippi Disaster MS-00066 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Application Deadline Date: 01/21/2014. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small...

  8. Hurricane Katrina impacts on Mississippi forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonja N. Oswalt; Christopher Oswalt; Jeffery Turner

    2008-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina triggered public interest and concern for forests in Mississippi that required rapid responses from the scientific community. A uniform systematic sample of 3,590 ground plots were established and measured in 687 days immediately after the impact of Hurricane Katrina on the Gulf Coast. The hurricane damaged an estimated 521 million trees with more...

  9. Mississippi Business and Technology Framework, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The primary purpose of the 2004 Mississippi Business and Technology Framework is to promote business and economic literacy, both successful domestic and international functioning, diverse practice of interpersonal, teamwork, and leadership skills, technology as a tool for managing information, and lifelong learning skills that foster flexible…

  10. Notes from the field: carbon monoxide exposures reported to poison centers and related to hurricane Sandy - Northeastern United States, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    Hurricane Sandy made landfall as a post-tropical cyclone along the coast of southern New Jersey on Monday, October 29, 2012. In the wake of Sandy, state and federal public health agencies have observed an increase in the number of exposures to carbon monoxide (CO) reported to poison centers. CO is imperceptible and can cause adverse health effects ranging from fatigue and headache to cardiorespiratory failure, coma, and death. CO poisoning is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in post-disaster situations, when widespread power outages occur and risky behaviors, such as improper placement of generators and indoor use of charcoal grills, increase.

  11. Water-quality data for selected streams in the Mississippi Alluvial Plain ecoregion, northwestern Mississippi, September – October 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Matthew B.; Stocks, Shane J.

    2010-01-01

    From September through October 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, collected and analyzed water-quality samples from streams in the Yazoo River basin within the Mississippi Alluvial Plain ecoregion in northwestern Mississippi. Water-quality samples were collected at 56 sites in the study area and analyzed for various physical and chemical characteristics including, but not limited to, suspended sediment, nutrients, and chlorophyll a. Additionally, water temperature, pH, specific conductance, and dissolved oxygen data were measured at 28 of the sites using multiparameter water-quality meters at 30-minute intervals for a minimum of 48 hours. Data collected for this project will be used in the development of water-quality criteria for nutrients. The nutrient data will enhance existing datasets and support evaluation of cause and effect relations for nutrient criteria development. In addition, these indicators will assist in the development and evaluation of restoration and remediation plans for water bodies not meeting their designated uses, as stated in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Water Act Section 303(d).

  12. Off-center coherent-state representation and an application to semiclassics

    CERN Document Server

    Parisio, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    By using the overcompleteness of coherent states we find an alternative form of the unit operator for which the ket and the bra appearing under the integration sign do not refer to the same phase-space point. This defines a new quantum representation in terms of Bargmann functions, whose basic features are presented. A continuous family of secondary reproducing kernels for the Bargmann functions is obtained, showing that this quantity is not necessarily unique for representations based on overcomplete sets. We illustrate the applicability of the presented results by deriving a semiclassical expression for the Feynman propagator that generalizes the well-known van Vleck formula and seems to point a way to cope with long-standing problems in semiclassical propagation of localized states.

  13. Kebijakan Ekonomi Politik Stated-Centered dan Rent-Seeking Behavior dalam Kebijakan Pangan Impor Beras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Riawanti

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This present a critical assessment of the political economy that underlie food policy and rice import in Indonesia. State-centric behavior and rent-seeking practices are important determinants of food policy formulation in Indonesia. The study analyzes the importation of rice by the Indonesian government. Study result show that rice policy is based on three main point which are: relationship between farmer's term of trade (NTP, ruse production and distribution; and political power in policy formulation.

  14. Childhood vaccination requirements: Lessons from history, Mississippi, and a path forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawkwell, Philip B; Oshinsky, David

    2015-10-26

    Mississippi consistently leads the United States in childhood vaccination with a greater than 99% measles-mumps-rubella vaccination rate for children entering kindergarten. The story of how this came to pass in a state that lags behind on nearly every other public health measure is pertinent given the recent outbreaks of measles in the United States, especially in pockets of the country where there is strong resistance to vaccination. The fight against compulsory vaccination law is centuries old and the enduring success of Mississippi at repelling challenges to their vaccination requirements is a testament to the public health infrastructure and legal framework established in the state. Herein we trace the anti-vaccination movement from its origins in England up until the present time in the United States and explore how Mississippi has established a model vaccination system. Seminal court cases and legislation are evaluated for their impact. Finally, contemporary battles over vaccination legislation are examined and the feasibility of national-level change is considered.

  15. Archive of sediment data from vibracores collected in 2010 offshore of the Mississippi barrier islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Kyle W.; Flocks, James G.

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center collected sediment cores from coastal waters offshore of the Mississippi barrier islands. With funding support from the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility project, 65 subaqueous sediment cores were collected over an area of 480 square kilometers (km2), from Ship Island to Petit Bois Island Pass, Mississippi, within the boundary of Gulf Islands National Seashore. This represents only a fraction of the total area encompassed by the NGOM project, which extends from Sabine Lake, Louisiana, to Perdido Bay, Alabama. The primary objectives of the NGOM project are to understand the evolution of coastal ecosystems on the northern gulf coast, the impact of human activities on these ecosystems, and the vulnerability of ecosystems and human communities to more frequent and intense hurricanes in the future.

  16. [Nutritional risk factors in patients with head and neck cancer in oncology care center Michoacan state].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Rojas Vázquez, L E; Trujano-Ramos, L A; Pérez-Rivera, E

    2013-01-01

    The head and neck cancer in Michoacán, Mexico, ranks as the third most common cancer and accounts for 12% of deaths. The increase in malnutrition in a patient with this disease has been associated with increased mortality. We studied prospectively 30 patients of both sexes, aged 18 years with head and neck cancer in the Cancer Care Center of Michoacan. In the evaluation period since August 2010 to August 2011. Formats were used VGS-Oncology (Subjective Global Assessment), NRS 2002 (Nutritional risk screen) and Guss (Gugging Swallowing Screen), through which nutritional risk was determined, and established the swallowing capacity of the study population. In our study, 53.3% of the population had moderate malnutrition according to the VGS Oncology, 33% weight loss record. The NRS 2002 show that 43.3% is at risk of malnutrition. The degree of dysphagia is shown more often in older patients, cancer type and stage of illness. Nutritional risk scales relate directly proportional to tumor location and stage, as well, there are other different oncological factors involved in the patient's nutritional deterioration. Therefore it is of vital importance to have a nutritionist as part of the multidisciplinary team, to detect the nutritional risk and to be able to handle it in an opportune way. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  17. Discharge against medical advice in a pediatric emergency center in the State of Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Abdulateef

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze cases that had left the Pediatric Emergency Center Al Sadd, Doha (PEC against medical advice, with the aim of developing policies to help reduce this occurrence. Methodology: All patients that were admitted to the main PEC observation room for treatment and/or investigation and subsequently left against medical advice from February 18, 2007 to June 18, 2007, were followed by a phone call, and a questionnaire, which was completed by the departmental patient representative. Results: 99,133 patients attended the facility during the study period. Of those, 106 left the facility against medical advice. Ninety-four guardians were successfully contacted. 90% of the cases were in children below 2 years of age. In 87% of the cases the mother was the main decision maker for leaving against medical advice. Domestic obligations were the leading cause of DAMA (discharge against medical advice, reported in 45% of the cases. Respondents reported that the consequences of DAMA were well explained by medical staff before they left the facility however, they had not met with the departmental patient representative during their stay. Conclusion:As the majority of DAMA cases occurred in infants, medical staff should address the concerns of this group early on in the course of treatment. Maintaining communication and providing support, in particular for mothers of higher risk groups may help to reduce the rate of DAMA cases.

  18. History of research centers and professional hypnosis societies in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgard, E R

    1993-07-01

    The brief history of hypnosis in America begins with William James's chapter in his Principles of Psychology that got hypnosis off to a good start as a legitimate part of psychology. In the 20th century, before World War II, the idea of performing scientific investigations of hypnosis took place at Harvard University through William McDougall, at the University of Wisconsin and Yale University under Clark Hull, and, in its clinical aspects particularly, through the personal efforts of Milton H. Erickson. The resurgence after World War II is related to the use of hypnosis with war casualties during the war and with the development of clinical psychology. The aspects of the history emphasized here are the founding of continuing institutes and research centers, some theoretical cleavages that have persisted to this day, and the establishment of hypnosis societies with their journals, annual meetings, and workshops, including an International Society of Hypnosis. The history of Division 30 within the American Psychological Association brings the story up to date.

  19. Academic health centers and care of undocumented immigrants in the United States: servant leaders or uncourageous followers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, David A; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio

    2014-04-01

    Public dialogue and debate about the health care overhaul in the United States is centered on one contentious question: Is there a moral obligation to ensure that all people (including undocumented immigrants) within its borders have access to affordable health care? For academic health centers (AHCs), which often provide safety-net care to the uninsured, this question has moral and social implications. An estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States (80% of whom are Latino) are uninsured and currently prohibited from purchasing exchange coverage under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, even at full cost. The authors attempt to dispel the many misconceptions and distorted assumptions surrounding the use of health services by this vulnerable population. The authors also suggest that AHCs need to recalibrate their mission to focus on social accountability as well as the ethical and humanistic practice of medicine for all people, recognizing the significance of inclusion over exclusion in making progress on population health and health care. AHCs play a crucial role, both in educational policy and as a safety-net provider, in reducing health disparities that negatively impact vulnerable populations. Better health for all is possible through better alignment, collaboration, and partnering with other AHCs and safety-net providers. Through servant leadership, AHCs can be the leaders that this change imperative demands.

  20. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the Ohio State University Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) Sediment Core Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) Sediment Core Repository operated by the Ohio State University is a partner in the Index to Marine and Lacustrine...

  1. Archive of information about geological samples available for research from the Ohio State University Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) Polar Rock Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Polar Rock Repository (PRR) operated by the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) at the Ohio State University is a partner in the Index to Marine and...

  2. Report on the 2011 and 2012 NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) / Alaska State Cargo Airship Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstettler, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    This presentation will summarize the Cargo Airships for Northern Operations workshop that was held August 24-25, 2011. This workshop co-sponsored by NASA ARC and the Alaska State Department of Transportation was initiated by interest from Alaska Lt. Governor Mead Treadwell for assistance in investigating the potential benefits of proposed cargo airships for the Alaskan economy and societal needs. The workshop provided a brief background on the technology and operational aspects of conventional airships and hybrids followed by presentations on issues affecting cargo airship operations such as weather management, insurance, regulations, crew duty/rest rules, and available support infrastructures. Speakers representing potential cargo airship users from Alaskan State and commercial organizations presented the needs they felt could be met by cargo airship services. Presenters from Canadian private and military interests also detailed applications and missions that cargo airships could provide to remote regions of Canada. Cost drivers of cargo airship operations were also addressed and tools for modeling and analyzing operational factors and costs affecting cargo airship operations were discussed. Four breakout sessions were held which allowed workshop participants to contribute inputs to four topic areas: Business Approaches and Strategies (financing incentives public/private partnerships etc) for Airship Development and Operation, Design, Development, Production Challenges, and Possible Solutions, Regulatory, Certification, Legal, and Insurance Issues, and Operational Issues, Customer Requirements, and Airship Requirements. A follow on to the 2011 cargo airship workshop is being planned for July 31 August 2, 2012. A status update on this second workshop will also be presented.

  3. Solid-state 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of three aluminum-centered dyes

    KAUST Repository

    Mroué, Kamal H.

    2010-02-01

    We report the first solid-state 27Al NMR study of three aluminum phthalocyanine dyes: aluminum phthalocyanine chloride, AlPcCl (1); aluminum-1,8,15,22-tetrakis(phenylthio)-29H,31H-phthalocyanine chloride, AlPc(SPh)4Cl (2); and aluminum-2,3-naphthalocyanine chloride, AlNcCl (3). Each of these compounds contains Al3+ ions coordinating to four nitrogen atoms and a chlorine atom. Solid-state 27Al NMR spectra, including multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) spectra and quadrupolar Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (QCPMG) spectra of stationary powdered samples have been acquired at multiple high magnetic field strengths (11.7, 14.1, and 21.1 T) to determine their composition and number of aluminum sites, which were analyzed to extract detailed information on the aluminum electric field gradient (EFG) and nuclear magnetic shielding tensors. The quadrupolar parameters for each 27Al site were determined from spectral simulations, with quadrupolar coupling constants (CQ) ranging from 5.40 to 10.0 MHz and asymmetry parameters (η) ranging from 0.10 to 0.50, and compared well with the results of quantum chemical calculations of these tensors. We also report the largest 27Al chemical shielding anisotropy (CSA), with a span of 120 ± 10 ppm, observed directly in a solid material. The combination of MQMAS and computational predictions are used to interpret the presence of multiple aluminum sites in two of the three samples.

  4. Myoelectric forearm prostheses: State of the art from a user-centered perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Peerdeman, MSc

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available User acceptance of myoelectric forearm prostheses is currently low. Awkward control, lack of feedback, and difficult training are cited as primary reasons. Recently, researchers have focused on exploiting the new possibilities offered by advancements in prosthetic technology. Alternatively, researchers could focus on prosthesis acceptance by developing functional requirements based on activities users are likely to perform. In this article, we describe the process of determining such requirements and then the application of these requirements to evaluating the state of the art in myoelectric forearm prosthesis research. As part of a needs assessment, a workshop was organized involving clinicians (representing end users, academics, and engineers. The resulting needs included an increased number of functions, lower reaction and execution times, and intuitiveness of both control and feedback systems. Reviewing the state of the art of research in the main prosthetic subsystems (electromyographic [EMG] sensing, control, and feedback showed that modern research prototypes only partly fulfill the requirements. We found that focus should be on validating EMG-sensing results with patients, improving simultaneous control of wrist movements and grasps, deriving optimal parameters for force and position feedback, and taking into account the psychophysical aspects of feedback, such as intensity perception and spatial acuity.

  5. Study of Seismic Hazards in the Center of the State of Veracruz, MÉXICO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Morales, G. F.; Leonardo Suárez, M.; Dávalos Sotelo, R.; Mora González, I.; Castillo Aguilar, S.

    2015-12-01

    Preliminary results obtained from the project "Microzonation of geological and hydrometeorological hazards for conurbations of Orizaba, Veracruz, and major sites located in the lower sub-basins: The Antigua and Jamapa" are presented. These project was supported by the Joint Funds CONACyT-Veracruz state government. It was developed a probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (henceforth PSHA) in the central area of Veracruz State, mainly in a region bounded by the watersheds of the rivers Jamapa and Antigua, whit the aim to evaluate the geological and hydrometeorological hazards in this region. The project pays most attention to extreme weather phenomena, floods and earthquakes, in order to calculate the risk induced by previous for landslides and rock falls. In addition, as part of the study, the PSHA was developed considered the site effect in the urban zones of the cities Xalapa and Orizaba; the site effects were incorporated by a standard format proposed in studies of microzonation and its application in computer systems, which allows to optimize and condense microzonation studies in a city. The results obtained from the PSHA are presented through to seismic hazard maps (hazard footprints), exceedance rate curves and uniform hazard spectrum for different spectral ordinates, between 0.01 and 5.0 seconds, associated to selected return periods: 72, 225, 475 and 2475 years.

  6. A Management State of POPs (Persistent Organic Pollutants) and the Measuring Direction - Centered By-Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Gyu; Lee, Hee Seon [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-12-01

    The chemical materials, DDT and Dioxin, threaten the human health and take the high toxicity on ecosystem and a living thing. Because the chemical materials remain in environment for a long time due to a slow natural decomposition, they are biologically concentrated through the food cycle in ecosystem and have a characteristic to move a long distance. Owing to such toxicity and the characteristics of chemical materials, the world organization named them as Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and has been actively progressing the international movement to strictly restrict them since the middle of 1990s. POPs regulation agreement, which is on progress centered in UNEP, is facing to the conclusion of the agreement of 2001 year. An agricultural chemical of organic chlorine among 12 POPs indicated by UNEP has been already prohibited in the domestic use and manufacturing or not registered, so the basic research, including search and monitoring if POPs remain or not, is required afterward. Because Dioxin, Puran, Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) among POPs, which are produced as by-products from all kinds of industrial processes, are not raw materials dislike other POPs, their use and manufacturing cannot be only prohibited by the related law but also they have few substitutes. Therefore, they should be applied by the different regulation from the existing toxic chemicals in order to manage the toxicity of the materials. However, the regulation on by-products among POPs is just in the beginning stage, and even the producing source has not been yet confirmed. This study suggests the necessity of the management on Dioxin, Puran, HCB, by-products among POPs, and presents the measuring direction with grasping the domestic and foreign trend of the regulation on the materials. 70 refs., 2 figs., 56 tabs.

  7. Cyclotriphosphazene appended porphyrins and fulleropyrrolidine complexes as supramolecular multiple photosynthetic reaction centers: steady and excited states photophysical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Vishnu Sukumaran; Pareek, Yogita; Karunakaran, Venugopal; Ravikanth, Mangalampalli; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2014-06-01

    New multiple photosynthetic reaction centers were constructed from cyclophosphazene decorated multiporphyrin chromophores and a fulleropyrrolidine having a pyridine ligand (FPY). The excited state electron transfer in the self-assembled donor-acceptor assembly was investigated by using steady state absorption and emission, time-resolved emission spectroscopy and nanosecond laser flash photolysis. The effect of metal (Zn(2+)) coordination to porphyrin units in the multiporphyrin arrays on cyclophosphazine scaffold (P3N3Zn) was studied by comparing with metal free porphyrin assembly on a cyclophosphazene scaffold (P3N3). In P3N3Zn, the decrease of absorption and fluorescence intensity and the lowering of the amplitude of longer fluorescence lifetime with increase of FPY concentration reflect the formation of a ground state complex with an association constant of ∼14,910 M(-1). When compared to the metal-free complex P3N3, the metal-coordinated derivative P3N3Zn exhibited shortening of the singlet and triplet state lifetimes and lowering of the singlet and triplet quantum yields. The cause of the decrease of the triplet quantum yields by insertion of zinc metal is discussed along with the possible non-planarity of the porphyrin ring. From the fluorescence lifetime measurements for the P3N3Zn-FPY mixture, it is proposed that self-assembly of the donor-acceptor complex leads to charge separated species with a rate constant of 7.1 × 10(9) s(-1). The decrease of triplet state intensity and lifetime of the P3N3Zn in the P3N3Zn-FPY complex from the nanosecond transient absorption studies support the occurrence of intermolecular electron transfer in the triplet state.

  8. Variability in the bulk composition and abundance of dissolved organic matter in the lower Mississippi and Pearl rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Shuiwang; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Shiller, Alan M.; Dria, Karl; Hatcher, Patrick G.; Carman, Kevin R.

    2007-06-01

    In this study, we examined the temporal and spatial variability of dissolved organic matter (DOM) abundance and composition in the lower Mississippi and Pearl rivers and effects of human and natural influences. In particular, we looked at bulk C/N ratio, stable isotopes (δ15N and δ13C) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry of high molecular weight (HMW; 0.2 μm to 1 kDa) DOM. Monthly water samples were collected at one station in each river from August 2001 to 2003. Surveys of spatial variability of total dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) were also conducted in June 2003, from 390 km downstream in the Mississippi River and from Jackson to Stennis Space Center in the Pearl River. Higher DOC (336-1170 μM), C/N ratio,% aromaticity, and more depleted δ15N (0.76-2.1‰) were observed in the Pearl than in the lower Mississippi River (223-380 μM, 4.7-11.5‰, respectively). DOC, C/N ratio, δ13C, δ15N, and % aromaticity of Pearl River HMW DOM were correlated with water discharge, which indicated a coupling between local soil inputs and regional precipitation events. Conversely, seasonal variability in the lower Mississippi River was more controlled by spatial variability of a larger integrative signal from the watershed as well as in situ DOM processing. Spatially, very little change occurred in total DOC in the downstream survey of the lower Mississippi River, compared to a decrease of 24% in the Pearl River. Differences in DOM between these two rivers were reflective of the Mississippi River having more extensive river processing of terrestrial DOM, more phytoplankton inputs, and greater anthropogenic perturbation than the Pearl River.

  9. Ciguatera Fish Poisoning and Climate Change: Analysis of National Poison Center Data in the United States, 2001–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Matthew J.; Hess, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Warm sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are positively related to incidence of ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP). Increased severe storm frequency may create more habitat for ciguatoxic organisms. Although climate change could expand the endemic range of CFP, the relationship between CFP incidence and specific environmental conditions is unknown. Objectives: We estimated associations between monthly CFP incidence in the contiguous United States and SST and storm frequency in the Caribbean basin. Methods: We obtained information on 1,102 CFP-related calls to U.S. poison control centers during 2001–2011 from the National Poison Data System. We performed a time-series analysis using Poisson regression to relate monthly CFP call incidence to SST and tropical storms. We investigated associations across a range of plausible lag structures. Results: Results showed associations between monthly CFP calls and both warmer SSTs and increased tropical storm frequency. The SST variable with the strongest association linked current monthly CFP calls to the peak August SST of the previous year. The lag period with the strongest association for storms was 18 months. If climate change increases SST in the Caribbean 2.5–3.5°C over the coming century as projected, this model implies that CFP incidence in the United States is likely to increase 200–400%. Conclusions: Using CFP calls as a marker of CFP incidence, these results clarify associations between climate variability and CFP incidence and suggest that, all other things equal, climate change could increase the burden of CFP. These findings have implications for disease prediction, surveillance, and public health preparedness for climate change. Citation: Gingold DB, Strickland MJ, Hess JJ. 2014. Ciguatera fish poisoning and climate change: analysis of National Poison Center data in the United States, 2001–2011. Environ Health Perspect 122:580–586; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307196 PMID:24618280

  10. Northern Mississippi National Wildlife Refuge Complex Bird List

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bird checklist for North Mississippi National Wildlife Refuges Complex including Cold River, Dahomey, and Tallahatchie National Wildlife Refuges.

  11. Womens Business Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Women's Business Centers (WBCs) represent a national network of nearly 100 educational centers throughout the United States and its territories, which are designed...

  12. Translation of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity recommendations into pedometer-based stepping targets in the Lower Mississippi Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) region of the United States is characterized by high levels of poverty, physical inactivity, obesity, and related chronic diseases. There is a pressing need to identify new strategies that will increase adherence to physical activity guidelines. Walking is an import...

  13. 2005 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Management. (Program CIP: 52.0901--Hospitality Administration/Management)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Lady Anne; Chandler, Mark; Nichols, Raynette; Nevill, Becky

    2005-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  14. 2007 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Food Products (Meats). (Program CIP: 01.0401 - Agricultural and Food Products Processing)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research and Curriculum Unit, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  15. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Marketing Management Technology (Program CIP: 52.1401--Business Mkt. & Mkt. Mgmt.). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the state's marketing management technology program. Presented in the introduction are a program description and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies for the…

  16. 2007 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Design Technology for Fashion and Interiors. (Program CIP: 19.0901 - Apparel and Textiles, General)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Carol; Lawrence, Angie; Pou, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  17. Floristic composition and potential competitors in Lindera melissifolia (Lauraceae) colonies in Mississippi with reference to hydrologic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy S Hawkins; Daniel A Skojac; Nathan M. Schiff; Theodor Leininger

    2010-01-01

    Lindera melissifolia is a federally endangered shrub endemic to the southeastern United States. Hydrologic regime and floristic composition within individual L. melissifolia colonies in three disjunct populations in Mississippi were monitored for three years. Sixty-nine vascular plant species were identified growing within L. melissifolia colonies. Although number of...

  18. 2005 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Machine Tool Operation. (Program CIP: 48.0503 - Machine Shop Technology/Assistant)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Nathan; Parker, Ronald; Lurie, Charles; Maples, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  19. 2005 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Horticulture. (Program CIP: 01.0601 - Applied Horticulture/Horticultural Operations, General)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research and Curriculum Unit, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  20. 77 FR 39393 - Special Local Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Mile 842.0 to 840.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... sponsor, Optum Health Performance, on March 13, 2012 stating they will be holding a triathlon on the Upper... Performance will hold the Optum Health Performance Twin Cities Triathlon between mile 842.0 and 840.0 on the Upper Mississippi River. There are expected to be at least 700 athletes participating in the...

  1. 2005 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary General Drafting. (Program CIP: 15.1301 - Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, General)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Karen; Ladner, Daryl; Lewis, Carroll; Moran, Sheryl; Schneider, Chester; Strickland, Ruth Ann; Welch, Amanda

    2005-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  2. 2007 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Agriculture Power and Machinery. (Program CIP: 01.0204 - Agricultural Power Machinery Operation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Lee; James, Terry; Washington, Lee; Taylor, John Grady; Rushing, Jimmy

    2007-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  3. Cultural Resources Survey of Fourteen Mississippi River Levee and Revetment Items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-14

    and small conical mounds located mainly on old lakeshore beaches of Lake Pontchartrain and on the Chenier Plain around Grand Lake. The Marksville...itself, and at Grand Ecaille is found the deepest oil well in the world. Elsewhere, higher up the Mississippi, changes have also come in recent times...in the state (Yoes 1973:11; Bouchereau 1873:28-30). Among the most important plantations near the Luling Revetment project was Esperanza , bought by

  4. Pediatric sports-related traumatic brain injury in United States trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, John K; Winkler, Ethan A; Burke, John F; Chan, Andrew K; Dhall, Sanjay S; Berger, Mitchel S; Manley, Geoffrey T; Tarapore, Phiroz E

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children is a significant public health concern estimated to result in over 500,000 emergency department (ED) visits and more than 60,000 hospitalizations in the United States annually. Sports activities are one important mechanism leading to pediatric TBI. In this study, the authors characterize the demographics of sports-related TBI in the pediatric population and identify predictors of prolonged hospitalization and of increased morbidity and mortality rates. METHODS Utilizing the National Sample Program of the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB), the authors retrospectively analyzed sports-related TBI data from children (age 0-17 years) across 5 sports categories: fall or interpersonal contact (FIC), roller sports, skiing/snowboarding, equestrian sports, and aquatic sports. Multivariable regression analysis was used to identify predictors of prolonged length of stay (LOS) in the hospital or intensive care unit (ICU), medical complications, inpatient mortality rates, and hospital discharge disposition. Statistical significance was assessed at α sports-related TBIs were recorded in the NTDB, and these injuries represented 11,614 incidents nationally after sample weighting. Fall or interpersonal contact events were the greatest contributors to sports-related TBI (47.4%). Mild TBI represented 87.1% of the injuries overall. Mean (± SEM) LOSs in the hospital and ICU were 2.68 ± 0.07 days and 2.73 ± 0.12 days, respectively. The overall mortality rate was 0.8%, and the prevalence of medical complications was 2.1% across all patients. Severities of head and extracranial injuries were significant predictors of prolonged hospital and ICU LOSs, medical complications, failure to discharge to home, and death. Hypotension on admission to the ED was a significant predictor of failure to discharge to home (OR 0.05, 95% CI 0.03-0.07, p injury incurred during roller sports was independently associated with prolonged hospital LOS compared

  5. Adult sports-related traumatic brain injury in United States trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Ethan A; Yue, John K; Burke, John F; Chan, Andrew K; Dhall, Sanjay S; Berger, Mitchel S; Manley, Geoffrey T; Tarapore, Phiroz E

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Sports-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important public health concern estimated to affect 300,000 to 3.8 million people annually in the United States. Although injuries to professional athletes dominate the media, this group represents only a small proportion of the overall population. Here, the authors characterize the demographics of sports-related TBI in adults from a community-based trauma population and identify predictors of prolonged hospitalization and increased morbidity and mortality rates. METHODS Utilizing the National Sample Program of the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB), the authors retrospectively analyzed sports-related TBI data from adults (age ≥ 18 years) across 5 sporting categories-fall or interpersonal contact (FIC), roller sports, skiing/snowboarding, equestrian sports, and aquatic sports. Multivariable regression analysis was used to identify predictors of prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS), medical complications, inpatient mortality rates, and hospital discharge disposition. Statistical significance was assessed at α sports-related TBIs were documented in the NTDB, which represented 18,310 incidents nationally. Equestrian sports were the greatest contributors to sports-related TBI (45.2%). Mild TBI represented nearly 86% of injuries overall. Mean (± SEM) LOSs in the hospital or intensive care unit (ICU) were 4.25 ± 0.09 days and 1.60 ± 0.06 days, respectively. The mortality rate was 3.0% across all patients, but was statistically higher in TBI from roller sports (4.1%) and aquatic sports (7.7%). Age, hypotension on admission to the emergency department (ED), and the severity of head and extracranial injuries were statistically significant predictors of prolonged hospital and ICU LOSs, medical complications, failure to discharge to home, and death. Traumatic brain injury during aquatic sports was similarly associated with prolonged ICU and hospital LOSs, medical complications, and failure to be discharged to

  6. The approach of occupational therapists in the Family Health Support Centers (NASF in the state of Alagoas, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Alves dos Santos Silva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary Health Care - ABS plays a key role among the public policies of the Brazilian Unified Health System - SUS, and it is guided by the Family Health Strategy - ESF. In this context, the Family Health Support Centers - NASF were created by the Health Ordinance No. 154 of 24 Jan. 2008, with the aim of expanding the action of ABS, and its importance was reaffirmed by the Health Ordinance No. 2, 488, dated 21 Oct. 2011, which revoked the first one but did not alter the assignments of the NASF professionals and consolidated teamwork as a priority for the reorganization of ABS in Brazil. In this context, the objective of this research was to understand the approach of Occupational Therapists in the Family Health Support Centers in Alagoas state. This is a qualitative study which uses a self-responsive questionnaire, structured by researchers, containing an open question where Occupational Therapists could describe their work in the NASF. All subjects agreed to participate. The responses were interpreted reflectively by researchers seeking contribution to the initial concepts of the working process of Occupational Therapists at the NASFs. In this study, the occupational therapist described the realization of preventive, promotion and education actions in health, as well as actions of rehabilitation, mental health and performance in Activities of Daily Living (ADL and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL. Thus, the NASF strategy places the Occupational Therapist in search for ways and strategies to perform a collective practice.

  7. Development of Innovative Radioactive Isotope Production Techniques at the Pennsylvania State University Radiation Science and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Amanda M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Radiation Science and Engineering Center; Heidrich, Brenden [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Radiation Science and Engineering Center; Durrant, Chad [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Department of mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Center; Bascom, Andrew [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Department of mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Center; Unlu, Kenan [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Radiation Science and Engineering Center

    2013-08-15

    The Penn State Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR) at the Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC) has produced radioisotopes for research and commercial purposes since 1956. With the rebirth of the radiochemistry education and research program at the RSEC, the Center stands poised to produce a variety of radioisotopes for research and industrial work that is in line with the mission of the DOE Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, Isotope Development and Production Research and Application Program. The RSEC received funding from the Office of Science in 2010 to improve production techniques and develop new capabilities. Under this program, we improved our existing techniques to provide four radioisotopes (Mn-56, Br-82, Na-24, and Ar-41) to researchers and industry in a safe and efficient manner. The RSEC is also working to develop new innovative techniques to provide isotopes in short supply to researchers and others in the scientific community, specifically Cu-64 and Cu-67. Improving our existing radioisotopes production techniques and investigating new and innovative methods are two of the main initiatives of the radiochemistry research program at the RSEC.

  8. Strong leadership and teamwork drive culture and performance change: Ohio State University Medical Center 2000-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Fred; Bendapudi, Neeli; Rucci, Anthony; Schlesinger, Leonard

    2008-09-01

    Several characteristics of academic health centers have the potential to create high levels of internal conflict and misalignment that can pose significant leadership challenges. In September 2000, the positions of Ohio State University (OSU) senior vice president for health sciences, dean of the medical school, and the newly created position of chief executive officer of the OSU Medical Center (OSUMC) were combined under a single leader to oversee the OSUMC. This mandate from the president and trustees was modeled after top institutions with similar structures. The leader who assumed the role was tasked with improving OSUMC's academic, clinical, and financial performance. To achieve this goal, the senior vice president and his team employed the service value chain model of improving performance, based on the premise that leadership behavior/culture drives employee engagement/satisfaction, leading to customer satisfaction and improved organizational performance. Implementing this approach was a seven-step process: (1) selecting the right leadership team, (2) assessing the challenges and opportunities, (3) setting expectations for performance and leadership behavior, (4) aligning structures and functions, (5) engaging constituents, (6) developing leadership skills, and (7) defining strategies and tracking goals. The OSUMC setting during this period provides an observational case study to examine how these stepwise changes, instituted by strong leadership and teamwork, were able to make and implement sound decisions that drove substantial and measurable improvements in the engagement and satisfaction of faculty and staff; the satisfaction of students and patients; and academic, clinical, and financial performance.

  9. Histomoniasis in wild turkeys in Mississippi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, G A

    1980-07-01

    Blackhead (histomoniasis, enterohepatitis) was diagnosed as the cause of death for three wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris) found in widely separated areas in Mississippi. The turkeys came from areas with high turkey population densities and supplemental feeding programs. Finding three sick and/or dead wild turkeys in a year's period suggests that the disease is more prevalent than generally believed. Recommendations for management programs are presented.

  10. Glyphosate-Resistant Goosegrass from Mississippi

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay K. Nandula; Wright, Alice A.; Molin, William T.

    2013-01-01

    A suspected glyphosate-resistant goosegrass [Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertn.] population, found in Washington County, Mississippi, was studied to determine the level of resistance and whether the resistance was due to a point mutation, as was previously identified in a Malaysian population. Whole plant dose response assays indicated a two- to four-fold increase in resistance to glyphosate. Leaf disc bioassays based on a glyphosate-dependent increase in shikimate levels indicated a five- to eight...

  11. U.S. Department of Energy Regional Resource Centers Report: State of the Wind Industry in the Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranowski, Ruth [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United St; Oteri, Frank [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United St; Baring-Gould, Ian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United St; Tegen, Suzanne [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United St

    2016-03-01

    The wind industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are addressing technical challenges to increasing wind energy's contribution to the national grid (such as reducing turbine costs and increasing energy production and reliability), and they recognize that public acceptance issues can be challenges for wind energy deployment. Wind project development decisions are best made using unbiased information about the benefits and impacts of wind energy. In 2014, DOE established six wind Regional Resource Centers (RRCs) to provide information about wind energy, focusing on regional qualities. This document summarizes the status and drivers for U.S. wind energy development on regional and state levels. It is intended to be a companion to DOE's 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report, 2014 Wind Technologies Market Report, and 2014 Offshore Wind Market and Economic Analysis that provide assessments of the national wind markets for each of these technologies.

  12. EXPERIENCE TUTORIALS IN THE GRADUATE FROM THE CENTER OF UPDATE OF THE MAGISTERIUM IN THE STATE OF DURANGO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana María Espinosa Sánchez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Following the experiences we have had in the Teacher Upgrading Center in tutorials graduate programs in the State of Durango we could detect the strengths and weaknesses, enabling us to make the diagnosis in order to reduce them and develop strengths. The biggest problem that humanity is to educate its members and society as it enters the twenty-first century requires changes and improvements to the educational systems, it is clear the need of teaching and learning for the continued existence of society, higher education institutions should strive to achieve development in man and woman, tutoring in higher education, is a complementary action to develop ethical behavior, intellectual skills and teaching skills. The study is predominantly qualitative and case study method.

  13. Formation of charge separated state P+OA- and triplet state 3P at low temperature in Rhodobacter sphaeroides (R-26) reaction centers in which bacteriopheophytin a is replaced by plant pheophytin a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkuropatov Aya; Proskuryakov, I I; Shkuropatova, V A; Zvereva, M G; Shuvalov, V A

    1994-09-05

    Low temperature optical and photochemical properties of Rhodobacter sphaeroides (R-26) reaction centers, in which bacteriopheophytin a has been replaced by plant pheophytin a, are reported. Modified reaction centers preserve the ability for photoinduced electron transfer from the primary electron donor P to the primary quinone acceptor QA at 80K. The triplet state ESR signal of modified reaction centers with prereduced QA at 10K shows an electron spin polarization pattern and ZFS parameters analogous to those for the triplet state 3P in non-treated reaction centers. It was found that at low temperature both P+QA- and 3P states are formed via a precursor radical pair P+I- in which I is the introduced plant pheophytin molecule. This shows that acceptor systems of bacterial and plant (photosystem II) reaction centers are mutually replacable in structural and functional aspects.

  14. Mapping of occupational therapy practice in the psychosocial Care Centers of Alcohol and Drugs In Sao Paulo state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Regina Silva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug use and the challenge of finding answers in assistance to the so called drug abuse is a current theme that challenges professionals, services and managers. This study aimed to map features, professionals and the activities carried out by occupational therapists of the Psychosocial Care Centers of Alcohol and other Drugs (Centros de Atenção Psicossocial Álcool e Drogas – CAPS ad in the state of Sao Paulo, through the application of a self-answerable questionnaire. During data collection, 45 CAPS ad were found in the interior of the state. Nineteen professionals cooperated with the research; 15 of them were occupational therapists. The results showed that these care centers present proposals regulated according to the guidelines of the Ministry of Health, but the complexity of the demand and its multiple facets with the social dimension require further discussion on the type of intervention that has been employed, as well as on its efficacy. Regarding the profile of the occupational therapists, most of them have at least five years of training, graduate degrees, and did not choose the area of mental health and drugs. The occupational therapists have different views of their actions, use different resources and strategies, especially in group activities and through workshops, and signify their actions in different ways, promoting new projects of life by joining treatment proposals from abstinence to harm reduction. We conclude that the assistance to the users of CAPS ad is extremely complex, because it involves social character themes with macro social determinants which require greater integration between sectors, areas and resources.

  15. Informing climate change adaptation in the Northeast and Midwest United States: The role of Climate Science Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, A. M.; Morelli, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Department of Interior Northeast Climate Science Center (NE CSC) is part of a federal network of eight Climate Science Centers created to provide scientific information and tools that managers and other parties interested in land, water, wildlife, and cultural resources can use to anticipate, monitor, and adapt to climate change. The NE CSC partners with other federal agencies, universities, and NGOs to facilitate stakeholder interaction and delivery of scientific products. For example, NE CSC researchers have partnered with the National Park Service to help managers at Acadia National Park adapt their infrastructure, operations, and ecosystems to rising seas and more extreme events. In collaboration with the tribal College of Menominee Nation and Michigan State University, the NE CSC is working with indigenous communities in Michigan and Wisconsin to co-develop knowledge of how to preserve their natural and cultural values in the face of climate change. Recently, in its largest collaborative initiative to date, the NE CSC led a cross-institutional effort to produce a comprehensive synthesis of climate change, its impacts on wildlife and their habitats, and available adaptation strategies across the entire Northeast and Midwest region; the resulting document was used by wildlife managers in 22 states to revise their Wildlife Action Plans (WAPs). Additionally, the NE CSC is working with the Wildlife Conservation Society to help inform moose conservation management. Other research efforts include hydrological modeling to inform culvert sizing under greater rainfall intensity, forest and landscape modeling to inform tree planting that mitigates the spread of invasive species, species and habitat modeling to help identify suitable locations for wildlife refugia. In addition, experimental research is being conducted to improve our understanding of how species such as brook trout are responding to climate change. Interacting with stakeholders during all phases of

  16. The International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management (ICIWaRM): The United States' Contribution to UNESCO IHP's Global Network of Water Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of a "category 2 center"—i.e., one that is closely affiliated with UNESCO, but not legally part of UNESCO—dates back many decades. However, only in the last decade has the concept been fully developed. Within UNESCO, the International Hydrological Programme (IHP) has led the way in creating a network of regional and global water-related centers.ICIWaRM—the International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management—is one member of this network. Approved by UNESCO's General Conference, the center has been operating since 2009. It was designed to fill a niche in the system for a center that was backed by an institution with on-the-ground water management experience, but that also had strong connections to academia, NGOs and other governmental agencies. Thus, ICIWaRM is hosted by the US Army Corps of Engineers' Institute for Water Resources (IWR), but established with an internal network of partner institutions. Three main factors have contributed to any success that ICIWaRM has achieved in its global work: A focus on practical science and technology which can be readily transferred. This includes the Corps' own methodologies and models for planning and water management, and those of our university and government partners. Collaboration with other UNESCO Centers on joint applied research, capacity-building and training. A network of centers needs to function as a network, and ICIWaRM has worked together with UNESCO-affiliated centers in Chile, Brazil, Paraguay, the Dominican Republic, Japan, China, and elsewhere. Partnering with and supporting existing UNESCO-IHP programs. ICIWaRM serves as the Global Technical Secretariat for IHP's Global Network on Water and Development Information in Arid Lands (G-WADI). In addition to directly supporting IHP, work through G-WADI helps the center to frame, prioritize and integrate its activities. With the recent release of the United Nation's 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, it is clear that

  17. Electronic Cigarette Use among Mississippi Adults, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent L. Mendy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes are battery-powered devices that deliver nicotine in the form of aerosol. We identify differences and associations in e-cigarette use by sociodemographic characteristics and describe the reported reasons for initiating use among Mississippi adults. We used the 2015 Mississippi Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, which collected information on e-cigarette use from 6,035 respondents. The prevalence of current e-cigarette use and having ever tried an e-cigarette was determined overall and by sociodemographic characteristics. Weighted prevalences and 95% confidence intervals were calculated, and prevalences for subgroups were compared using the X2 tests and associations were assessed using logistic regression. In 2015, 4.7% of Mississippi adults currently used e-cigarettes, while 20.5% had ever tried an e-cigarette. The prevalence of current e-cigarette use was significantly higher for young adults, whites, men, individuals unable to work, those with income $35,000–$49,999, and current smokers compared to their counterparts. Similar results were observed for having ever tried an e-cigarette. E-cigarette use was associated with age, race, income, and smoking status. Most (71.2% of current e-cigarette users and over half (52.1% of those who have ever tried e-cigarettes reported that a main reason for trying or using e-cigarettes was “to cut down or quit smoking.”

  18. Near-Infrared-Enhanced Charge-State Conversion for Low-Power Optical Nanoscopy with Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang-Dong; Li, Shen; Shen, Ao; Dong, Yang; Dong, Chun-Hua; Guo, Guang-Can; Sun, Fang-Wen

    2017-01-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) photon pumped optical physics of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond is experimentally studied by considering both the charge-state conversion and stimulated emission. We find that the NIR laser can help to highly increase the charge-state conversion rate and, subsequently, can be applied to improve the performance of charge-state-depletion (CSD) nanoscopy. Using a doughnut-shaped visible laser beam and a Gaussian-shaped NIR laser beam for charge-state manipulation, we develop a low-power two-depletion-laser CSD nanoscopy for NV centers. Without dropping the imaging resolution, the visible depletion-laser intensity is approximately 10 times lower than that in the single-depletion-laser CSD. With high spatial resolution and low laser power, the CSD nanoscopy can be used for nanoscale quantum sensing with NV centers.

  19. Control of center of mass motion state through cuing and decoupling of spontaneous gait parameters in level walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espy, D D; Yang, F; Pai, Y-C

    2010-09-17

    Can the center of mass (COM) motion state, i.e., its position and velocity relative to the base of support (BOS), which dictate gait stability, be predictably controlled by the global gait parameters of step length and gait speed, or by extension, cadence? The precise relationships among step length and gait speed, and the COM motion state are unknown, partially due to the interdependence between step length and gait speed and the difficulty in independent control of both parameters during spontaneous level walking. The purposes of this study were to utilize simultaneous audio-visual cuing to independently manipulate step length and gait speed, and to determine the extent to which the COM position and velocity can be subsequently controlled. Fifty-six young adults were trained at one of the three gait patterns in which both the step length and gait speed were targeted simultaneously. The results showed that the cuing could successfully "decouple" gait speed from step length. Although this approach did yield reliable control of the COM velocity through manipulation of gait speed (R(2)=0.97), the manipulation of step length yielded less precise control of COM position (R(2)=0.60). This latter control appears to require manipulation of an additional degree-of-freedom at the local segment level, such that the inclusion of trunk inclination with step length improved the prediction of COM position (R(2)=0.80).

  20. Level IV Ecoregions of Mississippi

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  1. Level III Ecoregions of Mississippi

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  2. Techniques for rearing and releasing nonmigratory cranes: Lessons from the Mississippi Sandhill Crane program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, D.H.; Olsen, G.H.; Gee, G.F.; Nicolich, Jane M.; O'Malley, K.E.; Nagendran, Meenakshi; Hereford, Scott G.; Range, P.; Harper, W.T.; Ingram, R.P.; Smith, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    Captive-reared Mississippi sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis pulla) reared at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (Patuxent) have been released at the Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge (MSCNWR) since 1981. Of 131 birds released through December 1990, 103 were reared by foster parents. The remaining 28 were experimentally hand-reared in 1989 and 1990. After refining release procedures, parent-reared birds have integrated into the wild flock, many have survived, and some have bred. Releases of hand-reared cranes elsewhere in the 1970's were largely unsuccessful, at least in part due to the lack of a lengthy acclimation period. A new hand-rearing protocol holds promise in producing release-worthy birds. The technique employs some features first used in the 1960's (e.g., a costume for the human caretaker and model crane heads used to train chicks to feed). In the mid-1980's, the following features were added: (1) the costumed caretaker was given a visor and feathers, (2) a taxidermic crane head or a hand puppet was held or suspended from the ceiling for use in stimulating chicks to feed, (3) a taxidermic mount of a brooding crane supplied warmth, (4) a full-sized live crane was maintained in an adjacent pen and in visual contact with neonatal young to provide an imprinting model, and (5) a small group of adult (or subadult) cranes was penned adjacent to the outdoor chick pens to provide socialization models. Recent releases of Mississippi sandhill cranes hand-reared according to this protocol and released in Mississippi have had high first-year survival rates. The now-operational technique holds promise for producing large numbers of release-worthy birds.

  3. Mississippi River Sediment Availability Study: Summary of Available Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Wallerstein . 2000. Sediment transport in the Lower Mississippi River. Final Report, Contract Number N68171-00-M-5982. London, England: U.S. Army Research...Development and Standardization Group-U.K. Thorne, C. R., O. P. Harmar, and N. Wallerstein . 2001. Morphodynamics of the Lower Mississippi River

  4. A comprehensive sediment budget for the Mississippi Barrier Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walstra, D.J.R.; De Vroeg, J.H.; Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.; Swinkels, C.; Luijendijk, A.P.; De Boer, W.P.; Hoekstra, R.; Hoonhout, B.; Henrotte, J.; Smolders, T.; Dekker, F.; Godsey, E.

    2012-01-01

    In order to conceive any realistic plan for post-Katrina island restoration, it is necessary to understand the physical processes that move sand along the littoral drift zone off the coast of Mississippi. This littoral zone influences the character of the Mississippi barrier islands as they exist in

  5. A comprehensive sediment budget for the Mississippi Barrier Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walstra, D.J.R.; De Vroeg, J.H.; Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.; Swinkels, C.; Luijendijk, A.P.; De Boer, W.P.; Hoekstra, R.; Hoonhout, B.; Henrotte, J.; Smolders, T.; Dekker, F.; Godsey, E.

    2012-01-01

    In order to conceive any realistic plan for post-Katrina island restoration, it is necessary to understand the physical processes that move sand along the littoral drift zone off the coast of Mississippi. This littoral zone influences the character of the Mississippi barrier islands as they exist in

  6. Perplexing Federal Cases from Mississippi: Lessons for School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Lindon J.

    2010-01-01

    Federal court cases are examined in an effort to view recent First Amendment rights infringements which have occurred in Mississippi. Case law reinforces students' rights to wear same-sex outfits to school functions as well as to bring same-sex dates. Connection to a recent civil rights investigation by the NAACP into a north Mississippi middle…

  7. 78 FR 36683 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Summit, Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Summit, Mississippi AGENCY: Federal Communications... Broadcasting, allots FM Channel 228A ] as a first local service at Summit, Mississippi. To accommodate that... U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting....

  8. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, 30 December 1992--29 December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier DBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  9. Solid State Imaging Device Parameter Study for Use in Electro-Optic Tracking Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-10-01

    DRAWER DE NUCLEAR ENGINEERING MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY ELDRED W. HOUGH, PH.D. MISSISSIPPI STATE, MISSISSIPPI 39762 PETROLEUM ENGINEERING TELEPHONE...are available for investigation. Both utilize the same tracking algorithm, but have different detector arrays. Tracker Number 1 uses a Reticon 50 x 50 A...encoding the outputs of linear reticon arrays. lTese I encoded dataare available then for instant recall. Up to 30 to 1 reductions of such information

  10. Humanities mini-course curricula for midcareer health professionals at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kimberly R; George, Daniel R

    2012-08-01

    The field of medical humanities has traditionally focused on medical students and, more recently, on premedical undergraduates. Comparatively little formal humanities pedagogy has been dedicated to midcareer health professionals. To address this lack, the Department of Humanities at the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine and the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center designed eight annual humanities mini-courses for faculty and staff throughout the college and medical center.These mini-courses fell into four categories: reading, reflection, and discussion; creative expression; technology; and ethics. They were geared toward midcareer health professionals who were seeking new intellectual and creative stimulation and variety in daily routine. They also provided humanities faculty the opportunity to devote attention to topics that capitalize on their professional training and that interest them personally.Participants indicated a high degree of satisfaction with the mini-courses for four principal reasons: (1) learning the tools and methodologies of a new discipline or domain other than biomedicine, (2) using their minds and training in uncustomary ways, (3) forming new alliances with colleagues (which served to lessen the sense of professional isolation), and (4) enjoying a respite from the stressful flow of the workday. Humanities faculty facilitators provided more mixed responses but agreed that conducting the mini-courses had been a positive overall experience.Although this article provides a foundational framework for the development of a humanities mini-course series, the authors encourage others to replicate these curricula in other medical settings as an important step toward a robust pedagogy designed for midcareer health care professionals.

  11. NV centers in 3 C ,4 H , and 6 H silicon carbide: A variable platform for solid-state qubits and nanosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bardeleben, H. J.; Cantin, J. L.; Csóré, A.; Gali, A.; Rauls, E.; Gerstmann, U.

    2016-09-01

    The outstanding magneto-optical properties of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond have stimulated the search for similar systems. We show here that NV triplet centers can also be generated in all the main SiC polytypes. We have identified by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and first-principles calculations the axial NV- pairs in 3 C ,4 H , and 6 H SiC, showing polytype and lattice site-specific magnetic and optical properties. We demonstrate very efficient room-temperature spin polarization of the ground state upon near infrared optical excitation for the NV center in 3 C SiC and axial NV centers in the hexagonal (4 H ,6 H ) polytypes; the signals of basal pairs are much lower in intensity. Axial NV centers in hexagonal SiC polytypes and thus constitute unidirectional ensembles which may be useful in nanosensing applications.

  12. Long-term measurements of agronomic crop irrigation in the Mississippi Delta portion of the Lower Mississippi River Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    With over 4 million ha irrigated cropland, the Lower Mississippi River Valley (LMRV) is a highly productive agricultural region where irrigation practices are similar and the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer (MRVA) is a primary source of on-demand irrigation. Owing to agricultural exports, ...

  13. Summer Research Program - 1997 Summer Faculty Research Program Volume 6 Arnold Engineering Development Center United States Air Force Academy Air Logistics Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Fracture Analysis of the F-5, 15%-Spar Bolt DR Devendra Kumar SAALC/LD 6- 16 CUNY-City College, New York, NY A Simple, Multiversion Concurrency Control...Program, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH. [3]AFGROW, Air Force Crack Propagation Analysis Program, Version 3.82 (1997) 15-8 A SIMPLE, MULTIVERSION ...Office of Scientific Research Boiling Air Force Base, DC and San Antonio Air Logistic Center August 1997 16-1 A SIMPLE, MULTIVERSION CONCURRENCY

  14. Staffing and Training Requirements for Tumor Registry Centers in the State of Louisiana. Technical Report 69-101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, C. Dennis

    An exploratory study was conducted to obtain information regarding staff requirements in small tumor registry centers, involving a brief analysis of existing tumor registry centers and exploration of training and organizational factors that might be associated with establishing new centers. Activities performed by tumor registry personnel were…

  15. The Legacy of the 1948 Underseepage and Crevasse Maps, Lower Mississippi River Levees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    ER D C/ G SL S R- 17 -2 The Legacy of the 1948 Underseepage and Crevasse Maps, Lower Mississippi River Levees G eo te ch ni ca l a nd...release; distribution is unlimited. The U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) solves the nation’s toughest engineering and...environmental sciences for the Army, the Department of Defense, civilian agencies, and our nation’s public good. Find out more at www.erdc.usace.army.mil. To

  16. Age, genesis, and paleoclimatic interpretation of the Sangamon/Loveland complex in the Lower Mississippi Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markewich, H.W.; Wysocki, D.A.; Pavich, M.J.; Rutledge, E.M.

    2011-01-01

    For more than a century, the Sangamon paleosol (the Sangamon) has been an integral part of geologic and pedologic investigations in the central United States, including the Upper Mississippi and Lower Missouri River Valleys. Compositional, pedologic, micromorphologic, stratigraphic, and age data indicate that the prominent reddish paleosol developed in silt-rich deposits of the Lower Mississippi Valley, from southernmost Illinois to northwestern Mississippi, represents multiple periods of soil formation, and is wholly or in part time equivalent to the Sangamon of the central United States. Thermoluminescence data, for localities where the Sangamon developed in loess, indicate that the primary period of loess deposition was from 190 to 130 ka (oxygen isotope stage, OIS6), that loess deposition continued intermittently from 130 to 74 ka (OIS5), and that deposition was wholly or in part coeval with Loveland loess deposition in the central United States. Beryllium-10, chemical, and pedologic data indicate that in the Lower Mississippi Valley: (1) the Sangamon represents a minimum time period of 60-80 k.y.; (2) there were at least two periods of soil formation, ca. 130-90 ka and 74-58 ka (OIS4); and (3) rates of weathering and pedogenesis equaled or exceeded the net loess-accumulation rate until at least 46 ka (OIS3) and resulted in development of a paleosol in the overlying basal Roxana Silt. Along a N-S transect from southern Illinois to western Mississippi, Sangamon macroscopic characteristics as well asthe micro-morphology, chemistry, and mineralogy, suggest a regional paleoclimate during periods of soil formation that: (1) was warm to hot, with a wider range in temperature, precipitation, and evapotranspiration than present; (2) had seasonal to decadal or longer periods of drought; and (3) had down-valley (southward) trends of increasing temperature and precipitation and decreasing seasonality and variation in annualto decadal precipitation. ?? 2011 Geological

  17. Neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation devices, techniques and team roles: 2011 survey results of the United States' Extracorporeal Life Support Organization centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Scott; Ellis, Cory; Butler, Katie; McRobb, Craig; Mejak, Brian

    2011-12-01

    In early 2011, surveys of active Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) centers within the United States were conducted by electronic mail regarding neonatal Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) equipment and professional staff. Seventy-four of 111 (67%) U.S. centers listed in the ELSO directory as neonatal centers responded to the survey. Of the responding centers, 53% routinely used roller pumps for neonatal ECMO, 15% reported using centrifugal pumps and 32% reported using a combination of both. Of the centers using centrifugal pumps, 51% reported that they do not use a compliance bladder in the circuit. The majority (95%) of roller pump users reported using a compliance bladder and 97% reported using Tygon" S-97-E tubing in the raceway of their ECMO circuits. Silicone membrane oxygenators were reportedly used by 25% of the respondents, 5% reported using micro-porous hollow fiber oxygenators (MPHF), 70% reported using polymethylpentene (PMP) hollow fiber oxygenators and 5% reported using a combination of the different types. Some form of in-line blood monitoring was used by 88% of the responding centers and 63% of responding centers reported using a circuit surface coating. Anticoagulation monitoring via the activated clotting time (ACT) was reported by 100% of the reporting centers. The use of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) was reported by 53% of the responding centers with 82% of those centers using a crystalloid primed circuit to initiate ECPR. A cooling protocol was used by 77% of the centers which have an ECPR program. When these data are compared with surveys from 2002 and 2008 it shows that the use of silicone membrane oxygenators continues to decline, the use of centrifugal pumps continues to increase and ECMO personnel continues to be comprised of multidisciplinary groups of dedicated allied health care professionals.

  18. Stennis Space Center Environmental Geographic Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovely, Janette; Cohan, Tyrus

    2000-01-01

    As NASA's lead center for rocket propulsion testing, the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) monitors and assesses the off-site impacts of such testing through its Environmental Office (SSC-EO) using acoustical models and ancillary data. The SSC-EO has developed a geographical database, called the SSC Environmental Geographic Information System (SSC-EGIS), that covers an eight-county area bordering the NASA facility. Through the SSC-EGIS, the Enivronmental Office inventories, assesses, and manages the nearly 139,000 acres that comprise Stennis Space Center and its surrounding acoustical buffer zone. The SSC-EGIS contains in-house data as well as a wide range of data obtained from outside sources, including private agencies and local, county, state, and U.S. government agencies. The database comprises cadastral/geodetic, hydrology, infrastructure, geo-political, physical geography, and socio-economic vector and raster layers. The imagery contained in the database is varied, including low-resolution imagery, such as Landsat TM and SPOT; high-resolution imagery, such as IKONOS and AVIRIS; and aerial photographs. The SSC-EGIS has been an integral part of several major projects and the model upon which similar EGIS's will be developed for other NASA facilities. The Corps of Engineers utilized the SSC-EGIS in a plan to establish wetland mitigation sites within the SSC buffer zone. Mississippi State University employed the SSC-EGIS in a preliminary study to evaluate public access points within the buffer zone. The SSC-EO has also expressly used the SSC-EGIS to assess noise pollution modeling, land management/wetland mitigation assessment, environmental hazards mapping, and protected areas mapping for archaeological sites and for threatened and endangered species habitats. The SSC-EO has several active and planned projects that will also make use of the SSC-EGIS during this and the coming fiscal year.

  19. Recruitment, retention and matriculation of ethnic minority nursing students: a University of Mississippi School of Nursing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Audwin; Williams, P Renee; Beacham, Tracilia; Elliott, Rowena W; Northington, LaDonna; Calvin, Rosie; Hill, Mary; Haynes, Avis; Winters, Karen; Davis, Sheila

    2003-01-01

    According to Bednash (2000), the future of health care pivots on an adequate supply of appropriately educated and skilled professional registered nurses. Recognizing the long history of and the struggles by African-American (AA) nurses for education and equality in the nursing profession, it is essential that more African-American students be recruited, retained, and matriculated into the profession of nursing. African-American nurses have always contributed to the care of the poor and the sick and played a decisive role in the improvement of the health of their communities. The Bureau of Health Professions Division of nursing (March 2000) reported that 86.6 percent of the registered nurse population were white while 12.3 percent represented racial and ethnic minority groups. Given the current racial/ethnic background of the registered nurse population in the United States, there is an obvious disparity in the representation of minorities in the nursing profession, in spite of the increasing number of minorities represented in the general population. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to document strategies that are used to actively recruit, retain, and graduate ethnic minority students from the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) School of Nursing (SON).

  20. Feasibility study of a corn-to-ethanol plant in Sardis, Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-06-01

    A feasibility study for a corn-to-ethanol plant in Panola County, Mississippi was carried out. This area is well suited for the production of ethanol from corn, as it has a mild climate, a plentiful supply of wood fuel, and a well-developed agricultural infrastructure. The project was designed for 5 million gallons per year, using the ACR Process, a process proven in 6 plants now operating. It was determined to be technically feasible for this size. However, without a state financial incentive such as a gasoline excise tax or sales tax exemption, the plant is not economically feasible in Mississippi. Even though a 4 cents per gallon federal excise tax exemption will likely remain, the economics without any other incentive are not strong enough to obtain financing or equity funds. While the Mississippi legislature decided not to consider a financial incentive in their 1982 session, an attempt will be made to introduce a proposal for a suitable exemption during the 1983 legislative session. Until then, the project is on hold.

  1. Refining Stable Oxygen and Hydrogen Isoscapes for the Identification of Human Remains in Mississippi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Monica M; Plemons, Amber M; Herrmann, Nicholas P; Regan, Laura A

    2017-06-30

    Isoscape refinement is an essential component for accurately predicting region-of-origin in forensic investigations involving isotope analysis of unidentified human remains. Stable oxygen (δ(18) O) and hydrogen (δ(2) H) isotopes were measured from 57 tap water samples collected across Mississippi to model refined isoscapes for the state. A tap water conversion equation, δ(18) Otw =1.64 δ(18) Op-31.35, was developed for the southeastern USA to test the prediction accuracy of the δ(18) Otw isoscape using individuals with known residential histories. A local Mississippi resident (USAFA-134) was assigned with 90% probability to the correct region-of-origin reported by the participant. Assignments for Georgia residents (USAFA-118 and USAFA-205) had variable results, predicting USAFA-118 from Mississippi and USAFA-205 as a nonlocal resident. Stable isotope values often overlap geographically and a multi-isotope approach should be used when narrowing region(s)-of-origin(s). This study demonstrates the utility of refining isoscapes and the importance of tissue calibration in prediction assignments of human remains. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. Feasibility study of a corn-to-ethanol plant in Sardis, Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-06-01

    A feasibility study for a corn-to-ethanol plant in Panola County, Mississippi was carried out. This area is well suited for the production of ethanol from corn, as it has a mild climate, a plentiful supply of wood fuel, and a well-developed agricultural infrastructure. The project was designed for 5 million gallons per year, using the ACR Process, a process proven in 6 plants now operating. It was determined to be technically feasible for this size. However, without a state financial incentive such as a gasoline excise tax or sales tax exemption, the plant is not economically feasible in Mississippi. Even though a 4 cents per gallon federal excise tax exemption will likely remain, the economics without any other incentive are not strong enough to obtain financing or equity funds. While the Mississippi legislature decided not to consider a financial incentive in their 1982 session, an attempt will be made to introduce a proposal for a suitable exemption during the 1983 legislative session. Until then, the project is on hold.

  3. Final report on decommissioning boreholes and wellsite restoration, Gulf Coast Interior Salt Domes of Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-01

    In 1978, eight salt domes in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi were identified for study as potential locations for a nuclear waste repository as part of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program. Three domes were selected in Mississippi for ``area characterization`` phase study as follows: Lampton Dome near Columbia, Cypress Creek Dome near New Augusta, and Richton Dome near Richton. The purpose of the studies was to acquire geologic and geohydrologic information from shallow and deep drilling investigations to enable selection of sites suitable for more intensive study. Eleven deep well sites were selected for multiple-well installations to acquire information on the lithologic and hydraulic properties of regional aquifers. In 1986, the Gulf Coast salt domes were eliminated from further consideration for repository development by the selection of three candidate sites in other regions of the country. In 1987, well plugging and restoration of these deferred sites became a closeout activity. The primary objectives of this activity are to plug and abandon all wells and boreholes in accordance with state regulations, restore all drilling sites to as near original condition as feasible, and convey to landowners any wells on their property that they choose to maintain. This report describes the activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives, as outlines in Activity Plan 1--2, ``Activity Plan for Well Plugging and Site Restoration of Test Hole Sites in Mississippi.``

  4. Agronomic Suitability of Bioenergy Crops in Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemus, Rocky; Baldwin, Brian; Lang, David

    2011-10-01

    In Mississippi, some questions need to be answered about bioenergy crops: how much suitable land is available? How much material can that land produce? Which production systems work best in which scenarios? What levels of inputs will be required for productivity and longterm sustainability? How will the crops reach the market? What kinds of infrastructure will be necessary to make that happen? This publication helps answer these questions: • Which areas in the state are best for bioenergy crop production? • How much could these areas produce sustainably? • How can bioenergy crops impact carbon sequestration and carbon credits? âÂÃÃÂ

  5. The role of the Wetland Reserve Program in conservation efforts in the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Sammy L.; Twedt, Daniel J.; Wilson, R. Randy

    2006-01-01

    The Mississippi River Alluvial Valley includes the floodplain of the Mississippi River from Cairo, Illinois, USA, to the Gulf of Mexico. Originally this region supported about 10 million ha of bottomland hardwood forests, but only about 2.8 million ha remain today. Furthermore, most of the remaining bottomland forest is highly fragmented with altered hydrologic processes. During the 1990s landscape-scale conservation planning efforts were initiated for migratory birds and the threatened Louisiana black bear (Ursus americanus luteolus). These plans call for large-scale reforestation and restoration efforts in the region, particularly on private lands. In 1990 the Food, Agriculture, Conservation and Trade Act authorized the Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP). The WRP is a voluntary program administered by the United States Department of Agriculture that provides eligible landowners with financial incentives to restore wetlands and retire marginal farmlands from agricultural production. As of 30 September 2005, over 275,700 ha have been enrolled in the program in the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley, with the greatest concentration in Louisiana, Arkansas, and Mississippi, USA. Hydrologic restoration is common on most sites, with open-water wetlands, such as moist-soil units and sloughs, constituting up to 30% of a given tract. Over 33,200 ha of open-water wetlands have been created, potentially providing over 115,000,000 duck-use days. Twenty-three of 87 forest-bird conservation areas have met or exceed core habitat goals for migratory songbirds and another 24 have met minimum area requirements. The WRP played an integral role in the fulfillment of these goals. Although some landscape goals have been attained, the young age of the program and forest stands, and the lack of monitoring, has limited evaluations of the program's impact on wildlife populations.

  6. Centers for independent living and secondary transition collaboration: characteristics for enhanced service delivery for adolescents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotner, Anthony J; Shogren, Karrie A; Shaw, Leslie A; VanHorn Stinnett, Chelsea; Seo, Hyojeong

    2017-06-01

    Research involving secondary transition practices indicates a growing implementation of interagency collaboration to maximize service delivery to support students transitioning from school to adult life. Centers for Independent Living (CILs) are often excluded from collaborative partnerships and denied the opportunity to contribute as a valued stakeholder in the transition process. A total of 189 CIL professionals representing represented 38 states completed the online survey to (a) identify to what degree does the factor structure of Thompson's Collaboration Survey holds for CIL professionals and (b) explore what specific CIL professional and agency characteristics predict greater collaboration between CILs and local education agencies (LEAs). Additionally (c) researchers sought to determine the degrees to which greater self-reported collaboration predicts more frequent transition services provided to transition-age youth by CIL professionals. Results indicated that the factor structure proposed by Thompson was confirmed in a sample of CIL professionals. None of the agency or individual characteristics (i.e., number of high schools partnered with, number of students served, amount of training in transition services, and importance of collaboration between high schools and agencies for transition) predicted greater collaboration with LEAS. When analyzing the effects of degree of collaboration on the services provided, high ratings on three of the five collaborative dimensions predicted a higher likelihood of providing services to transition-age youth. This study suggests that more training and experience of CIL professionals does not necessarily lead to greater collaboration. Additionally, the findings suggest that collaborative team structure is more important than social capital collaborative dimensions in leading to frequent services from CILs to transition-age youth. Implications for rehabilitation Extant literature suggests that secondary transition

  7. United States Air Force Summer Research Program -- 1993 Summer Research Program Final Reports. Volume 11. Arnold Engineering Development Center, Frank J. Seiler Research Laboratory, Wilford Hall Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Direction Switching A state machine for CREQ and CACK handling was written in Altera Hard- ware Description Language ( AHDL ) (see [4]). The corresponding...34, Issue 1.32. Spectrum Signal Process- ing Inc.. Burnaby. B.C.. Canada, Nov. 1991. [4] "’MAX+plusII Text Editor & AHDL ". Altera Corporation. version 1.0

  8. High-Temperature Fluid-Wall Reactor Technology Research, Test and Evaluation Performed at Naval Construction Battalion Center, Gulfport, Mississippi, for the United States Air Force Installation/Restoration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    obesity and lack of physical fitness, (3) recent alcohol intake, (4) dehydration, (5) individual suscepti- bility, (6) chronic cardiovascular disease in...62 120Choothn 1 U 127-184 Tet ~achlownetoelne 200 U 78-23.3 2-Butanonse M 934.5 11,1.2,2.Tetrachlonwehae. 200 U 1.l-Tuchmee’.:~- U106484 Toluare 200 U...feed chute has peripheral gasketing to prevent any dust leakage. The fee(d bini has a stationary 10-inch grid grizzly located under thle fe(ed chulte to

  9. Environmental assessment: Richton Dome Site, Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Richton Dome site in Mississippi as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Richton Dome site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. The site is in the Gulf interior region, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains two other potentially acceptable sites--the Cypress Creek Dome site in Mississippi and the Vacherie Dome site in Louisiana. Although the Cypress Creek Dome and the Vacherie Dome sites are suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Richton Dome site is the preferred site in the Gulf interior region. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Richton Dome site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  10. Parathion poisoning of Mississippi kites in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franson, J. Christian

    1994-01-01

    Parathion(phosphorothioic acid O, O-diethyl O-[4-nitrophenyl] ester) is a broad spectrum organophosphorus insecticide, used on a variety of crops and occasionally for mosquito control, and is highly toxic to birds (Smith 1987). Intentional poisoning with parathion is reported to have killed more than 8000 red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus), common grackles (Quiscalus quiscula), brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) and European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in two separate instances (Stone et al. 1984). Use of parathion on wheat fields has resulted in the mortality of about 1600 Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and other waterfowl in one instance (White et al. 1982) and about 200 Canada geese in another (Flickinger et al. 1991). More than 200 laughing gulls (Larus atricilla) died near cotton fields treated with parathion (White et al. 1979). Secondary poisoning of raptors resulting from the consumption of prey exposed to parathion, has been reported experimentally and in the field. Stone et al. (1984) found two dead red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), a Cooper's hawk (Accipiter cooperii) and an American kestrel (Falco sparverius) that had fed on blackbirds killed by parathion. One of four American kestrels died after being fed cricket frogs (Acris crepitans) that had been exposed to 10ppm parathion for 96 hr (Fleming et al. 1982). The Mississippi kite (Ictinia mississippensis) is highly insectivorous (Brown and Amadon 1968) and is thus subject to secondary poisoning resulting from consumption of insects exposed to pesticides. I report here an instance of secondary parathion poisoning in wild Mississippi kites.

  11. Gallbladder surgery for Medicare patients in Mississippi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, A B; Sanchez, N; Miller, D

    1994-10-01

    Mississippi Foundation for Medical Care (MFMC) conducted a review of gallbladder surgery performed on Mississippi Medicare Patients using hospital claims files and limited record review for verification of claims file data. Significant error rates in the surgeon identification number were found in the claims files. It should also be noted that the current ICD-9-CM coding system does not allow for identification of laparoscopic cholecystectomies converted to open procedures. Past studies have attempted to use claims data alone for these types of analyses. These findings demonstrate the importance of using caution by those attempting to use claims data (without verification) to define patterns of hospital utilization, clinical outcomes and/or physician profiling. Claims data must be tested for validity for reliable pattern analysis. In addition, considerable variation was found among providers in elements such as conversion rates, complication and readmission rates. A few surgeons showed patterns for critical variables that were quite different from the universe. There was however, no statistically significant differences associated between volume of cases performed and outcomes. Time frame comparisons over several years show significant (> 80%) increase in gallbladder surgery since the introduction of the laparoscopic procedure.

  12. Environmental assessment: Richton Dome site, Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Richton Dome site in Mississippi as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Richton Dome site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. The site is in the Gulf interior region, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains two other potentially acceptable sites--the Cypress Creek Dome site in Mississippi and the Vacherie Dome site in Louisiana. Although the Cypress Creek Dome and the Vacherie Dome sites are suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Richton Dome site is the preferred site in the Gulf interior region. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Richton Dome site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  13. Student Center Activities Aligned to the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects K-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Connie

    2012-01-01

    This publication helps educators create differentiated reading instruction experiences for their students by showing the relationship between two distinct resources: Student Center Activities (SCAs) and the Common Core State Standards (CCSSs). Reading specialists, reading coaches, and teachers will find this document useful in lesson planning, as…

  14. Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Katrina Inspired Disaster Screenings (KIDS): Psychometric Testing of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network Hurricane Assessment and Referral Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, Tonya Cross; Osofsky, Joy D.; Osofsky, Howard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Post disaster psychosocial surveillance procedures are important for guiding effective and efficient recovery. The Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Katrina Inspired Disaster Screenings (KIDS) is a model designed with the goal of assisting recovering communities in understanding the needs of and targeting services…

  15. PROJECT HEAD START, SUMMER 1966, LECTURES PRESENTED IN THE ORIENTATION SESSION FOR PERSONNEL IN THE CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTERS (SAN FRANCISCO STATE COLLEGE, JUNE 19-24, 1966).

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEWIS, MARY S.

    IN JUNE, 1966, SAN FRANCISCO STATE COLLEGE CONDUCTED AN ORIENTATION SESSION FOR THE PERSONNEL OF CHILD CARE CENTERS IN HEAD START PROGRAMS. FOLLOWING THE WASHINGTON, D. C., HEAD START STAFF GUIDELINES, THE 15 SPEAKERS PRESENTED SUCH TOPICS AS THE IMPACT OF POVERTY, HEALTH AND NUTRITION NEEDS FOR DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN, LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT,…

  16. Amsterdam Center for International law: introduction to the Symposium on Responsibility of International Organizations and of (Member) States: attributed or direct responsibility or both?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    This is the introduction to three articles that resulted from the Symposium on Responsibility of International Organizations and of (Member) States organized by the Amsterdam Center for International Law (ACIL) under direction of Professors André Nollkaemper and Pieter Jan Kuijper in April 2009. The

  17. Emergency Contraceptive Pills: A 10-Year Follow-up Survey of Use and Experiences at College Health Centers in the Mid-Atlantic United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura McKeller; Sawyer, Robin G.

    2006-01-01

    The authors conducted a 10-year follow-up study using a telephone survey to investigate the availability of emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) at college health centers in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. They also examined related issues, such as distribution procedure, existence of a written protocol, personnel involved,…

  18. 40 CFR 147.1250 - State-administered program-Class I, III, IV, and V wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL PROGRAMS Mississippi § 147.1250 State-administered program—Class I, III, IV, and V wells. The UIC program for Class I, III, IV and V wells in the State of Mississippi, except those on Indian lands, is the... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program-Class...

  19. Closing the quality gap: revisiting the state of the science (vol. 2: the patient-centered medical home).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John W; Jackson, George L; Powers, Benjamin J; Chatterjee, Ranee; Bettger, Janet Prvu; Kemper, Alex R; Hasselblad, Vic; Dolor, Rowena J; Irvine, R Julian; Heidenfelder, Brooke L; Kendrick, Amy S; Gray, Rebecca

    2012-07-01

    As part of the Closing the Quality Gap: Revisiting the State of the Science series of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), this systematic review sought to identify completed and ongoing evaluations of the comprehensive patient-centered medical home (PCMH), summarize current evidence for this model, and identify evidence gaps. We searched PubMed®, CINAHL®, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for published English-language studies, and a wide variety of databases and Web resources to identify ongoing or recently completed studies. Two investigators per study screened abstracts and full-text articles for inclusion, abstracted data, and performed quality ratings and evidence grading. Our functional definition of PCMH was based on the definition used by AHRQ. We included studies that explicitly claimed to be evaluating PCMH and those that did not but which met our functional definition. Seventeen studies with comparison groups evaluated the effects of PCMH (Key Question [KQ] 1). Older adults in the United States were the most commonly studied population (8 of 17 studies). PCMH interventions had a small positive impact on patient experiences (including patient-perceived care coordination) and small to moderate positive effects on preventive care services (moderate strength of evidence [SOE]). Staff experiences were also improved by a small to moderate degree (low SOE). There were too few studies to estimate effects on clinical or most economic outcomes. Twenty-one of 27 studies reported approaches that addressed all 7 major PCMH components (KQ 2), including team-based care, sustained partnership, reorganized care or structural changes to care, enhanced access, coordinated care, comprehensive care, and a systems-based approach to quality. A total of 51 strategies were used to address the 7 major PCMH components. Twenty-two of 27 studies reported information on financial systems used to implement PCMH, implementation strategies, and

  20. Closing the quality gap: revisiting the state of the science (vol. 2: the patient-centered medical home).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John W; Jackson, George L; Powers, Benjamin J; Chatterjee, Ranee; Bettger, Janet Prvu; Kemper, Alex R; Hasselblad, Vic; Dolor, Rowena J; Irvine, R Julian; Heidenfelder, Brooke L; Kendrick, Amy S; Gray, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES As part of the Closing the Quality Gap: Revisiting the State of the Science series of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), this systematic review sought to identify completed and ongoing evaluations of the comprehensive patient-centered medical home (PCMH), summarize current evidence for this model, and identify evidence gaps. DATA SOURCES We searched PubMed®, CINAHL®, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for published English-language studies, and a wide variety of databases and Web resources to identify ongoing or recently completed studies. REVIEW METHODS Two investigators per study screened abstracts and full-text articles for inclusion, abstracted data, and performed quality ratings and evidence grading. Our functional definition of PCMH was based on the definition used by AHRQ. We included studies that explicitly claimed to be evaluating PCMH and those that did not but which met our functional definition. RESULTS Seventeen studies with comparison groups evaluated the effects of PCMH (Key Question [KQ] 1). Older adults in the United States were the most commonly studied population (8 of 17 studies). PCMH interventions had a small positive impact on patient experiences (including patient-perceived care coordination) and small to moderate positive effects on preventive care services (moderate strength of evidence [SOE]). Staff experiences were also improved by a small to moderate degree (low SOE). There were too few studies to estimate effects on clinical or most economic outcomes. Twenty-one of 27 studies reported approaches that addressed all 7 major PCMH components (KQ 2), including team-based care, sustained partnership, reorganized care or structural changes to care, enhanced access, coordinated care, comprehensive care, and a systems-based approach to quality. A total of 51 strategies were used to address the 7 major PCMH components. Twenty-two of 27 studies reported information on financial systems used to

  1. A Survey of the Practice of Patient Education with Spinal Cord Injured Patients in Rehabilitation Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, June B.; Bendel, Judith G.

    Practices in patient education for spinal cord injured persons in 10 hospital rehabilitation centers were examined. Surveys revealed that a majority of the centers conducted patient education (designed to provide facts about the injury as well as psychological support). Findings revealed a large number of staff involved, but a wide difference in…

  2. The evolution of epilepsy surgery between 1991 and 2011 in nine major epilepsy centers across the United States, Germany, and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehi, Lara; Friedman, Daniel; Carlson, Chad; Cascino, Gregory; Dewar, Sandra; Elger, Christian; Engel, Jerome; Knowlton, Robert; Kuzniecky, Ruben; McIntosh, Anne; O’Brien, Terence J.; Spencer, Dennis; Sperling, Michael R.; Worrell, Gregory; Bingaman, Bill; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge; Doyle, Werner; French, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective Epilepsy surgery is the most effective treatment for select patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. In this article, we aim to provide an accurate understanding of the current epidemiologic characteristics of this intervention, as this knowledge is critical for guiding educational, academic, and resource priorities. Methods We profile the practice of epilepsy surgery between 1991 and 2011 in nine major epilepsy surgery centers in the United States, Germany, and Australia. Clinical, imaging, surgical, and histopathologic data were derived from the surgical databases at various centers. Results Although five of the centers performed their highest number of surgeries for mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) in 1991, and three had their highest number of MTS surgeries in 2001, only one center achieved its peak number of MTS surgeries in 2011. The most productive year for MTS surgeries varied then by center; overall, the nine centers surveyed performed 48% (95% confidence interval [CI] −27.3% to −67.4%) fewer such surgeries in 2011 compared to either 1991 or 2001, whichever was higher. There was a parallel increase in the performance of surgery for nonlesional epilepsy. Further analysis of 5/9 centers showed a yearly increase of 0.6 ± 0.07% in the performance of invasive electroencephalography (EEG) without subsequent resections. Overall, although MTS was the main surgical substrate in 1991 and 2001 (proportion of total surgeries in study centers ranging from 33.3% to 70.2%); it occupied only 33.6% of all resections in 2011 in the context of an overall stable total surgical volume. Significance These findings highlight the major aspects of the evolution of epilepsy surgery across the past two decades in a sample of well-established epilepsy surgery centers, and the critical current challenges of this treatment option in addressing complex epilepsy cases requiring detailed evaluations. Possible causes and implications of these findings are discussed

  3. Quality of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy in developing countries: a comparison of surgical and oncologic outcomes between a comprehensive cancer center in the United States and a cancer center in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Rene; Nick, Alpa M; Schmeler, Kathleen M; Frumovitz, Michael; Soliman, Pamela T; Buitrago, Carlos A; Borrero, Mauricio; Angel, Gonzalo; Reis, Ricardo Dos; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2012-05-01

    To help determine whether global collaborations for prospective gynecologic surgery trials should include hospitals in developing countries, we compared surgical and oncologic outcomes of patients undergoing laparoscopic radical hysterectomy at a large comprehensive cancer center in the United States and a cancer center in Colombia. Records of the first 50 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic radical hysterectomy at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston (between April 2004 and July 2007) and the first 50 consecutive patients who underwent the same procedure at the Instituto de Cancerología-Clínica las Américas in Medellín (between December 2008 and October 2010) were retrospectively reviewed. Surgical and oncologic outcomes were compared between the 2 groups. There was no significant difference in median patient age (US 41.9 years [range 23-73] vs. Colombia 44.5 years [range 24-75], P=0.09). Patients in Colombia had a lower median body mass index than patients in the US (24.4 kg/m(2) vs. 28.7 kg/m(2), P=0.002). Compared to patients treated in Colombia, patients who underwent surgery in the US had a greater median estimated blood loss (200 mL vs. 79 mL, P<0.001), longer median operative time (328.5 min vs. 235 min, P<0.001), and longer postoperative hospital stay (2 days vs. 1 day, P<0.001). Surgical and oncologic outcomes of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy were not worse at a cancer center in a developing country than at a large comprehensive cancer center in the United States. These results support consideration of developing countries for inclusion in collaborations for prospective surgical studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Disbursement of $65 million to the State of Texas for construction of a Regional Medical Technology Center at the former Superconducting Super Collider Site, Waxahachie, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    As part of a settlement agreement between the US DOE and the State of Texas, DOE proposes to transfer $65 million of federal funds to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNLRC) for construction of the Regional Medical Technology Center (RMTC) to be located in Ellis County, Texas. The RMTC would be a state-of-the-art medical facility for proton cancer therapy, operated by the State of Texas in conjunction with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. The RMTC would use the linear accelerator assets of the recently terminated DOE Superconducting Super Collider Project to accelerate protons to high energies for the treatment of cancer patients. The current design provides for treatment areas, examination rooms, support laboratories, diagnostic imaging equipment, and office space as well as the accelerators (linac and synchrotron) and beam steering and shaping components. The potential environmental consequences of the proposed action are expected to be minor.

  5. Inland Waters - Mississippi River Centerline - Headwaters to Gulf Coast

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — Mississippi River centerline data derived from USACE navigation sailing line (recommended track) data and on-screen digitized in areas of no data. Data set extends...

  6. Level III Ecoregions of the Mississippi Alluvial Plain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions for the Mississippi Alluvial Plain were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in...

  7. North Mississippi National Wildlife Refuges Complex: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on North Mississippi NWRs Complex for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Complex...

  8. Level IV Ecoregions of the Mississippi Alluvial Plain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions for the Mississippi Alluvial Plain were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in...

  9. Upper Mississippi River : Furbearer Manangement Plan and Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River NWR Furbearer Management Plan directs the management and regulation of trapping. The furbearer management program directly supports the...

  10. Breeding bird study in the Mississippi River Floodplain

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A breeding bird study was initiated in 1992 to census birds on the Gardner Division of Mark Twain NWR. The division is located in the Mississippi River floodplain...

  11. Forest Management Plan : Upper Mississippi River Wildlife & Fish Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi National Wildlife and Fish Refuge Forest Management Plan is a general plan which outlines the refuge management objectives, forest...

  12. 2005 Hancock and Jackson Counties, Mississippi LiDAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata record describes the topographic mapping of Hancock and Jackson Counties, Mississippi during 2005. Using a combination of laser rangefinding, GPS...

  13. The Trail Inventory of Mississippi Sandhill Crane NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this...

  14. Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge Bird List

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This checklist includes species of birds and is based on observations by refuge personnel, ornithologists,and members of the Mississippi Coast Audubon Society....

  15. Sign Plan : Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge Sign Plan explains how signs are used on the Refuge to help guide and educate visitors. An inventory of...

  16. Freshwater mussels of North Mississippi National Wildlife Refuge Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A literature search of the distribution of freshwater mussels anticipated to be found on refuges assoicated with the North Mississippi Refuges Cjomplex and museum...

  17. Ideas in Practice: The Mississippi River: Humanities and Civil Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonalt, Larry; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course offered for the freshman civil engineering major at the University of Missouri-Rolla. The rationale of developing the course which focuses on the symbolic, social, and technological aspects of the Mississippi River is included. (HM)

  18. The MAFLA (Mississippi, Alabama, Florida) Study, Grain Size Analyses

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The MAFLA (Mississippi, Alabama, Florida) Study was funded by NOAA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Program. Dr. L.J. Doyle produced grain size analyses in the...

  19. Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Mississippi Sandhill Crane NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge...

  20. Characterization of peak streamflows and flood inundation of selected areas in Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, and Mississippi from flood of March 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breaker, Brian K.; Watson, Kara M.; Ensminger, Paul A.; Storm, John B.; Rose, Claire E.

    2016-11-29

    Heavy rainfall occurred across Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, and Mississippi in March 2016 as a result of a slow-moving southward dip in the jetstream, funneling tropical moisture into parts of the Gulf Coast States and the Mississippi River Valley. The storm caused major flooding in the northwestern and southeastern parts of Louisiana and in eastern Texas. Flooding also occurred in the Mississippi River Valley in Arkansas and Mississippi. Over 26 inches of rain were reported near Monroe, Louisiana, over the duration of the storm. In March 2016, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hydrographers made more than 500 streamflow measurements in Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, and Mississippi. Many of those streamflow measurements were made to verify the accuracy of stage-streamflow relations at gaging stations operated by the USGS. Peak streamflows were the highest on record at 14 locations, and streamflows at 29 locations ranked in the top five for the period of record at USGS streamflow-gaging stations analyzed for this report. Following the storm, USGS hydrographers documented 451 high-water marks in Louisiana and on the western side of the Sabine River in Texas. Many of these high-water marks were used to create 19 flood-inundation maps for selected areas of Louisiana and Texas that experienced flooding in March 2016.

  1. Many-electron states of the N2 and N3 color centers in diamond: A first- principles and many-body study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babamoradi, Mohsen; Asgari, Sussan; Ranjbar, Ahmad; Belosludov, Rodion V.; Yunoki, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    A new model is applied to calculate the many-body properties of the neutral N3 color center in diamond. This model is based on the first-principles density functional theory (DFT) and cluster method, which is combined with the generalized Hubbard model. In contrast to the previous models for N3 centers, our model does not require the configuration interaction (CI) and molecular orbital (MO) techniques. The N3 defect in diamond is simulated with an empty site next to three substitutional nitrogen atoms in the center of a hydrogen-terminated diamond cluster. The method is shown to be highly accurate for describing the symmetries and spin properties of the ground state and the first dipole-allowed excited state for the N3 center. We obtain the transition energy as 412 nm for the first dipole-allowed transition, which is in good agreement with the corresponding experimental value as 415 nm. We assigned the dipole-allowed transition between the first and second excited states as the N2 optical peak, and evaluated the N2 optical peak to be 463 nm, which is close to the experimental value as 478 nm.

  2. Many-electron states of the N2 and N3 color centers in diamond: A first- principles and many-body study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babamoradi, Mohsen, E-mail: babamoradi@iust.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak,16846-13114 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asgari, Sussan [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak,16846-13114 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ranjbar, Ahmad [Computational Materials Science Research Team, RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Belosludov, Rodion V. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Yunoki, Seiji [Computational Materials Science Research Team, RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Computational Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Computational Quantum Matter Research Team, RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2017-01-15

    A new model is applied to calculate the many-body properties of the neutral N3 color center in diamond. This model is based on the first-principles density functional theory (DFT) and cluster method, which is combined with the generalized Hubbard model. In contrast to the previous models for N3 centers, our model does not require the configuration interaction (CI) and molecular orbital (MO) techniques. The N3 defect in diamond is simulated with an empty site next to three substitutional nitrogen atoms in the center of a hydrogen-terminated diamond cluster. The method is shown to be highly accurate for describing the symmetries and spin properties of the ground state and the first dipole-allowed excited state for the N3 center. We obtain the transition energy as 412 nm for the first dipole-allowed transition, which is in good agreement with the corresponding experimental value as 415 nm. We assigned the dipole-allowed transition between the first and second excited states as the N2 optical peak, and evaluated the N2 optical peak to be 463 nm, which is close to the experimental value as 478 nm.

  3. MARKETING PRACTICES AND MARKET CHANNEL UTILIZATION BY MISSISSIPPI SOYBEAN PRODUCERS

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson, Darren; JONES, Tom

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines current marketing practices by Mississippi soybean producers as well as willingness to participate in a marketing cooperative and willingness to plant Identity Preserved soybeans. In general, most Mississippi soybean producers utilize cash sales at harvest or forward contracting as primary marketing tools. Use of futures and options is found to increase with farm size. Willingness to participate in a marketing cooperative (pool) is found to be effected by use of cash sales...

  4. Dimerization of emission centers in Eu-doped GaN red light-emitting diode: cooperative charge capturing using valence states coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Masashi; Koizumi, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yasufumi

    2017-01-01

    Despite the recent progress in red light-emitting diodes (LED) made of gallium nitride doped with europium (GaN:Eu) having sharp emission lines due to the 5D0  →  7F2 transition of Eu3+, unexpected subsidiary Eu emission centers radiate several satellite lines. We investigated these subsidiary emission centers by analyzing the harmonic contents through electronic means, and observed the originally forbidden even harmonics in a specific frequency region of 23-45 MHz. The even-harmonic generation was formulized with a binary response caused by the electronic coupling of emission centers in valence states, i.e. dimerization. The coupling was consistent with the results of the optical analyses of former studies. The binary response was experimentally quantified by using a parameter such as the phase difference between the responses of coupled centers, and a significant phase difference of 63° was observed at 36 MHz. The injection charges were cooperatively captured by the coupled emission centers and were branched into the constituent centers for recombination, resulting in undesired satellite emission lines.

  5. Performance measures for a Mississippi River reintroduction into the forested wetlands of Maurepas Swamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Ken W.; Shaffer, Gary P.; Keim, Richard F.; Chambers, Jim L.; Wood, William B.; Hartley, Stephen B.

    2017-06-09

    The use of freshwater diversions (river reintroductions) from the Mississippi River as a restoration tool to rehabilitate Louisiana coastal wetlands has been promoted widely since the first such diversion at Caernarvon became operational in the early 1990s. To date, aside from the Bonnet Carré Spillway (which is designed and operated for flood control), there are only four operational Mississippi River freshwater diversions (two gated structures and two siphons) in coastal Louisiana, and they all target salinity intrusion, shellfish management, and (or) the enhancement of the integrity of marsh habitat. River reintroductions carry small sediment loads for various design reasons, but they can be effective in delivering fresh­water to combat saltwater intrusion and increase the delivery of nutrients and suspended fine-grained sediments to receiving wetlands. River reintroductions may be an ideal restoration tool for targeting coastal swamp forest habitat; much of the area of swamp forest habitat in coastal Louisiana is undergo­ing saltwater intrusion, high rates of submergence, and lack of riverine flow leading to reduced concentrations of important nutrients and suspended sediments, which sustain growth and regeneration, help to aerate swamp soils, and remove toxic compounds from the rhizosphere.The State of Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restora­tion Authority (CPRA) has made it a priority to establish a small freshwater river diversion into a coastal swamp forest located between Baton Rouge and New Orleans, Louisiana, to reintroduce Mississippi River water to Maurepas Swamp. While a full understanding of how a coastal swamp forest will respond to new freshwater loading through a Mississippi River reintroduction is unknown, this report provides guidance based on the available literature for establishing performance measures that can be used for evaluating the effectiveness of a Mississippi River reintroduction into the forested wetlands of Maurepas Swamp

  6. 78 FR 20889 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 158-Vicksburg/Jackson, Mississippi; Notification of Proposed Production...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    ... Proposed Production Activity; Bauhaus USA, Inc.; (Upholstered Furniture); Saltillo, Mississippi The Greater... activity on behalf of Bauhaus USA, Inc. (Bauhaus), located in Saltillo, Mississippi. The notification...

  7. Psychological Center as a Foundation for the Practical Training of Clinical psychologists at the Saint-Petersburg State University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina A Burina

    2016-05-01

    In overall, the Psychological Center with its long-term experience of preparation and practical skills training for the students of the Clinical Psychology specialty, has proven its necessity, relevance, and effectiveness.

  8. Proceedings of Conference XVIII: a workshop on "Continuing actions to reduce losses from earthquakes in the Mississippi Valley area," 24-26 May, 1982, St. Louis, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Paula L.; Hays, Walter W.; Kitzmiller, Carla

    1983-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Federal Emergency Management Agency sponsored a workshop on, "Continuing Actions to Reduce Losses from Earthquakes in the Mississippi Valley area," in St. Louis, Missouri, on May 24-26, 1982. Seventy individuals (see Appendix A) representing local, State, and Federal government; business and industry; and the research community participated in the three day workshop. Collectively, the participants had backgrounds in disaster preparedness, disaster response and recovery, geology, geophysics, seismology, engineering, architecture, social science, law, insurance, and land-use planning. Two-thirds of them came from the Mississippi Valley area

  9. Best Practices Article: Hitting the Target with Transition to Teaching in Mississippi's Poorest School Districts: High Retention Rates through Program Support, Resources, and Strategic Recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggan, Matthew K.; Jayroe, Teresa; Alexander, Ben

    2016-01-01

    In order to assist in alleviating the teaching shortage in poor, rural school districts, also known as Local Education Agencies (LEA's), faculty in the College of Education at Mississippi State University sought funding that would provide financial support for a new alternate route teaching program. This program, known as Learning and Educating…

  10. 2005 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Heating and Air Conditioning. (Program CIP: 47.0201 - Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation, and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jacob; LeBatard, Ernest; Wiggington, Donnie; Williams, Bennett

    2005-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  11. Ecosystem metabolism and nutrient dynamics in the main channel and backwaters of the Upper Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Jeff N.; Bartsch, Lynn; Richardson, William B.; Rogala, James T.; Sullivan, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthesis and respiration are primary drivers of dissolved oxygen dynamics in rivers. We measured dissolved oxygen dynamics, aquatic ecosystem metabolism, algal abundance and nutrient concentrations at main channel and backwater sites on a reach of the Upper Mississippi River that borders the states of Wisconsin and Minnesota (U.S.A.). We asked (i) how ecosystem metabolism rates, dissolved oxygen dynamics and nutrient concentrations differed in the main channel and in backwaters, (ii) whether ecosystem metabolism relates to solar irradiance, nutrient concentration, algal abundance, temperature and river discharge and (iii) whether the relationships between ecosystem metabolism and these environmental factors differs between the main channel and backwaters.

  12. Poison Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1222 immediately. Name State American Association of Poison Control Centers Address AAPCC Central Office NOT A POISON ... not for emergency use. Arkansas ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Address 1717 S. Philo Road, Suite 36 Urbana, ...

  13. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  14. Center for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aid & Attendance & Housebound Caregivers Community Living Centers (CLC) Community Nursing Homes Domiciliaries (Please contact your local VA Medical Center) Homemaker & Home Health Aid Care Hospice and Palliative Care State Veterans ...

  15. The Toxic Exposure Surveillance System (TESS): risk assessment and real-time toxicovigilance across United States poison centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, William A; Litovitz, Toby L; Belson, Martin G; Wolkin, Amy B Funk; Patel, Manish; Schier, Joshua G; Reid, Nicole E; Kilbourne, Edwin; Rubin, Carol

    2005-09-01

    The Toxic Exposure Surveillance System (TESS) is a uniform data set of US poison centers cases. Categories of information include the patient, the caller, the exposure, the substance(s), clinical toxicity, treatment, and medical outcome. The TESS database was initiated in 1985, and provides a baseline of more than 36.2 million cases through 2003. The database has been utilized for a number of safety evaluations. Consideration of the strengths and limitations of TESS data must be incorporated into data interpretation. Real-time toxicovigilance was initiated in 2003 with continuous uploading of new cases from all poison centers to a central database. Real-time toxicovigilance utilizing general and specific approaches is systematically run against TESS, further increasing the potential utility of poison center experiences as a means of early identification of potential public health threats.

  16. Genetic data of 15 autosomal STRs (Identifiler kit) of three Mexican Mestizo population samples from the States of Jalisco (West), Puebla (Center), and Yucatan (Southeast).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubi-Castellanos, R; Anaya-Palafox, M; Mena-Rojas, E; Bautista-España, D; Muñoz-Valle, J F; Rangel-Villalobos, H

    2009-06-01

    We report autosomal STR data (Identifiler PCR amplification kit) of a total sample of 884 unrelated Mestizos from three different regions of Mexico. The population sample included 309, 313 and 262 individuals from the states of Jalisco (West), Puebla (Center) and Yucatan (Southeast), respectively. Allele distribution and forensic statistical parameters are described. Genotype distribution by locus and two-loci combination was in agreement with Hardy-Weinberg expectations for all 15 STRs. Pairwise comparisons including Mexican populations reported in the literature demonstrated a significant differentiation, principally between North/West with regard to Center/Southeast Mexico. These results increase STR data from previously unreported regions of this country, and constitute a valuable guide in forensic casework for choosing an auxiliary STR database in states where it is not available.

  17. 1890's Land Cover/Use - Mississippi River Commission Surveys, Pool 12

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In the late 1880's and early 1900's the Mississippi River Commission (MRC) conducted an extensive high-resolution survey of the Mississippi River from Cairo,...

  18. Turnover Rates of Fall Migrating Pectoral Sandpipers Through the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MA V) is the historic alluvial floodplain of the Lower Mississippi River. Most of the MAV is located in Arkansas, Louisiana, and...

  19. 1890's Land Cover/Use - Mississippi River Commission Surveys, Pool 18

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In the late 1880's and early 1900's the Mississippi River Commission (MRC) conducted an extensive high-resolution survey of the Mississippi River from Cairo,...

  20. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Mississippi. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Mississippi.