WorldWideScience

Sample records for center lessons learned

  1. Lessons learned in simulating a command center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Gregory A.; Cantor, Robert M.; Wenzel, Gregory

    1995-06-01

    This paper presents some lessons learned from simulating the operation of a command center in distributed interactive simulations (DIS). We present the design of the Booz Allen Command Center Systems Interface (C2SI) in terms of its functional architecture as well as the technologies used in its implementation. We discuss the design of the distributed component interfaces based on cooperating software agent pairs. We discuss aspects of several issues in simulating command and control systems in the ADS/DIS environment, namely, interoperation of constructive and virtual simulation, situation awareness, communication with adjacent C2 entities, control of subordinate entities and external sensors, terrain/environmental data management, and data collection for after-action reporting.

  2. Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The examples of lessons learned comprise an outline of the problems encountered at the nuclear facilities involved. The situations are typical of the difficulties that can arise when planning or implementing a decommissioning project for a small facility. Although the information is not intended to be exhaustive, the reader is encouraged to evaluate the applicability of the lessons learned to a specific decommissioning project. The general categories of problem and the relevant section in which they are discussed are shown. One should also note that in almost all cases the lack/inadequacy of construction or operational records contributed to the seriousness of the reported occurrences.

  3. Lessons Learned in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, J. C.; Ryan, R. S.; Schutzenhofer, L. A.

    2011-01-01

    This Contractor Report (CR) is a compilation of Lessons Learned in approximately 55 years of engineering experience by each James C. Blair, Robert S. Ryan, and Luke A. Schutzenhofer. The lessons are the basis of a course on Lessons Learned that has been taught at Marshall Space Flight Center. The lessons are drawn from NASA space projects and are characterized in terms of generic lessons learned from the project experience, which are further distilled into overarching principles that can be applied to future projects. Included are discussions of the overarching principles followed by a listing of the lessons associated with that principle. The lesson with sub-lessons are stated along with a listing of the project problems the lesson is drawn from, then each problem is illustrated and discussed, with conclusions drawn in terms of Lessons Learned. The purpose of this CR is to provide principles learned from past aerospace experience to help achieve greater success in future programs, and identify application of these principles to space systems design. The problems experienced provide insight into the engineering process and are examples of the subtleties one experiences performing engineering design, manufacturing, and operations.

  4. Lessons learned: mobile device encryption in the academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusche, Kristopher P

    2009-01-01

    The academic medical center is faced with the unique challenge of meeting the multi-faceted needs of both a modern healthcare organization and an academic institution, The need for security to protect patient information must be balanced by the academic freedoms expected in the college setting. The Albany Medical Center, consisting of the Albany Medical College and the Albany Medical Center Hospital, was challenged with implementing a solution that would preserve the availability, integrity and confidentiality of business, patient and research data stored on mobile devices. To solve this problem, Albany Medical Center implemented a mobile encryption suite across the enterprise. Such an implementation comes with complexities, from performance across multiple generations of computers and operating systems, to diversity of application use mode and end user adoption, all of which requires thoughtful policy and standards creation, understanding of regulations, and a willingness and ability to work through such diverse needs. PMID:19382736

  5. SEMANTIC ANALYSIS OVER LESSONS LEARNED CONTAINED IN SOCIAL NETWORKS FOR GENERATING ORGANIZATIONAL MEMORY IN CENTERS R&D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Javier Suárez Barón

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the construction of an organizational memory metamodel focused on R&D centers. The metamodel uses lessons learned extracted from corporative social networks; the metamodel aims to promote learning and management of organizational knowledge at these types of organizations. The analysis is applied initially from lessons learned on topics of R&D in Spanish language. The metamodel use natural languages processing together with ontologies for analyze the semantic and lexical the each lesson learned. The final result involves a knowledge base integrated by RDF files interrogated by SPARQL queries.

  6. Kennedy Space Center's NASA/Contractor Team-Centered Total Quality Management Seminar: Results, methods, and lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinlaw, Dennis C.; Eads, Jeannette

    1992-01-01

    It is apparent to everyone associated with the Nation's aeronautics and space programs that the challenge of continuous improvement can be reasonably addressed only if NASA and its contractors act together in a fully integrated and cooperative manner that transcends the traditional boundaries of proprietary interest. It is, however, one thing to assent to the need for such integration and cooperation; it is quite another thing to undertake the hard tasks of turning such a need into action. Whatever else total quality management is, it is fundamentally a team-centered and team-driven process of continuous improvement. The introduction of total quality management at KSC, therefore, has given the Center a special opportunity to translate the need for closer integration and cooperation among all its organizations into specific initiatives. One such initiative that NASA and its contractors have undertaken at KSC is a NASA/Contractor team-centered Total Quality Management Seminar. It is this seminar which is the subject of this paper. The specific purposes of this paper are to describe the following: Background, development, and evolution of Kennedy Space Center's Total Quality Management Seminar; Special characteristics of the seminar; Content of the seminar; Meaning and utility of a team-centered design for TQM training; Results of the seminar; Use that one KSC contractor, EG&G Florida, Inc. has made of the seminar in its Total Quality Management initiative; and Lessons learned.

  7. Lessons Learned from Creating the Public Earthquake Resource Center at CERI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, G. L.; Michelle, D.; Johnston, A.

    2004-12-01

    The Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) at the University of Memphis opened the Public Earthquake Resource Center (PERC) in May 2004. The PERC is an interactive display area that was designed to increase awareness of seismology, Earth Science, earthquake hazards, and earthquake engineering among the general public and K-12 teachers and students. Funding for the PERC is provided by the US Geological Survey, The NSF-funded Mid America Earthquake Center, and the University of Memphis, with input from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology. Additional space at the facility houses local offices of the US Geological Survey. PERC exhibits are housed in a remodeled residential structure at CERI that was donated by the University of Memphis and the State of Tennessee. Exhibits were designed and built by CERI and US Geological Survey staff and faculty with the help of experienced museum display subcontractors. The 600 square foot display area interactively introduces the basic concepts of seismology, real-time seismic information, seismic network operations, paleoseismology, building response, and historical earthquakes. Display components include three 22" flat screen monitors, a touch sensitive monitor, 3 helicorder elements, oscilloscope, AS-1 seismometer, life-sized liquefaction trench, liquefaction shake table, and building response shake table. All displays include custom graphics, text, and handouts. The PERC website at www.ceri.memphis.edu/perc also provides useful information such as tour scheduling, ask a geologist, links to other institutions, and will soon include a virtual tour of the facility. Special consideration was given to address State science standards for teaching and learning in the design of the displays and handouts. We feel this consideration is pivotal to the success of any grass roots Earth Science education and outreach program and represents a valuable lesson that has been learned at CERI over the last several

  8. Lesson Learning at JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhettinger, David

    2011-01-01

    A lessons learned system is a hallmark of a mature engineering organization A formal lessons learned process can help assure that valuable lessons get written and published, that they are well-written, and that the essential information is "infused" into institutional practice. Requires high-level institutional commitment, and everyone's participation in gathering, disseminating, and using the lessons

  9. Planting the Seeds for Data Literacy: Lessons Learned from a Student-Centered Education Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake Carlson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing need for graduate students to acquire competencies in managing and curating their data sets as a part of their education. Librarians and other information professionals are beginning to respond to this need by developing programming, but as of yet there are few models to follow and the impact on the practices of students is under-explored. This case study presents a student-centered pilot program on data literacy offered at Purdue University. The program was offered through the College of Agriculture and was structured to be flexible enough to incorporate each student’s particular field of study. Exercises and assignments were designed to incorporate the student’s own research data to create meaningful, authentic learning experiences. Formative and summative assessment was a critical component of the program, which included interviews with students six months after completion of the program to determine the extent to which the data competencies covered had taken root in students’ research practices. The structure of the pilot program, its strengths and weakness, its impact on students, and lessons learned by the instructors are discussed.

  10. Destruction of the World Trade Center Towers. Lessons Learned from an Environmental Health Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibman, Joan; Levy-Carrick, Nomi; Miles, Terry; Flynn, Kimberly; Hughes, Catherine; Crane, Michael; Lucchini, Roberto G

    2016-05-01

    The assault and subsequent collapse of the World Trade Center towers in New York City on September 11, 2001 (9/11), released more than a million tons of debris and dust into the surrounding area, engulfing rescue workers as they rushed to aid those who worked in the towers, and the thousands of nearby civilians and children who were forced to flee. In December 2015, almost 15 years after the attack, and 5 years after first enactment, Congress reauthorized the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act, a law designed to respond to the adverse health effects of the disaster. This reauthorization affords an opportunity to review human inhalation exposure science in relation to the World Trade Center collapse. In this Special Article, we compile observations regarding the collective medical response to the environmental health disaster with a focus on efforts to address the adverse health effects experienced by nearby community members including local residents and workers. We also analyze approaches to understanding the potential for health risk, characterization of hazardous materials, identification of populations at risk, and shortfalls in the medical response on behalf of the local community. Our overarching goal is to communicate lessons learned from the World Trade Center experience that may be applicable to communities affected by future environmental health disasters. The World Trade Center story demonstrates that communities lacking advocacy and preexisting health infrastructures are uniquely vulnerable to health disasters. Medical and public health personnel need to compensate for these vulnerabilities to mitigate long-term illness and suffering. PMID:26872108

  11. Lessons learned bulletin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past four years, the Department of Energy -- Savannah River Operations Office and the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program completed various activities ranging from waste site investigations to closure and post closure projects. Critiques for lessons learned regarding project activities are performed at the completion of each project milestone, and this critique interval allows for frequent recognition of lessons learned. In addition to project related lessons learned, ER also performs lessons learned critiques. T'he Savannah River Site (SRS) also obtains lessons learned information from general industry, commercial nuclear industry, naval nuclear programs, and other DOE sites within the complex. Procedures are approved to administer the lessons learned program, and a database is available to catalog applicable lessons learned regarding environmental remediation, restoration, and administrative activities. ER will continue to use this database as a source of information available to SRS personnel

  12. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Meyer

    2007-04-01

    The objectives of this meeting were to capture the observations, insights, issues, concerns, and ideas of those involved in the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center (TAMU NSC) TRIGA Reactor Conversion so that future efforts can be conducted with greater effectiveness, efficiency, and with fewer challenges. This workshop was held in conjunction with a similar workshop for the University of Florida Reactor Conversion. Some of the generic lessons from that workshop are included in this report for completeness.

  13. Epidemiologic Methods Lessons Learned from Environmental Public Health Disasters: Chernobyl, the World Trade Center, Bhopal, and Graniteville, South Carolina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy A. Mousseau

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Environmental public health disasters involving hazardous contaminants may have devastating effects. While much is known about their immediate devastation, far less is known about long-term impacts of these disasters. Extensive latent and chronic long-term public health effects may occur. Careful evaluation of contaminant exposures and long-term health outcomes within the constraints imposed by limited financial resources is essential. Methods: Here, we review epidemiologic methods lessons learned from conducting long-term evaluations of four environmental public health disasters involving hazardous contaminants at Chernobyl, the World Trade Center, Bhopal, and Graniteville (South Carolina, USA. Findings: We found several lessons learned which have direct implications for the on-going disaster recovery work following the Fukushima radiation disaster or for future disasters. Interpretation: These lessons should prove useful in understanding and mitigating latent health effects that may result from the nuclear reactor accident in Japan or future environmental public health disasters.

  14. NASA Engineering Network Lessons Learned

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Lessons Learned system provides access to official, reviewed lessons learned from NASA programs and projects. These lessons have been made available to the...

  15. Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LLNL turned in 5 Declaration Line Items (DLI's) in 2006. Of these, one was declared completed. We made some changes to streamline our process from 2005, used less money, time and fewer team members. This report is a description of what changes we made in 2006 and what we learned. Many of our core review team had changed from last year, including our Laboratory Director, the Facility safety and security representatives, our Division Leader, and the OPSEC Committee Chair. We were able to hand out an AP Manual to some of them, and briefed all newcomers to the AP process. We first went to the OPSEC Committee and explained what the Additional Protocol process would be for 2006 and solicited their help in locating declarable projects. We utilized the 'three questions' from the AP meeting last year. LLNL has no single place to locate all projects at the laboratory. We talked to Resource Managers and key Managers in the Energy and Environment Directorate and in the Nonproliferation Homeland and International Security Directorate to find applicable projects. We also talked to the Principal Investigators who had projects last year. We reviewed a list of CRADA's and LDRD projects given to us by the Laboratory Site Office. Talking to the PI's proved difficult because of vacation or travel schedules. We were never able to locate one PI in town. Fortunately, collateral information allowed us to screen out his project. We had no problems in downloading new versions of the DWA and DDA. It was helpful for both Steve Blair and Arden Dougan to have write privileges. During the time we were working on the project, we had to tag-team the work to allow for travel and vacation schedules. We had some difficulty locating an 'activities block' in the software. This was mentioned as something we needed to fix from our 2005 declaration. Evidently the Activities Block has been removed from the current version of the software. We also had trouble finding the DLI Detail Report, which we included

  16. Lessons Learned for Improving Spacecraft Ground Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Michael; Henderson, Gena; Stambolian, Damon

    2013-01-01

    NASA policy requires each Program or Project to develop a plan for how they will address Lessons Learned. Projects have the flexibility to determine how best to promote and implement lessons learned. A large project might budget for a lessons learned position to coordinate elicitation, documentation and archival of the project lessons. The lessons learned process crosses all NASA Centers and includes the contactor community. o The Office of The Chief Engineer at NASA Headquarters in Washington D.C., is the overall process owner, and field locations manage the local implementation. One tool used to transfer knowledge between program and projects is the Lessons Learned Information System (LLIS). Most lessons come from NASA in partnership with support contractors. A search for lessons that might impact a new design is often performed by a contractor team member. Knowledge is not found with only one person, one project team, or one organization. Sometimes, another project team, or person, knows something that can help your project or your task. Knowledge sharing is an everyday activity at the Kennedy Space Center through storytelling, Kennedy Engineering Academy presentations and through searching the Lessons Learned Information system. o Project teams search the lessons repository to ensure the best possible results are delivered. o The ideas from the past are not always directly applicable but usually spark new ideas and innovations. Teams have a great responsibility to collect and disseminate these lessons so that they are shared with future generations of space systems designers. o Leaders should set a goal for themselves to host a set numbers of lesson learned events each year and do more to promote multiple methods of lessons learned activities. o High performing employees are expected to share their lessons, however formal knowledge sharing presentation are not the norm for many employees.

  17. Rethinking lessons learned processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttler, T.; Lukosch, S.G.; Kolfschoten, G.L.; Verbraeck, A.

    2012-01-01

    Lessons learned are one way to retain experience and knowledge in project-based organizations, helping them to prevent reinventin,g the wheel or to repeat past mistakes. However, there are several challenges that make these lessonts learned processes a challenging endeavor. These include capturing k

  18. The lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    What happened at TMI-2 and to the United States Nuclear Industry since the accident to that plant is recounted. Four main points are made: commercial use of nuclear power evolved so rapidly that neither industry nor society generally, was able to assimilate this dramatically new technology fast enough; accidents like TMI-2, and now, the much more damaging Chernobyl, are a part of the price paid; we must take every possible step so that the risks from nuclear power are reduced by learning from accidents and putting that knowledge into practice; the lessons learned and applied after TMI-2 have tended to be the readily achievable, shorter term ones. The most drastic changes will take more time. The organizational and institutional lessons are considered first, then the technical ones. The sequence and status of the TMI-2 cleanup is discussed. The design lessons are summarized. (author)

  19. Planting the Seeds for Data Literacy: Lessons Learned from a Student-Centered Education Program

    OpenAIRE

    Jake Carlson; Marianne Stowell Bracke

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing need for graduate students to acquire competencies in managing and curating their data sets as a part of their education. Librarians and other information professionals are beginning to respond to this need by developing programming, but as of yet there are few models to follow and the impact on the practices of students is under-explored. This case study presents a student-centered pilot program on data literacy offered at Purdue University. The program was offered thr...

  20. Lessons Learned in over Two Decades of GPS/GNSS Data Center Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boler, F. M.; Estey, L. H.; Meertens, C. M.; Maggert, D.

    2014-12-01

    The UNAVCO Data Center in Boulder, Colorado, curates, archives, and distributes geodesy data and products, mainly GPS/GNSS data from 3,000 permanent stations and 10,000 campaign sites around the globe. Although now having core support from NSF and NASA, the archive began around 1992 as a grass-roots effort of a few UNAVCO staff and community members to preserve data going back to 1986. Open access to this data is generally desired, but the Data Center in fact operates under an evolving suite of data access policies ranging from open access to nondisclosure for special cases. Key to processing this data is having the correct equipment metadata; reliably obtaining this metadata continues to be a challenge, in spite of modern cyberinfrastructure and tools, mostly due to human errors or lack of consistent operator training. New metadata problems surface when trying to design and publish modern Digital Object Identifiers for data sets where PIs, funding sources, and historical project names now need to be corrected and verified for data sets going back almost three decades. Originally, the data was GPS-only based on three signals on two carrier frequencies. Modern GNSS covers GPS modernization (three more signals and one additional carrier) as well as open signals and carriers of additional systems such as GLONASS, Galileo, BeiDou, and QZSS, requiring ongoing adaptive strategies to assess the quality of modern datasets. Also, new scientific uses of these data benefit from higher data rates than was needed for early tectonic applications. In addition, there has been a migration from episodic campaign sites (hence sparse data) to continuously operating stations (hence dense data) over the last two decades. All of these factors make it difficult to realistically plan even simple data center functions such as on-line storage capacity.

  1. Lessons learned from the implementation and assessment of student-centered methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Oliver Hoyo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The cAcL2 approach (concept Advancement through chemistry Lab-Lecture incorporates three major educational methodologies into one: a student-centered approach, the full integration of lecture and laboratory formats, and hands-on activity based-instruction. This format has been tested for cognitive and attitudinal gains in students and the results clearly point out to its benefits. Instructional materials for a oneyear general chemistry sequence have been developed to facilitate its implementation in classrooms. The most important aspects of the format with tested practices are discussed while challenges and implications of findings are shared in order to assist instructors interested in implementing innovative formats of instruction such this one, the cAcL2.

  2. Financial Lessons Learned

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ As the Wall Street chaos of 2008 swept the globe,China-with little exposure to subprime mortgages-was one of the only calm ports in the growing financial storm.Ifone lesson can be learned from the crisis,it is this: maintain a constant state of financial vigilance against risks even in boom times.China now faces the task of ensuring its financial health as it further opens to the world amid a global financial landscape reshaped by deep recessions.Economists and finance professors discussed these challenges at the Asia-Pacific Economic and Financial Forum recently held in Beijing.Edited excerpts follow:

  3. Financial Lessons Learned

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    As the Wall Street chaos of 2008 swept the globe,China-with little exposure to subprime mortgages-was one of the only calm ports in the growing financial storm.If one lesson can be learned from the crisis,it is this: maintain a constant state of financial vigilance against risks even in boom times.China now faces the task of ensuring its financial health as it further opens to the world amid a global financial landscape reshaped by deep recessions.Economists and finance professors discussed these challenges at the Asia-Pacific Economic and Financial Forum recently held in Beijing.Edited excerpts follow

  4. Lessons learned obtaining informed consent in research with vulnerable populations in community health center settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riden Heather E

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To improve equity in access to medical research, successful strategies are needed to recruit diverse populations. Here, we examine experiences of community health center (CHC staff who guided an informed consent process to overcome recruitment barriers in a medical record review study. Methods We conducted ten semi-structured interviews with CHC staff members. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and structurally and thematically coded. We used NVivo, an ethnographic data management software program, to analyze themes related to recruitment challenges. Results CHC interviewees reported that a key challenge to recruitment included the difficult balance between institutional review board (IRB requirements for informed consent, and conveying an appropriate level of risk to patients. CHC staff perceived that the requirements of IRB certification itself posed a barrier to allowing diverse staff to participate in recruitment efforts. A key barrier to recruitment also included the lack of updated contact information on CHC patients. CHC interviewees reported that the successes they experienced reflected an alignment between study aims and CHC goals, and trusted relationships between CHCs and staff and the patients they recruited. Conclusions Making IRB training more accessible to CHC-based staff, improving consent form clarity for participants, and developing processes for routinely updating patient information would greatly lower recruitment barriers for diverse populations in health services research.

  5. EMU Lessons Learned Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Kevin M., Jr.; Crocker, Lori; Cupples, J. Scott

    2011-01-01

    As manned space exploration takes on the task of traveling beyond low Earth orbit, many problems arise that must be solved in order to make the journey possible. One major task is protecting humans from the harsh space environment. The current method of protecting astronauts during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) is through use of the specially designed Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). As more rigorous EVA conditions need to be endured at new destinations, the suit will need to be tailored and improved in order to accommodate the astronaut. The Objective behind the EMU Lessons Learned Database(LLD) is to be able to create a tool which will assist in the development of next-generation EMUs, along with maintenance and improvement of the current EMU, by compiling data from Failure Investigation and Analysis Reports (FIARs) which have information on past suit failures. FIARs use a system of codes that give more information on the aspects of the failure, but if one is unfamiliar with the EMU they will be unable to decipher the information. A goal of the EMU LLD is to not only compile the information, but to present it in a user-friendly, organized, searchable database accessible to all familiarity levels with the EMU; both newcomers and veterans alike. The EMU LLD originally started as an Excel database, which allowed easy navigation and analysis of the data through pivot charts. Creating an entry requires access to the Problem Reporting And Corrective Action database (PRACA), which contains the original FIAR data for all hardware. FIAR data are then transferred to, defined, and formatted in the LLD. Work is being done to create a web-based version of the LLD in order to increase accessibility to all of Johnson Space Center (JSC), which includes converting entries from Excel to the HTML format. FIARs related to the EMU have been completed in the Excel version, and now focus has shifted to expanding FIAR data in the LLD to include EVA tools and support hardware such as

  6. Conclusions and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is the third in a series of national studies conducted under a unique partnership initiative officially registered with the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development by the IAEA, in cooperation with participating Cuban organizations and the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs. Similar studies for Brazil and South Africa were completed in 2006. This section presents the main conclusions derived from this comprehensive assessment of the Cuban energy system performed within a sustainable development framework. It also outlines 'other accomplishments' of, and 'lessons learned' from, the cooperative effort conducted jointly by Cuban and international experts. It concludes with some reflections about 'next steps' that may be followed to continue advancing the concepts and ideas supporting sustainable development at the national and international levels

  7. Lessons Learned from FUSRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Darina [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Carpenter, Cliff [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Miller, Michele [Navarro Research and Engineering

    2016-03-06

    The US DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the long-term steward for 90 sites remediated under numerous regulatory regimes including the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites. In addition, LM holds considerable historical information, gathered in the 1970s, to determine site eligibility for remediation under FUSRAP. To date, 29 FUSRAP sites are in LM’s inventory of sites for long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M), and 25 are with the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for remediation or in the process of being transitioned to LM. It is forecasted that 13 FUSRAP sites will transfer from the USACE to LM over the next 10 years; however, the timing of the transfers is strongly dependent upon federal funding of the ongoing remedial actions. Historically, FUSRAP sites were generally cleaned up for “unrestricted” industrial use or remediated to the “cleanup standards” at that time, and their use remained unchanged. Today, these sites as well as the adjacent properties are now changing or envisioned to have changes in land use, typically from industrial to commercial or residential uses. The implication of land-use change affects DOE’s LTS&M responsibility for the sites under LM stewardship as well as the planning for the additional sites scheduled to transition in time. Coinciding with land-use changes at or near FUSRAP sites is an increased community awareness of these sites. As property development increases near FUSRAP sites, the general public and interested stakeholders regularly inquire about the sufficiency of cleanups that impact their neighborhoods and communities. LM has used this experience to address a series of lessons learned to improve our program management in light of the changing conditions of our sites. We describe these lessons learned as (1) improved stakeholder relations, (2) enhanced LTS&M requirements for the sites, and (3) greater involvement in the transition process.

  8. What Lessons Can We Learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, W. A.

    2012-01-01

    It has become commonplace to ask, whenever anything has gone wrong, what lessons can be learned from the experience. But the appearance of open-endedness in that question is misleading: not every answer that we could give to it is acceptable. There are, in the context of such a question, tacit constraints in what counts as a valid lesson to be…

  9. Higher Education ERP: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Dave; Orgill, Ken

    2001-01-01

    Shares experiences and lessons learned by chief information officers of large universities about enterprise resource planning (ERP). Specifically, provides a framework for approaching an ERP that could save universities millions of dollars. (EV)

  10. Lessons learned from accident investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accidents in three main practices - medical applications, industrial radiography and industrial irradiators - are used to illustrate some common causes of accidents and the main lessons to be learned from them. A brief description of some of these accidents is given. Lessons learned from the accidents described are approached bearing in mind: safety culture, quality assurance, human factors, good engineering practice, defence in depth, security of sources, safety assessment and monitoring and verification compliance. (author)

  11. Lessons learned from accidents investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accidents from three main practices: medical applications, industrial radiography and industrial irradiators are used to illustrate some common causes of accidents and the main lessons to be learned. A brief description of some of these accidents is given. Lessons learned from the described accidents are approached by subjects covering: safety culture, quality assurance, human factors, good engineering practice, defence in depth, security of sources, safety assessment and monitoring and verification compliance. (author)

  12. Logistics Lessons Learned in NASA Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, William A.; DeWeck, Olivier; Laufer, Deanna; Shull, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    Information System (LLIS) and verified that we received the same result using the internal version of LLIS for our logistics lesson searches. In conducting the research, information from multiple databases was consolidated into a single spreadsheet of 300 lessons learned. Keywords were applied for the purpose of sorting and evaluation. Once the lessons had been compiled, an analysis of the resulting data was performed, first sorting it by keyword, then finding duplication and root cause, and finally sorting by root cause. The data was then distilled into the top 7 lessons learned across programs, centers, and activities.

  13. Patient safety: lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The traditional approach to patient safety in health care has ranged from reticence to outward denial of serious flaws. This undermines the otherwise remarkable advances in technology and information that have characterized the specialty of medical practice. In addition, lessons learned in industries outside health care, such as in aviation, provide opportunities for improvements that successfully reduce mishaps and errors while maintaining a standard of excellence. This is precisely the call in medicine prompted by the 1999 Institute of Medicine report ''To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System.'' However, to effect these changes, key components of a successful safety system must include: (1) communication, (2) a shift from a posture of reliance on human infallibility (hence ''shame and blame'') to checklists that recognize the contribution of the system and account for human limitations, and (3) a cultivation of non-punitive open and/or de-identified/anonymous reporting of safety concerns, including close calls, in addition to adverse events. (orig.)

  14. Patient safety: lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagian, James P. [National Center for Patient Safety, Department of Veterans Affairs, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2006-04-15

    The traditional approach to patient safety in health care has ranged from reticence to outward denial of serious flaws. This undermines the otherwise remarkable advances in technology and information that have characterized the specialty of medical practice. In addition, lessons learned in industries outside health care, such as in aviation, provide opportunities for improvements that successfully reduce mishaps and errors while maintaining a standard of excellence. This is precisely the call in medicine prompted by the 1999 Institute of Medicine report ''To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System.'' However, to effect these changes, key components of a successful safety system must include: (1) communication, (2) a shift from a posture of reliance on human infallibility (hence ''shame and blame'') to checklists that recognize the contribution of the system and account for human limitations, and (3) a cultivation of non-punitive open and/or de-identified/anonymous reporting of safety concerns, including close calls, in addition to adverse events. (orig.)

  15. Constellation Program Lessons Learned. Volume 2; Detailed Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer; Neubek, Deborah J.; Thomas, L. Dale

    2011-01-01

    These lessons learned are part of a suite of hardware, software, test results, designs, knowledge base, and documentation that comprises the legacy of the Constellation Program. The context, summary information, and lessons learned are presented in a factual format, as known and described at the time. While our opinions might be discernable in the context, we have avoided all but factually sustainable statements. Statements should not be viewed as being either positive or negative; their value lies in what we did and what we learned that is worthy of passing on. The lessons include both "dos" and "don ts." In many cases, one person s "do" can be viewed as another person s "don t"; therefore, we have attempted to capture both perspectives when applicable and useful. While Volume I summarizes the views of those who managed the program, this Volume II encompasses the views at the working level, describing how the program challenges manifested in day-to-day activities. Here we see themes that were perhaps hinted at, but not completely addressed, in Volume I: unintended consequences of policies that worked well at higher levels but lacked proper implementation at the working level; long-term effects of the "generation gap" in human space flight development, the need to demonstrate early successes at the expense of thorough planning, and the consequences of problems and challenges not yet addressed because other problems and challenges were more immediate or manifest. Not all lessons learned have the benefit of being operationally vetted, since the program was cancelled shortly after Preliminary Design Review. We avoid making statements about operational consequences (with the exception of testing and test flights that did occur), but we do attempt to provide insight into how operational thinking influenced design and testing. The lessons have been formatted with a description, along with supporting information, a succinct statement of the lesson learned, and

  16. Lessons learned from vitrification campaigns at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research at Clemson University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six vitrification campaigns on surrogate low-level radioactive mixed wastes have been completed at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research at Clemson University. Two glass melters were utilized in these trials: the EnVitco EV-16 Joule heated glass melter and the Stir-Melter WV-0.25 stiffed melter. The quality of glass made in the melters was excellent. In all cases, glass durabilities (measured by the Product Consistency Test - PCT) were much better than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass and leachabilities (measured by Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure - TCLP) were lower than Land Disposal Requirements (LDR). A few processing difficulties were encountered during the melter campaigns. These difficulties were due in part to a desire to obtain high waste loadings and aggressive operation of the melters. Devitrification of the melts was especially evident with high calcium compositions. In the EnVitco melter, corrosion of molybdenum electrodes occurred by alloying with reduced metals in the melt and significant corrosion of flux block refractory occurred when operating at high temperatures. In the stirred melter, rapid degradation of the impeller was observed in two instances likely due to localized melting of Inconel trademark 690 caused by a malfunctioning power supply. The focus of this paper is to describe the performance of the melters and convey open-quotes lessons learnedclose quotes from these campaigns for application to current and future vitrification efforts

  17. Lessons learned related to packaging and transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of lessons learned as a tool for learning from past experiences is well established, especially by many organizations within the nuclear industry. Every person has, at some time, used the principles of lessons learned to adopt good work practices based on their own experiences or the experiences of others. Lessons learned can also help to avoid the recurrence of adverse practices, which is often an area that most lessons-learned programs tend to focus on. This paper will discuss how lessons learned relate to packaging and transportation issues and events experienced at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. It will also discuss the role performed by the Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety's Office of Operating Experience Analysis and Feedback in disseminating lessons learned and operating experience feedback to the DOE complex. The central concept of lessons learned is that any organization should be able to learn from its own experiences and events. In addition, organizations should implement methodologies to scan external environments for lessons learned, to analyze and determine the relevance of lessons learned, and to bring about the necessary changes learned from these experiences. With increased concerns toward facility safety, the importance of utilizing the lessons-learned principles and the establishment of lessons-learned programs can not be overstated

  18. Basic safety principles: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation reviews the following issues: basic safety principles and lessons learned; some conclusions from the Kemeny report on the accident at TMI; some recommendations from the Kemeny report on the accident at TMI; conclusions and recommendations from the Rogovin report on the accident on TMI; instrumentation deficiencies (from Rogovin report)

  19. Constellation Lessons Learned Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, L. Dale; Neubek, Deb

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the lessons learned from the Constellation Program (CxP) and identified several factors that contributed to the inability of the CxP to meet the cost and schedule commitments. The review includes a significant section on the context in which the CxP operated since new programs are likely to experience the same constraints.

  20. FRMAC-93 lessons learned report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FRMAC-93 simulated a radiological accident at the Fort Calhoun nuclear power plant, 25 miles north of Omaha, Nebraska. The exercise involved the state Iowa and Nebraska, NRC as the lead Federal agency, FRMAC (Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center), and several federal agencies with statutory emergency responsibility. FRMAC-93 was a major 2-day field exercise designed to determine the effectiveness, coordination, and operations of a DOE-managed FRMAC. Other objectives were to ensure that appropriate priorities were established and assistance was provided to the states and the lead Federal agency by FRMAC. Day 1 involved the Fort Calhoun evaluated plume phase exercise. On Day 2, the flow of data, which was slow initially, improved so that confidence of states and other federal responders in FRMAC support capabilities was high. The impact and lessons learned from FRMAC-93 provided the necessary impetus to make organizational and operational changes to the FRMAC program, which were put into effect in the DOE exercise FREMONT at Hanford 3 months later

  1. Lessons Learned from EAST's Failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Significant progresses have been obtained on EAST tokamak partially based on lessons from its failures marked by more than 20 times leakages from PFC and 1.6 ton water inside of vacuum chamber. Lessons learned from major failures in EAST have been summarized in this paper. Major failures came from design, construction, commissioning and operation phases have been described which have been classified as imperfect design, QA control, failure of components and lack of understanding. Predictions for further risks and possible ways to mitigating these risks have been given in this paper. (author)

  2. Lessons Learned from the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Matt; Patel, Deepak; Bradshaw, Heather; Robinson, Frank; Neuberger, Dave

    2016-01-01

    The ICESat-2 Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) instrument is an upcoming Earth Science mission focusing on the effects of climate change. The flight instrument passed all environmental testing at GSFC (Goddard Space Flight Center) and is now ready to be shipped to the spacecraft vendor for integration and testing. This presentation walks through the lessons learned from design, hardware, analysis and testing perspective. ATLAS lessons learned include general thermal design, analysis, hardware, and testing issues as well as lessons specific to laser systems, two-phase thermal control, and optical assemblies with precision alignment requirements.

  3. Learning from Lessons Learned: Project Management Research Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kam Jugdev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: When we fail to learn from our own mistakes or those of others, we tend to repeat the mistakes. This study discusses lessons learned as important ways of gathering and sharing both formal and informal project knowledge. Approach: The study presents findings of three studies from a research program on lessons learned. The first study is a content analysis of two sets of conference proceedings. The second study is a case study from the energy sector on lessons learned. The final study is a content analysis of the Project Management Body of Knowledge� Guide. Results: The conference proceedings study indicated that the topic of lessons learned was under represented within the conference proceedings. This was in keeping with the literature review that the topic of lessons learned is emerging. The energy sector study shed light on the lessons learned process, best practices and challenges. The content analysis of the Project Management Body of Knowledge Guide� showed that the guide defines lessons learned narrowly, primarily as a set of administrative, documented outputs pertaining mainly to the closeout phase. This was also evident in the guide�s commodification of lessons learned (and related terms. Conclusion/Recommendations: This study contributes to the fields of project management, knowledge management and workplace learning. Academics and practitioners use various terms to refer to lessons learned. Negative events often compel companies to add lessons learned practices to their project management processes. In order to conduct effective lessons learned, there has to be management support, the right stakeholders should be involved and knowledge should be shared in both codified and uncodified ways. Lessons learned are processes that involve formal and informal learning. Effective lessons learned can be embedded into a company’s practices, especially through informal learning and sharing practices, such as

  4. Software Carpentry: lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Since its start in 1998, Software Carpentry has evolved from a week-long training course at the US national laboratories into a worldwide volunteer effort to improve researchers' computing skills. This paper explains what we have learned along the way, the challenges we now face, and our plans for the future. PMID:24715981

  5. Software Carpentry: Lessons Learned

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, Software Carpentry has evolved from a week-long training course at the US national laboratories into a worldwide volunteer effort to raise standards in scientific computing. This article explains what we have learned along the way the challenges we now face, and our plans for the future.

  6. Personal Inquiry: lessons learned

    OpenAIRE

    Anastopolou, Stamatina; Sharples, Mike; Wright, Michael; Ainsworth, Shaaron; Crook, Charles; Norton , Bronya; O'Malley, Claire

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes a school trial carried out to support inquiry learning between formal and informal settings supported by personal mobile technology. The aim of the school trial was to explore how a first version of the PI Toolkit facilitates secondary school students in performing a personally relevant scientific inquiry both in a science classroom as well as at home. An analysis of classroom video and interviews has resulted in a set of incidents from which we have derived design guideli...

  7. Eight lucky lessons learned

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alice; Shu-Hsien; Wu

    2009-01-01

    Since my father, Ray Wu, would have been 80 years old this past August, the eighth month of 2008, and since 8 is a lucky number in China-associated with good luck and good fortune (as seen so dramatically in the Beijing Olympics)-I thought I would write about 8 important things that I was lucky to have the chance to learn from my father.

  8. Implementing Geriatric Resources for Assessment and Care of Elders Team Care in a Veterans Affairs Medical Center: Lessons Learned and Effects Observed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Cathy C; Myers, Laura J; Allen, Katie; Counsell, Steven R

    2016-07-01

    In a randomized clinical trial, Geriatric Resources for Assessment and Care of Elders (GRACE), a model of care that works in collaboration with primary care providers (PCPs) and patient-centered medical homes to provide home-based geriatric care management focusing on geriatric syndromes and psychosocial problems commonly found in older adults, improved care quality and reduced acute care use for high-risk, low-income older adults. To assess the effect of GRACE at a Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center (VAMC), veterans aged 65 and older from Marion County, Indiana, with PCPs from four of five VAMC clinics who were not on hospice or dialysis were enrolled in GRACE after discharge home from an acute hospitalization. After an initial home-based transition visit to GRACE enrollees, the GRACE team returned to conduct a geriatric assessment. Guided by 12 protocols and input from an interdisciplinary panel and the PCP, the GRACE team developed and implemented a veteran-centric care plan. Hospitalized veterans from the fifth clinic, who otherwise met enrollment criteria, served as a usual-care comparison group. Demographic, comorbidity, and usage data were drawn from VA databases. The GRACE and comparison groups were similar in age, sex, and burden of comorbidity, although predicted risk of 1-year mortality in GRACE veterans was higher. Even so, GRACE enrollment was associated with 7.1% fewer emergency department visits, 14.8% fewer 30-day readmissions, 37.9% fewer hospital admissions, and 28.5% fewer total bed days of care, saving the VAMC an estimated $200,000 per year after program costs during the study for the 179 veterans enrolled in GRACE. Having engaged, enthusiastic VA leadership and GRACE staff; aligning closely with the medical home; and accommodating patient acuity were among the important lessons learned during implementation. PMID:27305428

  9. Learning from Lessons Learned: Project Management Research Program

    OpenAIRE

    Kam Jugdev

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: When we fail to learn from our own mistakes or those of others, we tend to repeat the mistakes. This study discusses lessons learned as important ways of gathering and sharing both formal and informal project knowledge. Approach: The study presents findings of three studies from a research program on lessons learned. The first study is a content analysis of two sets of conference proceedings. The second study is a case study from the energy sector on lessons learned. The fi...

  10. Comparisons and lessons learned

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker; van der Voordt, Theo; Coenen, Christian;

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To create an overview and evaluation of the achievements of the contributions in this book by identifying, summarising and discussing cross-cutting themes and essential learning points across the former chapters. Methodology: Based on a purposeful reading of all chapters comparisons...... are made of the essential theoretical perspectives, conceptual models and findings from empirical research. The most important novel aspects of the contributions are pinpointed. Findings: The three basic perspectives of FM, CREM and B2B marketing show to provide both overlapping and complementary focus......, while FM is more service and process oriented. Empirical research regarding the added value of FM is seen to utilise a broad range of both qualitative and quantitative methods in various combinations. The contributions provide important new focus and insights on different types of added value, its...

  11. CT1, Lessons learned in CA2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne; Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund

    2010-01-01

    This report summarises lessons learned from the 3 years of the Concerted Action 2 project with focus on the topic building energy "Certification Processes".......This report summarises lessons learned from the 3 years of the Concerted Action 2 project with focus on the topic building energy "Certification Processes"....

  12. Heartland Payment Systems: lessons learned from a data breach

    OpenAIRE

    Julia S. Cheney

    2010-01-01

    On August 13, 2009, the Payment Cards Center hosted a workshop examining the changing nature of data security in consumer electronic payments. The center invited the chairman and CEO of Heartland Payment Systems (HPS or Heartland), Robert (Bob) Carr, to lead this discussion and to share his experiences stemming from the data breach at his company in late 2008 and, as important, to discuss lessons learned as a result of this event. The former director of the Payment Cards Center, Peter Burns, ...

  13. Grant writing for childbirth educators: lessons learned from the resource center for young parents-to-be.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Brenda S; Broussard, Anne B

    2010-01-01

    Obtaining funding to support community-based childbirth education programs can be a challenge for childbirth educators who may have little grant-writing experience. This article was written by two nurse educators/nurse-midwives who have been involved for over 10 years with a grant-funded parenting and childbirth education program for pregnant teens. It reviews the background of the Resource Center for Young Parents-To-Be, suggests grant-funding sources, and explains the building of partnerships in the community. The basic steps involved in the grant-writing process are presented as well as the importance of follow-up evaluations and reports. Grant-writing skills and the ability to forge partnerships with other community organizations can be important tools for childbirth educators and health-care professionals. PMID:21197129

  14. Engaging Partners to Initiate Evaluation Efforts: Tactics Used and Lessons Learned From the Prevention Research Centers Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demia Sundra Wright, MPH

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s Prevention Research Centers (PRC Program underwent a 2-year evaluation planning project using a participatory process that allowed perspectives from the national community of PRC partners to be expressed and reflected in a national logic model.ContextThe PRC Program recognized the challenge in developing a feasible, useable, and relevant evaluation process for a large, diverse program. To address the challenge, participatory and utilization-focused evaluation models were used.MethodsFour tactics guided the evaluation planning process: 1 assessing stakeholders’ communication needs and existing communication mechanisms and infrastructure; 2 using existing mechanisms and establishing others as needed to inform, educate, and request feedback; 3 listening to and using feedback received; and 4 obtaining adequate resources and building flexibility into the project plan to support multifaceted mechanisms for data collection.ConsequencesParticipatory methods resulted in buy-in from stakeholders and the development of a national logic model. Benefits included CDC’s use of the logic model for program planning and development of a national evaluation protocol and increased expectations among PRC partners for involvement. Challenges included the time, effort, and investment of program resources required for the participatory approach and the identification of whom to engage and when to engage them for feedback on project decisions.InterpretationBy using a participatory and utilization-focused model, program partners positively influenced how CDC developed an evaluation plan. The tactics we used can guide the involvement of program stakeholders and help with decisions on appropriate methods and approaches for engaging partners.

  15. Implementing US Department of Energy lessons learned programs. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The DOE Lessons Learned Handbook is a two-volume publication developed to supplement the DOE Lessons Learned Standard (DOE-STD-7501-95) with information that will organizations in developing or improving their lessons learned programs. Volume 1 includes greater detail than the Standard in areas such as identification and documentation of lessons learned; it also contains sections on specific processes such as training and performance measurement. Volume 2 (this document) contains examples of program documents developed by existing lessons learned programs as well as communications material, functional categories, transmittal documents, sources of professional and industry lessons learned, and frequently asked questions about the Lessons Learned List Service.

  16. Lessons learned during the D & D of Fernald Plant 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motl, G.P.; Borgman, T.D.

    1994-01-14

    This document contains information about lessons learned from the decontamination and decommissioning of the Feed Materials Production Center in Fernald Ohio. The information relates to Plant 7 which was constructed to house processes for the reduction of uranium hexafluoride to uranium tetrafluoride. Topics discussed include: washdown, lockdown, asbestos removal, and bidding for dismantlement projects.

  17. Flight Planning Branch Space Shuttle Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Jennifer B.; Scott, Tracy A.; Hyde, Crystal M.

    2011-01-01

    Planning products and procedures that allow the mission flight control teams and the astronaut crews to plan, train and fly every Space Shuttle mission have been developed by the Flight Planning Branch at the NASA Johnson Space Center. As the Space Shuttle Program ends, lessons learned have been collected from each phase of the successful execution of these Shuttle missions. Specific examples of how roles and responsibilities of console positions that develop the crew and vehicle attitude timelines will be discussed, as well as techniques and methods used to solve complex spacecraft and instrument orientation problems. Additionally, the relationships and procedural hurdles experienced through international collaboration have molded operations. These facets will be explored and related to current and future operations with the International Space Station and future vehicles. Along with these important aspects, the evolution of technology and continual improvement of data transfer tools between the shuttle and ground team has also defined specific lessons used in the improving the control teams effectiveness. Methodologies to communicate and transmit messages, images, and files from Mission Control to the Orbiter evolved over several years. These lessons have been vital in shaping the effectiveness of safe and successful mission planning that have been applied to current mission planning work in addition to being incorporated into future space flight planning. The critical lessons from all aspects of previous plan, train, and fly phases of shuttle flight missions are not only documented in this paper, but are also discussed as how they pertain to changes in process and consideration for future space flight planning.

  18. Lessons Learned in Building the Ares Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumrall, John Phil

    2010-01-01

    Since being established in 2005, the Ares Projects at Marshall Space Flight Center have been making steady progress designing, building, testing, and flying the next generation of exploration launch vehicles. Ares is committed to rebuilding crucial capabilities from the Apollo era that made the first human flights to the Moon possible, as well as incorporating the latest in computer technology and changes in management philosophy. One example of an Apollo-era practice has been giving NASA overall authority over vehicle integration activities, giving civil service engineers hands-on experience in developing rocket hardware. This knowledge and experience help make the agency a "smart buyer" of products and services. More modern practices have been added to the management tool belt to improve efficiency, cost effectiveness, and institutional knowledge, including knowledge management/capture to gain better insight into design and decision making; earned value management, where Ares won a NASA award for its practice and implementation; designing for operability; and Lean Six Sigma applications to identify and eliminate wasted time and effort. While it is important to learn technical lessons like how to fly and control unique rockets like the Ares I-X flight test vehicle, the Ares management team also has been learning important lessons about how to manage large, long-term projects.

  19. Lessons Learned from TOPOFF 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Top Officials (TOPOFF) National Domestic Counter-terrorism Exercise Series mandated by Public Law 106-553 established through the Department of Homeland Security National Exercise Program (NEP) conducted the fourth nationwide exercise, TOPOFF 4, October 15-20, 2007. The exercise simulated a terrorist attack using radiological dispersion devices (RDD) in multiple locations in US cities and a US territory. Roughly 15,000 individuals participated in the exercise with the goal of determining the readiness of our emergency responders to implement the National Response Plan, Incident Command Systems, and National Incident Management Systems to handle a terrorist attack using unconventional weapons. This paper will address the publicly available 'lessons learned' from the latest of the nationwide exercises through a review of the 'after action reports' prepared by participating agencies and related documentation. (authors)

  20. Lessons learned from external hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a study performed by the European Clearinghouse of the Joint Research Centre on Operational Experience for nuclear power plants in cooperation with IRSN and GRS covering events reported by nuclear power plants in relation to external hazards. It summarizes the review of 235 event reports from 3 different databases. The events were grouped in 9 categories according to the nature of the external hazard involved, and the specific lessons learned and recommendations that can be derived from each of these categories are presented. Additional 'cross-cutting' recommendations covering several or all the external hazards considered are also discussed. These recommendations can be useful in preventing this type of events from happening again or in limiting their consequences. The study was launched in 2010 and therefore it does not cover the Fukushima event. This paper presents the main findings and recommendations raised by this study. (orig.)

  1. Incidents in the Spanish Industry. Learned Lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessons learned: It is necessary to check the by-products with which these leave the facility; It is very important to communicate as soon as possible the event in order to minimize the generated radioactive wastes

  2. N Reactor Lessons Learned workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a workshop designed to introduce participants to a process, or model, for adapting LWR Safety Standards and Analysis Methods for use on rector designs significantly different than LWR. The focus of the workshop is on the ''Lessons Learned'' from the multi-year experience in the operation of N Reactor and the efforts to adapt the safety standards developed for commercial light water reactors to a graphite moderated, water cooled, channel type reactor. It must be recognized that the objective of the workshop is to introduce the participants to the operation of a non-LWR in a LWR regulatory world. The total scope of this topic would take weeks to provide a through overview. The objective of this workshop is to provide an introduction and hopefully establish a means to develop a longer term dialogue for technical exchange. This report provides outline of the workshop, a proposed schedule of the workshop, and a description of the tasks will be required to achieve successful completion of the project

  3. Lessons Learned on Implementing Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR) in a Ground Launch Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferell, Bob; Lewis, Mark; Perotti, Jose; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Goerz, Jesse; Brown, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This paper's main purpose is to detail issues and lessons learned regarding designing, integrating, and implementing Fault Detection Isolation and Recovery (FDIR) for Constellation Exploration Program (CxP) Ground Operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC).

  4. Lessons of Diversity Learned the Hard Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Through experiences training teachers across the country, the author gains insight into the necessity to accommodate diverse Native American learners. Sensitivity to Native American learning styles and values enables the author to better meet individual needs and learn valuable lessons in diversity. The author tells the story of her experiences…

  5. Extension Learning Exchange: Lessons from Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treadwell, Paul; Lachapelle, Paul; Howe, Rod

    2013-01-01

    There is a clear need to support global professional development, international education, and collaborative learning opportunities in Extension. The program described here established an international learning exchange in Nicaragua to lead to global professional development and future international collaboration. The primary lessons and outcomes…

  6. Applying pharmaceutical lessons: learning lessons from the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, B

    1998-06-01

    Systematic evaluation of a project, product or other successes, and failures, is an important method for improving the performance of a company, as well as that of an individual. One should evaluate and determine if lessons learned can be applied to the systems and procedures being used in the company. Even if the company does not have to adjust its strategies, procedures, portfolio or systems as a result of lessons it has learned, there may be pointers to communicate to staff. It is easy for many aspects of a system to become outdated, particularly in an organization that is growing or changing rapidly. It is therefore generally appropriate to evaluate the company's regulatory compliance, toxicology compliance, clinical auditing practices and other appropriate systems on an annual or biannual basis. Most lessons of success or failure are specific to a single situation because of the combination of people, drug, competition, priorities and many other factors involved, and cannot be extrapolated to other situations. Some general lessons and principles are presented that will facilitate drug discovery, development and marketing. PMID:15616644

  7. X-31 Mishap: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Richard R.

    2007-01-01

    , and the program was successfully completed without incident. This presentation also shows a video of the mishap including lessons learned, and the changes that were made to resume the flight-test program are presented.

  8. Lessons Learned In Developing The VACIS Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SAIC's development of VACIS provides useful 'lessons learned' in bridging the gap from an idea to a security or contraband detection product. From a gamma densitometer idea for solving a specific Customs Service (CS) requirement (detection of drugs in near-empty tanker trucks) in mid-1990's, SAIC developed a broad line of vehicle and cargo inspections systems (over 500 systems deployed to date) based on a gamma-ray radiographic imaging technique. This paper analyzes the reasons for the successful development of VACIS and attempts to identify ''lessons learned'' useful for future security and contraband detection product developments.

  9. Very Large System Dynamics Models - Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Leonard Malczynski

    2008-10-01

    This paper provides lessons learned from developing several large system dynamics (SD) models. System dynamics modeling practice emphasize the need to keep models small so that they are manageable and understandable. This practice is generally reasonable and prudent; however, there are times that large SD models are necessary. This paper outlines two large SD projects that were done at two Department of Energy National Laboratories, the Idaho National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories. This paper summarizes the models and then discusses some of the valuable lessons learned during these two modeling efforts.

  10. Lessons learned from early criticality accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four accidents involving the approach to criticality occurred during the period July, 1945, through May, 1996. These have been described in the format of the OPERATING EXPERIENCE WEEKLY SUMMARY which is distributed by the Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety. Although the lessons learned have been incorporated in standards, codes, and formal procedures during the last fifty years, this is their first presentation in this format. It is particularly appropriate that they be presented in the forum of the Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Project Workshop closest to the fiftieth anniversary of the last of the four accidents, and that which was most instrumental in demonstrating the need to incorporate lessons learned

  11. Library 101: Why, How, and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Michael; King, David Lee

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how and why the Library 101 Project was created and the lessons that the developers learned out of this project. The Library 101 is a project that challenges librarians to revise the paradigm of "basic" library services in order to remain relevant in this technology-driven world. It was developed by Michael Porter,…

  12. Improving IT Project Portfolio Management: Lessons Learned

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Keld

    2013-01-01

    The IT PPM improvement process is not well understood, and our knowledge about what makes IT PPM improvement succeed or fail is not well developed. This article presents lessons learned from organizations trying to improve their IT PPM practice. Based on this research IT PPM practitioners are...

  13. Commissioning MMS: Challenges and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Paul; Gramling, Cheryl; Reiter, Jennifer; Smith, Patrick; Stone, John

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses commissioning of NASA's Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) Mission. The mission includes four identical spacecraft with a large, complex set of instrumentation. The planning for and execution of commissioning for this mission is described. The paper concludes by discussing lessons learned.

  14. Lessons learned from existing biomass power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltsee, G.

    2000-02-24

    This report includes summary information on 20 biomass power plants, which represent some of the leaders in the industry. In each category an effort is made to identify plants that illustrate particular points. The project experiences described capture some important lessons learned that lead in the direction of an improved biomass power industry.

  15. From Lessons Learned to Emerging Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baizerman, Michael; Roholt, Ross VeLure; Korum, Kathy; Rana, Sheetal

    2013-01-01

    Organizational development is based in part on knowledge development, both formal, scientifically proven and also nonscientific practice wisdom. This article brings together all of the lessons learned over our six years of work with Saint Paul Parks and Recreation, and suggests the practice utility of these.

  16. Developing a Workplace Skills Course: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holter, Norma C.; Kopka, Donald J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the development of a multidisciplinary cornerstone business course focused on communication, teamwork, problem solving, professional demeanor, research, ethics, and diversity. Discusses lessons learned: change itself raises obstacles, appropriate faculty are crucial, and time frame and course content should not be overly ambitious. (SK)

  17. SOFIA Program SE and I Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ronald J.; Fobel, Laura J.; Brignola, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Once a "Troubled Project" threatened with cancellation, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) Program has overcome many difficult challenges and recently achieved its first light images. To achieve success, SOFIA had to overcome significant deficiencies in fundamental Systems Engineering identified during a major Program restructuring. This presentation will summarize the lessons learn in Systems Engineering on the SOFIA Program. After the Program was reformulated, an initial assessment of Systems Engineering established the scope of the problem and helped to set a list of priorities that needed to be work. A revised Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) was written to address the new Program structure and requirements established in the approved NPR7123.1A. An important result of the "Technical Planning" effort was the decision by the Program and Technical Leadership team to re-phasing the lifecycle into increments. The reformed SOFIA Program Office had to quickly develop and establish several new System Engineering core processes including; Requirements Management, Risk Management, Configuration Management and Data Management. Implementing these processes had to consider the physical and cultural diversity of the SOFIA Program team which includes two Projects spanning two NASA Centers, a major German partnership, and sub-contractors located across the United States and Europe. The SOFIA Program experience represents a creative approach to doing "System Engineering in the middle" while a Program is well established. Many challenges were identified and overcome. The SOFIA example demonstrates it is never too late to benefit from fixing deficiencies in the System Engineering processes.

  18. Teaching science to science teachers: Lessons taught and lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, E. M.; Hashimoto-Martell, E. A.; Balicki, S.; Oglavie, D. R.

    2009-12-01

    our diverse participants was a constant challenge for us as instructors. In summer 2008, the course was organized so that fundamentals (chemistry, heat transfer, convection, physics) were taught in the first week and then applied in broader topics (water cycle, carbon cycle, weather and precipitation) in the second week. Learning these fundamentals was challenging for many teachers. Furthermore, the organization of topics caused frustration because there was not enough connection to the broader concepts of the course. In summer 2009, we rearranged the topics and interwove fundamentals with contextual topics within each week. We found this approach to be more successful in engaging and educating the teachers. The most successful activities were often the simplest to organize. Valuable instructional strategies included daily assessments in the form of morning quizzes, keeping a class website with all course materials, and centering the major project of the course around a lesson that teachers would design for their particular context. We saw a dramatic improvement in pre- and post-assessment test scores, with the class average increasing from 58% (pre-test) to 95% (post-test).

  19. Lessons Learned Study Final Report for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Laak, Jim; Brumfield, M. Larry; Moore, Arlene A.; Anderson, Brooke; Dempsey, Jim; Gifford, Bob; Holloway, Chip; Johnson, Keith

    2004-01-01

    This report is the final product of a 90-day study performed for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. The study was to assemble lessons NASA has learned from previous programs that could help the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate pursue the Exploration vision. It focuses on those lessons that should have the greatest significance to the Directorate during the formulation of program and mission plans. The study team reviewed a large number of lessons learned reports and data bases, including the Columbia Accident Investigation Board and Rogers Commission reports on the Shuttle accidents, accident reports from robotic space flight systems, and a number of management reviews by the Defense Sciences Board, Government Accountability Office, and others. The consistency of the lessons, findings, and recommendations validate the adequacy of the data set. In addition to reviewing existing databases, a series of workshops was held at each of the NASA centers and headquarters that included senior managers from the current workforce as well as retirees. The full text of the workshop reports is included in Appendix A. A lessons learned website was opened up to permit current and retired NASA personnel and on-site contractors to input additional lessons as they arise. These new lessons, when of appropriate quality and relevance, will be brought to the attention of managers. The report consists of four parts: Part 1 provides a small set of lessons, called the Executive Lessons Learned, that represent critical lessons that the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate should act on immediately. This set of Executive Lessons and their supporting rationale have been reviewed at length and fully endorsed by a team of distinguished NASA alumni; Part 2 contains a larger set of lessons, called the Selected Lessons Learned, which have been chosen from the lessons database and center workshop reports on the basis of their specific significance and relevance to the near

  20. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration lessons learned: 1993 technology demonstrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integrated technology demonstration was conducted by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Cold Test Pit in the summer of 1993. This program and demonstration was sponsored by the US Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. The demonstration included six technologies representing a synergistic system for the characterization and retrieval of a buried hazardous waste site. The integrated technology demonstration proved very successful and a summary of the technical accomplishments is presented. Upon completion of the integrated technology demonstration, cognizant program personnel participated in a lessons learned exercise. This exercise was conducted at the Simplot Decision Support Center at Idaho State University and lessons learned activity captured additional information relative to the integration of technologies for demonstration purposes. This information will be used by BWID to enhance program planning and strengthen future technology demonstrations

  1. Lessons Learned and Technical Standards: A Logical Marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Paul; Vaughan, William W.; Garcia, Danny; Gill, Maninderpal S. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive database of lessons learned that corresponds with relevant technical standards would be a boon to technical personnel and standards developers. The authors discuss the emergence of one such database within NASA, and show how and why the incorporation of lessons learned into technical standards databases can be an indispensable tool for government and industry. Passed down from parent to child, teacher to pupil, and from senior to junior employees, lessons learned have been the basis for our accomplishments throughout the ages. Government and industry, too, have long recognized the need to systematically document And utilize the knowledge gained from past experiences in order to avoid the repetition of failures and mishaps. The use of lessons learned is a principle component of any organizational culture committed to continuous improvement. They have formed the foundation for discoveries, inventions, improvements, textbooks, and technical standards. Technical standards are a very logical way to communicate these lessons. Using the time-honored tradition of passing on lessons learned while utilizing the newest in information technology, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has launched an intensive effort to link lessons learned with specific technical standards through various Internet databases. This article will discuss the importance of lessons learned to engineers, the difficulty in finding relevant lessons learned while engaged in an engineering project, and the new NASA project that can help alleviate this difficulty. The article will conclude with recommendations for more expanded cross-sectoral uses of lessons learned with reference to technical standards.

  2. WHC significant lessons learned 1993--1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickford, J.C.

    1997-12-12

    A lesson learned as defined in DOE-STD-7501-95, Development of DOE Lessons Learned Programs, is: A ``good work practice`` or innovative approach that is captured and shared to promote repeat applications or an adverse work practice or experience that is captured and shared to avoid a recurrence. The key word in both parts of this definition is ``shared``. This document was published to share a wide variety of recent Hanford experiences with other DOE sites. It also provides a valuable tool to be used in new employee and continuing training programs at Hanford facilities and at other DOE locations. This manual is divided into sections to facilitate extracting appropriate subject material when developing training modules. Many of the bulletins could be categorized into more than one section, however, so examination of other related sections is encouraged.

  3. Turning Operational Lessons Learned into Design Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The capabilities and limitations of a particular system design are well known by the people who operate it. Operational workarounds, operational notes and lessons learned are traditional methods for dealing with and documenting design shortcomings. The beginning of each new program brings the hope that hard-learned lessons will be incorporated into the next new system. But often operations personnel find their well-intentioned efforts frustrated by an inability to have their inputs considered by design personnel who have strictly-scoped requirements that are coupled with ambitious cost and schedule targets. There is a way for operational inputs to make it into the design, but the solution involves a combination of organizational culture and technical data. Any organization that utilizes this approach can realize significant benefits over the life cycle of their project.

  4. Incidents in Spanish Industry: Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a number of incidents involving the detection of radioactive materials which have occurred at Spanish steel plants in the period since the Protocol came into effect. The incidents illustrate the procedures followed in Spain for their management and the interaction of the government organizations and private companies as a result of the Protocol. The lessons learned from the incidents and the resulting changes brought about in procedures are described. (author)

  5. New Reactor Licensing Status and Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation deals with new reactor licensing status and lessons learned in the USA. The presentation covers a status of licensing for large light water reactors in the USA and insights and lessons learned from licensing reviews and on-going construction activities. In the area of lessons learned, the presentation highlights the importance of pre-application interactions between applicants and the regulator. It notes that early interactions and reviews are important for major policy and technical issues and areas where research may be needed. It highlights the importance of communication, the success of on-sight audits of detailed calculations and analyses, and the importance for applicants and regulators to be aware of issues arising on similar applications domestically and internationally. It next discusses the importance of translation of design into construction documents as well as the need to ensure that construction is conducted in accordance with the licensing basis, especially under the U.S. one-step licensing process. The presentation also provides a discussion on new processes being implemented to address the need for changes during construction. These include a preliminary amendment request process by which the licensee could seek a no objection letter from the regulator to proceeding with installing and testing a proposed change pending U.S.NRC's review of the license amendment request. It also discusses the use of pre-submittal meetings with licensees on draft amendment requests in order to provide feedback and expedite the review of the amendments when submitted. It notes the ongoing work to address Fukushima lessons learned. It concludes by noting that the U.S.NRC has initiated a comprehensive review to identify best practices and potential enhancements to its new reactor licensing processes and that a report should be published in early 2013

  6. Adaptive simulated annealing (ASA): Lessons learned

    OpenAIRE

    Ingber, L.

    2000-01-01

    Adaptive simulated annealing (ASA) is a global optimization algorithm based on an associated proof that the parameter space can be sampled much more efficiently than by using other previous simulated annealing algorithms. The author's ASA code has been publicly available for over two years. During this time the author has volunteered to help people via e-mail, and the feedback obtained has been used to further develop the code. Some lessons learned, in particular some which are relevant to ot...

  7. Automated Reasoning Across Tactical Stories to Derive Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wesley Regian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The Military Analogical Reasoning System (MARS is a performance support system and decision aid for commanders in Tactical Operations Centers. MARS enhances and supports the innate human ability for using stories to reason about tactical goals, plans, situations, and outcomes. The system operates by comparing many instances of stored tactical stories, determining which have analogous situations and lessons learned, and then returning a description of the lessons learned. The description of the lessons learned is at a level of abstraction that can be generalized to an appropriate range of tactical situations. The machine-understandable story representation is based on a military operations data model and associated tactical situation ontology. Thus each story can be thought of, and reasoned about, as an instance of an unfolding tactical situation. The analogical reasoning algorithm is based on Gentner's Structure Mapping Theory. Consider the following two stories. In the first, a U.S. platoon in Viet Nam diverts around a minefield and subsequently comes under ambush from a large hill overlooking their new position. In the second, a U.S. task force in Iraq diverts around a biochemical hazard and subsequently comes under ambush from the roof of an abandoned building. MARS recognizes these stories as analogical, and derives the following abstraction: When enemy-placed obstacles force us into an unplanned route, beware of ambush from elevation or concealment. In this paper we describe the MARS interface, military operations data model, tactical situation ontology, and analogical reasoning algorithm.

  8. Low level waste shipment accident lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On October 1, 1994 a shipment of low-level waste from the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio, was involved in an accident near Rolla, Missouri. The accident did not result in the release of any radioactive material. The accident did generate important lessons learned primarily in the areas of driver and emergency response communications. The shipment was comprised of an International Standards Organization (ISO) container on a standard flatbed trailer. The accident caused the low-level waste package to separate from the trailer and come to rest on its top in the median. The impact of the container with the pavement and median inflicted relatively minor damage to the container. The damage was not substantial enough to cause failure of container integrity. The success of the package is attributable to the container design and the packaging procedures used at the Fernald Environmental Management Project for low-level waste shipments. Although the container survived the initial wreck, is was nearly breached when the first responders attempted to open the ISO container. Even though the container was clearly marked and the shipment documentation was technically correct, this information did not identify that the ISO container was the primary containment for the waste. The lessons learned from this accident have DOE complex wide applicability. This paper is intended to describe the accident, subsequent emergency response operations, and the lessons learned from this incident

  9. Organizational safety factors research lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Paper reports lessons learned and state of knowledge gained from an organizational factors research activity involving commercial nuclear power plants in the United States, through the end of 1991, as seen by the scientists immediately involved in the research. Lessons learned information was gathered from the research teams and individuals using a question and answer format. The following five questions were submitted to each team and individual: (1) What organizational factors appear to influence safety performance in some systematic way, (2) Should organizational factors research focus at the plant level, or should it extend beyond the plant level to the parent company, rate setting commissions, regulatory agencies, (3) How important is having direct access to plants for doing organizational factors research, (4) What lessons have been learned to date as the result of doing organizational factors research in a nuclear regulatory setting, and (5) What organizational research topics and issues should be pursued in the future? Conclusions based on the responses provided for this report are that organizational factors research can be conducted in a regulatory setting and produce useful results. Technologies pioneered in other academic, commercial, and military settings can be adopted for use in a nuclear regulatory setting. The future success of such research depends upon the cooperation of regulators, contractors, and the nuclear industry

  10. Research Data Curation Pilots: Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Minor

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the spring of 2011, the UC San Diego Research Cyberinfrastructure (RCI Implementation Team invited researchers and research teams to participate in a research curation and data management pilot program. This invitation took the form of a campus-wide solicitation. More than two dozen applications were received and, after due deliberation, the RCI Oversight Committee selected five curation-intensive projects. These projects were chosen based on a number of criteria, including how they represented campus research, varieties of topics, researcher engagement, and the various services required. The pilot process began in September 2011, and will be completed in early 2014. Extensive lessons learned from the pilots are being compiled and are being used in the on-going design and implementation of the permanent Research Data Curation Program in the UC San Diego Library. In this paper, we present specific implementation details of these various services, as well as lessons learned. The program focused on many aspects of contemporary scholarship, including data creation and storage, description and metadata creation, citation and publication, and long term preservation and access. Based on the lessons learned in our processes, the Research Data Curation Program will provide a suite of services from which campus users can pick and choose, as necessary. The program will provide support for the data management requirements from national funding agencies.

  11. Lessons learned from benchmark orthopaedic trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiontkowski, Marc F; Agel, Julie

    2012-07-18

    Benchmark trials in orthopaedics are designed to address a question of substantial interest to clinicians and patients. They are also designed to have prospective data collection, an adequate sample size, an appropriate duration of follow-up based on the injury or treatment under study, blinded adjudication of the outcome variables, appropriate statistical analyses, and widespread and effective dissemination of the information learned in the trial. There are multiple lessons to be gleaned from these trials: (1) Identifying an engaging and relevant clinical question will make it easier to identify centers that are willing to participate. (2) Individual site leadership, both of the overall project and at the individual site, is critical to the success of any trial. (3) Not every trial needs to have a randomized design; observational trials can provide data that will impact clinical care. (4) Patients should understand the long-term goals of the project when they are enrolled so that they have a sense of the importance of their role in the study. (5) Follow-up rates that are >90% are possible for orthopaedic trials, but effort and money are required to achieve this. (6) Patients who do not agree to be randomized should be enrolled as subjects in a parallel observational design if it is available. (7) Blinded adjudication of the outcome variables is recommended whenever feasible. (8) Partnership with the academic community is mandatory for the success of industry-funded, phase-3 United States Food and Drug Administration trials. (9) Intention-to-treat analysis and as-treated analysis should be reported. Benchmark orthopaedic trials can and will change clinical practice, but detailed planning must occur to ensure that the results are believable and relevant to the orthopaedic community. These trials are time-consuming and expensive, but with the use of careful initial planning and continued oversight during the trial, Level-I evidence will be obtained and will be useful

  12. Lessons learned in managing ICT systems for online learning

    OpenAIRE

    Liyanage, Lalith; Pasqual, Ajith; WRIGHT, CLAYTON

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenges faced and lessons learned during the management of an online educational network in Sri Lanka. In all aspects of learning, technology can make a significant impact. Technology, when used appropriately, can be very effective in terms of interactivity among learners, between learners and the content and between learners and teachers, especially in contrast to print-based traditional distance education. Most difficulties that arise are due to constraints of sc...

  13. Lessons in Developing Distance Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gant, Lenora Peters

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of video teletraining (VTT) for distance learning in the Department of Defense. Topics include planning and organizing the VTT facility, staff development, site facilitators, the necessity of protocol, instructional design and development strategies, student involvement and interactivity, and evaluation and assessment. (LRW)

  14. Lessons in bridge damage learned from the Wenchuan earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W. Phillip Yen; Genda Chen; Mark Yashinski; Youssef Hashash; Curtis Holub; Wang Kehai; GuoXiaodong

    2009-01-01

    A strong earthquake occurred in Wenchuan County, Sichuan Province, China, on May 12, 2008. Shortly after the earthquake, the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center of the Federal Highway Administration, in partnership with the Research Institute of Highways, the Ministry of Communication of China, led a reconnaissance team to conduct a post-earthquake bridge performance investigation of the transportation system in the earthquake affected areas. The U.S.transportation system reconnaissance team visited the area during July 20-24, 2008. This paper presents the findings and lessons learned by the team.

  15. Ballistic Trauma: Lessons Learned from Iraq and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Emily H.; Sabino, Jennifer M.; Nanos, George P.; Valerio, Ian L.

    2015-01-01

    Management of upper extremity injuries secondary to ballistic and blast trauma can lead to challenging problems for the reconstructive surgeon. Given the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, advancements in combat-casualty care, combined with a high-volume experience in the treatment of ballistic injuries, has led to continued advancements in the treatment of the severely injured upper extremity. There are several lessons learned that are translatable to civilian trauma centers and future conflicts. In this article, the authors provide an overview of the physics of ballistic injuries and principles in the management of such injuries through experience gained from military involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan. PMID:25685099

  16. Learning Lessons from the X-37 Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Susan; Spanyer, Karen

    2005-01-01

    engineering to management. Some members have been with the project since its inception. All have gained priceless experience during the design, manufacturing, and testing of the ALTV, as well as through developing advanced orbital flight technologies, such as state-of-the-art Thermal Protection Systems and hot structures. Throughout this process, the X-37 Project team captures lessons that are directly applicable to other such efforts. The upcoming ALTV flights offer another dimension of data and first-hand experience that will prove invaluable to those designing new generations of reusable spacecraft. And ongoing technology developments will expand the aerospace knowledge base. Delivering prototype hardware is always a risky proposition. During the course of this effort, the X-37 team has experienced many challenging opportunities, delivering significant accomplishments and learning numerous lessons in the process. The ability to manage the risk landscape is key to overcoming obstacles, especially technical hurdles that are encountered in progressing hardware from design to flight. The approach to managing risk under this partnership is evolving but, in general, the team allocates resources to reduce the likelihood of severe-consequence risks, thus maximizing mission success and ensuring that the X-37 Project delivers value to its stakeholders. As the team sharpens its focus on operations, it continues to contribute knowledge to those who would undertake high-risk, high-payoff R&D and provides valuable experience to implement the Vision for Space Exploration.

  17. Rock slopes and reservoirs - lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessons learned about slope stability in the course of four decades of monitoring, and in some cases stabilizing, slopes along British Columbia's hydroelectric reservoirs are discussed. The lessons are illustrated by short case histories of some of the more important slopes such as Little Chief Slide, Dutchman's Ridge, Downie Slide, Checkerboard Creek and Wahleach. Information derived from the monitoring and other investigations are compared with early interpretations of geology and slope performance. The comparison serves as an indicator of progress in slope stability determination and as a measure of the value of accumulated experience in terms of the potential consequences to safety and cost savings over the long life-span of hydroelectric projects.14 refs., 2 tabs., 15 figs

  18. Introducing personal learning environments to informal learners: lessons learned from the OpenLearn case study

    OpenAIRE

    Mikroyannidis, Alexander; Connolly, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Personal Learning Environments (PLEs) hold the potential to address the needs of informal learners for multi-sourced content and easily customisable learning environments. This paper presents the lessons learned from a case study regarding the use of widget-based PLEs by informal learners for finding and evaluating Open Educational Resources (OER). The lessons learned from this case study have allowed the authors to detect some of the obstacles for the successful adoption of PLEs by informal ...

  19. Organizational safety factors research lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports lessons learned and state of knowledge gained from an organizational factors research activity involving commercial nuclear power plants in the United States, through the end of 1991, as seen by the scientists immediately involved in the research. Lessons learned information was gathered from the research teams and individuals using a question and answer format. The following five questions were submitted to each team and individual: (1) What organizational factors appear to influence safety performance in some systematic way, (2) should organizational factors research focus at the plant level, or should it extend beyond the plant level to the parent company, rate setting commissions, regulatory agencies, (3) how important is having direct access to plants for doing organizational factors research, (4) what lessons have been learned to date as the result of doing organizational factors research in a nuclear regulatory setting, and (5) What organizational research topics and issues should be pursued in the future? Conclusions based on the responses provided for this report are that organizational factors research can be conducted in a regulatory setting and produce useful results. Technologies pioneered in other academic, commercial, and military settings can be adopted for use in a nuclear regulatory setting. The future success of such research depends upon the cooperation of regulators, contractors, and the nuclear industry. Each in its own way can be expected to be a beneficiaries of the results. By regulators for moving beyond educated speculation to assessments of plant safety performance that are not only objective but instructive to both the regulators and the plant. By the licensees for self improvement. By the contractors, especially the 12 universities currently involved in the work, to collate and expand on the findings to the benefit of commercial, public, and military operators of complex high reliability socio-technical systems

  20. Team Learning in SMES: Learning the Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Ian

    2012-01-01

    This research identifies and explores the factors that influence team learning in the context of an SME management team. It examines the difficulties the team members face in attempting to share and combine their experiences to co-construct knowledge and understanding of their environment and future opportunities. The paper reveals a connection…

  1. Lessons learned from AU PSO-missions in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Thomas

    The paper deals with the lessons learned from AU's PSO since 2002, and what that entails for the design of future PSO.......The paper deals with the lessons learned from AU's PSO since 2002, and what that entails for the design of future PSO....

  2. Summary of major accidents with radiation sources and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews some of the major radiological accidents that have occurred around the world and identifies key lessons to be learned from them. It emphasizes the value of feedback from the reporting of accidents, the need for effective reporting mechanisms and, most important, the importance of acting on the lessons learned to ensure accident prevention. (author)

  3. The Fernald Closure Project: Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For nearly 37 years, the U.S. Department of Energy site at Fernald - near Cincinnati, Ohio - produced 230,000 metric tons (250,000 short tons) of high-purity, low-enriched uranium for the U.S. Defense Program, generating more than 5.4 million metric tons (6 million short tons) of liquid and solid waste as it carried out its Cold War mission. The facility was shut down in 1989 and clean up began in 1992, when Fluor won the contract to clean up the site. Cleaning up Fernald and returning it to the people of Ohio was a $4.4 billion mega environmental-remediation project that was completed in October 2006. Project evolved through four phases: - Conducting remedial-investigation studies to determine the extent of damage to the environment and groundwater at, and adjacent to, the production facilities; - Selecting cleanup criteria - final end states that had to be met that protect human health and the environment; - Selecting and implementing the remedial actions to meet the cleanup goals; - Executing the work in a safe, compliant and cost-effective manner. In the early stages of the project, there were strained relationships - in fact total distrust - between the local community and the DOE as a result of aquifer contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholders groups in the decision-making process, the DOE and Fluor developed a public-participation strategy to open the channels of communication with the various parties: site leadership, technical staff and regulators. This approach proved invaluable to the success of the project, which has become a model for future environmental remediation projects. This paper will summarize the history and shares lessons learned: the completion of the uranium-production mission to the implementation of the Records of Decision defining the cleanup standards and the remedies achieved. Lessons learned fall into ten categories: - Regulatory approach with end

  4. International Space Station Materials: Selected Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    2007-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) program is of such complexity and scale that there have been numerous issues addressed regarding safety of materials: from design to manufacturing, test, launch, assembly on-orbit, and operations. A selection of lessons learned from the ISS materials perspective will be provided. Topics of discussion are: flammability evaluation of materials with connection to on-orbit operations; toxicity findings for foams; compatibility testing for materials in fluid systems; and contamination control in precision clean systems and critical space vehicle surfaces.

  5. Lesson learned in the IBL project

    CERN Document Server

    Miucci, Antonio; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is ready to face the Run II with improved tracking performance thanks to the installation of a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). The IBL has been installed in May 2014 located at only 3.3 cm radius from the beam axis and it is successfully taking data since the beginning of Run II in June 2015. An overview of the lessons learned during the IBL project will be presented, focusing on the challenges and highlighting the issues met during the production, the integration, installation and commissioning phases of the detector.

  6. Lessons Learned from Designing Visualization Dashboards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froese, Maria-Elena; Tory, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    A variety of visualization guidelines, principles, and techniques are available to help create a visualization-based dashboard, but few publications discuss the experience of designing dashboards in the real world. This article discuss the lessons learned from designing applications for small start-up companies and institutions. From their experience as visualization practitioners, the authors confirm the need for tailored and customizable approaches, emphasize the need for a quicker way to create functional prototypes, point out frequent misconceptions on the scope of a functional prototype, discuss how performance can affect prototyping, and discuss the resistance of industrial partners to involve their customers in requirements gathering. PMID:26960030

  7. LESSONS LEARNED FROM A RECENT LASER ACCIDENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Michael; /SLAC

    2011-01-26

    A graduate student received a laser eye injury from a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser beam while adjusting a polarizing beam splitter optic. The direct causes for the accident included failure to follow safe alignment practices and failure to wear the required laser eyewear protection. Underlying root causes included inadequate on-the-job training and supervision, inadequate adherence to requirements, and inadequate appreciation for dimly visible beams outside the range of 400-700nm. This paper describes how the accident occurred, discusses causes and lessons learned, and describes corrective actions being taken.

  8. Lessons learned in the IBL project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miucci, A.

    2016-07-01

    The ATLAS experiment is ready for Run II of the LHC with improved tracking performance thanks to the installation of a new Pixel Detector layer, called the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). The IBL was installed in May 2014 located at only 3.3 cm radius from the beam axis and has been successfully taking data since the beginning of Run II in June 2015. An overview of the lessons learned during the IBL construction will be presented, focusing on the challenges and highlighting the issues met during the production, integration, installation and commissioning phases of the detector.

  9. Securitization; Lessons Learned and the Road Ahead

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel A. Segoviano Basurto; Bradley Jones; Peter Lindner; Johannes Blankenheim

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the financial stability implications arising from securitization markets, with one eye on the past and another on the future. The paper begins by deriving a number of “lessons learned†based on an examination of key industry developments in the years before the crisis. Emphasis is placed on the various ways in which securitization markets dramatically changed shape in the years preceding the crisis, vis-à -vis their earlier (simpler) incarnation. Current impediments to ...

  10. NASA Flight Planning Branch Space Shuttle Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenger, Jennifer D.; Bristol, Douglas J.; Whitney, Gregory R.; Blanton, Mark R.; Reynolds, F. Fisher, III

    2011-01-01

    Planning products and procedures that allowed the mission Flight Control Teams and the Astronaut crews to plan, train and fly every Space Shuttle mission were developed by the Flight Planning Branch at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. As the Space Shuttle Program came to a close, lessons learned were collected from each phase of the successful execution of these Space Shuttle missions. Specific examples of how roles and responsibilities of console positions that develop the crew and vehicle attitude timelines have been analyzed and will be discussed. Additionally, the relationships and procedural hurdles experienced through international collaboration have molded operations. These facets will be explored and related to current and future operations with the International Space Station and future vehicles. Along with these important aspects, the evolution of technology and continual improvement of data transfer tools between the Space Shuttle and ground team has also defined specific lessons used in improving the control team s effectiveness. Methodologies to communicate and transmit messages, images, and files from the Mission Control Center to the Orbiter evolved over several years. These lessons were vital in shaping the effectiveness of safe and successful mission planning and have been applied to current mission planning work in addition to being incorporated into future space flight planning. The critical lessons from all aspects of previous plan, train, and fly phases of Space Shuttle flight missions are not only documented in this paper, but are also discussed regarding how they pertain to changes in process and consideration for future space flight planning.

  11. Lessons Learned from Environmental Remediation Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several remediation projects have been developed to date, and experience with these projects has been accumulated. Lessons learned span from non-technical to technical aspects, and need to be shared with those who are beginning or are facing the challenge to implement environmental remediation works. This publication reviews some of these lessons. The key role of policy and strategies at the national level in framing the conditions in which remediation projects are to be developed and decisions made is emphasized. Following policy matters, this publication pays attention to the importance of social aspects and the requirement for fairness in decisions to be made, something that can only be achieved with the involvement of a broad range of interested parties in the decision making process. The publication also reviews the funding of remediation projects, planning, contracting, cost estimates and procurement, and issues related to long term stewardship. Lessons learned regarding technical aspects of remediation projects are reviewed. Techniques such as the application of cover systems and soil remediation (electrokinetics, phytoremediation, soil flushing, and solidification and stabilization techniques) are analysed with respect to performance and cost. After discussing soil remediation, the publication covers issues associated with water treatment, where techniques such as ‘pump and treat’ and the application of permeable barriers are reviewed. Subsequently, there is a section dedicated to reviewing briefly the lessons learned in the remediation of uranium mining and processing sites. Many of these sites throughout the world have become orphaned, and are waiting for remediation. The publication notes that little progress has been made in the management of some of these sites, particularly in the understanding of associated environmental and health risks, and the ability to apply prediction to future environmental and health standards. The publication concludes

  12. Microplastics: addressing ecological risk through lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syberg, Kristian; Khan, Farhan R; Selck, Henriette; Palmqvist, Annemette; Banta, Gary T; Daley, Jennifer; Sano, Larissa; Duhaime, Melissa B

    2015-05-01

    Plastic litter is an environmental problem of great concern. Despite the magnitude of the plastic pollution in our water bodies, only limited scientific understanding is available about the risk to the environment, particularly for microplastics. The apparent magnitude of the problem calls for quickly developing sound scientific guidance on the ecological risks of microplastics. The authors suggest that future research into microplastics risks should be guided by lessons learned from the more advanced and better understood areas of (eco) toxicology of engineered nanoparticles and mixture toxicity. Relevant examples of advances in these two fields are provided to help accelerate the scientific learning curve within the relatively unexplored area of microplastics risk assessment. Finally, the authors advocate an expansion of the "vector effect" hypothesis with regard to microplastics risk to help focus research of microplastics environmental risk at different levels of biological and environmental organization. PMID:25655822

  13. Lunar Prospector: First Results and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott Hubbard, G.; Feldman, William; Cox, Sylvia A.; Smith, Marcie A.; Chu-Thielbar, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Lunar Prospector, the first competitively selected mission in NASA's Discovery Program, is conducting a one-year orbital survey of the Moon's composition and structure. Launched on January 6 1998, the suite of five instruments is measuring water/ice to a sensitivity of 50 ppm (hydrogen), detecting key elemental constituents, gas release events and mapping the Moon's gravitational and magnetic fields. The mission is described with emphasis on the first scientific results and lessons learned from managing a very low cost project. A mission overview and systems description is given along with final mission trajectories. Lessons learned from government-industry teaming, new modes of project management, and novel contractual arrangements are discussed. The suite of five instruments (neutron spectrometer, alpha particle spectrometer, gamma-ray spectrometer, electron reflectometer and magnetometer) is outlined with attention to final technical performance as well as development on a constrained budget and schedule. A review of our novel approaches to education and public outreach is discussed and a summary with suggestions and implications for future missions is provided.

  14. Lessons learned from accidents in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is the only application of radiation which intentionally delivers very high doses to humans. A gross deviation from the prescribed dose or dose distribution can have severe, or even fatal consequences. Since the patient is placed directly in the beam or sources are inserted in the body, any mistake made with the beam or the sources leads almost certainly to an accidental exposure. Lessons learned from previous incidents can be used to test the vulnerability of a given facility, provided that these are adequately disseminated. The purpose of this paper is to present a summary of the lessons learned from a relatively large sample of events. The analysis has been presented as a short description followed by an identification of the triggering event and the contributing factors. These have been grouped as follows: errors in commissioning or calibration machines and sources affecting many patients; mistakes affecting individual patients such as irradiating the wrong patient, the wrong, field or site, and mistakes when entering data into or reading from the patient's chart; error due to unusual treatments or situations; equipment failure and human machine problems, including maintenance. (author). 1 ref

  15. Lessons Learned for the Study of Childhood Asthma from the Centers for Children’s Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research

    OpenAIRE

    Eggleston, Peyton A.; Diette, Greg; Lipsett, Michael; Lewis, Toby; Tager, Ira; McConnell, Rob; Chrischilles, Elizabeth; Lanphear, Bruce; Miller, Rachel; Krishnan, Jerry

    2005-01-01

    The National Children’s Study will address, among other illnesses, the environmental causes of both incident asthma and exacerbations of asthma in children. Seven of the Centers for Children’s Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research (Children’s Centers), funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, conducted studies relating to asthma. The design of these studies was diverse and included cohorts, longitudinal stud...

  16. Lessons Learned in Software Testing A Context-Driven Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kaner, Cem; Pettichord, Bret

    2008-01-01

    Decades of software testing experience condensed into the most important lessons learned.The world's leading software testing experts lend you their wisdom and years of experience to help you avoid the most common mistakes in testing software. Each lesson is an assertion related to software testing, followed by an explanation or example that shows you the how, when, and why of the testing lesson. More than just tips, tricks, and pitfalls to avoid, Lessons Learned in Software Testing speeds you through the critical testing phase of the software development project without the extensive trial an

  17. Introduce Lessons Learn Approach as A Phase in SDLC

    OpenAIRE

    Radhika D Amlani

    2013-01-01

    To understand what Lessons Learned is we must have to understand what is Lessons? Lessons can be derived from any activity. They are a product of operations, exercises, training, experiments, and day-to-day staff work. During the course of our activities most of us will recognize ways of doing things more easily or efficiently that can be passed on to our colleagues and successors to help them avoid problems and do even better than we did before. The term Lessons Learned is broadly used to de...

  18. Spent Fuel Storage Operation - Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experience gained in planning, constructing, licensing, operating, managing and modifying spent fuel storage facilities in some Member States now exceeds 50 years. Continual improvement is only achieved through post-project review and ongoing evaluation of operations and processes. This publication is aimed at collating and sharing lessons learned. Hopefully, the information provided will assist Member States that already have a developed storage capability and also those considering development of a spent nuclear fuel storage capability in making informed decisions when managing their spent nuclear fuel. This publication is expected to complement the ongoing Coordinated Research Project on Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research (SPAR-III); the scope of which prioritizes facility operational practices in lieu of fuel and structural components behaviour over extended durations. The origins of the current publication stem from a consultants meeting held on 10-12 December 2007 in Vienna, with three participants from the IAEA, Slovenia and USA, where an initial questionnaire on spent fuel storage was formulated (Annex I). The resultant questionnaire was circulated to participants of a technical meeting, Spent Fuel Storage Operations - Lessons Learned. The technical meeting was held in Vienna on 13-16 October 2008, and sixteen participants from ten countries attended. A consultants meeting took place on 18-20 May 2009 in Vienna, with five participants from the IAEA, Slovenia, UK and USA. The participants reviewed the completed questionnaires and produced an initial draft of this publication. A third consultants meeting took place on 9-11 March 2010, which six participants from Canada, Hungary, IAEA, Slovenia and the USA attended. The meeting formulated a second questionnaire (Annex II) as a mechanism for gaining further input for this publication. A final consultants meeting was arranged on 20-22 June 2011 in Vienna. Six participants from Hungary, IAEA, Japan

  19. Learning to Lead, Leading to Learn: How Facilitators Learn to Lead Lesson Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents research on how teacher developers in the United States learn to conduct lesson study. Although the practice of lesson study is expanding rapidly in the US, high-quality implementation requires skilled facilitation. In contexts such as the United States where this form of professional development is relatively novel, few…

  20. Preventive maintenance optimization at the Gentilly 2 NGS: initial results and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a Preventive Maintenance Optimization Process developed at the Gentilly 2 Nuclear Power Plant, and summarizes preliminary results of its initial implementation. It is based on both Streamlined Reliability Centered Maintenance and AP-913 Equipment Reliability Process. Results achieved and lessons learned create a sound base for continuing activities on remained Systems, Structures and Components (SSC). (author)

  1. Early Lessons Learned from Extramural School Programs That Offer HPV Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Kim A.; Entzel, Pamela; Berger, Wendy; Caskey, Rachel N.; Shlay, Judith C.; Stubbs, Brenda W.; Smith, Jennifer S.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There has been little evaluation of school-located vaccination programs that offer human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in US schools without health centers (ie, extramural programs). This article summarizes lessons learned from such programs. Methods: In July to August 2010, 5 programs were identi?ed. Semistructured, in-depth telephone…

  2. Preventive maintenance optimization at the Gentilly 2 NGS: initial results and lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darragi, M.; Komljenovic, D.; Vaillancourt, R.; Croteau, M. [Nuclear Generating Station Gentilly-2, Becancour, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: komljenovic.dragan@hydro.qc.ca

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents a Preventive Maintenance Optimization Process developed at the Gentilly 2 Nuclear Power Plant, and summarizes preliminary results of its initial implementation. It is based on both Streamlined Reliability Centered Maintenance and AP-913 Equipment Reliability Process. Results achieved and lessons learned create a sound base for continuing activities on remained Systems, Structures and Components (SSC). (author)

  3. Social support and child protection: Lessons learned and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ross A

    2015-03-01

    Social support has been a topic of research for nearly 50 years, and its applications to prevention and intervention have grown significantly, including programs advancing child protection. This article summarizes the central conclusions of the 1994 review of research on social support and the prevention of child maltreatment prepared for the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect, and surveys advances in the field since its publication. Among the lessons learned twenty years ago are (a) the diversity of the social support needs of at-risk families and their association with child endangerment, (b) the need to supplement the emotionally affirmative aspects of social support with efforts to socialize parenting practices and monitor child well-being, (c) the desirability of integrating formal and informal sources of social support for recipients, and (d) the importance of considering the complex recipient reactions to receiving support from others. The lessons we are now learning derive from research exploring the potential of online communication to enhance social support, the neurobiology of stress and its buffering through social support, and the lessons of evaluation research that are identifying the effective ingredients of social support interventions. PMID:25043921

  4. Forensic Archaeological Recovery of a Large-Scale Mass Disaster Scene: Lessons Learned from Two Complex Recovery Operations at the World Trade Center Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnasch, Scott C

    2016-05-01

    In 2006, unexpected discoveries of buried World Trade Center (WTC) debris and human remains were made at the World Trade Center mass disaster site. New York City's Office of Chief Medical Examiner (OCME) was given the task of systematically searching the site for any remaining victims' remains. The subsequent OCME assessment and archaeological excavation conducted from 2006 until 2013, resulted in the recovery of over 1,900 victims' remains. In addition, this operation demonstrated the essential skills archaeologists can provide in a mass disaster recovery operation. The OCME excavation data illustrates some of the challenges encountered during the original recovery effort of 2001/2002. It suggests that when understood within the larger site recovery context, certain fundamental components of the original recovery effort, such as operational priorities and activities in effect during the original recovery, directly or indirectly resulted in unsearched deposits that contained human remains. PMID:27122394

  5. Bruce A restart (execution and lessons-learned)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessons learned with the Bruce Units 3 and 4 restart have been incorporated into the current refurbishment of Units 1 and 2. In addition, lessons learned on the lead unit (U2) are aggressively applied on the lagging unit (U1) to maximize efficiency and productivity. There will be a discussion on how this internal OPEX, along with external lessons learned, are used to continuously improve all aspects of the Bruce A Restart project management cycle, from scope selection, through planning and scheduling, to execution.

  6. Considerations for implementing an organizational lessons learned process.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fosshage, Erik

    2013-05-01

    This report examines the lessons learned process by a review of the literature in a variety of disciplines, and is intended as a guidepost for organizations that are considering the implementation of their own closed-loop learning process. Lessons learned definitions are provided within the broader context of knowledge management and the framework of a learning organization. Shortcomings of existing practices are summarized in an attempt to identify common pitfalls that can be avoided by organizations with fledgling experiences of their own. Lessons learned are then examined through a dual construct of both process and mechanism, with emphasis on integrating into organizational processes and promoting lesson reuse through data attributes that contribute toward changed behaviors. The report concludes with recommended steps for follow-on efforts.

  7. Lessons From the World Trade Center Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibman, Joan; Oppenheimer, Beno W.; Vlahos, Ioannis; Harrison, Denise; Goldring, Roberta M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The present study (1) characterizes a physiologic phenotype of restrictive dysfunction due to airway injury and (2) compares this phenotype to the phenotype of interstitial lung disease (ILD). Methods: This is a retrospective study of 54 persistently symptomatic subjects following World Trade Center (WTC) dust exposure. Inclusion criteria were reduced vital capacity (VC), FEV1/VC > 77%, and normal chest roentgenogram. Measurements included spirometry, plethysmography, diffusing capacity of lung for carbon monoxide (Dlco), impulse oscillometry (IOS), inspiratory/expiratory CT scan, and lung compliance (n = 16). Results: VC was reduced (46% to 83% predicted) because of the reduction of expiratory reserve volume (43% ± 26% predicted) with preservation of inspiratory capacity (IC) (85% ± 16% predicted). Total lung capacity (TLC) was reduced, confirming restriction (73% ± 8% predicted); however, elevated residual volume to TLC ratio (0.35 ± 0.08) suggested air trapping (AT). Dlco was reduced (78% ± 15% predicted) with elevated Dlco/alveolar volume (5.3 ± 0.8 [mL/mm Hg/min]/L). IOS demonstrated abnormalities in resistance and/or reactance in 50 of 54 subjects. CT scan demonstrated bronchial wall thickening and/or AT in 40 of 54 subjects; parenchymal disease was not evident in any subject. Specific compliance at functional residual capacity (FRC) (0.07 ± 0.02 [L/cm H2O]/L) and recoil pressure (Pel) at TLC (27 ± 7 cm H2O) were normal. In contrast to patients with ILD, lung expansion was not limited, since IC, Pel, and inspiratory muscle pressure were normal. Reduced TLC was attributable to reduced FRC, compatible with airway closure in the tidal range. Conclusions: This study describes a distinct physiologic phenotype of restriction due to airway dysfunction. This pattern was observed following WTC dust exposure, has been reported in other clinical settings (eg, asthma), and should be incorporated into the definition of restrictive dysfunction. PMID

  8. Lessons learned in testing of safeguards equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Department of Safeguards uses complex instrumentation for the application of safeguards at nuclear facilities around the world. Often, this equipment is developed through cooperation with member state support programs because the Agency's requirements are unique and are not met by commercially available equipment. Before approving an instrument or system for routine inspection use, the IAEA subjects it to a series of tests designed to evaluate its reliability. In 2000, the IAEA began to observe operational failures in digital surveillance systems. In response to the observed failures, the IAEA worked with the equipment designer and manufacturer to determine the cause of failure. An action plan was developed to correct the performance issues and further test the systems to make sure that additional operational issues would not surface later. This paper addresses the steps taken to address operation issues related to digital image surveillance systems and the lessons learned during this process. (author)

  9. Theorizing Mediation: Lessons Learned from Legal Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Simon Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1990s, there has been an increasing interest in mediation in the Netherlands, as part of a set of ‘alternative dispute resolution’ methods. Politicians, lawyers and practitioners have embraced mediation as a legitimate method for settling disputes, alongside the adjudication of conflicts in courts of law. However, there is a striking lack of literature aimed at theorizing mediation from a legal perspective. This article argues that the legal anthropology literature on disputes and dispute settlement offers useful insights for understanding mediation from a ‘legal research’ point of view. This is because a lot of current common knowledge on mediation has its roots in a legal anthropological understanding. The argument that is set forth in this article is that the most important lesson that can be learned is that mediation should not be seen in isolation, but as part of a social process.

  10. Sellafield Decommissioning Programme - Update and Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutwyche, P. R.; Challinor, S. F.

    2003-02-24

    The Sellafield site in North West England has over 240 active facilities covering the full nuclear cycle from fuel manufacture through generation, reprocessing and waste treatment. The Sellafield decommissioning programme was formally initiated in the mid 1980s though several plants had been decommissioned prior to this primarily to create space for other plants. Since the initiation of the programme 7 plants have been completely decommissioned, significant progress has been made in a further 16 and a total of 56 major project phases have been completed. This programme update will explain the decommissioning arrangements and strategies and illustrate the progress made on a number of the plants including the Windscale Pile Chimneys, the first reprocessing plan and plutonium plants. These present a range of different challenges and requiring approaches from fully hands on to fully remote. Some of the key lessons learned will be highlighted.

  11. ATLAS Beam Steering Mechanism (BSM) Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Cramer, Alexander K.; Gosten, Alan B.; Hakun, Claef F.; Haney, Paul G.; Hinkle, Matthew R.; Lee, Kenneth Y.; Lugo, Carlos F.; Matuszeski, Adam J.; Morell, Armando; Armani, Nerses V.; Bonafede, Joseph; Jackson, Molly I.; Steigner, Peter J.; Stromsdorfer, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design, testing, and lessons learned during the development of the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) Beam Steering Mechanism (BSM). The BSM is a 2 degree-of-freedom tip-tilt mechanism for the purpose of pointing a flat mirror to tightly control the co-alignment of the transmitted laser and the receiver telescope of the ATLAS instrument. The high resolution needs of the mission resulted in sub-arcsecond pointing and knowledge requirements, which have been met. Development of the methodology to verify performance required significant effort. The BSM will fly as part of the Ice, Cloud, and Elevation Satellite II Mission (ICESat II), which is scheduled to be launched in 2017. The ICESat II primary mission is to map the Earth's surface topography for the determination of seasonal changes of ice sheet thickness and vegetation canopy thickness to establish long-term trends.

  12. ATLAS Beam Steering Mechanism Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Cramer, Alexander K.; Gostin, Alan B.; Hakun, Claef F.; Haney, Paul G.; Hinkle, Matthew R.; Lee, Kenneth Y.; Lugo, Carlos F.; Matuszeski, Adam J.; Morrell, Armando; Armani, Nerses V.; Bonafede, Joseph; Jackson, Molly I.; Steigner, Peter J.; Stromsdorfer, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design, testing, and lessons learned during the development of the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) Beam Steering Mechanism (BSM). The BSM is a 2 degree-of-freedom tip-tilt mechanism for the purpose of pointing a flat mirror to tightly control the co-alignment of the transmitted laser and the receiver telescope of the ATLAS instrument. The high resolution needs of the mission resulted in sub-arcsecond pointing and knowledge requirements, which have been met. Development of the methodology to verify performance required significant effort. The BSM will fly as part of the Ice, Cloud, and Elevation Satellite II Mission (ICESat II), which is scheduled to be launched in 2017. The ICESat II primary mission is to map the earth's surface topography for the determination of seasonal changes of ice sheet thickness and vegetation canopy thickness to establish long-term trends.

  13. Beam Steering Mechanism (BSM) Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Cramer, Alexander K.; Gostin, Alan B.; Hakun, Claef F.; Haney, Paul G.; Hinkle, Matthew R.; Lee, Kenneth Y.; Lugo, Carlos F.; Matuszeski, Adam J.; Morell, Armando; Armani, Nerses V.; Bonafede, Joseph; Jackson, Molly I.; Steigner, Peter J.; Stromsdorfer, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design, testing, and lessons learned during the development of the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) Beam Steering Mechanism (BSM). The BSM is a 2 degree-of-freedom tip-tilt mechanism for the purpose of pointing a flat mirror to tightly control the co-alignment of the transmitted laser and the receiver telescope of the ATLAS instrument. High resolution needs of the mission resulted in sub-arcsecond pointing and knowledge requirements, which have been met. Development of methodology to verify performance was a significant effortadvancement. The BSM will fly as part of the Ice, Cloud, and Elevation Satellite 2 Mission (ICESat 2), which is scheduled to be launched in 2017. The ICESat 2 primary mission is to map the earths surface topography for the determination of seasonal changes of ice sheet thickness as well as vegetation canopy thickness.

  14. Lessons learned from the 1994 Northridge Earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eli, M.W.; Sommer, S.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    Southern California has a history of major earthquakes and also has one of the largest metropolitan areas in the United States. The 1994 Northridge Earthquake challenged the industrial facilities and lifetime infrastructure in the northern Los Angeles (LA) area. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) sent a team of engineers to conduct an earthquake damage investigation in the Northridge area, on a project funded jointly by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and the United States Department of Energy (USDOE). Many of the structures, systems, and components (SSCs) and lifelines that suffered damage are similar to those found in nuclear power plants and in USDOE facilities. Lessons learned from these experiences can have some applicability at commercial nuclear power plants.

  15. Lessons learned during Type A Packaging testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the past 6 years, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Facility Safety Analysis (EH-32) has contracted Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct compliance testing on DOE Type A packagings. The packagings are tested for compliance with the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 7A, general packaging, Type A requirements. The DOE has shared the Type A packaging information throughout the nuclear materials transportation community. During testing, there have been recurring areas of packaging design that resulted in testing delays and/or initial failure. The lessons learned during the testing are considered a valuable resource. DOE requested that WHC share this resource. By sharing what is and can be encountered during packaging testing, individuals will hopefully avoid past mistakes

  16. Lessons learned using Snodgrass hypospadias repair.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, K M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: This is a review of our experience with the Snodgrass technique for distal hypospadias repair and we point to lessons learned in improving results. METHODS: We reviewed all patients who underwent Snodgrass hypospadias repair for distal hypospadias over a four-year period by a single surgeon. Chart review followed by parental telephone interview was used to determine voiding function, cosmesis and complication rate. RESULTS: Thirty children and three adults were identified. Age at surgery ranged from seven months to 39 years. The urinary stream was straight in 94%, and 97% reported a good or satisfactory final cosmetic outcome. One patient (3.3%) developed a urethral fistula and 21% developed meatal stenosis which required general anaesthetic. CONCLUSION: The Snodgrass urethroplasty provides satisfactory cosmetic and functional results. High rates of meatal stenosis initially encountered have improved with modifications to technique which include modified meatoplasty and routine meatal dilatation by the parents.

  17. Improved Lesson Planning with Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courey, Susan Joan; Tappe, Phyllis; Siker, Jody; LePage, Pam

    2013-01-01

    Efficient lesson planning with universal design for learning (UDL) enables teachers to more effectively meet students' individual needs. In this study, a comparison of lesson plans by teacher candidates in a teacher preparation program before and after UDL training is presented. After training, teachers (n = 45) incorporated more differentiated…

  18. New Horizons Risk Communication Strategy, Planning, Implementation, and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Sandra A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the risk communication goals, strategy, planning process and product development for the New Horizons mission, including lessons from the Cassini mission that were applied in that effort, and presents lessons learned from the New Horizons effort that could be applicable to future missions.

  19. Four Practical Lessons Learned from Multidisciplinary Projects:Presented at the Concurrent Engineering Conference 2015 in Delft, NL

    OpenAIRE

    Dineva, Evelina; Zill, Thomas; knodt, uwe; Nagel, Björn

    2014-01-01

    In this study we perform extended Lessons Learned interviews concerning collaboration in multidisciplinary engineering projects at DLR, the German Aerospace Center. Interviews are held with all available members out of several project teams. The success of a project is evaluated against a) standard Lessons Learned scales (as used in Project Management, PM) and b) the perceived satisfaction of the interviewees. Furthermore, we inquire about the nature of collaboration and individual experience...

  20. M-learning in a geography lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirski, Katri

    2014-05-01

    their work in Google Earth where they did a tour of their journey. In the feedback students said that it was a very interesting and an educational practical task. A new opportunity in M-learning is to use QR codes. This means that you don't have to print out worksheets with questions. You can hide question in the code and students can read them with their own devices on site. From the Master's thesis I also developed a tutorial material named "M-learning in a geography lesson" (in Estonian: M-õpe geograafiatunnis), you can see it in the webpage katrimope@wordpress.com. The tutorial received a second place on the Estonian study material contest in 2013. This is only one example on how to use M-learning. In Gustav Adolf Grammar School we use M-learning in lots of different subjects because it's really important in modern school to link new technologies, surrounding environment and learning for the purpose of better obtainment of knowledge.

  1. Lessons Learned in Pilot Testing Specialty Consultations to Benefit Individuals with Lower Limb Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Elnitsky

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Telerehabilitation technologies enable the delivery of rehabilitation services from providers to people with disabilities as well as specialty care consultations. This article discusses the barriers experienced when planning and pilot testing a telerehabilitation multi-site specialty consultation for specialists in their medical centers, and the lessons learned. The barriers included integration and participation, coordination across organizational units, and privacy and information security. Lessons learned included the need for collaboration across multiple departments, telerehabilitation equipment back-ups, and anonymous and private communication protocols. Despite delays resulting from coordination at multiple levels of a national organization, we developed a program plan and successfully implemented a pilot test of the southeast region program.  Specialty consultation using telerehabilitation delivery methods requires identifying provider preferences for technological features. Lessons learned could inform development of outpatient telerehabilitation for patients with amputations and studies of patients and providers involved in telerehabilitation.

  2. Rolex learning center English guide

    CERN Document Server

    Della Casa, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The novel architectural form of this building, conceived of by the architects of SAANA (winners of the Pritzker Prize in 2010), compelled the building engineers to come up with unprecedented structural, technical and logistical solutions. And yet, once the Rolex Learning Center was complete, the ingenuity required for its construction had become practically invisible in the eyes of the uninitiated. This richly illustrated guide provides, in condensed form, an account of the extraordinary adventure of the realization of the Rolex Learning Center. It explains in detail the context of its construction and brings to light the spatial subtleties of its architecture. In addition, it provides the visitor of the building with all the needed technical information and many novel facts and figures.

  3. Lessons learned from the TMT site testing campaign

    CERN Document Server

    Travouillon, T; Riddle, R L; Schöck, M; Skidmore, A W

    2011-01-01

    After a site testing campaign spanning 5 sites over a period of 5 years, the site selection for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) culminated with the choice of Mauna Kea 13N in Hawaii. During the campaign, a lot practical lessons were learned by our team and these lessons can be shared with current and future site testing campaign done for other observatories. These lessons apply to the preselection of the site, the ground work and operations of the campaign as well as the analysis of the data. We present of selection of such lessons in this paper preceded by a short summary of the TMT site testing activities.

  4. The lessons learned workshop : comprehensive conservation planning pilot projects

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary of the Lessons Learned Workshop, held i on January 22, 2003 in Lakewood, Colorado. Participants included U.S. Fish and Wildlife and U.S. Geological Survey....

  5. Implementing a lessons learned process at Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fosshage, Erik D.; Drewien, Celeste A.; Eras, Kenneth; Hartwig, Ronald Craig; Post, Debra S.; Stoecker, Nora Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    The Lessons Learned Process Improvement Team was tasked to gain an understanding of the existing lessons learned environment within the major programs at Sandia National Laboratories, identify opportunities for improvement in that environment as compared to desired attributes, propose alternative implementations to address existing inefficiencies, perform qualitative evaluations of alternative implementations, and recommend one or more near-term activities for prototyping and/or implementation. This report documents the work and findings of the team.

  6. Introduce Lessons Learn Approach as A Phase in SDLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika D Amlani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand what Lessons Learned is we must have to understand what is Lessons? Lessons can be derived from any activity. They are a product of operations, exercises, training, experiments, and day-to-day staff work. During the course of our activities most of us will recognize ways of doing things more easily or efficiently that can be passed on to our colleagues and successors to help them avoid problems and do even better than we did before. The term Lessons Learned is broadly used to describe act of learning from experience to achieve improvements. It is an activity used by people to gain benefit in current activity form past activity experience. The idea of lessons learned in an organization is that through a formal approach to learning, individual and the organization can reduce the risk of repeating mistakes and it would increase the chance of success. This means lessons learned approach will reduce failure risk, and improve operational effectiveness and also increase cost efficiency.

  7. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Purdue University Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Hewit

    2008-09-01

    The Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at Purdue University Reactor. With this work completed and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, the INL convened and engaged the project participants in a structured discussion to capture the lessons learned. The lessons learned process has allowed us to capture gaps, opportunities, and good practices, drawing from the project team’s experiences. These lessons will be used to raise the standard of excellence, effectiveness, and efficiency in all future conversion projects.

  8. Providing community education: lessons learned from Native Patient Navigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhansstipanov, Linda; Krebs, Linda U; Harjo, Lisa; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Pingatore, Noel; Isham, Debra; Duran, Florence Tinka; Denny, Loretta; Lindstrom, Denise; Crawford, Kim

    2014-09-01

    Native Navigators and the Cancer Continuum (NNACC) was a community-based participatory research study among five American Indian organizations. The intervention required lay Native Patient Navigators (NPNs) to implement and evaluate community education workshops in their local settings. Community education was a new role for the NPNs and resulted in many lessons learned. NPNs met quarterly from 2008 through 2013 and shared lessons learned with one another and with the administrative team. In July 2012, the NPNs prioritized lessons learned throughout the study that were specific to implementing the education intervention. These were shared to help other navigators who may be including community education within their scope of work. The NPNs identified eight lessons learned that can be divided into three categories: NPN education and training, workshop content and presentation, and workshop logistics and problem-solving. A ninth overarching lesson for the entire NNACC study identified meeting community needs as an avenue for success. This project was successful due to the diligence of the NPNs in understanding their communities' needs and striving to meet them through education workshops. Nine lessons were identified by the NPNs who provided community education through the NNACC project. Most are relevant to all patient navigators, regardless of patient population, who are incorporating public education into navigation services. Due to their intervention and budget implications, many of these lessons also are relevant to those who are developing navigation research. PMID:25087698

  9. CEBAF Upgrade: Cryomodule Performance And Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, Michael A.; Davis, G. Kirk; Hogan, John P.; Hovater, J. Curt; King, Lawrence; Marhauser, Frank; Park, HyeKyoung; Preble, Joe; Reece, Charles E.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng; Wiseman, Mark A.

    2014-02-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is currently engaged in the 12 GeV Upgrade Project. The goal of the 12 GeV Upgrade is a doubling of the available beam energy of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. This increase in beam energy will be due in large part to the addition of ten C100 cryomodules plus associated new RF in the CEBAF linacs. The C100 cryomodules are designed to deliver 100 MeV per installed cryomodule. Each C100 cryomodule is built around a string of eight seven-cell, electro-polished, superconducting RF cavities. While an average performance of 100MV per cryomodule is needed to achieve the overall 12 GeV beam energy goal, the actual performance goal for the cryomodules is an average energy gain of 108 MV to provide operational headroom. Cryomodule production started in December 2010. All ten of the C100 cryomodules are installed in the linac tunnels and are on schedule to complete commissioning by September 2013. Performance during Commissioning has ranged from 104 MV to 118 MV. In May, 2012 a test of an early C100 achieved 108 MV with full beam loading. This paper will discuss the performance of the C100 cryomodules along with operational challenges and lessons learned for future designs.

  10. Lessons Learned in Risk Management on NCSX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilson, G. H.; Gruber, C. O.; Harris, J. H.; Rej, D. J.; Simmons, R. T.; Strykowsky, R. L.

    2009-07-21

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was designed to test physics principles of an innovative stellarator design developed by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Construction of some of the major components and sub-assemblies was completed, but the estimated cost and schedule for completing the project grew as the technical requirements and risks became better understood, leading to its cancellation in 2008. The project's risks stemmed from its technical challenges, primarily the complex component geometries and tight tolerances that were required. The initial baseline, established in 2004, was supported by a risk management plan and risk-based contingencies, both of which proved to be inadequate. Technical successes were achieved in the construction of challenging components and subassemblies, but cost and schedule growth was experienced. As part of an effort to improve project performance, a new risk management program was devised and implemented in 2007-08. It led to a better understanding of project risks, a sounder basis for contingency estimates, and improved management tools. Although the risks ultimately were unacceptable to the sponsor, valuable lessons in risk management were learned through the experiences with the NCSX project.

  11. Lessons Learned in Risk Management on NCSX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilson, G. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ; Gruber, C. O. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ; Harris, Jeffrey H [ORNL; Rej, D. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Simmons, R. T. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ; Strykowsky, R. L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ

    2010-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was designed to test physics principles of an innovative stellarator design developed by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Construction of some of the major components and subassemblies was completed, but the estimated cost and schedule for completing the project grew as the technical requirements and risks became better understood, leading to its cancellation in 2008. The project's risks stemmed from its technical challenges, primarily the complex component geometries and tight tolerances that were required. The initial baseline, which was established in 2004, was supported by a risk management plan and risk-based contingencies, both of which proved to be inadequate. Technical successes were achieved in the construction of challenging components and subassemblies, but cost and schedule growth was experienced. As part of an effort to improve project performance, a new risk management program was devised and implemented in 2007-2008. It led to a better understanding of project risks, a sounder basis for contingency estimates, and improved management tools. Although the risks were ultimately unacceptable to the sponsor, valuable lessons in risk management were learned through the experiences with the NCSX project.

  12. Teaching with Internet Telescopes: Some Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stencel, Robert

    Observational astronomy is often difficult for pre-college students and teachers because: (1) school occurs in daytime and visual observing at night; (2) light pollution hides the stars from students living in cities; (3) few schools have teachers trained to use and maintain astronomy equipment; (4) there is lack of access to expertise when needed; (5) physically disabled students cannot easily access a telescope eypiece. Internet access to computer controlled telescopes with digital cameras can solve many of these difficulties. The Web enables students and teachers to access well-maintained internet-controllable telescopes at dark-site locations and to consult more readily with experts. This paper reports on a three-month pilot project exploring this situation conducted Feb-May 2002 which allowed high school students to access a CCD-equipped accurately-pointing and tracking telescope located in New Mexico controllable over the Web with a user-friendly skymap browser tool. User interest proved phenomenal and user statistics proved diverse. There were distinct lessons learned about how to enhance student participation in the research process. Details available at website www.du.edu/~rstencel/stn.htm. We thank the ICSRC for a grant to Denver University and acknowledge in-kind support from the estate of William Herschel Womble.

  13. Lessons learned in the IBL project

    CERN Document Server

    Miucci, Antonio; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is ready to face the Run-2 with improved tracking performance thanks to the installation of a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). The IBL has been installed in May 2014 being placed at only 3.3 cm radius from the beam axis. The combination of the limited distance from the interaction point and the increase of Luminosity that LHC will face in Run-2 will require to cope both with higher radiation environment and pixel occupancy. A new readout chip has been developed within CMOS 130nm technology with larger area, smaller pixel size and faster readout capability. Dedicated design features in combination with a new composite material were considered and used in order to reduce the material budget of the support structure while keeping the optimal thermo-mechanical performance. Due to the limited radial space about less than 1 cm, the IBL detector was a challenge in terms of design and mechanical integration. An overview of the lessons learned during the IBL project will be p...

  14. Verification for radiological decommissioning - Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past 10 years, the Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) at Oak ridge Associated Universities has performed radiological surveys to confirm the adequacy of cleanup and/or decommissioning actions at sites and facilities where radioactive materials have been handled. These surveys are part of the independent oversight programs of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Results of verification activities have been discouraging. Numerous independent surveys have identified residual contamination requiring further remediation; in some cases, initial decontamination and postremedial action monitoring were totally inadequate. While participating in decommission projects, ESSAP learned valuable lessons and has given this information to regulating agencies and decommissioning sites. The goal of this presentation is to highlight the difficulties encountered by ESSAP in its involvement with NRC and DOE decommissioning projects. Decommissioning projects require teamwork, and success depends to a large degree on the communication, cooperation, and coordination of efforts among the individual organizations involved. This information could be used by organizations involved in future decontamination projects to avoid some of the pitfalls associated with this process

  15. Radiation Accident Experience: Causes and Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since inception of the nuclear energy program in the United States of America, the Atomic. Energy Commission (USAEC) has maintained an extensive system for the reporting and review of radiation accidents in USAEC federal and licensing activities. Accidents required to be reported fall-into two main categories: (1) Accidents causing or threatening to cause radiation exposure to industrial workers or to the general public; (2) Accidents causing damage to or shutdown of facilities, or damage to public property. While many of the reported accidents carry with them the potential for exposure of persons to radioactivity, the cases reported, in this analysis are limited to those where certain prescribed levels of exposure have been exceeded or where significant uptake by the critical organ has occurred. This paper presents detailed analyses of the accident experience encountered in USAEC programs over the past nine years, including: (1) A breakdown of the types of work activities in the nuclear industry under which radiation accidents have occurred; (2) Characterization of the causes of such accidents as related to the types of work activities; (3) Lessons to be learned both in avoiding such accidents and in emergency planning, should such accidents occur. (author)

  16. Lessons Learned in Risk Management on NCSX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was designed to test physics principles of an innovative stellarator design developed by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Construction of some of the major components and subassemblies was completed, but the estimated cost and schedule for completing the project grew as the technical requirements and risks became better understood, leading to its cancellation in 2008. The project's risks stemmed from its technical challenges, primarily the complex component geometries and tight tolerances that were required. The initial baseline, which was established in 2004, was supported by a risk management plan and risk-based contingencies, both of which proved to be inadequate. Technical successes were achieved in the construction of challenging components and subassemblies, but cost and schedule growth was experienced. As part of an effort to improve project performance, a new risk management program was devised and implemented in 2007-2008. It led to a better understanding of project risks, a sounder basis for contingency estimates, and improved management tools. Although the risks were ultimately unacceptable to the sponsor, valuable lessons in risk management were learned through the experiences with the NCSX project.

  17. Contamination and UV lasers: lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, John G.

    2015-09-01

    Laser induced damage to optical elements has been a subject of significant research, development, and improvement, since the first lasers were built over the last 50 years. Better materials, with less absorption, impurities, and defects are available, as well as surface coatings with higher laser damage resistance. However, the presence of contamination (particles, surface deposition films, or airborne) can reduce the threshold for damage by several orders of magnitude. A brief review of the anticipated laser energy levels for damage free operation is presented as a lead into the problems associated with contamination for ultraviolet (UV) laser systems. As UV lasers become more common in applications especially in areas such as lithography, these problems have limited reliability and added to costs. This has been characterized as Airborne Molecular Contamination (AMC) in many published reports. Normal engineering guidelines such as screening materials within the optical compartment for low outgassing levels is the first step. The use of the NASA outgassing database (or similar test methods) with low Total Mass Loss (TML) and Condensed Collected Volatiles Collected Mass (CVCM) is a good baseline. Energetic UV photons are capable of chemical bond scission and interaction with surface contaminant or airborne materials results in deposition of obscuring film laser footprints that continue to degrade laser system performance. Laser systems with average powers less than 5 mW have been shown to exhibit aggressive degradation. Lessons learned over the past 15 years with UV laser contamination and steps to reduce risk will be presented.

  18. Lessons Learned in Risk Management on NCSX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was designed to test physics principles of an innovative stellarator design developed by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Construction of some of the major components and sub-assemblies was completed, but the estimated cost and schedule for completing the project grew as the technical requirements and risks became better understood, leading to its cancellation in 2008. The project's risks stemmed from its technical challenges, primarily the complex component geometries and tight tolerances that were required. The initial baseline, established in 2004, was supported by a risk management plan and risk-based contingencies, both of which proved to be inadequate. Technical successes were achieved in the construction of challenging components and subassemblies, but cost and schedule growth was experienced. As part of an effort to improve project performance, a new risk management program was devised and implemented in 2007-08. It led to a better understanding of project risks, a sounder basis for contingency estimates, and improved management tools. Although the risks ultimately were unacceptable to the sponsor, valuable lessons in risk management were learned through the experiences with the NCSX project

  19. Lessons learned from accidental exposures in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The medical use of radiation is unique in that patients are intentionally exposed to radiation. The aim in radiation therapy is twofold: to deliver a dose and dose distribution that is adequate for tumour control, but which also minimizes complications in normal tissues. In therapeutic applications, the doses are high and a deviation from the prescribed dose may have severe or even fatal consequences. There is therefore a great need to ensure adequate radiation protection and safety in radiotherapy by verifying that all personnel involved are appropriately trained for their duties, that the equipment used meets relevant international specifications for radiation safety and that safety culture is embedded in routine activities in radiotherapy departments. Many individuals must interact and work together on highly technical measurements and calculations, and therefore the potential for mistakes is great. A review of the mistakes shows that most are due to human error. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 115) require that a prompt investigation be conducted whenever an accidental medical exposure of patients occurs. The report of the investigation is to be disseminated to the appropriate parties so that lessons can be learned to prevent similar accidents or mitigate their consequences in the future. This Safety Report is a collection of a large number of events that may serve as a checklist against which to test the vulnerability of a facility to potential accidents, and to provide a basis for improving safety in the use of radiation in medical applications. A further purpose of this report is to encourage readers to develop a questioning and learning attitude, adopt measures for the prevention of accidents, and prepare for mitigation of the consequences of accidents if they occur

  20. Constellation Program: Lessons Learned. Volume 1; Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer L. (Editor)

    2011-01-01

    This document (Volume I) provides an executive summary of the lessons learned from the Constellation Program. A companion Volume II provides more detailed analyses for those seeking further insight and information. In this volume, Section 1.0 introduces the approach in preparing and organizing the content to enable rapid assimilation of the lessons. Section 2.0 describes the contextual framework in which the Constellation Program was formulated and functioned that is necessary to understand most of the lessons. Context of a former program may seem irrelevant in the heady days of new program formulation. However, readers should take some time to understand the context. Many of the lessons would be different in a different context, so the reader should reflect on the similarities and differences in his or her current circumstances. Section 3.0 summarizes key findings developed from the significant lessons learned at the program level that appear in Section 4.0. Readers can use the key findings in Section 3.0 to peruse for particular topics, and will find more supporting detail and analyses in Section 4.0 in a topical format. Appendix A contains a white paper describing the Constellation Program formulation that may be of use to readers wanting more context or background information. The reader will no doubt recognize some very similar themes from previous lessons learned, blue-ribbon committee reviews, National Academy reviews, and advisory panel reviews for this and other large-scale human spaceflight programs; including Apollo, Space Shuttle, Shuttle/Mir, and the ISS. This could represent an inability to learn lessons from previous generations; however, it is more likely that similar challenges persist in the Agency structure and approach to program formulation, budget advocacy, and management. Perhaps the greatest value of these Constellation lessons learned can be found in viewing them in context with these previous efforts to guide and advise the Agency and its

  1. Teaching Inquiry using NASA Earth-System Science: Lessons Learned for Blended, Scaffolded Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, T. D.; TeBockhorst, D.

    2013-12-01

    Teaching Inquiry using NASA Earth-System Science (TINES) is a NASA EPOESS funded program exploring blended professional development for pre- and in-service educators to learn how to conduct meaningful inquiry lessons and projects in the K-12 classroom. This project combines trainings in GLOBE observational protocols and training in the use of NASA Earth Science mission data in a backward-faded scaffolding approach to teaching and learning about scientific inquiry. It also features a unique partnership with the National Science Teachers Association Learning Center to promote cohort building and blended professional development with access to NSTA's collection of resources. In this presentation, we will discuss lessons learned in year one and two of this program and how we plan to further develop this program over the next two years.

  2. Microbiological Lessons Learned from the Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Ott, C. Mark; Bruce, Rebekah; Castro, Victoria A.; Mehta, Satish K.

    2011-01-01

    functions were found to be altered. Selected microorganisms were found to become more virulent during spaceflight. The increased knowledge gained on the Space Shuttle resulted in further studies of the host-microbe interactions on the ISS to determine if countermeasures were necessary. Lessons learned from the Space Shuttle Program were integrated into the ISS resulting in the safest space habitat to date.

  3. Applying Universal Design for Learning to Instructional Lesson Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhie-Richmond, Donna; Sung, Andrew N.

    2013-01-01

    Universal Design for Learning is a framework for developing inclusive instructional lesson plans. The effects of introducing Universal Design for Learning Principles and Guidelines in a university teacher education program with pre-service and practicing teachers were explored in a mixed methods approach. The results indicate that the study…

  4. Human Systems Integration in Practice: Constellation Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbado, Jennifer Rochlis

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Constellation program provided a unique testbed for Human Systems Integration (HSI) as a fundamental element of the Systems Engineering process. Constellation was the first major program to have HSI mandated by NASA's Human Rating document. Proper HSI is critical to the success of any project that relies on humans to function as operators, maintainers, or controllers of a system. HSI improves mission, system and human performance, significantly reduces lifecycle costs, lowers risk and minimizes re-design. Successful HSI begins with sufficient project schedule dedicated to the generation of human systems requirements, but is by no means solely a requirements management process. A top-down systems engineering process that recognizes throughout the organization, human factors as a technical discipline equal to traditional engineering disciplines with authority for the overall system. This partners with a bottoms-up mechanism for human-centered design and technical issue resolution. The Constellation Human Systems Integration Group (HSIG) was a part of the Systems Engineering and Integration (SE&I) organization within the program office, and existed alongside similar groups such as Flight Performance, Environments & Constraints, and Integrated Loads, Structures and Mechanisms. While the HSIG successfully managed, via influence leadership, a down-and-in Community of Practice to facilitate technical integration and issue resolution, it lacked parallel top-down authority to drive integrated design. This presentation will discuss how HSI was applied to Constellation, the lessons learned and best practices it revealed, and recommendations to future NASA program and project managers. This presentation will discuss how Human Systems Integration (HSI) was applied to NASA's Constellation program, the lessons learned and best practices it revealed, and recommendations to future NASA program and project managers on how to accomplish this critical function.

  5. Lessons learned from the TMT site testing campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Travouillon, T.; Els, S. G.; Riddle, R. L.; M. Schöck; Skidmore, A. W.

    2011-01-01

    After a site testing campaign spanning 5 sites over a period of 5 years, the site selection for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) culminated with the choice of Mauna Kea 13N in Hawaii. During the campaign, a lot practical lessons were learned by our team and these lessons can be shared with current and future site testing campaign done for other observatories. These lessons apply to the preselection of the site, the ground work and operations of the campaign as well as the analysis of the data...

  6. The lessons learned from the UK radioactive waste management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper reviews the history leading up to the rejection of the proposal to build a Rock Characterization Facility (RCF) in 1997 and discuss the lessons learned by its promoter, United Kingdom Nirex, from analysis of past approaches. The lessons are considered under the following headings: process (policy development and implementation), structure (an independent organization responsible for long term radioactive waste management), and behaviour (the need for openness, transparency and accountability in future processes). On the basis of these lessons, the paper points the way forward for resolving the problem of radioactive waste management in the UK. (author)

  7. Lessons Learned Designing and Building the Chandra Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenberg, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    This poster offers some of the major lessons learned by key members of the Chandra Telescope team. These lessons are gleaned from our experiences developing, designing, building and testing the telescope and its subsystems, with 15 years of hindsight. Among the topics to be discussed are the early developmental tests, known as VETA-I and VETA-II, requirements derivation, the impact of late requirements and reflection on the conservatism in the design process. This poster offers some opinions on how these lessons can affect future missions.

  8. Leadership development for MOOTW: an analysis of tactical lessons learned

    OpenAIRE

    Adkinson, Jason G.

    2000-01-01

    This thesis examines tactical lessons learned from recent military operations other than war (MOOTW) for implications on leadership development for junior leaders in the United States Marine Corps. A doctrinal examination of MOOTW provides the context for the study. The research questions focus on unique leadership capabilities and competencies necessary for junior Marine Corps leaders in the MOOTW environment. The research involved analysis of recent tactical experiential lessons. These tact...

  9. The lessons Nirex has learned from the RCF inquiry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In March 1997, the Government announced its refusal for planning permission for Nirex's proposed Rock Characterization Facility in Sellafield. Although this setback was undoubtedly a huge blow to Nirex and the nuclear industry, it has presented Nirex with the opportunity to learn valuable lessons from the mistakes that were made. This paper discusses what lessons were learnt and how these will help shape future company policy. (author)

  10. Nmag micromagnetic simulation tool - software engineering lessons learned

    OpenAIRE

    Fangohr, Hans; Albert, Maximilian; Franchin, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    We review design and development decisions and their impact for the open source code Nmag from a software engineering in computational science point of view. We summarise lessons learned and recommendations for future computational science projects. Key lessons include that encapsulating the simulation functionality in a library of a general purpose language, here Python, provides great flexibility in using the software. The choice of Python for the top-level user interface was very well rece...

  11. Lessons learned from student outreach: introducing optics to fifth graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Nancy; Donnelly, Matthew; Mahan, Gregory; Rossi, Tiffany

    2012-10-01

    Though light and vision has been included in the Connecticut science standards for several years, teachers continue to look for new ways of teaching these concepts effectively. The students from the Three Rivers Community College SPIE and OSA student chapters have partnered with EASTCONN, a regional education service center, to bring optics lessons to the classroom. In this paper, the lessons that were demonstrated including spectroscopy, refraction, and reflection will be explained. With anecdotes from the student chapter members, fifth grade students and their teachers, the effectiveness of these lessons and steps to improve them will be presented.

  12. Stand-alone photovoltaic applications. Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems Programme (PVPS) is one of the collaborative R and D agreements established within the IEA. The objective of Task III is to promote and facilitate the exchange of information and experiences in the field of PV Systems in Stand-alone and Island Applications (SAPV). The book focuses on the practical experiences gained, and does not aim to provide a complete manual on SAPV. When Task III started its activities in 1993, a collection of 50 'State of the art' projects was published in the book 'Examples of Stand-Alone Photovoltaic Systems'. This publication marked the base line for the work of the task. Now, in 1998, the showcases from each country demonstrate the lessons learned in five years of cooperation. The book consists of two parts. The first part contains eight chapters dealing with a specific aspect of stand-alone PV. The second part introduces 14 national showcase projects in a systematic presentation. Each chapter and showcase can be read independently from the rest of the book. Chapter 2, contributed by The Netherlands, analyses the market for stand-alone PV systems. It gives an overview of the 'traditional' application of stand-alone PV, which is the electrification of remote buildings and which has been addressed in depth in other publications. The focus is on the market niches of service applications that are also interesting for more densely populated areas, e.g. in industrialised countries. The United Kingdom illustrates the economic aspects in Chapter 3. Cost comparisons are made, but more important is the illustration of the non-financial considerations that make PV the preferred choice as a power source for many applications. Switzerland explores in Chapter 4 (financing aspects) different financing mechanisms, and financial policies used to overcome the initial cost barrier. Most of these approaches have been applied in developing countries rather than in the western world. Using various examples from all over the

  13. Integrated Programme Control Systems: Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dounreay was the UK's centre of fast reactor research and development from 1955 until 1994 and is now Scotland's largest nuclear clean up and demolition project. After four decades of research, Dounreay is now a site of construction, demolition and waste management, designed to return the site to as near as practicable to its original condition. Dounreay has a turnover in the region of Pounds 150 million a year and employs approximately 900 people. It subcontracts work to 50 or so companies in the supply chain and this provides employment for a similar number of people. The plan for decommissioning the site anticipates all redundant buildings will be cleared in the short term. The target date to achieve interim end state by 2039 is being reviewed in light of Government funding constraints, and will be subject to change through the NDA led site management competition. In the longer term, controls will be put in place on the use of contaminated land until 2300. In supporting the planning, management and organisational aspects for this complex decommissioning programme an integrated programme controls system has been developed and deployed. This consists of a combination of commercial and bespoke tools integrated to support all aspects of programme management, namely scope, schedule, cost, estimating and risk in order to provide baseline and performance management data based upon the application of earned value management principles. Through system evolution and lessons learned, the main benefits of this approach are management data consistency, rapid communication of live information, and increased granularity of data providing summary and detailed reports which identify performance trends that lead to corrective actions. The challenges of such approach are effective use of the information to realise positive changes, balancing the annual system support and development costs against the business needs, and maximising system performance. (author)

  14. 3 EXPOSE Missions - overview and lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbow, E.; Willnekcer, R.; Reitz, G.; Aman, A.; Bman, B.; Cman, C.

    2011-10-01

    The International Space Station ISS provides a variety of external research platforms for experiments aiming at the utilization of space parameters like vacuum, temperature oscillation and in particular extraterrestrial short wavelength UV and ionizing radiation which cannot be simulated accurately in the laboratory. Three Missions, two past and one upcoming, will be presented. A family of astrobiological experimental ESA facilities called "EXPOSE" were and will be accommodated on these outside exposure platforms: on one of the external balconies of the European Columbus Module (EXPOSE-E) and on the URM-D platform on the Russian Zvezda Module (EXPOSE-R and EXPOSE-R2). Exobiological and radiation experiments, exposing chemical, biological and dosimetric samples to the harsh space environment are - and will be - accommodated on these facilities to increase our knowledge on the origin, evolution and distribution of life, on Earth and possibly beyond. The biological experiments investigate resistance and adaptation of organisms like bacteria, Achaea, fungi, lichens, plant seeds and small animals like mosquito larvae to extreme environmental conditions and underlying mechanisms like DNA repair. The organic chemical experiments analyse chemical reactions triggered by the extraterrestrial environment, especially short wavelength UV radiation, to better understand prebiotic chemistry. The facility is optimized to allow exposure of biological specimen and material samples under a variety of conditions, using optical filter systems. Environmental parameters like temperature and radiation are regularly recorded and down linked by telemetry. Two long term missions named according to their facility - EXPOSE-E and EXPOSE-R - are completed and a third mission is planned and currently prepared. Operations of all three missions including sample accommodation are performed by DLR. An overview of the two completed missions will be given including lessons learned as well as an outlook

  15. A summary of lessons learned at the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the lessons learned from a management perspective during decommissioning. The lessons learned are presented in a chronological sequence during the life of the project up to the present time. The careful analysis of the lessons learned and the implementation of corresponding actions have contributed toward improving the effectiveness of decommissioning as time progresses. The lessons learned should be helpful in planning future decommissioning projects

  16. Lessons Learned from an International e-Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Training and Education Center (NTC) of KAERI is actively participating in the IAEA's Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT), focusing on web-based nuclear education and training. The center has contributed, in particular, to the development of the ANENT web-portal including cyber platform, and making relevant courses available on it. As part of this effort, the first e-training was attempted with a course on energy planning jointly by NTC of KAERI, and Planning and Economic Studies Section (PESS) and Nuclear Knowledge Management Section (NKM) of IAEA. The objective of the e-training was: - to introduce the use of an IAEA model named as SIMPACTS (Simplified approach for estimating environmental impacts from electricity generation) for assessing environmental impacts from various electricity generations; - to identify real problems as they are and consider solutions for an effective implementation of e-training courses. SIMPACTS deals with sub-programs, i.e. AirPacts for a non-radiological air pollution, NukPacts for a radiological air pollution, HydroPacts for project impacts, and LiquidPacts for a radiological water pollution. This paper discusses lessons learned from the perspective of the e-training host and an ANENT member

  17. Student teachers learning to plan mathematics lessons

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, K; Smith, K.

    1997-01-01

    Most educational professionals would agree that planning is an essential component of teaching. Such planning, educational texts and reports often stress, must focus on the specifying of clear objectives and a clear lesson structure. As a result, a common framework used to introduce student teachers to the complexities of lesson planning is premised on starting the planning process with specifying objectives. Yet there is considerable evidence that experienced teachers do not plan in this way...

  18. Pedagogical and learning theories and the improvement and development of lesson and learning studies

    OpenAIRE

    Runesson, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Purpose It has been suggested that, if pedagogical and learning theories are integrated into lesson and learning study, a systematic construction of pedagogical knowledge is possible (Elliott, 2012). In this Special Issue, it is reported how theory and theoretical concepts can add value to lesson and learning study. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the Special Issue and explore the above concepts. Design/methodology/approach This paper presents the Special Issue papers thematically a...

  19. Operating experience and lessons learned in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    period. The condition of buried piping has increasingly become an issue mainly due to the difficulties related to the use of standard inspection techniques. Development is ongoing to deliver new and more effective inspection techniques. All the OE accumulated in the plant with regard to ageing has been reviewed by the AMP owners and by the coordinator. In addition, the NRC’s Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report (currently NUREG-1801) is periodically reviewed to include OE from US plants. These reviews are analysed, since the GALL Report is one of the main references in the definition of AMPs

  20. SRMS History, Evolution and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Glenn; Bains, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    . Evolution of the simulations, guided by the Math Model Working Group, showed the utility of input from multiple modeling groups with a structured forum for discussion.There were many unique development challenges in the areas of hardware, software, certification, modeling and simulation. Over the years, upgrades and enhancements were implemented to increase the capability, performance and safety of the SRMS. The history and evolution of the SRMS program provided many lessons learned that can be used for future space robotic systems.

  1. What's a Learning Center?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Wesley C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this narrative is to describe and explain the function of learning centers in American colleges and universities. Since the early 1960's nearly every four-year institution has created or increased support for some kind of learning center with the ostensible aim of improving the academic performance of its enrolled students. In…

  2. Project Morpheus: Lessons Learned in Lander Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olansen, Jon B.; Munday, Stephen R.; Mitchell, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Morpheus Project has developed and tested a prototype planetary lander capable of vertical takeoff and landing, that is designed to serve as a testbed for advanced spacecraft technologies. The lander vehicle, propelled by a LOX/Methane engine and sized to carry a 500kg payload to the lunar surface, provides a platform for bringing technologies from the laboratory into an integrated flight system at relatively low cost. Designed, developed, manufactured and operated in-house by engineers at Johnson Space Center, the initial flight test campaign began on-site at JSC less than one year after project start. After two years of testing, including two major upgrade periods, and recovery from a test crash that caused the loss of a vehicle, flight testing will evolve to executing autonomous flights simulating a 500m lunar approach trajectory, hazard avoidance maneuvers, and precision landing, incorporating the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance (ALHAT) sensor suite. These free-flights are conducted at a simulated planetary landscape built at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility. The Morpheus Project represents a departure from recent NASA programs and projects that traditionally require longer development lifecycles and testing at remote, dedicated testing facilities. This paper expands on the project perspective that technologies offer promise, but capabilities offer solutions. It documents the integrated testing campaign, the infrastructure and testing facilities, and the technologies being evaluated in this testbed. The paper also describes the fast pace of the project, rapid prototyping, frequent testing, and lessons learned during this departure from the traditional engineering development process at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  3. Lessons Learned from the Analysis of Ingredients in Dietary Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessons learned and findings from the analysis of caffeine in dietary supplements and the analysis of vitamins and minerals in adult multivitamin products will be included in this discussion. Fifty-four dietary supplement products for weight loss or sports performance listing at least caffeine-cont...

  4. Qualification and Lessons Learned with Space Flight Fiber Optic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    This presentation covers lessons learned during the design, development, manufacturing and qualification of space flight fiber optic components. Changes at NASA, including short-term projects and decreased budgets have brought about changes to vendors and parts. Most photonics for NASA needs are now commercial off the shelf (COTS) products. The COTS Tecnology Assurance approach for space flight and qualification plans are outlined.

  5. TMI-2 Lessons Learned Task Force. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its final report reviewing the Three Mile Island accident, the TMI-2 Lessons Learned Task Force has suggested change in several fundamental aspects of basic safety policy for nuclear power plants. Changes in nuclear power plant design and operations and in the regulatory process are discussed in terms of general goals. The appendix sets forth specific recommendations for reaching these goals

  6. Lessons learned in using IPE model for IPEEE study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes lessons learned in applying the plant model developed in the Individual Plant Examination (IPE) to the IPE for External Events (IPEEE). Both core damage frequency and containment performance features are addressed. The IPE model applications are discussed for internal fires, hurricanes, and tornadoes. Areas in which the IPE model may be improved and general findings are described

  7. Lessons Learned? School Leadership and Curriculum Reform in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Siu Yin Annie

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the processes of implementing curriculum reform in schools. Specifically, it investigates how schools learn lessons from previous experiences of reform and apply them when challenged by new reforms. The context for this study is Hong Kong's New Secondary School Curriculum (NSSC), with particular reference to the subject of…

  8. Authentic Leadership: Lessons Learned on the Journey to Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Cecelia

    2004-01-01

    The author offers lessons learned from three related initiatives of the Wheelock College Institute for Leadership and Career Initiatives from 1997 to 2003 that aimed to promote authentic early care and education leadership by people who came from the community and who hold the same values as the population being served: "Taking the Lead",…

  9. Writing Learning Outcomes for English Language Lessons in Multilingual Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sally Ann

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes a pedagogic innovation in teacher education by articulating a method for writing learning outcomes for English language lessons in multilingual school contexts. The argument for this approach is founded on curriculum studies; however, the practice also draws specifically on applied psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic…

  10. Lessons Learned from a Tiered Service Delivery Implementation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Evelyn S.; Pool, Juli L.; Carter, Deborah R.

    2012-01-01

    Tiered models of service delivery for both academics and behavior are being increasingly adopted across the nation, and discussions of how to implement these models effectively and simultaneously are growing. In this article, the authors share some lessons learned from a 2-year implementation project to implement a comprehensive (both academic and…

  11. Learning Style Responses to an Online Soil Erosion Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamo, Martha; Kettler, Timothy; Hussman, Dann

    2005-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate responses from students with different learning styles to the use of computer technology as a supplemental tool in teaching soil erosion concepts. The online lesson utilized photographs, illustrations, animations, and an interactive model that allowed students to manipulate factors influencing soil erosion. Students…

  12. Lessons learned from 21 nuclear plant probabilistic risk assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the short time that plant-specific, full-scope probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) have been performed, extensive progress has been made in understanding and managing risk. This paper discusses the various lessons learned during this time. Twenty-one specific PRAs are evaluated

  13. Shutting down five reactors: reasons why and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1992 during start-up tests of the Barsebaeck-2 reactor clogging of the strainers of the containment spray system was observed. As a consequence of this incident the Swedish Nuclear Power inspectorate decided to revoke the operating licenses for the five Swedish BWRs with external recirculation loops. The lessons learned from this incidence are communicated. 1 tab

  14. Lessons learned in applying PSA methods to technical specification optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents some results of PSA application in the evaluation of Technical Specification. Two plant-specific studies are addressed in relation to Seabrook NPP and South Texas Project plants. Technical approach to TS evaluation is highlighted. Some insights and lessons learned are presented. (author). 9 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  15. Selection and use of learning media for music lessons

    OpenAIRE

    Kovačič, Bojan; Črčinovič Rozman, Janja

    2015-01-01

    This article presents how learning media is chosen and used in music classes. Special attention is given to the results of research done on the way learning media is used in classes. The aim of our research was to study the types of learning media used in student presentations for music education lessons and the influence of the different factors involved in choosing learning media. 105 fourth-grade elementary school students participated in our research, which took place during the 2007/08 s...

  16. Teaching about Terrorism: Lessons Learned at SWOTT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gregory D.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses some of the challenges and lessons for teaching undergraduate-level courses related to terrorism. The author outlines some of the primary issues that instructors can expect to face, and provides strategies for dealing with several of these challenges. The goal is to relay useful information to those teaching, or planning to…

  17. Lessons learned from two very different large radioactive spills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hard lessons in radioactive spill response, including decontamination and confinement methods, priority setting, survey techniques, and release limit determination were learned (by trial and error) from two spills which occurred recently at the Radiochemical Engineering and Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The responsibilities of radiological control personnel, decontamination workers, and facility management were often redefined as decontamination progressed. While each spill involved ∼1 Ci, their essential characteristics and isotopic distributions were quite different requiring innovative and pragmatic solutions. The first spill was liquid waste with water soluble fission products mixed in an organic solution of actinides. Rain, snowmelt, fog, and darkness foiled initial confinement efforts and contributed to the spread of contamination over several hundred square meters of concrete, asphalt, and floor covering. Contaminated runoff escaped into the environment until effective preventative measures were developed and put in place. The second spill happened when 224Cm and 241Am were accidentally siphoned from an in-cell product holding tank onto the floor of the Limited Access Area at the REDC. Several decontamination techniques were tried before an effective one was developed

  18. Immunizations from ground zero: lessons learned in urban middle schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer-Chuanroong, L; Woodruff, B A; Unti, L M; Sumida, Y U

    1997-09-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded a three-year demonstration project in San Francisco to assess the feasibility of a large-scale school-based vaccination effort. The project overcame a number of barriers, including lack of pre-existing health services, diversity of home languages, and an every-50-minute-bell schedule. The project targeted seventh graders and all special education students for hepatitis B vaccine (HBVac). Of 4,928 students targeted, 3,509 (71%) consented to vaccination and received the first dose. Of these 3,509 students, 3,256 (93%) completed the three-dose series at school. Key lessons learned include emphasizing a collaborative process in the planning stage, offering an educational component for students, providing an incentive to get timely parental consent, planning distribution and collection of parent materials, and planning vaccination clinics to minimize interrupting the school day. The project clearly demonstrated that, with sufficient attention to political and logistical dimensions, school-based vaccination programs are possible in large urban schools. PMID:9358380

  19. Lessons learned from CEA experience with dismantling project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the late 1980s the CEA has been actively implementing methods to benefit from its experience in dismantling nuclear facilities. Capitalizing on prior experience - originally to address safety requirements - has now acquired greater importance in the CEA with the implementation of project management knowledge bases that require better control of performance and cost from initial estimates to completion. Changing regulations (waste, radiological protection, safety, etc.) and decommissioning policies in major organizations (objectives, funding, deadlines, organization, etc.) significantly influence dismantling projects. Experience with knowledge management has shown that the approach consisting in exhaustive project data collection often produces large, unwieldy information bases that are difficult to apply to subsequent projects. Principles and recommendations can nevertheless be derived, but require detailed analysis of all the aspects of dismantling (waste, dosimetry, conventional and nuclear safety, cost, deadlines, physical and radiological environment, regulatory provisions, etc.). The wide range of CEA facilities, the different stages in the course of a project that often lasts for several decades, changing operators and supervisors, all imply that a given situation can be assessed and reconsidered differently depending on the project organization, participants and background. Past results can be considered technically satisfactory, but poorly rated in terms of cost or scheduling. The current approach consists in focusing more on the relevance of the information conserved, favoring common practices emanating from a dedicated center of expertise, and applying suitable processes after discriminating between the lessons learned directly from experience and from consolidation of professional knowledge bases. (author)

  20. Effective Broader Impacts - Lessons Learned by the Ocean Science Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scowcroft, G.

    2014-12-01

    Effective broader impact activities have the potential for scientists to engage with educators, students, and the public in meaningful ways that lead to increased scientific literacy. These interactions provide opportunities for the results and discoveries of federally funded research projects, along with their implications for society, to reach non-scientist audiences. This is especially important for climate, ocean, and environmental science research that will aid citizens in better understanding how they affect Earth's systems and how these systems affect their daily lives. The National Centers for Ocean Sciences Excellence (COSEE) Network has over 12 years of experience in conducting successful broader impact activities and has provided thousands of ocean scientists the opportunity to share the fruits of their research well beyond the scientific enterprise. COSEE evaluators and principal investigators collaborated over several years to determine the impacts of COSEE broader impact activities and to identify best practices. The lessons learned by the ocean science community can help to inform other disciplines. Fruitful broader impact activities require key elements, no matter the composition of the audience. For example, a high degree of success can be achieved when a "bridge builder" facilitates the interactions between scientists and non-science audiences. This presentation will offer other examples of best practices and successful strategies for engaging scientists in broader impact activities, increasing societal impacts of scientific research, and providing opportunities for collaboration on a national scale. http://www.cosee.net

  1. Lessons Learned From The EMU Fire and How It Impacts CxP Suit Element Development and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metts, Jonathan; Hill, Terry

    2008-01-01

    During testing a Space Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) pressure garment and life-support backpack was destroyed in a flash fire in the Johnson Space Center's Crew systems laboratory. This slide presentation reviews the accident, probable causes, the lessons learned and the effect this has on the testing and the environment for testing of the Space Suit for the Constellation Program.

  2. Lessons Learned From 104 Years of Mobile Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S. P.; Clark, P. D.; Neiswender, C.; Raymond, L.; Rioux, M.; Norton, C.; Detrick, R.; Helly, J.; Sutton, D.; Weatherford, J.

    2007-12-01

    Interoperability (MMI) community. All objects are tagged with an expert level, thus serving an educational audience, as well as research users. After staging, publication into the digital library is completely automated. The technical challenges have been largely overcome, thanks to a scalable, federated digital library architecture from the San Diego Supercomputer Center, implemented at SIO, WHOI and other sites. The metadata design is flexible, supporting modular blocks of metadata tailored to the needs of instruments, samples, documents, derived products, cruises or dives, as appropriate. Controlled metadata vocabularies, with content and definitions negotiated by all parties, are critical. Metadata may be mapped to required external standards and formats, as needed. Cultural Lessons Learned: The cultural challenges have been more formidable than expected. They became most apparent during attempts to categorize and stage digital data objects across two institutions, each with their own naming conventions and practices, generally undocumented, and evolving across decades. Whether the questions concerned data ownership, collection techniques, data diversity or institutional practices, the solution involved a joint discussion with scientists, data managers, technicians and archivists, working together. Because metadata discussions go on endlessly, significant benefit comes from dictionaries with definitions of all community-authorized metadata values.

  3. Lessons learned from the NREL village power program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, R.W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Renewable energy solutions for village power applications can be economical, functional, and sustainable. Pilot projects are an appropriate step in the development of a commercially viable market for rural renewable energy solutions. Moreover, there are a significant number of rural electrification projects under way that employ various technologies, delivery mechanisms, and financing arrangements. These projects, if properly evaluated, communicated, and their lessons incorporated in future projects and programs, can lead the way to a future that includes a robust opportunity for cost-effective, renewable-based village power systems. This paper summarizes some of NREL`s recent experiences and lessons learned.

  4. Lessons We Learned Designing and Building the Chandra Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenberg, Jonathan; Matthews, Gary; Atkinson, C.; Cohen, L.; Golisano, C.; Havey, K.; Hefner, K.; Jones, C.; Kegley, J.; Knollenberg, P.; Lavoie, T.; Oliver, J.; Plucinsky, P.; Tananbaun, H.; Texter, S.; Weisskopf, M.

    2014-01-01

    2014 marks the crystal (15th) anniversary of the launch of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. This paper offers some of the major lessons learned by some of the key members of the Chandra Telescope team. We offer some of the lessons gleaned from our experiences developing, designing, building and testing the telescope and its subsystems, with 15 years of hindsight. Among the topics to be discussed are the early developmental tests, known as VETA-I and VETA-II, requirements derivation, the impact of late requirements and reflection on the conservatism in the design process.

  5. Developing Student-Centered Learning Model to Improve High Order Mathematical Thinking Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragih, Sahat; Napitupulu, Elvis

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop student-centered learning model aiming to improve high order mathematical thinking ability of junior high school students of based on curriculum 2013 in North Sumatera, Indonesia. The special purpose of this research was to analyze and to formulate the purpose of mathematics lesson in high order…

  6. Lessons from Learning to Have Rational Expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Lindh, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews a growing literature investigating how economic agents may learn rational expectations. Fully rational learning requires implausible initial information assumptions, therefore some form of bounded rationality has come into focus. Such learning models often converge to rational expectations equilibria within certain bounds. Convergence analysis has been much simplified by methods from adaptive control theory. Learning stability as a correspondence principle show some promise...

  7. The Integration of Remote Sensing and Socioeconomic Data: Lessons from the Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sherbinin, A. M.; Chen, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    Many of the core research questions of the "anthropocene" are spatial in nature, and require spatial data integration to provide the answers: Where are the people most vulnerable to environmental changes located? How do global environmental changes affect people, ecosystems or production systems in a given location? What are the impacts of human activities in the coastal zone, or mountainous areas, or drylands? This paper provides examples of the integration of remotely sensed biophysical and socioeconomic data that illustrate the benefits of spatial data integration. It also addresses some of the challenges in integrating data developed at different scales and for different purposes, sharing lessons learned from twenty years of operating the NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC). Examples will be drawn from the literature on land use/land cover change, urbanization, disaster risk management, climate impact and vulnerability assessment, and natural resource management.

  8. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen; Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, M. W.; McQueen, S.; Brinch, J.

    2008-07-01

    DOE sponsored the Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen workshop to understand how lessons from past experiences can inform future efforts to commercialize hydrogen vehicles. This report contains the proceedings from the workshop.

  9. Influences of Multimedia Lesson Contents On Effective Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuncay Yavuz Ozdemir

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the information era that we experience today, there is a rapid change in the methods, techniques and materials used for education and teaching. The usage of information and communication technology-assisted teaching materials are becoming more commonplace. Parallel to these developments, the Ministry of National Education took steps to develop IT substructures of all schools in the country and implemented many projects. The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not the multimedia lesson content used by teachers affect effective learning. This study is a qualitative study, conducted with 45 teachers working in primary schools during the 2011-2012 academic year. According to the study findings, participants believe that using multimedia lesson content during lectures increases student motivation, makes students more curious and interested, and think that using multimedia lesson content has positive effects.

  10. Lessons learned in testing of Safeguards equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    regime to ensure that all aspects of the equipment are fully functional. If problems exist it is better to know about them prior to implementation. This paper will discuss the results of the subtasks completed under Task E.125 and the progress of active subtasks. The cost/benefit of these subtasks will be addressed. Lessons learned by the U.S. Support Program in undertaking these tasks will be identified. (author)

  11. Nursing 1000: a mosaic of lessons learned from patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan-Colwell, Ann

    2010-09-01

    Throughout my nursing career, I have been most grateful for the education and lessons that I received from the many gifted women and men faculty in the nursing programs I attended. From learning how to give a bed bath and intramuscular injections to writing a doctoral research proposal, the information, wisdom, guidance, and resources they shared with me are invaluable. I also am fortunate to have had the privilege of caring for many patients from whom I also learned invaluable lessons. Together, this latter group of women and men formed the faculty of Nursing 1000. They are the patients who were instrumental in shaping me and my nursing career. Many of them are no longer alive, and all of our paths have diverged, yet they remain influential in how I work with patients on a daily basis. The lessons they taught me form a most special montage. This mosaic article is a way to share with others what the faculty of Nursing 1000 taught me. It is also, in a small way, a tribute to all of the unique men and women with whom, as a nurse, I have shared transpersonal caring experiences and from whom I have learned much. The faculty of Nursing 1000 is composed of a variety of patients for whom I cared and who taught me valuable lessons that guided me in how to better care for patients in the future. Although the Nursing 1000 faculty are no longer physically part of my life, each day they continue to influence how I interact with others. The lessons they taught form a very special mosaic. To protect their confidentiality, all patient names are pseudonyms. PMID:20585103

  12. Lessons learned on stakeholder issues in decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issues of public concern during decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) are partly the same and partly different from those of the preceding phases (planning, construction and operation). While in the course of construction and operation the main challenges include meeting expectations of a higher quality of life, accommodating a growing population, mitigating construction nuisances, and assuring the safe operation of the facility, the main concerns in the D and D phase are decreasing employment rate, the eventual reduction of revenues for the municipality, the future use of the affected land and negative social impacts (e.g., out-migration). The decommissioning phase is characterised by heterogeneity of stakeholder interests and values, difficulties of reaching consensus or compromise, and difficulties in connection with the harmonization of energy production, environmental protection and sustainable socio-economic development considerations. Typically, there might also be tensions between local and regional decisions. As in other phases, the building of trust between stakeholder is crucial from the point of view of conflict management, and social lessons learnt from the siting and developments of nuclear facilities are widely applicable in the field of D and D as well. A review is presented of major lessons to be learnt from NEA activities in the field of decommissioning and stakeholder involvement. (author)

  13. Lessons learned on stakeholder issues in decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Sullivan, P.; Pescatore, C. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, 92 - Issy les Moulineaux (France)

    2008-07-01

    Issues of public concern during decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) are partly the same and partly different from those of the preceding phases (planning, construction and operation). While in the course of construction and operation the main challenges include meeting expectations of a higher quality of life, accommodating a growing population, mitigating construction nuisances, and assuring the safe operation of the facility, the main concerns in the D and D phase are decreasing employment rate, the eventual reduction of revenues for the municipality, the future use of the affected land and negative social impacts (e.g., out-migration). The decommissioning phase is characterised by heterogeneity of stakeholder interests and values, difficulties of reaching consensus or compromise, and difficulties in connection with the harmonization of energy production, environmental protection and sustainable socio-economic development considerations. Typically, there might also be tensions between local and regional decisions. As in other phases, the building of trust between stakeholder is crucial from the point of view of conflict management, and social lessons learnt from the siting and developments of nuclear facilities are widely applicable in the field of D and D as well. A review is presented of major lessons to be learnt from NEA activities in the field of decommissioning and stakeholder involvement. (author)

  14. Summary of Planned Implementation for the HTGR Lessons Learned Applicable to the NGNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian Mckirdy

    2011-09-01

    This document presents a reconciliation of the lessons learned during a 2010 comprehensive evaluation of pertinent lessons learned from past and present high temperature gas-cooled reactors that apply to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project along with current and planned activities. The data used are from the latest Idaho National Laboratory research and development plans, the conceptual design report from General Atomics, and the pebble bed reactor technology readiness study from AREVA. Only those lessons related to the structures, systems, and components of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), as documented in the recently updated lessons learned report are addressed. These reconciliations are ordered according to plant area, followed by the affected system, subsystem, or component; lesson learned; and finally an NGNP implementation statement. This report (1) provides cross references to the original lessons learned document, (2) describes the lesson learned, (3) provides the current NGNP implementation status with design data needs associated with the lesson learned, (4) identifies the research and development being performed related to the lesson learned, and (5) summarizes with a status of how the lesson learned has been addressed by the NGNP Project.

  15. Bringing Research into Educational Practice: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hille, Katrin

    2011-01-01

    Bringing research into educational practice is necessary but does not happen automatically. The Transfercenter for Neuroscience and Learning, at the University of Ulm in Germany, is set up to transfer (neuro)scientific knowledge into educational practice. In doing so we have learned why this does not happen automatically, and have tried to make…

  16. Chemistry Learning Centers for Elementary School Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deavor, James P.; Deavor, Janet W.

    1995-09-01

    This article describes a safe and attractive way to deliver a hands-on experience to students that they can engage in without direct adult supervision in elementary school library/media centers. In this case, a chemistry learning center was created for use by third through fifth graders.

  17. Learning in Plants: Lessons from Mimosa pudica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Charles I; Chicas-Mosier, Ana M

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the early Mimosa pudica literature; much of which is in journals not easily accessible to the reader. In contrast to the contemporary plant learning literature which is conducted primarily by plant biologists, this early literature was conducted by comparative psychologists whose goal was to search for the generality of learning phenomena such as habituation, and classical conditioning using experimental designs based on animal conditioning studies. In addition to reviewing the early literature, we hope to encourage collaborations between plant biologists and comparative psychologists by familiarizing the reader with issues in the study of learning faced by those working with animals. These issues include no consistent definition of learning phenomena and an overreliance on the use of cognition. We suggested that greater collaborative efforts be made between plant biologists and comparative psychologists if the study of plant learning is to be fully intergraded into the mainstream behavior theory. PMID:27065905

  18. Lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many lessons can be learned from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. First, if an isolation condenser (IC) continues to operate, the accident would be terminated soon. A reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) steam turbines also stopped due to loss of battery power in Units No.2 and No.3, suppression pool (S/P) temperature and pressure were so high that the accident management water injection took too long time. After the loss of ECCS and IC core cooling, Containment Vessel pressure increased. Hydrogen explosion occurred after venting. The analysis results show that the depressurization of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) started before RPV bottom failure. It is hoped that the lessons learned from this accident will help to improve the safety of nuclear power plants worldwide. (author)

  19. Lessons learned during decommissioning of underground structures, systems and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following examples present some important lessons learned, some brief technical details and a description of problems encountered in the past in various decommissioning projects related to the removal of underground SSCs. Some cases refer to embedded components. The situations described here are typical of the types of difficulty that can arise when planning for or implementing the removal of underground SSCs as an element of the decommissioning process. The information presented here is not intended to be exhaustive and the reader is encouraged to evaluate the applicability of the specific lessons learned to their own particular decommissioning project or activity. It is not the intention of this annex to identify projects for criticism but rather to enhance future operations planning and implementation in order to reduce the likelihood of the recurrence of earlier problems. A short analysis of the root causes of these problems is presented

  20. Rotavirus vaccine introduction in the Americas: progress and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Lucia Helena; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina; Matus, Cuauhtemoc Ruiz; Andrus, Jon Kim

    2008-04-01

    In Latin America and the Caribbean, rotavirus causes approximately 15,000 deaths, 75,000 hospitalizations, 2 million clinic visits and 10 million cases of rotavirus diarrhea annually. Two safe vaccines are available that are effective in preventing severe illness. To date, seven countries in Latin America (Brazil, Ecuador, El Salvador, Panama, Mexico, Nicaragua and Venezuela) have introduced the vaccine. For successful rotavirus vaccine introduction, the lessons learned re-emphasize the critical need for countries to have precise plans that will ensure technical, programmatic and financial sustainability of vaccine introduction. Of these lessons learned, programmatic feasibility and financial sustainability were particularly challenging for countries that were the first to introduce a rotavirus vaccine. PMID:18393604

  1. LESSONS LEARNED Biosurveillance Mobile App Development Intern Competition (Summer 2013)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noonan, Christine F.; Henry, Michael J.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2014-01-14

    The purpose of the lessons learned document for the BEOWulf Biosurveillance Mobile App Development Intern Competition is to capture the project’s lessons learned in a formal document for use by other project managers on similar future projects. This document may be used as part of new project planning for similar projects in order to determine what problems occurred and how those problems were handled and may be avoided in the future. Additionally, this document details what went well with the project and why, so that other project managers may capitalize on these actions. Project managers may also use this document to determine who the project team members were in order to solicit feedback for planning their projects in the future. This document will be formally communicated with the organization and will become a part of the organizational assets and archives.

  2. QA lessons learned for parameter control from the WIPP Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a summary of lessons learned from experiences on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WJPP) Project in implementation of quality assurance controls surrounding inputs for performance assessment analysis. Since the performance assessment (PA) process is inherent in compliance determination for any waste repository, these lessons-learned are intended to be useful to investigators, analysts, and Quality Assurance (QA) practitioners working on high level waste disposal projects. On the WIPP Project, PA analyses for regulatory-compliance determination utilized several inter-related computer programs (codes) that mathematically modeled phenomena such as radionuclide release, retardation, and transport. The input information for those codes are the parameters that are the subject of this paper. Parameters were maintained in a computer database, which was then queried electronically by the PA codes whenever input was needed as the analyses were run

  3. Identifying and Addressing Lessons Learned from Plant Modification Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utilities are Modifying Plant Systems and Control Rooms. This has Impacts on Human Factors and on facility personnel. NRC has been studying plant modification and modernization programs to identify safety significant human performance impacts on facility personnel. In addition to human performance impacts, other consistent observations emerged which are summarized in 10 lessons learned divided into two categories: A - Impact on Individual and Team Performance (1. Impact of modifications on personnel performance is not always obvious, 2. Plant personnel come to favor new technology, but may not at first, 3. Even new technology can be poorly designed from a human factors standpoint, 4. New technology has unanticipated consequences, 5.Personnel do not use HSIs in the way designers expect). B - Organizational and Programmatic Considerations (7. Knowledge gaps early in a modification project can be problematic, 7. Involvement of plant personnel increases over time and is usually more than what is expected, 8. End-point vision is often not achieved, 9. Computer-based systems may change staffing, training, and procedure requirements, 10. Coordination of plant modification with training and operational requirements is difficult). Lesson have implications for both plant safety and production missions. Learning the lessons and how to address them can ensure that the benefits of plant modifications are achieved. Characteristics of Effective Human Factors Engineering Programs: - Human factors program should be follow a top-down model; - Human factors should be considered a life-cycle process; - A graded approach should be used. The US NRC design review process reflects these characteristics: - Review process is designed to correlate with and track the design process; - Flexible, graded, risk-informed application. The addressing lessons are: - Impact of modifications on personnel performance is not always obvious; - Plant personnel come to favor new technology, but may not at

  4. Designing nursing learning centers of the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, D M

    1996-01-01

    As Drucker notes in The Atlantic Monthly (1994:53), the 21st century will be one of transformations and challenges. Nurse educators will need to think through the purposes, values, and content of educational programs and lifelong learning opportunities. Nurse educators as knowledge workers must prepare to meet challenges by developing nursing learning centers for future needs. Whereas a bold vision of the future, concrete plans that a customer driven, and monitoring for improvement are important, the nurse educator as manager/dean/director for the learning center and faculty teaching here will be key to facilitating nursings' transformation into the information age. PMID:8904359

  5. Savannah River Site environmental restoration lessons learned program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the past three years environmental restoration has been formally consolidated at Savannah River Site. Accomplishments include waste site investigations to closure activities. Positive, as well as negatively impacting, events have occurred. Until recently, lessons learned were captured on a less than formal basis. Now, a program based upon critiques, evaluations and corrective actions is being used. This presentation reviews the development, implementation and use of that program

  6. SNS Cryomodule Production Progress and Key Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferson Lab has been commissioned to design and manufacture one prototype, eleven-.61 Beta and twelve-.81 Beta cryomodules for the Spallation Neutron Source project. The production process is up and running with half of the .61 Beta cryomodules complete to date. This paper will present an overview of the beginning of production, with an emphasis on key lessons learned, that have been used to refine cryomodule production

  7. Global Innovation – Lessons Learned from the Novo Nordisk Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina BIRKMOSE

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the possibilities of Western multinationals to efficiently and effectively relocate research and development to emerging markets. In order to exemplify the findings, we will use the case of Danish pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk and their approach to the Chinese market. Thus, the research question of this paper is: Which lessons are to be learned from the case of Novo Nordisk in China?

  8. Lessons learned from the accident in Goiania, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiological accidents outside of the nuclear sector account for a significant proportion of incidents involving serious accidental exposure of people. Relevant statistics are briefly reviewed and then the paper concentrates on one of the most serious radiological accidents; that in Goiania, Brazil in 1987. As a consequence of the accident four people died and there was significant spread of radioactive contamination from a ruptured radiotherapy source. The development of the accident, the response to it and the lessons learned from it are addressed

  9. Lessons Learned and Challenges in Building a Filipino Health Coalition

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar, David E.; Abesamis-Mendoza, Noilyn; Ursua, Rhodora; Divino, Lily Ann M.; Cadag, Kara; Gavin, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, community-based coalitions have become an effective channel to addressing various health problems within specific ethnic communities. The purpose of this article is twofold: (a) to describe the process involved in building the Kalusugan Coalition (KC), a Filipino American health coalition based in New York City, and (b) to highlight the lessons learned and the challenges from this collaborative venture. The challenges described also offer insights on how the coalition develop...

  10. Evaluation of a potential nuclear fuel repository criticality: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents lessons learned from a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the potential for a criticality in a repository containing spent nuclear fuel with high enriched uranium. The insights gained consisted of remarkably detailed conclusions about design issues, failure mechanisms, frequencies and source terms for events up to 10,000 years in the future. Also discussed are the approaches taken by the analysts in presenting this very technical report to a nontechnical and possibly antagonistic audience

  11. Lessons learned in the accident of contamination with Pu-239

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the lessons learned during the accident by transuranic contamination in the National Institute of Nuclear Research happened between 1998 and 2003. The origin of the same one is the not authorized transfer of 0.51 g of plutonium metallic used as pattern source in the Department of Metrology to a laboratory which lacked of physical infrastructure, training and team to manipulate this source. (Author)

  12. Reactor D and D at Argonne National Laboratory - lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on the lessons learned during the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of two reactors at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E). The Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) was a 100 MW(t), 5 MSV(e) proof-of-concept facility. The Janus Reactor was a 200 kW(t) reactor located at the Biological Irradiation Facility and was used to study the effects of neutron radiation on animals

  13. Lessons learned from metabolic engineering of cyanogenic glucosides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morant, Anne Vinther; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Jørgensen, Bodil;

    2007-01-01

    Plants produce a plethora of secondary metabolites which constitute a wealth of potential pharmaceuticals, pro-vitamins, flavours, fragrances, colorants and toxins as well as a source of natural pesticides. Many of these valuable compounds are only synthesized in exotic plant species or in...... cyanogenic glucosides pioneering status in metabolic engineering of plant secondary metabolism. In this review, lessons learned from metabolic engineering of cyanogenic glucosides in Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress), Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi (tobacco), Manihot esculenta Crantz (cassava) and Lotus...

  14. Learning from Asia's success beyond simplistic 'lesson-making'

    OpenAIRE

    Hobday, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Many international organizations, governments and academics concerned with economic development look to Asia's success, recommending that other poor countries follow similar models and paths of development. This study argues that such Asian 'lesson-making' is a grave mistake in policy-thinking - and in the historical understanding of the nature and process of development. In identifying what we can and cannot learn from the Asian experience, this study examines the various paths of successful...

  15. Lessons learned from modal testing of aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, David L.; Brillhart, Ralph D.

    1993-02-01

    The primary factors affecting the accuracy and the time required to perform modal tests on aerospace structures are discussed, and the lessons learned from modal tests performed over the past 15 yrs are examined. Case histories of modal testing on aerospace structures are reviewed, including the Galileo satellite and the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor and test stand. Currently recommended approaches to the modal testing are addressed.

  16. Lessons Learned from Recent Failure and Incident Investigations of Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, J. B.; Glaessgen, E. H.; Raju, L. S.; Knight, N. F., Jr.; Reeder, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    During the past few decades, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has supported several large-scale failure and incident investigations and numerous requests for engineering consultations. Although various extenuating circumstances contributed to each of these incidents, in all cases, the failure resulted from accumulation and/or propagation of damage that reduced the load carrying capability of the structure to a level below that which was needed to sustain structural loads. A brief overview of various failure and incident investigations supported by LaRC, including some of the computational and experimental methodologies that have been applied, is presented. An important outcome of many of these failure and incident investigations is the development of an improved understanding of not only the state-of-the-art in experimental and analytical methods but also the state-of-the-art in the design and manufacturing processes that may contribute to such failures. In order to provide insight into such large-scale investigations, a series of lessons learned were captured. Awareness of these lessons learned is highly beneficial to engineers involved in similar investigations. Therefore, it is prudent that the lessons learned are disseminated such that they can be built upon in other investigations and in ensuing research and development activities.

  17. Team learning center design principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, B.; Loveland, J.; Whatley, A. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    This is a preliminary report of a multi-year collaboration of the authors addressing the subject: Can a facility be designed for team learning and would it improve the efficiency and effectiveness of team interactions? Team learning in this context is a broad definition that covers all activities where small to large groups of people come together to work, to learn, and to share through team activities. Multimedia, networking, such as World Wide Web and other tools, are greatly enhancing the capability of individual learning. This paper addresses the application of technology and design to facilitate group or team learning. Many organizational meetings need tens of people to come together to do work as a large group and then divide into smaller subgroups of five to ten to work and then to return and report and interact with the larger group. Current facilities were not, in general, designed for this type of meeting. Problems with current facilities are defined and a preliminary design solution to many of the identified problems is presented.

  18. Learning To Be Active Citizens: Lessons of Traditional Africa for Lifelong Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avoseh, M. B. M.

    2001-01-01

    Contrasts the current conceptualization of lifelong learning in the context of globalization with the concept in the context of Africa. States that lifelong learning in traditional African societies was the foundation for active citizenship in the process of becoming a revered ancestor. Suggests lessons for the current construction of lifelong…

  19. Lessons learned from advanced practice nursing payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan-Marx, Eileen M

    2008-05-01

    For more than 25 years, advanced practice nurses have been incrementally included as a part of the health care financing structure. Following physician payment revisions at the federal level, advanced practice nurses were overtly recognized as Medicare providers and have participated in the establishment of current procedural terminology codes and the subsequent relative work values associated with payment. Success in this regard has been the result of business, political, and policy savvy that has important lessons for moving forward in any health care restructuring for both nurses and advanced practice nurses. Principles of valuing nurse work, time, and intensity in the Resource-Based Relative Value Scale are discussed with implications for future opportunities of measuring nursing work and any potential relationship to quality outcomes of care. PMID:18650417

  20. Lessons learned -- NREL Village Power Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flowers, L.

    1998-07-01

    In 1993, a workshop was convened at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to discuss the issues of applying renewable energy in a sustainable manner to international rural development. One of the summary recommendations was that NREL could assist in the renewable energy for rural electrification effort by developing and supplying six related activities: resource assessment, comparative analysis and modeling, performance monitoring and analysis, pilot project development, internet-based project data, communications, and training. In response to this recommendation, NREL launched its Village Power Program consisting of these activities that cut across NREL technologies and disciplines. Currently NREL is active in 20 countries, with pilot projects in 12 of those countries. At this time the technologies include photovoltaics, wind, biomass, and hybrids. The rural applications include home lighting and communications, water pumping, schools and health posts, battery charging stations, ecotourism, and village systems. These pilot projects are central to the renewable energy village power development through the demonstration of three aspects critical to replication and implementation of the projects on a significant scale. The three aspects are technical functionality, economic competitiveness, and institutional sustainability. It is important to note that the pilot projects from which NREL's experience has been gained were funded and, in many cases, developed by other organizations and agencies. NREL's role has been one of technical assistance or project management or both. The purpose of this paper is to describe the lessons NREL staff has gleaned from their participation in the various pilot projects. The author hopes that these lessons will help the Renewable Energy-Based Rural Electrification (RERE) community in implementing sustainable projects that lead to replication.

  1. Worldwide Overview of Lessons Learned from Decommissioning Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With an increasing number of radioactive facilities and reactors now reaching the end of their useful life and being taken out of service, there is a growing emphasis worldwide on the safe and efficient decommissioning of such plants. There is a wealth of experience already gained in decommissioning projects for all kinds of nuclear facilities. It is now possible to compare and discuss progress and accomplishments worldwide. In particular, rather than on the factual descriptions of projects, technologies and case histories, it is important to focus on lessons learned: in this way, the return of experience is felt to effectively contribute to progress. Key issues - inevitably based on a subjective ranking - are presented in this paper. Through the exchange of lessons learned, it is possible to achieve full awareness of the need for resources for and constraints of safe and cost-effective decommissioning. What remains now is the identification of specific, remaining issues that may hinder or delay the smooth progress of decommissioning. To this end, lessons learned provide the necessary background information; this paper tries to make extensive use of practical experience gained by the international community

  2. THE ROLE OF LESSONS LEARNED MANAGEMENT IN DECISION MAKING IN THE MILITARY FIELD

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe CALOPAREANU

    2011-01-01

    Any professional organization, to include the Army, must be able to learn from mistakes, successes and must always remain open to critique and improvement. The military decision processes can be substantially improved by an effective lessons learned process. Unfortunately, some military organizations fail to deliver lessons when and where they are needed. In this paper, we highlight the importance of lessons learned system as a tool for military commanders in close relationship with the Army'...

  3. A summary of lessons learned activities conducted at the OECD Halden Reactor Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallbert, B.P. [OECD Halden Reactor Project (Norway)

    1997-02-01

    A series of lessons learned studies have been conducted at the OECD Halden Reactor Project. The purpose of these lessons learned reports are to summarize knowledge and experience gained across a number of research project. This paper presents a summary of main issues addressed in four of these lessons learned projects. These are concerned with software development and quality assurance, software reliability, methods for test and evaluation of developed systems, and the evaluation of system design features.

  4. A summary of lessons learned activities conducted at the OECD Halden Reactor Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of lessons learned studies have been conducted at the OECD Halden Reactor Project. The purpose of these lessons learned reports are to summarize knowledge and experience gained across a number of research project. This paper presents a summary of main issues addressed in four of these lessons learned projects. These are concerned with software development and quality assurance, software reliability, methods for test and evaluation of developed systems, and the evaluation of system design features

  5. Lessons learned from case studies of inhalation exposures of workers to radioactive aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, M.D.; Fencl, A.F.; Newton, G.J. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Various Department of Energy requirements, rules, and orders mandate that lessons learned be identified, evaluated, shared, and incorporated into current practices. The recently issued, nonmandatory DOE standard for Development of DOE Lessons Learned Program states that a DOE-wide lessons learned program will {open_quotes}help to prevent recurrences of negative experiences, highlight best practices, and spotlight innovative ways to solve problems or perform work more safely, efficiently, and cost effectively.{close_quotes} Additional information about the lessons learned program is contained in the recently issued DOE handbook on Implementing U.S. Department of Energy Lessons Learned Programs and in October 1995 DOE SAfety Notice on Lessons Learned Programs. This report summarizes work in progress at ITRI to identify lessons learned for worker exposures to radioactive aerosols, and describes how this work will be incorporated into the DOE lessons learned program, including a new technical guide for measuring, modeling, and mitigating airborne radioactive particles. Follow-on work is focusing on preparation of {open_quotes}lessons learned{close_quotes} training materials for facility designers, managers, health protection professionals, line supervisors, and workers.

  6. Lessons for the new CMS innovation center from the Medicare health support program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Michael S; Foote, Sandra M; Krakauer, Randall; Mattingly, Patrick H

    2010-07-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act establishes a new Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The center is intended to enhance the CMS's role in promoting much-needed improvements in payment and service delivery. Lessons from the Medicare Health Support Program, a chronic care pilot program that ran between 2005 and 2008, illustrate the value of drawing on experience in planning for the center and future pilot programs. The lessons include the importance of strong leadership; collaboration and flexibility to foster innovation; receptivity of beneficiaries to care management; and the need for timely data on patients' status. The lessons also highlight pitfalls to be avoided in planning future pilot programs, such as flawed strategies for selecting populations to target when testing payment and service delivery reforms. PMID:20606178

  7. Barriers, strategies, and lessons learned from complementary and alternative medicine curricular initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierpina, Victor S; Schneeweiss, Ronald; Frenkel, Moshe A; Bulik, Robert; Maypole, Jack

    2007-10-01

    Fifteen U.S. academic programs were the recipients of a National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine R25 Education Grant Program to introduce curricular changes in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in their institutions. The authors describe the lessons learned during the implementation of these CAM education initiatives. Principal investigators identified these lessons along with discovered barriers and strategies, both those traditionally related to medical and nursing education and those unique to CAM education. Many lessons, barriers, and strategies were common across multiple institutions. Most significant among the barriers were issues such as the resistance by faculty; the curriculum being perceived as too full; presenting CAM content in an evidence-based and even-handed way; providing useful, reliable resources; and developing teaching and assessment tools. Strategies included integration into existing curriculum; creating increased visibility of the curriculum; placing efforts into faculty development; cultivating and nurturing leadership at all levels in the organization, including among students, faculty, and administration; providing access to CAM-related databases through libraries; and fostering efforts to maintain sustainability of newly established CAM curricular elements through institutionalization and embedment into overall educational activities. These lessons, along with some detail on barriers and strategies, are reported and summarized here with the goal that they will be of practical use to other institutions embarking on new CAM education initiatives. PMID:17895653

  8. Building a Virtual Solar Observatory: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, R. S.; Tian, K. Q.; Davey, A.; Dimitoglou, G.; Gurman, J. B.; Hill, F.; Hourclé, J.; Martens, P. C.; Suárez-Sola, I.; Wampler, S.; Yoshimura, K.

    2005-05-01

    Two years into its development, the VSO has emerged from a drawing board concept into a full-fledged data query and data delivery system serving the Solar Physics community. Throughout its development, the VSO has lived up to its `small box' motto and has built light-weight servers that can easily run on a desktop or laptop. The two basic functions of the VSO are data query and data delivery. For these functions, the VSO servers act like switchboards, dispatching query/data requests to relevant data providers. More important, these servers present an abstraction that integrates diverse data archives, thus reducing complexity. The design of the VSO has evolved during its implementation in response to difficulties and user feedback. We discuss the changes in areas such as the data model, user interface, and performance. These lessons should be of interest to people designing and building other virtual observatories. We also discuss challenges and opportunities we foresee as the VSO becomes a significant and enabling research tool.

  9. Learning System Center App Controller

    CERN Document Server

    Naeem, Nasir

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for IT professionals working with Hyper-V, Azure cloud, VMM, and private cloud technologies who are looking for a quick way to get up and running with System Center 2012 R2 App Controller. To get the most out of this book, you should be familiar with Microsoft Hyper-V technology. Knowledge of Virtual Machine Manager is helpful but not mandatory.

  10. Lessons Learned from One-to-One

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLester, Susan

    2011-01-01

    When in 2002 Maine launched its pioneering Maine Learning Technology Initiative (MLTI) that equipped every one of the state's 30,000 seventh- and eighth-grade public school students and teachers with their own Apple iBook, all eyes were on the endeavor. As the first statewide one-to-one deployment, MLTI's $37 million education experiment…

  11. Secondary Teacher Candidates' Lesson Planning Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoyo, Christina; Zhang, Shaoan

    2016-01-01

    Teacher candidates (TCs) use clinical experiences to enact concepts taught in their university courses; therefore field experiences may be the most important component of teacher preparation (Hammerness et al., 2005). TCs require support and guidance as they learn to adapt curriculum materials for effective use in the classroom (Davis, 2006). They…

  12. Facilitating Interdisciplinary Learning: Lessons from Project Kaleidoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezar, Adrianna; Elrod, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Many major funding organizations, policymakers, government agencies, and other higher education stakeholders want higher education to encourage interdisciplinary learning so that students graduate with the requisite skills to take on complex jobs in science, policy, business, and industry. Calls for this kind of change have been most urgent within…

  13. Live Scale Active Shooter Exercise: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervin, Randy

    2008-01-01

    On October 23, 2007, the Lake Land College Public Safety Department conducted a full-scale live exercise that simulated an active shooter and barricaded hostage. In this article, the author will emphasize what they learned, and how they intend to benefit from it. He will list the law enforcement issues and general issues they encountered, and then…

  14. Lessons learned about ageing and gerontological nursing in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staja Q. Booker

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The unprecedented global growth in older adults merits high-quality gerontological nursing care. As gerontological nursing grows in visibility in developed and developing countries, nurses must possess a broader worldview of ageing with knowledge of physiological, psychosocial, and cultural issues.Purpose: The purpose of this article is to: (1 highlight lessons learned on differences and similarities in ageing and care of older adults in the United States of America (USA and South Africa (SA; and (2 provide recommendations on how to advance gerontological nursingeducation in SA.Methods: A two-week international service-learning project was undertaken by visiting SA and learning about their nursing system and care of older adults. Service-learning is an innovative teaching-learning-service method that provided reflective and hands-on experience of gerontological nursing. This article provides a personal reflection of lessons learned about ageing and gerontological nursing during the service-learning project.Findings: Care of older adults in SA is in many ways different from and similar to that in the USA. Consequently global nurses should recognise those differences and provide culturally appropriate care. This service-learning experience also demonstrated the need for gerontological nursing education in SA. Based on this, recommendations on how to infuse and advance gerontological nursing education in SA are provided.Conclusion: Caring for older adults in a global context requires knowledge and understanding of cultures and their values and practices. With a growing population of diverse older adults, there is a need for incorporation

  15. Welding in Space: Lessons Learned for Future In Space Repair Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. K.; Nunes, A. C.; Zimmerman, F. R.

    2005-01-01

    Welds have been made in the harsh environment of space only twice in the history of manned space flight. The United States conducted the M5 12 experiment on Skylab and the former Soviet Union conducted an Extravehicular Activity. Both experiments demonstrated electron beam welding. A third attempt to demonstrate and advance space welding was made by the Marshall Space Flight Center in the 90's but the experiment was demanifested as a Space Shuttle payload. This presentation summarizes the lessons learned from these three historical experiences in the areas of safety, design, operations and implementation so that welding in space can become an option for in space repair applications.

  16. Lessons learned from case studies of inhalation exposures of workers to radioactive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various Department of Energy requirements, rules, and orders mandate that lessons learned be identified, evaluated, shared, and incorporated into current practices. The recently issued, nonmandatory DOE standard for Development of DOE Lessons Learned Program states that a DOE-wide lessons learned program will open-quotes help to prevent recurrences of negative experiences, highlight best practices, and spotlight innovative ways to solve problems or perform work more safely, efficiently, and cost effectively.close quotes Additional information about the lessons learned program is contained in the recently issued DOE handbook on Implementing U.S. Department of Energy Lessons Learned Programs and in October 1995 DOE SAfety Notice on Lessons Learned Programs. This report summarizes work in progress at ITRI to identify lessons learned for worker exposures to radioactive aerosols, and describes how this work will be incorporated into the DOE lessons learned program, including a new technical guide for measuring, modeling, and mitigating airborne radioactive particles. Follow-on work is focusing on preparation of open-quotes lessons learnedclose quotes training materials for facility designers, managers, health protection professionals, line supervisors, and workers

  17. The development scale of learning strategies used in piano lesson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Kılınçer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to develop a valid and reliable measurement tool to designate the learning strategies exploited during the piano lesson by the answers of the students studying at the departments of music education. The sampling group is composed of 372 students of 5 music education departments around Turkey at second, third and fourth grades between 2010 and 2011. The scale which is developed for the study is based on the classification of the learning strategies by Weinstein and Meyer (1986. The phrases in the scale are determined via the essays of the students and screening of the literature. The hypothesis that each item is evaluating the related psychological formation is tested by confirmative factor analysis. The scale is made up of 5 sub-dimensions and 66 items. The factorial weights of items in the scale takes place between 0.452 and 0.802. The reliability coefficient for the scale (Cronbach alpha as a whole was 0.955. The confidence coefficients for sub-scales were determined as 0.940, 0.888, 0.858, 0.884 and 0.867. The results of the study suggests that this scale may help determining and assess the aplication levels of learning strategies exploited during the piano lesson and organizing the teaching and learning environment this direction.

  18. Energy market reform - lessons learned and next steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation will be based on the World Energy Council's recently published report, Energy Market Reform: Lessons Learned and Next Steps with Special Emphasis on the Energy Access Problems of Developing Countries. The report draws on practical lessons from past studies carried out by the World Energy Council and on current experiences on the desirable architecture of market reforms in electricity and natural gas. The approach of the study was not to further deepen the analysis or to provide technical recommendations but rather, to build a debate guided by the common thread of energy security and end-user empowerment, highlighting the possible areas of conflict of interest and the broad solutions that might be chosen depending on the local circumstances for different parts of the energy chains. The ambition was to identify key concerns and to initiate a debate on possible answers.(author)

  19. Climate services: Lessons learned and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, Guy P.; Gallardo, Laura

    2016-03-01

    This perspective paper reviews progress made in the last decades to enhance the communication and use of climate information relevant to the political and economic decision process. It focuses, specifically, on the creation and development of climate services, and highlights a number of difficulties that have limited the success of these services. Among them are the insufficient awareness by societal actors of their vulnerability to climate change, the lack of relevant products and services offered by the scientific community, the inappropriate format in which the information is provided, and the inadequate business model adopted by climate services. The authors suggest that, to be effective, centers should host within the same center a diversity of staff including experts in climate science, specialists in impact, adaptation, and vulnerability, representatives of the corporate world, agents of the public service as well as social managers and communication specialists. The role and importance of environmental engineering is emphasized.

  20. Global Online Learning among Asia-Pacific Economies: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treuhaft, Jack D.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of online learning in a multicultural environment focuses on experiences with the Asian Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC). Topics include technology problems; differences in learning styles; Web site use; cultural differences, and their influence on learning environments; and language considerations. (LRW)

  1. Solid-State Lighting: Early Lessons Learned on the Way to Market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandahl, Linda J.; Cort, Katherine A.; Gordon, Kelly L.

    2013-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document early challenges and lessons learned in the solid-state lighting (SSL) market development as part of the DOE’s SSL Program efforts to continually evaluate market progress in this area. This report summarizes early actions taken by DOE and others to avoid potential problems anticipated based on lessons learned from the market introduction of compact fluorescent lamps and identifies issues, challenges, and new lessons that have been learned in the early stages of the SSL market introduction. This study identifies and characterizes12 key lessons that have been distilled from DOE SSL program results.

  2. Lessons Learned in Student Venture Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caner, Edward

    The Physics Entrepreneurship Master's Program (PEP) at Case Western Reserve University is now in its 15th year of operation. PEP is a 27 credit-hour Master of Science in Physics, Entrepreneurship Track. The curriculum can be tailored to the needs of each student. Coursework consists of graduate-level classes in science, business, intellectual property law, and innovation. A master's thesis is required that is based on a real-world project in innovation or entrepreneurship within an existing company or startup (possibly the student's). PEP faculty help students connect with mentors, advisors, partners, funding sources and job opportunities. In this talk I will chronicle several pitfalls that we have encountered with our ''real world'' student projects and start-up businesses, several of which met their complete demise despite showing great promise for success. I will discuss how we have learned to avoid most of these pitfalls by taking surprisingly simple actions.

  3. Lessons learned from man-made catastrophes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk management is reminiscent of the parable of the blind men learning about the elephant by feeling about it from different directions. They had a wide range of perceptions. Several of the men felt tree trunks, others a huge snake, the sail of a boat, huge walls, or a rope. Imagine the symposium of these blind folks getting together and arguing about which are the most characteristic or essential parts of the elephant. Risk management is this kind of an elephant. It has many angles. GPU Nuclear, the sponsor of this symposium, seems to be one of the mall handful of organizations that is strongly directed and motivated to seek a whole vision of this very complex elephant. This paper reinforces some of Long's six steps of risk management. The intriguing problem is how to keep good advice from sounding like a series of cliches

  4. Oil field redevelopment -- some lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a summary of some oil field redevelopment experiences that resulted in unanticipated expenses or other inconveniences and consequently became learning experiences. Compared with many other types of contaminated properties, oil fields are relatively easy to remediate. The primary contaminant is crude oil ranging in nature from hard and weathered tar to fresh crude with a notable fraction of light end hydrocarbons. Groundwater is usually not impacted due to the low mobility and solubility of crude oil. Crude oil overall has a relatively low toxicity, is not considered a hazardous material and can usually be easily remediated using bioremediation. All of these factors contribute to the notion that oil fields are low risk in terms of cleanup. However, experience has shown that oil field redevelopment does have some risks as is illustrated by examples

  5. A Student-Centered Learning Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihyar Hesson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the authors experience in applying different approaches of active learning and student-centered teaching, the main problem that prevented the achievement of the full advantages of these approaches is the lack of motivation of students for self-centered learning. A new model for a student-centered learning is presented in this work. This model is of teaching integrative thinking, based on existing models of creativity and synthesis. In this model, the student is put at the heart of a bigger learning process that includes instructors, specialists and the public. Usually students who are in the final year of their study will be the target of the application of this model as a part of a capstone course or final year project. This model promotes the research and thinking skills of the students as well as the gained motivation of self-learning as a result of being in contact with the specialists who might be their potential future employers. A proto-type web-based system based on this model was developed. Although it is applied on a sample of students from the Biology department, the system is readily expandable to any number of other disciplines without any complications or programming overheads. The results achieved from the application of this model were very encouraging.

  6. System 80+trademark standard design incorporates radiation protection lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many lessons have been learned from the current generation of nuclear plants in the area of radiation protection. The following paper will outline how the lessons learned have been incorporated into the design and operational philosophy of the System 80+trademark Standard Design currently under development by ABB Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) with support from Duke Engineering and Services, Inc. and Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation in the Balance-of-Plant design. The System 80+trademark Standard Design is a complete nuclear power plant for national and international markets, designed in direct response to utility needs for the 1990's, and scheduled for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Design Certification under the new standardization rule (10 CFR Part 52). System 80+trademark is a natural extension of System 80R technology, an evolutionary change based on proven Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde in Arizona and under construction at Yonggwang in the Republic of Korea. The System 80+trademark Containment and much of the Balance of Plant design is based upon Duke Power Company's Cherokee Plant, which was partially constructed in the late 1970's, but, was later canceled (due to rapid declined in electrical load growth). The System 80+trademark Standard Design meets the requirements given in the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) Requirements Document. One of these requirements is to limit the occupational exposure to 100 person-rem/yr. This paper illustrates how this goal can be achieved through the incorporation of lessons learned, innovative design, and the implementation of a common sense approach to operation and maintenances practices

  7. Lessons learned on utilizing the SEI/CMM in the federal government work for others environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, A.

    1997-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on lessons learned on utilizing the Software Engineering Institute Capability Maturity Model in the federal government work for others environment. These viewgraphs outline: data systems research and development; what is the SEI/CMM; Data Systems Research and Development process improvement approach; accomplishments; and lessons learned.

  8. Solid-State Lighting. Early Lessons Learned on the Way to Market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandahl, L. J.; Cort, K. A.; Gordon, K. L.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of issues and lessons learned during the early stages of solid-state lighting market introduction in the U.S., which also summarizes early actions taken to avoid potential problems anticipated based on lessons learned from the market introduction of compact fluorescent lamps.

  9. Lessons learned? Selected public acceptance case studies since Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will present an overview of the present situation, some recent polling survey information, and then look at lessons learned in terms of selected case studies and some global issues over the 22 years since the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident. That is quite an ambitious topic but there are some important lessons we can learn from the post-TMI era. (author)

  10. Lessons learned? Selected public acceptance case studies since Three Mile Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blee, D. [NAC International, Atlanta Corporate Headquarters, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2001-02-01

    This paper will present an overview of the present situation, some recent polling survey information, and then look at lessons learned in terms of selected case studies and some global issues over the 22 years since the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident. That is quite an ambitious topic but there are some important lessons we can learn from the post-TMI era. (author)

  11. Lessons learned from a great master!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Seixas da Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Teaching Biochemistry is a huge challenge in the basic cycle of many undergraduate courses. How to convince students that this discipline is important for their academic degree so early in their college journeys? It may be hard to define in words a good teaching strategy for this purpose, but during the 70s'/80's a group of professors accepted this tough task! Professor Leopoldo de Meis paid particular attention to the way of teaching biochemistry. As a very sensitive person, he realized that the secret to a good teaching would be to keep the students motivated with doses of challenge.With this in mind, Prof. de Meis joined a small group of professors and graduate students from the former Department of Medical Biochemistry, now named Institute of Medical Biochemistry Leopoldo de Meis, at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, and proposed to use the Discovery learning method in classroom. The idea was to present the contents of the biochemistry course while challenging students to interpret the original data of the major biochemical findings. For this purpose, each biochemistry theme was shown through the experiments that led to the originally obtained conclusions currently present in the textbooks. Thus, students were motivated to ask questions and propose experiments that allow the interpretation of the scientists’ historical results. At first the methodology seemed very novel and difficult, but over the first few minutes the environment became a place for broad scientific discussion, where students enthusiastically participated and developed the ability to draw up the necessary questions to decipher the functioning of metabolic pathways. The parallel between the observed experimental facts and the physiological state of the experimental model used in classic experiments permitted the development of a broad and critical knowledge in the learning of biochemistry.To imagine that the students were motivated to develop the autonomy of

  12. PUREX/UO{sub 3} facilities deactivation lessons learned: History

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1997-11-25

    In May 1997, a historic deactivation project at the PUREX (Plutonium URanium EXtraction) facility at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State concluded its activities (Figure ES-1). The project work was finished at $78 million under its original budget of $222.5 million, and 16 months ahead of schedule. Closely watched throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex and by the US Department of Defense for the value of its lessons learned, the PUREX Deactivation Project has become the national model for the safe transition of contaminated facilities to shut down status.

  13. Closure of a mixed waste landfill: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Much experience has been gained during the closure of the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and many lessons were learned. This knowledge was applied to other closures at SRS yielding decreased costs, schedule enhancement, and increased overall project efficiency. The next major area of experience to be gained at SRS in the field of waste site closures will be in the upkeep, maintenance, and monitoring of clay caps. Further test programs will be required to address these requirements

  14. High strength bolt failure analysis and integrity assessment. Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolated failures have occurred in high strength bolting used in pressurized water reactor (PWR) component support applications. The U.S. nuclear industry component support bolting failure experience is described in this paper, focusing on materials specified intentionally as ''ultra-high-strength'' (minimum specified yield strength greater than 1034 MPa). The analysis and investigation of fabrication-induced problems with a bolt made from Carpenter Technology Alloy ''Custom 455'', (ASTM A 564 XM-16) a proprietary materials, are detailed, and the measures taken to assure integrity of these bolts during operation are discussed. Lessons learned to preclude future problems are presented as conclusions

  15. JLab SRF Cavity Fabrication Errors, Consequences and Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Marhauser

    2011-09-01

    Today, elliptical superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are preferably made from deep-drawn niobium sheets as pursued at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The fabrication of a cavity incorporates various cavity cell machining, trimming and electron beam welding (EBW) steps as well as surface chemistry that add to forming errors creating geometrical deviations of the cavity shape from its design. An analysis of in-house built cavities over the last years revealed significant errors in cavity production. Past fabrication flaws are described and lessons learned applied successfully to the most recent in-house series production of multi-cell cavities.

  16. PUREX/UO3 facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In May 1997, a historic deactivation project at the PUREX (Plutonium URanium EXtraction) facility at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State concluded its activities (Figure ES-1). The project work was finished at $78 million under its original budget of $222.5 million, and 16 months ahead of schedule. Closely watched throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex and by the US Department of Defense for the value of its lessons learned, the PUREX Deactivation Project has become the national model for the safe transition of contaminated facilities to shut down status

  17. EC6 safety enhancement - including impact of Fukushima lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Enhanced CANDU® 6 (EC6) is the new Generation III CANDU reactor design that meets the most up to date regulatory requirements and customer expectations. EC6 builds on the proven high performance design such as the Qinshan CANDU 6 units and has made improvements to safety and operational performance, and has incorporated extensive operational feedback including Fukushima. The Fukushima Dai-ichi March 11, 2011 event has demonstrated the importance of defence-in-depth considerations for beyond-design basis events, including severe accidents. The EC6 design is based on the defence-in-depth principles and provides further design features that address the lessons learned from Fukushima. (author)

  18. Regional Stability & Lessons Learned in Regional Peace Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestenskov, David; Johnsen, Anton Asklund

    none of the countries is able to deal with the intrastate and interstate conflicts on its own. The conference Regional Stability & Lessons Learned in Regional Peace Building was the result of comprehensive cooperation between Pakistan’s National Defence University and the Royal Danish Defence College......, and many of them were addressed at the conference: The withdrawal of international military forces, the Taliban, India/Pakistan relations, the need for regionalism, China’s role, EU and ASEAN as models for inspiration and regional perspectives from Iran and Afghanistan were all part of the talks in...

  19. Lessons learned by southern states in transportation of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report has been prepared under a cooperative agreement with DOE's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and is a summary of the lessons learned by southern states regarding the transportation of radioactive materials including High-Level Radioactive Wastes (HLRW) and Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF). Sources used in this publication include interviews of state radiological health and public safety officials that are members of the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) Advisory Committee on Radioactive Materials Transportation, as well as the Board's Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transportation Working Group. Other sources include letters written by the above mentioned committees concerning various aspects of DOE shipment campaigns

  20. Job task analysis: lessons learned from application in course development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Those at Public Service Electric and Gas Company are committed to a systematic approach to training known as Instructional System Design. Our performance-based training emphasizes the ISD process to have trainees do or perform the task whenever and wherever it is possible for the jobs for which they are being trained. Included is a brief description of our process for conducting and validating job analyses. The major thrust of this paper is primarily on the lessons that we have learned in the design and development of training programs based upon job analysis results

  1. Lessons Learned from Creating a Course Advising Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Mattei, Nicholas; Guerin, Joshua T; Goldsmith, Judy; Mazur, Joan M

    2013-01-01

    We detail some lessons learned while designing and testing a course selection tool for undergraduates at a large state university. Between 2009 - 2011 we conducted two surveys of over 500 students in multiple majors and colleges. These surveys asked students detailed questions about their preferences concerning courses selection, advising, and career paths. We present data from this study which may be helpful for faculty and staff who advise undergraduate students. We find that advising software tools can help both students and human advisors in terms of rote requirement checking and basic course planning, but nothing can replace an in person advising session.

  2. Lessons Learned Using a Relational Database for System Conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Stahlhut, Richard W.; McCallie, David P.

    1989-01-01

    Before a new system is brought on-line, data from an old system frequently needs to be massaged prior to loading into the new system. To determine if 4-GL tools could be used in these projects, a relational database management system, Oracle, was used to convert our old ADT system's data into the format required by the new system. In doing so, we learned several important performance lessons regarding proper structuring of SQL statements and database tuning. Although the ADT system data were ...

  3. Designing a database for performance assessment: Lessons learned from WIPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Compliance Certification Application (CCA) Performance Assessment (PA) used a relational database that was originally designed only to supply the input parameters required for implementation of the PA codes. Reviewers used the database as a point of entry to audit quality assurance measures for control, traceability, and retrievability of input information used for analysis, and output/work products. During these audits it became apparent that modifications to the architecture and scope of the database would benefit the EPA regulator and other stakeholders when reviewing the recertification application. This paper contains a discussion of the WPP PA CCA database and lessons learned for designing a database

  4. Design and evaluation of two blended learning approaches: Lessons learned

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, WS; Hew, KF

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we share two blended learning approaches used at the National Institute of Education in Singapore. We have been using these two approaches in the last twelve years in many courses ranging from the diploma to graduate programs. For the first blended learning approach, we integrated one asynchronous communication tool with face to face tutorials, classroom discussions, and a reflection session. For the second blended learning approach, we integrated two asynchronous tools with fa...

  5. A Computer Learning Center for Environmental Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, John F.

    2000-01-01

    In the fall of 1998, MacMillan Hall opened at Brown University to students. In MacMillan Hall was the new Computer Learning Center, since named the EarthLab which was outfitted with high-end workstations and peripherals primarily focused on the use of remotely sensed and other spatial data in the environmental sciences. The NASA grant we received as part of the "Centers of Excellence in Applications of Remote Sensing to Regional and Global Integrated Environmental Assessments" was the primary source of funds to outfit this learning and research center. Since opening, we have expanded the range of learning and research opportunities and integrated a cross-campus network of disciplines who have come together to learn and use spatial data of all kinds. The EarthLab also forms a core of undergraduate, graduate, and faculty research on environmental problems that draw upon the unique perspective of remotely sensed data. Over the last two years, the Earthlab has been a center for research on the environmental impact of water resource use in and regions, impact of the green revolution on forest cover in India, the design of forest preserves in Vietnam, and detailed assessments of the utility of thermal and hyperspectral data for water quality analysis. It has also been used extensively for local environmental activities, in particular studies on the impact of lead on the health of urban children in Rhode Island. Finally, the EarthLab has also served as a key educational and analysis center for activities related to the Brown University Affiliated Research Center that is devoted to transferring university research to the private sector.

  6. Communicating Tsunami Preparedness Through the Lessons Learned by Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerlow, I.

    2015-12-01

    Often times science communication is reactive and it minimizes the perceptions of the general public. The Tsunami of New Dreams is a film with the testimonies of survivors of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami in Banda Aceh and Aceh Besar in West Sumatra, Indonesia. Production of the film spanned over five years and dozens of interviews, and is based on a unique geographic, demographic and experiential sampling of the local population. This documentary feature film underscores the importance of Earth science and science communication in building sustainable communities. The film is a lesson in survival and sustainability, and it provides a simple but powerful testimony of what to do and what not to do before and during a tsunami. The film also highlights the direct relationship that exists between disaster survival rates and the knowledge of basic Earth science and preparedness facts. We hope that the human stories presented in the film will serve as a strong motivator for general audiences to learn about natural hazards, preparedness, and Earth science. These engaging narratives can touch the minds and hearts of general audiences much faster than technical lectures in a classroom. Some of the testimonies are happy and others are sad, but they all present the wide range of beliefs that influenced the outcomes of the natural disaster. The interviews with survivors are complemented with unique archival footage of the tsunami and unique footage of daily life in Aceh. Hand-drawn illustrations are used to recreate what survivors did immediately after the earthquake, and during the extreme moments when they faced the tsunami waves. Animated visuals, maps and diagrams enhance the understanding of earthquake and tsunami dynamics. The film is a production of the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) in collaboration with the International Center for Aceh and Indian Ocean Studies (ICAIOS) in Banda Aceh, Indonesia. The film is scheduled for release in late 2015. This is a unique

  7. QA in interventional cardiology: The lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation describes the methodology, shows the results and analyse the difficulties presented during implementation of the QA programmes in two Interventional Cardiology (IC) Centers of Uruguay in the context of an IAEA coordinated research project that explored the possibility of establishing guidance levels for interventional radiology procedures. First, cardiologists, technicians and nurses received specific information about the QA programme. X ray system tests methodologies were based on the DIMOND European Research Project. Characterizations were performed of the two X ray systems (Picker CV-PRO-1997- and Philips Integris 3000-1995). In clinical conditions (with couch and mattress), for all image intensifier diameters and all fluoroscopy and cine modes, Kerma rate and Kerma per frame (entrance patient dose) were measured with an ionization chamber (10x5-6 E, Radcal) at the entrance of four Plexiglas (PMMA) phantom thicknesses (16, 20, 24 and 28 cm). Simultaneously, spatial resolution and low contrast were evaluated at clinical distance to the monitor by a cardiologist and a physicist, using TOR [18FG] Leeds plate located in the center of the PMMA phantom and in the isocenter of the C-arm. In the same conditions, but for 10, 20 and 30 cm PMMA thicknesses, Kerma rate and Kerma per frame and image quality were studied with NEMA phantom (Standard XR21-2000). Constancy tests were performed with Leeds object test using 4 mm Cu attenuators and Leeds image plate. Kerma rates and Kerma per frame for the same conditions (geometry, cine or fluoroscopy modes, dose modes, image intensifier diameter, FOV and PMMA thickness) were different for each X ray system. As can be seen, values are high in the Philips unit. However, direct (subjective) observation of low and high contrast details of the Leeds test showed similar results. That would require objective evaluation (MTF, noise, contrast and SNR), but they consume more time. Differences in Kerma rate and Kerma per

  8. Six Lessons We Learned Applying Six Sigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Napoleon; Casleton, Christa H.

    2005-01-01

    As Chief Financial Officer of Kennedy Space Center (KSC), I'm not only responsible for financial planning and accounting but also for building strong partnerships with the CFO customers, who include Space Shuttle and International Space Station operations as well all who manage the KSC Spaceport. My never ending goal is to design, manage and continuously improve our core business processes so that they deliver world class products and services to the CFO's customers. I became interested in Six Sigma as Christa Casleton (KSC's first Six Sigma Black belt) applied Six Sigma tools and methods to our Plan and Account for Travel Costs Process. Her analysis was fresh, innovative and thorough but, even more impressive, was her approach to ensure ongoing, continuous process improvement. Encouraged by the results, I launched two more process improvement initiatives aimed at applying Six Sigma principles to CFO processes that not only touch most of my employees but also have direct customer impact. As many of you know, Six Sigma is a measurement scale that compares the output of a process with customer requirements. That's straight forward, but demands that you not only understand your processes but also know your products and the critical customer requirements. The objective is to isolate and eliminate the causes of process variation so that the customer sees consistently high quality.

  9. Lessons learned from perinatal exposure to diethylstilbestrol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) is well documented to be a perinatal carcinogen in both humans and experimental animals. Exposure to DES during critical periods of differentiation permanently alters the programming of estrogen target tissues resulting in benign and malignant abnormalities in the reproductive tract later in life. Using the perinatal DES-exposed rodent model, cellular and molecular mechanisms have been identified that play a role in these carcinogenic effects. Although DES is a potent estrogenic chemical, effects of low doses of the compound are being used to predict health risks of weaker environmental estrogens. Therefore, it is of particular interest that developmental exposure to very low doses of DES has been found to adversely affect fertility and to increase tumor incidence in murine reproductive tract tissues. These adverse effects are seen at environmentally relevant estrogen dose levels. New studies from our lab verify that DES effects are not unique; when numerous environmental chemicals with weak estrogenic activity are tested in the experimental neonatal mouse model, developmental exposure results in an increased incidence of benign and malignant tumors including uterine leiomyomas and adenocarcinomas that are similar to those shown following DES exposure. Finally, growing evidence in experimental animals suggests that some adverse effects can be passed on to subsequent generations, although the mechanisms involved in these trans-generational events remain unknown. Although the complete spectrum of risks to DES-exposed humans are uncertain at this time, the scientific community continues to learn more about cellular and molecular mechanisms by which perinatal carcinogenesis occurs. These advances in knowledge of both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms will be significant in ultimately predicting risks to other environmental estrogens and understanding more about the role of estrogens in normal and abnormal development

  10. Lessons Learned on Fuel Cycle Simulation Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piet, S.J.; Dixon, B.W.; Jacobson, J.J.; Matthern, G.E.; Shropshire, D.E. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 North Fremont Mail Stop 3870, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415-3870 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Nuclear fuel cycles are inherently dynamic, yet many (if not most) comparisons of nuclear fuel cycle options compare them via static time-independent analyses. Instead, assessments need to consider dynamics in at least three senses - transitions from one fuel cycle strategy to another, how fuel cycles perform with nuclear power growth superimposed with time delays throughout the system, and variability of fuel cycle performance due to perturbations. This paper explains some of what we have learned from dynamic fuel cycle simulations using the VISION model. Dynamic analysis shows details not available through static analysis alone. - The fraction of fast reactors at any point in time will be much lower than predicted by simple 'static equilibrium' calculations due to multiple system constraints that impact the amount of TRU available for fueling new reactors at startup. - TRU management needs to account for both the TRU consumed in fast reactors and the additional TRU generation avoided due to fast reactors replacing some LWRs. - It is difficult to match the timing and size of deployment of reactors, separation plants, and fuel fabrication plants. - The holdup of transuranic material in the system impacts system performance so that short time lags (e.g. when facilities are co-located instead of at different locations) can lead to faster system evolution. - The higher the nuclear power growth rate, the higher the fast reactor TRU conversion ratio should be from the standpoint of uranium usage and the further the fast reactor fraction from static equilibrium. - The impact of transitioning to a closed fuel cycle on waste management is large and depends on processing loss rate and how long the closed fuel cycle has been implemented. - Fuel and separation facilities must accommodate variation in fuel mixture elemental composition. (authors)

  11. Cybernetic Service-Learning Course Development: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Jonathan I.; Miller, Lee Q.

    2009-01-01

    Although the title of the course, Combating Loneliness among Older People in Contemporary Society, states a clear goal, our service-learning class was shaped by five guiding parameters. By avoiding certain things, we allowed the course to self-organize and evolve into a learning experience beyond the one originally envisioned. This paper…

  12. Design and Evaluation of Two Blended Learning Approaches: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Wing Sum; Hew, Khe Foon

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we share two blended learning approaches used at the National Institute of Education in Singapore. We have been using these two approaches in the last twelve years in many courses ranging from the diploma to graduate programs. For the first blended learning approach, we integrated one asynchronous communication tool with face to…

  13. Twenty years of immunocontraceptive research: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lowell A; Fagerstone, Kathleen A; Eckery, Douglas C

    2013-12-01

    The National Wildlife Research Center (NWRC) began immunocontraception vaccine research by testing porcine zona pellucida (PZP) on white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Early PZP research demonstrated that PZP induced infertility; however, increased length of the rut was observed in PZP-treated deer. An alternative vaccine using a keyhole limpet hemocyanin-gonadotropin-releasing hormone (KLH-GnRH) conjugate formulated with modified Freund's adjuvant was developed at NWRC. Suppression of GnRH has reduced reproduction in both sexes but is most effective in females. This vaccine was effective in preventing contraception in female deer for several years after a prime and boost. Due to adverse side effects of Freund's adjuvant, NWRC developed a new adjuvant called AdjuVac, a mineral oil/surfactant adjuvant with the addition of Mycobacterium avium as an immunostimulant. The price of KLH prompted a search for a more economical hemocyanin carrier protein for the GnRH peptide. Blue protein, derived from the mollusk Concholepas concholepas, proved to be a successful option. Formulation improvements resulted in a vaccine that can be effective as a single injection for multiple years, now called GonaCon. GonaCon is registered with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in white-tailed deer in urban/suburban areas and for wild horses (Equus caballus) and burros (Equus asinus). Future GonaCon applications may include reducing reproduction to manage populations of other wildlife species, such as prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) in urban areas and suppressing reproduction to reduce the spread of venereal diseases such as brucellosis. Research is being conducted to develop a GnRH vaccine used in combination with the rabies vaccine to control population growth in free-roaming dogs, with the secondary effect of managing the spread of rabies. The EPA would regulate all these uses. Research is also ongoing on a GnRH vaccine to delay the onset of adrenocortical

  14. 241-SY-101 air lance removal lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An emergency task was undertaken to remove four air lances and one thermocouple (TC) tree from tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101). This resulted from video observation that these pipes were being severely bent during periodic gas release events that regularly occurred every three to four months. At the time, the gas release events were considered to be the number one safety issue within the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This emergency removal task was undertaken on an extremely short schedule that required all activities possible to be completed in parallel. This approach and extremely short schedule, while successful, resulted in some undesirable consequences from less than desired time for design, reviews, equipment testing, operations training, and bad weather conditions. These consequences included leakage of liquid waste from the containers to the ground, higher than expected dose rates at the container surface, difficult field operations, and unexpected pipe configuration during removal. In addition, changes to environmental regulations and severe winter weather impacted the packaging and shipping activities required the prepare the removed pipes for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC). The purpose of this document is to identify lessons to be learned for future activities. In context of the emergency conditions that existed at the time and the urgency to remove these pipes, their removal was successfully completed under extremely difficult conditions and schedule. The success of the task should not be overshadowed by the desire to identify areas needing improvement and lessons to be learned. Many of the lessons identified in this document have already resulted in improved conduct of operations and engineering

  15. Progress of the Architectural Competition: Learning Center, the Lausanne Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Rittmeyer

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Point of entry to the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL, the Learning Center will be a place to learn, to obtain information, and to live. Replacing and improving the old main library, this new building will gradually assimilate all EPFL department libraries collections and services, as they are integrated into a global information system. Conceived as the place for those who are learning, mainly students, who have no personal working area on the campus, it is designed to adapt itself to the ‘seasons’ of academic life throughout the year (flexibility and modularity of rooms, extended opening hours during exam periods. It will take into account group working habits (silence vs. noise, changes in the rhythm of student life (meals, working alone, discussions, etc., and other environmental factors. Of course the needs of EPFL staff and alumni, local industry and citizens have also been carefully considered in the design. By offering a multitude of community functions, such as a bookshop, cafeteria and restaurant services, and rooms for relaxation and discussion, the Learning Center will link the campus to the city. Areas devoted to exhibition and debate will also be included, enforcing its role as an interactive science showcase, in particular for those technologies related to the research and teaching of the EPFL. The presentation described the process and steps towards the actual realisation of such a vital public space: from the programme definition to the collaboration with the bureau of architects (SAANA, Tokyo who won the project competition, the speakers showed what are the challenges and lessons already taken when working on this major piece of architecture, indeed the heart of the transformation of the technical school build in the 1970s into a real 2000s campus.

  16. Operational Lessons Learned from NASA Analog Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Larissa S.

    2010-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) efforts in human space flight are currently focused on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) programs, with efforts beginning on the future exploration opportunities. Both the Space Shuttle and ISS programs are important to the development of a capability for human exploration beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The ISS provides extensive research capabilities to determine how the human body reacts to long duration stays in space. Also, the ISS and Shuttle can serve as a limited testbed for equipment or entire systems that may be used on missions to the Moon, Mars, or to a near-Earth asteroid. It has been nearly 35 years since the Apollo astronauts visited the Moon. Future space explorers will have to re-learn how to work and live on planetary surfaces, and how to do that for extended periods of time. Exploration crews will perform a wide assortment of scientific tasks, including material sampling and emplacement of automated instruments. Surface mission operations include the activities of the crew living and working, mission support from the Earth, and the operation of robotic and other remotely commanded equipment on the surface and in planetary orbit. Other surface activities will include the following: exploring areas surrounding a habitat; using rovers to collect rock and soil samples; setting up experiments on the surface to monitor the radiation environment and any seismic or thermal activity; and conducting scientific analyses and experiments inside a habitat laboratory. Of course, the astronauts will also have to spend some of their surface time "doing chores" and maintaining their habitat and other systems. In preparation for future planetary exploration, NASA must design the answers to many operational questions. What will the astronauts do on the surface? How will they accomplish this? What tools will they require for their tasks? How will robots and astronauts work together? What

  17. Lessons learned in TRU waste process improvement at LANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Typical papers that discuss lessons learned or quality improvement focus on the challenge for a production facility reaching six sigma (3.4 Defects Per Million Opportunities) from five sigma. This paper discusses lessons learned when the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) transuranic (TRU) waste management project was challenged to establish a production system to meet the customer's expectations. The target for FY 2003 was set as two shipments of TRU waste per week leaving the site. The average for the four previous years (FY99-02) was about one shipment every two months. LANL recognized that, despite its success in 1999 as the first site to ship TRU waste to open the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), significant changes to the way business was being done were required to move to a production mode. Process improvements began in earnest in April 2002. This paper discusses several of the initiatives LANL took to achieve forty-five shipments in FY03. The paper is organized by topic into five major areas that LANL worked to get the job done.

  18. Lessons learned by southern states in designating alternative routes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to discuss the ''lessons learned'' by the five states within the southem region that have designated alternative or preferred routes under the regulations of the Department of Transportation (DOT) established for the transportation of radioactive materials. The document was prepared by reviewing applicable federal laws and regulations, examining state reports and documents and contacting state officials and routing agencies involved in making routing decisions. In undertaking this project, the Southern States Energy Board hopes to reveal the process used by states that have designated alternative routes and thereby share their experiences (i.e., lessons learned) with other southern states that have yet to make designations. Under DOT regulations (49 CFR 177.826), carriers of highway route controlled quantities of radioactive materials (which include spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste) must use preferred routes selected to reduce time in transit. Such preferred routes consist of (1) an interstate system highway with use of an interstate system bypass or beltway around cities when available, and (2) alternate routes selected by a ''state routing agency.''

  19. Lessons Learned In Aerosol Monitoring With The RASA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) is an automated aerosol collection and analysis system designed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in the 1990's and is deployed in several locations around the world as part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) required under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The RASA operates unattended, save for regularly scheduled maintenance, iterating samples through a three-step process on a 24-hour interval. In its 15-year history, much has been learned from the operation and maintenance of the RASA that can benefit engineering updates or future aerosol systems. On 11 March 2011, a 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami rocked the eastern coast of Japan, resulting in power loss and cooling failures at the Daiichi nuclear power plants in Fukushima Prefecture. Aerosol collections were conducted with the RASA in Richland, WA. We present a summary of the lessons learned over the history of the RASA, including lessons taken from the Fukushima incident, regarding the RASA IMS stations operated by the United States.

  20. Lessons learned from decommissioning projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes lessons learned over the last 20 years from 12 decommissioning projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory. These lessons relate both to overall program management and to management of specific projects during the planning and operations phases. The issues include waste management; the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA); the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); contracting; public involvement; client/customer interface; and funding. Key elements of our approach are to be proactive; follow the observation method; perform field activities concurrently; develop strategies to keep reportable incidents from delaying work; seek and use programs, methods, etc., in existence to shorten learning curves; network to help develop solutions; and avoid overstudying and overcharacterizing. This approach results in preliminary plans that require very little revision before implementation, reasonable costs and schedules, early acquisition of permits and NEPA documents, preliminary characterization reports, and contracting documents. Our track record is good -- the last four projects (uranium and plutonium-processing facility and three research reactors) have been on budget and on schedule

  1. Tracking technology: lessons learned in two health care sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Mary Elizabeth; Wingrave, Chadwick A; Klanchar, Angel; Craighead, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the process of staff and patient adoption and compliance of a real-time locating system (RTLS) across two health care settings and present lessons learned. While previous work has examined the technological feasibility of tracking staff and patients in a health care setting in real-time, these studies have not described the critical adoption issues that must be overcome for deployment. The ability to track and monitor individual staff and patients presents new opportunities for improving workflow, patient health and reducing health care costs. A RTLS is introduced in both a long-term care and a polytrauma transitional rehabilitation program (PTRP) in a Veterans Hospital to track staff and patient locations and five lessons learned are presented from our experiences and responses to emergent technological, work-related and social barriers to adoption. We conclude that successful tracking in a health care environment requires time and careful consideration of existing work, policies and stakeholder needs which directly impact the efficacy of the technology. PMID:23792793

  2. Ebola: lessons learned and future challenges for Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaglio, GianLuca; Goerens, Charles; Putoto, Giovanni; Rübig, Paul; Lafaye, Pierre; Karapiperis, Theodoros; Dario, Claudio; Delaunois, Paul; Zachariah, Rony

    2016-02-01

    The Ebola virus epidemic has topped media and political agendas for months; several countries in west Africa have faced the worst Ebola epidemic in history. At the beginning of the disease outbreak, European Union (EU) policies were notably absent regarding how to respond to the crisis. Although the epidemic is now receding from public view, this crisis has undoubtedly changed the European public perception of Ebola virus disease, which is no longer regarded as a bizarre entity confined in some unknown corner in Africa. Policy makers and researchers in Europe now have an opportunity to consider the lessons learned. In this Personal View, we discuss the EU's response to the Ebola crisis in west Africa. Unfortunately, although ample resources and opportunities for humanitarian and medical action existed, the EU did not use them to promote a rapid and well coordinated response to the Ebola crisis. Lessons learned from this crisis should be used to improve the role of the EU in similar situations in the future, ensuring that European aid can be effectively deployed to set up an improved emergency response system, and supporting the establishment of sustainable health-care services in west Africa. PMID:26627138

  3. Lessons-Learned from an Event during Overhaul

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The event frequency, also including portion of human errors, has been decreasing compared to last ten years. However, events due to human errors during overhaul occur every year. From analyzed results for human-related events during overhaul, similar problems were identified. And organizational and safety cultural factors were also identified. On the other hand, another event during overhaul is analyzed and Lessons-Learned is drawn in an aspect of the operators' situation awareness. There was an event during overhaul and the analyzed results drawn Lessons-Learned in the aspect of the operators' situation awareness. From the analysis, several alarms and variation of plant parameters during overhaul can occur due to various maintenance works and tests. And in the aspect of the situation awareness, operators can miss, neglect, or not recognize the abnormal situation due to other maintenance activities occurring simultaneously. Therefore, countermeasures such as operator education or training, development of operator support systems, and further researches should be necessary to cope with these problems

  4. IAEA International Generic Ageing Lessons Learned programme phase 1 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • International Generic Ageing Lessons Learned (IGALL) Programme was commenced to develop a practical guide for ageing management programmes. • Results of IGALL Phase 1 are publicly available on IAEA web sites. • 76 ageing management programmes and 27 time limited ageing analyses is provided. • More than 2000 consolidated line items in ageing management review tables was prepared. • The IGALL represents a common internationally agreed basis on what constitutes acceptable ageing management programme. - Abstract: This paper presents purpose and results of the IAEA International Generic Ageing Lessons Learned (IGALL) programme phase 1. The IGALL programme phase 1 (2010–2013) was successfully completed in September 2013. The IGALL safety report, which includes consolidated IGALL database information on 76 ageing management programmes, 27 time limited ageing analyses and more than 2000 consolidated line items in ageing management review tables was prepared for publication. The IGALL database was made publicly available in February 2014. The IGALL safety report represents a common internationally agreed basis on what constitutes acceptable ageing management programmes, as well as a knowledge base on ageing management for design of new plants, design reviews, safety reviews (such as periodic safety review), etc., and serves as a roadmap to available information on ageing management. The IAEA IGALL programme assures that information contained in the IGALL safety report will be kept updated and creates an international network for continuous discussion and development of AMPs and TLAAs as recommended tools to manage ageing

  5. WHY CANT WE LEARN FROM OUR MISTAKES LEARN THE LESSON TELL THE STORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tell the story well and people can learn from the lesson. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and its contractors are pursuing environmental remediation at the Hanford Site. This endeavor has been underway for a number of years, both at Hanford and at other sites across the DOE complex. Independently, the occurrence of two fatalities on two Sites at opposite ends of the country within two weeks raised the question, ''What is going on in the Field?'' Corporate EM management communicated directly with Field Office Managers to answer the question. As a result of this intense interest and focused communication, EM identified four areas that need additional exploration. One of those is, ''EM's ability to learn from its mistakes.'' The need to cultivate the ability to learn from our mistakes is not unique to DOE. A quick review of EM Lessons Learned reports shows that most of the reports in the EM system originate at the sites with the largest budgets doing the most work. Not surprising. A second look, however, reveals that many reports are repetitive, that many people might consider many reports trivial, and that reports on some of the more significant events sometimes take a long time to get distributed across the DOE Complex. Spot checks of event reports revealed frequent identification of symptoms rather than root causes. With a high percentage of identified root causes in the questionable category, it is highly unlikely that the real root causes of many events are being corrected, thus leading to recurrences of events. To learn the lesson from an event, people need to be aware of the root causes of the event. Someone has to tell a story the reader can learn from, i.e., include all the information needed to understand what happened and why it happened. Most importantly, they need to understand the lesson to be learned

  6. Distance Learning With NASA Lewis Research Center's Learning Technologies Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Ruth

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's Learning Technologies Project (LTP) has responded to requests from local school district technology coordinators to provide content for videoconferencing workshops. Over the past year we have offered three teacher professional development workshops that showcase NASA Lewis-developed educational products and NASA educational Internet sites. In order to determine the direction of our involvement with distance learning, the LTP staff conducted a survey of 500 U.S. schools. We received responses from 72 schools that either currently use distance learning or will be using distance learning in 98-99 school year. The results of the survey are summarized in the article. In addition, the article provides information on distance learners, distance learning technologies, and the NASA Lewis LTP videoconferencing workshops. The LTP staff will continue to offer teacher development workshops through videoconferencing during the 98-99 school year. We hope to add workshops on new educational products as they are developed at NASA Lewis.

  7. The German Climate Service Center: Philosophy, First Achievements and Lessons Learnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, G.; Braun, R.; Jacob, D.; Schaller, M.; Schwarze, R.

    2012-04-01

    The German Climate Service Center (CSC) has been established at the initiative of the Federal Government of Germany to help society (business and government) adapt to climate change. The center provides data, information, analyses and other services to a wide spectrum of stakeholders. The paper will discuss the philosophy that drives the centeŕs activities, present a few products as examples, and provide some "lessons learnt" during the 2.5 years of the Centeŕs existence.

  8. The Problems and its Countermeasures of Autonomous Language Learning Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE Jian-feng

    2014-01-01

    With the popularity of Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL), autonomous language learning centers have been established in the universities throughout the country. However, there are many problems exist in the practice of the auton-omous language learning center. This essay tries to discuss the problems and its countermeasures with an aim of improving Col-lege English learning and teaching by the example of autonomous language learning center in Nanyang Institute of Technology.

  9. IPY Education, Outreach and Communication - Some Lessons Learned (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, D. J.; Salmon, R.; Munro, N.

    2009-12-01

    IPY Education, Outreach and Communications planning and implementation occurred with a minimum of staff and resources and a maximum of international volunteer enthusiasm and energy. Although many relatively well-funded and remarkable national activities occurred, sharing and promoting these internationally depended entirely on the volunteer networks of individuals and institutions. Through these partnerships we have learned valuable lessons about impact and distribution, and challenged several assumptions about educational partnerships. For example, we learned the importance of regular pre-scheduled events, and how to use networks of volunteer translators and free geobrowser tools. We have learned how best to conduct planning meetings and live events across time zones and hemispheres, and shown how the best concepts and ideas of science education can propagate across age groups and among languages. We have learned the optimal times of year for international events, and the most effective means for international distribution and communication. We have established a rapid-response help desk without home or staff, and sustained active and high-impact interactions with journalists largely without press releases. We have shown that, in general, wide-spread distribution of freely accessible materials produces a better impact than embargoes and restrictions. Most fundamentally, we have exposed a pervasive interest in polar science and a hunger for climate information, and responded with an active, flexible, and efficient network of partners and products.

  10. PUREX/UO3 Facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1996-09-19

    accompanied by and were an integral part of sweeping ``culture changes,`` the story of the lessons learned during the PUREX Deactivation Project are worth recounting. Foremost among the lessons is recognizing the benefits of ``right to left`` project planning. A deactivation project must start by identifying its end points, then make every task, budget, and organizational decision based on reaching those end points. Along with this key lesson is the knowledge that project planning and scheduling should be tied directly to costing, and the project status should be checked often (more often than needed to meet mandated reporting requirements) to reflect real-time work. People working on a successful project should never be guessing about its schedule or living with a paper schedule that does not represent the actual state of work. Other salient lessons were learned in the PUREX/UO3 Deactivation Project that support these guiding principles. They include recognizing the value of independent review, teamwork, and reengineering concepts; the need and value of cooperation between the DOE, its contractors, regulators, and stakeholders; and the essential nature of early and ongoing communication. Managing a successful project also requires being willing to take a fresh look at safety requirements and to apply them in a streamlined and sensible manner to deactivating facilities; draw on the enormous value of resident knowledge acquired by people over years and sometimes decades of working in old plants; and recognize the value of bringing in outside expertise for certain specialized tasks.This approach makes possible discovering the savings that can come when many creative options are pursued persistently and the wisdom of leaving some decisions to the future. The essential job of a deactivation project is to place a facility in a safe, stable, low-maintenance mode, for an interim period. Specific end points are identified to recognize and document this state. Keeping the limited

  11. Lessons Learned the Hard Way but Learned Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirksen, Debra J.

    2014-01-01

    The author spins a tale of how she learned classroom management largely by trial and error and by making a commitment to never give up on her students. Classroom management done well provides the signposts that give students direction and enables them to reach their destination as learners and human beings. Classroom management is one of the most…

  12. A Proposal to Manage Lessons Learned in Projects: Web 2.0 Technologies to Promote Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcirio Silveira Chaves

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The web 2.0 is transforming the project management in organizations by improving communication and collaboration. The new generation of web-based collaborative tools provides much better experience than the traditional software package allowing document sharing, integrated task tracking, enforcing team processes and agile planning. Despite of the indubitable benefits brought by web 2.0, the use of these technologies to promote knowledge management remains unexplored. For many project managers to obtain and integrate information from different tools of previous similar projects in global organizations remains a challenge. This theoretical paper presents a proposal that suggests an innovation in the knowledge management area applying web 2.0 technologies. The main goal is to provide an integrated vision of a set of technologies that could be used by organizations in order to promote better management of lessons learned. The proposal includes the lessons learned processes (e.g. capture, share and dissemination, the process-based (e.g. project review and after action review and documentation-based (e.g. micro article and learning histories methods. Results show how web 2.0 technologies can help project managers and team project to cope with the main lessons learned processes and methods to learn from experience. Moreover, recommendations are made for the effective use of web 2.0 components promoting innovation and supporting lessons learned management in projects.Keywords: Project management; Lessons learned processes; lessons learned methods; project learning; web 2.0 technologies; innovation.

  13. Establishing an implementation network: lessons learned from community-based participatory research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Piedad

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implementation of evidence-based mental health assessment and intervention in community public health practice is a high priority for multiple stakeholders. Academic-community partnerships can assist in the implementation of efficacious treatments in community settings; yet, little is known about the processes by which these collaborations are developed. In this paper, we discuss our application of community-based participatory research (CBPR approach to implementation, and we present six lessons we have learned from the establishment of an academic-community partnership. Methods With older adults with psychosis as a focus, we have developed a partnership between a university research center and a public mental health service system based on CBPR. The long-term goal of the partnership is to collaboratively establish an evidence-based implementation network that is sustainable within the public mental healthcare system. Results In building a sustainable partnership, we found that the following lessons were instrumental: changing attitudes; sharing staff; expecting obstacles and formalizing solutions; monitoring and evaluating; adapting and adjusting; and taking advantage of emerging opportunities. Some of these lessons were previously known principles that were modified as the result of the CBPR process, while some lessons derived directly from the interactive process of forming the partnership. Conclusion The process of forming of academic-public partnerships is challenging and time consuming, yet crucial for the development and implementation of state-of-the-art approaches to assessment and interventions to improve the functioning and quality of life for persons with serious mental illnesses. These partnerships provide necessary organizational support to facilitate the implementation of clinical research findings in community practice benefiting consumers, researchers, and providers.

  14. Lessons learned and their application to program development and cultural issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Gilbert L.

    1991-01-01

    The main objectives of space product assurance are, in effect, the same as those of Total Quality Management (TQM) or its many variants. The most significant ingredients are the lessons learned and their application to ongoing and future programs as they are affected by changes in the cultural environment. The cultural issues which affect almost everything done in technical programs and projects are considered. Understanding the lessons learned and the synergism which results from this combination of knowledge, culture, and lessons learned is identified as crucial. A brief discussion of the closed loop linkage that should exist between the world of hands on activities and that of educational institutions is presented.

  15. OECD/NEA lessons learned on stakeholder issues in decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issues of public concern during decommissioning and dismantling are partly the same and partly different from those of the preceding phases (planning, construction and operation). While in the course of construction and operation, the main challenges include meeting expectations of a higher quality of life, accommodating a growing population, mitigating construction nuisances, and assuring the safe operation of the facility, the main concerns in the decommissioning phase are the decreasing employment rate, the eventual reduction of revenues for the municipality, the future use of the affected land and negative social impacts (e.g. out-migration). The decommissioning phase is characterised by the heterogeneity of stakeholder interests and values, the difficulties in reaching consensus or compromise, and the difficulties in connecting with the harmonization of energy production, environmental protection and sustainable socio-economic development considerations. Typically, there might also be tensions between local and regional decisions. As in other phases, the building of trust between stakeholders is crucial from the point of view of conflict management, and social lessons learnt from the siting and developments of nuclear facilities are widely applicable in the field of decommissioning. A review is presented of major lessons to be learned from OECD/NEA activities in the field of decommissioning and stakeholder involvement. (author)

  16. Lessons Learned from the Puerto Rico Battery Energy Storage System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOYES, JOHN D.; DE ANA, MINDI FARBER; TORRES, WENCESLANO

    1999-09-01

    The Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) installed a distributed battery energy storage system in 1994 at a substation near San Juan, Puerto Rico. It was patterned after two other large energy storage systems operated by electric utilities in California and Germany. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage Systems Program at Sandia National Laboratories has followed the progress of all stages of the project since its inception. It directly supported the critical battery room cooling system design by conducting laboratory thermal testing of a scale model of the battery under simulated operating conditions. The Puerto Rico facility is at present the largest operating battery storage system in the world and is successfully providing frequency control, voltage regulation, and spinning reserve to the Caribbean island. The system further proved its usefulness to the PREPA network in the fall of 1998 in the aftermath of Hurricane Georges. The owner-operator, PREPA, and the architect/engineer, vendors, and contractors learned many valuable lessons during all phases of project development and operation. In documenting these lessons, this report will help PREPA and other utilities in planning to build large energy storage systems.

  17. Timeline Iraq: Challenges and lessons learned from nuclear inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under a dramatic and far-reaching global spotlight, the International Atomic Energy Agency's experience in Iraq reached a turning point in March 2003. Its nuclear inspection team - together with teams of the United Nations Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC) and the rest of the UN organisations operating in Iraq - had to withdraw ahead of announced military operations. The diplomatic route to disarming Iraq had reached an impasse. Today, international inspection teams tracking weapons of mass destruction (WMD) programmes in Iraq work in the wings, ready to resume operations in Iraq at the UN Security Council's call. The mandate of international inspection stands, with the IAEA's Iraq Nuclear Verification Office (INVO) in Vienna in charge of the nuclear file. The IAEA's nuclear inspection and verification experience in Iraq stretches over a span of three decades, addressing activities from the mine to the weapon. Agency inspectors led the discovery and dismantlement of Iraq's secret nuclear weapons programme in the 1990s, and after the 1990s round of inspections had stopped, they had found no evidence, up to March 2003, that the programme had been revived since 1998. Since the first Iraq inspections under Security Council mandate in early 1991, the road of nuclear verification in Iraq has proved to be long and hard, and valuable lessons were learned that have benefited the international community and strengthened the IAEA inspectorate. This article highlights the IAEA's extensive experience in Iraq, the main challenges, and selected key lessons drawn from them

  18. Massachusetts nuclear power referendum: Lessons learned from the campaign trail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last November, Massachusetts voters cast their ballots on a binding initiative which, if passed, would have prohibited the production of high-level waste, thereby permanently shutting down the state's two nuclear power plants: Yankee and Pilgrim. Question 4, as the initiative became known, posed an unprecedented challenge for the state's six major utilities. Essentially, Question 4 was defeated for two reasons: compelling arguments and a well-founded strategy for communicating those arguments. One part of that strategy was the use of debates and public-speaking engagements before both civic groups and on radio/television. These debates and presentations were clearly the most interesting part of the campaign and provided many insights that may be applied to long-term public policy and informational programs. Obviously, there is a significant difference between an intense, focused campaign and an ongoing, diverse public information program-but many of the principles are the same. The purpose of this paper is to review some of the key lessons learned from over 300 debates and presentations in the highly emotional atmosphere of the Question 4 campaign. Throughout the campaign, debaters and speakers submitted after action reports, and it is from these as well as the overall campaign results that the lessons and anecdotes are derived

  19. Loss of Signal, Aeromedical Lessons Learned from the STS-107 Columbia Space Shuttle Mishap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepaniak, Phillip C.; Patlach, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Loss of Signal, a NASA publication to be available in May 2014 presents the aeromedical lessons learned from the Columbia accident that will enhance crew safety and survival on human space flight missions. These lessons were presented to limited audiences at three separate Aerospace Medical Association (AsMA) conferences: in 2004 in Anchorage, Alaska, on the causes of the accident; in 2005 in Kansas City, Missouri, on the response, recovery, and identification aspects of the investigation; and in 2011, again in Anchorage, Alaska, on future implications for human space flight. As we embark on the development of new spacefaring vehicles through both government and commercial efforts, the NASA Johnson Space Center Human Health and Performance Directorate is continuing to make this information available to a wider audience engaged in the design and development of future space vehicles. Loss of Signal summarizes and consolidates the aeromedical impacts of the Columbia mishap process-the response, recovery, identification, investigative studies, medical and legal forensic analysis, and future preparation that are needed to respond to spacecraft mishaps. The goal of this book is to provide an account of the aeromedical aspects of the Columbia accident and the investigation that followed, and to encourage aerospace medical specialists to continue to capture information, learn from it, and improve procedures and spacecraft designs for the safety of future crews. This poster presents an outline of Loss of Signal contents and highlights from each of five sections - the mission and mishap, the response, the investigation, the analysis and the future.

  20. Loss of Signal, Aeromedical Lessons Learned for the STS-I07 Columbia Space Shuttle Mishap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patlach, Robert; Stepaniak, Philip C.; Lane, Helen W.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of Signal, a NASA publication to be available in May 2014, presents the aeromedical lessons learned from the Columbia accident that will enhance crew safety and survival on human space flight missions. These lessons were presented to limited audiences at three separate Aerospace Medical Association (AsMA) conferences: in 2004 in Anchorage, Alaska, on the causes of the accident; in 2005 in Kansas City, Missouri, on the response, recovery, and identification aspects of the investigation; and in 2011, again in Anchorage, Alaska, on future implications for human space flight. As we embark on the development of new spacefaring vehicles through both government and commercial efforts, the NASA Johnson Space Center Human Health and Performance Directorate is continuing to make this information available to a wider audience engaged in the design and development of future space vehicles. Loss of Signal summarizes and consolidates the aeromedical impacts of the Columbia mishap process-the response, recovery, identification, investigative studies, medical and legal forensic analysis, and future preparation that are needed to respond to spacecraft mishaps. The goals of this book are to provide an account of the aeromedical aspects of the Columbia accident and the investigation that followed, and to encourage aerospace medical specialists to continue to capture information, learn from it, and improve procedures and spacecraft designs for the safety of future crews.

  1. MAVEN Information Security Governance, Risk Management, and Compliance (GRC): Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Eduardo; Gomez-Rosa, Carlos A.; Mangum, Kevin; Wasiak, Fran

    2014-01-01

    As the first interplanetary mission managed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) had three IT security goals for its ground system: COMPLIANCE, (IT) RISK REDUCTION, and COST REDUCTION. In a multiorganizational environment in which government, industry and academia work together in support of the ground system and mission operations, information security governance, risk management, and compliance (GRC) becomes a challenge as each component of the ground system has and follows its own set of IT security requirements. These requirements are not necessarily the same or even similar to each other's, making the auditing of the ground system security a challenging feat. A combination of standards-based information security management based on the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Risk Management Framework (RMF), due diligence by the Mission's leadership, and effective collaboration among all elements of the ground system enabled MAVEN to successfully meet NASA's requirements for IT security, and therefore meet Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA) mandate on the Agency. Throughout the implementation of GRC on MAVEN during the early stages of the mission development, the Project faced many challenges some of which have been identified in this paper. The purpose of this paper is to document these challenges, and provide a brief analysis of the lessons MAVEN learned. The historical information documented herein, derived from an internal pre-launch lessons learned analysis, can be used by current and future missions and organizations implementing and auditing GRC.

  2. Configuration control inside the W7-X cryostat: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is a fusion device of the stellarator type with optimized magnetic field geometry and superconducting coils. It is presently under construction at the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP) in Greifswald, Germany. The 3D geometry and tight space within the cryostat of W7-X necessitate a complex and very dense packing of components. In order to ensure collision-free design and operation, dedicated organizational structures, methods for design, configuration space control have been implemented within the project. This paper presents briefly the methods used and the lessons learned during the last five years of design and configuration control of components inside the cryostat of W7X. (authors)

  3. Nuclear Instrumentation and Control Cyber Testbed Considerations - Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Identifying and understanding digital instrumentation and control (I and C) cyber vulnerabilities within nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities is critical if nation states desire to operate nuclear facilities safely, reliably, and securely. To demonstrate objective evidence that cyber vulnerabilities have been adequately identified and mitigated, a test bed representing a facility's critical nuclear equipment must be replicated. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has built and operated similar test beds for common critical infrastructure I and C for over 10 years. This experience developing, operating, and maintaining an I and C test bed in support of research identifying cyber vulnerabilities has led the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute of the Republic of Korea to solicit the experiences of INL to help mitigate problems early in the design, development, operation, and maintenance of a similar test bed. The following information will discuss I and C test bed lessons learned and the impact of these experiences to KAERI

  4. Controlling changes - lessons learned from waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses lessons learned about change control at the Waste Reduction Operations Complex (WROC) and Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). WROC and WERF have developed and implemented change control and an as-built drawing process and have identified structures, systems, and components (SSCS) for configuration management. The operations have also formed an Independent Review Committee to minimize costs and resources associated with changing documents. WROC and WERF perform waste management activities at the INEL. WROC activities include storage, treatment, and disposal of hazardous and mixed waste. WERF provides volume reduction of solid low-level waste through compaction, incineration, and sizing operations. WROC and WERF's efforts aim to improve change control processes that have worked inefficiently in the past

  5. External Police Oversight in Mexico: Experiences, Challenges, and Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Guzmán Sánchez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available After nearly 20 years of ‘reformist’ measures, the police in Mexico continues to be an ineffective, unreliable, and ‘far from citizen’ institution. The efforts made so far have faded amongst political interests and agendas; multidimensional frameworks out-dated at both conceptual and interagency levels; short-sighted competition for resources; evaluation and performance monitors that are handicapped by bureaucratic inaction; and weak transparency and accountability that perpetuate the opacity in which the police operate. In this context, the agenda of external police oversight is still at a rudimentary stage. However, there are several initiatives that have managed to push the issue to the frontier of new knowledge and promising practices. This paper outlines the experiences and challenges of—as well as the lessons learned by—the Institute for Security and Democracy (Insyde A.C., one of the most recognised think tanks in Mexico.

  6. Lessons Learned from PEP-II LLRF and Longitudinal Feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, J.D.; Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.H.; Van Winkle, D.; /SLAC; Teytelman, D.; /Dimtel, Redwood City

    2010-08-26

    The PEP-II B-Factory collider ended the final phase of operation at nearly twice the design current and 4X the design luminosity. To highlight the evolution from the original conceptual design through to the 1.2E34 final machine we choose one example each from the broadband feedback and from the LLRF system. They illustrate the original design estimation missed some very significant details, and how in the course of PEP-II operation unexpected difficulties led to significant insights and new approaches which allowed higher machine performance. We present valuable 'lessons learned' which are of interest to designers of next generation feedback and impedance controlled LLRF systems.

  7. Lessons learned from CIRFT testing on SNF vibration integrity study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jiang, Hao [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Rob L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Scaglione, John M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT) was developed to support U.S. NRC and DOE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign studies on high burn-up (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) transportation during normal conditions of transport (NCT). Two devices were developed; the first CIRFT was successfully installed and operated in the ORNL hot-cells in September 2013. Since hot cell testing commenced several HBU SNF samples from both Zr-4 and M5 clads were investigated. The second CIRFT device was developed in February 2014, and has been used to test clad/fuel surrogate rods (stainless steel with alumina pellet inserts). The second CIRFT machine has also been used for sensor development and test sensitivity analyses, as well as loading boundary condition parameter studies. The lessons learned from CIRFT testing will be presented in this paper.

  8. Lessons Learned from the Past Accidents for Safety Culture Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All nuclear organizations strive to sustain and improve safety. There is diversity in the way organizations understand the concept of safety and the actions that can help to drive improvements. This paper presents an overview of the lessons to be learned from past nuclear accidents and their relevance for the development of nuclear safety culture. Although the term Safety Culture emerged after the Chernobyl accident, the factors that contributed to earlier accidents, of which the most notable was the accident of Three Mile Island Unit 2 , are also relevant for nuclear safety culture. As regards the Fukushima accident from 2011, safety culture was once again brought into discussion. It is easier to manage the workplaces and the organizations than the minds of employees, as it is not possible to change the human condition, but changing the conditions under which people work. For this, the commitment of the top management is important, without which, it is not possible to make the necessary changes. (author)

  9. Small grant management in health and behavioral sciences: Lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakraida, Teresa J; D'Amico, Jessica; Thibault, Erica

    2010-08-01

    This article describes considerations in health and behavioral sciences small grant management and describes lessons learned during post-award implementation. Using the components by W. Sahlman [Sahlman, W. (1997). How to write a great business plan. Harvard Business Review, 75(4), 98-108] as a business framework, a plan was developed that included (a) building relationships with people in the research program and with external parties providing key resources, (b) establishing a perspective of opportunity for research advancement, (c) identifying the larger context of scientific culture and regulatory environment, and (d) anticipating problems with a flexible response and rewarding teamwork. Small grant management included developing a day-to-day system, building a grant/study program development plan, and initiating a marketing plan. PMID:20643328

  10. Lessons Learned from the Puerto Rico Battery Energy Storage System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyes, John D.; De Anda, Mindi Farber; Torres, Wenceslao

    1999-08-11

    The Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) installed a battery energy storage system in 1994 at a substation near San Juan, Puerto Rico. It was patterned after two other large energy storage systems operated by electric utilities in California and Germany. The Puerto Rico facility is presently the largest operating battery storage system in the world and has successfully provided frequency control, voltage regulation, and spinning reseme to the Caribbean island. The system further proved its usefulness to the PREPA network in the fall of 1998 in the aftermath of Hurricane Georges. However, the facility has suffered accelerated cell failures in the past year and PREPA is committed to restoring the plant to full capacity. This represents the first repowering of a large utility battery facility. PREPA and its vendors and contractors learned many valuable lessons during all phases of project development and operation, which are summarized in this paper.

  11. Food security in China: lessons learned and future expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, X.

    2011-12-01

    Population expansion and rapid economic development have been and will continue placing dramatic pressure on Chinese land resources to provide food, water, and energy. Globalisation and international cooperation makes China land use system inseparable from the rest of the world. In this study, we will first analyze the historic changes of food supply/demand in China during the past by ensemble all the available dataset and information from literature. During the past 60 years, China has been self-fed its own population benefiting from the increase of productivity which helps provide enough food. By analyzing the factors behind of the increase of productivity, it raises quite some concerns with future development. Projections of possible pathways of development will be discussed in this paper. Lessons learn from the past will help study food security in other countries particularly in countries like India or African countries.

  12. Nuclear Instrumentation and Control Cyber Testbed Considerations – Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonathan Gray; Robert Anderson; Julio G. Rodriguez; Cheol-Kwon Lee

    2014-08-01

    Abstract: Identifying and understanding digital instrumentation and control (I&C) cyber vulnerabilities within nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities, is critical if nation states desire to operate nuclear facilities safely, reliably, and securely. In order to demonstrate objective evidence that cyber vulnerabilities have been adequately identified and mitigated, a testbed representing a facility’s critical nuclear equipment must be replicated. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has built and operated similar testbeds for common critical infrastructure I&C for over ten years. This experience developing, operating, and maintaining an I&C testbed in support of research identifying cyber vulnerabilities has led the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute of the Republic of Korea to solicit the experiences of INL to help mitigate problems early in the design, development, operation, and maintenance of a similar testbed. The following information will discuss I&C testbed lessons learned and the impact of these experiences to KAERI.

  13. Lessons learned from the spent fuel shipment Budapest - Mayak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The largest shipment yet of Russian-origin spent nuclear fuel (about 130 kgs HEU and 100 kgs LEU) arrived to the Mayak facility on October 22, 2008. All 16 available Skoda VPVR/M type casks were used, in 8 20 feet ISO containers. The containers were transported on trucks, on rail and on sea. The nuclear fuel was used in the Budapest Research Reactor between 1959 and 2005. The preparations of the shipment started in 2004. Technical works progressed well all the time, the administrative part caused much more difficulties. The paper gives an overview of the activities and tries to find the points where more attention could be necessary. Future shipments can be prepared and performed easier based on the lessons learned. The paper is illustrated by pictures, the authors have taken during the events. (author)

  14. Lessons Learned from System Integration and Testing for PMAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four units of the Plant Monitoring and Annunciator System (PMAS) for Shin-Kori and Shin-Wolsong Nuclear Power Plants 1 and 2 have been integrated and tested at the staging area of KEPCO E and C for 4 years. The PMAS consists of Plant Computer System (PCS), Plant Data Acquisition System (PDAS) and Plant Annunciator System (PAS). KEPCO E and C, system designer was responsible for providing Plant Computer System(PCS) software. The equipment supplier was in charge of providing PMAS hardware with its firmware. A rigorous project plan for system integration and testing of the PMAS was established to avoid any discrepancies that could be caused by these different companies. The system integration and testing were thoroughly performed by the system designer in accordance with the integration and testing procedures developed to satisfy the requirements of PMAS design specifications. This paper summarizes system integration, system testing and the lessons learned from these experiences

  15. Swedish Experience and Lessons Learned from Contaminated Scrap Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweden has so far only had a few incidents involving contaminated scrap metal, none of which has led to any hazardous consequences for human health or the environment. This paper reviews the development of the monitoring of scrap metal at the Swedish border, at scrapyards and at steel mills. Five incidents in which radioactive sources have been melted together with scrap metal at Swedish steel mills have been reported to the Swedish authorities. These incidents are described here, as is a recent incident in which a Swedish company, in October 2008, imported steel products contaminated with cobalt-60; this is the first reported incident involving contaminated products in Sweden. The Swedish scrap metal suppliers find a number of contaminated items in their incoming scrap metal shipments every year; a survey of reported incidents is given here. Finally, lessons learned are discussed from a regulatory point of view. (author)

  16. Pollution prevention program for new projects -- Lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lum, J. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to relay the experience of the Office of New Production Reactors (NP) in developing and implementing its pollution prevention program. NP was established to plan, design, and construct a new safe and environmentally acceptable nuclear reactor capacity necessary to provide an assured supply of tritium to maintain the nation`s long-term deterrent capability. The Program offered the Department of Energy an opportunity to demonstrate its commitment to environmental protection via minimization of environmental releases; new design offers the best opportunity for pollution prevention. The NP pollution prevention program was never fully implemented because NP`s tritium production design activity was recovery terminated. The information in this paper represented lessons learned from the last three years of NP operation.

  17. Lessons Learned from the Radiological Accident In Mayapuri, New Delhi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past, there were several reported incidents and accidents throughout the world due to inadvertent radiation exposure causing serious radiation injuries to members of the public due to the presence of radioactive sources in the public domain and scrap yards. In April 2010, for the first time in India, a radiation accident occurred due to the dismantling of a gamma cell, housing 60Co radioactive source pencils, by the workers in a scrap shop located in the Mayapuri area of New Delhi. This resulted in high radiation exposures to seven people, of whom one succumbed to radiation sickness. Officers from the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) and personnel from national emergency response agencies were involved at various stages of source recovery operations. It was revealed that the accident due to a ‘legacy’ source originated from a university. Several actions have been initiated by the AERB to prevent such accidents in future and lessons learned by stakeholders. (author)

  18. Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL

    2010-08-01

    Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

  19. Lessons learned: advantages and disadvantages of mixed method research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malina, Mary A.; Nørreklit, Hanne; Selto, Frank H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is first, to discuss the theoretical assumptions, qualities, problems and myopia of the dominating quantitative and qualitative approaches; second, to describe the methodological lessons that the authors learned while conducting a series of longitudinal studies...... on the use and usefulness of a specialized balanced scorecard; and third, to encourage researchers to actually use multiple methods and sources of data to address the very many accounting phenomena that are not fully understood. Design/methodology/approach – This paper is an opinion piece based on...... the authors' experience conducting a series of longitudinal mixed method studies. Findings – The authors suggest that in many studies, using a mixed method approach provides the best opportunity for addressing research questions. Originality/value – This paper provides encouragement to those who may...

  20. Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

  1. PUREX/UO3 facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility operated from 1956-1972, from 1983-1988, and briefly during 1989-1990 to produce for national defense at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The Uranium Trioxide (UO3) Facility operated at the Hanford Site from 1952-1972, 1984-1988, and briefly in 1993. Both plants were ordered to permanent shutdown by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in December 1992, thus initiating their deactivation phase. Deactivation is that portion of a facility's life cycle that occurs between operations and final decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D). This document details the history of events, and the lessons learned, from the time of the PUREX Stabilization Campaign in 1989-1990, through the end of the first full fiscal year (FY) of the deactivation project (September 30, 1994)

  2. Lessons Learned for the Resuscitation of Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinella, Philip C; Perkins, Jeremy G; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    The lessons learned regarding the resuscitation of traumatic hemorrhagic shock are numerous and come from a better understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and experience in this population over 10-plus years of combat operations. We have now come to better understand that the greatest benefit in survival can come from improved treatment of hemorrhage in the prehospital phase of care. We have learned that there is an endogenous coagulopathy that occurs with severe traumatic injury secondary to oxygen debt and that classic resuscitation strategies for severe bleeding based on crystalloid or colloid solutions exacerbate coagulopathy and shock for those with life-threatening hemorrhage. We have relearned that a whole blood-based resuscitation strategy, or one that at least recapitulates the functionality of whole blood, may reduce death from hemorrhage and reduce the risks of excessive crystalloid administration which include acute lung injury, abdominal compartment syndrome, cerebral edema, and anasarca. Appreciation of the importance of shock and coagulopathy management underlies the emphasis on early hemostatic resuscitation. Most importantly, we have learned that there is still much more to understand regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and the resuscitation strategies required to improve outcomes for casualties with hemorrhagic shock. PMID:27215864

  3. Overview of Fukushima accident and the lessons learned from it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is given in order to share the detailed information on the Fukushima Accident which occurred on March 11, 2011, and the lessons learned from it which worldwide nuclear experts might currently have more interest in. The paper first reflects how the facilities were damaged by a very strong earthquake and a series of beyond design-basis tsunamis. The earthquake caused loss of all off-site electric power at Fukushima Dacha Nuclear Power Station (1F), and the following series of tsunami made all emergency diesel generators except one for Unit 6 and most of DC batteries inoperable and severely damaged most of the facilities located on the ocean side. Thus all the units at 1a resulted in the loss of cooling function and ultimate heat sink for a long time period. TEPC focused on restoration of the instruments and lights in the Main Control Room (MCR), preparation of alternative water injection and venting of Primary Containment Vessel (PCV) in the recovery process. However, the workers faced a lot of difficulties such as total darkness, repeated aftershocks, high radiation dose, a lot of debris on the ground, loss of communication means, etc. Massive damages by the tsunami and lack of necessary equipment and resources hampered a quick recovery. It eventually resulted in the severe core damage of Unit 1, 2 and 3 and also the hydrogen explosions in the reactor buildings of Unit 1, 3 and 4. This paper finally extracts the lessons learned from the accident and proposed the countermeasures, such as flood protection for essential facilities, preparation of practical and effective tools, securing communication means and so on. These would help the people involved in the nuclear industries all over the world properly understand the accident and develop their own countermeasures appropriately

  4. Lessons learned from our accident at Fukushima nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is given in order to share the detailed information on the Fukushima Accident which occurred on March 11, 2011, and the lessons learned from it which worldwide nuclear experts might currently have more interest in. The paper first reflects how the facilities were damaged by a very strong earthquake and a series of beyond design-basis tsunamis. The earthquake caused loss of all off-site electric power at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (1F), and the following series of tsunami made all emergency diesel generators except one for Unit 6 and most of DC batteries inoperable and severely damaged most of the facilities located on the ocean side. Thus all the units at 1F resulted in the loss of cooling function and ultimate heat sink for a long time period. TEPCO focused on restoration of the instruments and lights in the Main Control Room (MCR), preparation of alternative water injection and venting of Primary Containment Vessel (PCV) in the recovery process. However, the workers faced a lot of difficulties such as total darkness, repeated aftershocks, high radiation dose, a lot of debris on the ground, loss of communication means, etc. Massive damages by the tsunami and lack of necessary equipments and resources hampered a quick recovery. It eventually resulted in the severe core damage of Unit 1, 2, and 3 and also the hydrogen explosions in the reactor buildings of Unit 1, 3, and 4. This paper finally extracts the lessons learned from the accident and proposes the countermeasures, such as flood protection for essential facilities, preparation of practical and effective tools, securing communication means and so on. These would help the people involved in the nuclear industries all over the world properly understand the accident and develop their own countermeasures appropriately. (authors)

  5. Robotic Esophagectomy for Cancer: Early Results and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerfolio, Robert J; Wei, Benjamin; Hawn, Mary T; Minnich, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive esophagectomy with intrathoracic dissection and anastomosis is increasingly performed. Our objectives are to report our operative technique, early results and lessons learned. This is a retrospective review of 85 consecutive patients who were scheduled for minimally invasive Ivor Lewis esophagectomy (laparoscopic or robotic abdominal and robotic chest) for esophageal cancer. Between 4/2011 and 3/2015, 85 (74 men, median age: 63) patients underwent robotic Ivor Lewis esophageal resection. In all, 64 patients (75%) had preoperative chemoradiotherapy, 99% had esophageal cancer, and 99% had an R0 resection. There were no abdominal or thoracic conversions for bleeding. There was 1 abdominal conversion for the inability to completely staple the gastric conduit. The mean operative time was 6 hours, median blood loss was 35ml (no intraoperative transfusions), median number of resected lymph nodes was 22, and median length of stay was 8 days. Conduit complications (anastomotic leak or conduit ischemia) occurred in 6 patients. The 30 and 90-day mortality were 3/85 (3.5%) and 9/85 (10.6%), respectively. Initial poor results led to protocol changes via root cause analysis: longer rehabilitation before surgery, liver biopsy in patients with history of suspected cirrhosis, and refinements to conduit preparation and anastomotic technique. Robotic Ivor Lewis esophagectomy for cancer provides an R0 resection with excellent lymph node resection. Our preferred port placement and operative techniques are described. Disappointingly high thoracic conduit problems and 30 and 90-day mortality led to lessons learned and implementation of change which are shared. PMID:27568155

  6. Lessons Learned from Web-Enhanced Teaching in Landscape Architecture Studios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Han

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to summarize lessons learned from implementing web-enhanced teaching in landscape architecture studio courses. The lessons are documented as challenges and opportunities based on a two-year assessment study of web-enhanced landscape architecture construction studios. This article will help landscape architecture…

  7. Lessons learned through tank closure activities from selected sites within the DOE complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The more than 230 lessons learned in this document were researched and identified from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, with attention to the technical, regulatory, and management strategies focus of the IMAP

  8. Lessons Learned from the Node 1 Temperature and Humidity Control Subsystem Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Node 1 flew to the International Space Station (ISS) on Flight 2A during December 1998. To date the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has learned a lot of lessons from this module based on its history of approximately two years of acceptance testing on the ground and currently its twelve years on-orbit. This paper will provide an overview of the ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) design of the Node 1 Temperature and Humidity Control (THC) subsystem and it will document some of the lessons that have been learned to date for this subsystem and it will document some of the lessons that have been learned to date for these subsystems based on problems prelaunch, problems encountered on-orbit, and operational problems/concerns. It is hoped that documenting these lessons learned from ISS will help in preventing them in future Programs. 1

  9. Organic marketing initiatives and rural development - lessons learned for the organic industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Heine; Kujala, Jouni

    2005-01-01

    Kujala J, Kristensen NH, (2005): Organic marketing initiatives and rural development - lessons learned for the organic industry. Article in "Organic farming for a new millennium - status and future challenges". Published by Nordic Association of Agricultural Scientists (NJF). Swedish University of...

  10. Lessons Learned in Preparation and Review of Safety Analysis Report of PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP) is the one and only research reactor in Malaysia. Since the day it was supplied by General Atomic (GA) in 1983, periodic safety reviews were carried out but not published in the form of a complete SAR. In fact, the original SAR (SAR 1983) document was provided by GA as soon as GA was selected as the supplier of RTP. The focus of this report is on the lessons learned from the preparation of SAR. The lessons learned were to address the preparation and regulatory review of the second SAR (SAR 2006). Realizing that safety is important as RTP is aging, the experiences and lessons learned from SAR development and updating processes are of great value for all parties involved. The purpose of this report is to consolidate and organize the lessons learned and suggest the best practice for the next SAR development both in preparation and regulatory review

  11. Climate change adaptation planning in agriculture: processes, experiences and lessons learned from early adapters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bizikova, L.; Crawford, E.; Nijnik, M.; Swart, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the lessons learned by leaders in agricultural adaptation planning in order to assist other jurisdictions to develop adaptation strategies. It seeks to identify effective institutional, participatory and collaborative processes involved in designing agricultural adaptation strate

  12. Lessons Learned from Canadian Pre-Project Design Review - Quality assurance of design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation deals with lessons learned from Canadian pre-project design review. It provides an overview of the Canadian legislative and regulatory framework and the pre-licensing review process. It highlights 12 lessons learned from design reviews, including incomplete project quality assurance program, lack of definition of design management process, lack of implementing procedures, weaknesses in considerations of interconnections between systems, non-conformances related to control of design, and difficulties in addressing the functions and responsibilities of the design authority

  13. SRS SLUDGE BATCH QUALIFICATION AND PROCESSING; HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE AND LESSONS LEARNED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cercy, M.; Peeler, D.; Stone, M.

    2013-09-25

    This report provides a historical overview and lessons learned associated with the SRS sludge batch (SB) qualification and processing programs. The report covers the framework of the requirements for waste form acceptance, the DWPF Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), waste feed acceptance, examples of how the program complies with the specifications, an overview of the Startup Program, and a summary of continuous improvements and lessons learned. The report includes a bibliography of previous reports and briefings on the topic.

  14. Systems Engineering Lessons Learned from Solar Array Structures and Mechanisms Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vipavetz, Kevin; Kraft, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This report has been developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) Risk Management team in close coordination with the Engineering Directorate at LaRC. This document provides a point-in-time, cumulative, summary of actionable key lessons learned derived from the design project. Lessons learned invariably address challenges and risks and the way in which these areas have been addressed. Accordingly the risk management thread is woven throughout the document.

  15. Service Oriented Robotic Architecture for Space Robotics: Design, Testing, and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluckiger, Lorenzo Jean Marc E; Utz, Hans Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the lessons learned from six years of experiments with planetary rover prototypes running the Service Oriented Robotic Architecture (SORA) developed by the Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) at the NASA Ames Research Center. SORA relies on proven software engineering methods and technologies applied to space robotics. Based on a Service Oriented Architecture and robust middleware, SORA encompasses on-board robot control and a full suite of software tools necessary for remotely operated exploration missions. SORA has been eld tested in numerous scenarios of robotic lunar and planetary exploration. The experiments conducted by IRG with SORA exercise a large set of the constraints encountered in space applications: remote robotic assets, ight relevant science instruments, distributed operations, high network latencies and unreliable or intermittent communication links. In this paper, we present the results of these eld tests in regard to the developed architecture, and discuss its bene ts and limitations.

  16. A Customizable Model for Chronic Disease Coordination: Lessons Learned From the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira, Sonia; Chavez, Amy Holmes

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding and technical assistance to all states and territories to implement the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program, marking the first time that all state health departments had federal resources to coordinate chronic disease prevention and control programs. This article describes lessons learned from this initiative and identifies key elements of a coordinated approach. We analyzed 80 programmatic documents from 21 states and conducted semistructured interviews with 7 chronic disease directors. Six overarching themes emerged: 1) focused agenda, 2) identification of functions, 3) comprehensive planning, 4) collaborative leadership and expertise, 5) managed resources, and 6) relationship building. These elements supported 4 essential activities: 1) evidence-based interventions, 2) strategic use of staff, 3) consistent communication, and 4) strong program infrastructure. On the basis of these elements and activities, we propose a conceptual model that frames overarching concepts, skills, and strategies needed to coordinate state chronic disease prevention and control programs. PMID:27032986

  17. Development of a model home health nurse internship program for new graduates: key lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur Coyle, Joanne

    2011-05-01

    A nursing shortage, the aging baby boomer population, an escalating need for home health care, and limited availability of health care dollars are threatening to undermine the quality of health care in the United States. The National Center for Health Workforce Analysis projects a deficit of 275,000 full-time equivalents by 2010 (-12%) and a deficit of 800,000 by 2020 (-29%). This article focuses on one home health agency's strategy to support nurse graduates transitioning from student to professional nurse. Based on Benner's (1984) hallmark theory from novice to expert, the goals of this program are to enhance job satisfaction and social integration, facilitate autonomy, increase critical thinking and psychomotor skills, and develop additional competencies. Eleven key lessons learned are outlined. PMID:20839661

  18. Lessons Learned: Employment and Tactical Use of The Combat Medic During Stability Support Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldred, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    It is the intent of this article to define the strategy by which Combat Medics have been employed in contemporary stability operations and counterinsurgency conflicts. This article describes the advances in training based on Tactical Combat Casualty Care and how training evolved into an evidence-based model. Training platforms evolved with shifts in mission requirements, new technology, improved medical techniques, and changing protocols. The last portion of this article details recommendations in doctrine, materiel, and training that could enable optimal sustainment standards while retaining operational capability across a wide variety of combat and peace operations. Lessons learned and changes adapted for Medics that are addressed: (1) advances in training and employment of the Combat Medic necessitated by tactics and strategy of current conflicts, (2) Combat Medic regulatory requirements and centralized, just-in-time training, and (3) changes in sustainment training driven by certification requirements and use of medical simulation training centers. PMID:27215893

  19. Profile of NASA software engineering: Lessons learned from building the baseline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dana; Mcgarry, Frank

    1993-01-01

    It is critically important in any improvement activity to first understand the organization's current status, strengths, and weaknesses and, only after that understanding is achieved, examine and implement promising improvements. This fundamental rule is certainly true for an organization seeking to further its software viability and effectiveness. This paper addresses the role of the organizational process baseline in a software improvement effort and the lessons we learned assembling such an understanding for NASA overall and for the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in particular. We discuss important, core data that must be captured and contrast that with our experience in actually finding such information. Our baselining efforts have evolved into a set of data gathering, analysis, and crosschecking techniques and information presentation formats that may prove useful to others seeking to establish similar baselines for their organization.

  20. A Customizable Model for Chronic Disease Coordination: Lessons Learned From the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voetsch, Karen; Sequeira, Sonia; Chavez, Amy Holmes

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding and technical assistance to all states and territories to implement the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program, marking the first time that all state health departments had federal resources to coordinate chronic disease prevention and control programs. This article describes lessons learned from this initiative and identifies key elements of a coordinated approach. We analyzed 80 programmatic documents from 21 states and conducted semistructured interviews with 7 chronic disease directors. Six overarching themes emerged: 1) focused agenda, 2) identification of functions, 3) comprehensive planning, 4) collaborative leadership and expertise, 5) managed resources, and 6) relationship building. These elements supported 4 essential activities: 1) evidence-based interventions, 2) strategic use of staff, 3) consistent communication, and 4) strong program infrastructure. On the basis of these elements and activities, we propose a conceptual model that frames overarching concepts, skills, and strategies needed to coordinate state chronic disease prevention and control programs. PMID:27032986

  1. Addressing NCDs through research and capacity building in LMICs: lessons learned from tobacco control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturke, Rachel; Vorkoper, Susan; Duncan, Kalina; Levintova, Marya; Parascondola, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Confronting the global non-communicable diseases (NCDs) crisis requires a critical mass of scientists who are well versed in regional health problems and understand the cultural, social, economic, and political contexts that influence the effectiveness of interventions. Investments in global NCD research must be accompanied by contributions to local research capacity. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Fogarty International Center have a long-standing commitment to supporting research capacity building and addressing the growing burden of NCDs in low- and middle-income countries. One program in particular, the NIH International Tobacco and Health Research and Capacity Building Program (TOBAC program), offers an important model for conducting research and building research capacity simultaneously. This article describes the lessons learned from this unique funding model and demonstrates how a relatively modest investment can make important contributions to scientific evidence and capacity building that could inform ongoing and future efforts to tackle the global burden of NCDs. PMID:27545455

  2. TMI-2: Lessons learned by the US Department of Energy: A programmatic perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a summary of the lessons learned by the US Department of Energy during its decade-long participation in the research and accident cleanup project at Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station Unit 2 near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. It is based on a review of a wide range of project documents and interviews with personnel from the many organizations involved. The lessons are organized into major subjects with a brief background section to orient the reader to that subject. The subjects are divided into sub-topics, each with a brief discussion and a series of lessons learned. The lessons are very brief and each is preceded with a keyword phrase to highlight its specific topic. References are given so that the details of the subject and the lesson can be further investigated. 99 refs., 24 figs

  3. Tunneling on the Yucca Mountain Project: Progress and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is the US's effort to confirm the technical acceptability of Yucca Mountain as a repository for high-level nuclear waste. A key part of the site characterization project is the construction of a 7.8-km-long, 7.6-m-diameter tunnel for in-depth geologic and other scientific investigations. The work is governed in varying degrees by the special requirements for nuclear quality assurance, which imposes uncommon and often stringent limitations on the materials which can be used in construction, the tunneling methods and procedures used, and record-keeping for many activities. This paper presents the current status of what has been learned, how construction has adapted to meet the requirements, and how the requirements were interpreted in a mitigating way to meet the legal obligations, yet build the tunnel as rapidly as possible. With regard to design methodologies and the realities of tunnel construction, ground support with a shielded Tunnel Boring Machine is discussed. Notable lessons learned include the need for broad design analyses for a wide variety of conditions and how construction procedures affect ground support

  4. Bringing authentic service learning to the classroom: benefits and lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Leslie C.

    2016-06-01

    Project-based learning, which has gained significant attention within K-12 education, provides rich hands-on experiences for students. Bringing an element of service to the projects allow students to engage in a local or global community, providing an abundance of benefits to the students’ learning. For example, service projects build confidence, increase motivation, and exercise problem-solving and communication skills in addition to developing a deep understanding of content. I will present lessons I have learned through four years of providing service learning opportunities in my classroom. I share ideas for astronomy projects, tips for connecting and listening to a community, and helpful guidelines to hold students accountable in order to ensure a productive and educational project.

  5. Development of X-33/X-34 Aerothermodynamic Data Bases: Lessons Learned and Future Enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. G.

    2000-01-01

    A synoptic of programmatic and technical lessons learned in the development of aerothermodynamic data bases for the X-33 and X-34 programs is presented in general terms and from the perspective of the NASA Langley Research Center Aerothermodynamics Branch. The format used is that of the "aerothermodynamic chain," the links of which are personnel, facilities, models/test articles, instrumentation, test techniques, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Because the aerodynamic data bases upon which the X-33 and X-34 vehicles will fly are almost exclusively from wind tunnel testing, as opposed to CFD, the primary focus of the lessons learned is on ground-based testing. The period corresponding to the development of X-33 and X-34 aerothermodynamic data bases was challenging, since a number of other such programs (e.g., X-38, X-43) competed for resources at a time of downsizing of personnel, facilities, etc., outsourcing, and role changes as NASA Centers served as subcontractors to industry. The impact of this changing environment is embedded in the lessons learned. From a technical perspective, the relatively long times to design and fabricate metallic force and moment models, delays in delivery of models, and a lack of quality assurance to determine the fidelity of model outer mold lines (OML) prior to wind tunnel testing had a major negative impact on the programs. On the positive side, the application of phosphor thermography to obtain global, quantitative heating distributions on rapidly fabricated ceramic models revolutionized the aerothermodynamic optimization of vehicle OMLs, control surfaces, etc. Vehicle designers were provided with aeroheating information prior to, or in conjunction with, aerodynamic information early in the program, thereby allowing trades to be made with both sets of input; in the past only aerodynamic data were available as input. Programmatically, failure to include transonic aerodynamic wind tunnel tests early in the assessment phase

  6. Validating a Technology Enhanced Student-Centered Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Myunghee; Hahn, Jungsun; Chung, Warren

    2015-01-01

    The Technology Enhanced Student Centered Learning (TESCL) Model in this study presents the core factors that ensure the quality of learning in a technology-supported environment. Although the model was conceptually constructed using a student-centered learning framework and drawing upon previous studies, it should be validated through real-world…

  7. Supply chain management/ Some lessons learned the hard way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This paper will look at some of the experiences, lessons and frustrations experienced in managing supply chains for business continuity. No-one has time to make all the mistakes, nor to learn all the lessons on their own, so it is useful to share experiences. Over the last 25 years, the author has been involved in supply chain management as a contract manager; a programme and project manager; and as a business continuity manager. Although times change, there are some fundamental principles that are absolutely critical in making sure that supply chains do what they are needed to do/ to keep business going. Supply chains are here to stay. Indeed, with today's drive towards outsourcing, best-shoring and contracting out, they are becoming more important every year and this will only continue over time. Moreover, in the highly competitive markets in which all organisations operate, suppliers may well be carrying out operations that not all that long ago would have been considered to be part of core business. Getting the right relationship with the supply chain is more critical than ever before.1 What does this mean to business continuity professionals? They need to think not just about their own BC plans, but about the plans of their suppliers, and even those of their suppliers' suppliers. This may seem obvious, but unlike internal BC plans written by and for an organisation, it must be considered just what a supplier's plans are designed to achieve. What business outcomes will their plans deliver? If they recover their own business, how does that affect the business they serve? Are others' assumptions of how they will react in line with theirs? PMID:23615062

  8. Lessons Learned and the Prospects of ISCN's Nuclear Security Capacity Building Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upon its establishment in accordance with Japan’s commitment statement at the 2010 Nuclear Security Summit in Washington DC, the Integrated Support Center for Nuclear Nonproliferation and Nuclear Security (ISCN) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was missioned to provide support to efforts to strengthen nuclear security regimes internationally and nationally. Although capacity building support for safeguards has proven to be useful in ISCN’s experience, some nuclear security-specific features need to be considered regarding its application to nuclear security. These features include the self-determining nature of nuclear security requirements, the importance of nuclear security culture for its performance, and the involvement of professionals from a variety of backgrounds. These features have added a new perspective to ISCN’s approach to its nuclear security capacity building support. The paper presents this approach and what lessons can be drawn for its advancement. It begins with a description of challenges to nuclear security capacity building support, introduces ISCN’s experience in addressing these challenges, and discusses how to apply lessons learned to advance our nuclear security capacity building support. (author)

  9. Experience gained from fires in nuclear power plants: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1993, the IAEA launched a programme to assist Member States in improving fire safety in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The review of fire safety assessment in many plants has shown that fire is one of the most important risk contributors for NPPs. Moreover, operational experience has confirmed that many events have a similar root cause, initiation and development mechanism. Therefore, many States have improved the analysis of their operational experience and its feedback. States that operate NPPs play an important role in the effort to improve fire safety by circulating their experience internationally - this exchange of information can effectively prevent potential events. When operating experience is well organized and made accessible, it can feed an improved fire hazard assessment on a probabilistic basis. The practice of exchanging operational experience seems to be bearing fruit: serious events initiated by fire are on the decline at plants in operating States. However, to maximize this effort, means for communicating operational experience need to be continuously improved and the pool of recipients of operational experience data enlarged. The present publication is the third in a series started in 1998 on fire events, the first two were: Root Cause Analysis for Fire Events (IAEA-TECDOC-1112) and Use of Operational Experience in Fire Safety Assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (IAEA-TECDOC-1134). This TECDOC summarizes the experience gained and lessons learned from fire events at operating plants, supplemented by specific Member State experiences. In addition, it provides a possible structure of an international fire and explosion event database aimed at the analysis of experience from fire events and the evaluation of fire hazard. The intended readership of this is operators of plants and regulators. The present report includes a detailed analysis of the most recent events compiled with the IAEA databases and other bibliographic sources. It represents a

  10. Decommissioning survey and site characterisation issues and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents an overview of several topical areas pertaining to issues and lessons learned for decommissioning characterization and survey, including: subsurface sampling and survey; dose modeling and derivation of DCGLs for survey units; buried pipes survey and characterization; characterization of solid materials for release; and survey and monitoring for detection of leakages and spills. The specific topical areas are briefly discussed below: The paper discusses key subsurface survey and characterization issues pertaining to: lack of sampling, modeling, decision framework approach; and lack of quality in the decision-making throughout the site investigation and remediation processes. Calculation of a DCGLW is a problematic issue for subsurface due to formulation of an appropriate exposure scenario that would occur in the subsurface. Similarly, the DCGLEMC is also a problematic parameter to derive, as the statistical hypothesis testing for surface assumes that the samples come from the same population which may not be the case for subsurface. The paper focuses on a difficulty arising from the fact that investigators cannot completely scan the subsurface (e.g.; due to lack of comprehensive coverage easily gained at the surface, which now presents a real obstacle in determining activity levels at depth). Other issues pertaining to dealing with volumetric (not area) samples present an added complexity; thus, increasing sampling requirements and scrutiny. The paper addresses key dose modeling issues including: selection of a scenario, treatment of uncertainties in support of decision-making, and assessment of contaminant transport through concrete structures or barriers, and considerations for selection of a period of performance to convert risk/dose criteria into radionuclide concentration release limits. The paper addresses a key issue pertaining to survey and characterization of buried pipes and infrastructure components. In this context, the paper discusses

  11. Learning lessons from natural disasters - sectorial or holistic perspectives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, M.; Blumenthal, B.; Nyberg, L.

    2009-04-01

    Lessons learning from systematic analyses of past natural disasters is of great importance for future risk reduction and vulnerability management. It is one crucial piece of a puzzle towards disaster resilient societies, together with e.g. models of future emerging climate-related risks, globalization or demographic changes. Systematic analyses of impact and management of past events have commonly been produced in many sectors, but the knowledge is seldom shared outside the own organization or produced for other actors. To increase the availability of reports and documents, the Swedish Rescue Services Agency has created the Swedish Natural Hazards Information System, in accordance with a government commission from 2005. The system gathers accident reports, investigations and in-depth analyses, together with societal additional costs and mappings of consequences from central and local governments, NGO's and private actors. Evaluation of the collection reveals large differences in quality, systematic approach, depth and extent, clearly consistent with the lack of coherent harmonization of investigation and reporting approaches. Type of hazard, degree of impact and time elapsed since present are decisive for the collected volume. LPHC (low probability high consequences) disasters usually comprise most data and analytical activities, since they often are met with surprise and highlight the failure to integrate resilience into normal societal planning. During the last 50 years, several LPHC events in Sweden have functioned as alarm clocks and entailed major changes and improvements in government policies or legislations, safety management systems, risk assessments, response training, stakeholder communication, etc. Such an event occurred in January 2005 when Northern Europe was confronted with one of the most severe storms in modern history. Accidents that caused 24 fatalities occurred (17 in Sweden), several regions in UK and Germany were flooded and extensive areas of

  12. Creating and Maintaining a Successful Service Line in an Academic Medical Center at the Dawn of Value-Based Care: Lessons Learned From the Heart and Vascular Service Line at UMass Memorial Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Robert A; Cyr, Jay; Keaney, John F; Messina, Louis M; Meyer, Theo E; Tam, Stanley K C; Korenda, Kathleen; Darrigo, Melinda; Kumar, Pooja; Challapalli, Sailu

    2015-10-01

    The service line (SL) model has been proven to help shift health care toward value-based services, which is characterized by coordinated, multidisciplinary, high-quality, and cost-effective care. However, academic medical centers struggle with how to effectively set up SL structures that overcome the organizational and cultural challenges associated with simultaneously delivering the highest-value care for the patient and advancing the academic mission. In this article, the authors examine the evolution of UMass Memorial Health Care's heart and vascular service line (HVSL) from 2006 to 2011 and describe the impact on its success of multiple strategic decisions. These include key academic physician leadership recruitments and engagement via a matrixed governance and management model; development of multidisciplinary teams; empowerment of SL leadership through direct accountability and authority over programs and budgets; joint educational and training programs; incentives for academic achievement; and co-localization of faculty, personnel, and facilities. The authors also explore the barriers to success, including the need to overcome historical departmental-based silos, cultural and training differences among disciplines, confusion engendered by a matrixed reporting structure, and faculty's unfamiliarity with the financial and organizational skills required to operate a successful SL. Also described here is the impact that successful implementation of the SL has on creating high-quality services, increased profitability, and contribution to the financial stability and academic achievement of the academic medical center. PMID:26222322

  13. Toward a powerful problem-based training tool for harnessing lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the purposes of this paper is to describe a training method and supporting technologies (tool) to increase personnel awareness of error precursors. This model-centered method may be an effective 'part task training' to precede more expensive fall-blown multimedia scenarios (behavioral simulations). The training is designed to efficiently increase positive transfer from lessons learned case studies. The tool enables developers to take actual instances and inexpensively frame them within an interactive computer learning environment. The learning is engaging and helps model the kind of causal thinking needed to prevent future occurrences. This method and tool could help workers 'see' the problems and feel the need to take action when they are in real settings. Another purpose of this paper is to present the results of research into the process of designing and developing this training software. The benefits for attendees are insights that may enable more rapid proto-typing of software for training the workforce. The authors will present the models, methodologies, and patterns in the participants' design activities. Results show that participants used a cyclical, spiral process that revisited design topics until they were clarified. (authors)

  14. Evaluation and lessons learned from an undergraduate service learning course providing youth-focused relationship education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElwain, Alyssa; Finnegan, Vanessa; Whittaker, Angela; Kerpelman, Jennifer; Adler-Baeder, Francesca; Duke, Adrienne

    2016-10-01

    Adolescent romantic relationships are known to have a significant impact on individual well-being and development. However, few teens experience formal education about the knowledge and skills necessary for building healthy romantic relationships. In response, a statewide relationship education initiative was developed at a large university in a Southeastern state. Undergraduates who enrolled in a service learning course in Human Development and Family Studies partnered with this initiative and implemented a relationship education program targeting high school students. A service learning model is used in this initiative because it offers opportunities for students' professional development and experiential learning. The present article provides a formative and illustrative summative evaluation of the service learning program. Specifically, the primary aims of this paper are to 1) provide an overview of the service learning course components; 2) describe preparation of the service learning students and their implementation of the relationship education program; 3) discuss challenges and lessons learned; and 4) offer initial evidence of effectiveness by showing change in targeted outcomes for the high school student recipients of the relationship education program. PMID:27367554

  15. Professionals calling in lifelong learning centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Manuel Monteiro Seco

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aims to understand how the way people see their work and the authentizotic character of their organizational climate contribute to the building of a Great Place to Work. Design/methodology/approach: This paper presents the results of a quantitative investigation that correlate the perceptions of organizational climate and the work orientations of professionals with different occupations on Portuguese lifelong education centers. Findings: The study indicates that all the core elements of an authentizotic organization contribute to explain what people potentially expect from their companies:  adequate  material  conditions  plus  a  meaningful contribution. Practical implications: The study has implications in the future for National Qualification Agency directors, education politicians and human resource managers who are responsible for providing good expectations within a healthy context of talent retention. Originality/value: The novel contribution of this paper is the finding that employee’s work orientations and authentizotic climate are related to each other in a Lifelong learning Center in the public education sector.

  16. Lessons learned from the quench-11 training exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    16 organizations in 12 countries are participating in a RELAP/SCDAPSIM training exercise based on the Quench 11 experiment performed at Karlsruhe (Germany) in 2005. This exercise is being conducted in parallel to an International Standard Problem (ISP). Both the ISP and the RELAP/SCDAPSIM training exercise included a 'semi-blind' portion that was completed in the fall of 2006 and an 'open' portion that is to be completed in the summer of 2007. The RELAP/SCDAPSIM training exercise is coordinated by Innovative Systems Software with support by the International SCDAP Development and Training Program (SDTP). The Quench-11 experiment is based on an electrically heated fuel rod bundle representative of a PWR design. The bundle was subjected to a boil down transient, heat-up, and quenching with peak temperatures exceeding the melting point of the Zircaloy cladding. This experiment was chosen by the European Union as an International Benchmark exercise to compare the effectiveness of quenching models in the severe accident computer codes used today for accident analysis. This paper briefly describes (a) RELAP/SCDAPSIM/MOD3.4, (b) the Quench facility and experiments used in the training exercise, and (c) the training guidelines provided to the participants followed by a more detailed description of the lessons learned from the initial 'semi-blind' portion. The representative results demonstrate that good analysts can still have a difficult time predicting the thermal hydraulic response of a relative simple transient in a complex system

  17. Lessons learned from HRA and human-system modeling efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human-System modeling is not unique to the field of Human Reliability Analysis (HRA). Since human factors professionals first began their explorations of human activities, they have done so with the concept of open-quotes systemclose quotes in mind. Though the two - human and system - are distinct, they can be properly understood only in terms of each other: the system provides a context in which goals and objectives for work are defined, and the human plays either a pre-defined or ad hoc role in meeting these goals. In this sense, every intervention which attempts to evaluate or improve upon some system parameter requires that an understanding of human-system interactions be developed. It is too often the case, however, that somewhere between the inception of a system and its implementation, the human-system relationships are overlooked, misunderstood, or inadequately framed. This results in mismatches between demands versus capabilities of human operators, systems which are difficult to operate, and the obvious end product-human error. The lessons learned from human system modeling provide a valuable feedback mechanism to the process of HRA, and the technologies which employ this form of modeling

  18. Transboundary Movement of Radioactively Contaminated Scrap Metal - Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting in 1989, Bulgaria has undergone a comprehensive transformation of its economy and social conditions. Part of this process is related to the intensive privatization that started in 2001. This privatization included facilities, as well as sites that use radioactive material for different applications - industry, medicine, agriculture, science, etc. The rapid change of property ownership and, in some cases, the resulting bankruptcy, has caused difficulties in tracing and identifying radioactive sources and materials and a deterioration of the system of safety, physical protection, etc. of radioactive material. In some cases, radioactive sources were stolen because of the value of their protective containers and sold for scrap metal. This led to the occurrence of different types of radiation incidents, mainly related to the discovery of radioactive sources in scrap metal. The consequences of these incidents include the risk of radiation exposure of the workers at scrap metal yards or reprocessing facilities and of members of the public and, in addition, radioactive contamination of the environment. The Bulgarian Nuclear Regulatory Agency (BNRA) has been responding to these incidents and has carried out a series of measures to improve the control over materials (e.g. activated or surface contaminated materials) and radioactive sources and to strengthen the preventive, monitoring, emergency preparedness and mitigating measures at facility, national and transboundary levels. This paper presents an analysis of the lessons learned by the BNRA and of the control of the transboundary movement of radioactively contaminated scrap metal through the territory of Bulgaria. (author)

  19. Robotics program development: Applicable lessons learned from TMI-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear industry is becoming increasingly aware of the benefits that can result from the use of robotics technology to augment plant maintenance and monitoring programs. This awareness is growing as a result of various utility successes in deploying robotics tools and realizing benefits to plant operations. These benefits include: (1) reducing occupational exposure risks associated with performing tasks in high radiation zones; (2) reducing fatigue associated with physically demanding tasks; and (3) minimizing human error associated with repetitive tasks. This EPRI-sponsored report addresses the programmatic issues faced by GPU Nuclear in developing a program that extensively employed robotics and remotely controlled equipment. Many of the lessons learned can be applied to an operating plant. This report has been prepared to present generally applicable experiences that a utility may wish to consider when developing a robotics program. Issues addressed within this report can serve as a preliminary guide to: (1) establishing equipment requirements; (2) preparing personnel to implement a robotics program; and (3) determining the impacts on the administrative aspects of operations related to procedures, licensing, and reliability. The Three Mile Island Unit 2 accident created a unique situation within industry; i.e., remotely controlled equipment provided the only viable option for accomplishing a number of recovery tasks. This impetus accelerated the development of practical robotics tooling for specific tasks. 16 refs., 35 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Suit Port Aft Bulkhead Mockup Test Results and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romig, Barbara A.; Allton, Charles

    2009-01-01

    The Small Pressurized Rover (SPR) is currently being carried as an integral part of the current Lunar Surface Architectures under consideration in the Constellation program. One element of the SPR is the suit port, the means by which the crew performs Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). Two suit port deliverables were produced in fiscal year 2008: an aft bulkhead mockup for functional integrated testing with the 1-G SPR mockup and a functional and pressurizable engineering unit. This paper focuses on the test results and lessons learned on the aft bulkhead mockup. The suit port aft bulkhead mockup was integrated with the mockup of the SPR cabin and chassis. It is located on the aft bulkhead of the SPR cabin structure and includes hatches, a locking mechanism, seals, interior and exterior suit don/doff aids, and exterior platforms to accommodate different crewmember heights. A lightweight mockup of the Mark III suit was tested with the suit port aft bulkhead mockup. There are several limitations to the suit port and mockup suits, and results of the suit port evaluation are presented and interpreted within the context of the limitations.

  1. Nmag micromagnetic simulation tool - software engineering lessons learned

    CERN Document Server

    Fangohr, Hans; Franchin, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    We review design decisions and their impact for the open source code Nmag from a software engineering in computational science point of view. Key lessons to learn include that the approach of encapsulating the simulation functionality in a library of a general purpose language, here Python, eliminates the need for configuration files, provides greatest flexibility in using the simulation, allows mixing of multiple simulations, pre- and post-processing in the same (Python) file, and allows to benefit from the rich Python ecosystem of scientific packages. The choice of programming language (OCaml) for the computational core did not resonate with the users of the package (who are not computer scientists) and was suboptimal. The choice of Python for the top-level user interface was very well received by users from the science and engineering community. The from-source installation in which key requirements were compiled from a tarball was remarkably robust. In places, the code is a lot more ambitious than necessa...

  2. The Tokyo subway sarin attack-lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sarin gas attack in the Tokyo subway system is reviewed from a clinical toxicology perspective. Based on the lessons learned from this attack, the following areas should be addressed on a global scale. First, an adequate supply of protective equipment is required, including level B protective equipment with a pressure demand breathing apparatus. In addition, a system should be established that enables a possible cause to be determined based on symptoms, physical findings, general laboratory tests, and a simple qualitative analysis for poisonous substances. If an antidote is needed, the system should enable it to be administered to the victims as quickly as possible. Preparation for a large-scale chemical attack by terrorists requires the prior establishment of a detailed decontamination plan that utilizes not only mass decontamination facilities but also public facilities in the area. A system should be established for summarizing, evaluating, and disseminating information on poisonous substances. Finally, a large-scale scientific investigation of the Tokyo sarin attack should be conducted to examine its long-term and subclinical effects and the effects of exposure to asymptomatic low levels of sarin

  3. Nuclear power plant Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL). Appendix B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this generic aging lessons learned (GALL) review is to provide a systematic review of plant aging information in order to assess materials and component aging issues related to continued operation and license renewal of operating reactors. Literature on mechanical, structural, and thermal-hydraulic components and systems reviewed consisted of 97 Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) reports, 23 NRC Generic Letters, 154 Information Notices, 29 Licensee Event Reports (LERs), 4 Bulletins, and 9 Nuclear Management and Resources Council Industry Reports (NUMARC IRs) and literature on electrical components and systems reviewed consisted of 66 NPAR reports, 8 NRC Generic Letters, 111 Information Notices, 53 LERs, 1 Bulletin, and 1 NUMARC IR. More than 550 documents were reviewed. The results of these reviews were systematized using a standardized GALL tabular format and standardized definitions of aging-related degradation mechanisms and effects. The tables are included in volumes 1 and 2 of this report. A computerized data base has also been developed for all review tables and can be used to expedite the search for desired information on structures, components, and relevant aging effects. A survey of the GALL tables reveals that all ongoing significant component aging issues are currently being addressed by the regulatory process. However, the aging of what are termed passive components has been highlighted for continued scrutiny. This report consists of Volume 2, which consists of the GALL literature review tables for the NUMARC Industry Reports reviewed for the report

  4. Six Years in Managing Structural Funds in Romania. Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoş JALIU

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The absorption of structural and cohesion funds is one of Romania’s top priorities. Nevertheless, with a very weak absorption rate (11.47% as of December 31st 2012, according to official data, the overall situation is particularly alarming, considering the slow pace of effective project implementation and expenditure recovery from the European Commission. This text proceeds to provide an analysis of the realities of managing structural funds in Romania, focusing on the causes and factors that lead to weak absorption and on the experience of the main actors and institutions involved in this process. Our interests are, in particular, connected to the following: (1 to identify and analyze the most important aspects of structural funds management in Romania after six years of accessing and implementing projects; (2 to evaluate the capacity of the institutions involved in the structural funds management system with a focus on the level of turnover of institutions involved in the process; and (3 to identify and present added-value experiences and lessons learned from both institutions and beneficiaries (public authorities involved in this process.

  5. Lessons learned from the MIT Tara control and data system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The control and data system of the MIT Tara Tandem Mirror has worked successfully throughout the lifetime of the experiment (1983 through 1987). As the Tara project winds down, it is appropriate to summarize the lessons learned from the implementation and operation of the control and data system over the years and in its final form. The control system handled ∼2400 I/0 points in real time throughout the 5 to 10 minute shot cycle while the data system, in near real time, handled ∼1000 signals with a total of 5 to 7 Mbytes of data each shot. The implementation depended upon a consistent approach based on separating physics and engineering functions and on detailed functional diagrams with narrowly defined cross communication. This paper is a comprehensive treatment of the principal successes, residual problems, and dilemmas that arose from the beginning until the final hardware and software implementation. Suggestions for future systems of either similar size or of larger scale such as CIT are made in the conclusion. 11 refs., 1 fig

  6. Lessons learned from accidents in radiotherapy. An IAEA Safety Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is a very special application from the view point of protection because humans are deliberately exposed to high doses of radiation, and no physical barrier can be placed between the source and the patient. It deserves, therefore, special considerations from the point of view of potential exposure. An IAEA's Safety Report (in preparation) reviews a large collection of accident information, their initiating events and contributing factors, followed by a set of lessons learned and measures for prevention. The most important causes were: deficiencies in education and training, lack of procedures and protocols for essential tasks (such as commissioning, calibration, commissioning and treatment delivery), deficient communication and information transfer, absence of defence in depth and deficiencies in design, manufacture, testing and maintenance of equipment. Often a combination of more than one of these causes was present in an accident, thus pointing to a problem of management. Arrangements for a comprehensive quality assurance and accident prevention should be required by regulations and compliance be monitored by a Regulatory Authority. (author)

  7. Geocuration Lessons Learned from the Climate Data Initiative Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, R.; Bugbee, K.; Tilmes, C.; Privette, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Curation is traditionally defined as the process of collecting and organizing information around a common subject matter or a topic of interest and typically occurs in museums, art galleries, and libraries. The task of organizing data around specific topics or themes is a vibrant and growing effort in the biological sciences but to date this effort has not been actively pursued in the Earth sciences. This presentation will introduce the concept of geocuration, which we define it as the act of searching, selecting, and synthesizing Earth science data/metadata and information from across disciplines and repositories into a single, cohesive, and useful compendium.We also present the Climate Data Initiative (CDI) project as an exemplar example. The CDI project is a systematic effort to manually curate and share openly available climate data from various federal agencies. CDI is a broad multi-agency effort of the U.S. government and seeks to leverage the extensive existing federal climate-relevant data to stimulate innovation and private-sector entrepreneurship to support national climate-change preparedness. The geocuration process used in CDI project, key lessons learned, and suggestions to improve similar geocuration efforts in the future will be part of this presentation.

  8. NASA Composite Materials Development: Lessons Learned and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, Darrel R.; Davis, John G., Jr.; Pipes, R. Byron; Johnston, Norman

    2009-01-01

    Composite materials have emerged as the materials of choice for increasing the performance and reducing the weight and cost of military, general aviation, and transport aircraft and space launch vehicles. Major advancements have been made in the ability to design, fabricate, and analyze large complex aerospace structures. The recent efforts by Boeing and Airbus to incorporate composite into primary load carrying structures of large commercial transports and to certify the airworthiness of these structures is evidence of the significant advancements made in understanding and use of these materials in real world aircraft. NASA has been engaged in research on composites since the late 1960 s and has worked to address many development issues with these materials in an effort to ensure safety, improve performance, and improve affordability of air travel for the public good. This research has ranged from synthesis of advanced resin chemistries to development of mathematical analyses tools to reliably predict the response of built-up structures under combined load conditions. The lessons learned from this research are highlighted with specific examples to illustrate the problems encountered and solutions to these problems. Examples include specific technologies related to environmental effects, processing science, fabrication technologies, nondestructive inspection, damage tolerance, micromechanics, structural mechanics, and residual life prediction. The current state of the technology is reviewed and key issues requiring additional research identified. Also, grand challenges to be solved for expanded use of composites in aero structures are identified.

  9. Lessons Learned From Gen I Carbon Dioxide Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David E. Shropshire

    2004-04-01

    This paper provides a review of early gas cooled reactors including the Magnox reactors originating in the United Kingdom and the subsequent development of the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGR). These early gas cooled reactors shared a common coolant medium, namely carbon dioxide (CO2). A framework of information is provided about these early reactors and identifies unique problems/opportunities associated with use of CO2 as a coolant. Reactor designers successfully rose to these challenges. After years of successful use of the CO2 gas cooled reactors in Europe, the succeeding generation of reactors, called the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR), were designed with Helium gas as the coolant. Again, in the 21st century, with the latest reactor designs under investigation in Generation IV, there is a revived interest in developing Gas Cooled Fast Reactors that use CO2 as the reactor coolant. This paper provides a historical perspective on the 52 CO2 reactors and the reactor programs that developed them. The Magnox and AGR design features and safety characteristics were reviewed, as well as the technologies associated with fuel storage, reprocessing, and disposal. Lessons-learned from these programs are noted to benefit the designs of future generations of gas cooled nuclear reactors.

  10. MIDAS: Lessons learned from the first spaceborne atomic force microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Bentley, Mark S; Butler, Bart; Gavira, Jose; Jeszenszky, Harald; Mannel, Thurid; Romstedt, Jens; Schmied, Roland; Torkar, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The Micro-Imaging Dust Analysis System (MIDAS) atomic force microscope (AFM) onboard the Rosetta orbiter was the first such instrument launched into space in 2004. Designed only a few years after the technique was invented, MIDAS is currently orbiting comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko and producing the highest resolution 3D images of cometary dust ever made in situ. After more than a year of continuous operation much experience has been gained with this novel instrument. Coupled with operations of the Flight Spare and advances in terrestrial AFM a set of "lessons learned" has been produced, cumulating in recommendations for future spaceborne atomic force microscopes. The majority of the design could be reused as-is, or with incremental upgrades to include more modern components (e.g. the processor). Key additional recommendations are to incorporate an optical microscope to aid the search for particles and image registration, to include a variety of cantilevers (with different spring constants) and a variety of ...

  11. Lessons learned from Gen-I carbon dioxide cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a review of early gas cooled reactors including the Magnox reactors originating in the United Kingdom and the subsequent development of the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGR). These early gas cooled reactors shared a common coolant medium, namely carbon dioxide (CO2). A framework of information is provided about these early reactors and identifies unique problems/opportunities associated with use of CO2 as a coolant. Reactor designers successfully rose to these challenges. After years of successful use of the CO2 gas cooled reactors in Europe, the succeeding generation of reactors, called the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR), were designed with Helium gas as the coolant. Again, in the 21. century, with the latest reactor designs under investigation in Generation IV, there is a revived interest in developing Gas Cooled Fast Reactors that use CO2 as the reactor coolant. This paper provides a historical perspective on the 52 CO2 reactors and the reactor programs that developed them. The Magnox and AGR design features and safety characteristics were reviewed, as well as the technologies associated with fuel storage, reprocessing, and disposal. Lessons-learned from these programs are noted to benefit the designs of future generations of gas cooled nuclear reactors. (author)

  12. Lessons Learned From Dynamic Simulations of Advanced Fuel Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; Jacob J. Jacobson; Gretchen E. Matthern; David E. Shropshire

    2009-04-01

    Years of performing dynamic simulations of advanced nuclear fuel cycle options provide insights into how they could work and how one might transition from the current once-through fuel cycle. This paper summarizes those insights from the context of the 2005 objectives and goals of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Our intent is not to compare options, assess options versus those objectives and goals, nor recommend changes to those objectives and goals. Rather, we organize what we have learned from dynamic simulations in the context of the AFCI objectives for waste management, proliferation resistance, uranium utilization, and economics. Thus, we do not merely describe “lessons learned” from dynamic simulations but attempt to answer the “so what” question by using this context. The analyses have been performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Dynamics (VISION). We observe that the 2005 objectives and goals do not address many of the inherently dynamic discriminators among advanced fuel cycle options and transitions thereof.

  13. Historical perspective on agroterrorism: lessons learned from 1945 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keremidis, Haralampos; Appel, Bernd; Menrath, Andrea; Tomuzia, Katharina; Normark, Magnus; Roffey, Roger; Knutsson, Rickard

    2013-09-01

    This article presents a historical perspective on agroterrorism cases from 1945 until 2012. The threat groups and perpetrators associated with bio- and agroterrorism are clustered into several groups: apocalyptic sects, lone wolves, political groups, and religious groups. We used open-source information, and 4 biological agroterrorism cases are described: (1) in 1952, Mau Mau poisoned cattle in Kenya by using a plant toxin from the African milk bush plant; (2) in 1985, the USDA claimed that Mexican contract workers were involved in deliberately spreading screwworm (Cochliomyia hominivorax) among livestock; (3) in 2000, Palestinian media reported that Israeli settlers released sewer water into Palestinian agricultural fields; and (4) in 2011, a person was sentenced to prison after threatening US and UK livestock with the deliberate spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus. All 4 cases can be assigned to political groups. These cases have not attracted much attention in literature nor in the public media, and the credibility of the sources of information varies. We concluded that agroterrorism has not been a problem during the period studied. Lessons learned from the few cases have generated awareness about the fact that nontypical biological weapons and non-high-risk agents, such as African milk bush, screwworm, and sewer water, have been used by attackers to influence local decision makers. This review will be useful in improving future preparedness planning and developing countermeasures. PMID:23971803

  14. Computerisation of procedures. Lessons learned and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computerisation of the procedures has been investigated for several years. Even though guidelines for such computerisation have been proposed, there is a need to extend and revise these guidelines. In this report, we look at what has been achieved so far, both within the Halden Project as well as within other organisations related to nuclear power plants. These experiences are often related to testing of particular computerised procedure systems either in research laboratories or in nuclear utilities. These activities have accumulated a body of general knowledge on the subject, as documented in other 'lessons learned' reports of the past. This report will extend this accepted body of knowledge. Furthermore, we identify the unresolved problems that need to be further studied to make usable computerised procedures for the future. The report identifies selected qualities that should be reinforced to make computerised procedure systems better. In particular, the integration aspect is emphasised. A flexible integration with the operator tasks and the remaining interfaces of the control room is important. Unless this integration is accomplished, the computerised procedures will not be functional. Another aspect of integration is combination with other systems inclusive those systems that deal with the plant documentation, electronic or paper based. This kind of integration is important to the safe and reliable operation of the plant. Good integration with plant documentation is instrumental in creating reliable QA of the procedures that covers the whole life cycle of the procedure. (Author). 48 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  15. The verification of DRAGON: progress and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general requirements for the verification of the legacy code DRAGON are somewhat different from those used for new codes. For example, the absence of a design manual for DRAGON makes it difficult to confirm that the each part of the code performs as required since these requirements are not explicitly spelled out for most of the DRAGON modules. In fact, this conformance of the code can only be assessed, in most cases, by making sure that the contents of the DRAGON data structures, which correspond to the output generated by a module of the code, contains the adequate information. It is also possible in some cases to use the self-verification options in DRAGON to perform additional verification or to evaluate, using an independent software, the performance of specific functions in the code. Here, we will describe the global verification process that was considered in order to bring DRAGON to an industry standard tool-set (IST) status. We will also discuss some of the lessons we learned in performing this verification and present some of the modification to DRAGON that were implemented as a consequence of this verification. (author)

  16. Spill response exercises and lessons learned : a response organization's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past five years, Burrard Clean Operations (BCO) has demonstrated its' oil spill response capabilities through different types of exercises. Such exercises are necessary for certification of Response Organizations in Canada. The exercises can be performed through actual response to spills or through simulated situations. Both can provide an opportunity to practice different levels of response to a range of conditions in various settings. They also provide the opportunity to focus on specific themes that can be part of a response and to identify areas for improvement in response actions. They also make it possible to interface with government agencies, industry and others that participate in spill responses. The exercise program for BCO is aimed at maintaining certification and to assist the Canadian Coast Guard. The exercises broaden the lessons learned and set a course for future enhancement to spill readiness should a real incident occur. The goals of the exercise program are to provide real time drills that show the operational capability of a representative sample of BCO equipment, management and trained spill responders. The response functions of the BCO exercise program are: notification, response organization activation, contractor activation, situation analysis, strategy development for marine oil spill response, site safety, equipment deployment, containment, recovery, shoreline assessment, cleanup, communications, decontamination, logistics, and financial management. The BCO experience has led to the basic conclusions that there is a need to vary the exercise design and format and that there is a need to implement follow-up actions provided during exercise evaluations. 7 refs., 3 tabs

  17. Building a GPS Receiver for Space Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotzky, Steve; Heckler, G. W.; Boegner, G.; Roman, J.; Wennersten, M.; Butler, R.; Davis, M.; Lanham, A.; Winternitz, L.; Thompson, W.; Bamford, B.; Banes, V.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past 4 years the Component Systems and Hardware branch at NASA GSFC has pursued an inhouse effort to build a unique space-flight GPS receiver. This effort has resulted in the Navigator GPS receiver. Navigator's first flight opportunity will come with the STS-125 HST-SM4 mission in August 2008. This paper covers the overall hardware design for the receiver and the difficulties encountered during the transition from the breadboard design to the final flight hardware design. Among the different lessons learned, the paper stresses the importance of selecting and verifying parts that are appropriate for space applications, as well as what happens when these parts are not accurately characterized by their datasheets. Additionally, the paper discusses what analysis needs to be performed when deciding system frequencies and filters. The presentation also covers how to prepare for thermal vacuum testing, and problems that may arise during vibration testing. It also contains what criteria should be considered when determining which portions of a design to create in-house, and which portions to license from a third party. Finally, the paper shows techniques which have proven to be extraordinarily helpful in debugging and analysis.

  18. License renewal demonstration program: NRC observations and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff's observations and lessons learned from the five License Renewal Demonstration Program (LRDP) site visits performed by the staff from March 25, 1996, through August 16, 1996. The LRDP was a Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) program intended to assess the effectiveness of the guidance provided by NEI 95-10, Revision 0, open-quotes Industry Guideline for Implementing the Requirements of 10 CFR Part 54 - The License Renewal Rule,close quotes to implement the requirements of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 54 (10 CFR Part 54), open-quotes Requirements for Renewal of Operating Licenses for Nuclear Power Plants.close quotes In general, NEI 95-10 appeared to contain the basic guidance needed for scoping, screening, identifying aging effects, developing aging management programs, and performing time-limited aging analyses. However, inconsistent implementation of this guidance in some areas was an indication that clarification of existing guidance and/or the inclusion-of some new guidance may be needed for applicants to develop a license renewal program that is consistent with the intent of the rule

  19. Decommissioning of small nuclear facilities: Problems encountered and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decommissioning of small facilities may present a lower radiological risk and easier planning and implementation than the decommissioning of large facilities but some practical difficulties, lack of strategies, regulatory considerations and financial resources can create serious problems in the decommissioning of small facilities that should be solved properly. In past years, the Radioactive Waste Management Service of the Centre for Radiation Protection and Hygiene has been involved in different decommissioning projects involving small facilities, including laboratories and medical facilities, in which radioisotopes were used for research, diagnosis and treatment. For different reasons, some of these facilities became contaminated. The facilities were closed for a long time and no actions were taken. The decommissioning was not considered during the useful life of these facilities and therefore no plans were in place and no decommissioning related records were kept. Despite these problems, the decommissioning projects were carried out and successfully completed. Several difficulties were overcome and the safety issues received the adequate priority. The paper gives special emphasis on the problems encountered, the solutions, and the lessons learned from each situation. (author)

  20. Lessons learned from accidents in industrial irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of ionizing radiation in medicine, industry and research for technical development continues to increase throughout the world. One application with a high growth rate is irradiation suing high energy gamma photons and electron beams. There are currently more than 160 gamma irradiation facilities and over 600 electron beam facilities in operation in almost all IAEA Member States. The most common uses of these facilities are to sterilize medical and pharmaceutical products, to preserve foodstuffs, to synthesize polymers and to eradicate insects. Although this industry has a good safety record, there is a potential for accidents with serious consequences to human health because of the high dose rates produced by these sources. Fatal accidents have occurred at installations in both developed and developing countries. Such accidents have prompted a review of several accidents, including five with fatalities, by a team of manufacturers, regulatory authorities and operating organizations. Having looked closely at the circumstances of each accident and the apparent deficiencies in design, safety and regulatory systems and personnel performance, the team made a number of recommendations on the ways in which the safety of irradiators can be improved. The findings of extensive research pertaining to the lessons that can be learned from irradiator accidents are presented. This publication is intended for manufacturers, regulatory authorities and operating organizations dealing with industrial irradiators. It was drafted by J.E. Glen, United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, United States of America, and P. Zuniga-Bello, Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Technologia, Mexico

  1. MIDAS: Lessons learned from the first spaceborne atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Mark Stephen; Arends, Herman; Butler, Bart; Gavira, Jose; Jeszenszky, Harald; Mannel, Thurid; Romstedt, Jens; Schmied, Roland; Torkar, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    The Micro-Imaging Dust Analysis System (MIDAS) atomic force microscope (AFM) onboard the Rosetta orbiter was the first such instrument launched into space in 2004. Designed only a few years after the technique was invented, MIDAS is currently orbiting comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko and producing the highest resolution 3D images of cometary dust ever made in situ. After more than a year of continuous operation much experience has been gained with this novel instrument. Coupled with operations of the Flight Spare and advances in terrestrial AFM a set of "lessons learned" has been produced, cumulating in recommendations for future spaceborne atomic force microscopes. The majority of the design could be reused as-is, or with incremental upgrades to include more modern components (e.g. the processor). Key additional recommendations are to incorporate an optical microscope to aid the search for particles and image registration, to include a variety of cantilevers (with different spring constants) and a variety of tip geometries.

  2. Nanotechnology, risk, and oversight: learning lessons from related emerging technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Priest, Susanna

    2010-11-01

    Emerging technologies are defined by their novelty and thus are accompanied by significant uncertainty in determining appropriate ways to manage risks associated with them. Yet, there is a body of prior knowledge about risk management and oversight policy for other technologies that have already permeated society. Here, we describe two ways in which prospective oversight policy analysis for emerging technologies can draw upon these past experiences. One involves comparing specific products that have already been marketed to similar products of the emerging technology (cognate-product approach). The other treats the emerging technology as a body of products and methods and relates it to another technological field that has already emerged and penetrated markets (whole-technology approach). In this article, we describe our work using these approaches to inform risk and oversight policy for nanotechnology and its products. We draw parallels between biotechnology and nanotechnology as whole fields of development and also between genetically engineered organisms in the food supply and agricultural products of nanotechnology. Through these comparisons, we find that both approaches to historical learning have value and present lessons that could be applied to nanotechnology. PMID:20723152

  3. Nuclear power plant Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL). Appendix B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasza, K.E.; Diercks, D.R.; Holland, J.W.; Choi, S.U. [and others

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this generic aging lessons learned (GALL) review is to provide a systematic review of plant aging information in order to assess materials and component aging issues related to continued operation and license renewal of operating reactors. Literature on mechanical, structural, and thermal-hydraulic components and systems reviewed consisted of 97 Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) reports, 23 NRC Generic Letters, 154 Information Notices, 29 Licensee Event Reports (LERs), 4 Bulletins, and 9 Nuclear Management and Resources Council Industry Reports (NUMARC IRs) and literature on electrical components and systems reviewed consisted of 66 NPAR reports, 8 NRC Generic Letters, 111 Information Notices, 53 LERs, 1 Bulletin, and 1 NUMARC IR. More than 550 documents were reviewed. The results of these reviews were systematized using a standardized GALL tabular format and standardized definitions of aging-related degradation mechanisms and effects. The tables are included in volume s 1 and 2 of this report. A computerized data base has also been developed for all review tables and can be used to expedite the search for desired information on structures, components, and relevant aging effects. A survey of the GALL tables reveals that all ongoing significant component aging issues are currently being addressed by the regulatory process. However, the aging of what are termed passive components has been highlighted for continued scrutiny. This report consists of Volume 2, which consists of the GALL literature review tables for the NUMARC Industry Reports reviewed for the report.

  4. AECL's underground research laboratory: technical achievements and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the development of the research program for the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program in the 1970's, the need for an underground facility was recognized. AECL constructed an Underground Research Laboratory (URL) for large-scale testing and in situ engineering and performance-assessment-related experiments on key aspects of deep geological disposal in a representative geological environment. Ale URL is a unique geotechnical research and development facility because it was constructed in a previously undisturbed portion of a granitic pluton that was well characterized before construction began, and because most of the shaft and experimental areas are below the water table. The specific areas of research, development and demonstration include surface and underground characterization; groundwater and solute transport; in situ rock stress conditions; temperature and time-dependent deformation and failure characteristics of rock; excavation techniques to minimize damage to surrounding rock and to ensure safe working conditions; and the performance of seals and backfills. This report traces the evolution of the URL and summarizes the technical achievements and lessons learned during its siting, design and construction, and operating phases over the last 18 years. (author)

  5. Lessons learned: Experiences with Integrated Safeguards in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrated safeguards (IS) was implemented in Norway in 2002 as one of the first countries in the world. The implementation of IS has provided both advantages and disadvantages for Norway. Lessons learned will be discussed. The concept of unannounced inspections under the integrated safeguards regime compared to traditional safeguards is one of the major issues. Small users with depleted uranium as shielding containers and the effort used to safeguard them is an aspect of this issue. Recently there has been an interest from the IAEA to investigate the historical boundaries between a research reactor site and a neighboring defense research site. The paper will address this issue as a part of the implementation of IS. Lately, we have seen that several commercial parties have started research on nuclear fuel cycle related projects. This raises some questions concerning what to declare under Article 2 of the Additional Protocol (AP). Today anyone with a computer connected to the internet could carry out research amenable to declaration under the AP. This paper will discuss this issue. (author)

  6. Nuclear disasters and health: lessons learned, challenges, and proposals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuru, Akira; Tanigawa, Koichi; Kumagai, Atsushi; Niwa, Ohtsura; Takamura, Noboru; Midorikawa, Sanae; Nollet, Kenneth; Yamashita, Shunichi; Ohto, Hitoshi; Chhem, Rethy K; Clarke, Mike

    2015-08-01

    Past nuclear disasters, such as the atomic bombings in 1945 and major accidents at nuclear power plants, have highlighted similarities in potential public health effects of radiation in both circumstances, including health issues unrelated to radiation exposure. Although the rarity of nuclear disasters limits opportunities to undertake rigorous research of evidence-based interventions and strategies, identification of lessons learned and development of an effective plan to protect the public, minimise negative effects, and protect emergency workers from exposure to high-dose radiation is important. Additionally, research is needed to help decision makers to avoid premature deaths among patients already in hospitals and other vulnerable groups during evacuation. Since nuclear disasters can affect hundreds of thousands of people, a substantial number of people are at risk of physical and mental harm in each disaster. During the recovery period after a nuclear disaster, physicians might need to screen for psychological burdens and provide general physical and mental health care for many affected residents who might experience long-term displacement. Reliable communication of personalised risks has emerged as a challenge for health-care professionals beyond the need to explain radiation protection. To overcome difficulties of risk communication and provide decision aids to protect workers, vulnerable people, and residents after a nuclear disaster, physicians should receive training in nuclear disaster response. This training should include evidence-based interventions, support decisions to balance potential harms and benefits, and take account of scientific uncertainty in provision of community health care. An open and joint learning process is essential to prepare for, and minimise the effects of, future nuclear disasters. PMID:26251394

  7. Towards Global Transdisciplinary Research: Lessons Learned from the Belmont Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillard, S. J.; Uhle, M. E.; van Jaarsveld, A. S.; Monfray, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Belmont Forum was initiated in 2009 by a sub group of the International Group of Funding Agencies for Global Change Research. The Belmont Challenge embodies the Forum's central goal: to deliver knowledge needed for societies to take action to mitigate and adapt to detrimental environmental change. This is fostered through collaboration among scientists across the globe and by stressing the importance of co-production of knowledge associated with coupled natural and social systems. The Belmont Challenge was clearly aligned with other collective thinking processes within the research community and key knowledge users from intergovernmental bodies. Convergence of these efforts gave rise to the S&T Alliance for Global Sustainability and its initiative - Future Earth. Collaborative Research Actions, consisting primarily of multilateral research calls to address topics relevant to Future Earth, have been the main tool developed to address the Belmont Challenge and some early lessons emerged. First, obstacles faced by the Belmont Forum are similar to those met by scientists collaborating across traditional boundaries. Building shared languages and interests between various disciplines and across global cultures, remains difficult; this results in a persistent underestimation of the transformation required to move knowledge creation towards a truly global inter- and transdisciplinary science. Second, the diversity of organizations, cultures and practices within the Belmont Forum is the main source of its creativity and its challenges. While some convergence is needed to build coherent strategies and work efficiently together, diversity is necessary to design actions suitable for all partners regardless of their national research system and science-policy priorities. Finding the right trade-offs is a learning process that Future Earth is also facing; thus both initiatives are not only linked through funding relations but also through strongly intertwined learning curves.

  8. Best intentions: Lessons learned on international partnering and alliance contracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the energy industry is still in the early stages of partnering and alliancing, there is enough accumulated experience to be worth sharing information on what has worked and what has not. This paper explores the lessons learned in six agreements in the UK, the US, and the Middle East. It concludes that not all projects are potential candidates for partnering or alliances. Those likely to be successful will contain common characteristics of complexity, uncertainty, technology and duration. Management structure is moving towards integrated teams, although projects currently fall along a broad spectrum before becoming truly integrated. The risk/reward structure is becoming more complex over time, although it is unclear that tinkering with percentage sharing schemes will actually change the behavior of project participants and result in additional cost savings. The use of team building techniques and facilitators may well enhance the alliance implementation, but the choice of both company and individual members is fundamental to success. The overriding success factor, however, is the setting of fair and achievable targets. All of the managers surveyed stated that their projects benefited from the use of a partnering or alliance structure. Three of the projects were far enough along to cite significant cost savings. Although some in the industry are still doubtful that alliances can make a true difference to a project's outcome, those who have participated are convinced they have achieved results which would have been unattainable in a traditional structure. They would add, however, that partnering and alliancing is not easy, and not for all projects. The industry must share practical information if significant learning is to occur

  9. Public perception of radioactive waste management and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the background to the current public awareness campaign on the management of radioactive wastes, which culminated in the publication by UK Nirex Limited of a Discussion Document 'The Way Forward'. The lessons learned from previous confrontations with communities and pressure groups are outlined together with the philosophy behind the Company's comprehensive discussion programme. An open policy of information distribution, while necessary was not enough. Therefore previous Nirex public information programmes had been less successful than hoped. Much has been learned from the problems encountered and this has been applied to develop a new programme. The importance of inviting people to take part in the decision process is manifest, and the discussion process was designed to encourage participation. It was an important step in overcoming the perception of secrecy which still surrounds the nuclear industry as a whole. It was unlikely that many communities would volunteer to take responsibility for the nations nuclear waste, although there are encouraging signs that some communities see the potential benefits outweigh perceived risks. However, by actively airing the matter in the general absence of local controversy a lot of accurate and hopefully persuasive information has been passed to many people and organisations in an atmosphere conducive to gaining their attention. If the Nirex discussion programme achieved nothing else there should be no local authority in the United Kingdom who does not know who we are, what we are doing and why. Having made a good start it is essential that an open debate continues and that local communities continue to share in the decision making process. There will be problems to overcome especially where unpopular recommendations have to be made but Nirex will continue to make every effort to win confidence and support by deeds as well as words

  10. Training Self-Regulated Learning in the Classroom: Development and Evaluation of Learning Materials to Train Self-Regulated Learning during Regular Mathematics Lessons at Primary School

    OpenAIRE

    Manuela Leidinger; Franziska Perels

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the intervention based on the self-regulation theory by Zimmerman (2000) was to promote a powerful learning environment for supporting self-regulated learning by using learning materials. In the study, primary school teachers were asked to implement specific learning materials into their regular mathematics lessons in grade four. These learning materials focused on particular (meta)cognitive and motivational components of self-regulated learning and were subdivided into six units, ...

  11. Project-Based Learning Using Discussion and Lesson-Learned Methods via Social Media Model for Enhancing Problem Solving Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewpanich, Chaiwat; Piriyasurawong, Pallop

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to 1) develop the project-based learning using discussion and lesson-learned methods via social media model (PBL-DLL SoMe Model) used for enhancing problem solving skills of undergraduate in education student, and 2) evaluate the PBL-DLL SoMe Model used for enhancing problem solving skills of undergraduate in education student.…

  12. Novice Teachers' Perspectives on Learning in Lesson Rehearsals in Second Language Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyan, Francis John; Peercy, Megan Madigan

    2016-01-01

    Although scholars working in core practices have put forth lesson rehearsals as central to novice teachers' learning and development, there is little work on how novice teachers experience rehearsals. This qualitative research investigated learning opportunities for novice teachers of language learners during rehearsals. The analysis examines two…

  13. Lessons Learned from Real-Time, Event-Based Internet Science Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, T.; Myszka, E.; Gallagher, D. L.; Adams, M. L.; Koczor, R. J.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For the last several years the Science Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center has carried out a diverse program of Internet-based science communication. The Directorate's Science Roundtable includes active researchers, NASA public relations, educators, and administrators. The Science@NASA award-winning family of Web sites features science, mathematics, and space news. The program includes extended stories about NASA science, a curriculum resource for teachers tied to national education standards, on-line activities for students, and webcasts of real-time events. The focus of sharing science activities in real-time has been to involve and excite students and the public about science. Events have involved meteor showers, solar eclipses, natural very low frequency radio emissions, and amateur balloon flights. In some cases, broadcasts accommodate active feedback and questions from Internet participants. Through these projects a pattern has emerged in the level of interest or popularity with the public. The pattern differentiates projects that include science from those that do not, All real-time, event-based Internet activities have captured public interest at a level not achieved through science stories or educator resource material exclusively. The worst event-based activity attracted more interest than the best written science story. One truly rewarding lesson learned through these projects is that the public recognizes the importance and excitement of being part of scientific discovery. Flying a camera to 100,000 feet altitude isn't as interesting to the public as searching for viable life-forms at these oxygen-poor altitudes. The details of these real-time, event-based projects and lessons learned will be discussed.

  14. When a natural disaster occurs: lessons learned in meeting students' needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Pamela G; Loffredo, Vincent J; McKee, John C

    2011-01-01

    Across the nation, weather-related natural disasters-tropical storms, floods, tornadoes, and earthquakes-struck even areas where weather concerns are not paramount on the minds of most people. These natural disasters heightened awareness that all geographic areas are susceptible to aberrant weather conditions. The purpose of this article was to relate the lessons learned by one academic health center in meeting students' emergency preparedness and disaster recovery needs following a major hurricane in fall 2008. To gauge students' storm-related needs, a Hurricane Needs Survey (HNS) was conducted in spring 2009, 7 months after the hurricane. Students responded to 26 structured response items and 3 open-ended questions. Five hundred fifteen surveys were completed, constituting a response rate of 37.2%. Data were analyzed by creating frequencies to profile students' hurricane experiences. Results indicated that all students left the island under mandatory evacuation orders; most stayed with their families, and most experienced moderate material losses. For some students, the evacuation process and life after the storm contributed to ongoing problems, worries, and academic performance issues. Qualitative content analysis was used to derive themes from the students' narrative responses to the HNS open-ended questions about their perceptions of the extent to which the University of Texas Medical Branch met their needs. When students' hurricane response comments were analyzed, three major themes emerged: being prepared, needing to be connected, and returning to normalcy. The major lessons learned are that the emergency preparation of students requires greater specificity and that discussion about poststorm recovery expectations is essential. Following a natural disaster, students experience more distress than may be readily apparent. PMID:22142912

  15. A Summary of the Rendezvous, Proximity Operations, Docking, and Undocking (RPODU) Lessons Learned from the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) Orbital Express (OE) Demonstration System Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.; Carpenter, James R.

    2011-01-01

    The Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) Technical Discipline Team (TDT) sponsored Dr. J. Russell Carpenter, a Navigation and Rendezvous Subject Matter Expert (SME) from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), to provide support to the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) Orbital Express (OE) rendezvous and docking flight test that was conducted in 2007. When that DARPA OE mission was completed, Mr. Neil Dennehy, NASA Technical Fellow for GN&C, requested Dr. Carpenter document his findings (lessons learned) and recommendations for future rendezvous missions resulting from his OE support experience. This report captures lessons specifically from anomalies that occurred during one of OE's unmated operations.

  16. PREFACE Protein folding: lessons learned and new frontiers Protein folding: lessons learned and new frontiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappu, Rohit V.; Nussinov, Ruth

    2009-03-01

    multi-scale dynamical problem when one considers the synergies between protein expression, spontaneous folding, chaperonin-assisted folding, protein targeting, the kinetics of post-translational modifications, protein degradation, and of course the drive to avoid aggregation. Further, there is growing recognition that cells not only tolerate but select for proteins that are intrinsically disordered. These proteins are essential for many crucial activities, and yet their inability to fold in isolation makes them prone to proteolytic processing and aggregation. In the series of papers that make up this special focus on protein folding in physical biology, leading researchers provide insights into diverse cross-sections of problems in protein folding. Barrick provides a concise review of what we have learned from the study of two-state folders and draws attention to how several unanswered questions are being approached using studies on large repeat proteins. Dissecting the contribution of hydration-mediated interactions to driving forces for protein folding and assembly has been extremely challenging. There is renewed interest in using hydrostatic pressure as a tool to access folding intermediates and decipher the role of partially hydrated states in folding, misfolding, and aggregation. Silva and Foguel review many of the nuances that have been uncovered by perturbing hydrostatic pressure as a thermodynamic parameter. As noted above, protein folding in vivo is expected to be considerably more complex than the folding of two-state proteins in dilute solutions. Lucent et al review the state-of-the-art in the development of quantitative theories to explain chaperonin-assisted folding in vivo. Additionally, they highlight unanswered questions pertaining to the processing of unfolded/misfolded proteins by the chaperone machinery. Zhuang et al present results that focus on the effects of surface tethering on transition state ensembles and folding mechanisms of a model two

  17. The Significant Incidents and Close Calls in Human Space Flight Chart: Lessons Learned Gone Viral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bill; Pate, Dennis; Thelen, David

    2010-01-01

    This presentation will explore the surprising history and events that transformed a mundane spreadsheet of historical spaceflight incidents into a popular and widely distributed visual compendium of lessons learned. The Significant Incidents and Close Calls in Human Space Flight Chart (a.k.a. The Significant Incidents Chart) is a popular and visually captivating reference product that has arisen from the work of the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Safety and Mission Assurance (S&MA) Flight Safety Office (FSO). It began as an internal tool intended to increase our team s awareness of historical and modern space flight incidents. Today, the chart is widely recognized across the agency as a reference tool. It appears in several training and education programs. It is used in familiarization training in the JSC Building 9 Mockup Facility and is seen by hundreds of center visitors each week. The chart visually summarizes injuries, fatalities, and close calls sustained during the continuing development of human space flight. The poster-sized chart displays over 100 total events that have direct connections to human space flight endeavors. The chart is updated periodically. The update process itself has become a collaborative effort. Many people, spanning multiple NASA organizations, have provided suggestions for additional entries. The FSO maintains a growing list of subscribers who have requested to receive updates. The presenters will discuss the origins and motivations behind the significant incidents chart. A review of the inclusion criteria used to select events will be offered. We will address how the chart is used today by S&MA and offer a vision of how it might be used by other organizations now and in the future. Particular emphasis will be placed on features of the chart that have met with broad acceptance and have helped spread awareness of the most important lessons in human spaceflight.

  18. Organic synthesis in the Smith Group: a personal selection of a dozen lessons learned at the University of Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minbiole, Kevin P C

    2016-04-01

    The passionate study of the complex and ever-evolving discipline of organic synthesis over more than a four-decade span is certain to elucidate meaningful and significant lessons. Over this period, Amos B. Smith III, the Rhodes-Thompson Professor of Chemistry and Member of the Monell Chemical Senses Center at the University of Pennsylvania, has mentored well over 100 doctoral and masters students, more than 200 postdoctoral associates and numerous undergraduates, in addition to collaborating with a wide spectrum of internationally recognized scholars. His research interests, broadly stated, comprise complex molecule synthesis, the development of new, versatile and highly effective synthetic methods, bioorganic and medicinal chemistry, peptide mimicry chemistry and material science. Each area demands a high level of synthetic design and execution. United by a passion to unlock the secrets of organic synthesis, and perhaps of Nature itself, innumerable lessons have been, and continue to be, learned by the members of the Smith Group. This lead article in a Special Issue of the Journal of Antibiotics affords an opportunity to share some of those lessons learned, albeit a small selection of personal favorites. PMID:26932408

  19. Lessons of experience: Key events and lessons learned of effective chief medical officers at freestanding children's hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowill, Donald P

    2011-01-01

    As the healthcare environment changes, physician executives who are effective leaders and agents of change are needed. Healthcare organizations that are successful at developing effective physician leaders will be at an advantage. This article examines how physician leaders develop on the job. Such knowledge and insight can be useful to healthcare systems looking to develop a new physician leadership development program or improve an existing one. This study identified that learning from other people (e.g., mentors, role models, bosses) and key events involving hardships are valuable means in developing leadership acumen for chief medical officers (CMOs) at freestanding children's hospitals. Most of the hardships CMOs reported were a result of mistakes made when they were trying to institute change. CMOs reported a disproportionately low number of learning events from developmental job assignments. This finding may indicate a lost opportunity on the part of healthcare organizations in developing leaders. The most frequent lessons learned pertained to handling relationships, interpersonal skills, and executive temperament. Skills in handling relationships and interpersonal skills were best learned through business mistakes made in dealing with others. Lessons in executive temperament, self confidence, and handling adversity were most often learned from role models and bosses. These findings indicate that physician leadership development initiatives should intentionally and systematically incorporate job assignments, role models, and mentors. PMID:21323028

  20. Lessons Learned in International Safeguards - Implementation of Safeguards at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehinger, Michael H [ORNL; Johnson, Shirley [Tucker Creek Consulting

    2010-02-01

    The focus of this report is lessons learned at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP). However, the subject of lessons learned for application of international safeguards at reprocessing plants includes a cumulative history of inspections starting at the West Valley (New York, U.S.A.) reprocessing plant in 1969 and proceeding through all of the efforts over the years. The RRP is the latest and most challenging application the International Atomic Energy Agency has faced. In many ways the challenges have remained the same, timely inspection and evaluation with limited inspector resources, with the continuing realization that planning and preparations can never start early enough in the life cycle of a facility. Lessons learned over the years have involved the challenges of using ongoing advances in technology and dealing with facilities with increased throughput and continuous operation. This report will begin with a review of historical developments and lessons learned. This will provide a basis for a discussion of the experiences and lessons learned from the implementation of international safeguards at RRP.

  1. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Lessons Learned Applicable to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. M. Beck; L. F. Pincock

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify possible issues highlighted by these lessons learned that could apply to the NGNP in reducing technical risks commensurate with the current phase of design. Some of the lessons learned have been applied to the NGNP and documented in the Preconceptual Design Report. These are addressed in the background section of this document and include, for example, the decision to use TRISO fuel rather than BISO fuel used in the Peach Bottom reactor; the use of a reactor pressure vessel rather than prestressed concrete found in Fort St. Vrain; and the use of helium as a primary coolant rather than CO2. Other lessons learned, 68 in total, are documented in Sections 2 through 6 and will be applied, as appropriate, in advancing phases of design. The lessons learned are derived from both negative and positive outcomes from prior HTGR experiences. Lessons learned are grouped according to the plant, areas, systems, subsystems, and components defined in the NGNP Preconceptual Design Report, and subsequent NGNP project documents.

  2. What Can We Learn from the Grand Policy Experiment? Lessons from SO2 Allowance Trading

    OpenAIRE

    Robert N. Stavins

    1998-01-01

    The most ambitious application ever attempted of a market-based approach to environmental protection has been for the control of acid rain under the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990, which established a sulfur dioxide allowance trading program. This essay identifies lessons that can be learned from this grand experiment in economically oriented environmental policy. The author examines positive political economy lessons, asking why this system was adopted from acid-rain control in 1990, and h...

  3. Learning Through the Use of Instructional Materials: Secondary Mathematics Teachers’ Enactment of Formative Assessment Lessons

    OpenAIRE

    Seashore, Kimberly Holmes

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation is an exploratory study that investigates what and how teachers learn from use of instructional materials. Over the course of one school year, eight secondary mathematics teachers in two urban schools interspersed their usual instruction with “formative assessment lessons” (FALs), based on lessons and lesson guides designed to allow teachers to use student thinking to inform instructional decision-making. The focus of the study was on understanding how the teachers interpret...

  4. Kinesthetic Astronomy: Significant Upgrades to the Sky Time Lesson that Support Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, C. A.; Zawaski, M.

    2004-12-01

    This paper will report on a significant upgrade to the first in a series of innovative, experiential lessons we call Kinesthetic Astronomy. The Sky Time lesson reconnects students with the astronomical meaning of the day, year, and seasons. Like all Kinesthetic Astronomy lessons, it teaches basic astronomical concepts through choreographed bodily movements and positions that provide educational sensory experiences. They are intended for sixth graders up through adult learners in both formal and informal educational settings. They emphasize astronomical concepts and phenomenon that people can readily encounter in their "everyday" lives such as time, seasons, and sky motions of the Sun, Moon, stars, and planets. Kinesthetic Astronomy lesson plans are fully aligned with national science education standards, both in content and instructional practice. Our lessons offer a complete learning cycle with written assessment opportunities now embedded throughout the lesson. We have substantially strengthened the written assessment options for the Sky Time lesson to help students translate their kinesthetic and visual learning into the verbal-linguistic and mathematical-logical realms of expression. Field testing with non-science undergraduates, middle school science teachers and students, Junior Girl Scouts, museum education staff, and outdoor educators has been providing evidence that Kinesthetic Astronomy techniques allow learners to achieve a good grasp of concepts that are much more difficult to learn in more conventional ways such as via textbooks or even computer animation. Field testing of the Sky Time lesson has also led us to significant changes from the previous version to support student learning. We will report on the nature of these changes.

  5. The Center for Interactive Learning: An Incubator for Hatching Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Janet

    1999-01-01

    Describes a state-of-the-art community college facility (Center for Interactive Learning) that helps professors integrate technology and instruction to provide students with unique technology-enhanced learning experiences. The center's planning, distinctive features, and amenities are detailed. (GR)

  6. The Gaian Paradigm: Cooperative Community Life-Long Learning Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Bill

    1998-01-01

    Cooperative community life-long learning centers may be the catalyst for fundamental change in the existing authoritarian education system. An outgrowth of the homeschooling movement, these cooperatively owned centers use community resources to provide a wide range of learning services to everyone regardless of age, ability, or status. (TD)

  7. Flipped Learning, MOOCs and Learning Analytics: Lessons learnt from a Web Map Design course redesign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treves, R.

    2013-12-01

    Five weeks content of a 12 week course in web map design were converted to 'flipped learning': Lecture sessions were replaced by online short video lectures and multiple choice questions to be completed outside class. Class time was taken up with activities and exercises linked to the online learning. Students use of the online content was carefully tracked and detailed student feedback gathered. The response from students was good, 90% of them completed all the out of class activities and their feedback was very positive. The format has the advantage of being easily repurposed as a MOOC or scaled up in other ways. Lessons learnt from the implementation of the materials and the analysis of the VLE logs will be discussed as will ongoing efforts to reuse the materials in a MOOC.

  8. Veggie Hardware Validation Test Preliminary Results and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Gioia D.; Dufour, Nicole F.; Smith, T. M.

    2014-01-01

    The Veggie hardware validation test, VEG-01, was conducted on the International Space Station during Expeditions 39 and 40 from May through June of 2014. The Veggie hardware and the VEG-01 experiment payload were launched to station aboard the SpaceX-3 resupply mission in April, 2014. Veggie was installed in an Expedite-the-Processing-of-Experiments-to-Space-Station (ExPRESS) rack in the Columbus module, and the VEG-01 validation test was initiated. Veggie installation was successful, and power was supplied to the unit. The hardware was programmed and the root mat reservoir and plant pillows were installed without issue. As expected, a small amount of growth media was observed in the sealed bags which enclosed the plant pillows when they were destowed. Astronaut Steve Swanson used the wet/dry vacuum to clean up the escaped particles. Water insertion or priming the first plant pillow was unsuccessful as an issue prevented water movement through the quick disconnect. All subsequent pillows were successfully primed, and the initial pillow was replaced with a backup pillow and successfully primed. Six pillows were primed, but only five pillows had plants which germinated. After about a week and a half it was observed that plants were not growing well and that pillow wicks were dry. This indicated that the reservoir was not supplying sufficient water to the pillows via wicking, and so the team reverted to an operational fix which added water directly to the plant pillows. Direct watering of the pillows led to a recovery in several of the stressed plants; a couple of which did not recover. An important lesson learned involved Veggie's bellows. The bellows tended to float and interfere with operations when opened, so Steve secured them to the baseplate during plant tending operations. Due to the perceived intensity of the LED lights, the crew found it challenging to both work under the lights and read crew procedures on their computer. Although the lights are not a safety

  9. Breastfeeding social marketing: lessons learned from USDA's "Loving Support" campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2012-10-01

    Social marketing involves the application of commercial marketing principles to advance the public good. Social marketing calls for much more than health communications campaigns. It involves four interrelated tasks: audience benefit, target behavior, essence (brand, relevance, positioning), and developing the "4Ps" (product, price, place, promotion) marketing mix. The ongoing U.S. Department of Agriculture "Loving Support Makes Breastfeeding Work" campaign was launched in 1997 based on social marketing principles to increase breastfeeding initiation rates and breastfeeding duration among Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) participants. Since then there have been improvements in breastfeeding duration in the country, and the majority of WIC women now initiate breastfeeding. Breastfeeding in public places is still not well accepted by society at large, and any and exclusive breastfeeding durations remain exceedingly low. Lessons learned from "Loving Support" and other campaigns indicate that it is important to design social marketing campaigns to target the influential societal forces (e.g., family and friends, healthcare providers, employers, formula industry, legislators) that affect women's decision and ability to breastfeed for the recommended amount of time. This will require formative research that applies the social-ecological model to different population segments, taking and identifying the right incentives to nudge more women to breastfeed for longer. Any new breastfeeding campaign needs to understand and take into account the information acquisition preferences of the target audiences. The vast majority of WIC women have mobile devices and are accessing social media. The Brazilian experience indicates that making breastfeeding the social norm can be done with a solid social marketing strategy. This is consistent with the recently released "Six Steps to Achieve Breastfeeding Goals for WIC Clinics," which identifies

  10. Lessons learned from applying VIM to fast reactor critical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VIM is a continuous energy Monte Carlo code first developed around 1970 for the analysis of plate-type, fast-neutron, zero-power critical assemblies. In most respects, VIM is functionally equivalent to the MCNP code but it has two features that make uniquely suited to the analysis of fast reactor critical experiments: (1) the plate lattice geometry option, which allows efficient description of and neutron tracking in the assembly geometry, and (2) a statistical treatment of neutron cross section data in the unresolved resonance range. Since its inception, VIM's capabilities have expanded to include numerous features, such as thermal neutron cross sections, photon cross sections, and combinatorial and other geometry options, that have allowed its use in a wide range of neutral-particle transport problems. The earliest validation work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) focused on the validation of VIM itself. This work showed that, in order for VIM to be a ''rigorous'' tool, extreme detail in the pointwise Monte Carlo libraries was needed, and the required detail was added. The emphasis soon shifted to validating models, methods, data and codes against VIM. Most of this work was done in the context of analyzing critical experiments in zero power reactor (ZPR) assemblies. The purpose of this paper is to present some of the lessons learned from using VIM in ZPR analysis work. This involves such areas as uncovering problems in deterministic methods and models, pitfalls in using Monte Carlo codes, and improving predictions. The numerical illustrations included here were taken from the extensive documentation cited as references

  11. Integrated Strategic Planning in a Learning-Centered Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Susan; Kaufman, Roger

    2007-01-01

    In learning-centered community colleges, planning, like all processes, must measurably improve learning and learner performance. This article shares Valencia Community College's approach to revising its strategic planning process based on the Organizational Elements Model to: 1) focus strategic planning on learning results that add value for…

  12. A Planetary Geophysicist Does EPO: Lessons Learned Along the Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, W. S.

    2011-12-01

    My "day job" is numerical modeling of the interiors of the terrestrial planets, but I have also done EPO projects for the last 17 years while at the Lunar and Planetary Institute. These range from single, hour long talks in classrooms or astronomy clubs, to week-long summer workshops for teachers and librarians, and even semester-long programs, along with a number of curriculum development projects. EPO projects are a great way to help develop both the next generation of scientists and, more importantly, of scientifically literate citizens and taxpayers. Here are a few lessons learned along the way in the school of hard knocks. (1) An engaging delivery style is even more important in EPO presentations than it is in college lectures or conference presentations. Emphasize a few key concepts rather than numerous facts, and keep the jargon out. Good analogies can go a long way towards explaining a concept to any age group. I teach the role of size in planetary cooling by first asking students how long it takes to cook food of various sizes (a hamburger, roast beef, turkey). (2) If you will be working with a group of students for more than one class period, classroom friendly activities strengthen the learning process. Such activities do not need to be elaborate - when teaching about the Moon, I sometimes assign students to take their parents outside at night and show them how to find lava flows on the Moon. Teachers usually need to have classroom activities that are aligned to state or national teaching standards. Fortunately, many effective, standards-aligned activities already exist, so you don't need to reinvent the wheel. For a useful listing of planetary science and astronomy activities, see the LPI website www.lpi.usra.edu/education/resources/ (3) Although EPO work can be personally rewarding, it is not always well rewarded in a professional context, and it can be difficult to find the time and financial resources to sustain major projects. We sometimes use a

  13. Learning with and about Advertising in Chemistry Education with a Lesson Plan on Natural Cosmetics--A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belova, Nadja; Eilks, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a case study on the chemistry behind natural cosmetics in five chemistry learning groups (grades 7-11, age range 13-17) in a German comprehensive school. The lesson plan intends to promote critical media literacy in the chemistry classroom and specifically emphasizes learning with and about advertising. The lessons of four…

  14. Managing an Infectious Disease Outbreak in a School. Lessons Learned from School Crises and Emergencies. Volume 2, Issue 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Lessons Learned" is a series of publications that are a brief recounting of actual school emergencies and crises. This "Lessons Learned" issue focuses on an infectious disease incident, which resulted in the death of a student, closure of area schools and the operation of an on-site school vaccine clinic. The report highlights the critical need…

  15. Incorporating Chemical Hazards into an Emergency Management Plan. Lessons Learned from School Crises and Emergencies. Volume 2, Issue 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Lessons Learned" is a series of publications that are a brief recounting of actual school emergencies and crises. This "Lessons Learned" issue focuses on a chemical spill that went unreported for approximately seven years, setting off a series of responses from the school district's Environmental Health and Safety Department (EHS) and the state…

  16. Lessons learned applying CASE methods/tools to Ada software development projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Maurice H.; Randall, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the lessons learned from introducing CASE methods/tools into organizations and applying them to actual Ada software development projects. This paper will be useful to any organization planning to introduce a software engineering environment (SEE) or evolving an existing one. It contains management level lessons learned, as well as lessons learned in using specific SEE tools/methods. The experiences presented are from Alpha Test projects established under the STARS (Software Technology for Adaptable and Reliable Systems) project. They reflect the front end efforts by those projects to understand the tools/methods, initial experiences in their introduction and use, and later experiences in the use of specific tools/methods and the introduction of new ones.

  17. Engineering Lessons Learned and Technical Standards Integration: Capturing Key Technologies for Future Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellen, Daniele P.; Garcia, Danny; Vaughan, William W.

    2003-01-01

    Capturing engineering lessons learned derived from past experiences and new technologies, then integrating them with technical standards, provides a viable process for enhancing engineering capabilities. The development of future space missions will require ready access, not only to the latest technical standards, but also to lessons learned derived from past experiences and new technologies. The integration of this information such that it is readily accessible by engineering and programmatic personnel is a key aspect of enabling technology. This paper addresses the development of a new and innovative Lessons Learned/Best Practices/Applications Notes--Standards Integration System, including experiences with its initial implementation as a pilot effort within the NASA Technical Standards Program. Included are metrics on the Program, feedbacks from users, future plans, and key issues that are being addressed to expand the System's utility. The objective is the enhancement of engineering capabilities on all aspects of systems development applicable to the success of future space missions.

  18. Lessons Learned from the Development and Implementation of the Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Monsi C.; Perry, Jay L.; Howard, David F.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Program's Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) Project have been developing atmosphere revitalization and environmental monitoring subsystem architectures suitable for enabling sustained crewed exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Using the International Space Station state-of-the-art (SOA) as the technical basis, the ARREM Project has contributed to technical advances that improve affordability, reliability, and functional efficiency while reducing dependence on a ground-based logistics resupply model. Functional demonstrations have merged new process technologies and concepts with existing ISS developmental hardware and operate them in a controlled environment simulating various crew metabolic loads. The ARREM Project's strengths include access to a full complement of existing developmental hardware that perform all the core atmosphere revitalization functions, unique testing facilities to evaluate subsystem performance, and a coordinated partnering effort among six NASA field centers and industry partners to provide the innovative expertise necessary to succeed. A project overview is provided and the project management strategies that have enabled a multidiscipinary engineering team to work efficiently across project, NASA field center, and industry boundaries to achieve the project's technical goals are discussed. Lessons learned and best practices relating to the project are presented and discussed.

  19. Lessons learned from the CEOG generic accident management guidelines confirmation (validation) exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In July 1995, the CE Owner's Group completed and issued Revision 0 of the Generic Accident Management Guidelines (AMG's) to the owners group task participants. This guidance provides a structured mechanism for the plant staff at CE utilities to respond to accidents that beyond the plant design basis and, possibly, the Emergency Operating Procedures. Prior to final issue of the generic AMGs, the CEOG conducted an AMG Confirmation Exercise to establish the ability of the AMGs to fulfill this important role. The specific objectives of the AMG Confirmation Exercise were to (1) clarify the interactions and transitions between the AMG/Technical Support Center (TSC) and the EOPS/Operations Personnel (2) validate the adequacy of the AMG data collection and plant condition diagnostic evaluation process and (3) assess the feasibility of the mechanical material and recommendations contained in the AMG's. The purpose of paper is to provide a detailed description of the AMG Confirmation Exercise as well as important lessons learned during the planning and implementation of the exercise. In addition, a discussion will be presented pertaining to the relationship between the AMG's (incumbent to the Technical Support Center) and the plants Emergency Operating Procedures (incumbent to the Control Room Operations Staff)

  20. Fire experience in NPPs and the lessons learned in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the design and administrative actions implemented at some Japanese plants in relation to fire protection in recent years. The lesson learnt from fire events and operational experience is carefully described for future use. (author)

  1. Space Operations Learning Center Facebook Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Ben; Milner, Barbara; Binebrink, Dan; Kuok, Heng

    2012-01-01

    The proposed Space Operations Learning Center (SOLC) Facebook module, initially code-named Spaceville, is intended to be an educational online game utilizing the latest social networking technology to reach a broad audience base and inspire young audiences to be interested in math, science, and engineering. Spaceville will be a Facebook application/ game with the goal of combining learning with a fun game and social environment. The mission of the game is to build a scientific outpost on the Moon or Mars and expand the colony. Game activities include collecting resources, trading resources, completing simple science experiments, and building architectures such as laboratories, habitats, greenhouses, machine shops, etc. The player is awarded with points and achievement levels. The player s ability increases as his/her points and levels increase. A player can interact with other players using multiplayer Facebook functionality. As a result, a player can discover unexpected treasures through scientific missions, engineering, and working with others. The player creates his/her own avatar with his/her selection of its unique appearance, and names the character. The player controls the avatar to perform activities such as collecting oxygen molecules or building a habitat. From observations of other successful social online games such as Farmville and Restaurant City, a common element of these games is having eye-catching and cartoonish characters, and interesting animations for all activities. This will create a fun, educational, and rewarding environment. The player needs to accumulate points in order to be awarded special items needed for advancing to higher levels. Trophies will be awarded to the player when certain goals are reached or tasks are completed. In order to acquire some special items needed for advancement in the game, the player will need to visit his/her neighboring towns to discover the items. This is the social aspect of the game that requires the

  2. Implementing a One-on-One Peer Support Program for Cancer Survivors Using a Motivational Interviewing Approach: Results and Lessons Learned

    OpenAIRE

    Allicock, Marlyn; Carr, Carol; Johnson, La-Shell; Smith, Rosie; Lawrence, Mary; Kaye, Leanne; Gellin, Mindy; Manning, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Peer Connect matches cancer survivors and caregivers (guides) with those currently experiencing cancer-related issues seeking support (partners). Motivational interviewing (MI)-based communication skills are taught to provide patient-centered support. There is little guidance about MI-based applications with cancer survivors who may have multiple coping needs. This paper addresses the results and lessons learned from implementing Peer Connect. Thirteen cancer survivors and two caregivers rece...

  3. The Hubble Education and Public Outreach Program: Best Practices and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhamer, B.; Jirdeh, H.; Knisely, L.; McCallister, D.; Ryer, H.; Smith, D.

    2014-07-01

    This paper highlights examples of best practices and lessons learned from the Hubble EPO program. Scientists and educators work side-by-side to identify the aspects of cutting-edge Hubble discoveries, data, and technology most relevant to STEM education and public understanding of science. The strategy has allowed us to bring Hubble science to the EPO community on a national scale. On this journey, we have identified and refined best practices and lessons learned in program staffing, meeting audience needs, translating cutting-edge science for a variety of diverse audiences, and achieving national reach.

  4. Learning with multiple representations: An example of a revision lesson in mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Darren; Ng, Eng Hock; Wee, Loo Kang; 10.1088/0031-9120/46/2/005

    2012-01-01

    We describe an example of learning with multiple representations in an A-level revision lesson on mechanics. The context of the problem involved the motion of a ball thrown vertically upwards in air and studying how the associated physical quantities changed during its flight. Different groups of students were assigned to look at the ball's motion using various representations: motion diagrams, vector diagrams, free-body diagrams, verbal description, equations and graphs, drawn against time as well as against displacement. Overall, feedback from students about the lesson was positive. We further discuss the benefits of using computer simulation to support and extend student learning.

  5. Learning with multiple representations: an example of a revision lesson in mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Darren; Poo, Sng Peng; Eng Hock, Ng; Loo Kang, Wee

    2011-03-01

    We describe an example of learning with multiple representations in an A-level revision lesson on mechanics. The context of the problem involved the motion of a ball thrown vertically upwards in air and studying how the associated physical quantities changed during its flight. Different groups of students were assigned to look at the ball's motion using various representations: motion diagrams, vector diagrams, free-body diagrams, verbal description, equations and graphs, drawn against time as well as against displacement. Overall, feedback from students about the lesson was positive. We further discuss the benefits of using computer simulation to support and extend student learning.

  6. Lessons learned from former radiation accidents on development of software tools for effective decision making support

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pecha, Petr; Hofman, Radek; Kuča, P.

    Praha : T-SOFT a.s, 2009, 15-1-15-8. ISBN 978-80-254-5913-3. [11th International Conference on Present and Future of Crisis Management 2009. Praha (CZ), 23.11.2009-24.11.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/07/1596 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Nuclear Accident * Lessons Learned * Software Support Subject RIV: AQ - Safety, Health Protection, Human - Machine http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2009/AS/pecha- lessons learned from former radiation accidents on development of software tools for effective decision making support.pdf

  7. Lessons learned from the NRU vessel leak repair and return to service projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In May 2009 the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor was shut down due to a small leak detected from the reactor vessel into the annulus surrounding the reactor. What ensued was a challenging, yet successful, 15 month long Repair and Return to Service Outage. This Repair and Return to Service Outage presented many first-of-a-kind challenges that provide learning opportunities which have been incorporated into subsequent planned outages. These lessons learned are invaluable tools to be used in the planning and execution of future outages. Following the repair of the NRU vessel, AECL was required to conduct annual inspections of the vessel wall. These inspections require an annual Extended Outage (up to 4 weeks in length). A planned Extended Outage was conducted in May/June 2011 and provided an opportunity to implement some of the lessons learned during the Repair and Return to Service Outage. Lessons learned from that Extended Outage have been incorporated in the subsequent monthly maintenance outages, with lessons learned sessions being held after each outage to ensure that the execution of outages is constantly improving. (author)

  8. Lessons learned from the NRU vessel leak repair and return to service projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeney, P.; Turcotte, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In May 2009 the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor was shut down due to a small leak detected from the reactor vessel into the annulus surrounding the reactor. What ensued was a challenging, yet successful, 15 month long Repair and Return to Service Outage. This Repair and Return to Service Outage presented many first-of-a-kind challenges that provide learning opportunities which have been incorporated into subsequent planned outages. These lessons learned are invaluable tools to be used in the planning and execution of future outages. Following the repair of the NRU vessel, AECL was required to conduct annual inspections of the vessel wall. These inspections require an annual Extended Outage (up to 4 weeks in length). A planned Extended Outage was conducted in May/June 2011 and provided an opportunity to implement some of the lessons learned during the Repair and Return to Service Outage. Lessons learned from that Extended Outage have been incorporated in the subsequent monthly maintenance outages, with lessons learned sessions being held after each outage to ensure that the execution of outages is constantly improving. (author)

  9. The child and adolescent psychiatry trials network (CAPTN: infrastructure development and lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breland-Noble Alfiee

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003, the National Institute of Mental Health funded the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Trials Network (CAPTN under the Advanced Center for Services and Intervention Research (ACSIR mechanism. At the time, CAPTN was believed to be both a highly innovative undertaking and a highly speculative one. One reviewer even suggested that CAPTN was "unlikely to succeed, but would be a valuable learning experience for the field." Objective To describe valuable lessons learned in building a clinical research network in pediatric psychiatry, including innovations intended to decrease barriers to research participation. Methods The CAPTN Team has completed construction of the CAPTN network infrastructure, conducted a large, multi-center psychometric study of a novel adverse event reporting tool, and initiated a large antidepressant safety registry and linked pharmacogenomic study focused on severe adverse events. Specific challenges overcome included establishing structures for network organization and governance; recruiting over 150 active CAPTN participants and 15 child psychiatry training programs; developing and implementing procedures for site contracts, regulatory compliance, indemnification and malpractice coverage, human subjects protection training and IRB approval; and constructing an innovative electronic casa report form (eCRF running on a web-based electronic data capture system; and, finally, establishing procedures for audit trail oversight requirements put forward by, among others, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA. Conclusion Given stable funding for network construction and maintenance, our experience demonstrates that judicious use of web-based technologies for profiling investigators, investigator training, and capturing clinical trials data, when coupled to innovative approaches to network governance, data management and site management, can reduce the costs and burden and improve the feasibility of

  10. Development practices and lessons learned in developing SimPEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockett, R.; Heagy, L. J.; Kang, S.; Rosenkjaer, G. K.

    2015-12-01

    Inverse modelling provides a mathematical framework for constructing a model of physical property distributions in the subsurface that are consistent with the data collected in geophysical surveys. The geosciences are increasingly moving towards the integration of geological, geophysical, and hydrological information to better characterize the subsurface. This integration must span disciplines and is not only challenging scientifically, but additionally the inconsistencies between conventions often makes implementations complicated, non­ reproducible, or inefficient. SimPEG is an open-source, multi-university effort aimed at providing a generalized framework for solving forward and inverse problems. SimPEG includes finite volume discretizations on structured and unstructured meshes, interfaces to standard numerical solver packages, convex optimization algorithms, model parameterizations, and visualization routines. The SimPEG package (http://simpeg.xyz) supports an ecosystem of forward and inverse modelling applications, including electromagnetics, vadose zone flow, seismic, and potential­ fields, that are all written with a common interface and toolbox. The goal of SimPEG is to support a community of researchers with well-tested, extensible tools, and encourage transparency and reproducibility both of the SimPEG software and the geoscientific research it is applied to. In this presentation, we will share some of the lessons we have learned in designing the modular infrastructure, testing and development practices of SimPEG. We will discuss our use of version control, extensive unit-testing, continuous integration, documentation, issue tracking, and resources that facilitate communication between existing team members and allows new researchers to get involved. These practices have enabled the use of SimPEG in research, industry, and education as well as the ability to support a growing number of dependent repositories and applications. We hope that sharing our

  11. Developing a PLC-friendly state machine model: lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessemier, Wim; Deconinck, Geert; Raskin, Gert; Saey, Philippe; Van Winckel, Hans

    2014-07-01

    Modern Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) have become an attractive platform for controlling real-time aspects of astronomical telescopes and instruments due to their increased versatility, performance and standardization. Likewise, vendor-neutral middleware technologies such as OPC Unified Architecture (OPC UA) have recently demonstrated that they can greatly facilitate the integration of these industrial platforms into the overall control system. Many practical questions arise, however, when building multi-tiered control systems that consist of PLCs for low level control, and conventional software and platforms for higher level control. How should the PLC software be structured, so that it can rely on well-known programming paradigms on the one hand, and be mapped to a well-organized OPC UA interface on the other hand? Which programming languages of the IEC 61131-3 standard closely match the problem domains of the abstraction levels within this structure? How can the recent additions to the standard (such as the support for namespaces and object-oriented extensions) facilitate a model based development approach? To what degree can our applications already take advantage of the more advanced parts of the OPC UA standard, such as the high expressiveness of the semantic modeling language that it defines, or the support for events, aggregation of data, automatic discovery, ... ? What are the timing and concurrency problems to be expected for the higher level tiers of the control system due to the cyclic execution of control and communication tasks by the PLCs? We try to answer these questions by demonstrating a semantic state machine model that can readily be implemented using IEC 61131 and OPC UA. One that does not aim to capture all possible states of a system, but rather one that attempts to organize the course-grained structure and behaviour of a system. In this paper we focus on the intricacies of this seemingly simple task, and on the lessons that we

  12. Lesson learned from the SARNET wall condensation benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The results of the benchmarking activity on wall condensation are reported. • The work was performed in the frame of SARNET. • General modelling techniques for condensation are discussed. • Results of University of Pisa and of other benchmark participants are discussed. • The lesson learned is drawn. - Abstract: The prediction of condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases has received continuing attention in the frame of the Severe Accident Research Network of Excellence, both in the first (2004–2008) and in the second (2009–2013) EC integrated projects. Among the different reasons for considering so relevant this basic phenomenon, coped with by classical treatments dated in the first decades of the last century, there is the interest for developing updated CFD models for reactor containment analysis, requiring validating at a different level the available modelling techniques. In the frame of SARNET, benchmarking activities were undertaken taking advantage of the work performed at different institutions in setting up and developing models for steam condensation in conditions of interest for nuclear reactor containment. Four steps were performed in the activity, involving: (1) an idealized problem freely inspired at the actual conditions occurring in an experimental facility, CONAN, installed at the University of Pisa; (2) a first comparison with experimental data purposely collected by the CONAN facility; (3) a second comparison with data available from experimental campaigns performed in the same apparatus before the inclusion of the activities in SARNET; (4) a third exercise involving data obtained at lower mixture velocity than in previous campaigns, aimed at providing conditions closer to those addressed in reactor containment analyses. The last step of the benchmarking activity required to change the configuration of the experimental apparatus to achieve the lower flow rates involved in the new test specifications. The

  13. Improving Software Sustainability: Lessons Learned from Profiles in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Marie E.

    2013-01-01

    abandonment. Sometimes these changes happen on short notice, so we continually monitor our library’s software for signs of endangerment. We have attempted to replace proprietary software with suitable in-house or open source software. When the replacement involves a standalone piece of software with a nearly equivalent version, such as replacing a commercial HTTP server with an open source HTTP server, the replacement is straightforward. Recently we replaced software that functioned not only as our search engine but also as the backbone of the architecture of our Web site. In this paper, we describe the lessons learned and the pros and cons of replacing this software with open source software. PMID:25267934

  14. Quality Management for WENDELSTEIN 7-X - Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    respect to technical quality, cost and time schedule. This can only be done with an intense monitoring on site by experienced inspectors and the responsible technical officers. The presentation will give an overview of the experiences with this QM-system during the past ten years, both within the project and with the contractors. The lessons learned should also be of relevance when setting-up the quality system for ITER. (author)

  15. Tank Waste Retrieval Lessons Learned at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    completed February 28, 2007, meeting the TPA Limits of less than 360 cu ft using salt-cake dissolution, modified sluicing, in-tank vehicle with high pressure water spray and caustic dissolution. Tanks C-108 and C-109 have been retrieved to 90% and 85% respectively. Modified sluicing was no longer effective at retrieving the remaining 5,000 to 10,000 gallons of residual. A Mobile Retrieval Tool (FoldTrac) is scheduled for installation early in 2008 to assist in breaking up chunks of waste and mobilizing the waste for transfer. Lessons learned from application of new tank waste retrieval methods are being documented and incorporated into future retrieval operations. They address all phases of retrieval including process design, equipment procurement and installation, supporting documentation, and system operations. Information is obtained through interviews with retrieval project personnel, focused workshops, review of problem evaluation requests, and evaluation of retrieval performance data. This paper presents current retrieval successes and lessons learned from retrieval of tank waste at the Hanford Site and discusses how this information is used to optimize retrieval system efficiency, improve overall cost effectiveness of retrieval operations, and ensure that HFFACO requirements are met. (authors)

  16. Learning and Teaching Centers: Hubs of Educational Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Susan R.

    2002-01-01

    Provides an overview of the history and future direction of campus learning and teaching centers, and discusses how they serve as repositories of institutional memory and catalysts of campus conversations about critical educational issues. (EV)

  17. Teachers at the Center: Learning and Leading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Ann; Campbell, Carol; Yashkina, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The Teacher Learning and Leadership Program (TLLP) has given us an excellent example of what happens when the conditions for learning are created for teachers, rather than teaching them in the traditional professional development way from the "outside" in. For 7 years, the Ontario Ministry of Education and the Ontario Teachers Federation…

  18. Integrating Individual and Organizational Learning: Agency Lessons Learned Systems and The Case Method in Teaching Public Procurement

    OpenAIRE

    Snider, Keith F

    2008-01-01

    Numerous public agencies have implemented systems for capturing and disseminating "lessons learned." To the extent that these systems provide descriptions of procurement practice, they compose a repository of case studies that may be used to train and educate public procurement professionals. Realizing the potential for such use depends on the degree to which agency organizational learning processes and procurement teaching processes may be integrated. This paper (1) describ...

  19. Implementasi Student Centered Learning dalam Praktikum Fisika Dasar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy K.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Telah dilakukan penelitian untuk mengimplementasikan student centered learning dalam praktikum fisika dasar. Berdasarkan pengalaman di jurusan fisika Unesa selama ini, kendala yang dijumpai adalah masih banyak mahasiswa yang belum dapat mandiri dalam melaksanakan kegiatan praktikumnya karena lebih banyak menunggu penjelasan dari pembimbing dan kurang berinisiatif dalam menyelesaikan masalah praktikumnya. Student centered learning (SCL merupakan strategi pembelajaran yang menempatkan mahasiswa sebagai subyek aktif dan mandiri yang bertanggung jawab sepenuhnya atas pembelajarannya. Memperhatikan karakteristik praktikum yang lebih mengarah pada pengembangan keterampilan ilmiah (hard skills dan soft skills mahasiswa dalam mengidentifikasi gejala dan menyelesaikan masalah perlu dilakukan pendekatan pembelajaran yang inovatif yang dapat mengembangkan keterampilan ilmiah mahasiswa secara maksimal. Untuk mengatasi keadaan tersebut, telah diujicobakan suatu mekanisme implementasi SCL dalam praktikum fisika dasar yang diharapkan dapat mengoptimalkan keterampilan praktikum mahasiswa. Efektivitas mekanisme kegiatan praktikum dengan pendekatan SCL tersebut dilihat berdasarkan sejauhmana sasaran yang diinginkan tersebut tercapai. Hasil implementasi student centered learning dalam penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa: 1 Atribut-atribut student centered learning yang dapat diintegrasikan ke dalam praktikum fisika dasar meliputi: kerja kelompok, diskusi, menulis, presentasi, dan pemecahan masalah. 2 Atribut-atribut softs skills mahasiswa yang bersesuaian dengan atribut-atribut student centered learning yang diintegrasikan ke dalam praktikum fisika dasar adalah: kerjasama merupakan penekanan dari kegiatan kerja kelompok, manajemen diri merupakan penekanan dari kegiatan diskusi, komunikasi tulis merupakan penekanan dari kegiatan menulis, komunikasi lisan merupakan penekanan dari kegiatan presentasi, berfikir kritis dan analitis merupakan penekanan dari pemecahan

  20. Accelerating Teacher Effectiveness: Lessons Learned from Two Decades of New Teacher Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    This article describes 10 lessons learned from two decades of new teacher induction. These include: (1) A new teacher induction program requires a systemwide commitment to teacher development; (2) Induction programs accelerate new teacher effectiveness; (3) Standards-based formative assessment tools document impact; (4) Induction programs build a…

  1. Large-scale housing in the UK: learning the lessons of the (recent) past

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Pia; Kraftl, Peter; Horton, John; Hadfield-Hill , Sophie

    2013-01-01

    The Coalition’s recent commitment to large-scale housing projects resonates with a long tradition of town planning in the UK. The team from the New Urbanisms, New Citizens project suggest that these plans must learn lessons from the more recent past, as well as from the grand schemes of decades ago.

  2. Lessons Learnt from Literature on the Diffusion of Innovative Learning and Teaching Practices in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Faced with the challenges of the changes in: higher education, educational developers' roles and the use of innovation to stimulate change, this study aimed to synthesise literature dealing with the diffusion of innovative learning and teaching practices in higher education to determine what lessons could be learnt. The findings suggest that the…

  3. Developing High Performing Boards: Seeking New Talent and Lessons Learned on Great Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakewell, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Numerous trends today are prompting organizations to formally seek and add new board members at a record pace. In this article, the author discusses what to look for when adding a new board member and lists some top lessons learned. He concludes with a few final thoughts that should be uppermost in the mind in every new board member search.

  4. Lessons Learned Report for the radioactive mixed waste land disposal facility (Trench 31, Project W-025)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the lessons learned from a project that involved modification to the existing burial grounds at the Hanford Reservation. This project has been focused on the development and operation of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act compliant landfill which will accept low-level radioactive wastes that have been placed in proper containers

  5. The BSCS National Academy for Curriculum Leadership: Contributions and Lessons Learned. An Evaluation Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. John, Mark; Hirabayashi, Judy; Helms, Jenifer V.; Tambe, Pam

    2006-01-01

    This Evaluation Brief examines the BSCS approach to improving secondary science education, and illuminates some of the lessons learned from its five years of work with districts across the nation. It highlights selected findings from the full study report and discusses the broader implications for the field. Specifically, this Brief examines the…

  6. Special nuclear materials cutoff exercise: Issues and lessons learned. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is appendices D-J for the Special Nuclear Materials Cutoff Exercise: Issues and Lessons Learned. Included are discussions of the US IAEA Treaty, safeguard regulations for nuclear materials, issue sheets for the PUREX process, and the LANL follow up activity for reprocessing nuclear materials

  7. Atmospheric/Space Environment Support Lessons Learned Regarding Aerospace Vehicle Design and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, William W.; Anderson, B. Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    In modern government and aerospace industry institutions the necessity of controlling current year costs often leads to high mobility in the technical workforce, "one-deep" technical capabilities, and minimal mentoring for young engineers. Thus, formal recording, use, and teaching of lessons learned are especially important in the maintenance and improvement of current knowledge and development of new technologies, regardless of the discipline area. Within the NASA Technical Standards Program Website http://standards.nasa.gov there is a menu item entitled "Lessons Learned/Best Practices". It contains links to a large number of engineering and technical disciplines related data sets that contain a wealth of lessons learned information based on past experiences. This paper has provided a small sample of lessons learned relative to the atmospheric and space environment. There are many more whose subsequent applications have improved our knowledge of the atmosphere and space environment, and the application of this knowledge to the engineering and operations for a variety of aerospace programs.

  8. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Analysis: Lessons Learned from Stationary Power Generation Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott E. Grasman; John W. Sheffield; Fatih Dogan; Sunggyu Lee; Umit O. Koylu; Angie Rolufs

    2010-04-30

    This study considered opportunities for hydrogen in stationary applications in order to make recommendations related to RD&D strategies that incorporate lessons learned and best practices from relevant national and international stationary power efforts, as well as cost and environmental modeling of pathways. The study analyzed the different strategies utilized in power generation systems and identified the different challenges and opportunities for producing and using hydrogen as an energy carrier. Specific objectives included both a synopsis/critical analysis of lessons learned from previous stationary power programs and recommendations for a strategy for hydrogen infrastructure deployment. This strategy incorporates all hydrogen pathways and a combination of distributed power generating stations, and provides an overview of stationary power markets, benefits of hydrogen-based stationary power systems, and competitive and technological challenges. The motivation for this project was to identify the lessons learned from prior stationary power programs, including the most significant obstacles, how these obstacles have been approached, outcomes of the programs, and how this information can be used by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program to meet program objectives primarily related to hydrogen pathway technologies (production, storage, and delivery) and implementation of fuel cell technologies for distributed stationary power. In addition, the lessons learned address environmental and safety concerns, including codes and standards, and education of key stakeholders.

  9. Innovative Work Practices and Lessons Learned at the N Area Deactivation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report identifies many of the lessons learned, innovations,and effective work practices that derived from activities supporting the N Area Deactivation Project at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. The work practices discussed in this report may be applicable and beneficial to similar projects throughout the DOE complex

  10. Changes in US commercial radioactive waste management and lessons learned in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The changes of commercial radioactive waste management in the US and the work done by the LLW generators in seeking new means to cost-effectively dispose these wastes without prejudicing future disposal options are introduced. Then the article concludes the lessons learned on radioactive waste management in China. (authors)

  11. Special nuclear materials cutoff exercise: Issues and lessons learned. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libby, R.A.; Segal, J.E.; Stanbro, W.D.; Davis, C.

    1995-08-01

    This document is appendices D-J for the Special Nuclear Materials Cutoff Exercise: Issues and Lessons Learned. Included are discussions of the US IAEA Treaty, safeguard regulations for nuclear materials, issue sheets for the PUREX process, and the LANL follow up activity for reprocessing nuclear materials.

  12. Critical Andragogy and Communication Activism: Approaches, Tensions, and Lessons Learned from a Senior Capstone Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeTurk, Sara

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, the author provides an in-depth description of the course "Communication and Activism" and its rationale. She then offers some evaluative reflections, and concludes with a discussion of tensions experienced and lessons learned. She closes with a recommendation for activist educators to be mindful of these tensions and their ethical…

  13. Conservation Learning in Wildlife Tourism Settings: Lessons from Research in Zoos and Aquariums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, Roy; Packer, Jan; Hughes, Karen; Dierking, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    Zoos and aquariums have shifted their focus over recent years, taking a much more active role in wildlife conservation and in promoting conservation learning among their visitors. Research in these settings provides a valuable foundation for the emerging field of non-captive wildlife tourism. In particular, valuable lessons regarding the potential…

  14. Lessons Learned from Net Zero Energy Assessments and Renewable Energy Projects at Military Installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callahan, M.; Anderson, K.; Booth, S.; Katz, J.; Tetreault, T.

    2011-09-01

    Report highlights the increase in resources, project speed, and scale that is required to achieve the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) energy efficiency and renewable energy goals and summarizes the net zero energy installation assessment (NZEI) process and the lessons learned from NZEI assessments and large-scale renewable energy projects implementations at DoD installations.

  15. Learning with Multiple Representations: An Example of a Revision Lesson in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Darren; Poo, Sng Peng; Hock, Ng Eng; Kang, Wee Loo

    2011-01-01

    We describe an example of learning with multiple representations in an A-level revision lesson on mechanics. The context of the problem involved the motion of a ball thrown vertically upwards in air and studying how the associated physical quantities changed during its flight. Different groups of students were assigned to look at the ball's motion…

  16. Positive Examples and Lessons Learned from Rural Small Business Adoption of E-Commerce Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamie, R. David; Barkley, David L.; Markley, Deborah M.

    2011-01-01

    Rural small businesses struggling against the current of competition from "big box" retailers, weak consumer demand, and on-line shopping options must find strategies that work. Many are finding that adoption of e-commerce strategies is a key to survival, even prosperity. This article highlights the lessons learned from a recent case study…

  17. Lessons Learned from Migrating to an Online Electronic Business Management Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walstrom, Kent A.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the lessons learned while migrating an Electronic Business Management course from traditional face-to-face delivery to online delivery across a six and a half year time frame. The course under review teaches students how to develop and construct a working information-based online business using free versions of online…

  18. Partial Testing Can Potentiate Learning of Tested and Untested Material from Multimedia Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Carole L.; Soderstrom, Nicholas C.; Bjork, Elizabeth Ligon

    2015-01-01

    Test-potentiated learning occurs when testing renders a subsequent study period more effective than it would have been without an intervening test. We examined whether testing only a subset of material from a multimedia lesson would potentiate the restudy of both tested and untested material. In Experiments 1a and 1b, participants studied a…

  19. Licence renewal in the United States - enhancing the process through lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) is the Washington based policy organisation representing the broad and varied interests of the diverse nuclear energy industry. It comprises nearly 300 corporate members in 15 countries with a budget last year of about USD 26.5 million. It has been working for 10 years with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), colleagues in the industry and others to demonstrate that license renewal is a safe and workable process. The first renewed license was issued on 24 March to BGE for the the Calvert Cliffs plant. One month later the NRC issued the renewed license for the Ocoenne plant. By 'Enhancing the process through lessons learned', we mean reducing the uncertainty in the license renewal process. This is achieved through lessons learned from the net wave of applicants and the reviews of the Calvert Cliffs and Ocoenne applications. Three areas will be covered: - Incentive for minimising uncertainty as industry interest in license renewal is growing dramatically. - Rigorous reviews by Nuclear Regulatory Commission assure continued safety: process put in place by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to assure safety throughout the license renewal term, specifically areas where the lessons learned suggest improvements can be made. - Lessons learned have identified enhancements to the process: numerous benefits associated with renewal of nuclear power plant licenses for consumers of electricity, the environment, the nuclear operating companies and the nation. (author)

  20. A Telepresence Learning Environment for Opera Singing: Distance Lessons Implementations over Internet2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpiste Penalba, Francisco; Rojas-Rajs, Teresa; Lorente, Pedro; Iglesias, Francisco; Fernández, Joaquín; Monguet, Josep

    2013-01-01

    The Opera eLearning project developed a solution for opera singing distance lessons at the graduate level, using high bandwidth to deliver a quality audio and video experience that has been evaluated by singing teachers, chorus and orchestra directors, singers and other professional musicians. Prior to finding a technological model that suits the…

  1. Lessons Learned from the USAID Girls' Education Activity in Guatemala, Morocco, and Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugh, Andrea; Brush, Lorelei

    The Girls' Education Activity (GEA) is a project of the United States Agency for International Development's (USAID's) Office of Women in Development (WID) in the Bureau for Economic Growth, Agriculture and Trade. This report summarizes the experiences and lessons learned from 12 project initiatives in the 3 participating countries (Guatemala,…

  2. Teaching a Chemistry MOOC with a Virtual Laboratory: Lessons Learned from an Introductory Physical Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Patrick J.; Agger, Jonathan R.; Anderson, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the experience and lessons learned of running a MOOC in introductory physical chemistry. The course was unique in allowing students to conduct experimental measurements using a virtual laboratory constructed using video and simulations. A breakdown of the student background and motivation for taking the course is…

  3. Unintended Learning in Primary School Practical Science Lessons from Polanyi's Perspective of Intellectual Passion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jisun; Song, Jinwoong; Abrahams, Ian

    2016-03-01

    This study explored, from the perspective of intellectual passion developed by Michael Polanyi, the unintended learning that occurred in primary practical science lessons. We use the term `unintended' learning to distinguish it from `intended' learning that appears in teachers' learning objectives. Data were collected using video and audio recordings of a sample of twenty-four whole class practical science lessons, taught by five teachers, in Korean primary schools with 10- to 12-year-old students. In addition, video and audio recordings were made for each small group of students working together in order to capture their activities and intra-group discourse. Pre-lesson interviews with the teachers were undertaken and audio-recorded to ascertain their intended learning objectives. Selected key vignettes, including unintended learning, were analysed from the perspective of intellectual passion developed by Polanyi. What we found in this study is that unintended learning could occur when students got interested in something in the first place and could maintain their interest. In addition, students could get conceptual knowledge when they tried to connect their experience to their related prior knowledge. It was also found that the processes of intended learning and of unintended learning were different. Intended learning was characterized by having been planned by the teacher who then sought to generate students' interest in it. In contrast, unintended learning originated from students' spontaneous interest and curiosity as a result of unplanned opportunities. Whilst teachers' persuasive passion comes first in the process of intended learning, students' heuristic passion comes first in the process of unintended learning. Based on these findings, we argue that teachers need to be more aware that unintended learning, on the part of individual students, can occur during their lesson and to be able to better use this opportunity so that this unintended learning can be

  4. Open Distance Learning for Development: Lessons from Strengthening Research Capacity on Gender, Crisis Prevention, and Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Chandra Babu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents the experience and lessons from implementing an e-learning program aimed at creating research capacity for gender, crisis prevention, and recovery. It presents a case study of bringing together a multidisciplinary group of women professionals through both online and face-to-face interactions to learn the skills needed to be a successful researcher. It reviews the issues related to distance learning programs with particular reference to the e-learning courses and highlights the constraints and challenges in implementing them. Lessons from the experience for future development of similar courses indicate that participant profiling prior to the course, user friendliness of technology, meeting various learning styles, encouraging and rewarding online exchanges, commitment of course moderators, a variety of learning materials, and mixed approaches to learning are some of the factors that can enhance the success of e-learning programs. The paper concludes that enhancing skills of developing country researchers through e-learning programs can increase learning accessibility to those living and working in remote and conflict ridden areas, and bring together a network of professionals to interact and exchange experiences on common problems and solutions.

  5. 1900 America: Historical Voices, Poetic Visions. Learning Page Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Chris; Gehler, David

    To better understand the turn-of-the-century United States, this interdisciplinary lesson (covering 6-8 weeks) integrates use of primary resources with historical and literary analysis. Students work in groups and express themselves creatively through a multi-media epic poem. The artistic models for the students' multi-media epic poem are Walt…

  6. Ugly Music: Lessons in Learning to Listen Respectfully

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Listening to music from a variety of national, ethnic, and historical traditions may help adolescents develop respect for individual differences, particularly when they are challenged to confront music that has little immediate musical appeal for them. This article outlines strategies for two sample listening lessons, using Serbo-Croatian gusle…

  7. Learning from Successful Skills Development Systems: Lessons from Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmel, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the main institutional features of Australia's TVET sector, focussing particularly on the qualifications framework, how it relates to the labour market, and the role of industry. It also looks briefly at two current policy challenges for Australia. Seeking lessons for other countries in the Asia Pacific region, it…

  8. Lessons Learned in the Plato Elementary Reading Curriculum Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Robert F.

    This paper summarizes the successes and failures of the Plato Elementary Reading Curriculum Project, a computer-assisted instructional system funded by the National Science Foundation from 1971 to 1976. The paper discusses what the project did, the types of hardware that were used, how lessons were designed, the two approaches that were taken…

  9. Implementing Ready To Learn Outreach: Lessons from 20 Public Television Stations.

    OpenAIRE

    Cheri Vogel; Stacey Uhl; Kimberly Boller; Justin Humphrey; Charles Nagatoshi; Lindsay Crozier; Kristin Quitoni; Ali Stieglitz; John Love

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes lessons learned for stations, partnerships, and outreach from an ongoing five-year evaluation of Ready To Learn, a Public Broadcasting Service and U.S. Department of Education initiative to help enhance children’s readiness for school. Stations need to be committed to the program and work to reduce turnover. Outreach coordinators should make developing partnerships a priority, and provide a variety of roles that will accommodate partners with different capacities to participate. Wo...

  10. Lessons Learned From the Whole Child and Coordinated School Health Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Rasberry, Catherine N.; Slade, Sean; Lohrmann, David K.; Valois, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The new Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) model, designed to depict links between health and learning, is founded on concepts of coordinated school health (CSH) and a whole child approach to education. METHODS The existing literature, including scientific articles and key publications from national agencies and organizations, was reviewed and synthesized to describe (1) the historical context for CSH and a whole child approach, and (2) lessons learned from the imple...

  11. Lessons Learned from Designing a Comprehensive Case- Based Reasoning (CBR) Tool for Support of Complex Thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Richmond, Doug

    2007-01-01

    This research study focused on learning lessons from the experience of designing a comprehensive case-based reasoning (CBR) tool for support of complex thinking skills. Theorists have historically identified, analyzed, and classified different thinking processes and skills. Thinking skills have been increasingly emphasized in national standards, state testing, curricula, teaching and learning resources, and research agendas. Complex thinking is the core of higher-order thinking. Complex think...

  12. Lessons learned from the microbial analysis of the Herschel spacecraft during assembly, integration, and test operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Pukall, Rüdiger; Probst, Alexander J; Stieglmeier, Michaela; Schwendner, Petra; Mora, Maximilian; Barczyk, Simon; Bohmeier, Maria; Rettberg, Petra

    2013-12-01

    Understanding microbial diversity in spacecraft assembly clean rooms is of major interest with respect to planetary protection considerations. A coordinated screening of different clean rooms in Europe and South America by three German institutes [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Leibniz-Institut DSMZ-Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen GmbH (DSMZ), and the Institute of Microbiology and Archaea Center, University of Regensburg] took place during the assembly, test, and launch operations of the Herschel spacecraft in 2006-2009. Through this campaign, we retrieved critical information regarding the microbiome within these clean rooms and on the Herschel spacecraft, which served as a model for upcoming ESA mission preparations. This "lessons learned" document summarizes and discusses the data we obtained during this sampling campaign. Additionally, we have taken the opportunity to create a database that includes all 16S rRNA gene sequences ever retrieved from molecular and cultivable diversity studies of spacecraft assembly clean rooms to compare the microbiomes of US, European, and South American facilities. PMID:24313230

  13. Conducting rapid, relevant research: lessons learned from the My Own Health Report project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Russell E; Kessler, Rodger S; Ory, Marcia G; Roby, Dylan; Gorin, Sherri Sheinfeld; Krist, Alex

    2014-08-01

    The lengthy and uncertain translation of research into clinical practice is well documented. Much of the current "gold standard" clinical research is slow, expensive, and lacks perceived relevance for practitioners and decision makers. In contrast, we summarize experiences conducting the My Own Health Report (MOHR) project to collect and address patient reported measures using principles of rapid, relevant pragmatic research. The methods used for rapid design and fielding of the MOHR project to improve attention to health behaviors and mental health are detailed. Within the multisite, pragmatic, implementation-focused MOHR study, we describe the four phases of the research and the key decisions made and actions taken within each. We provide concrete examples of how relevant research can be conducted transparently to rapidly provide information to practitioners. Data were collected and analyzed in 2013. The multisite (seven research centers partnered with 18 clinics) cluster randomized pragmatic delayed intervention trial was conducted in less than 18 months from receipt of funding applications to completion of data collection. Phases that were especially accelerated included funding and review, and recruitment and implementation. Conducting complex studies rapidly and efficiently is a realistic goal. Key lessons learned for prevention research include use of existing research networks; use of web-based assessment/feedback tools that are tailored to fit local needs; engaging relevant stakeholders early on and throughout the process to minimize need for redesign; and making pragmatic decisions that balance internal and external validity concerns rather than waiting for perfect solutions. PMID:24953520

  14. Lessons Learned from Three Mile Island Packaging, Transportation and Disposition that Apply to Fukushima Daiichi Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze; Dr. Koji Shirai

    2012-07-01

    Following the massive earthquake and resulting tsunami damage in March of 2011 at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, interest was amplified for what was done for recovery at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) in the United States following its meltdown in 1979. Many parallels could be drawn between to two accidents. This paper presents the results of research done into the TMI-2 recovery effort and its applicability to the Fukushima Daiichi cleanup. This research focused on three topics: packaging, transportation, and disposition. This research work was performed as a collaboration between Japan’s Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Hundreds of TMI-2 related documents were searched and pertinent information was gleaned from these documents. Other important information was also obtained by interviewing employees who were involved first hand in various aspects of the TMI-2 cleanup effort. This paper is organized into three main sections: (1) Transport from Three Mile Island to Central Facilities Area at INL, (2) Transport from INL Central Receiving Facility to INL Test Area North (TAN) and wet storage at TAN, and (3) Transport from TAN to INL Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) and Dry Storage at INTEC. Within each of these sections, lessons learned from performing recovery activities are presented and their applicability to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant cleanup are outlined.

  15. Lessons learned from Three Mile Island (TMI), USNRC long-term trends, industry response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies resulting from Three Mile Island (TMI) showed that corrections were needed in information processing, operator training and procedures, and certain aspects of the safety review process. These have been undertaken by industry and NRC and the results are positive. New safety instructions have been set up. The Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) is providing a focus for analysis of issues which have generic elements affecting a number of plants of similar or related design. The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) is setting industry standards for training and certification of operators and supervisory personnel, and for training of the managerial chain which oversees safety practices. Changes in procedures and in some design features called for in the recommendations of the NRC Lessons Learned Task Force (NUREG-0578) have been simplemented by utilities. Other requirements included in the NRC Action Plan (NUREG-0660) and its companion document clarification of TMI Action Plan Requirements (NUREG-0737), are also being addressed. Improved operator training and emergency procedures provide a continuing opportunity to make safety gains. Problems remain to be faced in the regulatory and political arenas. The long-term licensing trend will be affected by the manner in which degraded core issues and the development of a safety goal proceed. The Industry Degraded Core Rulemaking (IDCOR) program has been undertaken to develop the nuclear industry's position in anticipation of an impending rulemaking. Both industry and NRC are working on the development of a safety goal and standard risk assessment methodology. (AF)

  16. Barriers, Lessons Learned, and Best Practices in Engaging Scientists in Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, S. R.; Sharma, M.; Hsu, B.; Peticolas, L.; Nova, M. A. M.; CoBabe-Ammann, E.

    2012-08-01

    This Astronomical Society of the Pacific conference brought together a group of specialists interested in education and public outreach (EPO) from a wide variety of contexts including NASA centers, non-profits, museums, and universities. Active engagement of scientists in EPO activities results in benefits for both the audience and the scientists. Despite this, education research has shown that many barriers exist that keep scientists from engaging in EPO activities. To counter these barriers, many stakeholders in this community are working to bridge the gap and help scientists make a meaningful contribution to these efforts. There are many documented roles for scientists including giving public talks, classroom visits, large outreach events, radio broadcasts, engaging in curriculum development and teacher workshops. Over the past year, members of the NASA science mission directorate forums have been actively working with their community members to understand the reasons that scientists in our community do and do not participate in EPO activities. This session expanded the discussion to the larger community of stakeholders across science, education, and outreach contexts. It was an open forum for discussion of ideas about barriers and lessons learned regarding engaging scientists in education and public outreach.

  17. The value teleradiology represents for Europe: A study of lessons learned in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathology and demography have combined to fuel exponential demand for advanced medical imaging. To support this demand, radiology must move beyond traditional department or modality-based picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) to solutions that ensure access regardless of location. This article delineates underlying reasons for the growth in demand for access to medical imaging in both Europe and the United States. It explains why teleradiology/PACS is critical to support this growth in Europe. It discusses the benefits of and barriers to its widespread implementation as discovered in Canada and the U.S. and how these lessons learned relate to Europe. The article establishes the technological imperatives for teleradiology/PACS and presents three real-world case studies of successful data sharing and shared workflow models via single imaging implementations. CML HealthCare: Geographically spanning Canada and the United States with 129 sites performing nearly 5 million plus annual exams. Shields MRI: 29 facilities, including 3 Radiation Oncology centers, across an area 4 times the size of Switzerland. MRA/Novant: 40 radiologists working in a complete subspecialty reporting environment. Finally, it provides a high-level list of selection criteria for teleradiology/PACS and examines how industry trends affecting the U.S. are important baseline considerations to the success of teleradiology/PACS in Europe.

  18. Lessons to be learned from an analysis of ammonium nitrate disasters in the last 100 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Root causes and contributing factors from ammonium nitrate incidents are categorized into 10 lessons. • The lessons learned from the past 100 years of ammonium nitrate incidents can be used to improve design, operation, and maintenance procedures. • Improving organizational memory to help improve safety performance. • Combating and changing organizational cultures. - Abstract: Process safety, as well as the safe storage and transportation of hazardous or reactive chemicals, has been a topic of increasing interest in the last few decades. The increased interest in improving the safety of operations has been driven largely by a series of recent catastrophes that have occurred in the United States and the rest of the world. A continuous review of past incidents and disasters to look for common causes and lessons is an essential component to any process safety and loss prevention program. While analyzing the causes of an accident cannot prevent that accident from occurring, learning from it can help to prevent future incidents. The objective of this article is to review a selection of major incidents involving ammonium nitrate in the last century to identify common causes and lessons that can be gleaned from these incidents in the hopes of preventing future disasters. Ammonium nitrate has been involved in dozens of major incidents in the last century, so a subset of major incidents were chosen for discussion for the sake of brevity. Twelve incidents are reviewed and ten lessons from these incidents are discussed

  19. Lessons to be learned from an analysis of ammonium nitrate disasters in the last 100 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittman, William; Han, Zhe; Harding, Brian; Rosas, Camilo; Jiang, Jiaojun; Pineda, Alba; Mannan, M. Sam, E-mail: mannan@tamu.edu

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Root causes and contributing factors from ammonium nitrate incidents are categorized into 10 lessons. • The lessons learned from the past 100 years of ammonium nitrate incidents can be used to improve design, operation, and maintenance procedures. • Improving organizational memory to help improve safety performance. • Combating and changing organizational cultures. - Abstract: Process safety, as well as the safe storage and transportation of hazardous or reactive chemicals, has been a topic of increasing interest in the last few decades. The increased interest in improving the safety of operations has been driven largely by a series of recent catastrophes that have occurred in the United States and the rest of the world. A continuous review of past incidents and disasters to look for common causes and lessons is an essential component to any process safety and loss prevention program. While analyzing the causes of an accident cannot prevent that accident from occurring, learning from it can help to prevent future incidents. The objective of this article is to review a selection of major incidents involving ammonium nitrate in the last century to identify common causes and lessons that can be gleaned from these incidents in the hopes of preventing future disasters. Ammonium nitrate has been involved in dozens of major incidents in the last century, so a subset of major incidents were chosen for discussion for the sake of brevity. Twelve incidents are reviewed and ten lessons from these incidents are discussed.

  20. Addressing Ebola-related Stigma: Lessons Learned from HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Davtyan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV/AIDS and Ebola Virus Disease (EVD are contemporary epidemics associated with significant social stigma in which communities affected suffer from social rejection, violence, and diminished quality of life. Objective: To compare and contrast stigma related to HIV/AIDS and EVD, and strategically think how lessons learned from HIV stigma can be applied to the current EVD epidemic. Methods: To identify relevant articles about HIV/AIDS and EVD-related stigma, we conducted an extensive literature review using multiple search engines. PubMed was used to search for relevant peer-reviewed journal articles and Google for online sources. We also consulted the websites of the World Health Organization (WHO, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, and the National Institutes of Health to retrieve up-to-date information about EVD and HIV/AIDS. Results: Many stigmatizing attitudes and behaviors directed towards those with EVD are strikingly similar to those with HIV/AIDS but there are significant differences worthy of discussion. Both diseases are life-threatening and there is no medical cure. Additionally misinformation about affected groups and modes of transmission runs rampant. Unlike in persons with EVD, historically criminalized and marginalized populations carry a disproportionately higher risk for HIV infection. Moreover, mortality due to EVD occurs within a shorter time span as compared to HIV/AIDS. Conclusions: Stigma disrupts quality of life, whether it is associated with HIV infection or EVD. When addressing EVD, we must think beyond the immediate clinical therapeutic response, to possible HIV implications of serum treatment. There are emerging social concerns of stigma associated with EVD infection and double stigma associated with EVD and HIV infection. Drawing upon lessons learned from HIV, we must work to empower and mobilize prominent members of the community, those who recovered from the disease, and organizations