WorldWideScience

Sample records for center interactive plotting

  1. PRP: a FORTRAN IV interactive plotting program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, A. S.; Linde, J.

    A computer program, PRP, has been designed to plot any arithmetic combination selected from a set of major and trace element data on a y- x graph. y and x are defined and entered as a program string (y, x) which is interpreted sequentially. Operators ( +, -, ∗, /, ( unary) , square root, log 10, In c, antilog 10, exponential, integer, absolute value, (,),,) and integer or real numbers may be included. Axis lengths and scales are determined by the user. Five different plotting symbols are available.

  2. A framework for plot control in interactive story systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgouros, N.M.; Papakonstantinou, G.; Tsanakas, P. [National Technical Univ. of Athens, Zographou Campus (Greece)

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a framework for plot control in interactive story systems. In this framework, the user takes the place of the main character of the story, the protagonist. The rest of the cast consists of discrete characters, each playing a specific role in the story. A separate module in this system, the plot manager, controls the behavior of the cast and specifies what the protagonist can do. The story plot is dynamically shaped by the interference between cast members and their social interactions. The system accepts as input a story map which provides the main metaphor for organizing the plot and localizes the interaction of the protagonist with the rest of the cast. We are implementing this framework in PEGASUS, an interactive travel story environment for Greek mythology.

  3. PLOT3D: An Interactive Graphics Code for Three Dimensional Plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-28

    all program parameters PLOTF Plots the function y-f(x.z) according to the specified programs parameters. PLOTS Manipulates data for scaling and angles...of rotation; Calls PLOTF to plot each line PERIM Draws the plane of projection and perimeter around the plotted data PLTIF Puts data information on...PLT3T ADISP Clears alphanumeric display PLOTS Same as in PLT3T segment PLOTF Plots on pen plotter instead of the graphics terminal PERIM Same as in

  4. iCanPlot: visual exploration of high-throughput omics data using interactive Canvas plotting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit U Sinha

    Full Text Available Increasing use of high throughput genomic scale assays requires effective visualization and analysis techniques to facilitate data interpretation. Moreover, existing tools often require programming skills, which discourages bench scientists from examining their own data. We have created iCanPlot, a compelling platform for visual data exploration based on the latest technologies. Using the recently adopted HTML5 Canvas element, we have developed a highly interactive tool to visualize tabular data and identify interesting patterns in an intuitive fashion without the need of any specialized computing skills. A module for geneset overlap analysis has been implemented on the Google App Engine platform: when the user selects a region of interest in the plot, the genes in the region are analyzed on the fly. The visualization and analysis are amalgamated for a seamless experience. Further, users can easily upload their data for analysis--which also makes it simple to share the analysis with collaborators. We illustrate the power of iCanPlot by showing an example of how it can be used to interpret histone modifications in the context of gene expression.

  5. A Simple Interactive Software Package for Plotting, Animating, and Calculating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Larry

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new open source (free) software package that provides a simple, highly interactive interface for carrying out certain mathematical tasks that are commonly encountered in physics. These tasks include plotting and animating functions, solving systems of coupled algebraic equations, and basic calculus (differentiating and integrating…

  6. PlotXY: A High Quality Plotting System for the Herschel Interactive Processing Environment (HIPE) and the Astronomical Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panuzzo, P.; Li, J.; Caux, E.

    2012-09-01

    The Herschel Interactive Processing Environment (HIPE) was developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) in collaboration with NASA and the Herschel Instrument Control Centres, to provide the astronomical community a complete environment to process and analyze the data gathered by the Herschel Space Observatory. One of the most important components of HIPE is the plotting system (named PlotXY) that we present here. With PlotXY it is possible to produce easily high quality publication-ready 2D plots. It provides a long list of features, with fully configurable components, and interactive zooming. The entire code of HIPE is written in Java and is open source released under the GNU Lesser General Public License version 3. A new version of PlotXY is being developed to be independent from the HIPE code base; it is available to the software development community for the inclusion in other projects at the URL google.com/p/jplot2d/'>http://code.google.com/p/jplot2d/.

  7. A MATLAB Function for Plotting Phase Planes Interactively

    OpenAIRE

    Forsman, Krister

    1992-01-01

    A MATLAB-function serving as a sort of graphical interface to the MATLAB ODE-solver ode45 is presented. The main use of it is to facilitate phase plane analysis of nonlinear 2-D systems via simulation. The numerical integration of the system is mouse-operated via the ginput-function. After each choice of initial value a simulation is made and plotted in the phase plane.

  8. Interactive Classroom Graphics--Simulating Non-Linear Arrhenius Plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zion, M.; Hoz, S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes two simulation programs using an interactive graphic display terminal that were developed for a course in physical organic chemistry. Demonstrates the energetic conditions that give rise to deviations from linearity in the Arrhenius equation. (CS)

  9. ICONGRAPH - Program package for interactive controller design by graphical plotting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuschak, R.; Bars, R.; Habemayer, M.; Kovacs, T.; Vajk, I.; Vajta, Miklos

    1984-01-01

    ICONGRAPH is an interactive program package for CAD of control systems. The system under investigation has to be basically a linear single-loop one with lumped parameters. ICONGRAPH covers the following subjects: identification, design of controllers in the frequency and operator domains by

  10. Behavior of QQ-plots and genomic control in studies of gene-environment interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arend Voorman

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies of gene-environment interaction (GxE GWAS are becoming popular. As with main effects GWAS, quantile-quantile plots (QQ-plots and Genomic Control are being used to assess and correct for population substructure. However, in G x E work these approaches can be seriously misleading, as we illustrate; QQ-plots may give strong indications of substructure when absolutely none is present. Using simulation and theory, we show how and why spurious QQ-plot inflation occurs in G x E GWAS, and how this differs from main-effects analyses. We also explain how simple adjustments to standard regression-based methods used in G x E GWAS can alleviate this problem.

  11. Students' Misconceptions in Interpreting Center and Variability of Data Represented via Histograms and Stem-and-Leaf Plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Linda L.; Shore, Felice S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper identifies and discusses misconceptions that students have in making judgments of center and variability when data are presented graphically. An assessment addressing interpreting center and variability in histograms and stem-and-leaf plots was administered to, and follow-up interviews were conducted with, undergraduates enrolled in…

  12. On the role of final-state interactions in Dalitz plot studies

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, Bastian; Schneider, Sebastian P

    2011-01-01

    The study of Dalitz plots of heavy-meson decays to multi-hadron final states has received intensified interest by the possibility to gain access to precision investigations of CP violation. A thorough understanding of the hadronic final-state interactions is a prerequisite to achieve a highly sensitive, model-independent study of such Dalitz plots. We illustrate some of the theoretical tools, predominantly taken from dispersion theory, available for these and related purposes, and discuss the low-energy decays omega, phi --> 3pi in some more detail.

  13. The role of final-state interactions in Dalitz plot studies

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, Bastian

    2011-01-01

    Dalitz plot studies for multi-hadron decays of heavy mesons are expected to become very important tools for precision investigations of CP violation. A thorough understanding of the hadronic final-state interactions is a prerequisite to achieve a highly sensitive, model-independent study of CP-violating phases in such processes. We illustrate the theoretical tools available, as well as still to be developed, from low-to-medium-energy hadron physics for this purpose, and the goals of the informal "Les Nabis" network studying these and related problems.

  14. Center for Botanical Interaction Studies

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Research Area: Dietary Supplements, Herbs, Antioxidants Program:Centers for Dietary Supplements Research: Botanicals Description:This center will look at safety and...

  15. Unfavorable regions in the ramachandran plot: Is it really steric hindrance? The interacting quantum atoms perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Peter I; Popelier, Paul L A

    2017-11-05

    Accurate description of the intrinsic preferences of amino acids is important to consider when developing a biomolecular force field. In this study, we use a modern energy partitioning approach called Interacting Quantum Atoms to inspect the cause of the φ and ψ torsional preferences of three dipeptides (Gly, Val, and Ile). Repeating energy trends at each of the molecular, functional group, and atomic levels are observed across both (1) the three amino acids and (2) the φ/ψ scans in Ramachandran plots. At the molecular level, it is surprisingly electrostatic destabilization that causes the high-energy regions in the Ramachandran plot, not molecular steric hindrance (related to the intra-atomic energy). At the functional group and atomic levels, the importance of key peptide atoms (Oi-1 , Ci , Ni , Ni+1 ) and some sidechain hydrogen atoms (Hγ ) are identified as responsible for the destabilization seen in the energetically disfavored Ramachandran regions. Consistently, the Oi-1 atoms are particularly important for the explanation of dipeptide intrinsic behavior, where electrostatic and steric destabilization unusually complement one another. The findings suggest that, at least for these dipeptides, it is the peptide group atoms that dominate the intrinsic behavior, more so than the sidechain atoms. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Botany in children's literature: A content analysis of plant-centered children's picture books that have a plot and characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goins, Sheila Lewis

    This content analysis study examined 36 plant-centered children's science picture books that have a plot and characters published from 1950 to present. Botanical subject matter and learning opportunities offered by these books were analyzed, along with the range and frequency of the National Science Education Standards-consistent and age-appropriate plant science concepts and principles. The science graphics, artistic innovations, and story plot of these books were also examined. Rubrics and research-based recommendations were developed to offer parents, teachers, and librarians assistance in identifying, evaluating, and using such books to help children of ages 4--8 learn about plants and enjoy plant science. This genre of children's literature was identified and selected primarily through extensive research at four major, nationally recognized children's literature collections: The Kerlan Collection, The de Grummond Collection, The Center for Children's Books, and The Central Children's Room at the Donnell Library. This study determined that there was a substantial increase in the number of books written in this genre of children's literature from 1990 to 2000. Botanical subject-matter knowledge and learning opportunities offered by these books include biodiversity of plants; characteristics of plants; life cycles of plants; economic botany, ecology, and ethnobotany. The range and frequency of National Standards-consistent and age-appropriate plant science concepts and principles identified within these books, in part, though not exclusively, included the emergent categories of the process of photosynthesis; basic needs of plants; plant structures; external signals affecting plant growth; environmental stress to plants; biodiversity of plants; plants as animal habitats; and common uses of plants. With regard to plant science graphics, 13 books were identified as presenting some type of science graphic, beyond simple illustrations. The most frequently used

  17. Comparing the methods plot and point-centered quarter to describe a woody community from typical Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firmino Cardoso Pereira

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates the effectiveness of the methods fixed area plots (AP and point-centered quarters (PQ to describe a woody community from typical Cerrado. We used 10 APs and 140 PQs, distributed into 5 transects. We compared the density of individuals, floristic composition, richness of families, genera, and species, and vertical and horizontal vegetation structure. The AP method was more effective to sample the density of individuals. The PQ method was more effective for characterizing species richness, vertical vegetation structure, and record of species with low abundance. The composition of families, genera, and species, as well as the species with higher importance value index in the community were similarly determined by the 2 methods. The methods compared are complementary. We suggest that the use of AP, PQ, or both methods may be aimed at the vegetation parameter under study.

  18. High-Dimensional Data Visualization by Interactive Construction of Low-Dimensional Parallel Coordinate Plots

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, Takayuki; Kumar, Ashnil; Klein, Karsten; Kim, Jinman

    2016-01-01

    Parallel coordinate plots (PCPs) are among the most useful techniques for the visualization and exploration of high-dimensional data spaces. They are especially useful for the representation of correlations among the dimensions, which identify relationships and interdependencies between variables. However, within these high-dimensional spaces, PCPs face difficulties in displaying the correlation between combinations of dimensions and generally require additional display space as the number of...

  19. Fuzzy recurrence plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, T. D.

    2016-12-01

    Recurrence plots display binary texture of time series from dynamical systems with single dots and line structures. Using fuzzy recurrence plots, recurrences of the phase-space states can be visualized as grayscale texture, which is more informative for pattern analysis. The proposed method replaces the crucial similarity threshold required by symmetrical recurrence plots with the number of cluster centers, where the estimate of the latter parameter is less critical than the estimate of the former.

  20. Plot 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Inger-Lise; Gjessing, Susanne; Hermansen, Anne-Mette

    Plot 3 er første udgivelse af et alsidigt dansksystem til mellemtrinnet, hvor digitale medier er integreret i den daglige undervisning.......Plot 3 er første udgivelse af et alsidigt dansksystem til mellemtrinnet, hvor digitale medier er integreret i den daglige undervisning....

  1. Plot 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Inger-Lise; Gjessing, Susanne; Hermansen, Anne-Mette

    Plot 3 er første udgivelse af et alsidigt dansksystem til mellemtrinnet, hvor digitale medier er integreret i den daglige undervisning.......Plot 3 er første udgivelse af et alsidigt dansksystem til mellemtrinnet, hvor digitale medier er integreret i den daglige undervisning....

  2. Plot 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Inger-Lise; Hermansen, Anne-Mette; Ferdinand, Trine

    Danskfaglig vejledning informerer om de tanker, der ligger til grund for Plot 4, og beskriver danskfaget ud fra nyere forskning inden for fagets mange delområder. Kapitelvejledning introducerer bogens tekster, forklarer hensigten med kapitlernes opgaver, giver forslag til undervisningen og brugen...

  3. Plot 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Inger-Lise; Hermansen, Anne-Mette; Ferdinand, Trine

    Danskfaglig vejledning informerer om de tanker, der ligger til grund for Plot 5, og beskriver danskfaget ud fra nyere forskning inden for fagets mange delområder. Kapitelvejledning introducerer bogens tekster, forklarer hensigten med kapitlernes opgaver, giver forslag til undervisningen og brugen...

  4. Plotting Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Margaret Ann; Wilkinson, John Provost

    1997-01-01

    Conflict management theory is illustrated in a series of hypothetical scenarios, typical of library situations. Each scenario is discussed in terms of a specific management theory and the theories are transposed into useful management tools by plotting each situation along relevant axes. (Author/AEF)

  5. Plot 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Inger-Lise; Hermansen, Anne-Mette; Ferdinand, Trine

    Danskfaglig vejledning informerer om de tanker, der ligger til grund for Plot 5, og beskriver danskfaget ud fra nyere forskning inden for fagets mange delområder. Kapitelvejledning introducerer bogens tekster, forklarer hensigten med kapitlernes opgaver, giver forslag til undervisningen og brugen...

  6. THz frequency spectrum of protein-solvent interaction energy using a recurrence plot-based Wiener-Khinchin method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karain, Wael

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of a protein and the water surrounding it are coupled via nonbonded energy interactions. This coupling can exhibit a complex, nonlinear, and nonstationary nature. The THz frequency spectrum for this interaction energy characterizes both the vibration spectrum of the water hydrogen bond network, and the frequency range of large amplitude modes of proteins. We use a Recurrence Plot based Wiener-Khinchin method RPWK to calculate this spectrum, and the results are compared to those determined using the classical auto-covariance-based Wiener-Khinchin method WK. The frequency spectra for the total nonbonded interaction energy extracted from molecular dynamics simulations between the β-Lactamase Inhibitory Protein BLIP, and water molecules within a 10 Å distance from the protein surface, are calculated at 150, 200, 250, and 310 K, respectively. Similar calculations are also performed for the nonbonded interaction energy between the residues 49ASP, 53TYR, and 142PHE in BLIP, with water molecules within 10 Å from each residue respectively at 150, 200, 250, and 310 K. A comparison of the results shows that RPWK performs better than WK, and is able to detect some frequency data points that WK fails to detect. This points to the importance of using methods capable of taking the complex nature of the protein-solvent energy landscape into consideration, and not to rely on standard linear methods. In general, RPWK can be a valuable addition to the analysis tools for protein molecular dynamics simulations. Proteins 2016; 84:1549-1557. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The hydrophilicity vs. ion interaction selectivity plot revisited: The effect of mobile phase pH and buffer concentration on hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography selectivity behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Chad D; Gu, Xinyun; Lucy, Charles A

    2016-08-05

    This work systematically investigates the selectivity changes on many HILIC phases from w(w)pH 3.7-6.8, at 5 and 25mM buffer concentrations. Hydrophilicity (kcytosine/kuracil) vs. ion interaction (kBTMA/kuracil) selectivity plots developed by Ibrahim et al. (J. Chromatogr. A 1260 (2012) 126-131) are used to investigate the effect of mobile phase changes on the selectivity of 18 HILIC columns from various classes. "Selectivity change plots" focus on the change in hydrophilicity and ion interaction that the columns exhibit upon changing mobile phase conditions. In general, the selectivity behavior of most HILIC columns is dominated by silanol activity. Minimal changes in selectivity are observed upon changing pH between w(w)pH 5 and 6.8. However, a reduction in ionic interaction is observed when the buffer concentration is increased at w(w)pH≥5.0 due to ionic shielding. Reduction of the w(w)pH to<5.0 results in decreasing cation exchange activity due to silanol protonation. Under all eluent conditions, the majority of phases show little change in their hydrophilicity.

  8. The Plot

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, J. Kent

    1991-01-01

    The following essay on the Popish Plot is chapter nine of my biography of Thomas, 5th Baron, 1st Earl, and 1st Marquess of Wharton; and perhaps it is the only chapter in the history of biography that barely mentions the name of the protagonist. This odd state of affairs arises because neither the political career of Thomas Wharton, who later became de facto prince of the Whigs, nor the English Revolution, which he vigorously supported, can be understood without considerable bac...

  9. Distributed plot-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lotte Groth; Bossen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    different socio-technical systems (paper-based and electronic patient records). Drawing on the theory of distributed cognition and narrative theory, primarily inspired by the work done within health care by Cheryl Mattingly, we propose that the creation of overview may be conceptualised as ‘distributed plot......-making’. Distributed cognition focuses on the role of artefacts, humans and their interaction in information processing, while narrative theory focuses on how humans create narratives through the plot construction. Hence, the concept of distributed plot-making highlights the distribution of information processing...... between different social actors and artefacts, as well as the filtering, sorting and ordering of such information into a narrative that is made coherent by a plot. The analysis shows that the characteristics of paper-based and electronic patient records support or obstruct the creation of overview in both...

  10. Complexity Plots

    KAUST Repository

    Thiyagalingam, Jeyarajan

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a novel visualization technique for assisting the observation and analysis of algorithmic complexity. In comparison with conventional line graphs, this new technique is not sensitive to the units of measurement, allowing multivariate data series of different physical qualities (e.g., time, space and energy) to be juxtaposed together conveniently and consistently. It supports multivariate visualization as well as uncertainty visualization. It enables users to focus on algorithm categorization by complexity classes, while reducing visual impact caused by constants and algorithmic components that are insignificant to complexity analysis. It provides an effective means for observing the algorithmic complexity of programs with a mixture of algorithms and black-box software through visualization. Through two case studies, we demonstrate the effectiveness of complexity plots in complexity analysis in research, education and application. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Bounds on the maximum numbers of clear two-factor interactions for 2(n1+n2)-(k1+k2) fractional factorial split-plot designs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZI Xuemin; ZHANG Runchu; LIU Minqian

    2006-01-01

    Fractional factorial split-plot (FFSP) designs have an important value of investigation for their special structures.There are two types of factors in an FFSP design: the whole-plot (WP) factors and sub-plot (SP) factors,which can form three types of two-factor interactions:WP2fi,WS2fi and SP2fi.This paper considers FFSP designs with resolution Ⅲ or Ⅳ under the clear effects criterion.It derives the upper and lower bounds on the maximum numbers of clear WP2fis and WS2fis for FFSP designs,and gives some methods for constructing the desired FFSP designs.It further examines the performance of the construction methods.

  12. Enhancing Parent-Child Shared Book Reading Interactions: Promoting References to the Book's Plot and Socio-Cognitive Themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aram, Dorit; Fine, Yaara; Ziv, Margalit

    2013-01-01

    The study examined the efficacy of an intervention designed to promote parents' and preschoolers' references to storybooks' plot and socio-cognitive themes during shared reading within a sample of 58 families from low-SES background. All parents were given four books, one new book weekly, and were instructed to read each book four times per week…

  13. NPLOT - NASTRAN PLOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcentire, K.

    1994-01-01

    NPLOT is an interactive computer graphics program for plotting undeformed and deformed NASTRAN finite element models (FEMs). Although there are many commercial codes already available for plotting FEMs, these have limited use due to their cost, speed, and lack of features to view BAR elements. NPLOT was specifically developed to overcome these limitations. On a vector type graphics device the two best ways to show depth are by hidden line plotting or haloed line plotting. A hidden line algorithm generates views of models with all hidden lines removed, and a haloed line algorithm displays views with aft lines broken in order to show depth while keeping the entire model visible. A haloed line algorithm is especially useful for plotting models composed of many line elements and few surface elements. The most important feature of NPLOT is its ability to create both hidden line and haloed line views accurately and much more quickly than with any other existing hidden or haloed line algorithms. NPLOT is also capable of plotting a normal wire frame view to display all lines of a model. NPLOT is able to aid in viewing all elements, but it has special features not generally available for plotting BAR elements. These features include plotting of TRUE LENGTH and NORMALIZED offset vectors and orientation vectors. Standard display operations such as rotation and perspective are possible, but different view planes such as X-Y, Y-Z, and X-Z may also be selected. Another display option is the Z-axis cut which allows a portion of the fore part of the model to be cut away to reveal details of the inside of the model. A zoom function is available to terminals with a locator (graphics cursor, joystick, etc.). The user interface of NPLOT is designed to make the program quick and easy to use. A combination of menus and commands with help menus for detailed information about each command allows experienced users greater speed and efficiency. Once a plot is on the screen the interface

  14. Interactivity Centered Usability Evaluation (ICUE) for Course Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sangil

    2010-01-01

    ICUE (Interactivity Centered Usability Evaluation) is an enhanced usability testing protocol created by the researcher. ICUE augments the facilitator's role for usability testing, and offers strategies in developing and presenting usability tasks during a testing session. ICUE was designed to address weaknesses found in the usability evaluation of…

  15. A Dynamic and Interactive Monitoring System of Data Center Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ling-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To maximize the utilization and effectiveness of resources, it is very necessary to have a well suited management system for modern data centers. Traditional approaches to resource provisioning and service requests have proven to be ill suited for virtualization and cloud computing. The manual handoffs between technology teams were also highly inefficient and poorly documented. In this paper, a dynamic and interactive monitoring system for data center resources, ResourceView, is presented. By consolidating all data center management functionality into a single interface, ResourceView shares a common view of the timeline metric status, while providing comprehensive, centralized monitoring of data center physical and virtual IT assets including power, cooling, physical space and VMs, so that to improve availability and efficiency. In addition, servers and VMs can be monitored from several viewpoints such as clusters, racks and projects, which is very convenient for users.

  16. On exchange interaction between shallow impurity centers in diluted semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotkov, Pavel; Gor'kov, Lev

    2003-03-01

    We generalize the method developed in [1,2] to obtain asymptotically exact expressions for the exchange splitting in semiconductors of the levels of carriers localized on shallow impurities at small impurity concentrations (large inter-center separations). Our approach takes into account degeneracy inherent to shallow centers in most semiconductors. We also consider the effects of spin-orbital interaction and of an external magnetic field. [1] L.P. Gor'kov and L.P. Pitaevskii, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 151, 822 (1963) [Sov. Phys. Dokl. 8, 788 (1964)]. [2] C. Herring and M. Flicker, Phys. Rev. 134, A362 (1964)].

  17. Globular cluster-massive black hole interactions in galactic centers

    CERN Document Server

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R

    2016-01-01

    Many, if not all, galaxies host massive compact objects at their centers. They are present as singularities (super massive black holes) or high density star clusters (nuclear tar clusters). In some cases they coexist, and interact more or less strongly. In this short paper I will talk of the 'merger' globular cluster scenario, which has been shown in the past to be an explanation of the substantial mass accumulation in galactic centers. In particular, I will present the many astrophysical implications of such scenario pointing the attention on the mutual feedback of orbitally decaying globular clusters with massive and super massive black holes.

  18. S2PLOT: Three-dimensional (3D) Plotting Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, D. G.; Fluke, C. J.; Bourke, P. D.; Parry, O. T.

    2011-03-01

    We present a new, three-dimensional (3D) plotting library with advanced features, and support for standard and enhanced display devices. The library - S2PLOT - is written in C and can be used by C, C++ and FORTRAN programs on GNU/Linux and Apple/OSX systems. S2PLOT draws objects in a 3D (x,y,z) Cartesian space and the user interactively controls how this space is rendered at run time. With a PGPLOT inspired interface, S2PLOT provides astronomers with elegant techniques for displaying and exploring 3D data sets directly from their program code, and the potential to use stereoscopic and dome display devices. The S2PLOT architecture supports dynamic geometry and can be used to plot time-evolving data sets, such as might be produced by simulation codes. In this paper, we introduce S2PLOT to the astronomical community, describe its potential applications, and present some example uses of the library.

  19. TRAIL protein localization in human primary T cells by 3D microscopy using 3D interactive surface plot: a new method to visualize plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Christophe; Smith, Nikaïa; Sengmanivong, Lucie; Gandini, Mariana; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-31

    The apoptotic ligand TNF-related apoptosis ligand (TRAIL) is expressed on the membrane of immune cells during HIV infection. The intracellular stockade of TRAIL in human primary CD4(+) T cells is not known. Here we investigated whether primary CD4(+) T cells expressed TRAIL in their intracellular compartment and whether TRAIL is relocalized on the plasma membrane under HIV activation. We found that TRAIL protein was stocked in intracellular compartment in non activated CD4(+) T cells and that the total level of TRAIL protein was not increased under HIV-1 stimulation. However, TRAIL was massively relocalized on plasma membrane when cells were cultured with HIV. Using three dimensional (3D) microscopy we localized TRAIL protein in human T cells and developed a new method to visualize plasma membrane without the need of a membrane marker. This method used the 3D interactive surface plot and bright light acquired images.

  20. A mechanistic ecohydrological model to investigate complex interactions in cold and warm water-controlled environments. 1. Theoretical framework and plot-scale analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Fatichi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have explored the role of vegetation in controlling and mediating hydrological states and fluxes at the level of individual processes, which has led to improvements in our understanding of plot-scale dynamics. Relatively less effort has been directed toward spatially-explicit studies of vegetation-hydrology interactions at larger scales of a landscape.Only few continuous, process-oriented ecohydrological models had been proposed with structures of varying complexity. This study contributes to their further evolution and presents a novel ecohydrological model, {it Tethys-Chloris}. The model synthesizes the state-of-the-art knowledge on individual processes and coupling mechanisms drawn from the disciplines of hydrology, plant physiology, and ecology. Specifically, the model reproduces all essential components of the hydrological cycle: it resolves the mass and energy budgets in the atmospheric surface layer at the hourly scale, while representing up to two layers of vegetation; it includes a module of snowpack evolution; it describes the saturated and unsaturated soil water dynamics, processes of runoff generation and flow routing. The component of vegetation dynamics parameterizes lifecycle processes of different plant functional types, including photosynthesis, phenology, carbon allocation, and tissue turnover. This study presents a confirmation of the long-term, plot-scale model performance by simulating two types of ecosystems corresponding to different climate conditions. A consistent and highly satisfactory model skill in reproducing the energy and water budgets as well as physiological cycles of plants with minimum calibration overhead is demonstrated.Furthermore, these applications demonstrate that the model permits the identification of data types and observation frequencies crucial for appropriate evaluation of modeled dynamics. More importantly, through a synthesis of a wide array of process representations, the model

  1. User-centered design and interactive health technologies for patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito Dabbs, Annette; Myers, Brad A; Mc Curry, Kenneth R; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Hawkins, Robert P; Begey, Alex; Dew, Mary Amanda

    2009-01-01

    Despite recommendations that patients be involved in the design and testing of health technologies, few reports describe how to involve patients in systematic and meaningful ways to ensure that applications are customized to meet their needs. User-centered design is an approach that involves end users throughout the development process so that technologies support tasks, are easy to operate, and are of value to users. In this article, we provide an overview of user-centered design and use the development of Pocket Personal Assistant for Tracking Health (Pocket PATH) to illustrate how these principles and techniques were applied to involve patients in the development of this interactive health technology. Involving patient-users in the design and testing ensured functionality and usability, therefore increasing the likelihood of promoting the intended health outcomes.

  2. FLOWCHART; a computer program for plotting flowcharts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Bernice

    1982-01-01

    The computer program FLOWCHART can be used to very quickly and easily produce flowcharts of high quality for publication. FLOWCHART centers each element or block of text that it processes on one of a set of (imaginary) vertical lines. It can enclose a text block in a rectangle, circle or other selected figure. It can draw a 'line connecting the midpoint of any side of any figure with the midpoint of any side of any other figure and insert an arrow pointing in the direction of flow. It can write 'yes' or 'no' next to the line joining two figures. FLOWCHART creates flowcharts using some basic plotting subroutine* which permit plots to be generated interactively and inspected on a Tektronix compatible graphics screen or plotted in a deferred mode on a Houston Instruments 42' pen plotter. The size of the plot, character set and character height in inches are inputs to the program. Plots generated using the pen plotter can be up to 42' high--the larger size plots being directly usable as visual aids in a talk. FLOWCHART centers each block of text on an imaginary column line. (The number of columns and column width are specified as input.) The midpoint of the longest line of text within the block is defined to be the center of the block and is placed on the column line. The spacing of individual words within the block is not altered when the block is positioned. The program writes the first block of text in a designated column and continues placing each subsequent block below the previous block in the same column. A block of text may be placed in a different column by specifying the number of the column and an earlier block of text with which the new block is to be aligned. If block zero is given as the earlier block, the new text is placed in the new column continuing down the page below the previous block. Optionally a column and number of inches from the top of the page may be given for positioning the next block of text. The program will normally draw one of five

  3. Density Distribution Sunflower Plots

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont, William D; W. Dale Plummer Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Density distribution sunflower plots are used to display high-density bivariate data. They are useful for data where a conventional scatter plot is difficult to read due to overstriking of the plot symbol. The x-y plane is subdivided into a lattice of regular hexagonal bins of width w specified by the user. The user also specifies the values of l, d, and k that affect the plot as follows. Individual observations are plotted when there are less than l observations per bin as in a conventio...

  4. Role of exchange interaction in nitrogen vacancy center based magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Cong Son; Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Chen, Zilong; Krivitsky, Leonid A.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a multilayer device comprising a thin-film-based ferromagnetic heterostructure (FMH) deposited on a diamond layer doped with nitrogen vacancy centers (NVC's). We find that when the NVC's are in close proximity (1-2 nm) to the FMH, the exchange energy is comparable to, and may even surpass, the magnetostatic interaction energy. This calls forth the need to consider and utilize both effects in magnetometry based on NVC's in diamond. As the distance between the FMH and NVC is decreased to the subnanometer scale, the exponential increase in the exchange energy suggests spintronic applications of NVC's beyond magnetometry, such as detection of spin Hall effect or spin currents.

  5. Applying a User-Centered Approach to Interactive Visualisation Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassink, Ingo; Kulyk, Olga; van Dijk, Betsy; van der Veer, Gerrit; van der Vet, Paul

    Analysing users in their context of work and finding out how and why they use different information resources is essential to provide interactive visualisation systems that match their goals and needs. Designers should actively involve the intended users throughout the whole process. This chapter presents a user-centered approach for the design of interactive visualisation systems. We describe three phases of the iterative visualisation design process: the early envisioning phase, the global specification phase, and the detailed specification phase. The whole design cycle is repeated until some criterion of success is reached. We discuss different techniques for the analysis of users, their tasks and domain. Subsequently, the design of prototypes and evaluation methods in visualisation practice are presented. Finally, we discuss the practical challenges in design and evaluation of collaborative visualisation environments. Our own case studies and those of others are used throughout the whole chapter to illustrate various approaches.

  6. Dalitz plot analysis of ηc→K+K-η and ηc→K+K-π0 in two-photon interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Bougher, J.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; de Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Anulli, F.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindemann, D.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wang, W. F.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; de Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Babar Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    We study the processes γγ→K+K-η and γγ→K+K-π0 using a data sample of 519 fb-1 recorded with the BABAR detector operating at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at center-of-mass energies at and near the ϒ(nS) (n =2,3,4) resonances. We observe ηc→K+K-π0 and ηc→K+K-η decays, measure their relative branching fraction, and perform a Dalitz plot analysis for each decay. We observe the K0*(1430)→Kη decay and measure its branching fraction relative to the Kπ decay mode to be R(K0*(1430))=B(K/0*(1430)→Kη)B(K0*(1430)→Kπ)=0.092±0.025-0.025+0.010. The ηc →K+K-η and K0*(1430)→Kη results correspond to the first observations of these channels. The data also show evidence for ηc(2S)→K+K-π0 and first evidence for ηc (2S)→K+K-η.

  7. Getting a feel for parameters: using interactive parallel plots as a tool for parameter identification in the new rainfall-runoff model WALRUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Claudia; Torfs, Paul; Teuling, Ryan; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2015-04-01

    Recently, we developed the Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS) to fill the gap between complex, spatially distributed models often used in lowland catchments and simple, parametric models which have mostly been developed for mountainous catchments (Brauer et al., 2014ab). This parametric rainfall-runoff model can be used all over the world in both freely draining lowland catchments and polders with controlled water levels. The open source model code is implemented in R and can be downloaded from www.github.com/ClaudiaBrauer/WALRUS. The structure and code of WALRUS are simple, which facilitates detailed investigation of the effect of parameters on all model variables. WALRUS contains only four parameters requiring calibration; they are intended to have a strong, qualitative relation with catchment characteristics. Parameter estimation remains a challenge, however. The model structure contains three main feedbacks: (1) between groundwater and surface water; (2) between saturated and unsaturated zone; (3) between catchment wetness and (quick/slow) flowroute division. These feedbacks represent essential rainfall-runoff processes in lowland catchments, but increase the risk of parameter dependence and equifinality. Therefore, model performance should not only be judged based on a comparison between modelled and observed discharges, but also based on the plausibility of the internal modelled variables. Here, we present a method to analyse the effect of parameter values on internal model states and fluxes in a qualitative and intuitive way using interactive parallel plotting. We applied WALRUS to ten Dutch catchments with different sizes, slopes and soil types and both freely draining and polder areas. The model was run with a large number of parameter sets, which were created using Latin Hypercube Sampling. The model output was characterised in terms of several signatures, both measures of goodness of fit and statistics of internal model variables (such as the

  8. GlobPlot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linding, Rune; Russell, Robert B; Neduva, Victor

    2003-01-01

    are important for protein function. We present here a new tool for discovery of such unstructured, or disordered regions within proteins. GlobPlot (http://globplot.embl.de) is a web service that allows the user to plot the tendency within the query protein for order/globularity and disorder. We show examples...... with known proteins where it successfully identifies inter-domain segments containing linear motifs, and also apparently ordered regions that do not contain any recognised domain. GlobPlot may be useful in domain hunting efforts. The plots indicate that instances of known domains may often contain additional...... N- or C-terminal segments that appear ordered. Thus GlobPlot may be of use in the design of constructs corresponding to globular proteins, as needed for many biochemical studies, particularly structural biology. GlobPlot has a pipeline interface--GlobPipe--for the advanced user to do whole proteome...

  9. Difference and ratio plots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anders Jørgen; Holmskov, U; Bro, Peter

    1995-01-01

    hitherto unnoted differences between controls and patients with either rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus. For this we use simple, but unconventional, graphic representations of the data, based on difference plots and ratio plots. Differences between patients with Burkitt's lymphoma...... and systemic lupus erythematosus from another previously published study (Macanovic, M. and Lachmann, P.J. (1979) Clin. Exp. Immunol. 38, 274) are also represented using ratio plots. Our observations indicate that analysis by regression analysis may often be misleading....

  10. Split-Plot Designs with Mirror Image Pairs as Subplots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyssedal, John; Kulahci, Murat; Bisgaard, Soren

    2011-01-01

    In this article we investigate two-level split-plot designs where the sub-plots consist of only two mirror image trials. Assuming third and higher order interactions negligible, we show that these designs divide the estimated effects into two orthogonal sub-spaces, separating sub-plot main effects...... and sub-plot by whole-plot interactions from the rest. Further we show how to construct split-plot designs of projectivity P≥3. We also introduce a new class of split-plot designs with mirror image pairs constructed from non-geometric Plackett–Burman designs. The design properties of such designs are very...

  11. Multiple plots in R

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Stefan McKinnon

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter I will investigate how to combine multiple plots into a single. The scenario is a dataset of a series of measurements, on three samples in three situations. There are many ways we can display this, e.g. 3d graphs or faceting. 3d graphs are not good for displaying static data so we...... will not go there. Faceting is strictly speaking for plotting all variable / classes against each other....

  12. Multiple plots in R

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Stefan McKinnon

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter I will investigate how to combine multiple plots into a single. The scenario is a dataset of a series of measurements, on three samples in three situations. There are many ways we can display this, e.g. 3d graphs or faceting. 3d graphs are not good for displaying static data so we...... will not go there. Faceting is strictly speaking for plotting all variable / classes against each other....

  13. Density Distribution Sunflower Plots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Dupont

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Density distribution sunflower plots are used to display high-density bivariate data. They are useful for data where a conventional scatter plot is difficult to read due to overstriking of the plot symbol. The x-y plane is subdivided into a lattice of regular hexagonal bins of width w specified by the user. The user also specifies the values of l, d, and k that affect the plot as follows. Individual observations are plotted when there are less than l observations per bin as in a conventional scatter plot. Each bin with from l to d observations contains a light sunflower. Other bins contain a dark sunflower. In a light sunflower each petal represents one observation. In a dark sunflower, each petal represents k observations. (A dark sunflower with p petals represents between /2-pk k and /2+pk k observations. The user can control the sizes and colors of the sunflowers. By selecting appropriate colors and sizes for the light and dark sunflowers, plots can be obtained that give both the overall sense of the data density distribution as well as the number of data points in any given region. The use of this graphic is illustrated with data from the Framingham Heart Study. A documented Stata program, called sunflower, is available to draw these graphs. It can be downloaded from the Statistical Software Components archive at http://ideas.repec.org/c/boc/bocode/s430201.html . (Journal of Statistical Software 2003; 8 (3: 1-5. Posted at http://www.jstatsoft.org/index.php?vol=8 .

  14. Orbital Plots Using Gnuplot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian G.

    2000-06-01

    The plotting program Gnuplot is freely available, general purpose, easy to use, and available on a variety of platforms. Complex three-dimensional surfaces, including the familiar angular parts of the hydrogen atom orbitals, are easily represented using Gnuplot. Contour plots allow viewing the radial and angular variation of the probability density in an orbital. Examples are given of how Gnuplot is used in an undergraduate physical chemistry class to view familiar atomic orbitals in new ways or to generate views of orbital functions that the student may have not seen before. Gnuplot may also be easily integrated into the environment of a Web page; an example of this is discussed (and is available at http://onsager.bd.psu.edu/~moore/orbitals_gnuplot). The plotting commands are entered with a form and a CGI script is used to run Gnuplot and display the result back to the browser.

  15. Spatial recurrence plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, D B; Lopes, S R; Viana, R L; Kurths, J

    2006-05-01

    We propose an extension of the recurrence plot concept to perform quantitative analyzes of roughness and disorder of spatial patterns at a fixed time. We introduce spatial recurrence plots (SRPs) as a graphical representation of the pointwise correlation matrix, in terms of a two-dimensional spatial return plot. This technique is applied to the study of complex patterns generated by coupled map lattices, which are characterized by measures of complexity based on SRPs. We show that the complexity measures we propose for SRPs provide a systematic way of investigating the distribution of spatially coherent structures, such as synchronization domains, in lattice profiles. This approach has potential for many more applications, e.g., in surface roughness analyzes.

  16. PhasePlot: An Interactive Software Tool for Visualizing Phase Relations, Performing Virtual Experiments, and for Teaching Thermodynamic Concepts in Petrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiorso, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    The computer program PhasePlot was developed for Macintosh computers and released via the Mac App Store in December 2011. It permits the visualization of phase relations calculated from internally consistent thermodynamic data-model collections, including those from MELTS (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995, CMP 119, 197-212), pMELTS (Ghiorso et al., 2002, G-cubed 3, 10.1029/2001GC000217) and the deep mantle database of Stixrude and Lithgow-Bertelloni (2011, GJI 184, 1180-1213). The software allows users to enter a system bulk composition and a range of reference conditions, and then calculate a grid of phase relations. These relations may be visualized in a variety of ways including pseudosections, phase diagrams, phase proportion plots, and contour diagrams of phase compositions and abundances. The program interface is user friendly and the computations are fast on laptop-scale machines, which makes PhasePlot amenable to in-class demonstrations, as a tool in instructional laboratories, and as an aid in support of out-of-class exercises and research. Users focus on problem specification and interpretation of results rather than on manipulation and mechanics of computation. The software has been developed with NSF support and is free. The PhasePlot web site is at phaseplot.org where extensive user documentation, video tutorials and examples of use may be found. The original release of phase plot permitted calculations to be performed on pressure-, temperature-grids (P-T), by direct minimization of the Gibbs free energy of the system at each grid point. A revision of PhasePlot (scheduled for release to the Mac App Store in December 2012) extends capabilities to include pressure-, entropy-grids (P-S) by system enthalpy minimization, volume-, temperature-grids (V-T) by system Helmholtz energy minimization, and volume-,entropy-grids (V-S) by minimization of the Internal Energy of the system. P-S gridded results may be utilized to visualize phase relations as a function of heat

  17. Field Plot and Accuracy Assessment Points for Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Accuracy Assessment, Observation and Plot Points. Plot points were created from the GPS coordinates recorded at the center of each plot to map their distribution and...

  18. Embarking on the Road to Authentic Engagement: Investigating Racism through Interactive Learning Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Monica; Otinsky, Gennifer

    2006-01-01

    Taylor and Otinsky provide readers with a road map for interactive learning centers as a means to ground students as they develop their authentic questions about complex issues such as racism. Using interactive learning centers, students are invited to engage with a large number of collaborative experiences with texts of multiple media, the goal…

  19. The Peer-Interactive Writing Center at the University of New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The one-on-one format of tutoring, which is the norm for "writing" centers, can foster the much-maligned view of a "writing center" as a fix-it shop and undermine the role of the tutor as a co-learner and facilitator of peer-to-peer interactions. The peer-interactive "writing center approach", presented here, moves away from the one-on-one model…

  20. Plot til lyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil

    Den velfungerende krimi faciliterer denne dobbelte plotlæsning ved at muliggøre en særlig form for legende og udforskende interaktion mellem læser og plot: Ved at lægge spor ud og holde tolkningsmuligheder og løsningsmuligheder åbne får vi mulighed for at påtage os og udføre opklaringsarbejdet side......, der inviterer os med ind i selve handlingens rum og forløb og giver os forskellige handlingsmuligheder i forhold til disse. I bogen omtales denne særlige form for plot for forlystelsesplot med henvisning til forlystelsesparken og den særlige form for interaktiv fortælleform, som vi finder der: en...

  1. What Predicts Use of Learning-Centered, Interactive Engagement Methods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madson, Laura; Trafimow, David; Gray, Tara; Gutowitz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    What makes some faculty members more likely to use interactive engagement methods than others? We use the theory of reasoned action to predict faculty members' use of interactive engagement methods. Results indicate that faculty members' beliefs about the personal positive consequences of using these methods (e.g., "Using interactive…

  2. corner: Corner plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman-Mackey, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    corner uses matplotlib to visualize multidimensional samples using a scatterplot matrix. In these visualizations, each one- and two-dimensional projection of the sample is plotted to reveal covariances. corner was originally conceived to display the results of Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations and the defaults are chosen with this application in mind but it can be used for displaying many qualitatively different samples. An earlier version of corner was known as triangle.py.

  3. Interaction of pleuromutilin derivatives with the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, K. S.; Hansen, L. K.; Jakobsen, L.;

    2006-01-01

    Tiamulin is a pleuromutilin antibiotic that is used in veterinary medicine. The recently published crystal structure of a tiamulin-50S ribosomal subunit complex provides detailed information about how this drug targets the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. To promote rational design...

  4. The Half-Half Plot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einmahl, J.H.J.; Gantner, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Half-Half (HH) plot is a new graphical method to investigate qualitatively the shape of a regression curve. The empirical HH-plot counts observations in the lower and upper quarter of a strip that moves horizontally over the scatter plot. The plot displays jumps clearly and reveals further featu

  5. The Half-Half Plot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einmahl, J.H.J.; Gantner, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Half-Half (HH) plot is a new graphical method to investigate qualitatively the shape of a regression curve. The empirical HH-plot counts observations in the lower and upper quarter of a strip that moves horizontally over the scatter plot. The plot displays jumps clearly and reveals further

  6. The Half-Half Plot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einmahl, J.H.J.; Gantner, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Half-Half (HH) plot is a new graphical method to investigate qualitatively the shape of a regression curve. The empirical HH-plot counts observations in the lower and upper quarter of a strip that moves horizontally over the scatter plot. The plot displays jumps clearly and reveals further featu

  7. A Data Analysis Center for Electromagnetic and Hadronic Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briscoe, William John [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Studies; Strakovsky, Igor I. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Studies; Workman, Ronald L. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Studies

    2015-05-31

    The GW Data Analysis Center (DAC) has made significant progress in its program to enhance and expand the partial-wave and multipole analyses of fundamental reactions, while maintaining and expanding each associated database. These efforts provide guidance to national and international experimental and theoretical efforts, and are an important link between theory and experiment. Our principal goals are focused on baryon and meson physics programs and related topics.

  8. [Pharmacovigilance center --internal medicine interactions: A useful diagnostic tool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochoy, M; Gautier, S; Bordet, R; Caron, J; Launay, D; Hachulla, E; Hatron, P-Y; Lambert, M

    2015-08-01

    Patients hospitalized in internal medicine often have unexplained clinical symptoms for which a drug origin can be considered. The prevalence of patients hospitalized for iatrogenic is estimated between 4-22%. We wanted to evaluate the diagnostic value of the regional center of pharmacovigilance to identify or confirm an iatrogenic disease in the department of internal medicine of Lille and characterize factors associated with drug-related side effect. This is a single-center prospective diagnostic study. We included all subsequent requests from the department of internal medicine with the Nord-Pas-de-Calais regional pharmacovigilance center between 2010 and 2012. The opinion of the regional pharmacovigilance centre was held on the record of the adverse drug reaction in the national pharmacovigilance database and analyzed according to the conclusion of iatrogenic used by clinicians in internal medicine (reference diagnosis) with a follow-up to June 2013. The variables relating to the patient, medication and adverse events were analyzed by binary logistic regression. We analyzed 160 contacts: 118 concordant cases, 38 false-positives (drug-related side effect retained by the regional pharmacovigilance center only), 4 false negatives. Registration in the national pharmacovigilance database had a sensitivity of 96% (95% CI [0.92 to 0.99]), a specificity of 46% (95% CI [0.38 to 0.53]), a value positive predictive of 69% (95% CI [0.62 to 0.76]), a negative predictive value of 89% (95% CI [0.84 to 0.94]) and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.1. False-positive had chronological and semiological accountabilities questionable (adjusted RR=2.1, 95% CI [1.2 to 2.8]). In our study, the regional pharmacovigilance center confirms the clinician's suspicion of drug-related side effects and helps to exclude drug-induced with a high negative predictive value. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. matplotlib plotting cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Devert, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    This book follows a cookbook style approach that puts orthogonal and non-redundant recipes in your hands. Rather than rehashing the user manual, the explanations expose the underlying logic behind Matplotlib. If you are an engineer or scientist who wants to create great visualizations with Python, rather than yet another specialized language, this is the book for you. While there are several very competent plotting packages, Matplotlib is ""just"" a Python module. Thus, if you know some Python already, you will feel at home from the first steps on. In case you are an application writer, you wo

  10. New Mexico Center for Particle Physics: Studies of fundamental interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, J.A.J.

    1992-01-01

    The New Mexico Center/UNM group research program includes the CDF experiment at Fermilab and the SDC experiment at the SSC. In both experiments the UNM group research focuses on silicon strip tracking systems. The present research goals are to develop and utilize precision silicon tracking to increase significantly the physics reach of the Tevatron, and to make possible the study of high-P[sub t] physics at the SSC. The search for the t-quark in CDF is the primary goal of the upcoming Tevatron runs. This Progress Report summarizes our research accomplishments from the last year.

  11. Interaction of pleuromutilin derivatives with the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, K. S.; Hansen, L. K.; Jakobsen, L.

    2006-01-01

    are similarly anchored in the binding pocket by the common tricyclic mutilin core. However, varying effects are observed at U2584 and U2585, indicating that the side chain extensions adopt distinct conformations within the cavity and thereby affect the rRNA conformation differently. An Escherichia coli L3...... site. The data suggest that pleuromutilin drugs with enhanced antimicrobial activity may be obtained by maximizing the number of interactions between the side chain moiety and the peptidyl transferase cavity....

  12. Intelligent adaptive systems an interaction-centered design perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Ming; Burns, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    A synthesis of recent research and developments on intelligent adaptive systems from the HF (human factors) and HCI (human-computer interaction) domains, this book provides integrated design guidance and recommendations for researchers and system developers. It addresses a recognized lack of integration between the HF and HCI research communities, which has led to inconsistencies between the research approaches adopted, and a lack of exploitation of research from one field by the other. The book establishes design guidance through the review of conceptual frameworks, analytical methodologies,

  13. Plotting Gothic: A Paradox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Murray

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paradox of the title is that while most historians of medieval architecture agree that a combination of geometric and arithmetic methods was generally used to lay out a medieval church, there has been little consensus on the specifics of the process in relation to the design of any particular edifice. I begin by identifying four premises which underlie the debate. I then ask whether the new technologies — laser scanning and computer assisted design/drafting applications — can help. A case study uses newly generated point cloud data from a laser scan of the choir of Beauvais Cathedral. Finally, the notion of ‘plotting’ introduces essential sociological, anthropological and rhetorical dimensions. In the spirit of Roland Barthes ('Le plaisir du texte' and Peter Brooks ('Reading for the Plot', we can understand the urgency with which the architectural historian may seek to unscramble the hidden codes of the building as compulsive ‘reading for the plot’.

  14. BOREAS TE-23 Map Plot Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Paul M.; Fournier, Robert; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-23 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected map plot data in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on canopy architecture and understory cover at the BOREAS tower flux sites and selected auxiliary sites from May to August 1994. Mapped plots (typical dimensions 50 m x 60 m) were set up and characterized at all BOREAS forested tower flux and selected auxiliary sites. Detailed measurement of the mapped plots included: (1) stand characteristics (location, density, basal area); (2) map locations diameter at breast height (DBH) of all trees; (3) detailed geometric measures of a subset of trees (height, crown dimensions); and (4) understory cover maps. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  15. Aristotle's theory of tragedy plot and comparison with modern plot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋莹

    2008-01-01

    This paper is to study Aristotle's theory of tragedy and his tragedy plot from the Poetics. He says,'tragedy is an imitation of an action that is serious,complete,and of adequate magnitude-in language embellished in different ways in different parts-in the form of action,not of narration-through pity and fear effecting the purgation of these emotions. The elements of tragedy are plot,character,thought,diction,melody and spectacle in their order of importance.' However there exist some differences and similarities between his plot in Poetics and modern plot.

  16. GnuForPlot Graphics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-11-04

    Gnuforplot Graphics is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two and three dimensional plots of data on a personal computer. The program uses calls to the open source code Gnuplot to generate the plots. Two Fortran90 programs have been written to use the Gnuplot graphics capabilities. The first program, named Plotsetup.f90 reads data from output files created by either the Stadium or LeachXS/Orchestra modeling codes and saves the data in arrays for plotting. This program then calls Gnuforplot which takes the data array along with user specified parameters to set plot specifications and issues Gnuplot commands that generate the screen plots. The user can view the plots and optionally save copies in jpeg format.

  17. Cultural health capital and the interactional dynamics of patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbin, Leslie A; Chang, Jamie Suki; Shim, Janet K

    2013-09-01

    As intuitive and inviting as it may appear, the concept of patient-centered care has been difficult to conceptualize, institutionalize and operationalize. Informed by Bourdieu's concepts of cultural capital and habitus, we employ the framework of cultural health capital to uncover the ways in which both patients' and providers' cultural resources, assets, and interactional styles influence their abilities to mutually achieve patient-centered care. Cultural health capital is defined as a specialized collection of cultural skills, attitudes, behaviors and interactional styles that are valued, leveraged, and exchanged by both patients and providers during clinical interactions. In this paper, we report the findings of a qualitative study conducted from 2010 to 2011 in the Western United States. We investigated the various elements of cultural health capital, how patients and providers used cultural health capital to engage with each other, and how this process shaped the patient-centeredness of interactions. We find that the accomplishment of patient-centered care is highly dependent upon habitus and the cultural health capital that both patients and providers bring to health care interactions. Not only are some cultural resources more highly valued than others, their differential mobilization can facilitate or impede engagement and communication between patients and their providers. The focus of cultural health capital on the ways fundamental social inequalities are manifest in clinical interactions enables providers, patients, and health care organizations to consider how such inequalities can confound patient-centered care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Study on Surface Plotting Methods in Parts Plotting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhen; ZHAO Fa-dong

    2013-01-01

    According to the factors that confirm the shape of surface, it is classified into two categories:arc surface and curve surface. The method to confirm the category of surfaces and the plotting methods are discussed in this paper, which provide guidance for parts plotting.

  19. Box-and-Whisker Plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Russell D.

    1985-01-01

    Box-and-whisker plots (which give rapid visualization of batches of data) can be effectively used to present diverse collections of data used in traditional first-year chemistry courses. Construction of box-and-whisker plots and their use with bond energy data and data on heats of formation and solution are discussed. (JN)

  20. Mobile Gaming and Student Interactions in a Science Center: The Future of Gaming in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood-Blaine, Dana; Huffman, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the impact of an augmented reality iPad-based mobile game, called The Great STEM Caper, on students' interaction at a science center. An open-source, location-based game platform called ARIS (i.e. Augmented Reality and Interactive Storytelling) was used to create an iPad-based mobile game. The game used QR scan codes and a…

  1. PLOT3D user's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  2. Trellis plots as visual aids for analyzing split plot experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahci, Murat; Menon, Anil

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of split plot experiments can be challenging due to a complicated error structure resulting from restrictions on complete randomization. Similarly, standard visualization methods do not provide the insight practitioners desire to understand the data, think of explanations, generate...... hypotheses, build models, or decide on next steps. This article demonstrates the effective use of trellis plots in the preliminary data analysis for split plot experiments to address this problem. Trellis displays help to visualize multivariate data by allowing for conditioning in a general way. They can...

  3. Extensive promoter-centered chromatin interactions provide a topological basis for transcription regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoliang; Ruan, Xiaoan; Auerbach, Raymond K; Sandhu, Kuljeet Singh; Zheng, Meizhen; Wang, Ping; Poh, Huay Mei; Goh, Yufen; Lim, Joanne; Zhang, Jingyao; Sim, Hui Shan; Peh, Su Qin; Mulawadi, Fabianus Hendriyan; Ong, Chin Thing; Orlov, Yuriy L; Hong, Shuzhen; Zhang, Zhizhuo; Landt, Steve; Raha, Debasish; Euskirchen, Ghia; Wei, Chia-Lin; Ge, Weihong; Wang, Huaien; Davis, Carrie; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Mortazavi, Ali; Gerstein, Mark; Gingeras, Thomas; Wold, Barbara; Sun, Yi; Fullwood, Melissa J; Cheung, Edwin; Liu, Edison; Sung, Wing-Kin; Snyder, Michael; Ruan, Yijun

    2012-01-20

    Higher-order chromosomal organization for transcription regulation is poorly understood in eukaryotes. Using genome-wide Chromatin Interaction Analysis with Paired-End-Tag sequencing (ChIA-PET), we mapped long-range chromatin interactions associated with RNA polymerase II in human cells and uncovered widespread promoter-centered intragenic, extragenic, and intergenic interactions. These interactions further aggregated into higher-order clusters, wherein proximal and distal genes were engaged through promoter-promoter interactions. Most genes with promoter-promoter interactions were active and transcribed cooperatively, and some interacting promoters could influence each other implying combinatorial complexity of transcriptional controls. Comparative analyses of different cell lines showed that cell-specific chromatin interactions could provide structural frameworks for cell-specific transcription, and suggested significant enrichment of enhancer-promoter interactions for cell-specific functions. Furthermore, genetically-identified disease-associated noncoding elements were found to be spatially engaged with corresponding genes through long-range interactions. Overall, our study provides insights into transcription regulation by three-dimensional chromatin interactions for both housekeeping and cell-specific genes in human cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Action Between Plot and Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Thor

    2007-01-01

    , these narrated actions disrupt the theoretical divisions, on the one hand, between the narrated story and the narrating discourse, and on the other hand, between plot-narratology and discourse-narratology. As narrated actions, they seem to belong to the domain of plot-narratology, but insofar as they serve...... an important visualizing function, these narrated actions have a communicative function and, as such, they can be said to belong to the domain of discourse-narratology. In the first part of the article, I argue that a certain type of plot-narratology, due to its retrospective epistemology and abstract...

  5. Action Between Plot and Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Thor

    2007-01-01

    , these narrated actions disrupt the theoretical divisions, on the one hand, between the narrated story and the narrating discourse, and on the other hand, between plot-narratology and discourse-narratology. As narrated actions, they seem to belong to the domain of plot-narratology, but insofar as they serve...... an important visualizing function, these narrated actions have a communicative function and, as such, they can be said to belong to the domain of discourse-narratology. In the first part of the article, I argue that a certain type of plot-narratology, due to its retrospective epistemology and abstract...

  6. External Use of TOPCAT's Plotting Library

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, M B

    2014-01-01

    The table analysis application TOPCAT uses a custom Java plotting library for highly configurable high-performance interactive or exported visualisations in two and three dimensions. We present here a variety of ways for end users or application developers to make use of this library outside of the TOPCAT application: via the command-line suite STILTS or its Jython variant JyStilts, via a traditional Java API, or by programmatically assigning values to a set of parameters in java code or using some form of inter-process communication. The library has been built with large datasets in mind; interactive plots scale well up to several million points, and static output to standard graphics formats is possible for unlimited sized input data.

  7. Potential interaction and potential investigation of science center exhibits and visitors' interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busque, Laurier

    This research consisted of studying the characteristics of interaction and investigation potential present in museum or science center exhibits. Categories (strong and weak) for the characteristics of interaction potential and investigation potential were established. Fifteen exhibits were chosen from the Museum of Science (Ottawa) and from two science centers (Sudbury and Toronto); these were representative of the established characteristics and categories. A test was constructed that measured the interest in an exhibit in a museum or a science center. The final analysis of the test (20 items) reflects a coefficient of homogeneity (Cronbach alpha) of 0.97 (n = 278). In terms of the characteristics of interaction potential and investigation potential, a significant difference among the ranks of interest was not found once they were regrouped under the categories of strong and weak. The hypothesis of a relationship between the interaction potential and visitors' interest in an exhibit in a museum or science center and the hypothesis of a relationship between the investigation potential and the interest aroused were both rejected. In regards to the interaction potential, median ranks of interest in exhibits of 8.6 for the strong category and of 7.5 for the weak category were observed. In terms of the investigation potential, median ranks of interest of 7.0 for the strong category and of 9.1 for the weak category were observed. In the case of investigation potential, even if the difference is not significant, there is an indication that the strong investigation potential seems to have the effect of creating disinterest in the presentation of an exhibit in a museum or in a science center. In the context of new museum and science centers, the view of developing exhibits which are primarily objects which stimulate interest must be maintained. If this is done with exhibits that arc interactive and have an investigative approach, it is necessary for those in charge of

  8. Realtime multi-plot graphics system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipkowski, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    The increased complexity of test operations and customer requirements at Langley Research Center's National Transonic Facility (NTF) surpassed the capabilities of the initial realtime graphics system. The analysis of existing hardware and software and the enhancements made to develop a new realtime graphics system are described. The result of this effort is a cost effective system, based on hardware already in place, that support high speed, high resolution, generation and display of multiple realtime plots. The enhanced graphics system (EGS) meets the current and foreseeable future realtime graphics requirements of the NTF. While this system was developed to support wind tunnel operations, the overall design and capability of the system is applicable to other realtime data acquisition systems that have realtime plot requirements.

  9. Measurement of the I =1 /2 K π S -wave amplitude from Dalitz plot analyses of ηc→K K ¯π in two-photon interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Brown, D. N.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kim, J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Pennington, M. R.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Robertson, S. H.; Dey, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Heß, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; BaBar Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We study the processes γ γ →KS0K±π∓ and γ γ →K+K-π0 using a data sample of 519 fb-1 recorded with the BABAR detector operating at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at center-of-mass energies at and near the Υ (n S ) (n =2 , 3, 4) resonances. We observe ηc decays to both final states and perform Dalitz plot analyses using a model-independent partial wave analysis technique. This allows a model-independent measurement of the mass-dependence of the I =1 /2 K π S -wave amplitude and phase. A comparison between the present measurement and those from previous experiments indicates similar behavior for the phase up to a mass of 1.5 GeV /c2. In contrast, the amplitudes show very marked differences. The data require the presence of a new a0(1950 ) resonance with parameters m =1931 ±14 ±22 MeV /c2 and Γ =271 ±22 ±29 MeV .

  10. Normal probability plots with confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantarangsi, Wanpen; Liu, Wei; Bretz, Frank; Kiatsupaibul, Seksan; Hayter, Anthony J; Wan, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Normal probability plots are widely used as a statistical tool for assessing whether an observed simple random sample is drawn from a normally distributed population. The users, however, have to judge subjectively, if no objective rule is provided, whether the plotted points fall close to a straight line. In this paper, we focus on how a normal probability plot can be augmented by intervals for all the points so that, if the population distribution is normal, then all the points should fall into the corresponding intervals simultaneously with probability 1-α. These simultaneous 1-α probability intervals provide therefore an objective mean to judge whether the plotted points fall close to the straight line: the plotted points fall close to the straight line if and only if all the points fall into the corresponding intervals. The powers of several normal probability plot based (graphical) tests and the most popular nongraphical Anderson-Darling and Shapiro-Wilk tests are compared by simulation. Based on this comparison, recommendations are given in Section 3 on which graphical tests should be used in what circumstances. An example is provided to illustrate the methods.

  11. Visual analytics of large multidimensional data using variable binned scatter plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ming C.; Dayal, Umeshwar; Sharma, Ratnesh K.; Keim, Daniel A.; Janetzko, Halldór

    2010-01-01

    The scatter plot is a well-known method of visualizing pairs of two-dimensional continuous variables. Multidimensional data can be depicted in a scatter plot matrix. They are intuitive and easy-to-use, but often have a high degree of overlap which may occlude a significant portion of data. In this paper, we propose variable binned scatter plots to allow the visualization of large amounts of data without overlapping. The basic idea is to use a non-uniform (variable) binning of the x and y dimensions and plots all the data points that fall within each bin into corresponding squares. Further, we map a third attribute to color for visualizing clusters. Analysts are able to interact with individual data points for record level information. We have applied these techniques to solve real-world problems on credit card fraud and data center energy consumption to visualize their data distribution and cause-effect among multiple attributes. A comparison of our methods with two recent well-known variants of scatter plots is included.

  12. Split-plot fractional designs: Is minimum aberration enough?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahci, Murat; Ramirez, Jose; Tobias, Randy

    2006-01-01

    Split-plot experiments are commonly used in industry for product and process improvement. Recent articles on designing split-plot experiments concentrate on minimum aberration as the design criterion. Minimum aberration has been criticized as a design criterion for completely randomized fractional...... factorial design and alternative criteria, such as the maximum number of clear two-factor interactions, are suggested (Wu and Hamada (2000)). The need for alternatives to minimum aberration is even more acute for split-plot designs. In a standard split-plot design, there are several types of two...... for completely randomized designs. Consequently, we provide a modified version of the maximum number of clear two-factor interactions design criterion to be used for split-plot designs....

  13. Split-plot fractional designs: Is minimum aberration enough?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahci, Murat; Ramirez, Jose; Tobias, Randy

    2006-01-01

    Split-plot experiments are commonly used in industry for product and process improvement. Recent articles on designing split-plot experiments concentrate on minimum aberration as the design criterion. Minimum aberration has been criticized as a design criterion for completely randomized fractional...... factorial design and alternative criteria, such as the maximum number of clear two-factor interactions, are suggested (Wu and Hamada (2000)). The need for alternatives to minimum aberration is even more acute for split-plot designs. In a standard split-plot design, there are several types of two...... for completely randomized designs. Consequently, we provide a modified version of the maximum number of clear two-factor interactions design criterion to be used for split-plot designs....

  14. Electron-mediated nuclear-spin interactions between distant nitrogen-vacancy centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, A; Jelezko, F; Plenio, M B; Retzker, A

    2011-10-07

    We propose a scheme enabling controlled quantum coherent interactions between separated nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond in the presence of strong magnetic fluctuations. The proposed scheme couples nuclear qubits employing the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction between the electron spins and, crucially, benefits from the suppression of the effect of environmental magnetic field fluctuations thanks to a strong microwave driving. This scheme provides a basic building block for a full-scale quantum-information processor or quantum simulator based on solid-state technology.

  15. Electron-Mediated Nuclear-Spin Interactions Between Distant NV Centers

    CERN Document Server

    Bermudez, A; Plenio, M B; Retzker, A

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme enabling controlled quantum coherent interactions between separated nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond in the presence of strong magnetic fluctuations. The proposed scheme couples nuclear qubits employing the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction between the electron spins and, crucially, benefits from the suppression of the effect of environmental magnetic field fluctuations thanks to a strong microwave driving. This scheme provides a basic building block for a full-scale quantum information processor or quantum simulator based on solid-state technology.

  16. Precision measurement of electronic ion-ion interactions between neighboring Eu3+ optical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlefeldt, R L; McAuslan, D L; Longdell, J J; Manson, N B; Sellars, M J

    2013-12-13

    We report measurements of discrete excitation-induced frequency shifts on the 7F0→5D0 transition of the Eu+ center in La:Lu:EuCl3·6D2O resulting from the optical excitation of neighboring Eu3+ ions. Shifts of up to 46.081±0.005  MHz were observed. The magnitude of the interaction between neighboring ions was found to be significantly larger than expected from the electric dipole-dipole mechanism often observed in rare earth systems. We show that a large network of interacting and individually addressable centers can be created by lightly doping crystals otherwise stoichiometric in the optically active rare earth ion, and that this network could be used to implement a quantum processor with more than ten qubits.

  17. Chemical and biological interactions in the Rose Garden hydrothermal vent field, Galapagos spreading center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth S.; Childress, James J.; Hessler, Robert R.; Sakamoto-Arnold, Carole M.; Beehler, Carl L.

    1988-10-01

    The concentrations of a suite of redox reactive chemicals were measured in the Rose Garden hydrothermal vent field of the Galapagos spreading center. Sulfide, silicate, oxygen and temperature distributions were measured in situ with a submersible chemical analyser. In addition, 15 chemical species were measured in discrete samples. Variability in the slope of the temperature-silicate plots indicates that heat is lost from these relatively low temperatures (<15°C) solutions by conduction to the solid phase. Consumption of oxygen, sulfide and nitrate from the hydrothermal solution as it flows past the vent animals is apparent from the distributions measured in situ and in the discrete samples. The fraction of sulfide and nitrate removed from the solution by consumption appears to have increased between 1979-1985. Sulfide and oxygen appear to be consumed under different conditions: sulfide is removed primarily from the warmest solutions, and oxygen is consumed only from the cold seawater. This separation may be driven primarily by the increased gradients of each chemical under these conditions. There is no evidence for the consumption of significant amounts of manganese(II) by the vent organisms. The analysis of other data sets from this vent field indicate no significant consumption of methane by the vent organisms, as well.

  18. VTM plots as evidence of historical change: Goldmine or landmine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jon E.

    2004-01-01

    VTM (Vegetation Type Map) plots comprise a huge data set on vegetation composition for many parts of California collected mostly between 1929 and 1935. Historical changes in vegetation have been inferred by sampling these areas many decades later and evaluating the changes in plant dominance. VTM plots can not be precisely relocated, and it has been assumed that errors resulting from this problem are inconsequential or can be eliminated by comparison with a composite of multiple contemporary plots. This study examines that assumption for southern California shrubland landscapes by comparing the differences in species composition between closely positioned VTM-sized plots. Comparing shrub species density in 400-m² plots separated by 30 m (center to center), I found that all species exhibited considerable differences in density even over this short distance. This patchiness in shrub distribution could lead to major errors in historical reconstructions from VTM plot data. Two methods are proposed for dealing with this problem. One is to collect multiple samples from the vicinity of the VTM plot and use the observed spatial variation to set bounds on the temporal changes required to represent significant historical change. The other is to look at broad landscape changes reflected in the averages observed in a large sampling of sites.

  19. Evaluation of a Smartphone App for Forest Sample Plot Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikko Vastaranta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated a smartphone app (TRESTIMATM for forest sample plot measurements. The app interprets imagery collected from the sample plots using the camera in the smartphone and then estimates forest inventory attributes, including species-specific basal areas (G as well as the diameter (DgM and height (HgM of basal area median trees. The estimates from the smartphone app were compared to forest inventory attributes derived from tree-wise measurements using calipers and a Vertex height measurement device. The data consist of 2169 measured trees from 25 sample plots (32 m × 32 m, dominated by Scots pine and Norway spruce from southern Finland. The root-mean-square errors (RMSEs in the basal area varied from 19.7% to 29.3% and the biases from 11.4% to 18.4% depending on the number of images per sample plot and image shooting location. DgM measurement bias varied from −1.4% to 3.1% and RMSE from 5.2% to 11.6% depending on the tree species. Respectively, HgM bias varied from 5.0% to 8.3% and RMSE 10.0% to 13.6%. In general, four images captured toward the center of the plot provided more accurate results than four images captured away from the plot center. Increasing the number of captured images per plot to the analyses yielded only marginal improvement to the results.

  20. Convergence of CI single center calculations of positron-atom interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Mitroy, J

    2006-01-01

    The Configuration Interaction (CI) method using orbitals centered on the nucleus has recently been applied to calculate the interactions of positrons interacting with atoms. Computational investigations of the convergence properties of binding energy, phase shift and annihilation rate with respect to the maximum angular momentum of the orbital basis for the e^+Cu and PsH bound states, and the e^+-H scattering system were completed. The annihilation rates converge very slowly with angular momentum, and moreover the convergence with radial basis dimension appears to be slower for high angular momentum. A number of methods of completing the partial wave sum are compared, an approach based on a Delta X_J = a/(J + 1/2)^n + b/(J + 1/2)^(n+1) form (with n = 4 for phase shift (or energy) and n = 2 for the annihilation rate) seems to be preferred on considerations of utility and underlying physical justification.

  1. Development of 3D interactive visual objects using the Scripps Institution of Oceanography's Visualization Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilb, D.; Reif, C.; Peach, C.; Keen, C. S.; Smith, B.; Mellors, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    Within the last year scientists and educators at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO), the Birch Aquarium at Scripps and San Diego State University have collaborated with education specialists to develop 3D interactive graphic teaching modules for use in the classroom and in teacher workshops at the SIO Visualization center (http://siovizcenter.ucsd.edu). The unique aspect of the SIO Visualization center is that the center is designed around a 120 degree curved Panoram floor-to-ceiling screen (8'6" by 28'4") that immerses viewers in a virtual environment. The center is powered by an SGI 3400 Onyx computer that is more powerful, by an order of magnitude in both speed and memory, than typical base systems currently used for education and outreach presentations. This technology allows us to display multiple 3D data layers (e.g., seismicity, high resolution topography, seismic reflectivity, draped interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images, etc.) simultaneously, render them in 3D stereo, and take a virtual flight through the data as dictated on the spot by the user. This system can also render snapshots, images and movies that are too big for other systems, and then export smaller size end-products to more commonly used computer systems. Since early 2002, we have explored various ways to provide informal education and outreach focusing on current research presented directly by the researchers doing the work. The Center currently provides a centerpiece for instruction on southern California seismology for K-12 students and teachers for various Scripps education endeavors. Future plans are in place to use the Visualization Center at Scripps for extended K-12 and college educational programs. In particular, we will be identifying K-12 curriculum needs, assisting with teacher education, developing assessments of our programs and products, producing web-accessible teaching modules and facilitating the development of appropriate teaching tools to be

  2. Human-Centered Software Engineering: Software Engineering Architectures, Patterns, and Sodels for Human Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seffah, Ahmed; Vanderdonckt, Jean; Desmarais, Michel C.

    The Computer-Human Interaction and Software Engineering (CHISE) series of edited volumes originated from a number of workshops and discussions over the latest research and developments in the field of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and Software Engineering (SE) integration, convergence and cross-pollination. A first volume in this series (CHISE Volume I - Human-Centered Software Engineering: Integrating Usability in the Development Lifecycle) aims at bridging the gap between the field of SE and HCI, and addresses specifically the concerns of integrating usability and user-centered systems design methods and tools into the software development lifecycle and practices. This has been done by defining techniques, tools and practices that can fit into the entire software engineering lifecycle as well as by defining ways of addressing the knowledge and skills needed, and the attitudes and basic values that a user-centered development methodology requires. The first volume has been edited as Vol. 8 in the Springer HCI Series (Seffah, Gulliksen and Desmarais, 2005).

  3. The Ramachandran plots of glycine and pre-proline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brasseur Robert

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ramachandran plot is a fundamental tool in the analysis of protein structures. Of the 4 basic types of Ramachandran plots, the interactions that determine the generic and proline Ramachandran plots are well understood. The interactions of the glycine and pre-proline Ramachandran plots are not. Results In glycine, the ψ angle is typically clustered at ψ = 180° and ψ = 0°. We show that these clusters correspond to conformations where either the Ni+1 or O atom is sandwiched between the two Hα atoms of glycine. We show that the shape of the 5 distinct regions of density (the α, αL, βS, βP and βPR regions can be reproduced with electrostatic dipole-dipole interactions. In pre-proline, we analyse the origin of the ζ region of the Ramachandran plot, a region unique to pre-proline. We show that it is stabilized by a COi-1···CδHδi+1 weak hydrogen bond. This is analogous to the COi-1···NHi+1 hydrogen bond that stabilizes the γ region in the generic Ramachandran plot. Conclusion We have identified the specific interactions that affect the backbone of glycine and pre-proline. Knowledge of these interactions will improve current force-fields, and help understand structural motifs containing these residues.

  4. MatrixPlot: visualizing sequence constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik; Lund, Ole

    1999-01-01

    MatrixPlot: visualizing sequence constraints. Sub-title Abstract Summary : MatrixPlot is a program for making high-quality matrix plots, such as mutual information plots of sequence alignments and distance matrices of sequences with known three-dimensional coordinates. The user can add information...... about the sequences (e.g. a sequence logo profile) along the edges of the plot, as well as zoom in on any region in the plot. Availability : MatrixPlot can be obtained on request, and can also be accessed online at http://www. cbs.dtu.dk/services/MatrixPlot. Contact : gorodkin@cbs.dtu.dk...

  5. MatrixPlot: visualizing sequence constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik; Lund, Ole

    1999-01-01

    MatrixPlot: visualizing sequence constraints. Sub-title Abstract Summary : MatrixPlot is a program for making high-quality matrix plots, such as mutual information plots of sequence alignments and distance matrices of sequences with known three-dimensional coordinates. The user can add information...... about the sequences (e.g. a sequence logo profile) along the edges of the plot, as well as zoom in on any region in the plot. Availability : MatrixPlot can be obtained on request, and can also be accessed online at http://www. cbs.dtu.dk/services/MatrixPlot. Contact : gorodkin@cbs.dtu.dk...

  6. User-Centered Design for Interactive Maps: A Case Study in Crime Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Roth

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we address the topic of user-centered design (UCD for cartography, GIScience, and visual analytics. Interactive maps are ubiquitous in modern society, yet they often fail to “work” as they could or should. UCD describes the process of ensuring interface success—map-based or otherwise—by gathering input and feedback from target users throughout the design and development of the interface. We contribute to the expanding literature on UCD for interactive maps in two ways. First, we synthesize core concepts on UCD from cartography and related fields, as well as offer new ideas, in order to organize existing frameworks and recommendations regarding the UCD of interactive maps. Second, we report on a case study UCD process for GeoVISTA CrimeViz, an interactive and web-based mapping application supporting visual analytics of criminal activity in space and time. The GeoVISTA CrimeViz concept and interface were improved iteratively by working through a series of user→utility→usability loops in which target users provided input and feedback on needs and designs (user, prompting revisions to the conceptualization and functional requirements of the interface (utility, and ultimately leading to new mockups and prototypes of the interface (usability for additional evaluation by target users (user… and so on. Together, the background review and case study offer guidance for applying UCD to interactive mapping projects, and demonstrate the benefit of including target users throughout design and development.

  7. Phonon-magnon interactions in body centered cubic iron: A combined molecular and spin dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, Dilina, E-mail: dilinanp@physast.uga.edu; Landau, David P. [Center for Simulational Physics, The University of Georgia, Georgia 30602 (United States); Nicholson, Don M.; Malcolm Stocks, G.; Eisenbach, Markus; Yin, Junqi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Brown, Gregory [Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Combining an atomistic many-body potential with a classical spin Hamiltonian parameterized by first principles calculations, molecular-spin dynamics computer simulations were performed to investigate phonon-magnon interactions in body centered cubic iron. Results obtained for spin-spin and density-density dynamic structure factors show that noticeable softening and damping of magnon modes occur due to the presence of lattice vibrations. Furthermore, as a result of the phonon-magnon coupling, additional longitudinal spin wave excitations are observed, with the same frequencies as the longitudinal phonon modes.

  8. Conceptual recurrence plots: revealing patterns in human discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Daniel; Smith, Andrew; Wiles, Janet

    2012-06-01

    Human discourse contains a rich mixture of conceptual information. Visualization of the global and local patterns within this data stream is a complex and challenging problem. Recurrence plots are an information visualization technique that can reveal trends and features in complex time series data. The recurrence plot technique works by measuring the similarity of points in a time series to all other points in the same time series and plotting the results in two dimensions. Previous studies have applied recurrence plotting techniques to textual data; however, these approaches plot recurrence using term-based similarity rather than conceptual similarity of the text. We introduce conceptual recurrence plots, which use a model of language to measure similarity between pairs of text utterances, and the similarity of all utterances is measured and displayed. In this paper, we explore how the descriptive power of the recurrence plotting technique can be used to discover patterns of interaction across a series of conversation transcripts. The results suggest that the conceptual recurrence plotting technique is a useful tool for exploring the structure of human discourse.

  9. Experiments and contexts in the interactive exhibitions of centers and museums of science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Ventura Chinelli

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Here is described a research that meant to indentify, through analysis of experiments and contexts in interactive expositions held by centers and museums of science, the necessary conditions for grasping the scientific culture in the post-positivist conception. The project was developed with the participation of students in training courses for teachers on a proposal based on the principles and methods of action research, in order to form skills that lead to interferences in the professional future. The results show that the samples of interactive exhibits are organized according to the classic paradigm: they offer opportunities for experimentation that produce observational data supposedly neutral and maintain separate nature and human being. In conclusion, we have those exhibits contribute to bringing the visitors closer to the positivistic science, not contributing to bring them closer to the concept of science based on the contemporary paradigm of complexity.

  10. Investigating Student Communities with Network Analysis of Interactions in a Physics Learning Center

    CERN Document Server

    Brewe, Eric; Sawtelle, Vashti

    2011-01-01

    Developing a sense of community among students is one of the three pillars of an overall reform effort to increase participation in physics, and the sciences more broadly, at Florida International University. The emergence of a research and learning community, embedded within a course reform effort, has contributed to increased recruitment and retention of physics majors. Finn and Rock [1] link the academic and social integration of students to increased rates of retention. We utilize social network analysis to quantify interactions in Florida International University's Physics Learning Center (PLC) that support the development of academic and social integration,. The tools of social network analysis allow us to visualize and quantify student interactions, and characterize the roles of students within a social network. After providing a brief introduction to social network analysis, we use sequential multiple regression modeling to evaluate factors which contribute to participation in the learning community. ...

  11. Convergence of Place and Plot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil

    2010-01-01

    efterladt sig en række mærker og spor som kan læses og fortolkes. Blodspor, rester af negle, hår udgør forskellige (DNA)koder som kan dekrypteres og dechifreres på samme måde som krudtslam, skudhuller, fysiske skader er tegn som skal læses og fortolkes. Som sådan rummer stedet et plot (en fortælling) som...

  12. Dalitz plot distributions in presence of triangle singularities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczepaniak, Adam P., E-mail: aszczepa@indiana.edu [Department of Physics, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Theory Center, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47403 (United States)

    2016-06-10

    We discuss properties of three-particle Dalitz distributions in coupled channel systems in presence of triangle singularities. The single channel case was discussed long ago [1] where it was found that as a consequence of unitarity, effects of a triangle singularity seen in the Dalitz plot are not seen in Dalitz plot projections. In the coupled channel case we find the same is true for the sum of intensities of all interacting channels. Unlike the single channel case, however, triangle singularities do remain visible in Dalitz plot projections of individual channels.

  13. P3-23: Center/Surround Motion Interactions Measured Using a Nulling Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Hyun Park

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Many direction-selective neurons have a receptive field structure that promotes suppressive interactions between center and surround regions. These interactions sculpt the overall pattern of activity among those neurons and, therefore, presumably impact perceived direction of motion. To test this conjecture, we have assessed the effect of motion signals produced by a moving stimulus on perceived motion within a neighboring region. On each trial a vertical bar (inducer appeared at 8 eccentricity in the upper visual field, moving either leftward or rightward, and a circular shaped random dot kinematogram (test appeared at 4 eccentricity. The test dots moved randomly except when the inducer passed nearby the test, at which time a pulse of coherent motion occurred in one of the two directions within the test. Coherence strength was adjusted by QUEST to maintain equal likelihood (point of subjective equality: PSE of leftward and rightward reports of perceived direction during this motion pulse. The inducer caused a substantial shift in PSE: it was necessary for the test to contain 50% coherent motion in the same direction as that of the inducer to nullify the illusory motion within the test caused by the inducer. The effect of the inducer could also be offset by simultaneously presenting a second inducer moving in the opposite direction. This pattern of results implies substantial suppressive interactions between neighboring moving stimuli, interactions whose strength and direction can be assessed psychophysically using nulling procedures.

  14. Interactive breast cancer segmentation based on relevance feedback: from user-centered design to evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouze, A.; Kieffer, S.; Van Brussel, C.; Moncarey, R.; Grivegnée, A.; Macq, B.

    2009-02-01

    Computer systems play an important role in medical imaging industry since radiologists depend on it for visualization, interpretation, communication and archiving. In particular, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems help in lesion detection tasks. This paper presents the design and the development of an interactive segmentation tool for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. The tool conception is based upon a user-centered approach in order to ensure that the application is of real benefit to radiologists. The analysis of user expectations, workflow and decision-making practices give rise to the need for an interactive reporting system based on the BIRADS, that would not only include the numerical features extracted from the segmentation of the findings in a structured manner, but also support human relevance feedback as well. This way, the numerical results from segmentation can be either validated by end-users or enhanced thanks to domain-experts subjective interpretation. Such a domain-expert centered system requires the segmentation to be sufficiently accurate and locally adapted, and the features to be carefully selected in order to best suit user's knowledge and to be of use in enhancing segmentation. Improving segmentation accuracy with relevance feedback and providing radiologists with a user-friendly interface to support image analysis are the contributions of this work. The preliminary result is first the tool conception, and second the improvement of the segmentation precision.

  15. Galactic center excess in γ rays from annihilation of self-interacting dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplinghat, Manoj; Linden, Tim; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2015-05-29

    Observations by the Fermi Large-Area Telescope have uncovered a significant γ-ray excess directed toward the Milky Way Galactic Center. There has been no detection of a similar signal in the stacked population of Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Additionally, astronomical observations indicate that dwarf galaxies and other faint galaxies are less dense than predicted by the simplest cold dark matter models. We show that a self-interacting dark matter model with a particle mass of roughly 50 GeV annihilating to the mediator responsible for the strong self-interaction can simultaneously explain all three observations. The mediator is necessarily unstable, and its mass must be below about 100 MeV in order to decrease the dark matter density of faint galaxies. If the mediator decays to electron-positron pairs with a cross section on the order of the thermal relic value, then we find that these pairs can up-scatter the interstellar radiation field in the Galactic center and produce the observed γ-ray excess.

  16. AUTOMATED TECHNIQUE FOR CREATING LITHOLOGIC LOG PLOTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristijan Posavec

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents automated technique for creating lithologic log plots. Technique is based on three computer tools: Microsoft (MS Access program, LogPlot program, and Visual Basic (VB macros for MS Excel. MS Access ensures professional storage of lithologic data which can be in that way easier and faster entered, searched, updated, and also used for different purposes, while LogPlot provides tools for creating lithologic log plots. VB macros enable transfer of lithologic data from MS Access to LogPlot. Data stored in MS Access are exported in ASCII files which are later used by LogPlot for creation of lithologic log plots. Presented concept facilitates creation of lithologic log plots, and automated technique enables processing of a large number of data i.e. creation of lareg number lithologic log plots in a short period of time (the paper is published in Croatian.

  17. Dark matter with pseudoscalar-mediated interactions explains the DAMA signal and the galactic center excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arina, Chiara; Del Nobile, Eugenio; Panci, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    We study a Dirac dark matter particle interacting with ordinary matter via the exchange of a light pseudoscalar, and analyze its impact on both direct and indirect detection experiments. We show that this candidate can accommodate the long-standing DAMA modulated signal and yet be compatible with all exclusion limits at 99(S)% C.L. This result holds for natural choices of the pseudoscalar-quark couplings (e.g., flavor universal), which give rise to a significant enhancement of the dark matter-proton coupling with respect to the coupling to neutrons. We also find that this candidate can accommodate the observed 1-3 GeV gamma-ray excess at the Galactic center and at the same time have the correct relic density today. The model could be tested with measurements of rare meson decays, flavor changing processes, and searches for axionlike particles with mass in the MeV range.

  18. The Interaction of two Prominent Galactic Center Sources Sgr A East and the Molecular Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Yusef-Zadeh, F; Burton, M; Wardle, M; Melia, F; Lazio, T J W; Kassim, N E

    1999-01-01

    We present a synthesis of a number of recent observations in the near-IR H_2 and [Fe II] lines, OH (1720 MHz) maser line and various radio continuum measurements using the NICMOS of the HST, UNSWIRF on the AAT and the VLA. These observations suggest that the outer edge of the CND is collisionally excited whereas the inner edge is likely to be heated predominantly by the IRS 16 cluster. The velocity and spatial correlation of H_2 and OH (1720 MHz) as well as the spatial distribution of radio continuum emission at 90cm suggest that Sgr A East is responsible for shocking the gas and interacting with the circumnuclear ring at the Galactic center.

  19. Interactions between radio sources and X-ray gas at the centers of cooling core clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazin, C. L.; Blanton, E. L.; Clarke, T. E.

    Recent Chandra and XMM observations of the interaction of central radio sources and cooling cores in clusters of galaxies will be presented. The clusters studied include A262, A2052, A2626, A113, A2029, A2597, and A4059. The radio sources blow "bubbles" in the X-ray gas, displacing the gas and compressing it into shells around the radio lobes. At the same time, the radio sources are confined by the X-ray gas. At larger radii, "ghost bubbles" are seen which are weak in radio emission except at low frequencies. These may be evidence of previous eruptions of the radio sources. In some cases, buoyantly rising bubbles may entrain cooler X-ray gas from the centers of the cooling cores. Some radio sources previously classified as cluster merger radio relics may actually be displaced radio bubbles from the central radio sources. The relation between the radio bubbles, and cooler gas (10 keV).

  20. Interactions Between Frankliniella fusca and Pantoea ananatis in the Center Rot Epidemic of Onion (Allium cepa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Bhabesh; Gitaitis, Ronald; Barman, Apurba; Avci, Utku; Marasigan, Kathleen; Srinivasan, Rajagopalbabu

    2016-09-01

    An Enterobacteriaceae bacterium, Pantoea ananatis (Serrano) Mergaert, is the causal agent of an economically important disease of onion, center rot. P. ananatis is transmitted by an onion-infesting thrips, Frankliniella fusca (Hinds). However, interactions between F. fusca and P. ananatis as well as transmission mechanisms largely remain uncharacterized. This study investigated P. ananatis acquisition by thrips and transstadial persistence. Furthermore, the effects of bacterial acquisition on thrips fitness were also evaluated. When thrips larvae and adults were provided with acquisition access periods (AAP) on peanut leaflets contaminated with the bacterium, an exponentially positive relationship was observed between AAP and P. ananatis acquisition (R(2) ≥ 0.77, P = 0.01). P. ananatis persisted in thrips through several life stages (larvae, pupae, and adult). Despite the bacterial persistence, no significant effects on thrips fitness parameters such as fecundity and development were observed. Immunofluorescence microscopy of adult thrips with P. ananatis-specific antibody after 48 h AAP on contaminated food revealed that the bacterium was localized only in the gut. These results suggested that the pathogen is not circulative and could be transmitted through feces. Mechanical inoculation of onion seedlings with fecal rinsates produced center rot symptoms, whereas inoculation with rinsates potentially containing salivary secretions did not. These results provide evidence for stercorarian transmission (transmission through feces) of P. ananatis by F. fusca.

  1. Reviewing ChIPS, The Chandra Imaging and Plotting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Burke, D. J.; Evans, I. N.; Evans, J. D.; McLaughlin, W.

    2015-09-01

    The Chandra Imaging and Plotting System (ChIPS) is a 2D plotting system designed to allow users to easily create, manipulate, and produce publication quality visualizations. ChIPS has a simple but very powerful interactive interface that allows users to dynamically modify the contents and layout of their plots quickly and efficiently, with the results of any changes being immediately visible. ChIPS allows users to construct their plots fully interactively, and then save the final plot commands as a Python script. This bypasses the need to iteratively edit and rerun the script when developing the plot. Features such as undo and redo commands allow users to easily step backwards and forwards through previous commands, while the ability so save ChIPS sessions in a platform-independent state file allows the session to be restored at any time, even on another machine. Because ChIPS offers a Python interface, users can analyze their data using the broad array of modules offered in Python, and visualize the information in ChIPS at the same time. In this paper we explore the design decisions behind the development of ChIPS and some of the lessons learned along the way.

  2. Strain field of interstitial hydrogen atom in body-centered cubic iron and its effect on hydrogen-dislocation interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shuai; Takahashi, Keisuke; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Isobe, Shigehito; Ohnuki, Somei

    2013-01-01

    Effect of hydrogen in body-centered cubic iron is explored by using the density function theory. Hydrogen atoms increase the concentration of free electrons in the simulation cell and have bonding interaction with Fe atom. Caused by anisotropic strain components of hydrogen atoms in the tetrahedral sites, elastic interaction for hydrogen with screw dislocation has been found. The dependence of hydrogen-screw dislocation interaction on hydrogen concentration is confirmed by repeated stress rel...

  3. Investigating student communities with network analysis of interactions in a physics learning center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewe, Eric; Kramer, Laird; Sawtelle, Vashti

    2012-06-01

    Developing a sense of community among students is one of the three pillars of an overall reform effort to increase participation in physics, and the sciences more broadly, at Florida International University. The emergence of a research and learning community, embedded within a course reform effort, has contributed to increased recruitment and retention of physics majors. We utilize social network analysis to quantify interactions in Florida International University’s Physics Learning Center (PLC) that support the development of academic and social integration. The tools of social network analysis allow us to visualize and quantify student interactions and characterize the roles of students within a social network. After providing a brief introduction to social network analysis, we use sequential multiple regression modeling to evaluate factors that contribute to participation in the learning community. Results of the sequential multiple regression indicate that the PLC learning community is an equitable environment as we find that gender and ethnicity are not significant predictors of participation in the PLC. We find that providing students space for collaboration provides a vital element in the formation of a supportive learning community.

  4. Fostering learners' interaction with content: A learner-centered mobile device interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdous, M.

    2015-12-01

    With the ever-increasing omnipresence of mobile devices in student life, leveraging smart devices to foster students' interaction with course content is critical. Following a learner-centered design iterative approach, we designed a mobile interface that may enable learners to access and interact with online course content efficiently and intuitively. Our design process leveraged recent technologies, such as bootstrap, Google's Material Design, HTML5, and JavaScript to design an intuitive, efficient, and portable mobile interface with a variety of built-in features, including context sensitive bookmarking, searching, progress tracking, captioning, and transcript display. The mobile interface also offers students the ability to ask context-related questions and to complete self-checks as they watch audio/video presentations. Our design process involved ongoing iterative feedback from learners, allowing us to refine and tweak the interface to provide learners with a unified experience across platforms and devices. The innovative combination of technologies built around well-structured and well-designed content seems to provide an effective learning experience to mobile learners. Early feedback indicates a high level of satisfaction with the interface's efficiency, intuitiveness, and robustness from both students and faculty.

  5. Formation of Tertiary Interactions during rRNA GTPase Center Folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Michael J; Welty, Robb; Tom Stump, W; Hall, Kathleen B

    2015-08-28

    The 60-nt GTPase center (GAC) of 23S rRNA has a phylogenetically conserved secondary structure with two hairpin loops and a 3-way junction. It folds into an intricate tertiary structure upon addition of Mg(2+) ions, which is stabilized by the L11 protein in cocrystal structures. Here, we monitor the kinetics of its tertiary folding and Mg(2+)-dependent intermediate states by observing selected nucleobases that contribute specific interactions to the GAC tertiary structure in the cocrystals. The fluorescent nucleobase 2-aminopurine replaced three individual adenines, two of which make long-range stacking interactions and one that also forms hydrogen bonds. Each site reveals a unique response to Mg(2+) addition and temperature, reflecting its environmental change from secondary to tertiary structure. Stopped-flow fluorescence experiments revealed that kinetics of tertiary structure formation upon addition of MgCl2 are also site specific, with local conformational changes occurring from 5 ms to 4s and with global folding from 1 to 5s. Site-specific substitution with (15)N-nucleobases allowed observation of stable hydrogen bond formation by NMR experiments. Equilibrium titration experiments indicate that a stable folding intermediate is present at stoichiometric concentrations of Mg(2+) and suggest that there are two initial sites of Mg(2+) ion association.

  6. Rethinking Human-Centered Computing: Finding the Customer and Negotiated Interactions at the Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, Roxana; O'Neill, John; Mirmalek, Zara

    2003-01-01

    The breakdown in the air transportation system over the past several years raises an interesting question for researchers: How can we help improve the reliability of airline operations? In offering some answers to this question, we make a statement about Huuman-Centered Computing (HCC). First we offer the definition that HCC is a multi-disciplinary research and design methodology focused on supporting humans as they use technology by including cognitive and social systems, computational tools and the physical environment in the analysis of organizational systems. We suggest that a key element in understanding organizational systems is that there are external cognitive and social systems (customers) as well as internal cognitive and social systems (employees) and that they interact dynamically to impact the organization and its work. The design of human-centered intelligent systems must take this outside-inside dynamic into account. In the past, the design of intelligent systems has focused on supporting the work and improvisation requirements of employees but has often assumed that customer requirements are implicitly satisfied by employee requirements. Taking a customer-centric perspective provides a different lens for understanding this outside-inside dynamic, the work of the organization and the requirements of both customers and employees In this article we will: 1) Demonstrate how the use of ethnographic methods revealed the important outside-inside dynamic in an airline, specifically the consequential relationship between external customer requirements and perspectives and internal organizational processes and perspectives as they came together in a changing environment; 2) Describe how taking a customer centric perspective identifies places where the impact of the outside-inside dynamic is most critical and requires technology that can be adaptive; 3) Define and discuss the place of negotiated interactions in airline operations, identifying how these

  7. Multiple hypothesis clustering in radar plot extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizing, A.G.; Theil, A.; Dorp, Ph. van; Ligthart, L.P.

    1995-01-01

    False plots and plots with inaccurate range and Doppler estimates may severely degrade the performance of tracking algorithms in radar systems. This paper describes how a multiple hypothesis clustering technique can be applied to mitigate the problems involved in plot extraction. The measures of

  8. Multiple hypothesis clustering in radar plot extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizing, A.G.; Theil, A.; Dorp, Ph. van; Ligthart, L.P.

    1995-01-01

    False plots and plots with inaccurate range and Doppler estimates may severely degrade the performance of tracking algorithms in radar systems. This paper describes how a multiple hypothesis clustering technique can be applied to mitigate the problems involved in plot extraction. The measures of con

  9. Final Technical Report - SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnack, Dalton D.

    2012-07-01

    Final technical report for research performed by Dr. Thomas G. Jenkins in collaboration with Professor Dalton D. Schnack on SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodyanics, DE-FC02-06ER54899, for the period of 8/15/06 - 8/14/11. This report centers on the Slow MHD physics campaign work performed by Dr. Jenkins while at UW-Madison and then at Tech-X Corporation. To make progress on the problem of RF induced currents affect magnetic island evolution in toroidal plasmas, a set of research approaches are outlined. Three approaches can be addressed in parallel. These are: (1) Analytically prescribed additional term in Ohm's law to model the effect of localized ECCD current drive; (2) Introduce an additional evolution equation for the Ohm's law source term. Establish a RF source 'box' where information from the RF code couples to the fluid evolution; and (3) Carry out a more rigorous analytic calculation treating the additional RF terms in a closure problem. These approaches rely on the necessity of reinvigorating the computation modeling efforts of resistive and neoclassical tearing modes with present day versions of the numerical tools. For the RF community, the relevant action item is - RF ray tracing codes need to be modified so that general three-dimensional spatial information can be obtained. Further, interface efforts between the two codes require work as well as an assessment as to the numerical stability properties of the procedures to be used.

  10. Vibronic interaction in crystals with the Jahn-Teller centers in the elementary energy bands concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.M. Bercha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The order-disorder type phase transition caused by the vibronic interaction (collective Jahn-Teller effect in a monoclinic CuInP2S6 crystal is analyzed. For this purpose, a trigonal protostructure model of CuInP2S6 is created, through a slight change in the crystal lattice parameters of the CuInP2S6 paraelectric phase. In parallel to the group-theoretical analysis, the DFT-based ab initio band structure calculations of the CuInP2S6 protostructure, para-, and ferriphases are performed. Using the elementary energy bands concept, a part of the band structure from the vicinity of the forbidden energy gap, which is created by the d-electron states of copper has been related with a certain Wyckoff position where the Jahn-Teller's centers are localized. A construction procedure of the vibronic potential energy matrix is generalized for the case of crystal using the elementary energy bands concept and the group theoretical method of invariants. The procedure is illustrated by the creation of the adiabatic potentials of the Γ5-Γ5 vibronic coupling for the protostructure and paraphase of the CuInP2S6 crystal. A structure of the obtained adiabatic potentials is analyzed, followed by conclusions on their transformation under a phase transition and the discussion on the possibility for the spontaneous polarization to arise in this crystal.

  11. Designing fractional factorial split-plot experiments using integer programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capehart, Shay R.; Keha, Ahmet; Kulahci, Murat

    2011-01-01

    factorial (FF) design, with the restricted randomisation structure to account for the whole plots and subplots. We discuss the formulation of FFSP designs using integer programming (IP) to achieve various design criteria. We specifically look at the maximum number of clear two-factor interactions...

  12. Designing fractional factorial split-plot experiments using integer programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capehart, Shay R.; Keha, Ahmet; Kulahci, Murat

    2011-01-01

    factorial (FF) design, with the restricted randomisation structure to account for the whole plots and subplots. We discuss the formulation of FFSP designs using integer programming (IP) to achieve various design criteria. We specifically look at the maximum number of clear two-factor interactions...

  13. The AMPTE IRM Science Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, O. H.; Baumjohann, W.; Edwards, J.; Graeter, K.; Hoefner, H.; Klecker, B.; Muehlhaueser, K.-H.; Drexler, M.; Guckenbiehl, F.; Hansen, C.

    1985-01-01

    The creation of artificial ion clouds is a major aspect of the AMPTE program. The IRM Science Data center supports real-time decision for a release with real-time scientific data processing and display including model calculations of ion trajectories. Additionally, survey plots and summary data records are generated in near real time thus allowing to start the data analysis as early as possible. For detailed analyses, interactive programs were developed so that physical parameters of all IRM experiments can be combined to produce common spectra or line plots.

  14. Fifth International Symposium on Recurrence Plot

    CERN Document Server

    Riley, Michael; Giuliani, Alessandro; Webber, Charles; Jr, Jr; Translational Recurrences : From Mathematical Theory to Real-World Applications

    2014-01-01

    This book features 13 papers presented at the Fifth International Symposium on Recurrence Plots, held August 2013 in Chicago, IL. It examines recent applications and developments in recurrence plots and recurrence quantifi cation analysis (RQA) with special emphasis on biological and cognitive systems and the analysis of coupled systems using cross-recurrence methods. Readers will discover new applications and insights into a range of systems provided by recurrence plot analysis and new theoretical and mathematical developments in recurrence plots. Recurrence plot based analysis is a powerful tool that operates on real-world complex systems that are nonlinear, non-stationary, noisy, of any statistical distribution, free of any particular model type, and not particularly long. Quantitative analyses promote the detection of system state changes, synchronized dynamical regimes, or classifi cation of system states. Th e book will be of interest to an interdisciplinary audience of recurrence plot users and researc...

  15. Faithfulness of Recurrence Plots: A Mathematical Proof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Yoshito; Komuro, Motomasa; Horai, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    It is practically known that a recurrence plot, a two-dimensional visualization of time series data, can contain almost all information related to the underlying dynamics except for its spatial scale because we can recover a rough shape for the original time series from the recurrence plot even if the original time series is multivariate. We here provide a mathematical proof that the metric defined by a recurrence plot [Hirata et al., 2008] is equivalent to the Euclidean metric under mild conditions.

  16. Adding stress plot function to NASTRAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, S.

    1978-01-01

    Stress plot function was developed and added to the NASTRAN level 15.5. Computed stress distribution can be displayed by this function, with vectors showing the principal stresses of the finite elements over the specified portions of the structure. NASTRAN is reviewed in the aspect of plotting capabilities. Stress tensor field is examined in preparation of stress display. Then the stress plot function as added to the NASTRAN is described. A sample plotout by this function is shown.

  17. [Interaction of substrates and substrate-like inhibitors with the peptidyltransferase center from Escherichia coli ribosomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukhanova, M K; Burd, S B; Viktorova, L S; Nechipurenko, Iu D; Gottikh, B P

    1984-01-01

    The binding isotherms of CACCA(3'NHPhe----Ac) and CACCA(3'NHPhe) to E. coli ribosomes and 50S subunits were measured. A theoretical model of adsorption for the case of cooperative interaction between two ligands adsorbed on a ribosome was designated. The analysis of the experimental binding isoterms leads to the following conclusions. A ribosome (or subunit) binds one CACCA (3'NHPhe----Ac) molecule to donor site of the peptidyl transferase center, but two CACCA (3'NHPhe) molecules to both donor and acceptor sites. The binding of CACCA (3'NHPhe) to ribosomes (or subunits) is a cooperative process, characterized by the cooperativity coefficient tau = 40 +/- 5 or more. When model substrates CACCA-Phe, CACCA-Leu and CACCA-Val were taken instead of CACCA (3'NHPhe) in the incubation mixture with ribosomes, dipeptides were obtained even in the case, when ratio [model substrate]: [ribosome] (in moles) was much lower than 1. Puromycin binding to acceptor site with constant (1-2) X 10(4) M-1 also stimulates CACCA(3'NHPhe----Ac) adsorption to the donor site of ribosomes with cooperativity coefficient being equal to 1.5-2.5. It is also shown that cytidine 5'-phosphate binding to the donor site increases kappa cat of the reaction of minimal donors with CACCA-Phe by 1.5 orders of magnitude but has no effect on Km of this reaction. These facts point out that cytidine 5'-phosphate being adsorbed on the corresponding area of the donor site leads to the conversion of low-productive complex [ribosome + minimal donor substrate + acceptor substrate] into high-productive complex [ribosome + minimal donor substrate + acceptor substrate + cytidine 5'-phosphate].

  18. Cultures of education and rituals of transition from home to the infant toddler center. Observing interactions and professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Bove

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available At the infant-toddler center, the rituals of transition that mark children’s arrival and going home times offer interesting kaleidoscopes for the study of interactive dynamics with the associated meanings and implicit educational models. Numerous pedagogical studies have investigated the meanings of these events, for the most part drawing on the monocultural model of classical attachment theory to analyze interactions between adults and children. Far less research has approached these rituals using triadic, systemic and intercultural categories of analysis in order to explore not only educators’ actions but also what is going on in their minds. In this paper, we discuss examples from a recent study on rituals of transition in the multicultural context of an infant toddler center, combining description of the timing, behaviors and interactive styles of children and adults, with analysis of the thoughts and representations of the educators.

  19. Cognate interactions: extrafollicular IL-4 drives germinal-center reactions, a new role for an old cytokine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toellner, Kai-Michael

    2014-07-01

    Over the past 25 years it has become clear that B and T lymphocytes go through a range of interactions and migratory events when B cells differentiate to become high-affinity, antibody-secreting cells. This B-cell differentiation is associated with multiple sequential cognate interactions. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Turqueti-Neves et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2014. 44: 2130-2138] show that IL-4, a cytokine well known as a regulator of Ig class switch recombination, has another as-yet-unappreciated role. The authors show that IL-4 produced by T-helper cells outside germinal centers has a major effect on the early stages of germinal-center B-cell differentiation. This Commentary will summarize their findings and relate them to what we know on the sequence of cognate interactions and migratory events B cells undergo during T-dependent immune responses.

  20. An Excel macro for generating trilinear plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikaze, Steven G; Crowe, Allan S

    2007-01-01

    This computer note describes a method for creating trilinear plots in Microsoft Excel. Macros have been created in MS Excel's internal language: Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). A simple form has been set up to allow the user to input data from an Excel worksheet. The VBA macro is used to convert the triangular data (which consist of three columns of percentage data) into X-Y data. The macro then generates the axes, labels, and grid for the trilinear plot. The X-Y data are plotted as scatter data in Excel. By providing this macro in Excel, users can create trilinear plots in a quick, inexpensive manner.

  1. Representing uncertainty on model analysis plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Trevor I.

    2016-12-01

    Model analysis provides a mechanism for representing student learning as measured by standard multiple-choice surveys. The model plot contains information regarding both how likely students in a particular class are to choose the correct answer and how likely they are to choose an answer consistent with a well-documented conceptual model. Unfortunately, Bao's original presentation of the model plot did not include a way to represent uncertainty in these measurements. I present details of a method to add error bars to model plots by expanding the work of Sommer and Lindell. I also provide a template for generating model plots with error bars.

  2. The Process of Interactional Sensitivity Coding in Health Care: Conceptually and Operationally Defining Patient-Centered Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabee, Christina M; Koenig, Christopher J; Wingard, Leah; Foster, Jamie; Chivers, Nick; Olsher, David; Vandergriff, Ilona

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a process for measuring sensitivity in provider-patient interactions to better understand patient-centered communication. The authors developed the Process of Interactional Sensitivity Coding in Healthcare (PISCH) by incorporating a multimethod investigation into conversations between physicians and their patients with type 2 diabetes. The PISCH was then applied and assessed for its reliability across the unitization of interactions, the activities that were reflected, and the characteristics of patient-centered interactional sensitivity that were observed within each unit. In most cases, the PISCH resulted in reliable analysis of the interactions, but a few key areas (shared decision making, enabling self-management, and responding to emotion) were not reliably assessed. Implications of the test of this coding scheme include the expansion of the theoretical notion of interactional sensitivity to the health care context, rigorous implementation of a multimethod measurement development that relied on qualitative and quantitative assessments, and important future questions about the role of communication concepts in future interpersonal research.

  3. Driver for solar cell i-v characteristic plots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, G.B.

    1980-01-15

    A bipolar voltage ramp generator applies a linear voltage through a resistor to a solar cell for plotting its current versus voltage (I-v) characteristic between short circuit and open circuit conditions, with automatic stops at the end points. The resistor serves the multiple purpose of providing a current sensing resistor, setting the full-scale current value, and providing a load line with a slope approximately equal to one, such that it will pass through the origin and the approximate center of the i-v curve with about equal distance from that center to each of the end points.

  4. Box Plots in the Australian Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jane M.

    2012-01-01

    This article compares the definition of "box plot" as used in the "Australian Curriculum: Mathematics" with other definitions used in the education community; describes the difficulties students experience when dealing with box plots; and discusses the elaboration that is necessary to enable teachers to develop the knowledge…

  5. The Heuristic Interpretation of Box Plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lem, Stephanie; Onghena, Patrick; Verschaffel, Lieven; Van Dooren, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Box plots are frequently used, but are often misinterpreted by students. Especially the area of the box in box plots is often misinterpreted as representing number or proportion of observations, while it actually represents their density. In a first study, reaction time evidence was used to test whether heuristic reasoning underlies this…

  6. Reaction Order Ambiguity in Integrated Rate Plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Integrated rate plots are frequently used in reaction kinetics to determine orders of reactions. It is often emphasised, when using this methodology in practice, that it is necessary to monitor the reaction to a substantial fraction of completion for these plots to yield unambiguous orders. The present article gives a theoretical and statistical…

  7. Box Plots in the Australian Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jane M.

    2012-01-01

    This article compares the definition of "box plot" as used in the "Australian Curriculum: Mathematics" with other definitions used in the education community; describes the difficulties students experience when dealing with box plots; and discusses the elaboration that is necessary to enable teachers to develop the knowledge necessary to use them…

  8. A Discussion on Mean Excess Plots

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Souvik

    2009-01-01

    A widely used tool in the study of risk, insurance and extreme values is the mean excess plot. One use is for validating a Generalized Pareto model for the excess distribution. This paper investigates some theoretical and practical aspects of the use of the mean excess plot.

  9. PlotStuff: A class for plotting stuff from overture based on: GL{underscore}GraphicsInterface: A graphics interface based on OpenGL based on: GenericGraphicsInterface: A generic graphics interface: User guide, Version 1.00

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henshaw, B.

    1996-10-16

    {bold PlotStuff} can be used to interactively plot objects from Overture such as mappings, grids and grid functions. PlotStuff can be used to plot contours, surfaces, streamlines and grids. It can also be used to plot one-dimensional line plots. {bold GL{emdash}GraphicsInterface} is a class (from which PlotStuff is derived) that implements some standard plotting functions using OpenGL. {bold GL{emdash}Graphicslnterface} is itself derived from the class GenericGraphicsInterface which defines some standard plotting functions that are independent of any particular graphics package.

  10. Dynamical stabilization of the body centered cubic phase in lanthanum and thorium by phonon-phonon interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souvatzis, P; Rudin, S P [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bjoerkman, T; Eriksson, O [Department of Physics, Uppsala University, Box 530, SE-75121, Uppsala (Sweden); Andersson, P [FOI, Swedish Defence Research Agency, SE-164 90 Stockholm (Sweden); Katsnelson, M I [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, NL-6525 ED, Nijmegen (Netherlands)], E-mail: petros.souvatzis@gmail.com

    2009-04-29

    A recently developed self-consistent ab initio lattice dynamical method has been applied to the high temperature body centered cubic (bcc) phase of La and Th, which are dynamically unstable at low temperatures. The bcc phase of these metals is found to be stabilized by phonon-phonon interactions. The calculated high temperature phonon frequencies for La are found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data.

  11. Correlations in Nuclear Arrhenius-Type Plots

    CERN Document Server

    Tsang, M B

    1998-01-01

    Arrhenius-type plots for multifragmentation process, defined as the transverse energy dependence of the single-fragment emission-probability, -ln(p_{b}) vs 1/sqrt(E_{t}), have been studied by examining the relationship of the parameters p_{b} and E_{t} to the intermediate-mass fragment multiplicity . The linearity of these plots reflects the correlation of the fragment multiplicity with the transverse energy. These plots may not provide thermal scaling information about fragment production as previously suggested.

  12. Academic-Centered Peer Interactions and Retention in Undergraduate Mathematics Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Kadian M.

    2009-01-01

    Peer interactions are a critical component of students' academic success and retention in undergraduate programs. Scholars argue that peer interactions influence students' cognitive development, identity development, self-confidence and self-efficacy, and social and academic integration into the university environment (Pascarella & Terenzini,…

  13. Institutional History of an Interactive Science Center: The Founding and Development of the Exploratorium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Rodney T.; Loomis, Molly; Crain, Rhiannon

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the historical conditions that fostered significant reform in science education. To understand these conditions, we employ a framework drawn from the new institutionalism in organization theory to study the founding and early development of the Exploratorium--a prominent science center that greatly impacted the field of science…

  14. Towards Interactive Medical Content Delivery Between Simulated Body Sensor Networks and Practical Data Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaobo; Li, Wei; Song, Jeungeun; Hossain, M Shamim; Mizanur Rahman, Sk Md; Alelaiwi, Abdulhameed

    2016-10-01

    With the development of IoT (Internet of Thing), big data analysis and cloud computing, traditional medical information system integrates with these new technologies. The establishment of cloud-based smart healthcare application gets more and more attention. In this paper, semi-physical simulation technology is applied to cloud-based smart healthcare system. The Body sensor network (BSN) of system transmit has two ways of data collection and transmission. The one is using practical BSN to collect data and transmitting it to the data center. The other is transmitting real medical data to practical data center by simulating BSN. In order to transmit real medical data to practical data center by simulating BSN under semi-physical simulation environment, this paper designs an OPNET packet structure, defines a gateway node model between simulating BSN and practical data center and builds a custom protocol stack. Moreover, this paper conducts a large amount of simulation on the real data transmission through simulation network connecting with practical network. The simulation result can provides a reference for parameter settings of fully practical network and reduces the cost of devices and personnel involved.

  15. Split-plot designs for multistage experimentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahci, Murat; Tyssedal, John

    2016-01-01

    at the same time will be more efficient. However, there have been only a few attempts in the literature to provide an adequate and easy-to-use approach for this problem. In this paper, we present a novel methodology for constructing two-level split-plot and multistage experiments. The methodology is based...... be accommodated in each stage. Furthermore, split-plot designs for multistage experiments with good projective properties are also provided....

  16. Generalised Recurrence Plot Analysis for Spatial Data

    OpenAIRE

    Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Juergen; Saparin, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Recurrence plot based methods are highly efficient and widely accepted tools for the investigation of time series or one-dimensional data. We present an extension of the recurrence plots and their quantifications in order to study recurrent structures in higher-dimensional spatial data. The capability of this extension is illustrated on prototypical 2D models. Next, the tested and proved approach is applied to assess the bone structure from CT images of human proximal tibia. We find that the ...

  17. Development of TRatioPlot in ROOT

    CERN Document Server

    Gessinger-Befurt, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The ROOT data analysis and visualization framework is a software package which is widely used in physics, especially in high energy physics. A common visualization which has so far been lacking a direct implementation is the ratio plot, as well as a few similar types of plots. The scope and goal of the summer student project at CERN was to implement a class in ROOT itself, that can take care of the most common types of calculations, and produces high quality visuals.

  18. Infant feeding: the interfaces between interaction design and cognitive ergonomics in user-centered design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Flavia; Araújo, Lilian Kely

    2012-01-01

    This text presents a discussion on the process of developing interactive products focused on infant behavior, which result was an interactive game for encouraging infant feeding. For that, it describes the use of cognitive psychology concepts added to interaction design methodology. Through this project, this article sustains how the cooperative use of these concepts provides adherent solutions to users' needs, whichever they are. Besides that, it verifies the closeness of those methodologies to boundary areas of knowledge, such as design focused on user and ergonomics.

  19. The usability of WeChat as a mobile and interactive medium in student-centered medical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Gao, Furong; Li, Jiao; Zhang, Jieping; Li, Siguang; Xu, Guo-Tong; Xu, Lei; Chen, Jianjun; Lu, Lixia

    2017-09-01

    Biochemistry and cellular biology courses for medical students at Tongji University include the assessment that provides students with feedback to enhance their learning, which is a type of formative assessment. However, frequent instant feedback and guidance for students is often absent or inconsistently included in the teaching process. WeChat, the most popular Chinese social media, was introduced in biochemistry and cellular biology course. A WeChat official account (OA) was set up as an instant interactive platform. Over a period of two semesters, OA sent 73 push notifications. The components included course notices, preclass thought questions, after-class study materials, answer questions and feedback, simulation exercises, teacher-student interaction, and research progress relevant to the course. WeChat OA served as an active-learning teaching tool, provided more frequent feedback and guidance to students, and facilitated better student-centered communication in the teaching process. Using the WeChat OA in medical teaching emphasized interactive, interoperable, effective, engaging, adaptable, and more participatory teaching styles. As a new platform, WeChat OA was free, Internet-reliant, and easily managed. Using this new medium as a communication tool accelerated further advancement of instant feedback and improvement in teaching activities. Notifications and interactive feedback via the mobile social medium WeChat OA anytime and anywhere facilitated a student-centered teaching mode. Use of WeChat OA significantly increased the proportion of students interactively participating and resulted in a high degree of student satisfaction. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(5):421-425, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  20. Functional interactions within 23S rRNA involving the peptidyltransferase center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S

    1992-01-01

    A molecular genetic approach has been employed to investigate functional interactions within 23S rRNA. Each of the three base substitutions at guanine 2032 has been made. The 2032A mutation confers resistance to the antibiotics chloramphenicol and clindamycin, which interact with the 23S r...... that also confer antibiotic resistance. Both the domain II deletion and the 2057A mutation relieve the hypersensitive effect of the 2032A mutation, producing an erythromycin-resistant phenotype; in addition, the combination of the 2032A and 2057A mutations confers a higher level of chloramphenicol...... and chloramphenicol. Introduction of the domain II deletion into these double-mutation constructs gives rise to erythromycin resistance. The results are interpreted as indicating that position 2032 interacts with the peptidyltransferase loop and that there is a functional connection between domains II and V....

  1. Pairing and unpairing electron densities in organic systems: Two-electron three center through space and through bonds interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobayan, Rosana M., E-mail: rmlb@exa.unne.edu.ar [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Naturales y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional del Nordeste, 3400, Corrientes (Argentina); Bochicchio, Roberto C., E-mail: rboc@df.uba.ar [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-05-07

    Two-electron three-center bonding interactions in organic ions like methonium (CH{sub 5}{sup +}), ethonium (C{sub 2}H{sub 7}{sup +}), and protonated alkanes n−C{sub 4}H{sub 11}{sup +} isomers (butonium cations) are described and characterized within the theoretical framework of the topological analysis of the electron density decomposition into its effectively paired and unpaired contributions. These interactions manifest in some of this type of systems as a concentration of unpaired electron cloud around the bond paths, in contrast to the well known paradigmatic boron hydrids in which it is not only concentrated close to the atomic nucleus and the bond paths but out of them and over the region defined by the involved atoms as a whole. This result permits to propose an attempt of classification for these interactions based in such manifestations. In the first type, it is called as interactions through bonds and in the second type as interactions through space type.

  2. The thermal expansion of a face-centered cubic lattice with central two-body interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bicknese, V.

    1965-01-01

    The thermal expansion e is calculated by minimizing the free energy, including the cubic and quartic phonon-interaction terms. The free energy is expanded to third order in e. The work is closely related to that of Maradudin and Maradudin, Flinn and Coldwell-Horsfall. The resulting formulas are appl

  3. Interactive Learning to Stimulate the Brain's Visual Center and to Enhance Memory Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yang H.; Allen, Philip A.; Chaumpanich, Kritsakorn; Xiao, Yingcai

    2014-01-01

    This short paper describes an ongoing NSF-funded project on enhancing science and engineering education using the latest technology. More specifically, the project aims at developing an interactive learning system with Microsoft Kinect™ and Unity3D game engine. This system promotes active, rather than passive, learning by employing embodied…

  4. The Quality of Early Childhood Educators: Children's Interaction in Greek Child Care Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentzou, Konstantina; Sakellariou, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Though quality in early childhood education and care has attracted last decades enormous research interest there is still not a unanimous agreement about its definition. Yet, almost all definitions attempted include interaction, group size, adult:child ratio and early childhood educators' level of education, as important indices of quality.…

  5. Puromycin-rRNA interaction sites at the peptidyl transferase center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez-Fonseca, Christina; Phan, Hien; Long, Katherine Sarah

    2000-01-01

    The binding site of puromycin was probed chemically in the peptidyl-transferase center of ribosomes from Escherichia coli and of puromycin-hypersensitive ribosomes from the archaeon Haloferax gibbonsii. Several nucleotides of the 23S rRNAs showed altered chemical reactivities in the presence....... This streptogramin motif is also likely to provide binding sites for the 3' termini of the acceptor and donor tRNAs. In contrast, the effects at A508 and A1579, which are located at the exit site of the peptide channel, are likely to be caused by a structural effect transmitted along the peptide channel....

  6. Formation of Neuronal Circuits by Interactions between Neuronal Populations Derived from Different Origins in the Drosophila Visual Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takumi Suzuki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A wide variety of neurons, including populations derived from different origins, are precisely arranged and correctly connected with their partner to establish a functional neural circuit during brain development. The molecular mechanisms that orchestrate the production and arrangement of these neurons have been obscure. Here, we demonstrate that cell-cell interactions play an important role in establishing the arrangement of neurons of different origins in the Drosophila visual center. Specific types of neurons born outside the medulla primordium migrate tangentially into the developing medulla cortex. During their tangential migration, these neurons express the repellent ligand Slit, and the two layers that the neurons intercalate between express the receptors Robo2 and Robo3. Genetic analysis suggests that Slit-Robo signaling may control the positioning of the layer cells or their processes to form a path for migration. Our results suggest that conserved axon guidance signaling is involved in the interactions between neurons of different origins during brain development.

  7. Colleague interactions and new drug prescribing behavior: the case of the initial prescription of antidepressants in Taiwanese medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Jou; Jan, Kuan-An; Kao, Jen-Tse

    2011-10-01

    This research explores the social factors influencing hospital physicians' initial adoption of duloxetine hydrochloride, with a focus on colleague interactions. The study analyzes archival data compiled by the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan to examine how the prescribing decisions made by psychiatrists' colleagues influence the likelihood of the psychiatrists' initial prescription. The results show that the adoption ratio of a physician's colleagues in a medical center is positively associated with the likelihood of a physician's adoption of the new drug. Specifically, colleague groups with similar and longer tenure as well as similar and older age have significantly positive effects. Colleague groups with the same and different gender also have positive effects. In summary, tenure and age, rather than gender, are vital sources of heterogeneous colleague interactions.

  8. 6th International Symposium on Recurrence Plots

    CERN Document Server

    Jr, Jr; Ioana, Cornel; Marwan, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The chapters in this book originate from the research work and contributions presented at the Sixth International Symposium on Recurrence Plots held in Grenoble, France in June 2015. Scientists from numerous disciplines gathered to exchange knowledge on recent applications and developments in recurrence plots and recurrence quantification analysis. This meeting was remarkable because of the obvious expansion of recurrence strategies (theory) and applications (practice) into ever-broadening fields of science. It discusses real-world systems from various fields, including mathematics, strange attractors, applied physics, physiology, medicine, environmental and earth sciences, as well as psychology and linguistics. Even readers not actively researching any of these particular systems will benefit from discovering how other scientists are finding practical non-linear solutions to specific problems. The book is of interest to an interdisciplinary audience of recurrence plot users and researchers interested in time...

  9. Application of mapped plots for single-owner forest surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul C. Van Deusen; Francis Roesch

    2009-01-01

    Mapped plots are used for the nation forest inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service. Mapped plots are also useful foro single ownership inventoires. Mapped plots can handle boundary overlap and can aprovide less variable estimates for specified forest conditions. Mapping is a good fit for fixed plot inventories where the fixed area plot is used for both mapping...

  10. PLOT3D Export Tool for Tecplot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The PLOT3D export tool for Tecplot solves the problem of modified data being impossible to output for use by another computational science solver. The PLOT3D Exporter add-on enables the use of the most commonly available visualization tools to engineers for output of a standard format. The exportation of PLOT3D data from Tecplot has far reaching effects because it allows for grid and solution manipulation within a graphical user interface (GUI) that is easily customized with macro language-based and user-developed GUIs. The add-on also enables the use of Tecplot as an interpolation tool for solution conversion between different grids of different types. This one add-on enhances the functionality of Tecplot so significantly, it offers the ability to incorporate Tecplot into a general suite of tools for computational science applications as a 3D graphics engine for visualization of all data. Within the PLOT3D Export Add-on are several functions that enhance the operations and effectiveness of the add-on. Unlike Tecplot output functions, the PLOT3D Export Add-on enables the use of the zone selection dialog in Tecplot to choose which zones are to be written by offering three distinct options - output of active, inactive, or all zones (grid blocks). As the user modifies the zones to output with the zone selection dialog, the zones to be written are similarly updated. This enables the use of Tecplot to create multiple configurations of a geometry being analyzed. For example, if an aircraft is loaded with multiple deflections of flaps, by activating and deactivating different zones for a specific flap setting, new specific configurations of that aircraft can be easily generated by only writing out specific zones. Thus, if ten flap settings are loaded into Tecplot, the PLOT3D Export software can output ten different configurations, one for each flap setting.

  11. Experimental strategies in carrying out VCU for tobacco crop I: plot design and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, F H R B; Ramalho, M A P; Pulcinelli, C E; Bruzi, A T

    2013-09-19

    We aimed to establish standards for tobacco Valor de Cultivo e Uso (VCU) in Brazil. We obtained information regarding the size and design of plots of two varietal groups of tobacco (Virginia and Burley). Ten inbred lines of each varietal group were evaluated in a randomized complete block design with four replications. The plot contained 42 plants with six rows of seven columns each. For each experiment plant, considering the position of the respective plant in the plot (row and column) as a reference, cured leaf weight (g/plant), total sugar content (%), and total alkaloid content (%) were determined. The maximum curvature of the variations in coefficients was estimated. Trials with the number of plants per plot ranging from 2 to 41 were simulated. The use of a border was not justified because the interactions between inbred lines x position in the plots were never significant, showing that the behavior of the inbred lines coincided with the different positions. The plant performance varied according to the column position in the plot. To lessen the effect of this factor, the use of plots with more than one row is recommended. Experimental precision, evaluated by the CV%, increased with an increase in plot size; nevertheless, the maximum curvature of the variation coefficient method showed no expressive increase in precision if the number of plants was greater than seven. The result in identification of the best inbred line, in terms of the size of each plot, coincided with the maximum curvature method.

  12. Generalised recurrence plot analysis for spatial data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marwan, Norbert [Institute of Physics, University of Potsdam, 14415 Potsdam (Germany)]. E-mail: marwan@agnld.uni-potsdam.de; Kurths, Juergen [Institute of Physics, University of Potsdam, 14415 Potsdam (Germany); Saparin, Peter [Department of Biomaterials, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, 14424 Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

    2007-01-08

    Recurrence plot based methods are highly efficient and widely accepted tools for the investigation of time series or one-dimensional data. We present an extension of the recurrence plots and their quantifications in order to study recurrent structures in higher-dimensional spatial data. The capability of this extension is illustrated on prototypical 2D models. Next, the tested and proved approach is applied to assess the bone structure from CT images of human proximal tibia. We find that the spatial structures in trabecular bone become more recurrent during the bone loss in osteoporosis.

  13. User-centered design improves the usability of drug-drug interaction alerts: Experimental comparison of interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Daniel R; Rizzato Lede, Daniel A; Otero, Carlos M; Risk, Marcelo R; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2017-02-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems can alert health professionals about drug interactions when they prescribe medications. The Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires in Argentina developed an electronic health record with drug-drug interaction alerts, using traditional software engineering techniques and requirements. Despite enhancing the drug-drug interaction knowledge database, the alert override rate of this system was very high. We redesigned the alert system using user-centered design (UCD) and participatory design techniques to enhance the drug-drug interaction alert interface. This paper describes the methodology of our UCD. We used crossover method with realistic, clinical vignettes to compare usability of the standard and new software versions in terms of efficiency, effectiveness, and user satisfaction. Our study showed that, compared to the traditional alert system, the UCD alert system was more efficient (alerts faster resolution), more effective (tasks completed with fewer errors), and more satisfying. These results indicate that UCD techniques that follow ISO 9241-210 can generate more usable alerts than traditional design.

  14. Evolution of initial distributions with one and two centers in a two-dimensional model of the reaction-diffusion type with a nonlocal interaction of finite radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, A. V.; Trifonov, A. Yu.; Shapovalov, A. V.

    2011-06-01

    Solutions of a generalized Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov equation for a nonlocal interaction of finite radius have been constructed for initial conditions with one and two localization centers by using numerical methods. The dynamics depends on the choice of the equation parameters and initial conditions. The processes of formation and interaction of the rings expanding from each of the two localization centers and the formation of dissipative structures are considered.

  15. A Data Analysis Center for Electromagnetic and Hadronic Interaction. Products of the DAC members

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briscoe, William John [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Strakovsky, Igor I. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Workman, Ronald L. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-08-31

    The Data Analysis Center (DAC) of the Center for Nuclear Studies (CNS) at the George Washington University (GW) has made significant progress in its program to enhance and expand the partial-wave (and multipole) analyses of fundamental two- and three-body reactions (such as pion-nucleon, photon-nucleon, and nucleon-nucleon scattering) by maintaining and augmenting the analysis codes and databases associated with these reactions. These efforts provide guidance to experimental groups at the international level, forming an important link between theory and experiment. A renaissance in light hadron spectroscopy is underway as a continuous stream of polarization data issues from existing precision electromagnetic facilities and the coming Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade. Our principal goals have been focused on supporting the national N* resonance physics program. We have also continued to study topics more generally related to the problems associated with partial-wave analysis. On the Experimental side of the CNS DAC. Its primary goal is the enhancement of the body of data necessary for our analyses of fundamental γ - N reactions. We perform experiments that study the dynamics responsible for the internal structure of the nucleon and its excitations. Our principal focus is on the N* programs at JLab and MAMI. At JLab we study spin-polarization observables using polarized photons, protons and neutrons and yielding charged final states. Similarly at MAMI we study neutral meson photoproduction off polarized protons and neutrons. We use the Crystal Ball and TAPS spectrometers (CBT) to detect photons and neutrons to measure the photoproduction of π0, η, 2π0, π0η, and K0 off the neutron. The CBT program complements our program at JLab, which studies reactions resulting in charged final states. We are also involved in a renewed effort to make neutral pion photoproduction measurements close to threshold at Mainz. In addition to the programs underway, we are contributing to

  16. A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot has been constructed for simple fluids which is suitable for engineering computations in heat transfer. Volumetric expansion factors have been found useful in correlating heat transfer data over a wide range of operating conditions including liquids, gases and the near critical region.

  17. A model of motion transparency processing with local center-surround interactions and feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudies, Florian; Mingolla, Ennio; Neumann, Heiko

    2011-11-01

    Motion transparency occurs when multiple coherent motions are perceived in one spatial location. Imagine, for instance, looking out of the window of a bus on a bright day, where the world outside the window is passing by and movements of passengers inside the bus are reflected in the window. The overlay of both motions at the window leads to motion transparency, which is challenging to process. Noisy and ambiguous motion signals can be reduced using a competition mechanism for all encoded motions in one spatial location. Such a competition, however, leads to the suppression of multiple peak responses that encode different motions, as only the strongest response tends to survive. As a solution, we suggest a local center-surround competition for population-encoded motion directions and speeds. Similar motions are supported, and dissimilar ones are separated, by representing them as multiple activations, which occurs in the case of motion transparency. Psychophysical findings, such as motion attraction and repulsion for motion transparency displays, can be explained by this local competition. Besides this local competition mechanism, we show that feedback signals improve the processing of motion transparency. A discrimination task for transparent versus opaque motion is simulated, where motion transparency is generated by superimposing large field motion patterns of either varying size or varying coherence of motion. The model's perceptual thresholds with and without feedback are calculated. We demonstrate that initially weak peak responses can be enhanced and stabilized through modulatory feedback signals from higher stages of processing.

  18. Interactive data analysis for astronomy Shuttle experiments at Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinglesmith, D. A., III

    1981-01-01

    The eye as an efficient selection device for determining what is important in astronomical imagery can be greatly aided by the computer. A suitable facility, called the Interactive Astronomical Data Analysis Facility (IADAF), has been developed for the display and analysis of astronomical imagery by the Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics. The Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics currently has approval to fly two experiments on Spacelab. The Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Telescope (SEUTS) is to be used for the study of several fundamental problems of solar physics. The Ultraviolet Image Telescope for Astronomical Investigations (UIT) is to provide direct imagery of selected fields of view throughout the sky. A description is given of IADAF, taking into account its 16-bit computer and the COMTAL image processing display system. The use of IADAF by SEUTS and UIT is discussed.

  19. New Dimensions in Patient–Physician Interaction: Values, Autonomy, and Medical Information in the Patient-Centered Clinical Encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Aakash Kumar; Murinson, Beth Brianna

    2012-01-01

    Patient–physician interactions are increasingly influenced by the extraordinary diversification of populations and rapid expansion of medical knowledge that characterize our modern era. By contrast, the patient–physician interaction models currently used to teach medical trainees have little capacity to address these twin challenges. We developed a new model of patient–physician interaction to explicitly address these problems. Historically, models of patient–physician interaction viewed patient autonomy and the manifestation of clearly defined health care-related values as tightly linked, and it was assumed that patients’ medical knowledge was low. Unfortunately, this does not adequately represent patients such as 1) the highly educated non-medical specialist who possesses little familiarity with health-related values but is highly autonomous, and 2) the patient from a non-Western background who may have well-established health care-related values but a low sense of personal independence. In addition, it is evident to us that the assumption that all patients possess little medical knowledge can create alienation between patient and physician, e.g. the well-informed patient with a rare disease. We propose a paradigm that models autonomy, health care-related values formation, and medical knowledge as varying from patient to patient. Four examples of patient types are described within the context of the model based on clinical experience. We believe that adopting this model will have implications for optimizing patient–physician interactions and teaching about patient-centered care. Further research is needed to identify relevant patient types within this framework and to assess the impact on health care outcomes. PMID:23908841

  20. Interaction of molecular hydrogen with open transition metal centers for enhanced binding in metal-organic frameworks: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochan, Rohini C; Khaliullin, Rustam Z; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2008-05-19

    Molecular hydrogen is known to form stable, "nonclassical" sigma complexes with transition metal centers that are stabilized by donor-acceptor interactions and electrostatics. In this computational study, we establish that strong H2 sorption sites can be obtained in metal-organic frameworks by incorporating open transition metal sites on the organic linkers. Using density functional theory and energy decomposition analysis, we investigate the nature and characteristics of the H2 interaction with models of exposed open metal binding sites {half-sandwich piano-stool shaped complexes of the form (Arene)ML(3- n)(H2)n [M=Cr, Mo, V(-), Mn(+); Arene = C6H5X (X=H, F, Cl, OCH3, NH2, CH3, CF3) or C6H3Y2X (Y=COOH, X=CF3, Cl; L=CO; n=1-3]}. The metal-H2 bond dissociation energy of the studied complexes is calculated to be between 48 and 84 kJ/mol, based on the introduction of arene substituents, changes to the metal core, and of charge-balancing ligands. Thus, design of the binding site controls the H2 binding affinity and could be potentially used to control the magnitude of the H2 interaction energy to achieve reversible sorption characteristics at ambient conditions. Energy decomposition analysis illuminates both the possibilities and present challenges associated with rational materials design.

  1. PetroPlot: A plotting and data management tool set for Microsoft Excel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yongjun; Langmuir, Charles H.; Asimow, Paul D.

    2003-03-01

    PetroPlot is a 4000-line software code written in Visual Basic for the spreadsheet program Excel that automates plotting and data management tasks for large amount of data. The major plotting functions include: automation of large numbers of multiseries XY plots; normalized diagrams (e.g., spider diagrams); replotting of any complex formatted diagram with multiple series for any other axis parameters; addition of customized labels for individual data points; and labeling flexible log scale axes. Other functions include: assignment of groups for samples based on multiple customized criteria; removal of nonnumeric values; calculation of averages/standard deviations; calculation of correlation matrices; deletion of nonconsecutive rows; and compilation of multiple rows of data for a single sample to single rows appropriate for plotting. A cubic spline function permits curve fitting to complex time series, and comparison of data to the fits. For users of Excel, PetroPlot increases efficiency of data manipulation and visualization by orders of magnitude and allows exploration of large data sets that would not be possible making plots individually. The source codes are open to all users.

  2. Visualisation of gene expression data - the GE-biplot, the Chip-plot and the Gene-plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittelkow, Yvonne E; Wilson, Susan R

    2003-01-01

    Visualisation methods for exploring microarray data are particularly important for gaining insight into data from gene expression experiments, such as those concerned with the development of an understanding of gene function and interactions. Further, good visualisation techniques are useful for outlier detection in microarray data and for aiding biological interpretation of results, as well as for presentation of overall summaries of the data. The biplot is particularly useful for the display of microarray data as both the genes and the chips can be simultaneously plotted. In this paper we describe several ordination techniques suitable for exploring microarray data, and we call these the GE-biplot, the Chip-plot and the Gene-plot. The general method is first evaluated on synthetic data simulated in accord with current biological interpretation of microarray data. Then it is applied to two well-known data sets, namely the colon data of Alon et al. (1999) and the leukaemia data of Golub et al. (1999). The usefulness of the approach for interpreting and comparing different analyses of the same data is demonstrated.

  3. The Plot Thickens: Diet Microbe Interactions May Modulate Thrombosis Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Del Campo, Ana; Romano, Kymberleigh A; Rey, Federico E; Balskus, Emily P

    2016-04-12

    Thrombosis plays an important role in cardiovascular disease (CVD). Platelet activation is an essential step in the genesis and propagation of atherothrombotic complications. In a recent publication, Zhu and colleagues report that gut microbe-derived TMAO enhances platelet responsiveness and thrombosis, providing a novel mechanistic connection between microbes and CVD (Zhu et al., 2016).

  4. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, October 1976-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, A.

    1979-01-01

    DOE Contract No. EY-76-S-02-4078 was started in October 1976 to set up an investigative radiochemical facility at the Yale Medical Center which would bridge the gap between current investigation with radionuclides at the Yale School of Medicine and the facilities in the Chemistry Department at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. To facilitate these goals, Dr. Mathew L. Thakur was recruited who joined the Yale University faculty in March of 1977. This report briefly summarizes our research accomplishments through the end of June 1979. These can be broadly classified into three categories: (1) research using indium-111 labelled cellular blood components; (2) development of new radiopharmaceuticals; and (3) interaction with Dr. Alfred Wolf and colleagues in the Chemistry Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  5. Convex Arrhenius plots and their interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhlar, Donald G.; Kohen, Amnon

    2001-01-01

    This paper draws attention to selected experiments on enzyme-catalyzed reactions that show convex Arrhenius plots, which are very rare, and points out that Tolman's interpretation of the activation energy places a fundamental model-independent constraint on any detailed explanation of these reactions. The analysis presented here shows that in such systems, the rate coefficient as a function of energy is not just increasing more slowly than expected, it is actually decreasing. This interpretation of the data provides a constraint on proposed microscopic models, i.e., it requires that any successful model of a reaction with a convex Arrhenius plot should be consistent with the microcanonical rate coefficient being a decreasing function of energy. The implications and limitations of this analysis to interpreting enzyme mechanisms are discussed. This model-independent conclusion has broad applicability to all fields of kinetics, and we also draw attention to an analogy with diffusion in metastable fluids and glasses. PMID:11158559

  6. Extended quantification of the generalized recurrence plot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Maik; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    The generalized recurrence plot is a modern tool for quantification of complex spatial patterns. Its application spans the analysis of trabecular bone structures, Turing structures, turbulent spatial plankton patterns, and fractals. But, it is also successfully applied to the description of spatio-temporal dynamics and the detection of regime shifts, such as in the complex Ginzburg-Landau- equation. The recurrence plot based determinism is a central measure in this framework quantifying the level of regularities in temporal and spatial structures. We extend this measure for the generalized recurrence plot considering additional operations of symmetry than the simple translation. It is tested not only on two-dimensional regular patterns and noise but also on complex spatial patterns reconstructing the parameter space of the complex Ginzburg-Landau-equation. The extended version of the determinism resulted in values which are consistent to the original recurrence plot approach. Furthermore, the proposed method allows a split of the determinism into parts which based on laminar and non-laminar regions of the two-dimensional pattern of the complex Ginzburg-Landau-equation. A comparison of these parts with a standard method of image classification, the co-occurrence matrix approach, shows differences especially in the description of patterns associated with turbulence. In that case, it seems that the extended version of the determinism allows a distinction of phase turbulence and defect turbulence by means of their spatial patterns. This ability of the proposed method promise new insights in other systems with turbulent dynamics coming from climatology, biology, ecology, and social sciences, for example.

  7. Finding the service you need: human centered design of a Digital Interactive Social Chart in DEMentia care (DEM-DISC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Roest, H G; Meiland, F J M; Haaker, T; Reitsma, E; Wils, H; Jonker, C; Dröes, R M

    2008-01-01

    Community dwelling people with dementia and their informal carers experience a lot of problems. In the course of the disease process people with dementia become more dependent on others and professional help is often necessary. Many informal carers and people with dementia experience unmet needs with regard to information on the disease and on the available care and welfare offer, therefore they tend not to utilize the broad spectrum of available care and welfare services. This can have very negative consequences like unsafe situations, social isolation of the person with dementia and overburden of informal carers with consequent increased risk of illness for them. The development of a DEMentia specific Digital Interactive Social Chart (DEM-DISC) may counteract these problems. DEM-DISC is a demand oriented website for people with dementia and their carers, which is easy, accessible and provides users with customized information on healthcare and welfare services. DEM-DISC is developed according to the human centered design principles, this means that people with dementia, informal carers and healthcare professionals were involved throughout the development process. This paper describes the development of DEM-DISC from four perspectives, a domain specific content perspective, an ICT perspective, a user perspective and an organizational perspective. The aims and most important results from each perspective will be discussed. It is concluded that the human centered design was a valuable method for the development of the DEM-DISC.

  8. AvoPlot: An extensible scientific plotting tool based on matplotlib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nial Peters

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available AvoPlot is a simple-to-use graphical plotting program written in Python and making extensive use of the matplotlib plotting library. It can be found at http://code.google.com/p/avoplot/. In addition to providing a user-friendly interface to the powerful capabilities of the matplotlib library, it also offers users the possibility of extending its functionality by creating plug-ins. These can import specific types of data into the interface and also provide new tools for manipulating them. In this respect, AvoPlot is a convenient platform for researchers to build their own data analysis tools on top of, as well as being a useful standalone program.

  9. 9 CFR 108.3 - Preparation of plot plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preparation of plot plans. 108.3... LICENSED ESTABLISHMENTS § 108.3 Preparation of plot plans. Plot plans shall show all of the buildings on a... on the plot plan the use of immediate adjacent properties such as, residential area, pasture,...

  10. SciDAC - Center for Simulation of Wave Interactions with MHD -- General Atomics Support of ORNL Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abla, G

    2012-11-09

    The Center for Simulation of Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics (SWIM) project is dedicated to conduct research on integrated multi-physics simulations. The Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) is a framework that was created by the SWIM team. It provides an integration infrastructure for loosely coupled component-based simulations by facilitating services for code execution coordination, computational resource management, data management, and inter-component communication. The IPS framework features improving resource utilization, implementing application-level fault tolerance, and support of the concurrent multi-tasking execution model. The General Atomics (GA) team worked closely with other team members on this contract, and conducted research in the areas of computational code monitoring, meta-data management, interactive visualization, and user interfaces. The original website to monitor SWIM activity was developed in the beginning of the project. Due to the amended requirements, the software was redesigned and a revision of the website was deployed into production in April of 2010. Throughout the duration of this project, the SWIM Monitoring Portal (http://swim.gat.com:8080/) has been a critical production tool for supporting the project's physics goals.

  11. Optimal plot design in a multipurpose forest inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena M. Henttonen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: We explore the factors affecting the optimal plot design (size and type as well as the subsample tree selection strategies within a plot and their relative importance in defining the optimal plot design in amultipurpose forest inventory. The factors include time used to lay out the plot and to make the tree measurements within the plot, the between-plot variation of each of the variables of interest in the area, and the measurement and model errors for the different variables. Methods: We simulate different plot types and sizes and subsample tree selection strategies on measuredtest areas from North Lapland. The plot types used are fixed-radius, concentric and relascope plots. Weselect the optimal type and size first at plot level using a cost-plus-loss approach and then at cluster level byminimizing the weighted standard error with fixed budget. Results: As relascope plots are very efficient at the plot level for volume and basal area, and fixed-radius plots for stems per ha, the optimal plot type strongly depends on the relative importance of these variables. The concentric plot seems to be a good compromise between these two in many cases. The subsample tree selection strategy was more important in selecting optimal plot than many other factors. In cluster level, the most important factor is the transfer time between plots. Conclusions: While the optimal radius of plots and other parameters were sensitive to the measurement times and other cost factors, the concentric plot type was optimal in almost all studied cases. Subsample tree measurement strategies need further studies, as they were an important cost factor. However, their importance to the precision was not as clear. Keywords: Sample, Plot, Forest inventory, Measurement, Cost, Loss

  12. Dynamical assessment of physiological systems and states using recurrence plot strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, C L; Zbilut, J P

    1994-02-01

    Physiological systems are best characterized as complex dynamical processes that are continuously subjected to and updated by nonlinear feedforward and feedback inputs. System outputs usually exhibit wide varieties of behaviors due to dynamical interactions between system components, external noise perturbations, and physiological state changes. Complicated interactions occur at a variety of hierarchial levels and involve a number of interacting variables, many of which are unavailable for experimental measurement. In this paper we illustrate how recurrence plots can take single physiological measurements, project them into multidimensional space by embedding procedures, and identify time correlations (recurrences) that are not apparent in the one-dimensional time series. We extend the original description of recurrence plots by computing an array of specific recurrence variables that quantify the deterministic structure and complexity of the plot. We then demonstrate how physiological states can be assessed by making repeated recurrence plot calculations within a window sliding down any physiological dynamic. Unlike other predominant time series techniques, recurrence plot analyses are not limited by data stationarity and size constraints. Pertinent physiological examples from respiratory and skeletal motor systems illustrate the utility of recurrence plots in the diagnosis of nonlinear systems. The methodology is fully applicable to any rhythmical system, whether it be mechanical, electrical, neural, hormonal, chemical, or even spacial.

  13. FERMI/GLAST Integrated Trending and Plotting System Release 5.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Sheila; Brumer, Haim; Reitan, Denise

    2012-01-01

    An Integrated Trending and Plotting System (ITPS) is a trending, analysis, and plotting system used by space missions to determine performance and status of spacecraft and its instruments. ITPS supports several NASA mission operational control centers providing engineers, ground controllers, and scientists with access to the entire spacecraft telemetry data archive for the life of the mission, and includes a secure Web component for remote access. FERMI/GLAST ITPS Release 5.0 features include the option to display dates (yyyy/ddd) instead of orbit numbers along orbital Long-Term Trend (LTT) plot axis, the ability to save statistics from daily production plots as image files, and removal of redundant edit/create Input Definition File (IDF) screens. Other features are a fix to address invalid packet lengths, a change in naming convention of image files in order to use in script, the ability to save all ITPS plot images (from Windows or the Web) as GIF or PNG format, the ability to specify ymin and ymax on plots where previously only the desired range could be specified, Web interface capability to plot IDFs that contain out-oforder page and plot numbers, and a fix to change all default file names to show yyyydddhhmmss time stamps instead of hhmmssdddyyyy. A Web interface capability sorts files based on modification date (with newest one at top), and the statistics block can be displayed via a Web interface. Via the Web, users can graphically view the volume of telemetry data from each day contained in the ITPS archive in the Web digest. The ITPS could be also used in nonspace fields that need to plot data or trend data, including financial and banking systems, aviation and transportation systems, healthcare and educational systems, sales and marketing, and housing and construction.

  14. Charm Dalitz Plot Analysis Formalism and Results

    CERN Document Server

    Asner, David M

    2004-01-01

    Charm meson decay dynamics have been studied extensively over the last decade. We describe the Dalitz-plot analysis technique which has been applied by many experiments to three-body D0, D+ and Ds decays. We discuss experimental results from Mark II, Mark III, E687, E691, ARGUS, E791, FOCUS, CLEO and BABAR. These studies probe a variety of physics including doubly-Cabibbo suppressed decays, searches for CP violation, the properties of established light mesons and the properties of pipi and Kpi S-wave states.

  15. Optimal plot design in a multipurpose forest inventory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helena M Henttonen; Annika Kangas

    2016-01-01

    Background:We explore the factors affecting the optimal plot design (size and type as well as the subsample tree selection strategies within a plot) and their relative importance in defining the optimal plot design in amultipurpose forest inventory. The factors include time used to lay out the plot and to make the tree measurements within the plot, the between-plot variation of each of the variables of interest in the area, and the measurement and model errors for the different variables. Methods:We simulate different plot types and sizes and subsample tree selection strategies on measuredtest areas from North Lapland. The plot types used are fixed-radius, concentric and relascope plots. Weselect the optimal type and size first at plot level using a cost-plus-loss approach and then at cluster level byminimizing the weighted standard error with fixed budget. Results:As relascope plots are very efficient at the plot level for volume and basal area, and fixed-radius plots for stems per ha, the optimal plot type strongly depends on the relative importance of these variables. The concentric plot seems to be a good compromise between these two in many cases. The subsample tree selection strategy was more important in selecting optimal plot than many other factors. In cluster level, the most important factor is the transfer time between plots. Conclusions:While the optimal radius of plots and other parameters were sensitive to the measurement times and other cost factors, the concentric plot type was optimal in almost al studied cases. Subsample tree measurement strategies need further studies, as they were an important cost factor. However, their importance to the precision was not as clear.

  16. Dalitz Plot Analysis of Ds+->pi+pi-pi+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, R.N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-01-26

    A Dalitz plot analysis of {approx} 13, 000 D{sub s}{sup +} decays to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} has been performed. A 384 fb{sup -1} data sample, recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring running at center of mass energies near 10.6 GeV, is used. Amplitudes and phases of the intermediate resonances which contribute to this final state are measured. A high precision measurement of the ratio: {Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.199 {+-} 0.004 {+-} 0.006 is performed. Using a model independent partial wave analysis the amplitude and phase of the S-wave have been measured.

  17. Dalitz plot analysis of Ds+→π+π-π+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Ronan, M. T.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Li, X.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.

    2009-02-01

    A Dalitz plot analysis of approximately 13 000 Ds+ decays to π+π-π+ has been performed. The analysis uses a 384fb-1 data sample recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- storage ring running at center of mass energies near 10.6 GeV. Amplitudes and phases of the intermediate resonances which contribute to this final state are measured. A high precision measurement of the ratio of branching fractions is performed: B(Ds+→π+π-π+)/B(Ds+→K+K-π+)=0.199±0.004±0.009. Using a model-independent partial wave analysis, the amplitude and phase of the S wave have been measured.

  18. Hypothetical Outcome Plots Outperform Error Bars and Violin Plots for Inferences about Reliability of Variable Ordering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Hullman

    Full Text Available Many visual depictions of probability distributions, such as error bars, are difficult for users to accurately interpret. We present and study an alternative representation, Hypothetical Outcome Plots (HOPs, that animates a finite set of individual draws. In contrast to the statistical background required to interpret many static representations of distributions, HOPs require relatively little background knowledge to interpret. Instead, HOPs enables viewers to infer properties of the distribution using mental processes like counting and integration. We conducted an experiment comparing HOPs to error bars and violin plots. With HOPs, people made much more accurate judgments about plots of two and three quantities. Accuracy was similar with all three representations for most questions about distributions of a single quantity.

  19. Hypothetical Outcome Plots Outperform Error Bars and Violin Plots for Inferences about Reliability of Variable Ordering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullman, Jessica; Resnick, Paul; Adar, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    Many visual depictions of probability distributions, such as error bars, are difficult for users to accurately interpret. We present and study an alternative representation, Hypothetical Outcome Plots (HOPs), that animates a finite set of individual draws. In contrast to the statistical background required to interpret many static representations of distributions, HOPs require relatively little background knowledge to interpret. Instead, HOPs enables viewers to infer properties of the distribution using mental processes like counting and integration. We conducted an experiment comparing HOPs to error bars and violin plots. With HOPs, people made much more accurate judgments about plots of two and three quantities. Accuracy was similar with all three representations for most questions about distributions of a single quantity. PMID:26571487

  20. A Plot Story:The Ransom of Red Chief

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Si-yu

    2015-01-01

    The Ransom of Red Chief is a short story written by O · Henry. Some critics regard it as a plot story but some do not. A typical plot story should focus on the plot:using techniques such as flashback or foreshadowing to unfold the plot and containing exposition, complication, climax, resolution, conclusion to rich the plot. The main characters are presented with internal and ex⁃ternal conflicts as well. In this thesis, a detailed analysis will be presented to prove that this story is really a plot story.

  1. Human-robot interactions during the robot-assisted urban search and rescue response at the World Trade Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, J; Murphy, R R

    2003-01-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) rescue response provided an unfortunate opportunity to study the human-robot interactions (HRI) during a real unstaged rescue for the first time. A post-hoc analysis was performed on the data collected during the response, which resulted in 17 findings on the impact of the environment and conditions on the HRI: the skills displayed and needed by robots and humans, the details of the Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) task, the social informatics in the USAR domain, and what information is communicated at what time. The results of this work impact the field of robotics by providing a case study for HRI in USAR drawn from an unstaged USAR effort. Eleven recommendations are made based on the findings that impact the robotics, computer science, engineering, psychology, and rescue fields. These recommendations call for group organization and user confidence studies, more research into perceptual and assistive interfaces, and formal models of the state of the robot, state of the world, and information as to what has been observed.

  2. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: The Approach to Equilibrium in Strongly Interacting Matter. Volume 118

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Venugopalan, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berges, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaizot, J. -P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gelis, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-04-09

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory*. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan and the U. S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The RBRC is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has theory, lattice gauge computing and experimental components. It is presently exploring the possibility of an astrophysics component being added to the program. The purpose of this Workshop is to critically review the recent progress on the theory and phenomenology of early time dynamics in relativistic heavy ion collisions from RHIC to LHC energies, to examine the various approaches on thermalization and existing issues, and to formulate new research efforts for the future. Topics slated to be covered include Experimental evidence for equilibration/isotropization, comparison of various approaches, dependence on the initial conditions and couplings, and turbulent cascades and Bose-Einstein condensation.

  3. Public Communication of Science and Technology in Museums and Interactive Centers in MedellÍn (Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Inés Jiménez-G.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the simple and complex deficit and democratic model approaches, this paper analyses the communication strategies applied in several museums and interactive centers —Parque Explora, Museo Interactivo Empresas Públicas de Medellín, Planetario Jesús Emilio Ramírez and Museo Universitario from the University of Antioquia in the city of Medellín—. We argue that communicating scientific and technological developments at a conjunctural moment —because of the pressure exerted by the demand side to bring knowledge within the reach of the man in the street— involves recognizing science and technology issues should not be conveyed in a language increasingly distanced from layman’s understanding and should allow for citizens’ critical thinking formation face to techno-scientific developments. By analysing the communication approaches mentioned above, we found significant obstacles to be overcome in the communication strategies applied by museum staff in order to come to an understanding of science and technology.

  4. NOTE - Minimum number of common bean plants per plot to assess field resistance to white mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    uliana Andrade Dias

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the minimum number of plants per plot to assess the field resistance in common beanto white mold. Thirteen cultivars were inoculated with six isolates of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and evaluated in a randomized blockdesign with three replications and plots consisting of 1-m rows with 15 plants. Plants were inoculated by the straw test as proposedby Petzoldt and Dickson (1996, to evaluate partial resistance in a greenhouse. Eight days after inoculation the disease severity wasevaluated on a 1-9 diagrammatic scale, where 1 = asymptomatic plants to 9 = plant death. To determine the minimum number ofplants per plot, the following methods were used: maximum curvature, segmented linear model, quadratic segmented model and therelative CV model. There were significant differences among cultivars and isolates and no significant cultivar - isolate interaction.It was observed that eight plants per plot is an adequate number to assess the reaction of common bean to white mold.

  5. Volcano plots in analyzing differential expressions with mRNA microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wentian

    2012-12-01

    A volcano plot displays unstandardized signal (e.g. log-fold-change) against noise-adjusted/standardized signal (e.g. t-statistic or -log(10)(p-value) from the t-test). We review the basic and interactive use of the volcano plot and its crucial role in understanding the regularized t-statistic. The joint filtering gene selection criterion based on regularized statistics has a curved discriminant line in the volcano plot, as compared to the two perpendicular lines for the "double filtering" criterion. This review attempts to provide a unifying framework for discussions on alternative measures of differential expression, improved methods for estimating variance, and visual display of a microarray analysis result. We also discuss the possibility of applying volcano plots to other fields beyond microarray.

  6. Heterogeneous Molecular Catalysis of Electrochemical Reactions: Volcano Plots and Catalytic Tafel Plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costentin, Cyrille; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2017-06-14

    We analyze here, in the framework of heterogeneous molecular catalysis, the reasons for the occurrence or nonoccurrence of volcanoes upon plotting the kinetics of the catalytic reaction versus the stabilization free energy of the primary intermediate of the catalytic process. As in the case of homogeneous molecular catalysis or catalysis by surface-active metallic sites, a strong motivation of such studies relates to modern energy challenges, particularly those involving small molecules, such as water, hydrogen, oxygen, proton, and carbon dioxide. This motivation is particularly pertinent for what concerns heterogeneous molecular catalysis, since it is commonly preferred to homogeneous molecular catalysis by the same molecules if only for chemical separation purposes and electrolytic cell architecture. As with the two other catalysis modes, the main drawback of the volcano plot approach is the basic assumption that the kinetic responses depend on a single descriptor, viz., the stabilization free energy of the primary intermediate. More comprehensive approaches, investigating the responses to the maximal number of experimental factors, and conveniently expressed as catalytic Tafel plots, should clearly be preferred. This is more so in the case of heterogeneous molecular catalysis in that additional transport factors in the supporting film may additionally affect the current-potential responses. This is attested by the noteworthy presence of maxima in catalytic Tafel plots as well as their dependence upon the cyclic voltammetric scan rate.

  7. Showcasing the InTeGrate STEP Center principles and implementation programs through interactive webinars and websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, C. H.; McFadden, R.; Manduca, C. A.; Newman, A.

    2016-12-01

    Teaching sustainability curriculum provides an opportunity for building connections between academic learning and examples, experiences, and issues from beyond academia. Done well, this can increase students interest in a topic that feels relevant to their lives and help them transfer this learning to real life situations in their professional and personal lives. To support this approach to teaching, the NSF STEP Center InTeGrate developed a set of five core principles to guide development of teaching materials and programs that draw content from grand challenges to society and work to improve students' ability to understand the nature of science and think like a scientist. These principles include both effective pedagogical approaches and an interdisciplinary framework and are reflected in example curriculum modules, and implementation programs supported by InTeGrate. In order to promote adoption of teaching aligned with the InTeGrate philosophy and to use the InTeGrate-developed materials as tools, we organized a public webinar series led by materials developers and program leaders in the InTeGrate community. The webinars highlight programs that have addressed bigger-scale challenges such as increasing diversity of our majors and creating pathways to the workforce, as well as the materials used by these programs. They provide detailed examples designed to help other groups implement similar programs including showcase teaching activities and examples of their use in a wide range of settings. The webinars are interactive, with built-in activities and reflections that promote discussion among participants and speakers. Topics include natural hazards and risks, water resources and sustainability, energy and atmosphere, integrating sustainability into your course, and tracing environmental contaminants. These have clear components of geoscience, but promote an interdisciplinary perspective, that provides a deeper and more thorough discussion. Each webinar is archived

  8. Interaction and dephasing of center-of-mass quantized excitons in wide ZnSe/Zn0.94Mg0.06Se quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Hans Peter; Schätz, A.; Maier, R.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the interaction and dephasing of the excitons in wide ZnSe/Zn0.94Mg0.06Se quantum wells by spectrally resolved, femtosecond four-wave mixing (FWM). Polarization-dependent measurements indicate that excitation-induced dephasing is the dominant FWM process. The biexcitons of the center...

  9. A Study of Teacher-Pupil and Pupil-Pupil Interactional Differences Between Inquiry Centered Science and Traditional Science in Elementary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rains, Ohren Willis

    Reported is a study of teacher-pupil and pupil-pupil interactional differences between a traditional instruction method and an inquiry-centered learning method for 18 science classes at the fourth and fifth grade levels. Nine classes were assigned to the experimental group, and the remaining nine classes received a traditional program. Classroom…

  10. Generalized confidence interval plots using commands or dialogs

    OpenAIRE

    Roger Newson

    2005-01-01

    Confidence intervals may be presented as publication-ready tables or as presentation-ready plots. -eclplot- produces plots of estimates and confidence intervals. It inputs a dataset (or resultsset) with one observation per parameter and variables containing estimates, lower and upper confidence limits, and a fourth variable, against which the confidence intervals are plotted. This resultsset can be used for producing both plots and tables, and may be generated using a spreadsheet or using -st...

  11. When does the mean excess plot look linear?

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Souvik

    2010-01-01

    In risk analysis, the mean excess plot is a commonly used exploratory plotting technique for confirming iid data is consistent with a generalized Pareto assumption for the underlying distribution, since in the presence of such a distribution thresholded data have a mean excess plot that is roughly linear. Does any other class of distributions share this linearity of the plot? Under some extra assumptions, we are able to conclude that only the generalized Pareto family has this property.

  12. Worm plot to diagnose fit in quantile regression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buuren, S. van

    2007-01-01

    The worm plot is a series of detrended Q-Q plots, split by covariate levels. The worm plot is a diagnostic tool for visualizing how well a statistical model fits the data, for finding locations at which the fit can be improved, and for comparing the fit of different models. This paper shows how the

  13. Worm plot to diagnose fit in quantile regression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buuren, S. van

    2007-01-01

    The worm plot is a series of detrended Q-Q plots, split by covariate levels. The worm plot is a diagnostic tool for visualizing how well a statistical model fits the data, for finding locations at which the fit can be improved, and for comparing the fit of different models. This paper shows how

  14. Worm plot to diagnose fit in quantile regression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buuren, S. van

    2007-01-01

    The worm plot is a series of detrended Q-Q plots, split by covariate levels. The worm plot is a diagnostic tool for visualizing how well a statistical model fits the data, for finding locations at which the fit can be improved, and for comparing the fit of different models. This paper shows how the

  15. Meson Production in Proton-Proton and Antiproton - Interactions at Center of Mass Energy = 24.3 GEV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vinay Mohan

    Experiment UA6 measured the inclusive production cross section of pi^0, eta, and omega mesons in the p_{T} range 3.5 to 6.1 GeV/c in the reactions;eqalignno {p + p&to M + Xcrnoalign{hbox {rm and}}|{p} + p& to M + Xcr}where M represents a meson and X any other associated particles, at center of mass energy sqrt{s} = 24.3 GeV. The experiment was located at the CERN SppS collider and utilized a fixed hydrogen gas jet as the target in oppositely circulating proton and antiproton beams of momenta 315 GeV/c. The apparatus could be rotated to select either proton-proton or antiproton-proton interactions. The meson production cross section results were obtained from the analysis of 3.7 inverse picobarns (pb ^{-1}) of pp data collected in 1988 and 3.2 pb^{-1} of pp data collected in 1989. The eta/pi ^0 production ratio is measured to be 0.61 +/- 0.03 +/- 0.07 for pp and 0.62 +/- 0.03 +/- 0.07 for pp. The omega/ pi^0 production ratio is measured to be 0.87 +/- 0.16 +/- 0.13 for pp and 0.84 +/- 0.16 +/- 0.13 for pp. The inclusive pi^0 cross section is determined as a function of p_{T} averaged over the rapidity range 0.6 <= y <= 1.2. Comparison of the production between pp and pp reveals no significant difference. The cross section and production ratios are also compared with results from other experiments and found to be in agreement.

  16. Density Distribution Sunflower Plots in Stata Version 8

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont, William D

    2004-01-01

    Density distribution sunflower plots are used to display high-density bivariate data. They are useful for data where a conventional scatter plot is difficult to read due to overstriking of the plot symbol. The x-y plane is subdivided into a lattice of regular hexagonal bins of width w specified by the user. The user also specifies the values of l, d, and k that affect the plot as follows. Individual observations are plotted when there are less than l observations per bin as in a conventional ...

  17. Development of plotting position for the general extreme value distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sooyoung; Shin, Hongjoon; Joo, Kyoungwon; Heo, Jun-Haeng

    2012-12-01

    SummaryProbability plotting positions are used to graphically display the annual maximum rainfall or flood and to estimate the exceedance probabilities of those values. Therefore, the graphical approach using plotting positions has been applied in many hydrology and water resource engineering fields. The definition of unbiased plotting positions by Cunnane (1978) as the mean of the order statistics from reduced variates has influenced researchers to develop the plotting position of the probability distribution containing shape parameters. In this study, the plotting position formula for the general extreme value (GEV) distribution was derived by using the theoretical reduced variates of the GEV distribution for various sample sizes and shape parameters. To choose an appropriate plotting position formula, we examined eight plotting position formula types containing coefficients of skewness or squared coefficients of skewness in the numerator and/or denominator. In addition, the parameters of the plotting position formula for the GEV distribution were estimated by using a genetic optimization method known as the real-coded genetic algorithm (RGA). The accuracy of the derived plotting position formula for the GEV distribution was examined on the basis of the root mean square errors and relative bias between the theoretical reduced variates and those calculated from the derived and existing plotting position formulas. The derived plotting formula was found to be useful if the range of the shape parameter was within ±0.2.

  18. Computer program documentation modified version of the JA70 aerodynamic heating computer program H800 (MINIVER with a DISSPLA plot package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, L.

    1980-01-01

    The changes, modifications, and inclusions which were adapted to the current version of the MINIVER program are discussed. Extensive modifications were made to various subroutines, and a new plot package added. This plot package is the Johnson Space Center DISSPLA Graphics System currently driven under an 1110 EXEC 8 configuration. User instructions on executing the MINIVER program are provided and the plot package is described.

  19. Tracking Changes in Cardiac Output: Statistical Considerations on the 4-Quadrant Plot and the Polar Plot Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugel, Bernd; Grothe, Oliver; Wagner, Julia Y

    2015-08-01

    When comparing 2 technologies for measuring hemodynamic parameters with regard to their ability to track changes, 2 graphical tools are omnipresent in the literature: the 4-quadrant plot and the polar plot recently proposed by Critchley et al. The polar plot is thought to be the more advanced statistical tool, but care should be taken when it comes to its interpretation. The polar plot excludes possibly important measurements from the data. The polar plot transforms the data nonlinearily, which may prevent it from being seen clearly. In this article, we compare the 4-quadrant and the polar plot in detail and thoroughly describe advantages and limitations of each. We also discuss pitfalls concerning the methods to prepare the researcher for the sound use of both methods. Finally, we briefly revisit the Bland-Altman plot for the use in this context.

  20. The use of generalized {delta}M plots in the magnetic characterization of particulate media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissell, P.R.; Cerchez, Mihai; Stoleriu, Laurentiu; Chantrell, R.W.; Stancu, Alexandru

    2003-10-01

    We present here the properties of the generalized and the integral generalized {delta}M plots which are used to build an identification algorithm for the Generalized Moving Preisach Model. We also simulated systems of interacting particles with magnetic moments dynamics described by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. In each equilibrium state one studies the statistics of the interactions and other relevant parameters. These parameters are compared with the ones provided by the identification algorithm.

  1. Dispersion-theoretical analysis of the D^+ --> K^- pi^+ pi^+ Dalitz plot

    CERN Document Server

    Niecknig, Franz

    2015-01-01

    We study the Dalitz plot of the Cabibbo-favored charmed-meson decay $D^+\\to K^-\\pi^+\\pi^+$ using dispersion theory. The formalism respects all constraints from analyticity and unitarity, and consistently describes final-state interactions between all three decay products. We employ pion-pion and pion-kaon phase shifts as input, and fit the pertinent subtraction constants to Dalitz plot data by the CLEO and FOCUS collaborations. Phase motions of resonant as well as nonresonant amplitudes are discussed, which should provide crucial input for future studies of CP violation in similar three-body charm decays.

  2. Split-plot designs for robotic serial dilution assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzas, Jeffrey S; Wager, Carrie G; Lansky, David M

    2011-12-01

    This article explores effective implementation of split-plot designs in serial dilution bioassay using robots. We show that the shortest path for a robot to fill plate wells for a split-plot design is equivalent to the shortest common supersequence problem in combinatorics. We develop an algorithm for finding the shortest common supersequence, provide an R implementation, and explore the distribution of the number of steps required to implement split-plot designs for bioassay through simulation. We also show how to construct collections of split plots that can be filled in a minimal number of steps, thereby demonstrating that split-plot designs can be implemented with nearly the same effort as strip-plot designs. Finally, we provide guidelines for modeling data that result from these designs.

  3. Cross recurrence plot based synchronization of time series

    OpenAIRE

    N. Marwan; Thiel, M.; Nowaczyk, N. R.

    2002-01-01

    The method of recurrence plots is extended to the cross recurrence plots (CRP) which, among others, enables the study of synchronization or time differences in two time series. This is emphasized in a distorted main diagonal in the cross recurrence plot, the line of synchronization (LOS). A non-parametrical fit of this LOS can be used to rescale the time axis of the two data series (whereby one of them is compressed or stretched) so ...

  4. Recurrence plot statistics and the effect of embedding

    OpenAIRE

    March, T. K.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R.O.

    2005-01-01

    Recurrence plots provide a graphical representation of the recurrent patterns in a timeseries, the quantification of which is a relatively new field. Here we derive analytical expressions which relate the values of key statistics, notably determinism and entropy of line length distribution, to the correlation sum as a function of embedding dimension. These expressions are obtained by deriving the transformation which generates an embedded recurrence plot from an unembedded plot. A single unem...

  5. Phase Plots of Complex Functions: a Journey in Illustration

    CERN Document Server

    Wegert, Elias

    2010-01-01

    We propose to visualize complex (meromorphic) functions $f$ by their phase $P_f:=f/|f|$. Color--coding the points on the unit circle converts the function $P_f$ to an image (the phase plot of $f$), which represents the function directly on its domain. We discuss how special properties of $f$ are reflected by their phase plots and indicate several applications. In particular we reformulate a universality theorem for Riemann's Zeta function in the language of phase plots.

  6. Ultrasonic beam-plotting with very small spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, W H; Swan, H

    1991-12-01

    A method of pulse-echo ultrasonic beam plotting is described. It differs from traditional pulse-echo beam plotting in that the ultrasonic pulses are scattered off a totally isolated sphere rather than a sphere suspended on a wire. The method also allows extremely small spheres to be used thus providing greater resolution. It is demonstrated that pulse-echo beam plotting using spheres of different size produces different iso-echo amplitude curves.

  7. Coarse-graining time series data: Recurrence plot of recurrence plots and its application for music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukino, Miwa; Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-02-01

    We propose a nonlinear time series method for characterizing two layers of regularity simultaneously. The key of the method is using the recurrence plots hierarchically, which allows us to preserve the underlying regularities behind the original time series. We demonstrate the proposed method with musical data. The proposed method enables us to visualize both the local and the global musical regularities or two different features at the same time. Furthermore, the determinism scores imply that the proposed method may be useful for analyzing emotional response to the music.

  8. Coarse-graining time series data: Recurrence plot of recurrence plots and its application for music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukino, Miwa; Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-02-01

    We propose a nonlinear time series method for characterizing two layers of regularity simultaneously. The key of the method is using the recurrence plots hierarchically, which allows us to preserve the underlying regularities behind the original time series. We demonstrate the proposed method with musical data. The proposed method enables us to visualize both the local and the global musical regularities or two different features at the same time. Furthermore, the determinism scores imply that the proposed method may be useful for analyzing emotional response to the music.

  9. 试论修辞谋划%On Rhetorical Plot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江结宝

    2015-01-01

    Rhetorical plot is the overall design,scheme and specification. It can be divided into macro⁃scopic plot,medium plot and microscopic plot,with different types of general plot and special plot.. Rhetori⁃cal plot is the beginning of rhetorical process running through the whole rhetoric process. Rhetoric should pay attention to research of rhetoric plot. Rhetoric plot is different from rhetorical strategy.%修辞谋划是对修辞行为的整体设计、谋定和规约。修辞谋划可分为宏观谋划、中观谋划和微观谋划三个层次,包括一般谋划和特殊谋划两大类型。修辞谋划是修辞过程的起点,并贯穿整个修辞过程,修辞学应该重视修辞谋划的研究。修辞谋划不同于一般所说的“修辞策略”。

  10. Measurement of the ω→π+π−π0 Dalitz plot distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Adlarson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Using the production reactions pd→He3ω and pp→ppω, the Dalitz plot distribution for the ω→π+π−π0 decay is studied with the WASA detector at COSY, based on a combined data sample of (4.408±0.042×104 events. The Dalitz plot density is parametrised by a product of the P-wave phase space and a polynomial expansion in the normalised polar Dalitz plot variables Z and ϕ. For the first time, a deviation from pure P-wave phase space is observed with a significance of 4.1σ. The deviation is parametrised by a linear term 1+2αZ, with α determined to be +0.147±0.036, consistent with the expectations of ρ-meson-type final-state interactions of the P-wave pion pairs.

  11. Measurement of the $\\omega \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$ Dalitz plot distribution

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Augustyniak, W; Bardan, W; Bashkanov, M; Bergmann, F S; Berłowski, M; Bhatt, H; Bondar, A; Büscher, M; Calén, H; Ciepał, I; Clement, H; Czerwiński, E; Demmich, K; Engels, R; Erven, A; Erven, W; Eyrich, W; Fedorets, P; Föhl, K; Fransson, K; Goldenbaum, F; Goswami, A; Grigoryev, K; Gullström, C -O; Heijkenskjöld, L; Hejny, V; Hüsken, N; Jarczyk, L; Johansson, T; Kamys, B; Kemmerling, G; Khan, F A; Khatri, G; Khoukaz, A; Khreptak, O; Kirillov, D A; Kistryn, S; Kleines, H; Kłos, B; Krzemień, W; Kulessa, P; Kupść, A; Kuzmin, A; Lalwani, K; Lersch, D; Lorentz, B; Magiera, A; Maier, R; Marciniewski, P; Mariański, B; Morsch, H -P; Moskal, P; Ohm, H; del Rio, E Perez; Piskunov, N M; Prasuhn, D; Pszczel, D; Pysz, K; Pyszniak, A; Ritman, J; Roy, A; Rudy, Z; Rundel, O; Sawant, S; Schadmand, S; Schätti-Ozerianska, I; Sefzick, T; Serdyuk, V; Shwartz, B; Sitterberg, K; Skorodko, T; Skurzok, M; Smyrski, J; Sopov, V; Stassen, R; Stepaniak, J; Stephan, E; Sterzenbach, G; Stockhorst, H; Ströher, H; Szczurek, A; Trzciński, A; Varma, R; Wolke, M; Wrońska, A; Wüstner, P; Yamamoto, A; Zabierowski, J; Zieliński, M J; Złomańczuk, J; Żuprański, P; Żurek, M; Kubis, B; Leupold, S

    2016-01-01

    Using the production reactions $pd\\to {}^3\\mbox{He}\\,\\omega$ and $pp\\to pp\\omega$, the Dalitz plot distribution for the $\\omega \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$ decay is studied with the WASA detector at COSY, based on a combined data sample of $ (4.408\\pm 0.042) \\times 10^4$ events. The Dalitz plot density is parametrised by a product of the $P$-wave phase space and a polynomial expansion in the normalised polar Dalitz plot variables $Z$ and $\\phi$. For the first time, a deviation from pure $P$-wave phase space is observed with a significance of $4.1\\sigma$. The deviation is parametrised by a linear term $1+2\\alpha Z$, with $\\alpha$ determined to be $+0.147\\pm0.036$, consistent with the expectations of $\\rho$-meson-type final-state interactions of the $P$-wave pion pairs.

  12. The Engagement and Interaction of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Segregated and Inclusive Early Childhood Center-Based Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Yuriko; Kemp, Coral

    2009-01-01

    The engagement and interaction of 12 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were measured during free play in segregated and inclusive prior-to-school early childhood settings to compare the learning opportunities provided in each type of setting. Ratings of overall engagement and the frequency and quality of interaction were also compared…

  13. Final Report for "Tech-X Corporation work for the SciDAC Center for Simulation of RF Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics (SWIM)"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Thomas G. [Tech–X Corporation, 5621 Arapahoe Avenue, Boulder, CO, 80303; Kruger, Scott E. [Tech–X Corporation, 5621 Arapahoe Avenue, Boulder, CO, 80303

    2013-03-25

    Work carried out by Tech-X Corporation for the DoE SciDAC Center for Simulation of RF Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics (SWIM; U.S. DoE Office of Science Award Number DE-FC02-06ER54899) is summarized and is shown to fulfil the project objectives. The Tech-X portion of the SWIM work focused on the development of analytic and computational approaches to study neoclassical tearing modes and their interaction with injected electron cyclotron current drive. Using formalism developed by Hegna, Callen, and Ramos [Phys. Plasmas 16, 112501 (2009); Phys. Plasmas 17, 082502 (2010); Phys. Plasmas 18, 102506 (2011)], analytic approximations for the RF interaction were derived and the numerical methods needed to implement these interactions in the NIMROD extended MHD code were developed. Using the SWIM IPS framework, NIMROD has successfully coupled to GENRAY, an RF ray tracing code; additionally, a numerical control system to trigger the RF injection, adjustment, and shutdown in response to tearing mode activity has been developed. We discuss these accomplishments, as well as prospects for ongoing future research that this work has enabled (which continue in a limited fashion under the SciDAC Center for Extended Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling (CEMM) project and under a baseline theory grant). Associated conference presentations, published articles, and publications in progress are also listed.

  14. Round versus rectangular: Does the plot shape matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iserloh, Thomas; Bäthke, Lars; Ries, Johannes B.

    2016-04-01

    Field rainfall simulators are designed to study soil erosion processes and provide urgently needed data for various geomorphological, hydrological and pedological issues. Due to the different conditions and technologies applied, there are several methodological aspects under review of the scientific community, particularly concerning design, procedures and conditions of measurement for infiltration, runoff and soil erosion. Extensive discussions at the Rainfall Simulator Workshop 2011 in Trier and the Splinter Meeting at EGU 2013 "Rainfall simulation: Big steps forward!" lead to the opinion that the rectangular shape is the more suitable plot shape compared to the round plot. A horizontally edging Gerlach trough is installed for sample collection without forming unnatural necks as is found at round or triangle plots. Since most research groups did and currently do work with round plots at the point scale (<1m²), a precise analysis of the differences between the output of round and square plots are necessary. Our hypotheses are: - Round plot shapes disturb surface runoff, unnatural fluvial dynamics for the given plot size such as pool development especially directly at the plot's outlet occur. - A square plot shape prevent these problems. A first comparison between round and rectangular plots (Iserloh et al., 2015) indicates that the rectangular plot could indeed be the more suitable, but the rather ambiguous results make a more elaborate test setup necessary. The laboratory test setup includes the two plot shapes (round, square), a standardised silty substrate and three inclinations (2°, 6°, 12°). The analysis of the laboratory test provide results on the best performance concerning undisturbed surface runoff and soil/water sampling at the plot's outlet. The analysis of the plot shape concerning its influence on runoff and erosion shows that clear methodological standards are necessary in order to make rainfall simulation experiments comparable. Reference

  15. A Guided Inquiry on Hubble Plots and the Big Bang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forringer, Ted

    2014-01-01

    In our science for non-science majors course "21st Century Physics," we investigate modern "Hubble plots" (plots of velocity versus distance for deep space objects) in order to discuss the Big Bang, dark matter, and dark energy. There are two potential challenges that our students face when encountering these topics for the…

  16. Development of gnuplot plotting package for MAD-X

    CERN Document Server

    Romero Leiro, Freddy Jose

    2015-01-01

    MAD-X is a general purpose software for charged-particle optics design and it needs a visualisation tool to be able to show the data in a more manageable way, this visualisation tools being already in MAD-X are the PLOT and SETPLOT commands. Nonetheless issues like compatibility and the desire of having alternative ways to show the plots in a more portable way have lead to explore the use of open source available software to reproduce the same results. The purpose of this project is to create a package compatible with the MAD-X output format, capable of generating publication quality plots, mainly lattice beamline plots and scatter plots by using the Gnuplot for creating plots. This software must support the same options as the PLOT and SETPLOT commands from MAD-X but additions or improvement over the present version are more than welcome. The main purpose of the program is to pre-process the data in order to be ready for Gnuplot to read it and plot it .This report is mostly a description of the development o...

  17. Recurrence plots from altimetry data of some lakes in Africa

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2014-01-01

    The paper shows recurrence plots obtained from time series of the level variations of four lakes in Africa (Nasser, Tana, Chad and Kainji). The data, coming from remote sensing, are provided by the United States Department of Agriculture. The recurrence plots allow a good visual comparison of the behaviours of local drainage basins.

  18. A Guided Inquiry on Hubble Plots and the Big Bang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forringer, Ted

    2014-01-01

    In our science for non-science majors course "21st Century Physics," we investigate modern "Hubble plots" (plots of velocity versus distance for deep space objects) in order to discuss the Big Bang, dark matter, and dark energy. There are two potential challenges that our students face when encountering these topics for the…

  19. Instrumentation for full-year plot-scale runoff monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Replicated 0.34 ha cropping systems plots have been in place since 1991 at the USDA-ARS Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed in central Missouri. Recently, instrumentation has been installed at 18 of those plots for continuous runoff water quality and quantity monitoring. That installation require...

  20. Precise FIA plot registration using field and dense LIDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetrios Gatziolis

    2009-01-01

    Precise registration of forest inventory and analysis (FIA) plots is a prerequisite for an effective fusion of field data with ancillary spatial information, which is an approach commonly employed in the mapping of various forest parameters. Although the adoption of Global Positioning System technology has improved the precision of plot coordinates obtained during...

  1. Weak limits for exploratory plots in the analysis of extremes

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Bikramjit

    2010-01-01

    Exploratory plotting tools have been devised aplenty in order to diagnose the goodness-of-fit of data sets to a hypothesized distribution. Some of them have found extensive use in diverse areas of finance, telecommunication, environmental science, etc. in order to detect sub-exponential or heavy-tailed behavior in observed data. In this paper we concentrate on two such plotting methodologies: the Quantile-Quantile plots for heavy-tails and the Mean Excess plots. Under the assumption of heavy-tailed behavior of the underlying sample the convergence in probability of these plots to a fixed set in a suitable topology of closed sets of $\\R^2$ has been studied in \\cite{das:resnick:2008} and \\cite{ghosh:resnick:2009}. These results give theoretical justifications for using the plots to test the null hypothesis that the underlying distribution is heavy-tailed by checking if the observed plot is ``close'' to the limit under the null hypothesis. In practice though one set of observations would lead to only one plot of...

  2. Superplot: Graphical interface for plotting and analyzing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowlie, Andrew; Bardsley, Michael Hugh

    2016-12-01

    Superplot calculates and plots statistical quantities relevant to parameter inference from a "chain" of samples drawn from a parameter space produced by codes such as MultiNest (ascl:1109.006), BAYES-X (ascl:1505.027), and PolyChord (ascl:1502.011). It offers a graphical interface for browsing a chain of many variables quickly and can produce numerous kinds of publication quality plots, including one- and two-dimensional profile likelihood, three-dimensional scatter plots, and confidence intervals and credible regions. Superplot can also save plots in PDF format, create a summary text file, and export a plot as a pickled object for importing and manipulating in a Python interpreter.

  3. Dalitz plot analysis of the D+ ---> K- pi+ pi+ decay in the FOCUS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; /UC, Davis; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /CINVESTAV, IPN /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U.

    2007-05-01

    Using data collected by the high energy photoproduction experiment FOCUS at Fermilab we performed a Dalitz plot analysis of the Cabibbo favored decay D{sup +} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. This study uses 53653 Dalitz-plot events with a signal fraction of {approx} 97%, and represents the highest statistics, most complete Dalitz plot analysis for this channel. Results are presented and discussed using two different formalisms. The first is a simple sum of Breit-Wigner functions with freely fitted masses and widths. It is the model traditionally adopted and serves as comparison with the already published analyses. The second uses a K-matrix approach for the dominant S-wave, in which the parameters are fixed by first fitting K{pi} scattering data and continued to threshold by Chiral Perturbation Theory. We show that the Dalitz plot distribution for this decay is consistent with the assumption of two body dominance of the final state interactions and the description of these interactions is in agreement with other data on the K{pi} final state.

  4. New insight on the interaction of self-activated and Mn-related emission centers in ZnS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacherikov, Yu Yu; Vorona, I.; Zhuk, A.; Gilchuk, A. V.; Korsunska, N.; Markevich, I.

    2017-02-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation (PLE) spectra of undoped and thermally doped with Mn ZnS single crystals are studied. In the PL spectra, the bands caused by Mn-related and self-activated (SA) emission centers were observed. A number of narrow peaks whose intensity enhanced with increasing Mn content were found in the PLE spectra of SA emission. The same peaks were present in the PLE spectra of the Mn-related emission band. Some of these peaks were previously observed in the absorption spectra and attributed to Mn2+ ions. The appearance of Mn-related peaks in the PLE spectra of SA emission is explained by excitation transfer from the Mn2+ ions to SA emission centers. The conditions required for this transfer and possible mechanisms of the process are discussed.

  5. Data Analysis and Assessment Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The DoD Supercomputing Resource Center (DSRC) Data Analysis and Assessment Center (DAAC) provides classified facilities to enhance customer interactions with the ARL...

  6. POMO--Plotting Omics analysis results for Multiple Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jake; Kreisberg, Richard; Kallio, Aleksi; Dudley, Aimée M; Nykter, Matti; Shmulevich, Ilya; May, Patrick; Autio, Reija

    2013-12-24

    Systems biology experiments studying different topics and organisms produce thousands of data values across different types of genomic data. Further, data mining analyses are yielding ranked and heterogeneous results and association networks distributed over the entire genome. The visualization of these results is often difficult and standalone web tools allowing for custom inputs and dynamic filtering are limited. We have developed POMO (http://pomo.cs.tut.fi), an interactive web-based application to visually explore omics data analysis results and associations in circular, network and grid views. The circular graph represents the chromosome lengths as perimeter segments, as a reference outer ring, such as cytoband for human. The inner arcs between nodes represent the uploaded network. Further, multiple annotation rings, for example depiction of gene copy number changes, can be uploaded as text files and represented as bar, histogram or heatmap rings. POMO has built-in references for human, mouse, nematode, fly, yeast, zebrafish, rice, tomato, Arabidopsis, and Escherichia coli. In addition, POMO provides custom options that allow integrated plotting of unsupported strains or closely related species associations, such as human and mouse orthologs or two yeast wild types, studied together within a single analysis. The web application also supports interactive label and weight filtering. Every iterative filtered result in POMO can be exported as image file and text file for sharing or direct future input. The POMO web application is a unique tool for omics data analysis, which can be used to visualize and filter the genome-wide networks in the context of chromosomal locations as well as multiple network layouts. With the several illustration and filtering options the tool supports the analysis and visualization of any heterogeneous omics data analysis association results for many organisms. POMO is freely available and does not require any installation or

  7. CFD Extraction Tool for TecPlot From DPLR Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, David

    2013-01-01

    This invention is a TecPlot macro of a computer program in the TecPlot programming language that processes data from DPLR solutions in TecPlot format. DPLR (Data-Parallel Line Relaxation) is a NASA computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, and TecPlot is a commercial CFD post-processing tool. The Tec- Plot data is in SI units (same as DPLR output). The invention converts the SI units into British units. The macro modifies the TecPlot data with unit conversions, and adds some extra calculations. After unit conversions, the macro cuts a slice, and adds vectors on the current plot for output format. The macro can also process surface solutions. Existing solutions use manual conversion and superposition. The conversion is complicated because it must be applied to a range of inter-related scalars and vectors to describe a 2D or 3D flow field. It processes the CFD solution to create superposition/comparison of scalars and vectors. The existing manual solution is cumbersome, open to errors, slow, and cannot be inserted into an automated process. This invention is quick and easy to use, and can be inserted into an automated data-processing algorithm.

  8. BASIN Synthesis and Spatial Mapping of Keeling Plot Data Using an Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, K. P.; Lai, C.; Ehleringer, J.; McDowell, N.; Alstad, K.; Griffis, T.; Bowling, D.; Wingate, L.; Ogee, J.; Burlett, R.; Mortazavi, B.; Knohl, A.; Yakir, D.; Dawson, T.; Members, B.

    2008-12-01

    The "Keeling plot" method has proven to be a robust and highly informative measure of ecosystem- atmosphere interactions, particularly with respect to photosynthesis, respiration and water use efficiency of terrestrial ecosystems. Applied over many years and locations, the archive of Keeling plot data is steadily increasing, especially in light of recent coordinated collection efforts and advances in laser-based technologies. However, meta-analyses of this valuable and potentially informative record remains challenging because of the discontinuous nature of the largely campaign-based and site-specific collections over the years. One of the main objectives of the Biogeosphere-Atmosphere Stable Isotope Network (BASIN) is to facilitate the synthesis and exchange of stable isotope information related to ecosystem processes in carbon and water cycles at various scales. Towards this goal, we have initiated a BASIN-wide effort for routine synthesis of past and future Keeling plot data in the context of an objective and statistically based approach using an artificial neural network (ANN) to help elucidate coherent patterns in the inherently disparate data. Predictive relationships between Keeling plot intercepts and climate and vegetation developed with this method can help to not only reveal patterns in the data that may lead to future process-based research, but can also provide the means to efficiently translate site-specific, campaign-based data into spatial and temporally continuous maps of Keeling plot intercepts. Using this data-intensive approach, the ANN can be continually updated to increase its accuracy and resolution as new data from more sites becomes available. We will describe the various sites and datasets currently available (BASIN, SIBAE, DOE-TCP, etc.), results related to the training and site-specific validation of the ANN, functional responses of Keeling plot intercepts to environmental conditions and vegetation status as revealed through the ANN, and

  9. CLASS-Infant: An Observational Measure for Assessing Teacher-Infant Interactions in Center-Based Child Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Kristen Roorbach; Cabell, Sonia Q.; LoCasale-Crouch, Jennifer; Hamre, Bridget K.; Pianta, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: The growing body of literature demonstrating the importance of quality interactions with caregivers to infant development coupled with the increasing number of infants spending time in classroom settings highlights the need for a measure of interpersonal relationships between infants and caregivers. This article introduces a new…

  10. Intergrating users in an interactive video education project: reframing the patient-centered strategy of a cystic fibrosis centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.C. Aspria (Marcello); M. de Mul (Marleen); S.A. Adams (Samantha); R.A. Bal (Roland)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThis article reports on the formative evaluation of WebPEP (“Web-Based Patient Education Program”), an interactive video education project at ErasmusMC–Sophia Children’s Hospital (SCH) in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Through monthly live webcasts, doctors, nurses, psychologists, and oth

  11. Using Zoom Technologies to Display HEP Plots and Talks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, G.

    2012-12-01

    Particle physics conferences and experiments generate a huge number of plots and presentations. It is impossible to keep up. A typical conference (like CHEP) will have 100's of plots. A single analysis result from a major experiment will have almost 50 plots. Scanning a conference or sorting out what plots are new is almost a full time job. The advent of multi-core computing and advanced video cards means that we have more processor power available for visualization than any time in the past. This poster describes two related projects that take advantage of this to solve the viewing problem. The first, Collider Plots, has a backend that looks for new plots released by ATLAS, CMS, CDF, and DZERO and organizes them by date, by experiment, and by subgroup for easy viewing and sorting. It maintains links back to associated conference notes and web pages with full result information. The second project, Deep Conference, renders all the slides as a single large zoomable picture. In both cases, much like a web mapping program, details are revealed as you zoom in. In the case of Collider Plots the plots are stacked as histograms to give visual clues for the most recent updates and activity have occurred. Standard plug-in software for a browser allows a user to zoom in on a portion of the conference that looks interesting. As the user zooms further more and more details become visible, allowing the user to make a quick and cheap decision on whether to spend more time on a particular talk or series of plots. Both projects are available at http://deeptalk.phys.washington.edu. The poster discusses the implementation and use as well as cross platform performance and possible future directions.

  12. Analysing spatially extended high-dimensional chaos by recurrence plots

    CERN Document Server

    Marwana, Norbert; Foerster, Saskia

    2014-01-01

    Recurrence plot based measures of complexity are capable tools for characterizing complex dynamics. In this letter we show the potential of selected recurrence plot measures for the investigation of even high-dimensional chaos. We apply this method on spatially extended chaos, such as derived from the Lorenz96 model and show that the recurrence plot based measures can qualitatively characterize typical dynamical properties such as chaotic or periodic dynamics. Moreover, we demonstrate its power by analyzing satellite image time series of vegetation cover with contrasting dynamics as a high-dimensional example from the real world.

  13. Recurrence plot analysis of spatially extended high-dimensional dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwan, Norbert; Foerster, Saskia; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Recurrence plot based measures of complexity are capable tools for characterizing complex dynamics. We show the potential of selected recurrence plot measures for the investigation of spatially extended high-dimensional dynamics by applying them to data from the Lorenz96 model. The recurrence plot based measures are able to qualitatively characterize typical dynamical properties such as chaotic or periodic dynamics. Moreover, we demonstrate its power by analyzing satellite image time series of vegetation cover with contrasting dynamics as a spatially extended and potentially high-dimensional example from the real world.

  14. Analysing spatially extended high-dimensional dynamics by recurrence plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwan, Norbert; Foerster, Saskia; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Recurrence plot based measures of complexity are capable tools for characterizing complex dynamics. We show the potential of selected recurrence plot measures for the investigation of even high-dimensional dynamics. We apply this method on spatially extended chaos, such as derived from the Lorenz96 model and show that the recurrence plot based measures can qualitatively characterize typical dynamical properties such as chaotic or periodic dynamics. Moreover, we demonstrate its power by analyzing satellite image time series of vegetation cover with contrasting dynamics as a spatially extended and potentially high-dimensional example from the real world.

  15. An Analysis of Property Rights in Privately Owned Family Plots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MengXiangzhong

    2005-01-01

    In the present Chinese system of rural land ownership, family plots still supplement the collectively-owned rural economy. As they occupy a very small proportion of the total amount of arable land, there has been little study of their economic effects; indeed, they have been totally neglected. In the past, under the planned economy, family plots could provide a diversified source of livelihood for Chinese farmers; at present, they have become a “bottleneck” obstructing the further industrialization of the rural economy. First of all, the ownership system for family plots fragments the system of land ownership, hindering the legal circulation of land-use,

  16. Demarcação de uma grade de trilhas no Centro de Pesquisas da Mata do Paraíso, Viçosa, Minas Gerais Plotting of a trail grid system in the Mata do Paraíso Research Center, Viçosa, State of Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo Ribon

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available O Centro de Pesquisas da Mata do Paraíso (CPMP é parte integrante do maior fragmento de Floresta Semidecidual Altimontana das imediações do município de Viçosa, sudeste de Minas Gerais. Como centro de pesquisas da Universidade Federal de Viçosa, ele tem servido para a coleta de dados de monografias de graduação, dissertações, teses e pesquisas de professores, principalmente dos Departamentos de Biologia Animal, Biologia Vegetal e Engenharia Florestal. Essas pesquisas têm sido conduzidas em trilhas preexistentes, aleatoriamente distribuídas pela mata, ou em novas trilhas abertas conforme a conveniência dos pesquisadores ou a exigência de suas pesquisas. Essa prática impede ou dificulta o mapeamento adequado de locais de amostragem e os monitoramentos temporal e espacial de comunidades animais e vegetais, bem como a repetibilidade de experimentos. No presente trabalho, descreve-se a implantação de um sistema de trilhas em 40 ha do CPMP, formado por um conjunto de cinco trilhas paralelas de 1.000 m e 11 de 400 m, formando 40 quadrados contíguos de 1 ha. O CPMP passou a ser uma das poucas reservas florestais no país a contar com um sistema ordenado e medido de trilhas, abrindo um novo leque de oportunidades para a realização de pesquisas de importância internacional. Destacam-se a urgência de manutenção das trilhas, a necessidade de seu georreferenciamento e a expansão da grade para 100 ha, a fim de que alcance padrões internacionais entre estações de pesquisa de comunidades florestais na região neotropical.Mata do Paraíso Research Center (CPMP is the core area of the largest Lower Montane Semideciduous Atlantic Forest fragment in Viçosa region, southeastern State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. As a research center belonging to the Universidade Federal de Viçosa (UFV, it has been an important site for the fieldwork of undergraduate monographs, Master and Doctorate Thesis, and research conducted by professors, mostly from

  17. Coordination studies of the metal center of hemocyanin by {sup 199m}Hg nuclear quadrupole interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troeger, W.; Ctortecka, B. [Nukleare Festkoerperphysik, Univ. Leipzig (Germany); Faller, P. [Nukleare Festkoerperphysik, Univ. Leipzig (Germany); Biochemisches Inst., Univ. Zuerich (Switzerland); Decker, H. [Nukleare Festkoerperphysik, Univ. Leipzig (Germany); Inst. fuer Molekulare Biophysik, Univ. Mainz (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    The nuclear quadrupole interaction of {sup 199m}Hg monitored by time differential perturbed angular correlations of {gamma}-rays was employed to investigate the binding of Hg(II) to the binuclear metal site in the copper protein hemocyanin Eurypelma californicum. The data indicate that Hg(II) occupies the two metal sites and alters the metal site geometry from a trigonal to a diagonal coordination. (orig.)

  18. Dalitz plot analysis of three-body Charmonium Decays at BaBar

    CERN Document Server

    Palano, Antimo

    2015-01-01

    We present preliminary results on the measurement of the I=1/2 $K \\pi$ $\\mathcal{S}$-wave through a model independent partial wave analysis of $\\eta_c$ decays to $K^0_S K^+ \\pi^-$ and $K^+ K^- \\pi^0$ produced in two-photon interactions. We also perform a Dalitz plot analysis of the $J/\\psi$ decays to $\\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$ and $K^+ K^- \\pi^0$ produced by the initial state radiation process.

  19. Dalitz plot analysis of three-body charmonium decays at BABAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palano, Antimo

    2016-05-01

    We present preliminary results on the measurement of the I=1/2 Kπ S-wave through a model independent partial wave analysis of ηc decays to KS0 K+π- and K+ K-π0 produced in two-photon interactions. We also perform a Dalitz plot analysis of the J/ψ decays to π+π-π0 and K+ K-π0 produced in the initial state radiation process.

  20. Analysis of a Split-Plot Experimental Design Applied to a Low-Speed Wind Tunnel Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    A procedure to analyze a split-plot experimental design featuring two input factors, two levels of randomization, and two error structures in a low-speed wind tunnel investigation of a small-scale model of a fighter airplane configuration is described in this report. Standard commercially-available statistical software was used to analyze the test results obtained in a randomization-restricted environment often encountered in wind tunnel testing. The input factors were differential horizontal stabilizer incidence and the angle of attack. The response variables were the aerodynamic coefficients of lift, drag, and pitching moment. Using split-plot terminology, the whole plot, or difficult-to-change, factor was the differential horizontal stabilizer incidence, and the subplot, or easy-to-change, factor was the angle of attack. The whole plot and subplot factors were both tested at three levels. Degrees of freedom for the whole plot error were provided by replication in the form of three blocks, or replicates, which were intended to simulate three consecutive days of wind tunnel facility operation. The analysis was conducted in three stages, which yielded the estimated mean squares, multiple regression function coefficients, and corresponding tests of significance for all individual terms at the whole plot and subplot levels for the three aerodynamic response variables. The estimated regression functions included main effects and two-factor interaction for the lift coefficient, main effects, two-factor interaction, and quadratic effects for the drag coefficient, and only main effects for the pitching moment coefficient.

  1. Vegetation-plot data and databases in Europe: an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaminée, J.H.J.; Hennekens, S.M.; Chytrý, M.; Rodwell, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    During the last decade many electronic databases of vegetation plots, mainly phytosociological relevés, were established in different European countries. These databases contain information which is extremely valuable for both testing various macroecological hypotheses and for nature conservation

  2. Field Plot Points for Voyageurs National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — A total of 191 vegetation field plot samples were collected at Voyageurs National Park and environs to support vegetation classification development. Teams of...

  3. Casa Grande Ruins National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project - Plot Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This layer contains spatial information for 25 plots sampled during vegetation mapping and classification efforts at Casa Grande Ruins NM, AZ. Data was collected by...

  4. 2012 Four Square Mile survey plots : Kulm WMD

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Map of survey plots for the annual Four-Square-Mile survey conducted on the Kulm Wetland Management District (WMD) as part of a national effort to annually estimate...

  5. The master plot in the audiovisual narrative. The western case.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Félix GONZÁLEZ SÁNCHEZ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A plot provides us the story that it offers a hyphen and later a film. Plots are limited, however possibilities, argument them that these offer music infinite. At the same time, we can say that all cultures avail themselves of some plots and similar arguments to structure their mythical stories. In addition, United States is the modern nation where better a dialectic relation between the myth and story keeps. At this nation, the significance of the event has been shown and you have gotten free through the myth. We will see through this article how the western is the kind of American cinema what else and better answer for the folkloric traditional story to the cánones, because your plots have been taken directly of the classical legends.

  6. Recurrence plots of sunspots, solar flux and irradiance

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia

    2008-01-01

    The paper shows the recurrence and cross recurrence plots of three time series, concerning data of the solar activity. The data are the sunspot number and the values of solar radio flux at 10.7 cm and of solar total irradiance, which are known as highly correlated. To compare the series, the radio flux and irradiance values are monthly averaged. Recurrence plots display the oscillating behaviour with remarkable features. Moreover, cross recurrence plots help in identifying time lags between the sunspot number maximum and the maximum of radio or irradiance signals, in circumstances where the data values are highly dispersed. Image processing is useful too, in enhancing the monitoring. An interesting behaviour is displayed by cross recurrence plots of irradiance, which are not symmetric with respect to the line of identity.

  7. Field Plot Points for Wupatki National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This spatial dataset in ESRI Coverage format maps field releve plot locations for the vegetation classification and descriptions of the vegetation map at Wupatki...

  8. Analysing spatially extended high-dimensional dynamics by recurrence plots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marwan, Norbert, E-mail: marwan@pik-potsdam.de [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, 14412 Potsdam (Germany); Kurths, Jürgen [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, 14412 Potsdam (Germany); Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Institut für Physik (Germany); Nizhny Novgorod State University, Department of Control Theory, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Foerster, Saskia [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Section 1.4 Remote Sensing, Telegrafenberg, 14473 Potsdam (Germany)

    2015-05-08

    Recurrence plot based measures of complexity are capable tools for characterizing complex dynamics. In this letter we show the potential of selected recurrence plot measures for the investigation of even high-dimensional dynamics. We apply this method on spatially extended chaos, such as derived from the Lorenz96 model and show that the recurrence plot based measures can qualitatively characterize typical dynamical properties such as chaotic or periodic dynamics. Moreover, we demonstrate its power by analysing satellite image time series of vegetation cover with contrasting dynamics as a spatially extended and potentially high-dimensional example from the real world. - Highlights: • We use recurrence plots for analysing partially extended dynamics. • We investigate the high-dimensional chaos of the Lorenz96 model. • The approach distinguishes different spatio-temporal dynamics. • We use the method for studying vegetation cover time series.

  9. Graphical interpretation of confidence curves in rankit plots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyltoft Petersen, Per; Blaabjerg, Ole; Andersen, Marianne

    2004-01-01

    A well-known transformation from the bell-shaped Gaussian (normal) curve to a straight line in the rankit plot is investigated, and a tool for evaluation of the distribution of reference groups is presented. It is based on the confidence intervals for percentiles of the calculated Gaussian...... distribution and the percentage of cumulative points exceeding these limits. The process is to rank the reference values and plot the cumulative frequency points in a rankit plot with a logarithmic (In=log(e)) transformed abscissa. If the distribution is close to In-Gaussian the cumulative frequency points...... presentation, however, makes it easy to disclose deviations from In-Gaussianity, and to make other interpretations of the distributions, e.g., comparison to non-Gaussian distributions in the same plot, where the cumulative frequency percentage can be read from the ordinate. A long list of examples of In...

  10. China's largest tropical rainforest dynamics plot established in Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ A 20-ha Tropical Rainforest Dynamics Plot, located in Xishuangbanna in southwestern Yunnan Province, was recently established by the CAS Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden (XTBG) and the Xishuangbanna National Nature Reserve Administration recently.

  11. Field Plot Points for Tuzigoot National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Vegetation field plots at Tuzigoot NM were visited, described, and documented in a digital database. The database consists of 3 parts - (1)Physical Descriptive Data,...

  12. The multiscale coarse-graining method. XI. Accurate interactions based on the centers of charge of coarse-grained sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Zhen; Voth, Gregory A., E-mail: gavoth@uchicago.edu [Department of Chemistry, James Franck Institute, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and Computation Institute, The University of Chicago, 5735 S Ellis Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    It is essential to be able to systematically construct coarse-grained (CG) models that can efficiently and accurately reproduce key properties of higher-resolution models such as all-atom. To fulfill this goal, a mapping operator is needed to transform the higher-resolution configuration to a CG configuration. Certain mapping operators, however, may lose information related to the underlying electrostatic properties. In this paper, a new mapping operator based on the centers of charge of CG sites is proposed to address this issue. Four example systems are chosen to demonstrate this concept. Within the multiscale coarse-graining framework, CG models that use this mapping operator are found to better reproduce the structural correlations of atomistic models. The present work also demonstrates the flexibility of the mapping operator and the robustness of the force matching method. For instance, important functional groups can be isolated and emphasized in the CG model.

  13. Plotting partial correlation and regression in ecological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moya-Laraño

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple regression, the General linear model (GLM and the Generalized linear model (GLZ are widely used in ecology. The widespread use of graphs that include fitted regression lines to document patterns in simple linear regression can be easily extended to these multivariate techniques in plots that show the partial relationship of the dependent variable with each independent variable. However, the latter procedure is not nearly as widely used in ecological studies. In fact, a brief review of the recent ecological literature showed that in ca. 20% of the papers the results of multiple regression are displayed by plotting the dependent variable against the raw values of the independent variable. This latter procedure may be misleading because the value of the partial slope may change in magnitude and even in sign relative to the slope obtained in simple least-squares regression. Plots of partial relationships should be used in these situations. Using numerical simulations and real data we show how displaying plots of partial relationships may also be useful for: 1 visualizing the true scatter of points around the partial regression line, and 2 identifying influential observations and non-linear patterns more efficiently than using plots of residuals vs. fitted values. With the aim to help in the assessment of data quality, we show how partial residual plots (residuals from overall model + predicted values from the explanatory variable vs. the explanatory variable should only be used in restricted situations, and how partial regression plots (residuals of Y on the remaining explanatory variables vs. residuals of the target explanatory variable on the remaining explanatory variables should be the ones displayed in publications because they accurately reflect the scatter of partial correlations. Similarly, these partial plots can be applied to visualize the effect of continuous variables in GLM and GLZ for normal distributions and identity link

  14. Tracking Changes in Cardiac Output: Statistical Considerations on the 4-Quadrant Plot and the Polar Plot Methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saugel, Bernd; Grothe, Oliver; Wagner, Julia Y

    2015-01-01

    When comparing 2 technologies for measuring hemodynamic parameters with regard to their ability to track changes, 2 graphical tools are omnipresent in the literaturethe 4-quadrant plot and the polar...

  15. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  16. Interaction of iron deficiency anemia and hemoglobinopathies among college students and pregnant women: a multi center evaluation in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Dipika; Gorakshakar, Ajit C; Colah, Roshan B; Patel, Ramesh Z; Master, Dilip C; Mahanta, J; Sharma, Santanu K; Chaudhari, Utpal; Ghosh, Malay; Das, Sheila; Britt, Reitt P; Singh, Shawinder; Ross, Cecil; Jagannathan, Lata; Kaul, Rajni; Shukla, Deepak K; Muthuswamy, Vasantha

    2014-01-01

    Although iron deficiency anemia is very common in India, systematic large studies on the prevalence and hematological consequences of iron deficiency among carriers of β-thalassemia (β-thal) and other hemoglobinopathies are lacking. A multi center project was undertaken to screen college/university students and pregnant women for iron deficiency anemia and various hemoglobinopathies. Fifty-six thousand, seven hundred and seventy-two subjects from six states, Maharashtra, Gujarat, Karnataka, West Bengal, Assam and Punjab, were studied. Iron deficiency anemia was evaluated by measuring zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) and hemoglobin (Hb) levels, while β-thal and other hemoglobinopathies were detected by measuring the red cell indices and by Hb analysis using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). College boys (2.2%), college girls (14.3%) and antenatal women (27.0%) without any hemoglobinopathies had iron deficiency anemia. Among the β-thal carriers, the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was 17.3% in college boys, 38.1% in college girls and 55.9% in pregnant women, while in the Hb E [β26(B8)Glu→Lys; HBB: c.79G>A] carriers, it was 7.3% in college boys, 25.4% in college girls and 78.0% in antenatal women. In individuals with Hb E disease, the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia varied from 31.2-77.3% in the three groups. A significant reduction in Hb levels was seen when iron deficiency anemia was associated with hemoglobinopathies. However, the Hb A2 levels in β-thal carriers were not greatly reduced in the presence of iron deficiency anemia.

  17. Atrial fibrillation detection by heart rate variability in Poincare plot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon Moongu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atrial fibrillation (AFib is one of the prominent causes of stroke, and its risk increases with age. We need to detect AFib correctly as early as possible to avoid medical disaster because it is likely to proceed into a more serious form in short time. If we can make a portable AFib monitoring system, it will be helpful to many old people because we cannot predict when a patient will have a spasm of AFib. Methods We analyzed heart beat variability from inter-beat intervals obtained by a wavelet-based detector. We made a Poincare plot using the inter-beat intervals. By analyzing the plot, we extracted three feature measures characterizing AFib and non-AFib: the number of clusters, mean stepping increment of inter-beat intervals, and dispersion of the points around a diagonal line in the plot. We divided distribution of the number of clusters into two and calculated mean value of the lower part by k-means clustering method. We classified data whose number of clusters is more than one and less than this mean value as non-AFib data. In the other case, we tried to discriminate AFib from non-AFib using support vector machine with the other feature measures: the mean stepping increment and dispersion of the points in the Poincare plot. Results We found that Poincare plot from non-AFib data showed some pattern, while the plot from AFib data showed irregularly irregular shape. In case of non-AFib data, the definite pattern in the plot manifested itself with some limited number of clusters or closely packed one cluster. In case of AFib data, the number of clusters in the plot was one or too many. We evaluated the accuracy using leave-one-out cross-validation. Mean sensitivity and mean specificity were 91.4% and 92.9% respectively. Conclusions Because pulse beats of ventricles are less likely to be influenced by baseline wandering and noise, we used the inter-beat intervals to diagnose AFib. We visually displayed regularity of the inter

  18. The availability of Henkel plots for sintered hard/soft magnetic composite ferrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Ailin, E-mail: alxia@126.com [Anhui Key Laboratory of Metal Materials and Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan 243002 (China); Li, Yang; Li, Tingting [Anhui Key Laboratory of Metal Materials and Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan 243002 (China); Su, Shubing [School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Ningbo University of Technology, Ningbo 315016 (China); Jin, Chuangui; Liu, Xianguo [Anhui Key Laboratory of Metal Materials and Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan 243002 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Henkel plots of several kinds of hard/soft magnetic composites with exchange coupling interaction, including SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}/(Ni,Zn)Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}/Fe–B, were obtained from the recoil loops in the initial magnetization and demagnetization state measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer. It is found that the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant (K) and coercivity (H{sub c}) of ‘soft’ phases could affect the availability of Henkel plots greatly. The Henkel plot could be used to characterize the existence and strength of exchange coupling interaction only in a composite with a ‘soft’ phase of small K and H{sub c}, and it deviates markedly from the reality for a composite of a ‘soft’ phase of relatively large K and H{sub c}.

  19. Plot-scale field experiment of surface hydrologic processes with EOS implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laymon, Charles A.; Macari, Emir J.; Costes, Nicholas C.

    1992-01-01

    Plot-scale hydrologic field studies were initiated at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to a) investigate the spatial and temporal variability of surface and subsurface hydrologic processes, particularly as affected by vegetation, and b) develop experimental techniques and associated instrumentation methodology to study hydrologic processes at increasingly large spatial scales. About 150 instruments, most of which are remotely operated, have been installed at the field site to monitor ground atmospheric conditions, precipitation, interception, soil-water status, and energy flux. This paper describes the nature of the field experiment, instrumentation and sampling rationale, and presents preliminary findings.

  20. Probing Higgs self-interactions in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 100 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Fuks, Benjamin; Lee, Seung J

    2015-01-01

    We present a phenomenological study of triple-Higgs production in which we estimate the prospects for measuring the form of the Higgs potential at future circular collider projects. We analyze proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 100 TeV and focus on two different signatures in which the final state is made of four b-jets and either a pair of photons or a pair of tau leptons. We study the resulting sensitivity on the Higgs cubic and quartic self-interactions and investigate how it depends on the b-tagging, tau-tagging and photon resolution performances of detectors that could be designed for these future machines. We then discuss possible luminosity goals for future 100 TeV collider projects that would allow for a measurement of the Higgs potential and its possible departures from the Standard Model expectation.

  1. Split-plot Experiments with Unusual Numbers of Subplot Runs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahci, Murat

    2007-01-01

    In many experimental situations, it may not be feasible or even possible to run experiments in a completely randomized fashion as usually recommended. Under these circumstances, split-plot experiments in which certain factors are changed less frequently than the others are often used. Most...... of the literature on split-plot designs is based on 2-level factorials. For those designs, the number of subplots is a power of 2. There may however be some situations where for cost purposes or physical constraints, we may need to have unusual number of subplots such as 3, 5, 6, etc. In this article, we explore...... this issue and provide some examples based on the Plackett and Burman designs. Also algorithmically constructed D-optimal split-plot designs are compared to those based on Plackett and Burman designs....

  2. D.3.3 PLOT Persuasive Learning Design Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram-Hansen, Sandra Burri

    2012-01-01

    In this third and final deliverable of WP3: Persuasive Learning Designs, the theoretical cross field between persuasion and learning and the practical analysis of the technological learning tools and products which are currently related to the PLOT project, namely the GLOMaker and the 3ET tool......, are linked together as persuasive learning designs are defined and exemplified through the four e-PLOT cases. Based on the literary study of D.3.1 as well as the subsequent discussions and reflections regarding the theoretical foundation and practical application of persuasive learning technologies......, and in acknowledgement that the results of this deliverable are to be applicable in both WP4 and 5, the persuasive learning designs presented in this report are not summarized as patterns. Instead the definition of persuasive learning designs is presented on more general terms and exemplified in relation to the e-PLOT...

  3. Cross recurrence plot based synchronization of time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Marwan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of recurrence plots is extended to the cross recurrence plots (CRP which, among others, enables the study of synchronization or time differences in two time series. This is emphasized in a distorted main diagonal in the cross recurrence plot, the line of synchronization (LOS. A non-parametrical fit of this LOS can be used to rescale the time axis of the two data series (whereby one of them is compressed or stretched so that they are synchronized. An application of this method to geophysical sediment core data illustrates its suitability for real data. The rock magnetic data of two different sediment cores from the Makarov Basin can be adjusted to each other by using this method, so that they are comparable.

  4. Cross Recurrence Plot Based Synchronization of Time Series

    CERN Document Server

    Marwan, N; Nowaczyk, N R

    2002-01-01

    The method of recurrence plots is extended to the cross recurrence plots (CRP), which among others enables the study of synchronization or time differences in two time series. This is emphasized in a distorted main diagonal in the cross recurrence plot, the line of synchronization (LOS). A non-parametrical fit of this LOS can be used to rescale the time axis of the two data series (whereby one of it is e.g. compressed or stretched) so that they are synchronized. An application of this method to geophysical sediment core data illustrates its suitability for real data. The rock magnetic data of two different sediment cores from the Makarov Basin can be adjusted to each other by using this method, so that they are comparable.

  5. Experts’ Misinterpretation of Box Plots – a Dual Processing Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Lem

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that students often misinterpret the area of the box in box plots as representing the frequency or proportion of observations in that interval, while it actually represents density. This misinterpretation has been shown to be based on the saliency of this area and can be explained by heuristic reasoning as defined by dual process theories. In this study we tested whether expert users of box plots also display this misinterpretation and show signs of the same heuristic reasoning as found in students. Using a reaction time test, we found signs of heuristic reasoning in experts, both with respect to accuracy and reaction times. If even experts have difficulty interpreting box plots, one can question whether these are an appropriate form of representation to use when reporting data and deserve the prominent place they currently have in the statistics curriculum.

  6. LEGO plot for simultaneous application of multiple quality requirements during trueness verification of quantitative laboratory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-il; Chae, Hyojin; Kim, Myungshin; Lee, Jehoon; Kim, Yonggoo

    2014-03-01

    We developed a two-dimensional plot for viewing trueness that takes into account potential shift and variable quality requirements to verify trueness using certified reference material (CRM). Glucose, total cholesterol (TC), and creatinine levels were determined by two kinds of assay in two levels of a CRM. Available quality requirements were collected, codified, and sorted in an ascending order in the plot's header row. Centering on the mean of measured values from CRM, the "mean ± US CLIA '88 allowable total error" was located in the header of the leftmost and rightmost columns. Twenty points were created in intervening columns as potential shifts. Uncertainties were calculated according to regression between certified values and uncertainties of CRM, and positioned in the corresponding columns. Cells were assigned different colors where column and row intersected based on comparison of the 95% confidence interval of the percentage bias with each quality requirement. A glucose assay failed to meet the highest quality criteria, for which shift of +0.13-0.14 mmol/l was required. A TC assay met the quality requirement and a shift of ±0.03 mmol/l was tolerable. A creatinine assay also met the quality requirement but any shift was not tolerable. The plot provides a systematic view of the trueness of quantitative laboratory tests. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Dalitz Plot Analysis of D0-->K0bar K+ K-

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, Michael T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De, R; Sangro; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai, F; Tehrani; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, Gallieno; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, S W; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-01-01

    A Dalitz plot analysis of approximately 12500 D0 events reconstructed in the hadronic decay D0-->K0bar K+ K- is presented. This analysis is based on a data sample of 91.5 fb-1 collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+ e- storage rings at SLAC running at center-of-mass energies on and 40 MeV below the Y4S resonance. The events are selected from e+ e- --> c cbar annihilations using the decay D*+ --> D0 pi+. The following ratio of branching fractions has been obtained: BR = Gamma(D0-->K0bar K+ K-)/Gamma(D0-->K0bar pi+ pi-) = (15.8+/-0.1(stat.)+/-0.5(syst.)x 10-2 Estimates of fractions and phases for resonant and non-resonant contributions to the Dalitz plot are also presented. The a0(980)-->K Kbar projection has been extracted with little background. A search for CP asymmetries on the Dalitz plot has been performed.

  8. Dalitz Plot Analysis of D0 to K0K+ K-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2005-07-12

    A Dalitz plot analysis of approximately 12,500 D{sup 0} events reconstructed in the hadronic decay D{sup 0} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0} K{sup +}K{sup -} is presented. This analysis is based on a data sample of 91.5 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings at SLAC running at center-of-mass energies on and 40 MeV below the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. The events are selected from e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} annihilations using the decay D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}. The following ratio of branching fractions has been obtained: BR = {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}K{sup +}K{sup -})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (15.8 {+-} 0.1(stat.) {+-} 0.5 (syst.)) x 10{sup -2}. Estimates of fractions and phases for resonant and non-resonant contributions to the Dalitz plot are also presented. The a{sub 0}(980) {yields} {bar K}K projection has been extracted with little background. A search for Cp asymmetries on the Dalitz plot has been performed.

  9. The GEISA 2009 Spectroscopic Database System and its CNES/CNRS Ether Products and Services Center Interactive Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquinet-Husson, Nicole; Crépeau, Laurent; Capelle, Virginie; Scott, Noëlle; Armante, Raymond; Chédin, Alain; Boonne, Cathy; Poulet-Crovisier, Nathalie

    2010-05-01

    The GEISA (1) (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) computer-accessible database, initiated in 1976, is developed and maintained at LMD (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, France) a system comprising three independent sub-databases devoted respectively to : line transition parameters, infrared and ultraviolet/visible absorption cross-sections, microphysical and optical properties of atmospheric aerosols. The updated 2009 edition (GEISA-09) archives, in its line transition parameters sub-section, 50 molecules, corresponding to 111 isotopes, for a total of 3,807,997 entries, in the spectral range from 10-6 to 35,877.031 cm-1. Detailed description of the whole database contents will be documented. GEISA and GEISA/IASI are implemented on the CNES/CNRS Ether Products and Services Centre WEB site (http://ether.ipsl.jussieu.fr), where all archived spectroscopic data can be handled through general and user friendly associated management software facilities. These facilities will be described and widely illustrated, as well. Interactive demonstrations will be given if technical possibilities are feasible at the time of the Poster Display Session. More than 350 researchers are registered for on line use of GEISA on Ether. Currently, GEISA is involved in activities (2) related to the remote sensing of the terrestrial atmosphere thanks to the sounding performances of new generation of hyperspectral Earth' atmospheric sounders, like AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder -http://www-airs.jpl.nasa.gov/), in the USA, and IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer -http://earth-sciences.cnes.fr/IASI/) in Europe, using the 4A radiative transfer model (3) (4A/LMD http://ara.lmd.polytechnique.fr; 4A/OP co-developed by LMD and NOVELTIS -http://www.noveltis.fr/) with the support of CNES (2006). Refs: (1) Jacquinet-Husson N., N.A. Scott, A. Chédin,L. Crépeau, R. Armante, V. Capelle

  10. A Randomized Trial Comparing Classical Participatory Design to VandAID, an Interactive CrowdSourcing Platform to Facilitate User-Centered Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufendach, Kevin R; Koch, Sabine; Unertl, Kim M; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2017-04-28

    Early involvement of stakeholders in the design of medical software is particularly important due to the need to incorporate complex knowledge and actions associated with clinical work. Standard user-centered design methods include focus groups and participatory design sessions with individual stakeholders, which generally limit user involvement to a small number of individuals due to the significant time investments from designers and end users. The goal of this project was to reduce the effort for end users to participate in co-design of a software user interface by developing an interactive web-based crowdsourcing platform. In a randomized trial, we compared a new web-based crowdsourcing platform to standard participatory design sessions. We developed an interactive, modular platform that allows responsive remote customization and design feedback on a visual user interface based on user preferences. The responsive canvas is a dynamic HTML template that responds in real time to user preference selections. Upon completion, the design team can view the user's interface creations through an administrator portal and download the structured selections through a REDCap interface. We have created a software platform that allows users to customize a user interface and see the results of that customization in real time, receiving immediate feedback on the impact of their design choices. Neonatal clinicians used the new platform to successfully design and customize a neonatal handoff tool. They received no specific instruction and yet were able to use the software easily and reported high usability. VandAID, a new web-based crowdsourcing platform, can involve multiple users in user-centered design simultaneously and provides means of obtaining design feedback remotely. The software can provide design feedback at any stage in the design process, but it will be of greatest utility for specifying user requirements and evaluating iterative designs with multiple options.

  11. Design criteria and eigensequence plots for satellite computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahba, G.

    1983-01-01

    The use of the degrees of freedom for signal is proposed as a design criteria for comparing different designs for satellite and other measuring systems. It is also proposed that certain eigensequence plots be examined at the design stage along with appropriate estimates of the parameter lambda playing the role of noise to signal ratio. The degrees of freedom for signal and the eigensequence plots may be determined using prior information in the spectral domain which is presently available along with a description of the system, and simulated data for estimating lambda. This work extends the 1972 work of Weinreb and Crosby.

  12. D.3.2 PLOT Persuasive Learning Design Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram-Hansen, Sandra Burri; Schärfe, Henrik; Winther-Nielsen, Nicolai

    2011-01-01

    of the technological learning tools and products which are currently related to the PLOT project, namely the GLOMaker and the 3ET tool, and a selection of GLOs and learning exercises. The primary focus of the analysis is to explore how the theoretical perspectives presented in D.3.1 are represented in these tools......, in particular the notions of persuasive design and constructive alignment. Whilst the report provides a persuasive design perspective on the technologies related to Euro PLOT, it must be stressed that if the document is to function as a basis for further discussion within the consortium, the partners...

  13. [Recurrence plot analysis of HRV for brain ischemia and asphyxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Qiu, Yihong; Zhu, Yisheng

    2008-02-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is the tiny variability existing in the cycles of the heart beats, which reflects the corresponding balance between sympathetic and vagus nerves. Since the nonlinear characteristic of HRV is confirmed, the Recurrence Plot method, a nonlinear dynamic analysis method based on the complexity, could be used to analyze HRV. The results showed the recurrence plot structures and some quantitative indices (L-Mean, L-Entr) during asphyxia insult vary significantly as compared to those in normal conditions, which offer a new method to monitor brain asphyxia injury.

  14. Recurrence plots and recurrence quantification analysis of human motion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josiński, Henryk; Michalczuk, Agnieszka; Świtoński, Adam; Szczesna, Agnieszka; Wojciechowski, Konrad

    2016-06-01

    The authors present exemplary application of recurrence plots, cross recurrence plots and recurrence quantification analysis for the purpose of exploration of experimental time series describing selected aspects of human motion. Time series were extracted from treadmill gait sequences which were recorded in the Human Motion Laboratory (HML) of the Polish-Japanese Academy of Information Technology in Bytom, Poland by means of the Vicon system. Analysis was focused on the time series representing movements of hip, knee, ankle and wrist joints in the sagittal plane.

  15. Vector plotting as an indication of the approach to flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, E. G.

    1975-01-01

    A binary flexure-torsion analysis was made to check theoretically a method for predicting flutter which depends on plotting vectorially the amplitudes of response relative to the exciting force and extracting the relevant damping rate. The results of this calculation are given in graphs both of the vector plots themselves and of the estimated damping rate against forward speed. The estimated damping rates are compared with calculated values. The method has the advantage that in a flight flutter test damping can be estimated from continuous excitation records: the method is an extension of the Kennedy and Pancu technique used in ground resonance testing.

  16. Facilitated gate setting by sequential dot plot scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Susanne; Müller, Susann

    2015-07-01

    Microbial communities comprising thousands of unknown organisms can be studied flow cytometrically by applying just one fluorescent parameter and using scatter characteristics of cells. Resulting 2D-plots need to represent high numbers of cells to detect the many subcommunities, even rare ones that might be present in the sample. Evaluation of such data can be faulty and subjective due to the low number of parameters available for data discrimination and the high numbers of overlaying events. Here, we describe a procedure that helps to evaluate such data using facilitated gate setting by sequential dot-plot scanning.

  17. On the Nature of Earth-Mars Porkchop Plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Ryan C.; Whetsel, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    Porkchop plots are a quick and convenient tool to help mission designers plan ballistic trajectories between two bodies. Parameter contours give rise to the familiar 'porkchop' shape. Each synodic period the pattern repeats, but not exactly, primarily due to differences in inclination and non-zero eccentricity. In this paper we examine the morphological features of Earth-to-Mars porkchop plots and the orbital characteristics that create them. These results are compared to idealistic and optimized transfers. Conclusions are drawn about 'good' opportunities versus 'bad' opportunities for different mission applications.

  18. Evaluation of a Smartphone App for Forest Sample Plot Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Mikko Vastaranta; Eduardo González Latorre; Ville Luoma; Ninni Saarinen; Markus Holopainen; Juha Hyyppä

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated a smartphone app (TRESTIMA(TM)) for forest sample plot measurements. The app interprets imagery collected from the sample plots using the camera in the smartphone and then estimates forest inventory attributes, including species-specific basal areas (G) as well as the diameter (D-gM) and height (H-gM) of basal area median trees. The estimates from the smartphone app were compared to forest inventory attributes derived from tree-wise measurements using calipers and a Vertex height...

  19. On the Nature of Earth-Mars Porkchop Plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Ryan C.; Whetsel, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    Porkchop plots are a quick and convenient tool to help mission designers plan ballistic trajectories between two bodies. Parameter contours give rise to the familiar 'porkchop' shape. Each synodic period the pattern repeats, but not exactly, primarily due to differences in inclination and non-zero eccentricity. In this paper we examine the morphological features of Earth-to-Mars porkchop plots and the orbital characteristics that create them. These results are compared to idealistic and optimized transfers. Conclusions are drawn about 'good' opportunities versus 'bad' opportunities for different mission applications.

  20. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists...... such as Lorentz and Einstein as well as mathematicians such as Poincare, Minkowski, Hilbert and Weyl contributed to this development. They created the new physical theories and the mathematical disciplines that play such paramount roles in their mathematical formulations. These physicists and mathematicians were...

  1. MoleView : An Attribute and Structure-Based Semantic Lens for Large Element-Based Plots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurter, Christophe; Ersoy, Ozan; Telea, Alexandru

    2011-01-01

    We present MoleView, a novel technique for interactive exploration of multivariate relational data. Given a spatial embedding of the data, in terms of a scatter plot or graph layout, we propose a semantic lens which selects a specific spatial and attribute-related data range. The lens keeps the

  2. A study of the critical properties of the Ising model on body-centered cubic lattice taking into account the interaction of next behind nearest neighbors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtazaev, A. K.; Ramazanov, M. K.; Kurbanova, D. R.; Badiev, M. K.; Abuev, Ya. K.

    2017-06-01

    The replica Monte Carlo method has been used to investigate the critical behavior of a threedimensional antiferromagnetic Ising model on a body-centered cubic lattice, taking into account interactions of the adjacent behind neighbors. Investigations are carried out for the ratios of the values of exchange interactions behind the nearest and next nearest neighbors k = J 2/ J 1 in the range of k ∈ [0.0, 1.0] with the step Δ k = 0.1. In the framework of the theory of finite-dimensional scaling the static critical indices of heat capacity α, susceptibility γ, of the order parameter β, correlation radius ν, and also the Fisher index η are calculated. It is shown that the universality class of the critical behavior of this model is kept in the interval of k ∈ [0.0, 0.6]. It is established that a nonuniversal critical behavior is observed in the range k ∈ [0.8, 1.0].

  3. Linked Scatter Plots, A Powerful Exploration Tool For Very Large Sets of Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Duane Francis; Henze, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    We present a new tool, based on linked scatter plots, that is designed to efficiently explore very large spectrum data sets such as the SDSS, APOGEE, LAMOST, GAIA, and RAVE data sets.The tool works in two stages: the first uses batch processing and the second runs interactively. In the batch stage, spectra are processed through our data pipeline which computes the depths relative to the local continuum at preselected feature wavelengths. These depths, and any additional available variables such as local S/N level, magnitudes, colors, positions, and radial velocities, are the basic measured quantities used in the interactive stage.The interactive stage employs the NASA hyperwall, a configuration of 128 workstation displays (8x16 array) controlled by a parallelized software suite running on NASA's Pleiades supercomputer. Each hyperwall panel is used to display a fully linked 2-D scatter plot showing the depth of feature A vs the depth of feature B for all of the spectra. A and B change from panel to panel. The relationships between the various (A,B) strengths and any distinctive clustering, as well as unique outlier groupings, are visually apparent when examining and inter-comparing the different panels on the hyperwall. In addition, the data links between the scatter plots allow the user to apply a logical algebra to the measurements. By graphically selecting the objects in any interesting region of any 2-D plot on the hyperwall, the tool immediately and clearly shows how the selected objects are distributed in all the other 2-D plots. The selection process may be repeated multiple times and, at each step, the selections can represent a sequence of logical constraints on the measurements, revealing those objects which satisfy all the constraints thus far. The spectra of the selected objects may be examined at any time on a connected workstation display.Using over 945,000,000 depth measurements from 569,738 SDSS DR10 stellar spectra, we illustrate how to quickly

  4. Field Plot and Accuracy Assessment Points for Palo Alto Battlefield National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Accuracy Assessment, Observation and Plot Points. Plot data were collected from 2000-2003; however, minimal attributes were maintained and a plots database was not...

  5. How useful are Green-Ampt parameters derived from small rainfall simulation plots for modelling runoff at different plot lengths?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhans, Christoph; Engels, Lien; Tegenbos, Lize; Govers, Gerard; Diels, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Rainfall simulation on small field plots is an invaluable method to derive effective field parameters for infiltration models such as Green-Ampt. Plot scales of ca. 1m² integrate much of the micro-scale variability and processes, which ring-infiltrometers or soil core measurements cannot capture. However, these parameters have to be used with caution on larger scales, because processes such as run-on infiltration can be considerable. The Green-Ampt parameters suction across the wetting front (psi) and effective hydraulic conductivity (Ke) were estimated from rainfall simulations on two ridged fields in Togo, West Africa. Additionally, rainfall events were recorded, and on plots of 1m width and lengths of 1, 4 and 16m, total runoff volume and sediment concentration were measured. The storm runoff hydrographs of the plots were modelled with Chu's Green-Ampt variable rainfall intensity infiltration model, using the field-average parameters derived from the simulations. Potential effects of runoff lag time were assumed negligible. Calculated total runoff volumes were compared to measured runoff volumes. For the 1m plots, runoff was underestimated, as patches of seal in the furrows produced runoff already at rainfall intensities much lower than the average infiltration capacity. For the longer plots, no run-on infiltration or other scale dependent processes were assumed, so the relative error due to scale effects was proportional to the average difference or runoff depth. In contrast to the 1m plots, runoff was overestimated by a factor of 1.2 and 2 for the 4m and 16m plots, respectively. It appears that the application of the Green-Ampt effective hydraulic conductivity derived from rainfall simulations faces two main problems, which are their dependence on one single rainfall intensity and scale-effects by run-on infiltration. Errors necessarily propagate into the scale dependency of erosion and sediment transport, as these processes are directly dependent on runoff

  6. plotKML: Scientific Visualization of Spatio-Temporal Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Hengl

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available plotKML is an R package that provides methods for writing the most common R spatial classes into KML files. It builds up on the existing XML parsing functionality (XML package, and provides similar plotting functionality as the lattice package. Its main objective is to provide a simple interface to generate KML files with a small number of arguments, and allows users to visually explore spatio-temporal data available in R: points, polygons, gridded maps, trajectory-type data, vertical profiles, ground photographs, time series vector objects or raster images, along with the results of spatial analysis such as geostatistical mapping, spatial simulations of vector and gridded objects, optimized sampling designs, species distribution models and similar. A generic plotKML( function automatically determines the parsing order and visualizes data directly from R; lower level functions can be combined to allow for new user-created visualization templates. In comparison to other packages writing KML, plotKML seems to be more object oriented, it links more closely to the existing R classes for spatio-temporal data (sp, spacetime and raster packages than the alternatives, and provides users with the possibility to create their own templates.

  7. A Conductive Gel for the Plotting of Equipotential Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizalde-Torres, J.; González-Cardel, M.; Vega-Murguía, E. J.; Castillo-González, I.; Rodríguez-Nava, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a conductive gel that can be used to measure the electrical potential differences on its surface, and has enough consistency to plot equipotential lines. It has a gelation time of less than 10 min, and is suitable for implementing learning experiences in a physics teaching laboratory in a 90 min session. To…

  8. 70 Years of permanent plot research in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, N.A.C.; Schaminée, J.H.J.; Duuren, van L.

    2002-01-01

    Within the framework of the Dutch `Network Ecological Monitoring¿, a large set of new permanent plots has been established to monitor selected plant communities throughout The Netherlands for studying the effects of environmental changes on species composition of semi-natural communities. This

  9. D.3.1 PLOT Persuasive Learning Design Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram-Hansen, Sandra Burri; Schärfe, Henrik; Dinesen, Jens Vilhelm

    2011-01-01

    , constructive alignment, and towards a common understanding of the ethical stances we believe should underpin persuasive efforts. In section 4, we present viewpoints on the four cases, central to the PLOT project. This section is the result of a workshop held at the consortium meeting in Aalborg. Finally...

  10. Constructing General Orthogonal Fractional Factorial Split-Plot Designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sartono, B.; Goos, P.; Schoen, E.

    2015-01-01

    While the orthogonal design of split-plot fractional factorial experiments has received much attention already, there are still major voids in the literature. First, designs with one or more factors acting at more than two levels have not yet been considered. Second, published work on nonregular fra

  11. Omitted Variable Sensitivity Analysis with the Annotated Love Plot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ben B.; Fredrickson, Mark M.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this research is to make sensitivity analysis accessible not only to empirical researchers but also to the various stakeholders for whom educational evaluations are conducted. To do this it derives anchors for the omitted variable (OV)-program participation association intrinsically, using the Love plot to present a wide range of…

  12. A New method of preparing iso-hardness plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V.; Patwardhan, A. K.

    1993-02-01

    A new approach has been used for the preparation of iso-hardness plots, which are very useful in the heat treating of metals and alloys. An alloy white iron containing ~6% Mn, ~5% Cr, and ~3% Cu was heat treated at 800,850,900,950,1000, and 1050 °C and soaked for 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 h, respectively, at each of these temperatures followed by air cooling. It was observed that, although the hardness varied linearly with soaking time, its variation with soaking temperature was nonlinear. This can be represented as: H = 98.285e2021.33/T + (0.037 - 0.316 × 10- 4 T) . t where H is Vickers hardness; T is soaking temperature in K; and t is soaking time in seconds. The variation in hardness has been discussed in light of microstructural changes that can take place upon heat treating. A three-dimensional plot of hardness, soaking temperature, and time was prepared based on the above equation. It revealed that the variation in hardness on heat treating can be represented as a surface instead of lines, where the change in the slope of the surface reflects the various transformations occurring in the alloy system. This iso- hardness plot, consisting of contours of constant hardness, has been prepared by projecting the above-mentioned surface on the soaking temperature- time plane. The method of selection of heat treating parameters based on this iso- hardness plot is discussed.

  13. Subclassifying disordered proteins by the CH-CDF plot method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fei; Oldfield, Christopher; Meng, Jingwei; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Xue, Bin; Uversky, Vladimir N; Romero, Pedro; Dunker, A Keith

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are associated with a wide range of functions. We suggest that sequence-based subtypes, which we call flavors, may provide the basis for different biological functions. The problem is to find a method that separates IDPs into different flavor / function groups. Here we discuss one approach, the (Charge-Hydropathy) versus (Cumulative Distribution Function) plot or CH-CDF plot, which is based the combined use of the CH and CDF disorder predictors. These two predictors are based on significantly different inputs and methods. This CH-CDF plot partitions all proteins into 4 groups: structured, mixed, disordered, and rare. Studies of the Protein Data Bank (PDB) entries and homologous show different structural biases for each group classified by the CH-CDF plot. The mixed class has more order-promoting residues and more ordered regions than the disordered class. To test whether this partition accomplishes any functional separation, we performed gene ontology (GO) term analysis on each class. Some functions are indeed found to be related to subtypes of disorder: the disordered class is highly active in mitosis-related processes among others. Meanwhile, the mixed class is highly associated with signaling pathways, where having both ordered and disordered regions could possibly be important.

  14. Developing Box Plots While Navigating the Maze of Data Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Bruce; Fitzallen, Noleine

    2013-01-01

    The learning sequence described in this article was developed to provide students with a demonstration of the development of box plots from authentic data as an illustration of the advantages gained from using multiple forms of data representation. The sequence follows an authentic process that starts with a problem to which data representations…

  15. Polar plot representation of time-resolved fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichorst, John Paul; Wen Teng, Kai; Clegg, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Measuring changes in a molecule's fluorescence emission is a common technique to study complex biological systems such as cells and tissues. Although the steady-state fluorescence intensity is frequently used, measuring the average amount of time that a molecule spends in the excited state (the fluorescence lifetime) reveals more detailed information about its local environment. The lifetime is measured in the time domain by detecting directly the decay of fluorescence following excitation by short pulse of light. The lifetime can also be measured in the frequency domain by recording the phase and amplitude of oscillation in the emitted fluorescence of the sample in response to repetitively modulated excitation light. In either the time or frequency domain, the analysis of data to extract lifetimes can be computationally intensive. For example, a variety of iterative fitting algorithms already exist to determine lifetimes from samples that contain multiple fluorescing species. However, recently a method of analysis referred to as the polar plot (or phasor plot) is a graphical tool that projects the time-dependent features of the sample's fluorescence in either the time or frequency domain into the Cartesian plane to characterize the sample's lifetime. The coordinate transformations of the polar plot require only the raw data, and hence, there are no uncertainties from extensive corrections or time-consuming fitting in this analysis. In this chapter, the history and mathematical background of the polar plot will be presented along with examples that highlight how it can be used in both cuvette-based and imaging applications.

  16. Igloo-Plot: a tool for visualization of multidimensional datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntal, Bhusan K; Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Mande, Sharmila S

    2014-01-01

    Advances in science and technology have resulted in an exponential growth of multivariate (or multi-dimensional) datasets which are being generated from various research areas especially in the domain of biological sciences. Visualization and analysis of such data (with the objective of uncovering the hidden patterns therein) is an important and challenging task. We present a tool, called Igloo-Plot, for efficient visualization of multidimensional datasets. The tool addresses some of the key limitations of contemporary multivariate visualization and analysis tools. The visualization layout, not only facilitates an easy identification of clusters of data-points having similar feature compositions, but also the 'marker features' specific to each of these clusters. The applicability of the various functionalities implemented herein is demonstrated using several well studied multi-dimensional datasets. Igloo-Plot is expected to be a valuable resource for researchers working in multivariate data mining studies. Igloo-Plot is available for download from: http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/IglooPlot/.

  17. Box-and-Whisker Plots Applied to Food Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Joao E. V.; Miranda, Ricardo M.; Figueiredo, Antonio F.; Barbosa, Jardel P.; Brasil, Edykarlos M.

    2016-01-01

    Box-and-whisker plots or simply boxplots are powerful graphical representations that give an overview of a data set. In this work five different examples illustrate the applications of boxplots in food chemistry. The examples involve relative sweetness of sugars and sugar alcohols with respect to sucrose, the potassium content of fruits and…

  18. Non-parametric and least squares Langley plot methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. W. Kiedron

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Langley plots are used to calibrate sun radiometers primarily for the measurement of the aerosol component of the atmosphere that attenuates (scatters and absorbs incoming direct solar radiation. In principle, the calibration of a sun radiometer is a straightforward application of the Bouguer–Lambert–Beer law V=V>/i>0e−τ ·m, where a plot of ln (V voltage vs. m air mass yields a straight line with intercept ln (V0. This ln (V0 subsequently can be used to solve for τ for any measurement of V and calculation of m. This calibration works well on some high mountain sites, but the application of the Langley plot calibration technique is more complicated at other, more interesting, locales. This paper is concerned with ferreting out calibrations at difficult sites and examining and comparing a number of conventional and non-conventional methods for obtaining successful Langley plots. The eleven techniques discussed indicate that both least squares and various non-parametric techniques produce satisfactory calibrations with no significant differences among them when the time series of ln (V0's are smoothed and interpolated with median and mean moving window filters.

  19. Box-and-Whisker Plots Applied to Food Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Joao E. V.; Miranda, Ricardo M.; Figueiredo, Antonio F.; Barbosa, Jardel P.; Brasil, Edykarlos M.

    2016-01-01

    Box-and-whisker plots or simply boxplots are powerful graphical representations that give an overview of a data set. In this work five different examples illustrate the applications of boxplots in food chemistry. The examples involve relative sweetness of sugars and sugar alcohols with respect to sucrose, the potassium content of fruits and…

  20. Surveillance of Site A and Plot M report for 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W. (ESQ)

    2011-05-31

    The results of the environmental surveillance program conducted at Site A/Plot M in the Palos Forest Preserve area for Calendar Year 2010 are presented. Based on the results of the 1976-1978 radiological characterization of the site, a determination was made that a surveillance program be established. The characterization study determined that very low levels of hydrogen-3 (as tritiated water) had migrated from the burial ground and were present in two nearby hand-pumped picnic wells. The current surveillance program began in 1980 and consists of sample collection and analysis of surface and subsurface water. The results of the analyses are used to monitor the migration pathway of hydrogen-3 contaminated water from the burial ground (Plot M) to the hand-pumped picnic wells and monitor for the presence of radioactive materials in the environment of the area. Hydrogen-3 in the Red Gate Woods picnic wells was still detected this year, but the average and maximum concentrations were significantly less than found earlier. Hydrogen-3 continues to be detected in a number of wells, boreholes, dolomite holes, and a surface stream. Analyses since 1984 have indicated the presence of low levels of strontium-90 in water from a number of boreholes next to Plot M. The results of the surveillance program continue to indicate that the radioactivity remaining at Site A/Plot M does not endanger the health or safety of the public visiting the site, using the picnic area, or living in the vicinity.

  1. Surveillance of Site A and Plot M, Report for 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.

    2010-04-21

    The results of the environmental surveillance program conducted at Site A/Plot M in the Palos Forest Preserve area for Calendar Year 2009 are presented. Based on the results of the 1976-1978 radiological characterization of the site, a determination was made that a surveillance program be established. The characterization study determined that very low levels of hydrogen-3 (as tritiated water) had migrated from the burial ground and were present in two nearby hand-pumped picnic wells. The current surveillance program began in 1980 and consists of sample collection and analysis of surface and subsurface water. The results of the analyses are used to monitor the migration pathway of hydrogen-3 contaminated water from the burial ground (Plot M) to the hand-pumped picnic wells and monitor for the presence of radioactive materials in the environment of the area. Hydrogen-3 in the Red Gate Woods picnic wells was still detected this year, but the average and maximum concentrations were significantly less than found earlier. Hydrogen-3 continues to be detected in a number of wells, boreholes, dolomite holes, and a surface stream. Analyses since 1984 have indicated the presence of low levels of strontium-90 in water from a number of boreholes next to Plot M. The results of the surveillance program continue to indicate that the radioactivity remaining at Site A/Plot M does not endanger the health or safety of the public visiting the site, using the picnic area, or living in the vicinity.

  2. Interactive modeling-synthesis-characterization approach towards controllable in situ self-assembly of artificial pinning centers in RE-123 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Judy; Shi, Jack

    2017-10-01

    Raising critical current density J c in high temperature superconductors (HTSs) is an important strategy towards performance-cost balanced HTS technology for commercialization. The development of strong nanoscale artificial pinning centers (APCs) in HTS, such as YBa2Cu3O7 or RE-123 in general, represents one of the most exciting progressions in HTS material research in the last decade. Significantly raised J c has been demonstrated in APC/RE-123 nanocomposites by enhanced pinning on magnetic vortices in magnetic fields towards that demanded in practical applications. Among other processes, strain-mediated self-organization has been explored extensively for in situ formation of the APCs based on fundamental physics design rules. The desire in controlling the morphology, dimension, orientation, and concentration of APCs has led to a fundamental question on how strains interact in determining APCs at a macroscopic scale. Answering this question demands an interactive modeling-synthesis-characterization approach towards a thorough understanding of fundamental physics governing the strain-mediated self-organization of the APCs in the APC/RE-123 nanocomposites. Such an understanding is the key for a leap forward from the traditionally empirical method to materials-by-design to enable an optimal APC landscape to be achieved in epitaxial films of APC/YBCO nanocomposites under a precise guidance of fundamental physics. The paper intends to provide a review of recent progress made in the controllable generation of APCs using the interactive modeling-synthesis-characterization approach. The emphasis will be given to the understanding so far achieved using such an approach on the collective effect of the strain field on the morphology, dimension, and orientation of APCs in epitaxial APC/RE-123 nanocomposite films.

  3. Comparative water balance study of forest and fallow plots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Móricz N

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Increasing pressure on groundwater due to land use change (e.g., afforestation and future climate change will alter the recharge of groundwater aquifers, causing shifts in water table levels and hence influencing the avai­lable groundwater resources. The effect of land use change on groundwater resources has initiated a major scientific debate during the last decades between foresters and experts in water management in Hungary and in several other countries. The aim of this study was to compare water balances of two different vegetation covers, a groundwater dependent oak forest and a nearby fallow area in the Hungarian Lowland. Water balance components for an oak and a fallow plots, exposed to similar weather conditions and with similar soils, were estimated and compared by calibrating the Hydrus 1-D model using mea­sured soil water content and groundwater levels. The difference in the groundwater consumption was analyzed in details during dry and wet growing seasons. Transpiration at the fallow plot was only about two-thirds of that in the oak forest, while groundwater consumption was three times higher in the forest than at the fallow plot throughout the two-year study. During the dry growing season, the proportion of groundwater use from the total transpiration reached up to 90% at the oak plot. According to the model, in the dry growing season in 2007 both vegetation covers relied significantly on groundwater resources, while in 2008 the consumption of groundwater was notably reduced due to the wet weather at both plots.

  4. Aquifer test interpretation using derivative analysis and diagnostic plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Espriú, Antonio; Real-Rangel, Roberto; Cortés-Salazar, Iván; Castro-Herrera, Israel; Luna-Izazaga, Gabriela; Sánchez-León, Emilio

    2017-04-01

    Pumping tests remain a method of choice to deduce fundamental aquifer properties and to assess well condition. In the oil and gas (O&G) industry, well testing has been the core technique in examining reservoir behavior over the last 50 years. The pressure derivative by Bourdet, it is perhaps, the most significant single development in the history of well test analysis. Recently, the so-called diagnostics plots (e.g. drawdown and drawdown derivative in a log-log plot) have been successfully tested in aquifers. However, this procedure is still underutilized by groundwater professionals. This research illustrates the applicability range, advantages and drawbacks (e.g. smoothing procedures) of diagnostic plots using field examples from a wide spectrum of tests (short/long tests, constant/variable flow rates, drawdown/buildup stages, pumping well/observation well) in dissimilar geological conditions. We analyze new and pre-existent aquifer tests in Mexico, USA, Canada, Germany, France and Saudi Arabia. In constant flow rate tests, our results show that derivative analysis is an easy, robust and powerful tool to assess near-borehole damage effects, formation heterogeneity, boundaries, flow regimes, infinite-acting radial stages, i.e., valid Theisian framework, and fracture-driven flow. In step tests, the effectiveness relies on high-frequency drawdown measurements. Moreover, we adapt O&G analytical solutions to cater for the conditions in groundwater systems. In this context, further parameters can be computed analytically from the plots, such as skin factor, head losses, wellbore storage, distance to the boundary, channel-aquifer and/or fracture zone width, among others. Therefore, diagnostic plots should be considered a mandatory tool for pumping tests analysis among hydrogeologists. This project has been supported by DGAPA (UNAM) under the research project PAPIIT IN-112815.

  5. PuffinPlot: A versatile, user-friendly program for paleomagnetic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurcock, P. C.; Wilson, G. S.

    2012-06-01

    PuffinPlot is a user-friendly desktop application for analysis of paleomagnetic data, offering a unique combination of features. It runs on several operating systems, including Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux; supports both discrete and long core data; and facilitates analysis of very weakly magnetic samples. As well as interactive graphical operation, PuffinPlot offers batch analysis for large volumes of data, and a Python scripting interface for programmatic control of its features. Available data displays include demagnetization/intensity, Zijderveld, equal-area (for sample, site, and suite level demagnetization data, and for magnetic susceptibility anisotropy data), a demagnetization data table, and a natural remanent magnetization intensity histogram. Analysis types include principal component analysis, Fisherian statistics, and great-circle path intersections. The results of calculations can be exported as CSV (comma-separated value) files; graphs can be printed, and can also be saved as publication-quality vector files in SVG or PDF format. PuffinPlot is free, and the program, user manual, and fully documented source code may be downloaded from http://code.google.com/p/puffinplot/.

  6. A tool to determine crown and plot canopy transparency for forest inventory and analysis phase 3 plots using digital photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew F. Winn; Philip A. Araman

    2012-01-01

    The USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program collects crown foliage transparency estimates for individual trees on Phase 3 (P3) inventory plots. The FIA crown foliage estimate is obtained from a pair of perpendicular side views of the tree. Researchers with the USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station have developed a computer program that...

  7. PRELIMINARY STUDY OF D0 ---> K PI PI0 DECAYS WITH DALITZ PLOTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gresham, Moira I

    2002-08-19

    Particle physicists study the smallest particles and most basic rules of their interactions in humankind's current scope. The Charm Analysis Working Group (CWG) of the BaBar Collaboration studies decays involving the charm quark. They currently study mixing in D decays, an interesting and poorly understood phenomenon in current physics models. We, as part of the CWG, investigated the plausibility of using Dalitz plots and the BaBar analysis framework to study mixing in Wrong Sign (WS) D{sup 0} {yields} K{pi}{pi}{sup 0} decays. Others in the CWG have studied mixing in the 2-body decay, D{sup 0} {yields} K{pi}. The 3-body decay analyzed with the RooFitDalitz analysis package and Dalitz plots provides more information and another way of separating Doubly Cabibbo Suppressed Decays (DCSD) from mixing--which share the same end products. Through doing many simulations, we have demonstrated the usefulness of this approach. We selected D{sup 0} {yields} K{pi}{pi}{sup 0} events from Simulation Production run No.4 (SP4) and BaBar's run 1 and run 2. We made Dalitz plots with this data. Now that we better understand Dalitz plots and software, we plan to select WS D{sup 0} {yields} K{pi}{pi}{sup 0} events and perform rate fits as discussed in BaBar Analysis Document (BAD) No.443, as well as fits for several different decay times and resonances, in order to further distinguish DCSD from mixing.

  8. A method to quantify FRET stoichiometry with phasor plot analysis and acceptor lifetime ingrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, WeiYue; Avezov, Edward; Schlachter, Simon C; Gielen, Fabrice; Laine, Romain F; Harding, Heather P; Hollfelder, Florian; Ron, David; Kaminski, Clemens F

    2015-03-10

    FRET is widely used for the study of protein-protein interactions in biological samples. However, it is difficult to quantify both the FRET efficiency (E) and the affinity (Kd) of the molecular interaction from intermolecular FRET signals in samples of unknown stoichiometry. Here, we present a method for the simultaneous quantification of the complete set of interaction parameters, including fractions of bound donors and acceptors, local protein concentrations, and dissociation constants, in each image pixel. The method makes use of fluorescence lifetime information from both donor and acceptor molecules and takes advantage of the linear properties of the phasor plot approach. We demonstrate the capability of our method in vitro in a microfluidic device and also in cells, via the determination of the binding affinity between tagged versions of glutathione and glutathione S-transferase, and via the determination of competitor concentration. The potential of the method is explored with simulations.

  9. A comparison of trenched plot techniques for partitioning soil respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Bronson, Dustin; Bladyka, Emma; Gower, Stith T.

    2011-07-16

    Partitioning the soil surface CO{sub 2} flux (R{sub S}) flux is an important step in understanding ecosystem-level carbon cycling, given that R{sub S} is poorly constrained and its source components may have different responses to climate change. Trenched plots are a classic method of separating the R{sub S} source fluxes, but labor-intensive and may cause considerable disturbance to the soil environment. This study tested if various methods of plant suppression in trenched plots affected R{sub S} fluxes, quantified the R{sub S} response to soil temperature and moisture changes, and estimated the heterotrophic contribution to R{sub S}. It was performed in a boreal black spruce (Picea mariana) plantation, using a complete randomized design, during the 2007 growing season (May-November). Trenched plots had significantly lower R{sub S} than control plots, with differences appearing {approx}100 days after trenching; spatial variability doubled after trenching but then declined throughout the experiment. Most trenching treatments had significantly lower (by {approx}0.5 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) R{sub S} than the controls, and there was no significant difference in R{sub S} among the various trenching treatments. Soil temperature at 2 cm explained more R{sub S} variability than did 10-cm temperature or soil moisture. Temperature sensitivity (Q10) declined in the control plots from {approx}2.6 (at 5 C) to {approx}1.6 (at 15 C); trenched plots values were higher, from 3.1 at 5 C to 1.9 at 15 C. We estimated R{sub S} for the study period to be 241 {+-} 40 g C m{sup -2}, with roots contributing 64% of R{sub S} after accounting for fine root decay, and 293 g C m{sup -2} for the entire year. These findings suggest that laborious hand weeding of vegetation may be usefully replaced by other methods, easing future studies of this large and poorly-understood carbon flux.

  10. CADASTRAL CLASSIFICATION OF THE LAND PLOTS IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KIRICHEK Yu. O.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Work concerns development of national system of classification of the land plots. The developed classification will allow to solve correctly a number of the corresponding cadastral, land management, estimated and other tasks. The analysis of classifications of lands, improvements and real estate in general is made. The created offers concerning creation of a new classification of the land plots in Ukraine. Today the Ukrainian real estate market has no single system that separates the system property groups, classes and types. This significantly complicates the work and can not fully be aware of the specific situation of real estate market. This task is designed to solve classification properties, it is used to transition from a diversity of individual properties to a limited number of classes of evaluation objects. The classification is different functional purpose (use facilities assessment, which determines the difference in value.

  11. Losing the Plot: the Geological Anti-Narrative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelene Buckland

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Geology has often been treated by literary critics as the producer narratives of earth history which were appropriated or resisted by novelists and poets. This paper will problematise this tradition by considering a widespread problematisation of plot as a mode of rational enquiry in the nineteenth century, and which underpinned much literary and geological discourse. Rooting itself in elite, fashionable literary culture, geology often resisted plot as a means of unravelling and describing earth history. Briefly considering the reading and the writings of geologists including Adam Sedgwick, William Buckland and Charles Lyell, this essay demonstrates that geology is a much different case in 'science and literature' than the evolutionary sciences explored by Gillian Beer and George Levine.

  12. [Eugenics, an element of the literary plots of dystopia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Ewa; Musielak, Michał

    2007-01-01

    The work presents the ideas and assumptions of eugenics, a social philosophy established in 1883 by Francis Galton, which affected the social policies of numerous European countries in the first half of the 20th century. The work shows the effect of eugenics on the literary standards of European prose in the previous century. Two outstanding dystopian novels of the 20th century, The Brave New World by Aldous Huxley and 1984 by George Orwell, situate eugenics as a permanent element of the literary plot of dystopia. Apart from the typical features of this type of novel, for example: personal narration with a trace of irony, a totalitarian state and Newspeak, eugenics is an important element of the literary plot with is aim to exclude and marginalise certain social groups. Eugenics is also one of the main social ideas criticised by both the writers.

  13. Automated drawing of network plots in network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rücker, Gerta; Schwarzer, Guido

    2016-03-01

    In systematic reviews based on network meta-analysis, the network structure should be visualized. Network plots often have been drawn by hand using generic graphical software. A typical way of drawing networks, also implemented in statistical software for network meta-analysis, is a circular representation, often with many crossing lines. We use methods from graph theory in order to generate network plots in an automated way. We give a number of requirements for graph drawing and present an algorithm that fits prespecified ideal distances between the nodes representing the treatments. The method was implemented in the function netgraph of the R package netmeta and applied to a number of networks from the literature. We show that graph representations with a small number of crossing lines are often preferable to circular representations.

  14. The Chymistry of "The Learned Dr Plot" (1640-96).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Anna Marie

    2014-01-01

    In the seventeenth century, there were developing norms of openness in the presentation of scientific knowledge that were at odds with traditions of secrecy among chymists, particularly practitioners of chrysopoeia, or the transmutation of metals. This chapter analyzes how Dr. Robert Plot, the first professor of chymistry at Oxford, negotiated these boundaries within an institutional context. I first delineate his chymical and experimental practice, which incorporated procedures from medieval alchemical sources, particularly the Lullian corpus, as well as more novel practices from seventeenth-century chymistry. Then, I analyze how personal and institutional ambitions and economic considerations shaped to what extent Plot negotiated the boundaries between secrecy and the public dissemination of chymical knowledge.

  15. [Murderers in white coats--the physicians' plot against Stalin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, B

    1997-12-10

    During the Moscow trials in 1936-38 several doctors were sentenced for participating in the murders of party leaders. As others who were accused, the doctors willingly confessed to crimes they could not possibly have committed. A second doctors' plot took place in the autumn of 1952. This time nine doctors, six of them Jews, were arrested for the attempted murder of political leaders. Only the unexpected death of Josef Stalin prevented a new wave of terror. With the single exception of Genrikh Grigorjevitsj Jagoda (1891-1938), head of the NKVD (KGB's predecessor), all those sentenced under the Moscow process are now rehabilitated. The participants of the second doctors' plot were rehabilitated immediately after Stalin's death.

  16. Review article: The mountain motif in the plot of Matthew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert J. Volschenk

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This article reviewed T.L. Donaldson’s book, Jesus on the mountain: A study in Matthean theology, published in 1985 by JSOT Press, Sheffield, and focused on the mountain motif in the structure and plot of the Gospel of Matthew, in addition to the work of Donaldson on the mountain motif as a literary motif and as theological symbol. The mountain is a primary theological setting for Jesus’ ministry and thus is an important setting, serving as one of the literary devices by which Matthew structured and progressed his narrative. The Zion theological and eschatological significance and Second Temple Judaism serve as the historical and theological background for the mountain motif. The last mountain setting (Mt 28:16–20 is the culmination of the three theological themes in the plot of Matthew, namely Christology, ecclesiology and salvation history.

  17. Volcano plots in hydrogen electrocatalysis - uses and abuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaino, Paola; Juarez, Fernanda; Santos, Elizabeth; Schmickler, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Sabatier's principle suggests, that for hydrogen evolution a plot of the rate constant versus the hydrogen adsorption energy should result in a volcano, and several such plots have been presented in the literature. A thorough examination of the data shows, that there is no volcano once the oxide-covered metals are left out. We examine the factors that govern the reaction rate in the light of our own theory and conclude, that Sabatier's principle is only one of several factors that determine the rate. With the exception of nickel and cobalt, the reaction rate does not decrease for highly exothermic hydrogen adsorption as predicted, because the reaction passes through more suitable intermediate states. The case of nickel is given special attention; since it is a 3d metal, its orbitals are compact and the overlap with hydrogen is too low to make it a good catalyst.

  18. Automatic target recognition based on cross-plot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin Kian Loong Wong

    Full Text Available Automatic target recognition that relies on rapid feature extraction of real-time target from photo-realistic imaging will enable efficient identification of target patterns. To achieve this objective, Cross-plots of binary patterns are explored as potential signatures for the observed target by high-speed capture of the crucial spatial features using minimal computational resources. Target recognition was implemented based on the proposed pattern recognition concept and tested rigorously for its precision and recall performance. We conclude that Cross-plotting is able to produce a digital fingerprint of a target that correlates efficiently and effectively to signatures of patterns having its identity in a target repository.

  19. A new approach to detect congestive heart failure using Teager energy nonlinear scatter plot of R-R interval series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Chandrakar

    2012-09-01

    A novel approach to distinguish congestive heart failure (CHF) subjects from healthy subjects is proposed. Heart rate variability (HRV) is impaired in CHF subjects. In this work hypothesizing that capturing moment to moment nonlinear dynamics of HRV will reveal cardiac patterning, we construct the nonlinear scatter plot for Teager energy of R-R interval series. The key feature of Teager energy is that it models the energy of the source that generated the signal rather than the energy of the signal itself. Hence, any deviations in the genesis of HRV, by complex interactions of hemodynamic, electrophysiological, and humoral variables, as well as by the autonomic and central nervous regulations, get manifested in the Teager energy function. Comparison of the Teager energy scatter plot with the second-order difference plot (SODP) for normal and CHF subjects reveals significant differences qualitatively and quantitatively. We introduce the concept of curvilinearity for central tendency measures of the plots and define a radial distance index that reveals the efficacy of the Teager energy scatter plot over SODP in separating CHF subjects from healthy subjects. The k-nearest neighbor classifier with RDI as feature showed almost 100% classification rate.

  20. Extended Recurrence Plot Analysis and its Application to ERP Data

    CERN Document Server

    Marwan, N; Marwan, Norbert; Meinke, Anja

    2004-01-01

    We present new measures of complexity and their application to event related potential data. The new measures base on structures of recurrence plots and makes the identification of chaos-chaos transitions possible. The application of these measures to data from single-trials of the Oddball experiment can identify laminar states therein. This offers a new way of analyzing event-related activity on a single-trial basis.

  1. Dispatching policy for manufacturing jobs and time-delay plots

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, the concepts of chaos and non-linear dynamics are briefly introduced and the tools used in the characterization of a chaotic or non-linear system are discussed for studying the performance of dispatching policies in manufacturing systems. The scheduling of a simple manufacturing system with the help of common assignment rules has been simulated first. The results are studied and analysed with the help of time-delay plots. Some conclusions are drawn and, base...

  2. Method for detecting software anomalies based on recurrence plot analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Michał Mosdorf

    2012-01-01

    Presented paper evaluates method for detecting software anomalies based on recurrence plot analysis of trace log generated by software execution. Described method for detecting software anomalies is based on windowed recurrence quantification analysis for selected measures (e.g. Recurrence rate - RR or Determinism - DET). Initial results show that proposed method is useful in detecting silent software anomalies that do not result in typical crashes (e.g. exceptions).

  3. Method for detecting software anomalies based on recurrence plot analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Mosdorf

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Presented paper evaluates method for detecting software anomalies based on recurrence plot analysis of trace log generated by software execution. Described method for detecting software anomalies is based on windowed recurrence quantification analysis for selected measures (e.g. Recurrence rate - RR or Determinism - DET. Initial results show that proposed method is useful in detecting silent software anomalies that do not result in typical crashes (e.g. exceptions.

  4. Graphical interpretation of confidence curves in rankit plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyltoft Petersen, Per; Blaabjerg, Ole; Andersen, Marianne; Jørgensen, Lone G M; Schousboe, Karoline; Jensen, Esther

    2004-01-01

    A well-known transformation from the bell-shaped Gaussian (normal) curve to a straight line in the rankit plot is investigated, and a tool for evaluation of the distribution of reference groups is presented. It is based on the confidence intervals for percentiles of the calculated Gaussian distribution and the percentage of cumulative points exceeding these limits. The process is to rank the reference values and plot the cumulative frequency points in a rankit plot with a logarithmic (In=log(e)) transformed abscissa. If the distribution is close to In-Gaussian the cumulative frequency points will fit to the straight line describing the calculated In-Gaussian distribution. The quality of the fit is evaluated by adding confidence intervals (CI) to each point on the line and calculating the percentage of points outside the hyperbola-like CI-curves. The assumption was that the 95% confidence curves for percentiles would show 5% of points outside these limits. However, computer simulations disclosed that approximate 10% of the series would have 5% or more points outside the limits. This is a conservative validation, which is more demanding than the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The graphical presentation, however, makes it easy to disclose deviations from In-Gaussianity, and to make other interpretations of the distributions, e.g., comparison to non-Gaussian distributions in the same plot, where the cumulative frequency percentage can be read from the ordinate. A long list of examples of In-Gaussian distributions of subgroups of reference values from healthy individuals is presented. In addition, distributions of values from well-defined diseased individuals may show up as In-Gaussian. It is evident from the examples that the rankit transformation and simple graphical evaluation for non-Gaussianity is a useful tool for the description of sub-groups.

  5. Surveillance of Site A and Plot M - Report for 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; ESH/QA Oversight

    2007-05-07

    The results of the environmental surveillance program conducted at Site A/Plot M in the Palos Forest Preserve area for Calendar Year 2006 are presented. Based on the results of the 1976-1978 radiological characterization of the site, a determination was made that a surveillance program be established. The characterization study determined that very low levels of hydrogen-3 (as tritiated water) had migrated from the burial ground and were present in two nearby hand-pumped picnic wells. The current surveillance program began in 1980 and consists of sample collection and analysis of surface and subsurface water. The results of the analyses are used to (1) monitor the migration pathway of water from the burial ground (PlotM) to the hand pumped picnic wells, (2) establish if buried radionuclides other than hydrogen-3 have migrated, and (3) monitor the presence of radioactive and chemically hazardous materials in the environment of the area. Hydrogen-3 in the Red GateWoods picnic wells was still detected this year, but the average and maximum concentrations were significantly less than found earlier. Hydrogen-3 continues to be detected in a number of wells, boreholes, dolomite holes, and a surface stream. Analyses since 1984 have indicated the presence of low levels of strontium-90 in water from a number of boreholes next to Plot M. The results of the surveillance program continue to indicate that the radioactivity remaining at Site A/Plot M does not endanger the health or safety of the public visiting the site, using the picnic area, or living in the vicinity.

  6. How to Create and Manipulate Radar Range-Doppler Plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    set of wave fronts with constant wavelength, direction, and relative phase. Electromagnetic waves produced by radar transmitters and lasers are... radars . The Matlab function fft orders its DFT amplitudes in a way that renders negative frequencies positive and greater than the Nyquist frequency. I...UNCLASSIFIED How to Create and Manipulate Radar Range–Doppler Plots Don Koks Cyber & Electronic Warfare Division Defence Science and Technology

  7. Surveillance of Site A and Plot M, Report for 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.

    2009-05-07

    The results of the environmental surveillance program conducted at Site A/Plot M in the Palos Forest Preserve area for Calendar Year 2008 are presented. Based on the results of the 1976-1978 radiological characterization of the site, a determination was made that a surveillance program be established. The characterization study determined that very low levels of hydrogen-3 (as tritiated water) had migrated from the burial ground and were present in two nearby hand pumped picnic wells. The current surveillance program began in 1980 and consists of sample collection and analysis of surface and subsurface water. The results of the analyses are used to (1) monitor the migration pathway of hydrogen-3 contaminated water from the burial ground (Plot M) to the hand-pumped picnic wells, (2) establish if other buried radionuclides have migrated, and (3) monitor for the presence of radioactive materials in the environment of the area. Hydrogen-3 in the Red Gate Woods picnic wells was still detected this year, but the average and maximum concentrations were significantly less than found earlier. Hydrogen-3 continues to be detected in a number of wells, boreholes, dolomite holes, and a surface stream. Analyses since 1984 have indicated the presence of low levels of strontium-90 in water from a number of boreholes next to Plot M. The results of the surveillance program continue to indicate that the radioactivity remaining at Site A/Plot M does not endanger the health or safety of the public visiting the site, using the picnic area, or living in the vicinity.

  8. Surveillance of site A and plot M, report for 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; ESH/QA Oversight

    2008-03-25

    The results of the environmental surveillance program conducted at Site A/Plot M in the Palos Forest Preserve area for Calendar Year 2007 are presented. Based on the results of the 1976-1978 radiological characterization of the site, a determination was made that a surveillance program be established. The characterization study determined that very low levels of hydrogen-3 (as tritiated water) had migrated from the burial ground and were present in two nearby hand pumped picnic wells. The current surveillance program began in 1980 and consists of sample collection and analysis of surface and subsurface water. The results of the analyses are used to: (1) monitor the migration pathway of water from the burial ground (Plot M) to the hand-pumped picnic wells, (2) establish if other buried radionuclides have migrated, and (3) monitor the presence of radioactive materials in the environment of the area. Hydrogen-3 in the Red Gate Woods picnic wells was still detected this year, but the average and maximum concentrations were significantly less than found earlier. Hydrogen-3 continues to be detected in a number of wells, boreholes, dolomite holes, and a surface stream. Analyses since 1984 have indicated the presence of low levels of strontium-90 in water from a number of boreholes next to Plot M. The results of the surveillance program continue to indicate that the radioactivity remaining at Site A/Plot M does not endanger the health or safety of the public visiting the site, using the picnic area, or living in the vicinity.

  9. Educational outreach and impacts of white-tailed deer browse on native and invasive plants at the Crooked Creek Environmental Learning Center, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Lisa O.

    Overabundance of deer can assist the intrusion of invasive plants through browse, leading to homogenization of plant communities. Public attitudes towards native and invasive plant species and white-tailed deer browse related to personal experiences, can be changed through education focusing public awareness of ramifications of deer browse on native and invasive plants. I developed an interactive, interpretive Self-Guided Walking Tour brochure of the "You Can Trail" to provide an educational outreach program for visitors of Crooked Creek Environmental Learning Center that includes ecologically important native and invasive plants species from my investigation. This research study focuses on the overall abundance of native and invasive plant species once Odocoileus virginianus have been removed from the landscape during collection periods in June and September 2013 from exclosure and access plots that were maintained for seven years. Similarity of abundance were found in native and invasive abundance of forbs, bushes and percentage of ground cover. Differences included native bush volume being greater than invasive bush volume in the access plot in June with opposing results in the exclosure plot, being greater in invasive bush volume. However, in September, native and invasive bush volume was similar within the exclosure plot, while invasive bush volume decreased in the access plot. Invasive vines recorded in the June access plot were absent in the September collection period.

  10. Crop residue decomposition in Minnesota biochar amended plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyers, S. L.; Spokas, K. A.

    2014-02-01

    Impacts of biochar application at laboratory scales are routinely studied, but impacts of biochar application on decomposition of crop residues at field scales have not been widely addressed. The priming or hindrance of crop residue decomposition could have a cascading impact on soil processes, particularly those influencing nutrient availability. Our objectives were to evaluate biochar effects on field decomposition of crop residue, using plots that were amended with biochars made from different feedstocks and pyrolysis platforms prior to the start of this study. Litterbags containing wheat straw material were buried below the soil surface in a continuous-corn cropped field in plots that had received one of seven different biochar amendments or a non-charred wood pellet amendment 2.5 yr prior to start of this study. Litterbags were collected over the course of 14 weeks. Microbial biomass was assessed in treatment plots the previous fall. Though first-order decomposition rate constants were positively correlated to microbial biomass, neither parameter was statistically affected by biochar or wood-pellet treatments. The findings indicated only a residual of potentially positive and negative initial impacts of biochars on residue decomposition, which fit in line with established feedstock and pyrolysis influences. Though no significant impacts were observed with field-weathered biochars, effective soil management may yet have to account for repeat applications of biochar.

  11. The value of building plots in Italy - pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Rosato

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper suggests some analysis on dynamics of building plots value in Italy. This is an important subject, since the study of changes in plots value in space and time enables the evaluation of urban rent, which is essential for a fair and effective planning. The analysis confirm past hypothesis which are well known to real estate market operators. The first resulting fact is that the changes in building plots value are concurrent to those in real estate value and the increase occurring in the last years is in relative terms higher than the past one. This seems to confirm that, during real estate market expansion, most of the increase of buildings’ value is attributable to the land rent. The second observation is about value dynamics over time: it has been observed that, during an expansion in demand, the value significantly increases in central areas, much more than in peripheral ones; this means that absolute rent arising from shortage in urban areas is higher than the differential rent created through urban expansion in peripheral areas. Finally, it was highlighted that the factors affecting the value in building areas play different roles, depending on their location relative to the urban centre, identifying differently structured market segments.

  12. Looking at large data sets using binned data plots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, D.B.

    1990-04-01

    This report addresses the monumental challenge of developing exploratory analysis methods for large data sets. The goals of the report are to increase awareness of large data sets problems and to contribute simple graphical methods that address some of the problems. The graphical methods focus on two- and three-dimensional data and common task such as finding outliers and tail structure, assessing central structure and comparing central structures. The methods handle large sample size problems through binning, incorporate information from statistical models and adapt image processing algorithms. Examples demonstrate the application of methods to a variety of publicly available large data sets. The most novel application addresses the too many plots to examine'' problem by using cognostics, computer guiding diagnostics, to prioritize plots. The particular application prioritizes views of computational fluid dynamics solution sets on the fly. That is, as each time step of a solution set is generated on a parallel processor the cognostics algorithms assess virtual plots based on the previous time step. Work in such areas is in its infancy and the examples suggest numerous challenges that remain. 35 refs., 15 figs.

  13. The IG-DMR and the MEG3-DMR at human chromosome 14q32.2: hierarchical interaction and distinct functional properties as imprinting control centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagami, Masayo; O'Sullivan, Maureen J; Green, Andrew J; Watabe, Yoshiyuki; Arisaka, Osamu; Masawa, Nobuhide; Matsuoka, Kentarou; Fukami, Maki; Matsubara, Keiko; Kato, Fumiko; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2010-06-17

    Human chromosome 14q32.2 harbors the germline-derived primary DLK1-MEG3 intergenic differentially methylated region (IG-DMR) and the postfertilization-derived secondary MEG3-DMR, together with multiple imprinted genes. Although previous studies in cases with microdeletions and epimutations affecting both DMRs and paternal/maternal uniparental disomy 14-like phenotypes argue for a critical regulatory function of the two DMRs for the 14q32.2 imprinted region, the precise role of the individual DMR remains to be clarified. We studied an infant with upd(14)pat body and placental phenotypes and a heterozygous microdeletion involving the IG-DMR alone (patient 1) and a neonate with upd(14)pat body, but no placental phenotype and a heterozygous microdeletion involving the MEG3-DMR alone (patient 2). The results generated from the analysis of these two patients imply that the IG-DMR and the MEG3-DMR function as imprinting control centers in the placenta and the body, respectively, with a hierarchical interaction for the methylation pattern in the body governed by the IG-DMR. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating an essential long-range imprinting regulatory function for the secondary DMR.

  14. The IG-DMR and the MEG3-DMR at human chromosome 14q32.2: hierarchical interaction and distinct functional properties as imprinting control centers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayo Kagami

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Human chromosome 14q32.2 harbors the germline-derived primary DLK1-MEG3 intergenic differentially methylated region (IG-DMR and the postfertilization-derived secondary MEG3-DMR, together with multiple imprinted genes. Although previous studies in cases with microdeletions and epimutations affecting both DMRs and paternal/maternal uniparental disomy 14-like phenotypes argue for a critical regulatory function of the two DMRs for the 14q32.2 imprinted region, the precise role of the individual DMR remains to be clarified. We studied an infant with upd(14pat body and placental phenotypes and a heterozygous microdeletion involving the IG-DMR alone (patient 1 and a neonate with upd(14pat body, but no placental phenotype and a heterozygous microdeletion involving the MEG3-DMR alone (patient 2. The results generated from the analysis of these two patients imply that the IG-DMR and the MEG3-DMR function as imprinting control centers in the placenta and the body, respectively, with a hierarchical interaction for the methylation pattern in the body governed by the IG-DMR. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating an essential long-range imprinting regulatory function for the secondary DMR.

  15. Theoretical studies on the influence of molecular interactions on the mechanism of electron transfer in photosynthetic reaction center of Rps. viridis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐红; 张汝波; 屈正旺; 张兴康; 张启元

    2002-01-01

    Based on the QM/MM optimized X-ray crystal structure of the photosynthetic reaction center (PRC) of purple bacteria Rhodopseudomonas (Rps.) viridis, quantum chemistry density functional method (DFT, B3LYP/6-31G) has been performed to study the interactions between the pigment molecules and either the surrounded amino acid residues or water molecules that are either axially coordinated or hydrogen bonded with the pigment molecules, leading to an explanation of the mechanism of the primary electron-transfer (ET) reactions in the PRC. Results show that the axial coordination of amino acid residues greatly raises the ELUMO of pigment molecules and it is important for the possibility of ET to take place. Different hydrogen bonds between amino acid residues, water molecules and pigment molecules decrease the ELUMO of the pigment molecules to different extents. It is crucial for the ET taking place from excited P along L branch and sustains that the ET is a one-step reaction without through accessory bacteriochlorophyll (ABChl b). It is insufficient to treat the whole protein surrounding as a homogeneous dielectric medium.

  16. Interacting Cosmic Rays with Molecular Clouds: A Bremsstrahlung Origin of Diffuse High Energy Emission from the Inner 2deg by 1deg of the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Yusef-Zadeh, F; Wardle, M; Tatischeff, V; Roberts, D; Cotton, W; Uchiyama, H; Nobukawa, M; Tsuru, T G; Heinke, C; Royster, M

    2012-01-01

    The high energy activity in the inner few degrees of the Galactic center is traced by diffuse radio, X-ray and gamma-ray emission. The physical relationship between different components of diffuse gas emitting at multiple wavelengths is a focus of this work. We first present radio continuum observations using Green Bank Telescope and model the nonthermal spectrum in terms of a broken power-law distribution of GeV electrons emitting synchrotron radiation. We show that the emission detected by Fermi is primarily due to nonthermal bremsstrahlung produced by the population of synchrotron emitting electrons in the GeV energy range interacting with neutral gas. The extrapolation of the electron population measured from radio data to low and high energies can also explain the origin of FeI 6.4 keV line and diffuse TeV emission, as observed with Suzaku, XMM-Newton, Chandra and the H.E.S.S. observatories. The inferred physical quantities from modeling multi-wavelength emission in the context of bremsstrahlung emission...

  17. SOFEPL: A Plotting Postprocessor for ’SOFE’ User’s Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    area General KPLUSDWork List of plots using Area IPLUSD current run KT (created in PLTNED) PLOT IPlot 1 IA(KLPTP+ 2-1) A AData Area PLOT 2Plot 2 IA...reasons: computer turn-around times for big runs are prohibitively long; a short preliminary evalu- ation of performance is needed before a lot of

  18. ResidPlots-2: Computer Software for IRT Graphical Residual Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tie; Han, Kyung T.; Hambleton, Ronald K.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the ResidPlots-2, a computer software that provides a powerful tool for IRT graphical residual analyses. ResidPlots-2 consists of two components: a component for computing residual statistics and another component for communicating with users and for plotting the residual graphs. The features of the ResidPlots-2 software are…

  19. Plot and Personification in “Tehran-e- Makhuf“

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pashaei

    Full Text Available Story is one of the important and influential literary genres that deserves to research on its structure and content .By study and analysis of a story, the reader could comprehend the textual messages and change his attitude toward life and different issues .After defining of the social novel, the author tries to analyze plot and personification in novel of “Tehran-e- Makhuf” and respond to the questions on the method employed for plot and personification and analyze it from plot and its components such as conflict, suspension and resolution and compare the differences and similarities between old tales and modern novels.The plot of “Tehran-e- Makhuf” is not so complex due to its subject and content and natural order of events dominates on artificial discipline and it lacks open plot. Of main elements of plot, conflict is more outstanding here. This novel is full of emotional and moral conflicts and there is no similarity with historical novels that describe good and bad conflicts. Cause and effect relationship is main element of plot that shadows on the story events .In “Tehrna-e- Makhuf”, the author tries to violate the principles and cause to imbalance in natural events sequences with discomposing rational and experiential relationship and take action toward artificiality and unnatural suspension. In creating suspension by emphasis on incidences in some extremist cases, Kazemi tries to found the story based on the considerable sequence of events and this conduct reduces quality of the story significantly and leads to imbalance in rational and acceptable discipline.Kazemi employs direct or reporting personification mostly. This novel lacks diversity in personage considerably .All characters speak in similar style and there is no particular speech style. The personification of Kazemi in “Tehran-e-Makhuf” is continuous and interdependent in style of old tales and novel in European account. In some cases, he approaches to story

  20. PET kinetic analysis --pitfalls and a solution for the Logan plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuichi; Naganawa, Mika; Shidahara, Miho; Ikoma, Yoko; Watabe, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    The Logan plot is a widely used algorithm for the quantitative analysis of neuroreceptors using PET because it is easy to use and simple to implement. The Logan plot is also suitable for receptor imaging because its algorithm is fast. However, use of the Logan plot, and interpretation of the formed receptor images should be regarded with caution, because noise in PET data causes bias in the Logan plot estimates. In this paper, we describe the basic concept of the Logan plot in detail and introduce three algorithms for the Logan plot. By comparing these algorithms, we demonstrate the pitfalls of the Logan plot and discuss the solution.

  1. Dalitz plot analysis of the D+ $\\to$K $\\pi$+$\\pi$+ decay in the FOCUS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Link, J M; Anjos, J C; Bediaga, I; Castromonte, C; Machado, A A; Magnin, J; Massafferri, A; De Miranda, J M; Pepe, I M; Polycarpo, E; Dos Reis, A C; Carrillo, S; Casimiro, E; Cuautle, E; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Uribe, C; Vázquez, F; Agostino, L; Cinquini, L; Cumalat, J P; Frisullo, V; O'Reilly, B; Segoni, I; Stenson, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chiodini, G; Gaines, I; Garbincius, P H; Garren, L A; Gottschalk, E; Kasper, P H; Kreymer, A E; Kutschke, R; Wang, M; Benussi, L; Bianco, S; Fabbri, F L; Zallo, A; Reyes, M; Cawlfield, C; Kim, D Y; Rahimi, A; Wiss, J; Gardner, R; Kryemadhi, A; Chung, Y S; Kang, J S; Ko, B R; Kwak, J W; Lee, K B; Cho, K; Park, H; Alimonti, G; Barberis, S; Boschini, M; Cerutti, A; D'Angelo, P; Di Corato, M; Dini, P; Edera, L; Erba, S; Inzani, P; Leveraro, F; Malvezzi, S; Menasce, D; Mezzadri, M; Moroni, L; Pedrini, D; Pontoglio, C; Prelz, F; Rovere, M; Sala, S; Davenport, T F; Arena, V; Boca, G; Bonomi, G; Gianini, G; Liguori, G; Lopes-Pegna, D; Merlo, M M; Pantea, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Vitulo, P; Göbel, C; Otalora, J; Hernández, H; López, A M; Méndez, H; Paris, A; Quinones, J; Ramírez, J E; Zhang, Y; Wilson, J R; Handler, T; Mitchell, R; Engh, D; Hosack, M; Johns, W E; Luiggi, E; Nehring, M; Sheldon, P D; Vaandering, E W; Webster, M; Sheaff, M; Pennington, Michael R

    2007-01-01

    Using data collected by the high energy photoproduction experiment FOCUS at Fermilab we performed a Dalitz plot analysis of the Cabibbo favored decay D+ to K-pi+ pi+. This study uses 53653 Dalitz-plot events with a signal fraction of ~ 97%, and represents the highest statistics, most complete Dalitz plot analysis for this channel. Results are presented and discussed using two different formalisms. The first is a simple sum of Breit--Wigner functions with freely fitted masses and widths. It is the model traditionally adopted and serves as comparison with the already published analyses. The second uses a K-matrix approach for the dominant S-wave, in which the parameters are fixed by first fitting Kpi scattering data and continued to threshold by Chiral Perturbation Theory. We show that the Dalitz plot distribution for this decay is consistent with the assumption of two body dominance of the final state interactions and the description of these interactions is in agreement with other data on the Kpi final state.

  2. Efficiency of incomplete split-plot designs – a compromise between traditional split-plot designs and randomised complete block design

    OpenAIRE

    Kristensen, Kristian; Bigongiali, Federica; Østergård, Hanne

    2008-01-01

    The paper shows, how incomplete split-plot designs can be constructed from -designs and how they can be analysed. The incomplete split-plot design can be regarded as both a practical and statistical compromise between traditional split-plot design and randomised complete block design. The efficiency of the design is compared to traditional split-plot design and randomised complete block design using data from 5 trials carried out using incomplete split-plot designs in Denmark through 2004-20...

  3. Interaction Effects between Exposure to Sexually Explicit Online Materials and Individual, Family, and Extrafamilial Factors on Hong Kong High School Students' Beliefs about Gender Role Equality and Body-Centered Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Siu-ming; Kan, Siu-mee Iu; Ngai, Steven Sek-yum

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the interaction effects between Hong Kong adolescents' exposure to sexually explicit online materials (SEOM) and individual, family, peer, and cultural factors on their beliefs about gender role equality and body-centered sexuality. Based on a survey design with a sample of 503 high school students in Hong Kong, the results…

  4. Interaction Effects between Exposure to Sexually Explicit Online Materials and Individual, Family, and Extrafamilial Factors on Hong Kong High School Students' Beliefs about Gender Role Equality and Body-Centered Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Siu-ming; Kan, Siu-mee Iu; Ngai, Steven Sek-yum

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the interaction effects between Hong Kong adolescents' exposure to sexually explicit online materials (SEOM) and individual, family, peer, and cultural factors on their beliefs about gender role equality and body-centered sexuality. Based on a survey design with a sample of 503 high school students in Hong Kong, the results…

  5. Arrhenius plots of membrane-bound enzymes of mitochondria and microsomes in the brain cortex of developing and old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgani, M N; Pour-Rahimi, F; Meisami, E

    1986-06-01

    To study changes in lipid-protein-interaction and fluidity in mitochondrial and microsomal membranes of brain during development and aging, the Arrhenius plots of marker enzymes for mitochondrial inner and outer membranes as well as those of microsomal membranes were compared at different ages. The enzymes were, beta-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (BDH) for the inner mitochondrial membrane and rotenone-insensitive-NADH-cytochrome c reductase (Mit-NADH-CytR) for the outer membrane; also antimycin-insensitive-NADH-cytochrome c reductase (Micr-NADH-CytR) and NADPH-cytochrome c reductase for the microsomal membranes. The ages studied were, 1, 5, 30, 60 days postnatal and 2 years. In the microsomes, the plots of NADH-cytochrome c reductase were found to be biphasic at all ages except in the newborn where no break temperature was observed. The activation energy of this enzyme in the physiological range of temperature was found to be high in the newborn, declining with brain maturation. The plot of this enzyme in the old rat showed no difference when compared with the mature. The specific activity of the enzyme, however, was markedly reduced in the old brain microsomal fraction. In contrast, comparison of the plots of microsomal NADPH-cytochrome c reductase at the various ages revealed no break temperature and very similar energies of activation. For the inner mitochondrial membrane beta-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase, the Arrhenius plots were generally biphasic at all ages studied with a break temperature of about 20 degrees C. However, the newborn plot was only barely biphasic showing a high energy of activation in the physiological range of temperature. In contrast, for the outer membrane NADH-cytochrome c reductase, the newborn plots were definitely biphasic, exhibiting low activation energy above the breaks. There was also a significant decline in the break temperature with brain development. No significant differences in the plots of this enzyme were found between the

  6. Interactive graphics for data analysis principles and examples

    CERN Document Server

    Theus, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Introduction PRINCIPLESInteractivity Queries Selection and Linked Highlighting Linking AnalysesInteracting with Graphics Examining a Single Variable Categorical DataContinuous DataTransforming Data Weighted Plots Interactions between Two VariablesTwo Categorical VariablesOne Categorical Variable and One Continuous VariableTwo Continuous VariablesMultidimensional Plots Mosaic PlotsParallel Coordinate Plots Trellis Displays Plot Ensembles and Statistical ModelsResponse ModelsANOVALoglinear ModelsGeographical DataMore Interactivity Sorting and Ordering Zooming Multiple ViewsInteractive Graphics ?

  7. Dive and Explore: An Interactive Exhibit That Simulates Making an ROV Dive to a Submarine Volcano, Hatfield Marine Science Visitor Center, Newport, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, C.; Chadwick, W. W.; Hanshumaker, W.; Osis, V.; Hamilton, C.

    2002-12-01

    We have created a new interactive exhibit in which the user can sit down and simulate that they are making a dive to the seafloor with the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) named ROPOS. The exhibit immerses the user in an interactive experience that is naturally fun but also educational. This new public display is located at the Hatfield Marine Science Visitor Center in Newport, Oregon. The exhibit is designed to look like the real ROPOS control console and includes three video monitors, a PC, a DVD player, an overhead speaker, graphic panels, buttons, lights, dials, and a seat in front of a joystick. The dives are based on real seafloor settings at Axial seamount, an active submarine volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (NE Pacific) that is also the location of a seafloor observatory called NeMO. The user can choose between 1 of 3 different dives sites in the caldera of Axial Volcano. Once a dive is chosen, then the user watches ROPOS being deployed and then arrives into a 3-D computer-generated seafloor environment that is based on the real world but is easier to visualize and navigate. Once on the bottom, the user is placed within a 360 degree panorama and can look in all directions by manipulating the joystick. By clicking on markers embedded in the scene, the user can then either move to other panorama locations via movies that travel through the 3-D virtual environment, or they can play video clips from actual ROPOS dives specifically related to that scene. Audio accompanying the video clips informs the user where they are going or what they are looking at. After the user is finished exploring the dive site they end the dive by leaving the bottom and watching the ROV being recovered onto the ship at the surface. The user can then choose a different dive or make the same dive again. Within the three simulated dives there are a total of 6 arrival and departure movies, 7 seafloor panoramas, 12 travel movies, and 23 ROPOS video clips. The exhibit software was created

  8. Plant species richness enhances nitrogen retention in green roof plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Catherine; Schweinhart, Shelbye; Buffam, Ishi

    2016-10-01

    Vegetated (green) roofs have become common in many cities and are projected to continue to increase in coverage, but little is known about the ecological properties of these engineered ecosystems. In this study, we tested the biodiversity-ecosystem function hypothesis using commercially available green roof trays as replicated plots with varying levels of plant species richness (0, 1, 3, or 6 common green roof species per plot, using plants with different functional characteristics). We estimated accumulated plant biomass near the peak of the first full growing season (July 2013) and measured runoff volume after nearly every rain event from September 2012 to September 2013 (33 events) and runoff fluxes of inorganic nutrients ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate from a subset of 10 events. We found that (1) total plant biomass increased with increasing species richness, (2) green roof plots were effective at reducing storm runoff, with vegetation increasing water retention more than soil-like substrate alone, but there was no significant effect of plant species identity or richness on runoff volume, (3) green roof substrate was a significant source of phosphate, regardless of presence/absence of plants, and (4) dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN = nitrate + ammonium) runoff fluxes were different among plant species and decreased significantly with increasing plant species richness. The variation in N retention was positively related to variation in plant biomass. Notably, the increased biomass and N retention with species richness in this engineered ecosystem are similar to patterns observed in published studies from grasslands and other well-studied ecosystems. We suggest that more diverse plantings on vegetated roofs may enhance the retention capacity for reactive nitrogen. This is of importance for the sustained health of vegetated roof ecosystems, which over time often experience nitrogen limitation, and is also relevant for water quality in receiving waters

  9. Crown condition assessment at the CONECOFOR Permanent Monitoring Plots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzo NIBBI

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available A detailed crown condition assessment is currently being carried out at the CONECOFOR (CONtrollo ECOsistemi FORestali, Control of Forest Ecosystems plots. The assessment began in 1996, and during the first two years (1996 and 1997 an assessment form based on previous regional experience was used; in 1998 the new official EU form was adopted. The resulting loss of comparability means that only a few indices can be used in the temporal series 1996-1999. Much effort was devoted to Quality Assurance (QA procedures. The QA program is structured as follows: (i specific field manuals have been adopted and are continuously updated; (ii a national training and intercalibration course (NT&IC is undertaken yearly before beginning the assessment campaign;( iii field checks are carried out yearly on a large number of plots. The results of the QA program have shown that for several indices the quality objectives were not reached, but the quality of the data is improving with time. To express the change in crown conditions in each area, a complex index (CCI = Crown Condition Index was adopted. This index is the result of the sum of the relativized values of all the common indices used during the four years. The following parameters were used: transparency, ramification type, leaf colour alteration extension, leaf damage extension, alteration of leaf distension extension. The range within which the CCI fluctuates was evaluated taking into account all the observations carried out at a given plot throughout the years. The number of cases over a given threshold (outliers was calculated for each year. The threshold for outliers was calculated as the median value plus 2 times the range of the interquartile value. All individual cases exceeding this value are considered outliers. The results are presented for all the areas in which the data set is complete for the four years. The yearly fluctuations are discussed and related to possible causes.

  10. ATPase center of bacteriophage lambda terminase involved in post-cleavage stages of DNA packaging: identification of ATP-interactive amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, J Q; Tack, B F; Feiss, M

    2000-09-29

    Terminase is the enzyme that mediates lambda DNA packaging into the viral prohead. The large subunit of terminase, gpA (641 amino acid residues), has a high-affinity ATPase activity (K(m)=5 microM). To directly identify gpA's ATP-interacting amino acids, holoterminase bearing a His(6)-tag at the C terminus of gpA was UV-crosslinked with 8-N(3)-[alpha-(32)P]ATP. Tryptic peptides from the photolabeled terminase were purified by affinity chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. Two labeled peptides of gpA were identified. Amino acid sequencing failed to show the tyrosine residue of the first peptide, E(43)SAY(46)QEGR(50), or the lysine of the second peptide, V(80)GYSK(84)MLL(87), indicating that Y(46) and K(84) were the 8-N(3)-ATP-modified amino acids. To investigate their roles in lambda DNA packaging, Y(46) was changed to E, A, and F, and K(84) was changed to E and A. Purified His(6)-tagged terminases with changes at residues 46 and 84 lacked the gpA high-affinity ATPase activity, though the cos cleavage and cohesive end separation activities were near to those of the wild-type enzyme. In virion assembly reactions using virion DNA as a packaging substrate, the mutant terminases showed severe defects. In summary, the results indicate that Y(46) and K(84) are part of the high-affinity ATPase center of gpA, and show that this ATPase activity is involved in the post-cos cleavage stages of lambda DNA packaging.

  11. The Alienated Plot in The End of the Road

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽娜

    2014-01-01

    The End of the Road is John Barth’s second novel, and it is the first novel that brought abortion to the focus of public attention, which proves to be a huge success. This paper intends to study the alienation in The End of the Road based on the alienation as a literary style and the alienation embodied in the literary context. Through the analysis of the alienated plot, the pa-per aims to emphasize the internal cause for the end of the different character ’s road.

  12. [Heart rate variability study based on a novel RdR RR Intervals Scatter Plot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongwei; Lu, Xiuyun; Wang, Chunfang; Hua, Youyuan; Tian, Jiajia; Liu, Shihai

    2014-08-01

    On the basis of Poincare scatter plot and first order difference scatter plot, a novel heart rate variability (HRV) analysis method based on scatter plots of RR intervals and first order difference of RR intervals (namely, RdR) was proposed. The abscissa of the RdR scatter plot, the x-axis, is RR intervals and the ordinate, y-axis, is the difference between successive RR intervals. The RdR scatter plot includes the information of RR intervals and the difference between successive RR intervals, which captures more HRV information. By RdR scatter plot analysis of some records of MIT-BIH arrhythmias database, we found that the scatter plot of uncoupled premature ventricular contraction (PVC), coupled ventricular bigeminy and ventricular trigeminy PVC had specific graphic characteristics. The RdR scatter plot method has higher detecting performance than the Poincare scatter plot method, and simpler and more intuitive than the first order difference method.

  13. Computational Drafting of Plot Structures for Russian Folk Tales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervás, Pablo

    The plots of stories are known to follow general patterns in terms of their overall structure. This was the basic tenet of structuralist approaches to narratology. Vladimir Propp proposed a procedure for the generation of new tales based on his semi-formal description of the structure of Russian folk tales. This is one of the first existing instances of a creative process described procedurally. The present paper revisits Propp's morphology to build a system that generates instances of Russian folk tales. Propp's view of the folk tale as a rigid sequence of character functions is employed as a plot driver, and some issues that Propp declared relevant but did not explore in detail-such as long-range dependencies between functions or the importance of endings-are given computational shape in the context of a broader architecture that captures all the aspects discussed by Propp. A set of simple evaluation metrics for the resulting outputs is defined inspired on Propp's formalism. The potential of the resulting system for providing a creative story generation system is discussed, and possible lines of future work are discussed.

  14. Recurrence plot for parameters analysing of internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexa, O.; Ilie, C. O.; Marinescu, M.; Vilau, R.; Grosu, D.

    2015-11-01

    In many technical disciplines modem data analysis techniques has been successfully applied to understand the complexity of the system. The growing volume of theoretical knowledge about systems dynamic's offered researchers the opportunity to look for non-linear dynamics in data whose evolution linear models are unable to explain in a satisfactory manner. One approach in this respect is Recurrence Analysis - RA which is a graphical method designed to locate hidden recurring patterns, nonstationarity and structural changes. RA approach arose in natural sciences like physics and biology but quickly was adopted in economics and engineering. Meanwhile. The fast development of computer resources has provided powerful tools to perform this new and complex model. One free software which was used to perform our analysis is Visual Recurrence Analysis - VRA developed by Eugene Kononov. As is presented in this paper, the recurrence plot investigation for the analyzing of the internal combustion engine shows some of the RPA capabilities in this domain. We chose two specific engine parameters measured in two different tests to perform the RPA. These parameters are injection impulse width and engine angular speed and the tests are I11n and I51n. There were computed graphs for each of them. Graphs were analyzed and compared to obtain a conclusion. This work is an incipient research, being one of the first attempts of using recurrence plot for analyzing automotive dynamics. It opens a wide field of action for future research programs.

  15. Dark-lines in bifurcation plots of nonlinear dynamic systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Zhi-Ying; Shen Yun-Wen; Liu Meng-Jun

    2005-01-01

    Based on the regressive character of chaotic motion in nonlinear dynamic systems, a numerical regression algorithm is developed, which can be used to research the dark-lines passing through chaotic regions in bifurcation plots. The dark-lines of the parabolic mapping are obtained by using the numerical regression algorithm, and compared with those that are accurately acquired through dark-line equations. Thus the validity of this algorithm is proved. Furthermore,for the Brussel oscillation system and the piecewise linear dynamic system of a gear pair, the dark-lines are researched by using the regression algorithm. By researching the dark-lines in the bifurcation plots of nonlinear dynamic systems,the periodic windows embedded in chaotic regions can be ascertained by tangential points of dark-lines, and the turning points of chaotic attractors can be also obtained by intersected points. The results show that this algorithm is helpful to analyse dynamic behaviour of systems and control chaotic motion.

  16. New user-friendly approach to obtain an Eisenberg plot and its use as a practical tool in protein sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Rob C A

    2011-01-01

    The Eisenberg plot or hydrophobic moment plot methodology is one of the most frequently used methods of bioinformatics. Bioinformatics is more and more recognized as a helpful tool in Life Sciences in general, and recent developments in approaches recognizing lipid binding regions in proteins are promising in this respect. In this study a bioinformatics approach specialized in identifying lipid binding helical regions in proteins was used to obtain an Eisenberg plot. The validity of the Heliquest generated hydrophobic moment plot was checked and exemplified. This study indicates that the Eisenberg plot methodology can be transferred to another hydrophobicity scale and renders a user-friendly approach which can be utilized in routine checks in protein-lipid interaction and in protein and peptide lipid binding characterization studies. A combined approach seems to be advantageous and results in a powerful tool in the search of helical lipid-binding regions in proteins and peptides. The strength and limitations of the Eisenberg plot approach itself are discussed as well. The presented approach not only leads to a better understanding of the nature of the protein-lipid interactions but also provides a user-friendly tool for the search of lipid-binding regions in proteins and peptides.

  17. Information extraction from FN plots of tungsten microemitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mussa, Khalil O. [Department of Physics, Mu' tah University, Al-Karak (Jordan); Mousa, Marwan S., E-mail: mmousa@mutah.edu.jo [Department of Physics, Mu' tah University, Al-Karak (Jordan); Fischer, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.fischer@physik.tu-chemnitz.de [Institut für Physik, Technische Universität Chemnitz, Chemnitz (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    Tungsten based microemitter tips have been prepared both clean and coated with dielectric materials. For clean tungsten tips, apex radii have been varied ranging from 25 to 500 nm. These tips were manufactured by electrochemical etching a 0.1 mm diameter high purity (99.95%) tungsten wire at the meniscus of two molar NaOH solution. Composite micro-emitters considered here are consisting of a tungsten core coated with different dielectric materials—such as magnesium oxide (MgO), sodium hydroxide (NaOH), tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), and zinc oxide (ZnO). It is worthwhile noting here, that the rather unconventional NaOH coating has shown several interesting properties. Various properties of these emitters were measured including current–voltage (IV) characteristics and the physical shape of the tips. A conventional field emission microscope (FEM) with a tip (cathode)–screen (anode) separation standardized at 10 mm was used to electrically characterize the electron emitters. The system was evacuated down to a base pressure of ∼10{sup −8}mbar when baked at up to ∼180°C overnight. This allowed measurements of typical field electron emission (FE) characteristics, namely the IV characteristics and the emission images on a conductive phosphorus screen (the anode). Mechanical characterization has been performed through a FEI scanning electron microscope (SEM). Within this work, the mentioned experimental results are connected to the theory for analyzing Fowler–Nordheim (FN) plots. We compared and evaluated the data extracted from clean tungsten tips of different radii and determined deviations between the results of different extraction methods applied. In particular, we derived the apex radii of several clean and coated tungsten tips by both SEM imaging and analyzing FN plots. The aim of this analysis is to support the ongoing discussion on recently developed improvements of the theory for analyzing FN plots related to metal field electron emitters, which in

  18. Field Plot Points for Acadia National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has produced a vegetation spatial database coverage (vegetation map) for the Acadia...

  19. Dalitz plot analysis of the D+ -> K- pi+ pi+ decay

    CERN Document Server

    Bonvicini, G; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Naik, P; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Ecklund, K M; Love, W; Savinov, V; López, A; Mehrabyan, S; Méndez, H; Ramírez, J; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Horwitz, N; Khalil, S; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sia, R; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M

    2007-01-01

    We present a Dalitz plot analysis of the decay D+ -> K- pi+ pi+ based on 281 pb-1 of e+e- collision data produced at the psi(3770) by CESR and observed with the CLEO-c detector. We select 67086 candidate events with a small, ~1.1%, background for this analysis. When using a simple isobar model our results are consistent with the previous measurements done by E791. Since our sample is considerably larger we can explore alternative models. We find better agreement with data when we include an isospin-two pi+pi+ S-wave contribution. We apply a quasi model-independent partial wave analysis and measure the amplitude and phase of the K pi and pi+pi+ S waves in the range of invariant masses from the threshold to the maximum in this decay.

  20. Multiscale recurrence quantification analysis of order recurrence plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengjia; Shang, Pengjian; Lin, Aijing

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method of multiscale recurrence quantification analysis (MSRQA) to analyze the structure of order recurrence plots. The MSRQA is based on order patterns over a range of time scales. Compared with conventional recurrence quantification analysis (RQA), the MSRQA can show richer and more recognizable information on the local characteristics of diverse systems which successfully describes their recurrence properties. Both synthetic series and stock market indexes exhibit their properties of recurrence at large time scales that quite differ from those at a single time scale. Some systems present more accurate recurrence patterns under large time scales. It demonstrates that the new approach is effective for distinguishing three similar stock market systems and showing some inherent differences.

  1. Recurrence plots and chaotic motion around Kerr black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Kopáček, Ondřej; Karas, Vladimír; Stuchlík, Zdeněk; 10.1063/1.3506071

    2010-01-01

    We study the motion of charged test particles around a Kerr black hole immersed in the asymptotically uniform magnetic field, concluding that off-equatorial stable orbits are allowed in this system. Being interested in dynamical properties of these astrophysically relevant orbits we employ rather novel approach based on the analysis of recurrences of the system to the vicinity of its previous states. We use recurrence plots (RPs) as a tool to visualize recurrences of the trajectory in the phase space. Construction of RPs is simple and straightforward regardless of the dimension of the phase space, which is a major advantage of this approach when compared to the "traditional" methods of the numerical analysis of dynamical systems (for instance the visual survey of Poincar\\'{e} surfaces of section, evaluation of the Lyapunov spectra etc.). We show that RPs and their quantitative measures (obtained from recurrence quantification analysis -- RQA) are powerful tools to detect dynamical regime of motion (regular vs...

  2. Recurrence plots of discrete-time Gaussian stochastic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdani, Sofiane; Bouchara, Frédéric; Lagarde, Julien; Lesne, Annick

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the statistical properties of recurrence plots (RPs) of data generated by discrete-time stationary Gaussian random processes. We analytically derive the theoretical values of the probabilities of occurrence of recurrence points and consecutive recurrence points forming diagonals in the RP, with an embedding dimension equal to 1. These results allow us to obtain theoretical values of three measures: (i) the recurrence rate (REC) (ii) the percent determinism (DET) and (iii) RP-based estimation of the ε-entropy κ(ε) in the sense of correlation entropy. We apply these results to two Gaussian processes, namely first order autoregressive processes and fractional Gaussian noise. For these processes, we simulate a number of realizations and compare the RP-based estimations of the three selected measures to their theoretical values. These comparisons provide useful information on the quality of the estimations, such as the minimum required data length and threshold radius used to construct the RP.

  3. B^0 --> K^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0 Dalitz Plot Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Abrams, G S; Adye, T; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Aleksan, Roy; Allison, J; Allmendinger, T; Altenburg, D; Andreotti, M; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Aston, D; Azzolini, V; Baak, M; Back, J J; Bailey, S; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Barate, R; Bard, D J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Barrett, M; Bartoldus, R; Batignani, G; Bauer, J M; Beck, T W; Behera, P K; Bellini, F; Benayoun, M; Berger, N; Bernard, D; Berryhill, J W; Best, D; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Blanc, F; Blaylock, G; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P; Bóna, M; Bondioli, M; Bonneaud, G R; Borgland, A W; Bosisio, L; Boutigny, D; Bowerman, D A; Boyarski, A M; Boyd, J T; Bozzi, C; Brandenburg, G; Brandt, T; Brau, J E; Breon, A B; Briand, H; Brochard, F; Brose, J; Brown, C L; Brown, C M; Brown, D; Brown, D N; Bruinsma, M; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Buchanan, C; Buchmüller, O L; Bugg, W; Bulten, H; Burchat, Patricia R; Button-Shafer, J; Buzzo, A; Côté, D; Cahn, R N; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Campagnari, C; Capra, R; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Chao, M; Charles, E; Charles, M J; Chauveau, J; Chavez, C A; Chen, A; Chen, E; Chen, J C; Chen, S; Cheng, B; Cheng, C H; Chevalier, N; Christ, S; Cibinetto, G; Clark, P J; Claus, R; Cochran, J; Colecchia, F; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cormack, C M; Cossutti, F; Cottingham, W N; Couderc, F; Covarelli, R; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Crawley, H B; Cremaldi, L M; Cristinziani, M; Crosetti, G; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dahmes, B; Dallapiccola, C; Danielson, N; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Dauncey, P D; David, P; Davier, M; Davis, C L; Day, C T; De Groot, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Buono, L; Della Ricca, G; Di Lodovico, F; Dickopp, M; Dittongo, S; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dorigo, A; Druzhinin, V P; Dubitzky, R S; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Dvoretskii, A; Eckmann, R; Edwards, A J; Egede, U; Eichenbaum, A M; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Elmer, P; Elsen, E E; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Eschenburg, V; Eschrich, I; Fabozzi, F; Faccini, R; Fan, S; Farbin, A; Feltresi, E; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Finocchiaro, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Flood, K T; Ford, K E; Ford, W T; Forster, I J; Forti, F; Fortin, D; Foulkes, S D; Franek, B J; Frey, R; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gaidot, A; Gaillard, J M; Gaillard, J R; Galeazzi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Gamet, R; Gan, K K; Ganzhur, S F; Gary, J W; Gaspero, M; Gatto, C; Geddes, N I; Gill, M S; Giorgi, M A; Giraud, P F; Giroux, X; Gladney, L; Glanzman, T; Godang, R; Goetzen, K; Golubev, V B; Gopal, G P; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M; Grancagnolo, S; Green, M G; Greene, M G; Grenier, G J; Grenier, P; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Groysman, Y; Guo, Q H; Hadavand, H K; Hadig, T; Haire, M; Halyo, V; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Hamon, O; Harrison, P F; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hart, P A; Hartfiel, B L; Harton, J L; Hast, C; Hauke, A; Hawkes, C M; Hearty, C; Held, T; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hicheur, A; Hill, E J; Hitlin, D G; Höcker, A; Hodgkinson, M C; Hollar, J J; Honscheid, K; Hrynóva, T; Hufnagel, D; Hulsbergen, W D; Hutchcroft, D E; Igonkina, O; Innes, W R; Ivanchenko, V N; Izen, J M; Jackson, P D; Jackson, P S; Jacobsen, R G; Jawahery, A; Jayatilleke, S M; Jessop, C P; John, M J J; Johnson, J R; Judd, D; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kagan, H; Karyotakis, Yu; Kass, R; Kelly, M P; Kelsey, M H; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kirkby, D; Kitayama, I; Knecht, N S; Koch, H; Kocian, M L; Kofler, R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Koptchev, V B; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R V; Kozanecki, Witold; Kravchenko, E A; Krishnamurthy, M; Kroeger, R; Kroseberg, J; Kukartsev, G; Kutter, P E; Kyberd, P; Lacker, H M; Lae, C K; Lafferty, G D; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Langenegger, U; Lankford, A J; Laplace, S; Latham, T E; Lau, Y P; Lavin, D; Lazzaro, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lees, J P; Legendre, M; Leith, D W G S; Lepeltier, V; Leruste, P; Lewandowski, B; Li Gioi, L; Li, H; Libby, J; Lillard, V; Lista, L; Liu, R; LoSecco, J M; Lo Vetere, M; Lockman, W S; Lombardo, V; London, G W; Long, O; Lou, X C; Lu, A; Lü, C; Luitz, S; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Lüth, V; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; Lynch, H L; Lyon, A J; MacFarlane, D B; Macri, M; Malcles, J; Mallik, U; Mancinelli, G; Mandelkern, M A; Manfredi, P F; Mangeol, D J J; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Marsiske, H; Martínez-Vidal, F; Mattison, T S; Mayer, B; Mazur, M A; Mazzoni, M A; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T R; Meadows, B T; Messner, R; Meyer, T I; Meyer, W T; Miftakov, V; Mihályi, A; Mir, L M; Mohanty, G B; Mohapatra, A K; Mommsen, R K; Monge, M R; Monorchio, D; Moore, T B; Morandin, M; Morgan, S E; Morganti, M; Morganti, S; Morii, M; Morton, G W; Muheim, F; Müller, D R; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Narsky, I; Nash, J A; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Negrini, M; Neri, N; Nesom, G; Nicholson, H; Nikolich, M B; Nogowski, R; O'Grady, C P; Ocariz, J; Oddone, P J; Ofte, I; Olaiya, E O; Olivas, A; Olsen, J; Onuchin, A P; Orimoto, T J; Otto, S; Ozcan, V E; Paar, H P; Paick, K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Pan, Y; Panetta, J; Panvini, R S; Paoloni, E; Paolucci, P; Parry, R J; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pelizaeus, M; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Peruzzi, I M; Petersen, B A; Petersen, T C; Petrak, S; Petzold, A; Piatenko, T; Piccolo, D; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Pierini, M; Pioppi, M; Piredda, G; Pivk, M; Plaszczynski, S; Playfer, S; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Potter, C T; Prell, S; Prepost, R; Pripstein, M; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Qi, N D; Rahatlou, S; Rahimi, A M; Rama, M; Rankin, P; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Re, V; Reidy, J; Ricciardi, S; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roat, C; Roberts, D A; Robertson, S H; Robutti, E; Roe, N A; Röthel, W; Ronan, Michael T; Roney, J M; Rong, G; Roodman, A; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rotondo, M; Rubin, A E; Ryd, A; Saeed, M A; Safai-Tehrani, F; Saleem, M; Salnikov, A A; Salvatore, F; Samuel, A; Sanders, D A; Sandrelli, F; Santroni, A; Saremi, S; Sarti, A; Satpathy, A; Schalk, T; Schindler, R H; Schott, G; Schrenk, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schumm, B A; Schune, M H; Schwiening, J; Schwierz, R; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Sciolla, G; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Serednyakov, S I; Sharma, V; Shelkov, V G; Shen, B C; Simani, M C; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Sinev, N B; Skovpen, Yu I; Sloane, R J; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snoek, H L; Snyder, A; Sobie, R J; Soffer, A; Soha, A; Sokoloff, M D; Solodov, E P; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Spradlin, P; Stängle, H; Steinke, M; Stelzer, J; Stoker, D P; Stroili, R; Strom, D; Stugu, B; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Summers, D J; Sundermann, J E; T'Jampens, S; Tan, P; Tantot, L; Taras, P; Taylor, F; Taylor, G P; Telnov, A V; Teodorescu, L; Ter-Antonian, R; Therin, G; Thiebaux, C; Thiessen, D; Tiozzo, G; Tisserand, V; Toki, W H; Torrence, E; Tosi, S; Touramanis, C; Treadwell, E; Vasileiadis, G; Vasseur, G; Vavra, J; Verderi, M; Verkerke, W; Vitale, L; Voci, C; Voena, C; Vuagnin, G; Wagner, G; Wagner, S R; Wagoner, D E; Waldi, R; Walsh, J; Wang, K; Wang, P; Wappler, F R; Watson, A T; Weaver, M; Weidemann, A W; Weinstein, A J R; Wenzel, W A; Wilden, L; Williams, D C; Williams, J C; Willocq, S; Wilson, F F; Wilson, J R; Wilson, M G; Wilson, R J; Winter, M A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Won, E; Wong, Q K; Wormser, G; Wright, D H; Wright, D M; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Xie, Y; Yamamoto, R K; Yang, S; Yarritu, A K; Ye, S; Yéche, C; Yi, J; Young, C C; Yu, Z; Yumiceva, F X; Yushkov, A N; Zallo, A; Zeng, Q; Zghiche, A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, H W; Zhu, Y S; Zito, M; De Sangro, R; Del Re, D; La Vaissière, C de

    2004-01-01

    We present preliminary results on the Dalitz plot analysis of $B^0 \\to K^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$ decays. The data sample comprises 213 million $\\Upsilon(4S) \\to B {\\bar B}$ decays collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy $B$ Factory at SLAC. We report measurements of the inclusive branching fraction, quasi-two-body fractions and CP-violating charge asymmetries for intermediate states including $K^*(892)^+ \\pi^-$ and $\\rho(770)^- K^+$. Observations of $B^0$ decays to the $K\\pi$ $S$-wave intermediate states, $K_0^*(1430)^+ \\pi^-$ and $K_0^*(1430)^0 \\pi^0$, are reported. Evidence of the decay $B^0 \\to K^*(892)^0 \\pi^0$ is seen. We set upper limits at 90% confidence level on branching fractions of the nonresonant and other less significant intermediate states.

  4. Dalitz Plot Analysis of Ds to K+K-pi+

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, R E

    2009-01-01

    We perform a Dalitz plot analysis of the decay Ds to K+K-pi+ with the CLEO-c data set of 586/pb of e+e- collisions accumulated at sqrt(s) = 4.17 GeV. This corresponds to about 0.57 million D_s+D_s(*)- pairs from which we select 14400 candidates with a background of roughly 15%. In contrast to previous measurements we find good agreement with our data only by including an additional f_0(1370)pi+ contribution. We measure the magnitude, phase, and fit fraction of K*(892) K+, phi(1020)pi+, K0*(1430)K+, f_0(980)pi+, f_0(1710)pi+, and f_0(1370)pi+ contributions and limit the possible contributions of other KK and Kpi resonances that could appear in this decay.

  5. Finding the plot in South African reading education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Rule

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that we have lost the plot in South African reading education. To find it, we need to move beyond the predominant mode of reading as oral performance, where the emphasis is on accuracy and pronunciation, to reading as comprehension of meaning in text. While reading research in South Africa has been conducted mainly in school contexts, this case study is of a school and Adult Basic Education and Training Centre in a rural KwaZulu-Natal community near Pietermaritzburg. It found that an oratorical approach to reading dominated in both settings. It suggests that developing the way in which teachers understand the teaching of reading and transforming the teaching practices of those who teach as they were taught in the education system of the apartheid era are key to improving the teaching of reading.

  6. Parallel coordinate plots of maize traits under different magnesium applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan Bocianowski; Piotr Szulc; Kamila Nowosad

    2015-01-01

    The paral el coordinate plot is proposed as an efifcient tool for visualization of 13 traits of“stay-green”maize (Zea mays L.) cultivar exposed to different methods of magnesium application. The ifeld experiment was conducted in the Department of Agronomy, PoznańUniversity of Life Sciences, on the ifelds of the Department of Teaching and Experimental Station in Swadzim in 2006–2008. Experiment was conducted as a single-factor experiment with seven applications of magnesium in a randomized complete block design with four replicates. The highest mean values of grain yield and 1 000-grain weight were obtained after application of variant T3 of magnesium (10 kg MgO ha–1 soil) in the al three years of study.

  7. Plant mycorrhizal traits and carbon fates from plot to globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudzilovskaia, N.; Cornelissen, H. H. C.

    2016-12-01

    Evidence is accumulating that plant traits related to mycorrhizal symbiosis, i.e. mycorrhizal type and the degree of plant root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi have important consequences for carbon pools and allocation in plants and soil. How plant and soil carbon pools vary among vegetation dominated by plants of different mycorrhizal types is a new and exciting research challenge. Absence of global databases on abundance of mycorrhizal fungi in soil and plant roots retards research aimed to understand involvement of mycorrhizas into soil carbon transformation processes. Using own data and published studies we have assembled currently world-largest database of plant species-per-site degrees root colonization by two most common types of mycorrhizal fungi, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (EM). The database features records for plant root colonization degrees by AM and EM (above 8000 records in total). Using this database, we demonstrate that the degree of mycorrhizal fungal colonization has globally consistent patterns across plant species. This suggests that the level of plant species-specific root colonization can be used as a plant trait. I will discuss how combining plot-level field data, literature data and mycorrhizal infection trait data may help us to quantify the carbon consequences of relative dominance by arbuscular versus ectomycorrhizal symbiosis in vegetation from plot to global scale. To exemplify this method, I will present an assessment of the impacts of EM shrub encroachment on carbon stocks in sub-arctic tundra, and show how the plant trait data (root, leaf, stem and mycorrhizal colonization traits) could predict (1) impacts of AM and EM vegetation on soil carbon budget and (2) changes in soil carbon budget due to increase of EM plants in an AM-dominated ecosystem and visa versa. This approach may help to predict how global change-mediated vegetation shifts, via mycorrhizal carbon pools and dynamics, may affect terrestric and

  8. Field Plot and Accuracy Assessment Points for Bent's Old Fort National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Accuracy Assessment, Observation and Plot Points. Plots within the park were identified and sampled in the summer of 2005. In the summer of 2006, randomly selected...

  9. Field Plot and Accuracy Assessment Points for Padre Island National Seashore Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Accuracy Assessment, Observation and Plot Points. Currently there are NO DATA in this feature class. As of December 2009, a plots database has not been developed and...

  10. Field Plot and Observation Points for Natural Bridges National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file displays the 97 field plot and observation points visited in 2003 & 2004 as part of the vegetation mapping project. Sample plots were located...

  11. Field Plot Points Modified for Fort Necessity National Battlefield Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Locations of vegetation classification sampling plots at Fort Necessity National Battlefield. In this data set, the X, Y coordinates for three plots have been...

  12. Field Plot and Observation Points for Dinosaur National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file displays the 727 vegetation plots and 217 observation points visited in 2002, 2003 and 2004 as part of the vegetation mapping project. Plots and...

  13. Excel Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Citigroup,one of the World top 500 companies,has now settled in Excel Center,Financial Street. The opening ceremony of Excel Center and the entry ceremony of Citigroup in the center were held on March 31.Government leaders of Xicheng District,the Excel CEO and the heads of Asia-Pacific Region leaders of Citibank all participated in the ceremony.

  14. Maintaining a permanent plot data base for growth and yield research: Solutions to some recurring problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    John C. Byrne

    1993-01-01

    Methods for solving some recurring problems of maintaining a permanent plot data base for growth and yield reseuch are described. These methods include documenting data from diverse sampling designs, changing sampling designs, changing field procedures, and coordinating activities in the plots with the land management agency. Managing a permanent plot data base (...

  15. A K-sample Homogeneity Test based on the Quantification of the p-p Plot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Hinloopen (Jeroen); R. Wagenvoort (Rien); J.G.M. van Marrewijk (Charles)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractWe propose a quantification of the p-p plot that assigns equal weight to all distances between the respective distributions: the surface between the p-p plot and the diagonal. This surface is labelled the Harmonic Weighted Mass (HWM) index. We introduce the diagonal-deviation (d-d) plot

  16. A K-sample Homogeneity Test based on the Quantification of the p-p Plot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinloopen, Jeroen; Wagenvoort, Rien; Marrewijk, van Charles

    2008-01-01

    We propose a quantification of the p-p plot that assigns equal weight to all distances between the respective distributions: the surface between the p-p plot and the diagonal. This surface is labelled the Harmonic Weighted Mass (HWM) index. We introduce the diagonal-deviation (d-d) plot that allows

  17. The influence of fipronil on Reticulitermes flavipes (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) feeding beyond treated plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Shelton

    2013-01-01

    A small-plot field trial was conducted to examine the area of influence of fipronil at incremental distances away from treated plots on the Harrison Experimental Forest near Saucier, MS. Small treated (water and fipronil) plots were surrounded by untreated wooden boards in an eight-point radial pattern, and examined for evidence of termite feeding every 60 d for 1 yr...

  18. Classification of calorimetric titration plots for alkyltrimethylammonium and alkylpyridinium cationic surfactants in aqueous solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijma, K; Engberts, J.B.F.N.; Blandamer, M.J; Cullis, P.M.; Last, P.M.; Irlam, K.D.; Soldi, L.G.

    1997-01-01

    Calorimetric titration plots for deaggregation of micelles formed by alkylpyridinium and alkyltrimethylammonium surfactants are classified into three types, A, B and C, depending on the shape of the plot of the enthalpy of dilution as a function of surfactant concentration. For Type A plots the reco

  19. Fitting Data to Model: Structural Equation Modeling Diagnosis Using Two Scatter Plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ke-Hai; Hayashi, Kentaro

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces two simple scatter plots for model diagnosis in structural equation modeling. One plot contrasts a residual-based M-distance of the structural model with the M-distance for the factor score. It contains information on outliers, good leverage observations, bad leverage observations, and normal cases. The other plot contrasts…

  20. Classification of calorimetric titration plots for alkyltrimethylammonium and alkylpyridinium cationic surfactants in aqueous solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijma, K; Engberts, J.B.F.N.; Blandamer, M.J; Cullis, P.M.; Last, P.M.; Irlam, K.D.; Soldi, L.G.

    1997-01-01

    Calorimetric titration plots for deaggregation of micelles formed by alkylpyridinium and alkyltrimethylammonium surfactants are classified into three types, A, B and C, depending on the shape of the plot of the enthalpy of dilution as a function of surfactant concentration. For Type A plots the

  1. A K-sample Homogeneity Test based on the Quantification of the p-p Plot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Hinloopen (Jeroen); R. Wagenvoort (Rien); J.G.M. van Marrewijk (Charles)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractWe propose a quantification of the p-p plot that assigns equal weight to all distances between the respective distributions: the surface between the p-p plot and the diagonal. This surface is labelled the Harmonic Weighted Mass (HWM) index. We introduce the diagonal-deviation (d-d) plot

  2. A K-sample Homogeneity Test based on the Quantification of the p-p Plot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinloopen, Jeroen; Wagenvoort, Rien; Marrewijk, van Charles

    2008-01-01

    We propose a quantification of the p-p plot that assigns equal weight to all distances between the respective distributions: the surface between the p-p plot and the diagonal. This surface is labelled the Harmonic Weighted Mass (HWM) index. We introduce the diagonal-deviation (d-d) plot that allows

  3. Meta-STEPP: subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot for individual patient data meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin Victoria; Cole, Bernard; Bonetti, Marco; Gelber, Richard D

    2016-09-20

    We have developed a method, called Meta-STEPP (subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot for meta-analysis), to explore treatment effect heterogeneity across covariate values in the meta-analysis setting for time-to-event data when the covariate of interest is continuous. Meta-STEPP forms overlapping subpopulations from individual patient data containing similar numbers of events with increasing covariate values, estimates subpopulation treatment effects using standard fixed-effects meta-analysis methodology, displays the estimated subpopulation treatment effect as a function of the covariate values, and provides a statistical test to detect possibly complex treatment-covariate interactions. Simulation studies show that this test has adequate type-I error rate recovery as well as power when reasonable window sizes are chosen. When applied to eight breast cancer trials, Meta-STEPP suggests that chemotherapy is less effective for tumors with high estrogen receptor expression compared with those with low expression. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Relationship between heart rate variability using Lorenz plot and sleep level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Kosuke; Deguchi, Akihiro; Hagiwara, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we propose a new technique for estimating depth of sleep over the whole night using electrocardiogram (ECG) RR intervals (RRIs). We produced a Lorenz plot (LP) using the RRIs recorded during all-night sleep and confirmed that changes in distribution on the LP occur based on changes in sleep stage. To evaluate the changes in these distributions, RRIs are projected a LP on a y = x axis, y = -x axis, and analyzed the shifting of the mean (center C) and standard deviation (area S) for each sleep stage. Analysis interval time was 60 seconds, shifting every second, and we compared heart rate variability (HRV) and sleep level. Center C showed progress toward light sleep levels and area S showed the transition phases toward deep sleep. A concordance rate of 60.1% between the estimated values and actual transitional sleep level was obtained for all-night sleep. Therefore, transitional sleep level can be evaluated based on HRV using the LP.

  5. The physical model of a terraced plot: first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlotto, Chiara; D'Agostino, Vincenzo; Buzzanca, Giacomo

    2017-04-01

    Terrace building have been expanded in the 19th century because of the increased demographic pressure and the need to crop additional areas at steeper slopes. Terraces are also important to regulate the hydrological behavior of the hillslope. Few studies are available in literature on rainfall-runoff processes and flood risk mitigation in terraced areas. Bench terraces, reducing the terrain slope and the length of the overland flow, quantitatively control the runoff flow velocity, facilitating the drainage and thus leading to a reduction of soil erosion. The study of the hydrologic-hydraulic function of terraced slopes is essential in order to evaluate their possible use to cooperate for flood-risk mitigation also preserving the landscape value. This research aims to better focus the times of the hydrological response, which are determined by a hillslope plot bounded by a dry-stone wall, considering both the overland flow and the groundwater. A physical model, characterized by a quasi-real scale, has been built to reproduce the behavior of a 3% outward sloped terrace at bare soil condition. The model consists of a steel metal box (1 m large, 3.3 m long, 2 m high) containing the hillslope terrain. The terrain is equipped with two piezometers, 9 TDR sensors measuring the volumetric water content, a surface spillway at the head releasing the steady discharge under test, a scale at the wall base to measure the outflowing discharge. The experiments deal with different initial moisture condition (non-saturated and saturated), and discharges of 19.5, 12.0 and 5.0 l/min. Each experiment has been replicated, conducting a total number of 12 tests. The volumetric water content analysis produced by the 9 TDR sensors was able to provide a quite satisfactory representation of the soil moisture during the runs. Then, different lag times at the outlet since the inflow initiation were measured both for runoff and groundwater. Moreover, the time of depletion and the piezometer

  6. Dalitz plot analysis of B-→D+π-π-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Ronan, M. T.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; da Costa, J. Firmino; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Li, X.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.

    2009-06-01

    We report on a Dalitz plot analysis of B-→D+π-π- decays, based on a sample of about 383×106 Υ(4S)→B Bmacr decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. We find the total branching fraction of the three-body decay: B(B-→D+π-π-)=(1.08±0.03±0.05)×10-3. We observe the established D2*0 and confirm the existence of D0*0 in their decays to D+π-, where the D2*0 and D0*0 are the 2+ and 0+c umacr P-wave states, respectively. We measure the masses and widths of D2*0 and D0*0 to be: mD2*0=(2460.4±1.2±1.2±1.9)MeV/c2, ΓD2*0=(41.8±2.5±2.1±2.0)MeV, mD0*0=(2297±8±5±19)MeV/c2, and ΓD0*0=(273±12±17±45)MeV. The stated errors reflect the statistical and systematic uncertainties, and the uncertainty related to the assumed composition of signal events and the theoretical model.

  7. Automated quantification of the synchrogram by recurrence plot analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Chinh Duc; Wilson, Stephen James; Crozier, Stuart

    2012-04-01

    Recently, the concept of phase synchronization of two weakly coupled oscillators has raised a great research interest and has been applied to characterize synchronization phenomenon in physiological data. Phase synchronization of cardiorespiratory coupling is often studied by a synchrogram analysis, a graphical tool investigating the relationship between instantaneous phases of two signals. Although several techniques have been proposed to automatically quantify the synchrogram, most of them require a preselection of a phase-locking ratio by trial and error. One technique does not require this information; however, it is based on the power spectrum of phase's distribution in the synchrogram, which is vulnerable to noise. This study aims to introduce a new technique to automatically quantify the synchrogram by studying its dynamic structure. Our technique exploits recurrence plot analysis, which is a well-established tool for characterizing recurring patterns and nonstationarities in experiments. We applied our technique to detect synchronization in simulated and measured infants' cardiorespiratory data. Our results suggest that the proposed technique is able to systematically detect synchronization in noisy and chaotic data without preselecting the phase-locking ratio. By embedding phase information of the synchrogram into phase space, the phase-locking ratio is automatically unveiled as the number of attractors.

  8. The imprint of exile through the plot of the narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Dutrénit Bielous

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Exile is a circumstance different from other migrations, although it resembles them in the possible insertion or alienation from the receiving society. It is with no a doubt a forced migration process which is always accompanied by an idea and an imaginary: the disappearrance of the conditions that forced to exile and thus, the return.Although it is not possible to generalize, because there is no one single experience of exile and the subjectivities that compose it are diverse, it undoubtedly produces a sensation of alienation, which can lead to the rejection of the cultural norms of society; it is part of a process of “being in one place, but thinking about another.” However, as exile is prolonged, the experience of adaptation for the different generations involved becomes diversified, communication vessels develop, feelings of inclusion, of adaptation, of attachment with the social and cultural environment that the place of refuge offered.The present text builds on testimonies of Uruguayans exiled in Mexico who have returned to their country. In their narrative, the meanings that relate to the subjective perspective that provoked the “return” to their country of origin as being viable and a palpable event are perceived. In summary, an incursion through the testimonial plot explains to what extent the return is a recovery of the space of identity longed for and the subsequent abandonment of the foreign space, in other words, it adds to the perspective of identity as a dynamic and relational construction.

  9. High-speed digital phonoscopy images analyzed by Nyquist plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuling

    2012-02-01

    Vocal-fold vibration is a key dynamic event in voice production, and the vibratory characteristics of the vocal fold correlate closely with voice quality and health condition. Laryngeal imaging provides direct means to observe the vocal fold vibration; in the past, however, available modalities were either too slow or impractical to resolve the actual vocal fold vibrations. This limitation has now been overcome by high-speed digital imaging (HSDI) (or high-speed digital phonoscopy), which records images of the vibrating vocal folds at a rate of 2000 frames per second or higher- fast enough to resolve a specific, sustained phonatory vocal fold vibration. The subsequent image-based functional analysis of voice is essential to better understanding the mechanism underlying voice production, as well as assisting the clinical diagnosis of voice disorders. Our primary objective is to develop a comprehensive analytical platform for voice analysis using the HSDI recordings. So far, we have developed various analytical approaches for the HSDI-based voice analyses. These include Nyquist plots and associated analysese that are used along with FFT and Spectrogram in the analysis of the HSDI data representing normal voice and specific voice pathologies.

  10. Applying manifold learning to plotting approximate contour trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shigeo; Fujishiro, Issei; Okada, Masato

    2009-01-01

    A contour tree is a powerful tool for delineating the topological evolution of isosurfaces of a single-valued function, and thus has been frequently used as a means of extracting features from volumes and their time-varying behaviors. Several sophisticated algorithms have been proposed for constructing contour trees while they often complicate the software implementation especially for higher-dimensional cases such as time-varying volumes. This paper presents a simple yet effective approach to plotting in 3D space, approximate contour trees from a set of scattered samples embedded in the high-dimensional space. Our main idea is to take advantage of manifold learning so that we can elongate the distribution of high-dimensional data samples to embed it into a low-dimensional space while respecting its local proximity of sample points. The contribution of this paper lies in the introduction of new distance metrics to manifold learning, which allows us to reformulate existing algorithms as a variant of currently available dimensionality reduction scheme. Efficient reduction of data sizes together with segmentation capability is also developed to equip our approach with a coarse-to-fine analysis even for large-scale datasets. Examples are provided to demonstrate that our proposed scheme can successfully traverse the features of volumes and their temporal behaviors through the constructed contour trees.

  11. Dalitz plot analysis of $B\\to DDK$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Purohit, Milind V

    2015-01-01

    We present Dalitz plot analyses for the decays of $B$ mesons to $D^-D^0K^+$ and $\\overline{D}^0D^0K^+$. [Charge conjugate reactions are implicitly assumed throughout.] We report the observation of the $D^*_{s1}(2700)^+$ resonance in these two channels and obtain measurements of the mass $M(D^*_{s1}(2700)^+) = 2699^{+14}_{-7}$ MeV/$c^2$ and of the width $\\Gamma(D^*_{s1}(2700)^+) = 127^{+24}_{-19}$ MeV, including statistical and systematic uncertainties. In addition, we observe an enhancement in the $D^0K^+$ invariant mass around 2350--2500 MeV/$c^2$ in both decays $B^0 \\to D^-D^0K^+$ and $B^+ \\to \\overline{D}^0D^0K^+$, which we are not able to interpret. The results are based on 429 $fb^{-1}$ of data containing $471\\times 10^6$ $B\\overline{B}$ pairs collected at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance with the BaBar detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

  12. The quartile benefit plot: a middle ear surgery benefit assessment scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerber, Sébastien; Karkas, Alexandre; Righini, Christian A; Chahine, Karim A

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to present a new method for the assessment of hearing improvement following stapes surgery, taking into account additional, previously omitted evaluation criteria. Retrospective. A quartile plot, based on the currently used Glasgow benefit plot, is structured to include two additional criteria of hearing assessment, namely the absence of postoperative sensorineural hearing loss and the closure of the air-bone gap to <10 dB. Pre- and postoperative hearing results of 132 patients diagnosed with bilateral otosclerosis and treated with bilateral stapes surgery were plotted on both the classical Glasgow benefit plot and the new quartile benefit plot. The difference in success assessment due to stricter assessment criteria is demonstrated. Functional success rate following bilateral stapes surgery as plotted on the traditional Glasgow benefit plot was 51.5%. Success rate for bilateral stapes surgery assessed on the new quartile plot with the addition of the two new criteria was 38.64%. The difference in success rates was found to be statistically significant. The basis of benefit assessment in stapes surgery solely on the mean deficit in air conduction results in overestimation of success rate. This study demonstrates that results that appear satisfactory when judged by the Glasgow benefit plot are of modest success when assessed by the new quartile plot. The quartile benefit plot presented in this paper provides a strict measure of presentation and evaluation of stapes surgery results.

  13. The art of visualising dose distributions: Improved plotting flexibility for the R-package 'Luminescence'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, Michael; Kreutzer, Sebastian; Burow, Christoph; Fuchs, Margret; Fischer, Manfred; Schmidt, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Luminescence dating profoundly relies on the compelling presentation of equivalent doses. However, there is no perfect way to depict equivalent dose distributions with all their measures of uncertainty. Amongst others, most common approaches are the Radial Plot and kernel density estimate (KDE) graphs. Both plot types are supported by the R-package 'Luminescence', a comprehensive and flexible compilation of functions for convenient analysis and presentation of luminescence dating data. In its upcoming version, the package comprises updated versions of these two most popular plot functions to allow the user sound control over a wide variety of graphical parameters. Furthermore, a new plot type is added: The Abanico Plot (plot_AbanicoPlot()). It combines the strengths of both, the classic Radial Plot and a KDE plot. Our contribution will show all updated data visualisation approaches and provide a quick guide (workflow chart) on how to get from measurement data to high-quality dose distribution plots. It may serve to raise further discussions about the package in general and specific plot approaches in particular.

  14. Substitution of cysteine for a conserved alanine residue in the catalytic center of type II iodothyronine deiodinase alters interaction with reducing cofactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Klootwijk (Willem); T.J. Visser (Theo); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractHuman type II iodothyronine deiodinase (D2) catalyzes the activation of T(4) to T(3). The D2 enzyme, like the type I (D1) and type III (D3) deiodinases, contains a selenocysteine (SeC) residue (residue 133 in D2) in the highly conserved catalytic center. Remarkably, all

  15. Substitution of cysteine for a conserved alanine residue in the catalytic center of type II iodothyronine deiodinase alters interaction with reducing cofactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Klootwijk (Willem); T.J. Visser (Ton); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractHuman type II iodothyronine deiodinase (D2) catalyzes the activation of T(4) to T(3). The D2 enzyme, like the type I (D1) and type III (D3) deiodinases, contains a selenocysteine (SeC) residue (residue 133 in D2) in the highly conserved catalytic center. Remarkably, all

  16. Distribution center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Distribution center is a logistics link fulfill physical distribution as its main functionGenerally speaking, it's a large and hiahly automated center destined to receive goods from various plants and suppliers,take orders,fill them efficiently,and deliver goods to customers as quickly as possible.

  17. Model-independent plot of dynamic PET data facilitates data interpretation and model selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Ole Lajord

    2012-02-21

    When testing new PET radiotracers or new applications of existing tracers, the blood-tissue exchange and the metabolism need to be examined. However, conventional plots of measured time-activity curves from dynamic PET do not reveal the inherent kinetic information. A novel model-independent volume-influx plot (vi-plot) was developed and validated. The new vi-plot shows the time course of the instantaneous distribution volume and the instantaneous influx rate. The vi-plot visualises physiological information that facilitates model selection and it reveals when a quasi-steady state is reached, which is a prerequisite for the use of the graphical analyses by Logan and Gjedde-Patlak. Both axes of the vi-plot have direct physiological interpretation, and the plot shows kinetic parameter in close agreement with estimates obtained by non-linear kinetic modelling. The vi-plot is equally useful for analyses of PET data based on a plasma input function or a reference region input function. The vi-plot is a model-independent and informative plot for data exploration that facilitates the selection of an appropriate method for data analysis.

  18. Measurement of the I=1/2 Kπ S -wave amplitude from Dalitz plot analyses of ηcKK¯π in two-photon interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Brown, D. N.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kim, J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Pennington, M. R.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Robertson, S. H.; Dey, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Heß, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    We study the processes γγ→K0SK±π and γγ→K+K-π0 using a data sample of 519 fb-1 recorded with the BABAR detector operating at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at center-of-mass energies at and near the Υ(nS) (n=2, 3, 4) resonances. We observe ηc decays to both final states and perform Dalitz plot analyses using a model-independent partial wave analysis technique. This allows a model-independent measurement of the mass-dependence of the I=1/2 Kπ S-wave amplitude and phase. A comparison between the present measurement and those from previous experiments indicates similar behavior for the phase up to a mass of 1.5 GeV/c2. In contrast, the amplitudes show very marked differences. The data require the presence of a new a0(1950) resonance with parameters m=1931±14±22 MeV/c2 and Γ=271±22±29 MeV.

  19. Cross-functional interaction during the early phases of user-centered software new product development: reconsidering the common area of interest

    OpenAIRE

    Molin-Juustila, T. (Tonja)

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Applying the principles of user-centered development (UCD) in software development practice is not straightforward. In technology-push type software product development it is not clear how to match the new product innovation to the future needs of potential future users. Intensive collaboration between different organizational functions becomes essential. UCD provides valuable tools and practices as learning mechanisms both for users and for the company. The purpose of cross-funct...

  20. Pattern and associated factors of potential drug-drug interactions in both pre- and early post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation stages at a referral center in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholaminezhad, Safoora; Hadjibabaie, Molouk; Gholami, Kheirollah; Javadi, Mohammad Reza; Radfar, Mania; Karimzadeh, Iman; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the pattern as well as associated factors of moderate and major potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) in both the pre- and early post-transplantation stages at a referral hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) center. All adolescents and adults undergone HSCT within a 3-year period were screened retrospectively for potential moderate or severe PDDIs by the Lexi-Interact On-Desktop software. Among 384 patients, a total of 13,600 PDDIs were detected. The median (interquartile range) cumulative PDDIs burden was 41 (28). All (100 %) individuals experienced at least one PDDI. More than four fifths (81.8 %) of detected PDDIs were moderate. The predominant mechanism of PDDIs was pharmacokinetics (54.3 %). Interaction between sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim and fluconazole was the most common PDDIs involving 95.3 % of the study population. More than three fifths (61.5 %) of detected PDDIs were caused by HSCT-related medications. No interaction was identified between two anticancer agents. Interactions of cyclophosphamide with phenytoin, busulfan with metronidazole, dexamethasone, or clarithromycin were the only detected PDDI between anticancer and non-anticancer medications. Type of HSCT and the numbers of administered medications were significantly associated with major PDDIs. The epidemiology, real clinical consequence, and economic burden of DDIs on patients undergone HSCT particularly around the transplantation period should be assessed further by prospective, multicenter studies.

  1. A new instrument to measure plot-scale runoff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Stewart

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of the amount and timing of surface runoff at multiple scales is needed to understand fundamental hydrological processes. At the plot-scale (i.e., length scales on the order of 1 to 10 m current methods for direct measurement of runoff either store the water in a collection vessel, which is unconducive to long-term monitoring studies, or utilize expensive installations such as large-scale tipping buckets or flume/weir systems. We developed an alternative low-cost, robust and reliable instrument to measure runoff that we call the "Upwelling Bernoulli Tube" (UBeTube. The UBeTube instrument is a pipe with a slot machined in its side that is installed vertically at the base of a runoff collection system. The flow rate through the slot is inferred by measuring the water height within the pipe. The geometry of the slot can be modified to suit the range of flow rates expected for a given site; we demonstrate a slot geometry which is capable of measuring flow rates across more than three orders of magnitude (up to 300 L min−1 while requiring only 30 cm of hydraulic head. System accuracy is dependent on both the geometry of the slot and the accuracy of the water level measurements. With an off-the-shelf pressure transducer sensor, the mean theoretical error for the demonstrated slot geometry was ~17% (ranging from errors of more than 50% at low flow rates to less than 2% at high flow rates, while the observed error during validation was 1–25%. A simple correction factor reduced this mean error to −14%, and further reductions in error could be achieved through the use of taller, narrower slot dimensions (which requires greater head gradients to drive flow or through more accurate water level measurements. The UBeTube device has been successfully employed in a long-term rainfall-runoff study, demonstrating the ability of the instrument to measure surface runoff across a range of flows and conditions.

  2. Mortality factors for dead trees from a subset of plots from the Sierra Nevada Forest Dynamics Plot Network from 1998 to 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset was used to summarize and analyze the mortality factors recorderd on dead trees in the Sierra Nevada Forest Dynamics Plot Network, which is managed by...

  3. A New Process Monitoring Method Based on Waveform Signal by Using Recurrence Plot

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng Zhou; Weidong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Process monitoring is an important research problem in numerous areas. This paper proposes a novel process monitoring scheme by integrating the recurrence plot (RP) method and the control chart technique. Recently, the RP method has emerged as an effective tool to analyze waveform signals. However, unlike the existing RP methods that employ recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) to quantify the recurrence plot by a few summary statistics; we propose new concepts of template recurrence plots ...

  4. Recurrence Plot Based Damage Detection Method by Integrating  Control Chart

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng Zhou; Weidong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Because of the importance of damage detection in manufacturing systems and other areas, many fault detection methods have been developed that are based on a vibration signal. Little work, however, has been reported in the literature on using a recurrence plot method to analyze the vibration signal for damage detection. In this paper, we develop a recurrence plot based fault detection method by integrating the statistical process control technique. The recurrence plots of the vibration signals...

  5. Derivation of plotting position formula for GEV distribution using genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Heo, J.

    2008-12-01

    Probability plotting positions are used for the graphical display of annual maximum rainfall or flood series and the estimation of exceedance probability of those values. In addition, plotting positions allow a visual examination of the fitness of probability distribution provided by flood frequency analysis. Therefore, the graphical approach using plotting position has been applied to many fields of hydrology and water resources planning. Various plotting position formulas were developed for probability distributions in many researches and plotting position formulas by Gringorten(1963) and Cunnane(1978) were applied to the Gumbel and GEV distributions generally. Especially, Cunnane(1978) defined the plotting position that related with the mean of data and proposed the general formula that can be applied to various probability distributions. The definition of the plotting position by Cunnane(1978) have influenced on the plotting position of probability distribution contained shape parameter. In this study, the plotting position formula for the GEV distribution is derived by using the combination of the order statistics and the probability weight moment of the GEV distribution for various sample sizes and shape parameters. In addition, the parameters of plotting position formula for the GEV distribution are estimated by using genetic algorithm considering the range of a coefficient of skewness related with the shape parameters of the GEV distribution. The accuracy of derived plotting position formula for the GEV distribution is examined by the comparison of root mean square errors between theoretical reduced variates and those calculated from the derived and existing plotting position formulas such as Gringorten(1963) and Cunnane(1978).

  6. Immigration of the barley mildew pathogen into field plots of barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Hara, R.B.; Brown, J.K.M.

    1996-01-01

    Immigration of the barley powdery mildew pathogen (Erysiphe graminis f.sp. hordei) into field plots of the spring barley variety Tyra (carrying the resistance allele Mla1) was investigated. Spores were trapped from the top of the plot canopies, as well as from control plots of wheat with no barley...... nearby. Comparison of the frequencies of virulent and avirulent single-colony isolates showed that the amount of immigration, relative to the amount of inoculum being produced within the plot, reduced very rapidly, until it could not be detected in the middle of the growing season (mid-June)....

  7. Field Plot Points for Colonial National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile shows the location of vegetation sampling plots used for vegetation classification and mapping at Colonial National Historical Park.

  8. Field Plot Points for Richmond National Battlefield Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile shows the location of vegetation sampling plots used for vegetation classification and mapping at Richmond National Battlefield Park.

  9. Visualizing the deep end of sound: plotting multi-parameter results from infrasound data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perttu, A. B.; Taisne, B.

    2016-12-01

    Infrasound is sound below the threshold of human hearing: approximately 20 Hz. The field of infrasound research, like other waveform based fields relies on several standard processing methods and data visualizations, including waveform plots and spectrograms. The installation of the International Monitoring System (IMS) global network of infrasound arrays, contributed to the resurgence of infrasound research. Array processing is an important method used in infrasound research, however, this method produces data sets with a large number of parameters, and requires innovative plotting techniques. The goal in designing new figures is to be able to present easily comprehendible, and information-rich plots by careful selection of data density and plotting methods.

  10. Textual Form and Cultural Affect: William Empson's Double-Plot and Raymond Williams's Structure of Feeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pamela McCallum

    2005-01-01

    By insisting on the primacy of double-plot, Empson brackets the sometimes deceptive appearances of a text's content to uncover and disengage the more fundamental double-plot system at work within the defining structure of the text. Empson's thinking about the reception of double-plot structures enables Raymond Williams's early formulations of structure of feeling, in particular the gesturing this perplexing, underdeveloped, but persistent concept makes towards understanding collective response to cultural forms. This article explores the implications of the reception of double-plot structures, drawing out the assumptions inscribed in Empson's claims about processes at work as an audience engages with these dramatic structures.

  11. Runoff and erosion from native and reclaimed sites: Large versus small plots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, M.K.; Buchanan, B.A. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Estrada, O.J. [BHP - Utah International Inc., Fruitland, NM (United States)

    1990-12-31

    Runoff and erosion were compared using rainfall simulators on small (1 m{sup 2}) and large (3 x 10.67 m) runoff plots. Four small and two large plots were located on each of eight sites. These included two native sites dominated by bunchgrasses and shrubs on sandy dunes, two nearly barren badlands, two 10 year-old reclaimed sites treated with topdressing and dominated by bunchgrasses and shrubs, and two first year reclaimed sites treated with topdressing and dominated by annual forbs and wheat. Rainfall was more uniform and more easily controlled on small plots than large plots. Many small plots (at least eight) could be rained on each day by using wind screens while large plots required calm winds during simulated rainfall which was delayed for many days on numerous occasions. Results from small plots were as accurate and more precise than from large plots on native and reclaimed sites where slope lengths were truncated by shrubs and bunchgrasses. Runoff and erosion from small plots could be measured quickly and cheaply for evaluating reclamation success.

  12. Kinetics of the addition of olefins to Si-centered radicals: the critical role of dispersion interactions revealed by theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Erin R; Clarkin, Owen J; Dale, Stephen G; DiLabio, Gino A

    2015-06-04

    Solution-phase rate constants for the addition of selected olefins to the triethylsilyl and tris(trimethylsilyl)silyl radicals are measured using laser-flash photolysis and competition kinetics. The results are compared with predictions from density functional theory (DFT) calculations, both with and without dispersion corrections obtained from the exchange-hole dipole moment (XDM) model. Without a dispersion correction, the rate constants are consistently underestimated; the errors increase with system size, up to 10(6) s(-1) for the largest system considered. Dispersion interactions preferentially stabilize the transition states relative to the separated reactants and bring the DFT-calculated rate constants into excellent agreement with experiment. Thus, dispersion interactions are found to play a key role in determining the kinetics for addition reactions, particularly those involving sterically bulky functional groups.

  13. Interactive genetic algorithm for user-centered design of distributed conservation practices in a watershed: An examination of user preferences in objective space and user behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piemonti, Adriana Debora; Babbar-Sebens, Meghna; Mukhopadhyay, Snehasis; Kleinberg, Austin

    2017-05-01

    Interactive Genetic Algorithms (IGA) are advanced human-in-the-loop optimization methods that enable humans to give feedback, based on their subjective and unquantified preferences and knowledge, during the algorithm's search process. While these methods are gaining popularity in multiple fields, there is a critical lack of data and analyses on (a) the nature of interactions of different humans with interfaces of decision support systems (DSS) that employ IGA in water resources planning problems and on (b) the effect of human feedback on the algorithm's ability to search for design alternatives desirable to end-users. In this paper, we present results and analyses of observational experiments in which different human participants (surrogates and stakeholders) interacted with an IGA-based, watershed DSS called WRESTORE to identify plans of conservation practices in a watershed. The main goal of this paper is to evaluate how the IGA adapts its search process in the objective space to a user's feedback, and identify whether any similarities exist in the objective space of plans found by different participants. Some participants focused on the entire watershed, while others focused only on specific local subbasins. Additionally, two different hydrology models were used to identify any potential differences in interactive search outcomes that could arise from differences in the numerical values of benefits displayed to participants. Results indicate that stakeholders, in comparison to their surrogates, were more likely to use multiple features of the DSS interface to collect information before giving feedback, and dissimilarities existed among participants in the objective space of design alternatives.

  14. Evaluation of Soft Tissue Landmark Reliability between Manual and Computerized Plotting Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinathan, Geetha; Kommi, Pradeep B; Kumar, Senthil M; Yashwant, Aniruddh; Arani, Nandakumar; Sabapathy, Senkutvan

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the reliability of soft tissue landmark identification between manual and digital plot-tings in both X and Y axes. A total of 50 pretreatment lateral cephalograms were selected from patients who reported for orthodontic treatment. The digital images of each cephalogram were imported directly into Dolphin software for onscreen digi-talization, while for manual tracing, images were printed using a compatible X-ray printer. After the images were standardized, and 10 commonly used soft tissue landmarks were plotted on each cephalogram by six different professional observers, the values obtained were plotted in X and Y axes. Intraclass correlation coefficient was used to determine the intrarater reliability for repeated landmark plotting obtained by both the methods. The evaluation for reliability of soft tissue landmark plottings in both manual and digital methods after subjecting it to interclass correlation showed a good reliability, which was nearing complete homogeneity in both X and Y axes, except for Y axis of throat point in manual plotting, which showed moderate reliability as a cephalometric variable. Intraclass correlation of soft tissue nasion had a moderate reliability along X axis. Soft tissue pogonion shows moderate reliability in Y axis. Throat point exhibited moderate reliability in X axis. The interclass correlation in X and Y axes shows high reliability in both hard tissue and soft tissue except for throat point in Y axis, when plotted manually. The intraclass correlation is more consistent and highly reliable for soft tissue landmarks and the hard tissue landmark identification is also consistent. The results obtained for manual and digital methods were almost similar, but the digital landmark plotting has an added advantage in archiving, retrieval, transmission, and can be enhanced during plotting of lateral cephalograms. Hence, the digital method of landmark plotting could be preferred for both daily use and

  15. Energy efficient data centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-03-30

    through extensive participation with data center professionals, examination of case study findings, and participation in data center industry meetings and workshops. Industry partners enthusiastically provided valuable insight into current practice, and helped to identify areas where additional public interest research could lead to significant efficiency improvement. This helped to define and prioritize the research agenda. The interaction involved industry representatives with expertise in all aspects of data center facilities, including specialized facility infrastructure systems and computing equipment. In addition to the input obtained through industry workshops, LBNL's participation in a three-day, comprehensive design ''charrette'' hosted by the Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) yielded a number of innovative ideas for future research.

  16. User Centered Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egbert, Maria; Matthews, Ben

    2012-01-01

    The interdisciplinary approach of User Centered Design is presented here with a focus on innovation in the design and use of hearing technologies as well as on the potential of innovation in interaction. This approach is geared towards developing new products, systems, technologies and practices...... based on an understanding of why so few persons with hearing loss use the highly advanced hearing technologies. In integrating Conversation Analysis (“CA”), audiology and User Centered Design, three disciplines which are collaborating together for the first time, we are addressing the following...

  17. User-Centered Design Gymkhana

    OpenAIRE

    Garreta Domingo, Muriel; Almirall Hill, Magí; Mor Pera, Enric

    2007-01-01

    The User-centered design (UCD) Gymkhana is a tool for human-computer interaction practitioners to demonstrate through a game the key user-centered design methods and how they interrelate in the design process.The target audiences are other organizational departments unfamiliar with UCD but whose work is related to the definition, cretaion, and update of a product service.

  18. Box, Line, and Midgap Plots: Effects of Display Characteristics on the Accuracy and Bias of Estimates of Whisker Length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, William A.; Behrens, John T.

    1991-01-01

    The accuracy and bias of estimates of whisker length based on box, line, and midgap plots were examined. For each type of graph, 20 different undergraduates (n=60) viewed 48 single-plot graphs. Whisker-length estimates for box and line plots were more accurate and less biased than those for midgap plots. (TJH)

  19. First look at NA52 data on Pb-Pb interactions at 158 A {center_dot} GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelquist, G. [Department of Physics, University of Stockholm (Sweden); Baglin, C. [CNRS-IN2PS, LAPP Annecy (France); Beringer, J.; Borer, K. [Lab. for High Energy Physics, University of Bern (Switzerland); Bohm, C. [Department of Physics, University of Stockholm (Sweden); Bussiere, A. [CNRS-IN2PS, LAPP Annecy (France); Dittus, F. [Lab. for High Energy Physics, University of Bern (Switzerland); Elsener, K. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Frei, D. [Lab. for High Energy Physics, University of Bern (Switzerland); Gorodetzky, P. [CNRS-IN2PS, CRN Strasbourg (France); Guillaud, J.P. [CNRS-IN2PS, LAPP Annecy (France); Hugentobler, E.; Klingenberg, R. [Lab. for High Energy Physics, University of Bern (Switzerland); Linden, T. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki (Finland); Lohmann, K.D. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Moser, U.; Pal, T.; Pretzl, K.; Schacher, J. [Lab. for High Energy Physics, University of Bern (Switzerland); Sellden, B. [Department of Physics, University of Stockholm (Sweden); Stoffel, F. [Lab. for High Energy Physics, University of Bern (Switzerland); Tuominiemi, J. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki (Finland); Zhang, Q.P. [Department of Physics, University of Stockholm (Sweden); Presented by F. Dittus for the Newmass Collaboration

    1995-07-20

    We have searched for strange matter particles, so-called {ital strangelets}, in Pb-Pb interactions at {ital p}{sub lab}=157.7 GeV/{ital c} per nucleon. The NA52 apparatus is also ideally suited to measure production yields and rapidity distribution of {pi}{sup {plus_minus}}, K{sup {plus_minus}}, p, {bar p}, d, {bar d}, ... near 0{sup 0} production angle. Some preliminary results are shown. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  20. Forest Plots in Excel: Moving beyond a Clump of Trees to a Forest of Visual Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derzon, James H.; Alford, Aaron A.

    2013-01-01

    Forest plots provide an effective means of presenting a wealth of information in a single graphic. Whether used to illustrate multiple results in a single study or the cumulative knowledge of an entire field, forest plots have become an accepted and generally understood way of presenting many estimates simultaneously. This article explores…

  1. Determination of the Runoff and Suspended Sediment from Two Different Slope Length Using Field Plots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Şensoy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of slope length on runoff and suspended sediment yield has been investigated by using plots on uniform slopes under natural rainfall conditions. From September 2007 to September 2009, during two year-period, measurements were done in Dallıca village experimental area in Bartın province. In this study, six field plots with a width of 1.87 m were used. Three of them were 5.5 m long (short plots and remaining three were 11.05 m long (long plots. Plots were located on bare soil surface that has no conservative vegetation. During the period of experimentation, a total of 158 rainy days were registered and average annual rainfall amount was 1194.8 mm. Average annual runoff per square meter was 270.81 mm, and 311.27 mm in long and short plots, respectively. Average annual suspended sediment was 809.68 g m-2, and 766.53 g m-2 from long and short plots, respectively. While statistically significant differences were found in runoff amount from plots with different lengths, there were no statistically significant differences in terms of the amount of eroded sediment.

  2. Plot intensity and cycle-length effects on growth and removals estimates from forest inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul C. Van Deusen; Francis A. Roesch

    2015-01-01

    Continuous forest inventory planners can allocate the budget to more plots per acre or a shorter remeasurement cycle. A higher plot intensity benefits small area estimation and allows for more precision in current status estimates. Shorter cycles may provide better estimates of growth, removals and mortality. On a fixed budget, the planner can't have both greater...

  3. On-plot drinking water supplies and health: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbo, Alycia; Williams, Ashley R; Evans, Barbara; Hunter, Paul R; Bartram, Jamie

    2016-07-01

    Many studies have found that household access to water supplies near or within the household plot can reduce the probability of diarrhea, trachoma, and other water-related diseases, and it is generally accepted that on-plot water supplies produce health benefits for households. However, the body of research literature has not been analyzed to weigh the evidence supporting this. A systematic review was conducted to investigate the impacts of on-plot water supplies on diarrhea, trachoma, child growth, and water-related diseases, to further examine the relationship between household health and distance to water source and to assess whether on-plot water supplies generate health gains for households. Studies provide evidence that households with on-plot water supplies experience fewer diarrheal and helminth infections and greater child height. Findings suggest that water-washed (hygiene associated) diseases are more strongly impacted by on-plot water access than waterborne diseases. Few studies analyzed the effects of on-plot water access on quantity of domestic water used, hygiene behavior, and use of multiple water sources, and the lack of evidence for these relationships reveals an important gap in current literature. The review findings indicate that on-plot water access is a useful health indicator and benchmark for the progressive realization of the Sustainable Development Goal target of universal safe water access as well as the human right to safe water.

  4. Using contour plots in elecgroproduction to examine regions in {epsilon}, Q{sup 2}, W space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funsten, H. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    In determining incident CEBAF beam energies for CLAS electroproduction experiments that separate the longitudinal and transverse cross section components, contour plots of {epsilon} defined over a 2 dimensional Q{sup 2}, W space can be useful. This note describes an approximate method of constructing such plots.

  5. Follow-up Designs to Resolve Confounding in Split-Plot Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almimi, Ashraf A.; Kulahci, Murat; Montgomery, Douglas C.

    2008-01-01

    Split-plot designs are effective in industry due to time and/or cost constraints, restriction on randomization of the treatment combinations of the hard-to-change factors, and different sizes of experimental units. Some of the results of fractional factorial split-plot experiments can be ambiguou...

  6. 36 CFR 9.42 - Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. 9.42 Section 9.42 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. Any technical data...

  7. Combining Multiple External Representations and Refutational Text: An Intervention on Learning to Interpret Box Plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lem, Stephanie; Kempen, Goya; Ceulemans, Eva; Onghena, Patrick; Verschaffel, Lieven; Van Dooren, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Box plots are frequently misinterpreted and educational attempts to correct these misinterpretations have not been successful. In this study, we used two instructional techniques that seemed powerful to change the misinterpretation of the area of the box in box plots, both separately and in combination, leading to three experimental conditions,…

  8. Identifying hidden common causes from bivariate time series: a method using recurrence plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2010-01-01

    We propose a method for inferring the existence of hidden common causes from observations of bivariate time series. We detect related time series by excessive simultaneous recurrences in the corresponding recurrence plots. We also use a noncoverage property of a recurrence plot by the other to deny the existence of a directional coupling. We apply the proposed method to real wind data.

  9. 9 CFR 108.7 - Filing of plot plans, blueprints, and legends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... legends. 108.7 Section 108.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... REQUIREMENTS FOR LICENSED ESTABLISHMENTS § 108.7 Filing of plot plans, blueprints, and legends. Three copies of all plot plans, blueprints, and legends, including revisions, shall be submitted to Animal and...

  10. 9 CFR 108.2 - Plot plans, blueprints, and legends required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Plot plans, blueprints, and legends... REQUIREMENTS FOR LICENSED ESTABLISHMENTS § 108.2 Plot plans, blueprints, and legends required. Each applicant... area, blueprints for each building used in the preparation of biological products and...

  11. Follow-up Designs to Resolve Confounding in Split-Plot Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almimi, Ashraf A.; Kulahci, Murat; Montgomery, Douglas C.

    2008-01-01

    Split-plot designs are effective in industry due to time and/or cost constraints, restriction on randomization of the treatment combinations of the hard-to-change factors, and different sizes of experimental units. Some of the results of fractional factorial split-plot experiments can be ambiguou...

  12. Including the Tukey Mean-Difference (Bland-Altman) Plot in a Statistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Marcin; Wnuk, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    The Tukey mean-difference plot, also called the Bland-Altman plot, is a recognized graphical tool in the exploration of biometrical data. We show that this technique deserves a place on an introductory statistics course by encouraging students to think about the kind of graph they wish to create, rather than just creating the default graph for the…

  13. An Intuitive Graphical Approach to Understanding the Split-Plot Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Timothy J.; Brenneman, William A.; Myers, William R.

    2009-01-01

    While split-plot designs have received considerable attention in the literature over the past decade, there seems to be a general lack of intuitive understanding of the error structure of these designs and the resulting statistical analysis. Typically, students learn the proper error terms for testing factors of a split-plot design via "expected…

  14. Rainfall–runoff model parameter estimation and uncertainty evaluation on small plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four seasonal rainfall simulations in 2009 and 2010were applied to a field containing 36 plots (0.75 × 2 m each), resulting in 144 runoff events. In all simulations, a constant rate of rainfall was applied then halted 60min after initiation of runoff, with plot-scale monitoring o...

  15. The Effect Direction Plot: Visual Display of Non-Standardised Effects across Multiple Outcome Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Hilary J.; Thomas, Sian

    2013-01-01

    Visual display of reported impacts is a valuable aid to both reviewers and readers of systematic reviews. Forest plots are routinely prepared to report standardised effect sizes, but where standardised effect sizes are not available for all included studies a forest plot may misrepresent the available evidence. Tabulated data summaries to…

  16. Sample Plot Change in the Seventh Review of Continuous National Forest Inventory in Zigui County

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongmei DENG; Jiaxuan XIANG; Jun SONG; Xueyong QIN; Dongwei WANG; Lei ZHOU

    2016-01-01

    The following qualitative conclusions of forest resources in Zigui can be drawn by the research on 73 plots and 5 vegetation plots:forest area is increasing; forest growing stock is increasing; the adjustment of forest category structure is constantly improved; forest quality has been improving; stand structure is optimized continuously; biodiversity has initially appeared.

  17. New Iterative Learning Control Algorithms Based on Vector Plots Analysis1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIESheng-Li; TIANSen-Ping; XIEZhen-Dong

    2004-01-01

    Based on vector plots analysis, this paper researches the geometric frame of iterativelearning control method. New structure of iterative learning algorithms is obtained by analyzingthe vector plots of some general algorithms. The structure of the new algorithm is different fromthose of the present algorithms. It is of faster convergence speed and higher accuracy. Simulationspresented here illustrate the effectiveness and advantage of the new algorithm.

  18. Forest Plots in Excel: Moving beyond a Clump of Trees to a Forest of Visual Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derzon, James H.; Alford, Aaron A.

    2013-01-01

    Forest plots provide an effective means of presenting a wealth of information in a single graphic. Whether used to illustrate multiple results in a single study or the cumulative knowledge of an entire field, forest plots have become an accepted and generally understood way of presenting many estimates simultaneously. This article explores…

  19. Interactive Narrator in Ludic Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nobaew, Banphot; Ryberg, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    For decades, the development of digital interactive storytelling in games has been of interest to many researchers. Some scholars have studied the expert system which dynamically creates plots for players, while other scholars investigate the story structure. However, the latter mostly focuses......, they simultaneously interpret meaning and produce the storyline per se. The result shows that (1) gameplayers create distinctive story plots which are shown by the story graphs in a freedom of Ludic space, (2) each quest has the different of story plot patterns; although, it has likewise a storyline pattern...

  20. Improving plot- and regional-scale crop models for simulating impacts of climate variability and extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, F.; Rötter, R.

    2013-12-01

    Many studies on global climate report that climate variability is increasing with more frequent and intense extreme events1. There are quite large uncertainties from both the plot- and regional-scale models in simulating impacts of climate variability and extremes on crop development, growth and productivity2,3. One key to reducing the uncertainties is better exploitation of experimental data to eliminate crop model deficiencies and develop better algorithms that more adequately capture the impacts of extreme events, such as high temperature and drought, on crop performance4,5. In the present study, in a first step, the inter-annual variability in wheat yield and climate from 1971 to 2012 in Finland was investigated. Using statistical approaches the impacts of climate variability and extremes on wheat growth and productivity were quantified. In a second step, a plot-scale model, WOFOST6, and a regional-scale crop model, MCWLA7, were calibrated and validated, and applied to simulate wheat growth and yield variability from 1971-2012. Next, the estimated impacts of high temperature stress, cold damage, and drought stress on crop growth and productivity based on the statistical approaches, and on crop simulation models WOFOST and MCWLA were compared. Then, the impact mechanisms of climate extremes on crop growth and productivity in the WOFOST model and MCWLA model were identified, and subsequently, the various algorithm and impact functions were fitted against the long-term crop trial data. Finally, the impact mechanisms, algorithms and functions in WOFOST model and MCWLA model were improved to better simulate the impacts of climate variability and extremes, particularly high temperature stress, cold damage and drought stress for location-specific and large area climate impact assessments. Our studies provide a good example of how to improve, in parallel, the plot- and regional-scale models for simulating impacts of climate variability and extremes, as needed for

  1. BCM1F Performance Plots for EPS 2015

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Fast Beam Condition Monitor BCM1F consists of 24 single-crystal CVD 5 mm x 5 mm diamonds positioned 1.8 m on either side of the interaction point at a radius of 6.5 cm from the beam pipe. The signal is read out, shaped by a frontend ASIC, and converted to an optical signal which is then transmitted to the backend electronics in USC55. The data travels parallel paths: a discriminator path registers the time of signal pulses and transfers this information to dedicated fast readout electronics, while an ADC system captures full orbits for monitoring studies but is prevented from acting as data readout by a high deadtime. BCM1F provides information on the condition of the beam and ensures that the inner detector occupancy is sufficiently low for data-taking. In addition to providing beam information, BCM1F also detects collisions and as such can be used as a luminometer.

  2. Perennial vegetation data from permanent plots on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Robert H.; Murov, Marilyn B.; Esque, Todd C.; Boyer, Diane E.; DeFalco, Lesley A.; Haines, Dustin F.; Oldershaw, Dominic; Scoles, Sara J.; Thomas, Kathryn A.; Blainey, Joan B.; Medica, Philip A.

    2003-01-01

    Perennial vegetation data from 68 permanent plots on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, are given for the period of 1963 through 2002. Dr. Janice C. Beatley established the plots in 1962 and then remeasured them periodically from 1963 through 1975. We remeasured 67 of these plots between 2000 and 2003; the remaining plot was destroyed at some time between 1975 and 1993. The plots ranged from 935 to 2,274 m in elevation and are representative of common plant associations of the Mojave Desert, the transition to Great Basin Desert, and pinyon-juniper woodlands. The purpose of this report is to describe the complete set of ecological data that Beatley collected from the Nevada Test Site from 1963 through 1975 and to present the data for perennial vegetation collected from 2000 through 2003.

  3. Master plot analysis of microcracking in graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairn, John A.; Hu, Shoufeng; Bark, Jong Song

    1993-01-01

    We used a variational stress analysis and an energy release rate failure criterion to construct a master plot analysis of matrix microcracking. In the master plot, the results for all laminates of a single material are predicted to fall on a single line whose slope gives the microcracking toughness of the material. Experimental results from 18 different layups of AS4/3501-6 laminates show that the master plot analysis can explain all observations. In particular, it can explain the differences between microcracking of central 90 deg plies and of free-surface 90 deg plies. Experimental results from two different AS4/PEEK laminates tested at different temperatures can be explained by a modified master plot that accounts for changes in the residual thermal stresses. Finally, we constructed similar master plot analyses for previous literature microcracking models. All microcracking theories that ignore the thickness dependence of the stresses gave poor results.

  4. Unbalanced and Minimal Point Equivalent Estimation Second-Order Split-Plot Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Peter A.; Kowalski, Scott M.; Vining, G. Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    Restricting the randomization of hard-to-change factors in industrial experiments is often performed by employing a split-plot design structure. From an economic perspective, these designs minimize the experimental cost by reducing the number of resets of the hard-to- change factors. In this paper, unbalanced designs are considered for cases where the subplots are relatively expensive and the experimental apparatus accommodates an unequal number of runs per whole-plot. We provide construction methods for unbalanced second-order split- plot designs that possess the equivalence estimation optimality property, providing best linear unbiased estimates of the parameters; independent of the variance components. Unbalanced versions of the central composite and Box-Behnken designs are developed. For cases where the subplot cost approaches the whole-plot cost, minimal point designs are proposed and illustrated with a split-plot Notz design.

  5. PETRO.CALC.PLOT, Microsoft Excel macros to aid petrologic interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidder, Gary B.

    1994-07-01

    PETRO.CALC.PLOT is a package of macros which normalizes whole-rock oxide data to 100%, calculates the cation percentages and molecular proportions used for normative mineral calculations, computes the apices for ternary diagrams, determines sums and ratios of specific elements of petrologic interest, and plots 33 X-Y graphs and five ternary diagrams. PETRO.CALC.PLOT also may be used to create other diagrams as desired by the user. The macros run in Microsoft Excel 3.0 and 4.0 for Macintosh computers and in Microsoft Excel 3.0 and 4.0 for Windows. Macros provided in PETRO.CALC.PLOT minimize repetition and time required to recalculate and plot whole-rock oxide data for petrologic analysis.

  6. View_SPECPR: Software for Plotting Spectra (Installation Manual and User's Guide, Version 1.2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.

    2008-01-01

    This document describes procedures for installing and using the 'View_SPECPR' software system to plot spectra stored in SPECPR (SPECtrum Processing Routines) files. The View_SPECPR software is comprised of programs written in IDL (Interactive Data Language) that run within the ENVI (ENvironment for Visualizing Images) image processing system. SPECPR files are used by earth-remote-sensing scientists and planetary scientists for storing spectra collected by laboratory, field, and remote sensing instruments. A widely distributed SPECPR file is the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) spectral library that contains thousands of spectra of minerals, vegetation, and man-made materials (Clark and others, 2007). SPECPR files contain reflectance data and associated wavelength and spectral resolution data, as well as meta-data on the time and date of collection and spectrometer settings. Furthermore, the SPECPR file automatically tracks changes to data records through its 'history' fields. For more details on the format and content of SPECPR files, see Clark (1993). For more details on ENVI, see ITT (2008). This program has been updated using an ENVI 4.5/IDL7.0 full license operating on a Windows XP operating system and requires the installation of the iTools components of IDL7.0; however, this program should work with full licenses on UNIX/LINUX systems. This software has not been tested with ENVI licenses on Windows Vista or Apple Operating Systems.

  7. What Can We Learn in Electrocatalysis, from Nanoparticulated Precious and/or Non-Precious Catalytic Centers Interacting with Their Support?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Mora-Hernández

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This review is devoted to discussing the state of the art in the relevant aspects of the synthesis of novel precious and non-precious electrocatalysts. It covers the production of Pt- and Pd-based electrocatalysts synthesized by the carbonyl chemical route, the synthesis description for the preparation of the most catalytically active transition metal chalcogenides, then the employment of free-surfactants synthesis routes to produce non-precious electrocatalysts. A compilation of the best precious electrocatalysts to perform the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR is described; a section is devoted to the synthesis and electrocatalytic evaluation of non-precious materials which can be used to perform the HOR in alkaline medium. Apropos the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR, the synthesis and modification of the supports is also discussed as well, aiming at describing the state of the art to improve kinetics of low temperature fuel cell reactions via the hybridization process of the catalytic center with a variety of carbon-based, and ceramic-carbon supports. Last, but not least, the review covers the experimental half-cells results in a micro-fuel cell platform obtained in our laboratory, and by other workers, analyzing the history of the first micro-fuel cell systems and their tailoring throughout the time bestowing to the design and operating conditions.

  8. Making large amounts of meteorological plots easily accessible to users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy-Thepaut, Sylvie; Siemen, Stephan; Sahin, Cihan; Raoult, Baudouin

    2015-04-01

    The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) is an international organisation providing its member organisations with forecasts in the medium time range of 3 to 15 days, and some longer-range forecasts for up to a year ahead, with varying degrees of detail. As part of its mission, ECMWF generates an increasing number of forecast data products for its users. To support the work of forecasters and researchers and to let them make best use of ECMWF forecasts, the Centre also provides tools and interfaces to visualise their products. This allows users to make use of and explore forecasts without having to transfer large amounts of raw data. This is especially true for products based on ECMWF's 50 member ensemble forecast, where some specific processing and visualisation are applied to extract information. Every day, thousands of raw data are being pushed to the ECMWF's interactive web charts application called ecCharts, and thousands of products are processed and pushed to ECMWF's institutional web site ecCharts provides a highly interactive application to display and manipulate recent numerical forecasts to forecasters in national weather services and ECMWF's commercial customers. With ecCharts forecasters are able to explore ECMWF's medium-range forecasts in far greater detail than has previously been possible on the web, and this as soon as the forecast becomes available. All ecCharts's products are also available through a machine-to-machine web map service based on the OGC Web Map Service (WMS) standard. ECMWF institutional web site provides access to a large number of graphical products. It was entirely redesigned last year. It now shares the same infrastructure as ECMWF's ecCharts, and can benefit of some ecCharts functionalities, for example the dashboard. The dashboard initially developed for ecCharts allows users to organise their own collection of products depending on their work flow, and is being further developed. In its first

  9. CD9 may contribute to the survival of human germinal center B cells by facilitating the interaction with follicular dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Ok Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The germinal center (GC is a dynamic microenvironment where antigen (Ag-activated B cells rapidly expand and differentiate, generating plasma cells (PC that produce high-affinity antibodies. Precise regulation of survival and proliferation of Ag-activated B cells within the GC is crucial for humoral immune responses. The follicular dendritic cells (FDC are the specialized stromal cells in the GC that prevent apoptosis of GC-B cells. Recently, we reported that human GC-B cells consist of CD9+ and CD9− populations and that it is the CD9+ cells that are committed to the PC lineage. In this study, we investigated the functional role of CD9 on GC-B cells. Tonsillar tissue section staining revealed that in vivo CD9+ GC-B cells localized in the light zone FDC area. Consistent this, in vitro CD9+ GC-B cells survived better than CD9− GC-B cells in the presence of HK cells, an FDC line, in a cell–cell contact-dependent manner. The frozen tonsillar tissue section binding assay showed that CD9+ GC-B cells bound to the GC area of tonsillar tissues significantly more than the CD9− GC-B cells did and that the binding was significantly inhibited by neutralizing anti-integrin β1 antibody. Furthermore, CD9+ cells bound to soluble VCAM-1 more than CD9− cells did, resulting in activation and stabilization of the active epitope of integrin β1. All together, our data suggest that CD9 on GC-B cells contributes to survival by strengthening their binding to FDC through the VLA4/VCAM-1 axis.

  10. GPCRs of adrenal chromaffin cells & catecholamines: The plot thickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperopoulos, Anastasios; Brill, Ava; McCrink, Katie A

    2016-08-01

    The circulating catecholamines (CAs) epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) derive from two major sources in the whole organism: the sympathetic nerve endings, which release NE on effector organs, and the chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla, which are cells that synthesize, store and release Epi (mainly) and NE. All of the Epi in the body and a significant amount of circulating NE derive from the adrenal medulla. The secretion of CAs from adrenal chromaffin cells is regulated in a complex way by a variety of membrane receptors, the vast majority of which are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including adrenergic receptors (ARs), which act as "presynaptic autoreceptors" in this regard. There is a plethora of CA-secretagogue signals acting on these receptors but some of them, most notably the α2ARs, inhibit CA secretion. Over the past few years, however, a few new proteins present in chromaffin cells have been uncovered to participate in CA secretion regulation. Most prominent among these are GRK2 and β-arrestin1, which are known to interact with GPCRs regulating receptor signaling and function. The present review will discuss the molecular and signaling mechanisms by which adrenal chromaffin cell-residing GPCRs and their regulatory proteins modulate CA synthesis and secretion. Particular emphasis will be given to the newly discovered roles of GRK2 and β-arrestins in these processes and particular points of focus for future research will be highlighted, as well.

  11. Visual coherence for large-scale line-plot visualizations

    KAUST Repository

    Muigg, Philipp

    2011-06-01

    Displaying a large number of lines within a limited amount of screen space is a task that is common to many different classes of visualization techniques such as time-series visualizations, parallel coordinates, link-node diagrams, and phase-space diagrams. This paper addresses the challenging problems of cluttering and overdraw inherent to such visualizations. We generate a 2x2 tensor field during line rasterization that encodes the distribution of line orientations through each image pixel. Anisotropic diffusion of a noise texture is then used to generate a dense, coherent visualization of line orientation. In order to represent features of different scales, we employ a multi-resolution representation of the tensor field. The resulting technique can easily be applied to a wide variety of line-based visualizations. We demonstrate this for parallel coordinates, a time-series visualization, and a phase-space diagram. Furthermore, we demonstrate how to integrate a focus+context approach by incorporating a second tensor field. Our approach achieves interactive rendering performance for large data sets containing millions of data items, due to its image-based nature and ease of implementation on GPUs. Simulation results from computational fluid dynamics are used to evaluate the performance and usefulness of the proposed method. © 2011 The Author(s).

  12. The HippoDraw Application and the HippoPlot C++ Toolkit Upon Which it is Built

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, Paul F

    2002-03-27

    HippoDraw is a highly interactive, document centric data visualization application. It was first implemented on NeXTStep where it was highly acclaimed by its limited user base[1]. It is now a crossplatform application with GUI components written in Java and the underlying core using the HippoPlot C++ class library. The HippoDraw application is based on a document paradigm much like a word processor or drawing program. This idea is simple but has been used in a number of unexpected ways. The principle user interface is GUI-based. The interface is easy to use and makes it quicker for the user to display how he wants things. Its highly interactive nature gives its users a better feel for the data being displayed.

  13. Construction of an experimental plot seeder of wheat planting and compare it by imported one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Eskandari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Researchers frequently include multiple cultivars and fertility levels in field experiments. Therefore, the experiments sowing operation must represent a considerable saving in time and labor, compared to hand sowing. Greater flexibility in experimental design and setup could be achieved by equipment that enables quick changes in the cultivar and fertilizer rates from one plot to the next. A satisfactory seed drill must distribute a given quantity of seed evenly over a predetermined length of coulter row, the coulters must be spaced at exact intervals and depth of sowing must be uniform. In a self-propelled type of plot seeder, no coulter should run in a wheel track as the compaction of the soil can cause observable differences in vigor between plants in such a row and those in un-compacted rows. The machine should sow in succession from a try in which a series of seed pocket separated clearly and must be put into distributer funnel by an assistant operator. The length of gap being varied according to the nature and purpose of the plot. The objectives of this experiment were 1- to design and construct a local self-propelled plot seeder and 2- To compare it with the imported (Wintersteiger plot seeder in cereal breeding programs. Materials and Methods A small-plot seeder was designed and constructed to meet this objective. The unit consists of the following basic components: a toolbar for pulling a set of six blade coulter, an air compressor for lifting and putting down the openers and metering transmission drive wheel, an operators chair and work rack, one belt seed distribution. A cone-celled and rotor seed distributor is used for seed distribution to the openers. The cone system is connected to the gearbox and allows for great flexibility in changing cultivars, crop species, and plot length. This is driven by the separate drive wheel. The cone-celled distributor sows all the seed of the sample in making one complete turn. The

  14. [Effects of sampling plot number on tree species distribution prediction under climate change].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu; He, Hong-Shi; Wu, Zhi-Wei; Li, Xiao-Na; Luo, Xu

    2013-05-01

    Based on the neutral landscapes under different degrees of landscape fragmentation, this paper studied the effects of sampling plot number on the prediction of tree species distribution at landscape scale under climate change. The tree species distribution was predicted by the coupled modeling approach which linked an ecosystem process model with a forest landscape model, and three contingent scenarios and one reference scenario of sampling plot numbers were assumed. The differences between the three scenarios and the reference scenario under different degrees of landscape fragmentation were tested. The results indicated that the effects of sampling plot number on the prediction of tree species distribution depended on the tree species life history attributes. For the generalist species, the prediction of their distribution at landscape scale needed more plots. Except for the extreme specialist, landscape fragmentation degree also affected the effects of sampling plot number on the prediction. With the increase of simulation period, the effects of sampling plot number on the prediction of tree species distribution at landscape scale could be changed. For generalist species, more plots are needed for the long-term simulation.

  15. Construction of an experimental plot seeder of wheat planting and compare it by imported one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Eskandari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Researchers frequently include multiple cultivars and fertility levels in field experiments. Therefore, the experiments sowing operation must represent a considerable saving in time and labor, compared to hand sowing. Greater flexibility in experimental design and setup could be achieved by equipment that enables quick changes in the cultivar and fertilizer rates from one plot to the next. A satisfactory seed drill must distribute a given quantity of seed evenly over a predetermined length of coulter row, the coulters must be spaced at exact intervals and depth of sowing must be uniform. In a self-propelled type of plot seeder, no coulter should run in a wheel track as the compaction of the soil can cause observable differences in vigor between plants in such a row and those in un-compacted rows. The machine should sow in succession from a try in which a series of seed pocket separated clearly and must be put into distributer funnel by an assistant operator. The length of gap being varied according to the nature and purpose of the plot. The objectives of this experiment were 1- to design and construct a local self-propelled plot seeder and 2- To compare it with the imported (Wintersteiger plot seeder in cereal breeding programs. Materials and Methods A small-plot seeder was designed and constructed to meet this objective. The unit consists of the following basic components: a toolbar for pulling a set of six blade coulter, an air compressor for lifting and putting down the openers and metering transmission drive wheel, an operators chair and work rack, one belt seed distribution. A cone-celled and rotor seed distributor is used for seed distribution to the openers. The cone system is connected to the gearbox and allows for great flexibility in changing cultivars, crop species, and plot length. This is driven by the separate drive wheel. The cone-celled distributor sows all the seed of the sample in making one complete turn. The

  16. Overland flow connectivity in olive orchard plots with cover crops and conventional tillage, and under different rainfall scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vicente, Manuel; García-Ruiz, Roberto; Guzmán, Gema; Vicente-Vicente, José Luis; Gómez, José Alfonso

    2016-04-01

    The study of overland flow connectivity (QC) allows understanding the redistribution dynamics of runoff and soil components as an emergent property of the spatio-temporal interactions of hydrological and geomorphic processes. However, very few studies have dealt with runoff connectivity in olive orchards. In this study we simulated QC in four olive orchard plots, located on the Santa Marta farm (37° 20' 33.6" N, 6° 13' 44" W), in Seville province (Andalusia) in SW Spain. The olive plantation was established in 1985 with trees planted at 8 m x 6 m. Each bounded plot is 8 m wide (between 2 tree lines) and 60 m long (total area of 480 m2), laid out with the longest dimension parallel to the maximum slope and to the tree lines. The slope is uniform, with an average steepness of 11%. Two plots (P2 and P4) were devoted to conventional tillage (CT) consisting of regular chisel plow passes depending on weed growth. Another set of two plots had two types of cover crops (CC) in the inter tree rows (the area outside the vertical olive canopy projection): uniform CC of Lolium multiflorum (P3) and a mixture of L. rigidum and L. multiflorum together with other species (P5). The tree rows were treated with herbicide to keep bare soil. We selected the Index of runoff and sediment Connectivity (IC) of Borselli et al. (2008) to simulate three rainfall scenarios: i) low rainfall intensity (Sc-LowInt) and using the MD flow accumulation algorithm; ii) moderate rainfall intensity (Sc-ModInt) and using MD8; and iii) high rainfall intensity (Sc-HighInt) and using D8. After analysing the values of rainfall intensity during two hydrological years (Oct'09-Sep'10 and Oct'10-Sep'11) we associated the three scenarios with the followings months: Sc-LowInt during the period Jan-Mar, that summarizes 42% of all annual rainfall events; Sc-ModInt during Oct-Nov and Apr-May (32% of all events); and Sc-HighInt during the period Jun-Sep and in December (26% of all events). Instead of using the C

  17. Dalitz Plot Analysis Of Neutral B-meson Decays To Charged Kaon, Charged Pion, And Neutral Pion Final States

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Z

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes a Dalitz plot analysis of B0 → K+π−π 0 decays. The data sample comprises 213 million &Ugr;(4 S) → BB¯ decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California (SLAGC). Preliminary results are presented for measurements of the inclusive branching fraction, quasi-two-body fractions and CP-violating charge asymmetries for intermediate states including K*(892)+π − and ρ(770)−K +. Observations of B0 decays to the Kπ S-wave intermediate states, K*0 (1430)+π− and K*0 (1430)0π0, are reported. Evidence of the decay B0 → K*(892) 0π0 is seen. We set tipper limits at 90% confidence level on branching fractions of the nonresonant and other less significant intermediate states.

  18. Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Visualization Single Satellite Footprint (SSF) Plot Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsi, Julia A.

    1995-01-01

    The first Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument will be launched in 1997 to collect data on the Earth's radiation budget. The data retrieved from the satellite will be processed through twelve subsystems. The Single Satellite Footprint (SSF) plot generator software was written to assist scientists in the early stages of CERES data analysis, producing two-dimensional plots of the footprint radiation and cloud data generated by one of the subsystems. Until the satellite is launched, however, software developers need verification tools to check their code. This plot generator will aid programmers by geolocating algorithm result on a global map.

  19. Axial thiophenolate coordination on diiron(III)bisporphyrin: influence of heme-heme interactions on structure, function and electrochemical properties of the individual heme center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Debangsu; Tuglak Khan, Firoz Shah; Rath, Sankar Prasad

    2014-11-17

    The binding of a series of substituted thiophenols as axial ligands on a highly flexible ethane-bridged diiron(III)bisporphyrin framework has been investigated as a model of diheme proteins. Spectroscopic characterization reveals a high-spin (S = 5/2) state of iron for all of the pentacoordinate thiophenolato complexes. In the UV-visible spectra of the complexes, the positions of the Soret and band I have been found to be dependent on the pKa of thiophenols. The alternating shift pattern, which has opposite sign of the chemical shifts for meta- vs. ortho- and para-protons in the (1)H NMR spectra, is attributed to negative and positive spin densities, respectively, on thiophenolate carbon atoms and is indicative of π-spin delocalization to the bound thiophenolate ligand. The Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couple of the complexes bears a linear relationship with the pKa of thiophenol and is found to be positively shifted with decreasing pKa. The effect of the electronic nature of the substituent on the thiophenolate ring has also been demonstrated in which a large potential range of 540 mV was observed (in contrast to the value of only 270 mV in case of monoheme analogues) for the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couple on going from monoheme to diheme and is attributed to the interheme interaction. Also, the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox potential of the thiophenolato complexes has been found to be more positively shifted compared to their phenolato analogues, which was further supported by DFT calculation. The addition of another thiophenol at the sixth axial position of the five-coordinate thiophenolato complex causes a change in iron spin from high (S = 5/2) to low (S = 1/2) along with a large positive shift of 490 mV for the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couple.

  20. Centering research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katan, Lina Hauge; Baarts, Charlotte

    and collected 24 portfolios in which students reflect auto-ethnographically on their educational practices. Analyzing this qualitative material, we explore how researchers and students respectively read and write to develop and advance their thinking in those learning processes that the two groups fundamentally...... share as the common aim of both research and education. Despite some similarities, we find that how the two groups engage in and benefit from reading and writing diverges significantly. Thus we have even more reason to believe that centering practice-based teaching on these aspects of research is a good...

  1. Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project - Field Plots, Observation and Accuracy Assessment Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the 2008 vegetation (classification) field plots (spatial database) and 2010 accuracy assessment points (spatial database) created from the...

  2. Field Plot and Observation Points for Timpanogos Cave National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point feature class contains points representing field sample data (13 plots points and 10 observations points, collected June 2007) for the vegetation mapping...

  3. Golden Spike National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project - Field Plot and Observation Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point feature class contains points representing field sample data (3 plots points and 46 observations points, collected June 2007) for the vegetation mapping...

  4. Field Plot and Observation Points for Colorado National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file displays the 525 field plot and observation locations visited in 2003 and 2004 as part of the vegetation mapping project for Colorado National...

  5. Ionospheric Values (Daily Work Sheets), F-Plots, Tabulations, Booklets, Catalogs, and Log Books

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These ionospheric data consist of scaling notes, equipment usage logs, and ionospheric values in the form of daily work sheets, F-Plots, tabulations, and booklets....

  6. Technical note: A significance test for data-sparse zones in scatter plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrova, V. V.; Bardsley, W. E.

    2012-04-01

    Data-sparse zones in scatter plots of hydrological variables can be of interest in various contexts. For example, a well-defined data-sparse zone may indicate inhibition of one variable by another. It is of interest therefore to determine whether data-sparse regions in scatter plots are of sufficient extent to be beyond random chance. We consider the specific situation of data-sparse regions defined by a linear internal boundary within a scatter plot defined over a rectangular region. An Excel VBA macro is provided for carrying out a randomisation-based significance test of the data-sparse region, taking into account both the within-region number of data points and the extent of the region. Example applications are given with respect to a rainfall time series from Israel and also to validation scatter plots from a seasonal forecasting model for lake inflows in New Zealand.

  7. Revisiting the Logan plot to account for non-negligible blood volume in brain tissue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schain, Martin; Fazio, Patrik; Mrzljak, Ladislav; Amini, Nahid; Al-Tawil, Nabil; Fitzer-Attas, Cheryl; Bronzova, Juliana; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Sampaio, Christina; Halldin, Christer; Varrone, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    .... The bias extent depends on the amount of radioactivity in the blood vessels. In this study, we seek to revisit the well-established Logan plot and derive alternative formulations that provide estimation of distribution volume ratios (DVRs...

  8. Field Plot Points for Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This spatial dataset in ESRI Coverage format maps field releve plot locations for the vegetation classification and descriptions of the vegetation map at Sunset...

  9. Field Plot Points for Walnut Canyon National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This spatial dataset in ESRI Coverage format maps field releve plot locations for the vegetation classification and descriptions of the vegetation map at Walnut...

  10. [Effects of spatial heterogeneity on spatial extrapolation of sampling plot data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu; He, Hong-Shi; Hu, Yuan-Man; Bu, Ren-Cang

    2012-01-01

    By using model combination method, this paper simulated the changes of response variable (tree species distribution area at landscape level under climate change) under three scenarios of environmental spatial heterogeneous level, analyzed the differentiation of simulated results under different scenarios, and discussed the effects of environmental spatial heterogeneity on the larger spatial extrapolation of the tree species responses to climate change observed in sampling plots. For most tree species, spatial heterogeneity had little effects on the extrapolation from plot scale to class scale; for the tree species insensitive to climate warming and the azonal species, spatial heterogeneity also had little effects on the extrapolation from plot-scale to zonal scale. By contrast, for the tree species sensitive to climate warming, spatial heterogeneity had effects on the extrapolation from plot scale to zonal scale, and the effects could be varied under different scenarios.

  11. Field Plot Points for Bluestone National Scenic River Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This feature class contains point features which represent locations of vegetation sampling plots in Bluestone National Scenic River. Location coordinates for most...

  12. Field Plot Points for Wind Cave National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Vegetation field plots at Wind Cave NP were visited, described, and documented in a digital database. The database consists of 2 parts - (1) Physical Descriptive...

  13. Field Plot and Accuracy Assessment Points for Shenandoah National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This data set is an ESRI point shapefile. Points represent vegetation and accuracy assessment plots from which field data were collected as part of the Version 2.0...

  14. Field Plot and Accuracy Assessment Points for Ozark National Scenic Riverways Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Accuracy Assessment, Observation and Plot Points. This data set includes points used to collect data for map valdiation of community types in Ozark National Scenic...

  15. Field Plot and Observation Points for Fossil Butte National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file contains 255 point locations of field plot and observation data used by, and collected for, the vegetation mapping project for Fossil Butte National...

  16. Field Plot Points Modified for Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Location of vegetation sampling plots use to collect data for vegetation classification and mapping at Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. In this data set,...

  17. Field Plot Points for George Washington Birthplace National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile shows the location of vegetation sampling plots used for vegetation classification and mapping at George Washington Birthplace National Monument.

  18. Field Plot Points for Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Location of vegetation sampling plots used to collect data for vegetation classification and mapping at Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River.

  19. Field Plot Points for Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile shows the location of vegetation sampling plots used for vegetation classification and mapping at Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park

  20. Field Plot Points for Allegheny Portage Railroad National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Location of vegetation sampling plots used to collect data for vegetation classification and mapping at Allegheny Portage Railroad National Historic Site. In this...