WorldWideScience

Sample records for center ii discovery

  1. Near-infrared counterparts to Chandra X-ray sources toward the Galactic Center. II. Discovery of Wolf-Rayet stars and O supergiants

    CERN Document Server

    Mauerhan, Jon C; Morris, Mark R; Stolovy, Susan R; Cotera, Angela S

    2009-01-01

    We present new identifications of infrared counterparts to the population of hard X-ray sources near the Galactic center detected by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We have confirmed 16 new massive stellar counterparts to the X-ray population, including nitrogen-type (WN) and carbon-type (WC) Wolf-Rayet stars, and O supergiants. For the majority of these sources, the X-ray photometry is consistent with thermal emission from plasma having temperatures in the range of kT=1-8 keV or non-thermal emission having power-law indices in the range of -1

  2. Discovery: Under the Microscope at Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Philip M.

    2013-01-01

    The National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) is known for discovery, exploration, and advancement of knowledge. Since the days of Leeuwenhoek, microscopy has been at the forefront of discovery and knowledge. No truer is that statement than today at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), where microscopy plays a major role in contamination identification and is an integral part of failure analysis. Space exploration involves flight hardware undergoing rigorous "visually clean" inspections at every step of processing. The unknown contaminants that are discovered on these inspections can directly impact the mission by decreasing performance of sensors and scientific detectors on spacecraft and satellites, acting as micrometeorites, damaging critical sealing surfaces, and causing hazards to the crew of manned missions. This talk will discuss how microscopy has played a major role in all aspects of space port operations at KSC. Case studies will highlight years of analysis at the Materials Science Division including facility and payload contamination for the Navigation Signal Timing and Ranging Global Positioning Satellites (NA VST AR GPS) missions, quality control monitoring of monomethyl hydrazine fuel procurement for launch vehicle operations, Shuttle Solids Rocket Booster (SRB) foam processing failure analysis, and Space Shuttle Main Engine Cut-off (ECO) flight sensor anomaly analysis. What I hope to share with my fellow microscopists is some of the excitement of microscopy and how its discoveries has led to hardware processing, that has helped enable the successful launch of vehicles and space flight missions here at Kennedy Space Center.

  3. The University of New Mexico Center for Molecular Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Bruce S; Gouveia, Kristine; Oprea, Tudor I; Sklar, Larry A

    2014-03-01

    The University of New Mexico Center for Molecular Discovery (UNMCMD) is an academic research center that specializes in discovery using high throughput flow cytometry (HTFC) integrated with virtual screening, as well as knowledge mining and drug informatics. With a primary focus on identifying small molecules that can be used as chemical probes and as leads for drug discovery, it is a central core resource for research and translational activities at UNM that supports implementation and management of funded screening projects as well as "up-front" services such as consulting for project design and implementation, assistance in assay development and generation of preliminary data for pilot projects in support of competitive grant applications. The HTFC platform in current use represents advanced, proprietary technology developed at UNM that is now routinely capable of processing bioassays arrayed in 96-, 384- and 1536-well formats at throughputs of 60,000 or more wells per day. Key programs at UNMCMD include screening of research targets submitted by the international community through NIH's Molecular Libraries Program; a multi-year effort involving translational partnerships at UNM directed towards drug repurposing - identifying new uses for clinically approved drugs; and a recently established personalized medicine initiative for advancing cancer therapy by the application of "smart" oncology drugs in selected patients based on response patterns of their cancer cells in vitro. UNMCMD discoveries, innovation, and translation have contributed to a wealth of inventions, patents, licenses and publications, as well as startup companies, clinical trials and a multiplicity of domestic and international collaborative partnerships to further the research enterprise.

  4. Teaching Technology Applied in the Main Stream: The Supermarket Discovery Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filep, Robert T.; Gillette, Pearl

    1969-01-01

    Describes the approach and results of the Supermarket Discovery Center Demonstration Project, a program attempting to provide pre-school children with meaningful learning experiences while their parents are shopping. (LS)

  5. The center for causal discovery of biomedical knowledge from big data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Gregory F; Bahar, Ivet; Becich, Michael J; Benos, Panayiotis V; Berg, Jeremy; Espino, Jeremy U; Glymour, Clark; Jacobson, Rebecca Crowley; Kienholz, Michelle; Lee, Adrian V; Lu, Xinghua; Scheines, Richard

    2015-11-01

    The Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Center for Causal Discovery is developing and disseminating an integrated set of open source tools that support causal modeling and discovery of biomedical knowledge from large and complex biomedical datasets. The Center integrates teams of biomedical and data scientists focused on the refinement of existing and the development of new constraint-based and Bayesian algorithms based on causal Bayesian networks, the optimization of software for efficient operation in a supercomputing environment, and the testing of algorithms and software developed using real data from 3 representative driving biomedical projects: cancer driver mutations, lung disease, and the functional connectome of the human brain. Associated training activities provide both biomedical and data scientists with the knowledge and skills needed to apply and extend these tools. Collaborative activities with the BD2K Consortium further advance causal discovery tools and integrate tools and resources developed by other centers.

  6. Observation of Coherence in the Photosystem II Reaction Center

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Franklin D; Senlik, S Seckin; Wilcox, Daniel E; Ogilvie, Jennifer P

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthesis powers life on our planet. The basic photosynthetic architecture comprises antenna complexes to harvest solar energy and reaction centers to convert the energy into a stable charge separated state. In oxygenic photosynthesis, the initial charge separation event occurs in the photosystem II reaction center; the only known natural enzyme that uses solar energy to split water. Energy transfer and charge separation in photosynthesis are rapid and have high quantum efficiencies. Recently, nonlinear spectroscopic experiments have suggested that electronic coherence may play a role in energy transfer efficiency in antenna complexes. Here we report the observation of coherence in the photosystem II reaction center by two dimensional electronic spectroscopy. The frequencies of the observed coherences match exciton difference frequencies and/or known vibrational modes of the photosystem II reaction center. These observations raise questions about the possible role of electronic and/or vibrational coheren...

  7. Vertical, horizontal, and temporal changes in temperature in the Atlantis II and Discovery hot brine pools, Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Stephen; Bower, Amy; Schmitt, Raymond

    2013-04-01

    In October 2008, we measured temperature and salinity in hot (68°C), hypersaline (250 psu) brine filling the Atlantis II and Discovery Deeps on the Red Sea spreading center near 21°N. In agreement with previous observations in the Atlantis II Deep, we found a stack of four convective layers (in which temperature is vertically uniform) separated by thin interfaces with high vertical temperature gradients. Compared with the last observations in 1997, temperature in the thickest, deepest convective layer in the Atlantis II Deep continued to slowly increase at 0.1°C/yr. Based on earlier data extending back to the 1960s, we found that the temperature of all four convective layers increased at the same rate, from which we infer that diffusive vertical heat flux between convective layers is rapid on time scales of 3-5 yr and, thus, heat is lost from the brine pools to overlying Red Sea Deep Water. Heat budgets suggest that the heat flux from hydrothermal venting decreased from 0.54 GW in 1966 to 0.18 GW in 2008. A towed CTD survey found that temperature in the upper convective layers changes about 0.2°C over 5-6 km, whereas the temperature in the lower brine layer remains constant. Compared to previous surveys, temperature in the lower convective layer in the Discovery Deep remains unchanged at 48°C. To explain these results, we hypothesize that heat flux from a hydrothermal vent in the floor of the Discovery Deep has been stable for 40 years, whereas temperature of the brine in the Atlantis II Deep is adjusting to a decrease in hydrothermal heat flux from the vent in the Southwest Basin. We found no changes in the upper transition layer at 1900-1990 m depth that appeared between 1976 and 1992. Our data are consistent with this layer originating from a seafloor vent elsewhere in the rift.

  8. Vertical, horizontal, and temporal changes in temperature in the Atlantis II and Discovery hot brine pools, Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Swift, Stephen A.

    2012-06-01

    In October 2008, we measured temperature and salinity in hot, hypersaline brine filling the Atlantis II and Discovery Deeps on the Red Sea spreading center west of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. In agreement with previous observations in the Atlantis II Deep, we found a stack of four convective layers with vertically uniform temperature profiles separated by thin interfaces with high vertical temperature gradients. Temperature in the thick lower convective layer in the Atlantis II Deep continued to slowly increase at 0.1 °C/year since the last observations in 1997. Previously published data show that the temperature of all four convective layers increased since the 1960s at the same rate, from which we infer that diffusive vertical heat flux between convective layers is rapid on time scales of 3-5 years and, thus, heat is lost from the brine pools to overlying Red Sea Deep Water. Heat budgets suggest that the heat flux from hydrothermal venting has decreased from 0.54. GW to 0.18. GW since 1966. A tow-yo survey found that temperature in the upper convective layers changes about 0.2 °C over 5-6. km but the temperature in the lower brine layer remains constant. Temperature in the lower convective layer in the Discovery Deep remains unchanged at 48 °C. To explain these results, we hypothesize that heat flux from a hydrothermal vent in the floor of the Discovery Deep has been stable for 40 years, whereas temperature of the brine in the Atlantis II Deep is adjusting to the change in hydrothermal heat flux from the vent in the Southwest Basin. We found no changes in the upper transition layer at 1900-1990. m depth that appeared between 1976 and 1992 and suggest that this layer originated from the seafloor elsewhere in the rift. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Discovery and Observations of the Unusually Bright Type-Defying II-P/II-L Supernova ASASSN-13co

    CERN Document Server

    Holoien, T W -S; Pejcha, O; Stanek, K Z; Kochanek, C S; Shappee, B J; Grupe, D; Morrell, N; Thorstensen, J R; Basu, U; Beacom, J F; Bersier, D; Brimacombe, J; Davis, A B; Pojmanski, G; Szczygiel, D M

    2014-01-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of ASASSN-13co, an unusually luminous Type II supernova and the first core-collapse supernova discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN). First detection of the supernova was on UT 2013 August 29 and the data presented span roughly 3.5 months after discovery. We use the recently developed model from Pejcha & Prieto (2014) to model the multi-band light curves of ASASSN-13co and derive the bolometric luminosity curve. We compare ASASSN-13co to other Type II supernovae to show that it was a unique event that was not only unusually bright for a Type II supernova but also exhibited an atypical light curve shape that does not cleanly match that of either a standard Type II-L or Type II-P supernova.

  10. Discovery of [FeII]- and H2-emission from protostellar jets in the CB3 and CB230 globules

    CERN Document Server

    Massi, F; Brand, J

    2004-01-01

    Four Bok globules were studied in the Near-Infrared, through narrow-band filters, centered at the 1.644 micron line of [FeII], the H2-line at 2.122 micron, and the adjacent continuum. We report the discovery of [FeII] and H2 protostellar jets and knots in the globules CB3 and CB230. The [FeII]-jet in CB230 is defined by a continuous elongated emission feature, superimposed on which two knots are seen; the brighter one lies at the tip of the jet. The jet is oriented in the same direction as the large-scale CO outflow, and emerges from the nebulosity in which a Young Stellar Object is embedded. The H2 emission associated with this jet is fainter and wider than the [FeII] emission, and is likely coming from the walls of the jet-channel. In CB3 four H2 emission knots are found, all towards the blue-shifted lobe of the large-scale outflow. There is a good correspondence between the location of the knots and the blue-shifted SiO(5-4) emission, confirming that SiO emission is tracing the jet-like flow rather well. N...

  11. Thiolate coordination to Fe(II)-porphyrin NO centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praneeth, V K K; Haupt, Erhard; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2005-04-01

    The interaction of the Fe(II)-porphyrin NO model complex [Fe(TPP)(NO)] (1, TPP=tetraphenylporphyrin) with thiophenolate ligands and tetrahydrothiophene is explored both computationally and experimentally. Complex 1 is reacted with substituted thiophenolates and the obtained six-coordinate adducts of type [Fe(TPP)(SR)(NO)](-) are investigated in solution using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. From the obtained g values and (14)N hyperfine pattern of the NO ligand it is concluded that the interaction of the thiophenolates with the Fe(II) center is weak in comparison to the corresponding 1-methylimidazole adduct. The strength of the Fe-S bond is increased when alkylthiolates are used as evidenced by comparison with the published EPR spectra of ferrous NO adducts in cytochromes P450 and P450nor, which have an axial cysteinate ligand. These results are further evaluated by density functional (DFT) calculations. The six-coordinate model complex [Fe(P)(SMe)(NO)](-) (1-SMe; P=porphine ligand used for the calculations) has an interesting electronic structure where NO acts as a medium strong sigma donor and pi acceptor ligand. Compared to the N-donor adducts with 1-methylimidazole (1-MeIm), etc., donation from the pi(h)( *) orbital of NO to Fe(II) is reduced due to the stronger trans effect of the alkylthiolate ligand. This is reflected by the predicted longer Fe-NO bond length and smaller Fe-NO force constant for 1-SMe compared to the 1-MeIm adduct. Therefore, the Fe(II)-porphyrin NO adducts with trans alkylthiolate coordination have to be described as Fe(II)-NO(radical) systems. The N-O stretching frequency of these complexes is predicted below 1600cm(-1) in agreement with the available experimental data. In addition, 1-SMe has a unique spin density distribution where Fe has a negative spin density of -0.26 from the calculations. The implications of this unusual electronic structure for the reactivity of the Fe(II)-NO alkylthiolate adducts as they occur

  12. The CUAHSI Water Data Center: Enabling Data Publication, Discovery and Re-use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seul, M.; Pollak, J.

    2014-12-01

    The CUAHSI Water Data Center (WDC) supports a standards-based, services-oriented architecture for time-series data and provides a separate service to publish spatial data layers as shape files. Two new services that the WDC offers are a cloud-based server (Cloud HydroServer) for publishing data and a web-based client for data discovery. The Cloud HydroServer greatly simplifies data publication by eliminating the need for scientists to set up an SQL-server data base, a requirement that has proven to be a significant barrier, and ensures greater reliability and continuity of service. Uploaders have been developed to simplify the metadata documentation process. The web-based data client eliminates the need for installing a program to be used as a client and works across all computer operating systems. The services provided by the WDC is a foundation for big data use, re-use, and meta-analyses. Using data transmission standards enables far more effective data sharing and discovery; standards used by the WDC are part of a global set of standards that should enable scientists to access unprecedented amount of data to address larger-scale research questions than was previously possible. A central mission of the WDC is to ensure these services meet the needs of the water science community and are effective at advancing water science.

  13. Improved Discovery and Re-Use of Oceanographic Data through a Data Management Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, S.; Allison, M. D.; Groman, R. C.; Chandler, C. L.; Galvarino, C.; Gegg, S. R.; Kinkade, D.; Shepherd, A.; Wiebe, P. H.; Glover, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Effective use and reuse of ecological data are not only contingent upon those data being well-organized and documented, but also upon data being easily discoverable and accessible by others. As funding agency and publisher policies begin placing more emphasis on, or even requiring, sharing of data, some researchers may feel overwhelmed in determining how best to manage and share their data. Other researchers may be frustrated by the inability to easily find data of interest, or they may be hesitant to use datasets that are poorly organized and lack complete documentation. In all of these scenarios, the data management and sharing process can be facilitated by data management centers, as demonstrated by the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). BCO-DMO was created in 2006 to work with investigators to manage data from research funded by the Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE) Biological and Chemical Oceanography Sections and the Division of Polar Programs (PLR) Antarctic Organisms and Ecosystems Program of the US National Science Foundation (NSF). BCO-DMO plays a role throughout the data lifecycle, from the early stages of offering support to researchers in developing data management plans to the final stages of depositing data in a permanent archive. An overarching BCO-DMO goal is to provide open access to data through a system that enhances data discovery and reuse. Features have been developed that allow users to find data of interest, assess fitness for purpose, and download the data for reuse. Features that enable discovery include both text-based and geospatial-based search interfaces, as well as a semantically-enabled faceted search [1]. BCO-DMO data managers work closely with the contributing investigators to develop robust metadata, an essential component to enable data reuse. The metadata, which describe data acquisition and processing methods, instrumentation, and parameters, are enhanced by the mapping of local vocabulary

  14. Discovery boxes for active spending of free time in the center for children and youth with special needs

    OpenAIRE

    Brbre, Irena

    2012-01-01

    Children and young people with minor mental health disorder who stay in the centers for children and youth with special needs, spend their free time in different ways. They have the option to take part in various extra-curricular activities depending on their interests, wishes, needs and abilities. I believe that one of such active spending of free time is also work with discovery boxes where children and young people can develop natural-historical procedures with their own experiences and ob...

  15. Energy Efficiency, Water Efficiency, and Renewable Energy Site Assessment: Seneca Rocks Discovery Center, Seneca Rocks, West Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiatreungwattana, Kosol [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Salasovich, James [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kandt, Alicen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-22

    As part of ongoing efforts by the U.S. Forest Service to reduce energy use and incorporate renewable energy technologies into its facilities, the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory performed an energy efficiency and renewable energy site assessment of the Seneca Rocks Discovery Center in Seneca Rocks, West Virginia. This report documents the findings of this assessment, and provides site-specific information for the implementation of energy and water conservation measures, and renewable energy measures.

  16. Discovery of Quantum structure and A Theory of Everything Part I and Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meggie

    2012-10-01

    (Part I) During my research I discovered logical errors in the logic of science and in mathematics. These errors caused scientists missed out important information when interpreting data. This led me to revisit the method of science and the existing results and able to find new information, which lead to the discovery of photon's structure. A ``particle collision illumination'' experiment then provided direct evidence supported the structure. Analysis of the properties of the structure suggested an organized but not-continuous multi-dimension (n-D) space within. Therefore I formed a hypothesis of a not-continuous n-D space structure. In search for evidence, I turned into crystal technology, and found direct evidence supported the hypotesis, then further particle collision found more evidence support this finding. (Part II) Analysis of single electron buildup revealed star and galaxy formation is from a single particle following a predictable pattern. This pattern is also common in matter formation. Analysis of the quantum structure suggested the formation of a larger structure through the space expansion within the structure. Further experiment results support the finding and result revealed the expansion is through space folding. Result also suggested a violation of energy conservation law that energy is created during the formation of matter, and matter itself is moving from a lower energy state to a higher energy state. When putting all information together, I arrived to a theory of everything which gives explanations to all existing phenomenon in the universe including black hole, dark energy, star formation, consciousness.

  17. Interview to Neil Gehrels, NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center, astrophysicist, on the occasion of the Spaceparts conference at CERN, on the 100th anniversary of the cosmic rays discovery.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Visual Media Office

    2012-01-01

    Interview to Neil Gehrels, NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center, astrophysicist, on the occasion of the Spaceparts conference at CERN, on the 100th anniversary of the cosmic rays discovery. He describes current research from space on dark matter and dark energy.

  18. Oral health in Brazil - Part II: Dental Specialty Centers (CEOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Pedrazzi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The concepts of health promotion, self-care and community participation emerged during the 1970s and, since then, their application has grown rapidly in the developed world, showing evidence of effectiveness. In spite of this, a major part of the population in the developing countries still has no access to specialized dental care such as endodontic treatment, dental care for patients with special needs, minor oral surgery, periodontal treatment and oral diagnosis. This review focuses on a program of the Brazilian Federal Government named CEOs (Dental Specialty Centers, which is an attempt to solve the dental care deficit of a population that is suffering from oral diseases and whose oral health care needs have not been addressed by the regular programs offered by the SUS (Unified National Health System. Literature published from 2000 to the present day, using electronic searches by Medline, Scielo, Google and hand-searching was considered. The descriptors used were Brazil, Oral health, Health policy, Health programs, and Dental Specialty Centers. There are currently 640 CEOs in Brazil, distributed in 545 municipal districts, carrying out dental procedures with major complexity. Based on this data, it was possible to conclude that public actions on oral health must involve both preventive and curative procedures aiming to minimize the oral health distortions still prevailing in developing countries like Brazil.

  19. Unique prokaryotic consortia in geochemically distinct sediments from Red Sea Atlantis II and discovery deep brine pools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania Siam

    Full Text Available The seafloor is a unique environment, which allows insights into how geochemical processes affect the diversity of biological life. Among its diverse ecosystems are deep-sea brine pools - water bodies characterized by a unique combination of extreme conditions. The 'polyextremophiles' that constitute the microbial assemblage of these deep hot brines have not been comprehensively studied. We report a comparative taxonomic analysis of the prokaryotic communities of the sediments directly below the Red Sea brine pools, namely, Atlantis II, Discovery, Chain Deep, and an adjacent brine-influenced site. Analyses of sediment samples and high-throughput pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified environmental 16S ribosomal RNA genes (16S rDNA revealed that one sulfur (S-rich Atlantis II and one nitrogen (N-rich Discovery Deep section contained distinct microbial populations that differed from those found in the other sediment samples examined. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Deferribacteres, and Euryarchaeota were the most abundant bacterial and archaeal phyla in both the S- and N-rich sections. Relative abundance-based hierarchical clustering of the 16S rDNA pyrotags assigned to major taxonomic groups allowed us to categorize the archaeal and bacterial communities into three major and distinct groups; group I was unique to the S-rich Atlantis II section (ATII-1, group II was characteristic for the N-rich Discovery sample (DD-1, and group III reflected the composition of the remaining sediments. Many of the groups detected in the S-rich Atlantis II section are likely to play a dominant role in the cycling of methane and sulfur due to their phylogenetic affiliations with bacteria and archaea involved in anaerobic methane oxidation and sulfate reduction.

  20. Unique prokaryotic consortia in geochemically distinct sediments from Red Sea Atlantis II and discovery deep brine pools.

    KAUST Repository

    Siam, Rania

    2012-08-20

    The seafloor is a unique environment, which allows insights into how geochemical processes affect the diversity of biological life. Among its diverse ecosystems are deep-sea brine pools - water bodies characterized by a unique combination of extreme conditions. The \\'polyextremophiles\\' that constitute the microbial assemblage of these deep hot brines have not been comprehensively studied. We report a comparative taxonomic analysis of the prokaryotic communities of the sediments directly below the Red Sea brine pools, namely, Atlantis II, Discovery, Chain Deep, and an adjacent brine-influenced site. Analyses of sediment samples and high-throughput pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified environmental 16S ribosomal RNA genes (16S rDNA) revealed that one sulfur (S)-rich Atlantis II and one nitrogen (N)-rich Discovery Deep section contained distinct microbial populations that differed from those found in the other sediment samples examined. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Deferribacteres, and Euryarchaeota were the most abundant bacterial and archaeal phyla in both the S- and N-rich sections. Relative abundance-based hierarchical clustering of the 16S rDNA pyrotags assigned to major taxonomic groups allowed us to categorize the archaeal and bacterial communities into three major and distinct groups; group I was unique to the S-rich Atlantis II section (ATII-1), group II was characteristic for the N-rich Discovery sample (DD-1), and group III reflected the composition of the remaining sediments. Many of the groups detected in the S-rich Atlantis II section are likely to play a dominant role in the cycling of methane and sulfur due to their phylogenetic affiliations with bacteria and archaea involved in anaerobic methane oxidation and sulfate reduction.

  1. Discovery of the recombining plasma in the south of the Galactic center; a relic of the past Galactic center activity?

    CERN Document Server

    Nakashima, S; Uchida, H; Tanaka, T; Tsuru, T G; Koyama, K; Murakami, H; Uchiyama, H

    2013-01-01

    We report Suzaku results for soft X-ray emission to the south of the Galactic center (GC). The emission (hereafter "GC South") has an angular size of ~42' x 16' centered at (l, b) ~ (0.0, -1.4), and is located in the largely extended Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). The X-ray spectrum of GC South exhibits emission lines from highly ionized atoms. Although the X-ray spectrum of the GRXE can be well fitted with a plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE), that of GC South cannot be fitted with a plasma in CIE, leaving hump-like residuals at ~2.5 and 3.5 keV, which are attributable to the radiative recombination continua of the K-shells of Si and S, respectively. In fact, GC South spectrum is well fitted with a recombination-dominant plasma model; the electron temperature is 0.46 keV while atoms are highly ionized (kT = 1.6 keV) in the initial epoch, and the plasma is now in a recombining phase at a relaxation scale (plasma density x elapsed time) of 5.3 x 10^11 s cm^-3. The absorption column densi...

  2. Helping Students Understand Gene Regulation with Online Tools: A Review of MEME and Melina II, Motif Discovery Tools for Active Learning in Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Treves

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Review of: MEME and Melina II, which are two free and easy-to-use online motif discovery tools that can be employed to actively engage students in learning about gene regulatory elements.

  3. Carbon antisite clusters in SiC: a possible pathway to the D_{II} center

    OpenAIRE

    Mattausch, Alexander; Bockstedte, Michel; Pankratov, Oleg

    2003-01-01

    The photoluminescence center D_{II} is a persistent intrinsic defect which is common in all SiC polytypes. Its fingerprints are the characteristic phonon replicas in luminescence spectra. We perform ab-initio calculations of vibrational spectra for various defect complexes and find that carbon antisite clusters exhibit vibrational modes in the frequency range of the D_{II} spectrum. The clusters possess very high binding energies which guarantee their thermal stability--a known feature of the...

  4. Synthetic Model of the Oxygen-Evolving Center: Photosystem II under the Spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Hu, Cheng; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Jiangyun

    2015-09-21

    The oxygen-evolving center (OEC) in photosystem II catalyzes a water splitting reaction. Great efforts have already been made to artificially synthesize the OEC, in order to elucidate the structure-function relationship and the mechanism of the reaction. Now, a new synthetic model makes the best mimic yet of the OEC. This recent study opens up the possibility to study the mechanism of photosystem II and photosynthesis in general for applications in renewable energy and synthetic biology.

  5. Discovery of a Slow X-Ray Pulsator, AX J1740.1-2847, in the Galactic Center Region

    CERN Document Server

    Sakano, M; Koyama, K; Maeda, Y; Yamauchi, S; Sakano, Masaaki; Torii, Ken'ichi; Koyama, Katsuji; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Yamauchi, Shigeo

    2000-01-01

    We report the discovery of an X-ray pulsar AX J1740.1-2847 from the Galactic center region. This source was found as a faint hard X-ray object on 7--8 September 1998 with the ASCA Galactic center survey observation. Then, coherent pulsations of P=729 +/- 14 sec period were detected. The X-ray spectrum is described by a flat power-law of ~= 0.7 photon index. The large absorption column of log NH ~= 22.4 (cm^-2) indicates that AX J1740.1-2847 is a distant source, larger than 2.4 kpc, and possibly near at the Galactic center region. The luminosity in the 2--10 keV band is larger than 2.5 x 10^33 erg/s, or likely to be 3.2 x 10^34 erg/s at the Galactic center distance. Although the slow pulse period does not discriminate whether AX J1740.1-2847 is a white dwarf or neutron star binary, the flat power-law and moderate luminosity strongly favor a neutron star binary.

  6. Design and Discovery in Educational Assessment: Evidence-Centered Design, Psychometrics, and Educational Data Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mislevy, Robert J.; Behrens, John T.; Dicerbo, Kristen E.; Levy, Roy

    2012-01-01

    "Evidence-centered design" (ECD) is a comprehensive framework for describing the conceptual, computational and inferential elements of educational assessment. It emphasizes the importance of articulating inferences one wants to make and the evidence needed to support those inferences. At first blush, ECD and "educational data…

  7. Continuum probe two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of the photosystem II reaction center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogilvie J. P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We report two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of the photosystem II reaction center, collected in the pump-probe geometry employing a continuum probe. This enables observation of ion bands that report on intermediates in the charge separation process.

  8. Overview of Data Discovery and Access at the Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinsland, P. L.; Little, M. M.; Kusterer, J.; Tisdale, M.; Johnson, C. J.; Quam, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC), in its role as an Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) has made substantial improvements to the ways in which data is delivered. The architecture and services have been developed in response to both emerging customer needs to support multiple paths for access and associated technologies. Consideration of user interfaces and automated machine to machine methods will be described. This presentation provides an overview of the approach and how the various elements of data, metadata, and documentation are provided to the access methods at the ASDC. These include recently refreshed conventional ordering tools, Esri and Open-source GIS products, and piloting efforts to optimize Open-source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol (OPeNDAP), Hadoop, and Integrated Rule Oriented Data Systems (iRODS).

  9. Inhibition of Shikimate Kinase and Type II Dehydroquinase for Antibiotic Discovery: Structure-Based Design and Simulation Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Bello, Concepcion

    2016-01-01

    The loss of effectiveness of current antibiotics caused by the development of drug resistance has become a severe threat to public health. Current widely used antibiotics are surprisingly targeted at a few bacterial functions - cell wall, DNA, RNA, and protein biosynthesis - and resistance to them is widespread and well identified. There is therefore great interest in the discovery of novel drugs and therapies to tackle antimicrobial resistance, in particular drugs that target other essential processes for bacterial survival. In the past few years a great deal of effort has been focused on the discovery of new inhibitors of the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids, also known as the shikimic acid pathway, in which chorismic acid is synthesized. The latter compound is the synthetic precursor of L-Phe, L-Tyr, L-Phe, and other important aromatic metabolites. These enzymes are recognized as attractive targets for the development of new antibacterial agents because they are essential in important pathogenic bacteria, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Helicobacter pylori, but do not have any counterpart in human cells. This review is focused on two key enzymes of this pathway, shikimate kinase and type II dehydroquinase. An overview of the use of structure-based design and computational studies for the discovery of selective inhibitors of these enzymes will be provided. A detailed view of the structural changes caused by these inhibitors in the catalytic arrangement of these enzymes, which are responsible for the inhibition of their activity, is described. PMID:26303426

  10. PTF discovery of PTF10abyy, a young Type II Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, A.; Yaron, O.; Ben-Ami, S.; Sternberg, A.; Green, Y.; Xu, D.; Arcavi, I.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Quimby, R. M.; Ofek, E. O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, H. Ebeling P.; Howell, D. A.; Sullivan, M.; Bloom, J. S.; Law, N. M.

    2010-12-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/) reports the discovery of a new supernova, PTF10abyy. The supernova was discovered by Oarical, an autonomous software framework of the PTF collaboration, on December 8 UT at RA(J2000) = 05:16:40.52 and DEC(J2000) = +06:47:53.8 at a magnitude of 18.7 in R-band (calibrated with respect to the USNOB1 catalog). The supernova was not detected down to mag 21 in previous PTF images taken during Dec.

  11. ECMWF MACC-II evaluation of performances with MPLNET Lidar network at NASA Goddard Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolli, Simone; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Benedetti, Angela; Lewis, Jasper

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol vertical distribution is a critical parameter for most of the common aerosol forecast models. In this study are evaluated the performances of the MACC-II ECMWF aerosol model in forecasting aerosol extinction profiles and planetary boundary layer height versus the new V3 measured MPLNET Lidar extinction retrievals taken as reference at continuous operational site Goddard Space Flight Center, MD, USA. The model is evaluated at different assimilation stages: no assimilation, MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) assimilation and MODIS AOD plus lidar CALIPSO assimilation. The sensitivity study of the model is also investigated respect to the assimilation process..Assessing the model performances it is the first step for future near-real time lidar data assimilation into MACC-II aerosol model forecast.

  12. Discovery of periodic class II methanol masers associated with G339.986-0.425 region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maswanganye, J. P.; van der Walt, D. J.; Goedhart, S.; Gaylard, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    10 new class II methanol masers from the 6.7-GHz Methanol Multibeam survey catalogues III and IV were selected for a monitoring programme at both 6.7 and 12.2 GHz with the 26-m Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory radio telescope for 2 yr and 9 months, from 2012 August to 2015 May. In the sample, only masers associated with G339.986-0.425 were found to show periodic variability at both 6.7 and 12.2 GHz. The existence of periodic variation was tested with four independent methods. The analytical method gave the best estimation of the period, which was 246 ± 1 d. The time series of G339.986-0.425 show strong correlations across velocity channels and between the 6.7- and 12.2-GHz masers. The time delay was also measured across channels and shows structure across the spectrum which is continuous between different maser components.

  13. ALFALFA DISCOVERY OF THE NEARBY GAS-RICH DWARF GALAXY LEO P. II. OPTICAL IMAGING OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J.; Haurberg, Nathalie C.; Van Sistine, Angela; Young, Michael D. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Adams, Elizabeth A. K. [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cannon, John M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Skillman, Evan D.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W., E-mail: rhode@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: riccardo@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: betsey@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    We present results from ground-based optical imaging of a low-mass dwarf galaxy discovered by the ALFALFA 21 cm H I survey. Broadband (BVR) data obtained with the WIYN 3.5 m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) are used to construct color-magnitude diagrams of the galaxy's stellar population down to V{sub o} {approx} 25. We also use narrowband H{alpha} imaging from the KPNO 2.1 m telescope to identify a H II region in the galaxy. We use these data to constrain the distance to the galaxy to be between 1.5 and 2.0 Mpc. This places Leo P within the Local Volume but beyond the Local Group. Its properties are extreme: it is the lowest-mass system known that contains significant amounts of gas and is currently forming stars.

  14. Famed Bulgarian physicists. I. St. Petroff's Goettingen research of the photostimulated interconversions of color centers in alkali halides: the discovery of the photostimulated aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Georgiev, Mladen

    2008-01-01

    This essay tells briefly of the life and work of one of the most successful scientists originating from a Balkan settlement whose name and popularity have greatly exceeded its realm. The word is of a discovery during WWII of the photostimulated aggregation of the F centers (else alkali atoms) dissolved from the vapor into an alkali halide crystal. Using optical absorption techniques while a grantee of Humboldt's Foundation in Goettingen, Germany between 1943-1944, he found new absorption band...

  15. Discovery of periodic class II methanol masers associated with G339.986-0.425 region

    CERN Document Server

    Maswanganye, J P; Goedhart, S; Gaylard, M J

    2015-01-01

    Ten new class II methanol masers from the 6.7-GHz Methanol Multibeam survey catalogues III and IV were selected for a monitoring programme at both 6.7 and 12.2 GHz with the 26m Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO) radio telescope for two years and nine months, from August 2012 to May 2015. In the sample, only masers associated with G339.986-0.425 were found to show periodic variability at both 6.7 and 12.2 GHz. The existence of periodic variation was tested with four independent methods. The analytical method gave the best estimation of the period, which was 246 $\\pm$ 1 days. The time series of G339.986-0.425 show strong correlations across velocity channels and between the 6.7 and 12.2 GHz masers. The time delay was also measured across channels and shows structure across the spectrum which is continuous between different maser components.

  16. Famed Bulgarian physicists. I. St. Petroff's Goettingen research of the photostimulated interconversions of color centers in alkali halides: the discovery of the photostimulated aggregation

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiev, Mladen

    2008-01-01

    This essay tells briefly of the life and work of one of the most successful scientists originating from a Balkan settlement whose name and popularity have greatly exceeded its realm. The word is of a discovery during WWII of the photostimulated aggregation of the F centers (else alkali atoms) dissolved from the vapor into an alkali halide crystal. Using optical absorption techniques while a grantee of Humboldt's Foundation in Goettingen, Germany between 1943-1944, he found new absorption bands pertaining to small-size F center aggregates and followed their interconversions. A primary photochemical solid state reaction was evidenced for the first time leading to nanoscale products.

  17. Discovery of molecular shells associated with supernova remnants. (II) Kesteven 75

    CERN Document Server

    Su, Yang; Yang, Ji; Koo, Bon-Chul; Zhou, Xin; Jeong, Il-Gyo; Zhang, Chun-Guang

    2008-01-01

    The young composite supernova remnant (SNR) Kesteven 75, with a pulsar wind nebula at its center, has an unusual morphology with a bright southern half-shell structure in multiwavelengths. The distance to Kes 75 has long been uncertain. Aiming to address these issues, we have made millimeter spectroscopic observations of the molecular gas toward the remnant. The V_{LSR}~83--96 km/s molecular clouds (MCs) are found to overlap a large north-western region of the remnant and are suggested to be located in front of the SNR along the line of sight. Also in the remnant area, the V_{LSR}= 45--58 km/s MC shows a blue-shifted broadening in the 12CO (J=1-0) line profile and a perturbed position-velocity structure near the edge of the remnant, with the intensity centroid sitting in the northern area of the remnant. In particular, a cavity surrounded by a molecular shell is unveiled in the intensity map in the broadened blue wing (45--51 km/s), and the southern molecular shell follows the bright partial SNR shell seen in...

  18. IPHAS and the symbiotic stars . II. New discoveries and a sample of the most common mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradi, R. L. M.; Valentini, M.; Munari, U.; Drew, J. E.; Rodríguez-Flores, E. R.; Viironen, K.; Greimel, R.; Santander-García, M.; Sabin, L.; Mampaso, A.; Parker, Q.; DePew, K.; Sale, S. E.; Unruh, Y. C.; Vink, J. S.; Rodríguez-Gil, P.; Barlow, M. J.; Lennon, D. J.; Groot, P. J.; Giammanco, C.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Walton, N. A.

    2010-01-01

    WHT telescopes of the Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias; the 2.3 m ANU telescope at Siding Spring Observatory, Australia; the Asiago 1.82 m telescope of the INAF Astronomical Observatory of Padova, Italy; and the 2.1 m telescope at San Pedro Martir, Mexico. Some of the INT spectra incorporated into this paper were obtained as part of a CCI International Time Programme awarded to the IPHAS collaboration. This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center/California Institute of Technology, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Science Foundation. This research has also made use of the SIMBAD database, operated at CDS, Strasbourg, France.

  19. Does quantum entanglement in DNA synchronize the catalytic centers of type II restriction endonucleases?

    CERN Document Server

    Kurian, P; Lindesay, J

    2014-01-01

    Several living systems have been examined for their apparent optimization of structure and function for quantum behavior at biological length scales. Orthodox type II endonucleases, the largest class of restriction enzymes, recognize four-to-eight base pair sequences of palindromic DNA, cut both strands symmetrically, and act without an external metabolite such as ATP. While it is known that these enzymes induce strand breaks by attacking phosphodiester bonds, what remains unclear is the mechanism by which cutting occurs in concert at the catalytic centers. Previous studies indicate the primacy of intimate DNA contacts made by the specifically bound enzyme in coordinating the two synchronized cuts. We propose that collective electronic behavior in the DNA helix generates coherent oscillations, quantized through boundary conditions imposed by the endonuclease, that provide the energy required to break two phosphodiester bonds. Such quanta may be preserved in the presence of thermal noise and electromagnetic in...

  20. Theoretical investigation on peripheral ligands of oxygen-evolving center in photosystem II

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The interaction between the Mn-cluster and its peripheral ligands in oxygen-evolving center is still unclear. Theoretical investigation on the coordination of histidine, H2O, and Cl to Mn2O2 units in OEC is conducted. The following conclusions are obtained: (i) both histidine and H2O molecule, bound to the two Mn ions, respectively, are vertical to the Mn2O2 plane, and maintain a large distance; (ii) the two H2O molecules cannot bind to the same Mn2O2 unit. Based on Mn-cluster structure in OEC, we theoretically predict that two H2O molecules bind to the two Mn ions at the "C"-shaped open end in S0 state, while two His residues at the closed end. Cl ion can only terminally ligate at the open end. Individual valence for the four Mn ions in S0 state is assigned.

  1. KNK II, Compact Sodium-Cooled Reactor in the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report gives an overview of the project of the sodium-cooled fast reactor KNK II in the nuclear research center KfK in Karlsruhe. This test reactor was the preparatory stage of the prototype plant SNR 300 and had several goals: to train operating personal, to practice the licensing procedures in Germany, to get experience with the sodium technology and to serve as a test bed for fast breeder core components. The report contains contributions of KfK as the owner and project managing organization, of INTERATOM as the design and construction company and of the KBG as the plant operating organization. Experience with and results of relevant aspects of the project are tackled: project management, reactor core and component design, safety questions and licensing, plant design and test programs

  2. A protein dynamics study of photosystem II: the effects of protein conformation on reaction center function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, Sergej; Bruce, Doug

    2006-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study photosystem II structure and function. Structural information obtained from simulations was combined with ab initio computations of chromophore excited states. In contrast to calculations based on the x-ray structure, the molecular-dynamics-based calculations accurately predicted the experimental absorbance spectrum. In addition, our calculations correctly assigned the energy levels of reaction-center (RC) chromophores, as well as the lowest-energy antenna chlorophyll. The primary and secondary quinone electron acceptors, Q(A) and Q(B), exhibited independent changes in position over the duration of the simulation. Q(B) fluctuated between two binding sites similar to the proximal and distal sites previously observed in light- and dark-adapted RC from purple bacteria. Kinetic models were used to characterize the relative influence of chromophore geometry, site energies, and electron transport rates on RC efficiency. The fluctuating energy levels of antenna chromophores had a larger impact on quantum yield than did their relative positions. Variations in electron transport rates had the most significant effect and were sufficient to explain the experimentally observed multi-component decay of excitation in photosystem II. The implications of our results are discussed in the context of competing evolutionary selection pressures for RC structure and function.

  3. Comparing Galactic Center MSSM dark matter solutions to the Reticulum II gamma-ray data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achterberg, Abraham; Beekveld, Melissa van [Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics,Faculty of Science, Mailbox 79, Radboud University Nijmegen,P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Beenakker, Wim [Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics,Faculty of Science, Mailbox 79, Radboud University Nijmegen,P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Institute of Physics, University of Amsterdam,Science Park 904, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Caron, Sascha [Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics,Faculty of Science, Mailbox 79, Radboud University Nijmegen,P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nikhef, Science Park,Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hendriks, Luc [Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics,Faculty of Science, Mailbox 79, Radboud University Nijmegen,P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2015-12-04

    Observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) indicate a possible small photon signal originating from the dwarf galaxy Reticulum II that exceeds the expected background between 2 GeV and 10 GeV. We have investigated two specific scenarios for annihilating WIMP dark matter within the phenomenological Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (pMSSM) framework as a possible source for these photons. We find that the same parameter ranges in pMSSM as reported by an earlier paper to be consistent with the Galactic Center excess, are also consistent with the excess observed in Reticulum II, resulting in a J-factor of log{sub 10} (J(α{sub int}=0.5{sup ∘}))≃(20.3−20.5){sub −0.3}{sup +0.2} GeV{sup 2}cm{sup −5}. This J-factor is consistent with log{sub 10} (J(α{sub int}=0.5{sup ∘}))=19.6{sub −0.7}{sup +1.0} GeV{sup 2}cm{sup −5}, which was derived using an optimized spherical Jeans analysis of kinematic data obtained from the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS)

  4. Supramolecular control of a mononuclear biomimetic copper(II) center: bowl complexes vs funnel complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gout, Jérôme; Višnjevac, Aleksandar; Rat, Stéphanie; Parrot, Arnaud; Hessani, Assia; Bistri, Olivia; Le Poul, Nicolas; Le Mest, Yves; Reinaud, Olivia

    2014-06-16

    Modeling the mononuclear site of copper enzymes is important for a better understanding of the factors controlling the reactivity of the metal center. A major difficulty stems from the difficult control of the nuclearity while maintaining free sites open to coordination of exogenous ligands. A supramolecular approach consists in associating a hydrophobic cavity to a tripodal ligand that will define the coordination spheres as well as access to the metal ion. Here, we describe the synthesis of a bowl Cu(II) complex based on the resorcinarene scaffold. This study supplements a previous work on Cu(I) coordination. It provides a complete picture of the cavity-copper system in its two oxidation states. The first XRD structure of such a bowl complex was obtained, evidencing a 5-coordinate Cu(II) ion with the three imidazole donors bound to the metal (two in the base of the pyramid, one in the apical position) and with an acetate anion, completing the base of the pyramid, and deeply included in the bowl. Solution studies conducted by EPR and UV-vis absorption spectroscopies as well as cyclic voltammetry highlighted interaction with coordinating solvents, various carboxylates that can sit either in the endo or in the exo position depending on their size as well as possible stabilization of hydroxo species in a mononuclear state. A comparison of the binding and redox properties of the bowl complex with funnel complexes based on the calix[6]arene core further highlights the importance of supramolecular features defining the first, second, and third coordination sphere for control of the metal ion. PMID:24901070

  5. Properties of H II Regions in the Centers of Nearby Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, L C; Sargent, W L W; Ho, Luis C.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Sargent, Wallace L. W.

    1997-01-01

    As part of an optical spectroscopic survey of nearby, bright galaxies, we have identified a sample of over 200 emission-line nuclei having optical spectra resembling those of giant extragalactic H II regions. Such "H II nuclei," powered by young, massive stars, are found in a substantial fraction of nearby galaxies, especially those of late Hubble type. This paper summarizes the observational characteristics of H II nuclei, contrasts the variation of their properties with Hubble type, and compares the nuclear H II regions with those found in galaxy disks. Similarities and differences between H II nuclei and luminous starburst nuclei are additionally noted.

  6. Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackman, Thomas [Desert Research Institute; Minor, Timothy [Desert Research Institute; Pohll, Gregory [Desert Research Institute

    2013-07-22

    Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during

  7. The Galactic Center Molecular Cloud Survey. II. A Lack of Dense Gas & Cloud Evolution along Galactic Center Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffmann, Jens; Zhang, Qizhou; Menten, Karl M; Goldsmith, Paul F; Lu, Xing; Guzmán, Andrés E; Schmiedeke, Anika

    2016-01-01

    We present the first systematic study of the density structure of clouds found in a complete sample covering all major molecular clouds in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ; inner $\\sim{}200~\\rm{}pc$) of the Milky Way. This is made possible by using data from the Galactic Center Molecular Cloud Survey (GCMS), the first study resolving all major molecular clouds in the CMZ at interferometer angular resolution. We find that many CMZ molecular clouds have unusually shallow density gradients compared to regions elsewhere in the Milky Way. This is possibly a consequence of weak gravitational binding of the clouds. The resulting relative absence of dense gas on spatial scales $\\sim{}0.1~\\rm{}pc$ is probably one of the reasons why star formation (SF) in dense gas of the CMZ is suppressed by a factor $\\sim{}10$, compared to solar neighborhood clouds. Another factor suppressing star formation are the high SF density thresholds that likely result from the observed gas kinematics. Further, it is possible but not certain t...

  8. Entdeckung elektroschwacher Produktion einzelner Top-Quarks mit dem CDF II Experiment; Discovery electroweak production of single top quarks with the CDF II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luck, Jan [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (KIT) (Germany)

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents a neural network search for combined as well as separate s- and t-channel single top-quark production with the CDF II experiment at the Tevatron using 3.2 fb-1 of collision data. It is the twelfth thesis dealing with single top-quark production performed within the CDF Collaboration, whereas three have been done in Run I [53–55] and eight in Run II [23, 25, 28, 39, 56–59].

  9. Semantic Web Data Discovery of Earth Science Data at NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Mahabaleshwara; Strub, Richard F.; Lynnes, Christopher S.; Fang, Hongliang; Teng, William

    2008-01-01

    Mirador is a web interface for searching Earth Science data archived at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). Mirador provides keyword-based search and guided navigation for providing efficient search and access to Earth Science data. Mirador employs the power of Google's universal search technology for fast metadata keyword searches, augmented by additional capabilities such as event searches (e.g., hurricanes), searches based on location gazetteer, and data services like format converters and data sub-setters. The objective of guided data navigation is to present users with multiple guided navigation in Mirador is an ontology based on the Global Change Master directory (GCMD) Directory Interchange Format (DIF). Current implementation includes the project ontology covering various instruments and model data. Additional capabilities in the pipeline include Earth Science parameter and applications ontologies.

  10. X-ray emission from the giant molecular clouds in the Galactic Center region and the discovery of new X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoli, L; Treves, A; Parmar, A N; Turolla, R; Favata, F

    2001-01-01

    We report the results of X-ray (2-10 keV) observations of the giant molecular clouds SgrB, SgrC and SgrD in the Galactic Center region, together with the discovery of the point-like source SAXJ1748.2-2808. The data have been obtained with the MECS instrument on the BeppoSAX satellite. The core of SgrB2 has an X-ray luminosity of 6x10^34 erg/s and its spectrum is characterized by a strong Fe emission line at 6.5 keV with an equivalent width of 2 keV. Faint diffuse X-ray emission is detected from SgrC and from the SNR G1.05-0.15 (SgrD). A new, unresolved source with a strong Fe line has been discovered in the SgrD region. This source, SAXJ1748.2-2808, is probably associated with a SiO and OH maser source at the Galactic Center distance. If so, its luminosity is 10^34 erg/s. We propose that the X-ray emission from SAX J1748.2-2808 is produced either by protostars or by a giant molecular cloud core. Emission from sources similar to SAX J1748.2-2808 could have an impact on the expected contribution on the observed...

  11. Time-resolved photoluminescence of type-II quantum dots and isoelectronic centers in Zn-Se-Te superlattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M. C.-K.; Cartwright, A. N.; Sellers, I. R.; McCombe, B. D.; Kuskovsky, I. L.

    2008-01-01

    Spectrally and time-resolved photoluminescence of a ZnTe /ZnSe superlattice reveals a smooth transition of the photoluminescence (PL) lifetime from ˜100ns at 2.35eV to less than a few nanoseconds at 2.8eV. The significant increase of the lifetime in the low energy region is strong evidence to support the formation of type-II quantum dots (QDs), since in these nanostructures the spatial separation of carriers is increased. The shorter lived emission above 2.5eV is attributed to excitons bound to Te isoelectronic centers in the ZnSe matrix. The smooth transition of the PL lifetime confirms that clusters of these Te atoms evolve into type-II ZnTe /ZnSe QDs.

  12. Comparing Galactic Center MSSM dark matter solutions to the Reticulum II gamma-ray data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Achterberg; M. van Beekveld; W. Beenakker; S. Caron; L. Hendriks

    2015-01-01

    Observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) indicate a possible small photon signal originating from the dwarf galaxy Reticulum II that exceeds the expected background between 2 GeV and 10 GeV . We have investigated two specific scenarios for annihilating WIMP dark matter within the pheno

  13. Design electronic of manual control for cobalt unit Alcyon II of the National Center of Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A manual control for the cobalt unit, of French production, it was designed by the team of electronic of the national center of radiotherapy with materials found in the national trade. The control has the same characteristics that the original one and it is also adapted a switch from which you can control the lights of the room of the cobalt

  14. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, program history, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  15. Three-dimensional nonlinear optical chromophores based on metal-to-ligand charge-transfer from ruthenium(II) or iron(II) centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Benjamin J; Harris, James A; Brunschwig, Bruce S; Asselberghs, Inge; Clays, Koen; Garín, Javier; Orduna, Jesús

    2005-09-28

    In this article, we describe a series of new complex salts in which electron-rich transition-metal centers are coordinated to three electron-accepting N-methyl/aryl-2,2':4,4' ':4',4' ''-quaterpyridinium ligands. These complexes contain either Ru(II) or Fe(II) ions and have been characterized by using various techniques, including electronic absorption spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Molecular quadratic nonlinear optical (NLO) responses beta have been determined by using hyper-Rayleigh scattering at 800 nm and also via Stark (electroabsorption) spectroscopic studies on the intense, visible d --> pi* metal-to-ligand charge-transfer bands. The latter experiments reveal that these putatively octupolar D(3) chromophores exhibit two substantial components of the beta tensor which are associated with transitions to dipolar excited states. Computations involving time-dependent density-functional theory and the finite field method serve to further illuminate the electronic structures and associated linear and NLO properties of the new chromophoric salts. PMID:16173774

  16. Formation of photosystem II reaction centers that work as energy sinks in lichen symbiotic Trebouxiophyceae microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéra, Alfredo; Gasulla, Francisco; Barreno, Eva

    2016-04-01

    Lichens are poikilohydric symbiotic organisms that can survive in the absence of water. Photosynthesis must be highly regulated in these organisms, which live under continuous desiccation-rehydration cycles, to avoid photooxidative damage. Analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence induction curves in the lichen microalgae of the Trebouxiophyceae Asterochloris erici and in Trebouxia jamesii (TR1) and Trebouxia sp. (TR9) phycobionts, isolated from the lichen Ramalina farinacea, shows differences with higher plants. In the presence of the photosynthetic electron transport inhibitor DCMU, the kinetics of Q(A) reduction is related to variable fluorescence by a sigmoidal function that approaches a horizontal asymptote. An excellent fit to these curves was obtained by applying a model based on the following assumptions: (1) after closure, the reaction centers (RCs) can be converted into "energy sink" centers (sRCs); (2) the probability of energy leaving the sRCs is very low or zero and (3) energy is not transferred from the antenna of PSII units with sRCs to other PSII units. The formation of sRCs units is also induced by repetitive light saturating pulses or at the transition from dark to light and probably requires the accumulation of reduced Q(A), as well as structural changes in the reaction centers of PSII. This type of energy sink would provide a very efficient way to protect symbiotic microalgae against abrupt changes in light intensity. PMID:26482588

  17. Nuclear Energy Center study. Phase II. Site suitability analysis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A site screening study was conducted to identify a site or sites for detailed, site-specific study as a nuclear energy center. Using technical criteria of water requirements, geotechnical constraints, and projected load center and transmission considerations as well as environmental and institutional considerations, five potential study sites in the State of South Carolina were identified, evaluated against established criteria, and ranked according to their acceptability as potential nuclear energy center study sites. Consideration of what is ''representative'' of a site as well as the ranking score was factored into site recommendations, since the site deemed easiest to license and permit may not be the most desirable site for future study of the technical and institutional feasibility and practicality of a specific site. The sites near Lake Hartwell and the Savannah River Plant (SRP) of the Department of Energy were selected as potential study sites after consideration of the above criteria. Because the Lake Hartwell site offers the opportunity to consider institutional issues which may be more representative of other possible NEC sites, it is recommended that the Lake Hartwell site be studied to establish the feasibility and practicality of the nuclear energy concept on a site-specific basis

  18. The role of calcium in the oxygen evolving center of photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latimer, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    The photosynthetic oxygen evolving complex (OEC) contains a cluster of four manganese atoms and requires both Ca and Cl for activity. Ca can be replaced by Sr with retention of activity. The role of Ca in the OEC has been investigated by performing Mn X-ray absorption experiments on Ca-depleted samples of photosystem II (PS II) and on PS II samples depleted of Ca and reconstituted by either Ca or Sr. Mn X-ray K-edge spectra exhibit no significant differences in oxidation state or symmetry between Ca- and Sr-reactivated preparations, but differences are observed in the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The amplitude of a Fourier transform peak arising from scatterers at distances greater than 3 A is larger for samples reactivated with strontium relative to calcium. Curve-fitting analyses of the EXAFS data using FEFF 5-calculated parameters favor a model where both manganese and calcium (or strontium) scatterers contribute to the {approximately}3 {Angstrom} Fourier peak (Mn-Mn at 3.3{Angstrom} and Mn-Ca(Sr) at 3.4--3.5 {Angstrom}). Possible structural arrangements for a calcium binding site are discussed. Analysis of Mn K-edge spectra from Ca-depleted samples in the S{sub 1}, S{sub 2}, and S{sub 3} states shows an edge shift on the S{sub 1}-S{sub 2} transition, but no edge shift on the S{sub 2}-S{sub 3} transition, supporting a model where the oxidizing equivalent from the S{sub 2} to S{sub 3} transition is stored on a ligand or nearby protein residue rather than on the Mn cluster. Parallels between Ca-depleted and native samples are discussed.

  19. Teleradiology support for maternal and newborn health in II level perinatal centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telemedicine can be defined as the use of electronic signals to transfer medical information from one system to another. The emergence and development of teleradiology occurred due to the needs of optimal allocation of resources. The effectiveness of medical care is being increasing simply by the fact that an expert radiologist or other specialist can view patient images from his working place without losing his precious time for traveling. Teleradiology solution offers a range of advantages: reducing the presence of specialists on call, rapid obtaining of second opinions, medical centers interconnection etc.In our study we will focus on the teleradiology activity. A prospective study of consulted cases was conducted via teleradiology; there were applied two basic methods of transmitting information. In 01.01.2012 to 31.12.2012 there were totally examined 393 children and consulted 430 radiological images, of them - through Skype - 102 children and 199 images via iPath platform. Successful implementation of teleradiology within telemedicine has improved the quality of diagnosis in cases treated in the pilot centers. (authors)

  20. Does slow energy transfer limit the observed time constant for radical pair formation in photosystem II reaction centers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, T; Durrant, J R; Joseph, D M; Barber, J; Porter, G; Klug, D R

    1994-12-13

    We have used spectrally photoselective femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy on photosystem II reaction centers to show that there are at least two pools of chlorin molecules/states which can transfer excitation energy to P680, the primary electron donor in photosystem II. It has previously been shown that one chlorin pool equilibrates with P680 in 100 fs [Durrant et al. (1992) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 89, 11632-11636], and we report here the observation of energy transfer from a second more weakly coupled chlorin pool. The effect of the weakly coupled pool is to increase the apparent time constant for radical pair formation from 21 ps when P680 is selectively excited to 27 ps when the accessory chlorins are excited. We conclude that it is possible to observe both radical pair formation somewhat slowed by an energy transfer step and radical pair formation not limited by this slow energy transfer, depending upon which chromophores are initially excited. These observations provide evidence that when using photoselective excitation of P680, the observed 21 ps time constant for radical pair formation is not limited by a slow energy transfer step. PMID:7993905

  1. Doppler Lidar System Design via Interdisciplinary Design Concept at NASA Langley Research Center - Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crasner, Aaron I.; Scola,Salvatore; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Petway, Larry B.

    2014-01-01

    Optimized designs of the Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) instrument for Autonomous Landing Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) were accomplished via Interdisciplinary Design Concept (IDEC) at NASA Langley Research Center during the summer of 2013. Three branches in the Engineering Directorate and three students were involved in this joint task through the NASA Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars (LARSS) Program. The Laser Remote Sensing Branch (LRSB), Mechanical Systems Branch (MSB), and Structural and Thermal Systems Branch (STSB) were engaged to achieve optimal designs through iterative and interactive collaborative design processes. A preliminary design iteration was able to reduce the power consumption, mass, and footprint by removing redundant components and replacing inefficient components with more efficient ones. A second design iteration reduced volume and mass by replacing bulky components with excessive performance with smaller components custom-designed for the power system. Thermal modeling software was used to run steady state thermal analyses, which were used to both validate the designs and recommend further changes. Analyses were run on each redesign, as well as the original system. Thermal Desktop was used to run trade studies to account for uncertainty and assumptions about fan performance and boundary conditions. The studies suggested that, even if the assumptions were significantly wrong, the redesigned systems would remain within operating temperature limits.

  2. Tidal breakup of binary stars at the Galactic Center. II. Hydrodynamic simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Antonini, Fabio; Merritt, David

    2010-01-01

    In Paper I, we followed the evolution of binary stars as they orbited near the supermassive black hole (SMBH) at the Galactic center, noting the cases in which the two stars would come close enough together to collide. In this paper we replace the point-mass stars by fluid realizations, and use a smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code to follow the close interactions. We model the binary components as main-sequence stars with initial masses of 1, 3 and 6 Solar masses, and with chemical composition profiles taken from stellar evolution codes. Outcomes of the close interactions include mergers, collisions that leave both stars intact, and ejection of one star at high velocity accompanied by capture of the other star into a tight orbit around the SMBH. For the first time, we follow the evolution of the collision products for many ($\\gtrsim 100$) orbits around the SMBH. Stars that are initially too small to be tidally disrupted by the SMBH can be puffed up by close encounters or collisions, with the result th...

  3. Doppler lidar system design via interdisciplinary design concept at NASA Langley Research Center: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crasner, Aaron I.; Scola, Salvatore; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Petway, Larry B.

    2014-06-01

    Optimized designs of the Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) instrument for Autonomous Landing Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) were accomplished via Interdisciplinary Design Concept (IDEC) at NASA Langley Research Center during the summer of 2013. Three branches in the Engineering Directorate and three students were involved in this joint task through the NASA Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars (LARSS) Program. The Laser Remote Sensing Branch (LRSB), Mechanical Systems Branch (MSB), and Structural and Thermal Systems Branch (STSB) were engaged to achieve optimal designs through iterative and interactive collaborative design processes. A preliminary design iteration was able to reduce the power consumption, mass, and footprint by removing redundant components and replacing inefficient components with more efficient ones. A second design iteration reduced volume and mass by replacing bulky components with excessive performance with smaller components custom-designed for the power system. Thermal modeling software was used to run steady state thermal analyses, which were used to both validate the designs and recommend further changes. Analyses were run on each redesign, as well as the original system. Thermal Desktop was used to run trade studies to account for uncertainty and assumptions about fan performance and boundary conditions. The studies suggested that, even if the assumptions were significantly wrong, the redesigned systems would remain within operating temperature limits.

  4. Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackman, Thomas [Desert Research Institute; Minor, Timothy [Desert Research Institute; Pohll, Gregory [Desert Research Institute

    2013-07-22

    Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during

  5. Dusty cradles in a turbulent nursery: the SGR A east H II region complex at the galactic center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, R. M.; Herter, T. L.; Adams, J. D. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, 202 Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Morris, M. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    We present imaging at 19, 25, 31, and 37 μm of the compact H II region complex G-0.02-0.07 located 6 pc in projection from the center of the Galaxy obtained with SOFIA using FORCAST. G-0.02-0.07 contains three compact H II regions (A, B, and C) and one ultra-compact H II region (D). Our observations reveal the presence of two faint, infrared sources located 23'' and 35'' to the east of region C (FIRS 1 and 2) and detect dust emission in two of the three 'ridges' of ionized gas west of region A. The 19/37 color temperature and 37 μm optical depth maps of regions A-C are used to characterize the dust energetics and morphology. Regions A and B exhibit average 19/37 color temperatures of ∼105 K, and regions C and D exhibit color temperatures of ∼115 K and ∼130 K, respectively. Using the DustEM code, we model the SEDs of regions A-D and FIRS 1, all of which require populations of very small, transiently heated grains and large, equilibrium-heated grains. We also require the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in regions A-C in order to fit the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm fluxes observed by Spitzer/IRAC. The location of the heating source for region A is determined by triangulation from distances and temperatures derived from DustEM models fit to SEDs of three different points around the region, and it is found to be displaced to the northeast of the center of curvature near the color temperature peak. Based on total luminosity, expected 1.90 μm fluxes, and proximity to the mid-IR color temperature peaks, we identify heating source candidates for regions A, B, and C. However, for region D, the observed fluxes at 1.87 and 1.90 μm of the previously proposed ionizing star are a factor of ∼40 times too bright to be the heating source and hence is likely just a star lying along the line of sight toward region D.

  6. Nuclear Energy Center Site Survey, 1975. Part II. The U.S. electric power system and the potential role of nuclear energy centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information related to Nuclear Energy Centers (NEC) in the U.S. is presented concerning the U.S. electric power system today; electricity demand history and forecasts; history and forecasts of the electric utility industry; regional notes; the status, history, and forecasts of the nuclear role; power plant siting problems and practices; nuclear facilities siting problems and practices; origin and evolution of the nuclear energy center concept; conceptualized description of nuclear energy centers; potential role of nuclear energy centers; assumptions, criteria, and bases; typical evolution of a nuclear energy center; and the nuclear fuel cycle

  7. Substitution of cysteine for a conserved alanine residue in the catalytic center of type II iodothyronine deiodinase alters interaction with reducing cofactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Klootwijk (Willem); T.J. Visser (Ton); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractHuman type II iodothyronine deiodinase (D2) catalyzes the activation of T(4) to T(3). The D2 enzyme, like the type I (D1) and type III (D3) deiodinases, contains a selenocysteine (SeC) residue (residue 133 in D2) in the highly conserved catalytic center. Remarkably, all

  8. Syntheses and properties of two-dimensional charged nonlinear optical chromophores incorporating redox-switchable cis-tetraammineruthenium(II) centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Benjamin J; Harris, James A; Jones, Lathe A; Brunschwig, Bruce S; Song, Kai; Clays, Koen; Garín, Javier; Orduna, Jesús; Coles, Simon J; Hursthouse, Michael B

    2005-04-01

    In this article, we describe a series of new complex salts in which electron-donating cis-{Ru(II)(NH3)(4)}(2+) centers are connected to two electron-accepting N-methyl/aryl-pyridinium groups. These V-shaped complexes contain either monodentate 4,4'-bipyridyl-derived ligands or related chelates based on 2,2':4,4":4',4'''-quaterpyridyl and have been characterized by using various techniques including electronic absorption spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Molecular quadratic nonlinear optical (NLO) responses beta have been determined by using hyper-Rayleigh scattering at 800 nm and also via Stark (electroabsorption) spectroscopic studies on the intense, visible d --> pi metal-to-ligand charge-transfer bands. These experiments reveal that these dipolar pseudo-C(2v)chromophores exhibit two substantial components of the beta tensor, beta(zzz)and beta(zyy), with the difference between them being most marked for the nonchelated systems. Time-dependent density-functional theory and finite field calculations serve to further illuminate the electronic structures and associated linear and NLO properties of the new chromophoric salts. PMID:15796549

  9. Off-center impurity in alkali halides: reorientation, electric polarization and pairing to F center. II. In-plane rotation and polarizability

    CERN Document Server

    Baldacchini, G; Grassano, U M; Scacco, A; Petrova, P; Mladenova, M; Ivanovich, M; Georgiev, M

    2007-01-01

    Because of its inherent 2-D character, the eigenvalue equation for the hindered rotation around a normal cation site of an off-center impurity nearest-neighboring an F center is the well-known Mathieu equation. We present an overview of literature data on Mathieu's periodic functions providing exact solutions to the Li+ reorientational problem. We compare them with bottom-well approximating solutions by harmonic-oscillator functions at an effective vibrational frequency renormalized by both first- and third- order electron-mode coupling. We finally discuss the in-plane inversion polarizability of an off-center impurity assumed to form a dipole-dipole coupling with a nearby F center.

  10. Survey of eight dimensions quality of life for patients with diabetes type II, referred to Sanandaj diabetes center in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnaz Khaledi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Diabetes is a chronic disease; the patients suffer from diabetes needs a special care. One of the programs to help these kinds of patients is to analyze their quality of life, which was carried out through a nursing disciplinary program by a cross sectional study during 2009. Materials & Methods: 198 type II diabetic patients who were referred to diabetic center of an educational hospital, affiliated to Sanandaj medical university were selected randomly, they were interviewed and obtained a written permission to join this study, then asked to fill up SF-36 questionnaires, and finally, the data from the questionnaires were analyzed by the SPSS software program. Results: The results showed the quality of life of diabetes patients (55.6% with respect to their physical fitness were acceptable. Whereas, in case of play in the physical role 67.7% were not acceptable but in case of the physical pain 45.3% had physical pain and effects on public health 45.6% were moderately effected, in case of energy and vitality 35.4% were not acceptable, in case of social functioning 38.5% were favorable, in case of emotional role 75.8% were undesirable and finally considering psycho mental health 49.5% were in the desirable limit. Statistical analysis for evaluation of relationship between quality of life and demographic data, were carried out by using "ANOVA” test. Conclusion: This study showed that the quality of life in all the group of study were at moderate level. In order to improve the quality of life in diabetes patients it is suggested that planners and managers should pay enough attention to support the physical, mental and social well being of the diabetes patients.

  11. Study of the Mn-binding sites in photosystem II using antibodies raised against lumenal regions of the D1 and D2 reaction center proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmasso, E.A.

    1992-04-01

    The experiments discussed in this thesis focus on identifying the protein segments or specific amino acids which provide ligands to the Mn cluster of photosystem II (PS II). This Mn cluster plays a central role in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PS II. The Mn cluster is thought to be bound by lumenal regions of the PS II reaction center proteins known as D1 and D2. First, several peptides were synthesized which correspond to specific lumenal segments of the D1 and D2 proteins. Next, polyclonal antibodies were successfully elicited using three of these peptides. The peptides recognized by these antibodies correspond to protein segments of the spinach reaction center proteins: Ile-321 to Ala-344 of D1 (D1-a), Asp-319 to Arg-334 of D1 (D1-b), and Val-300 to Asn-319 of D2 (D2-a). These antibodies were then used in assays which were developed to structurally or functionally probe the potential Mn-binding regions of the D1 and D2 proteins.

  12. Site Energies of Active and Inactive Pheophytins in the Reaction Center of Photosystem II from Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is widely accepted that the primary electron acceptor in various Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) preparations is pheophytin α (Pheo α) within the D1 protein (PheoD1), while PheoD2 (within the D2 protein) is photochemically inactive. The Pheo site energies, however, have remained elusive, due to inherent spectral congestion. While most researchers over the past two decades placed the Qy-states of PheoD1 and PheoD2 bands near 678-684 and 668-672 nm, respectively, recent modeling (Raszewski et al. Biophys. J. 2005, 88, 986-998; Cox et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 12364-12374) of the electronic structure of the PSII RC reversed the assignment of the active and inactive Pheos, suggesting that the mean site energy of PheoD1 is near 672 nm, whereas PheoD2 (∼677.5 nm) and ChlD1 (∼680 nm) have the lowest energies (i.e., the PheoD2-dominated exciton is the lowest excited state). In contrast, chemical pigment exchange experiments on isolated RCs suggested that both pheophytins have their Qy absorption maxima at 676-680 nm (Germano et al. Biochemistry 2001, 40, 11472-11482; Germano et al. Biophys. J. 2004, 86, 1664-1672). To provide more insight into the site energies of both PheoD1 and PheoD2 (including the corresponding Qx transitions, which are often claimed to be degenerate at 543 nm) and to attest that the above two assignments are most likely incorrect, we studied a large number of isolated RC preparations from spinach and wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (at different levels of intactness) as well as the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant (D2-L209H), in which the active branch PheoD1 is genetically replaced with chlorophyll α (Chl α). We show that the Qx-/Qy-region site energies of PheoD1 and PheoD2 are ∼545/680 nm and ∼541.5/670 nm, respectively, in good agreement with our previous assignment (Jankowiak et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2002, 106, 8803?8814). The latter values should be used to model excitonic structure and excitation energy

  13. Site Energies of Active and Inactive Pheophytins in the Reaction Center of Photosystem II from Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, K.; Neupane, B.; Zazubovich, V.; Sayre, R. T.; Picorel, R.; Seibert, M.; Jankowiak, R.

    2012-03-29

    It is widely accepted that the primary electron acceptor in various Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) preparations is pheophytin {alpha} (Pheo {alpha}) within the D1 protein (Pheo{sub D1}), while Pheo{sub D2} (within the D2 protein) is photochemically inactive. The Pheo site energies, however, have remained elusive, due to inherent spectral congestion. While most researchers over the past two decades placed the Q{sub y}-states of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} bands near 678-684 and 668-672 nm, respectively, recent modeling [Raszewski et al. Biophys. J. 2005, 88, 986-998; Cox et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 12364-12374] of the electronic structure of the PSII RC reversed the assignment of the active and inactive Pheos, suggesting that the mean site energy of Pheo{sub D1} is near 672 nm, whereas Pheo{sub D2} ({approx}677.5 nm) and Chl{sub D1} ({approx}680 nm) have the lowest energies (i.e., the Pheo{sub D2}-dominated exciton is the lowest excited state). In contrast, chemical pigment exchange experiments on isolated RCs suggested that both pheophytins have their Q{sub y} absorption maxima at 676-680 nm [Germano et al. Biochemistry 2001, 40, 11472-11482; Germano et al. Biophys. J. 2004, 86, 1664-1672]. To provide more insight into the site energies of both Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} (including the corresponding Q{sub x} transitions, which are often claimed to be degenerate at 543 nm) and to attest that the above two assignments are most likely incorrect, we studied a large number of isolated RC preparations from spinach and wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (at different levels of intactness) as well as the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant (D2-L209H), in which the active branch Pheo{sub D1} is genetically replaced with chlorophyll {alpha} (Chl {alpha}). We show that the Q{sub x}-/Q{sub y}-region site energies of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} are {approx}545/680 nm and {approx}541.5/670 nm, respectively, in good agreement with our previous assignment

  14. Volatility Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Gustavo Fruet; Scherrer, Cristina; Papailias, Fotis

    There is a large literature that investigates how homogenous securities traded on different markets incorporate new information (price discovery analysis). We extend this concept to the stochastic volatility process and investigate how markets contribute to the efficient stochastic volatility whi...

  15. The discovery of quarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, M

    1992-05-29

    Quarks are widely recognized today as being among the elementary particles of which matter is composed. The key evidence for their existence came from a series of inelastic electron-nucleon scattering experiments conducted between 1967 and 1973 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Other theoretical and experimental advances of the 1970s confirmed this discovery, leading to the present standard model of elementary particle physics.

  16. Impact of Mercury(II) on proteinase K catalytic center: investigations via classical and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, Jarosław J; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Novič, Marjana; Jezierska-Mazzarello, Aneta

    2011-02-01

    Mercury(II) has a strong affinity for the thiol groups in proteins often resulting in the disruption of their biological functions. In this study we present classical and first-principles, DFT-based molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a complex of Hg(II) and proteinase K, a well-known serine protease with a very broad and diverse enzymatic activity. It contains a catalytic triad formed by Asp39, His69, and Ser224, which is responsible for its biological activity. It was found previously by X-ray diffraction experiments that the presence of Hg(II) inhibits the enzymatic action of proteinase K by affecting the stereochemistry of the triad. Our simulations predict that (i) the overall structure as well as the protein backbone dynamics are only slightly affected by the mercury cation, (ii) depending on the occupied mercury site, the hydrogen bonds of the catalytic triad are either severely disrupted (both bonds for mercury at site 1, and the His69-Ser224 contact for mercury at site 2) or slightly strengthened (the Asp39-His69 bond when mercury is at site 2), (iii) the network of hydrogen bonds of the catalytic triad is not static but undergoes constant fluctuations, which are significantly modified by the presence of the Hg(II) cation, influencing in turn the triad's ability to carry out the enzymatic function--these facts explain the experimental findings on the inhibition of proteinase K by Hg(II).

  17. Development and evaluation of a patient centered cardiovascular health education program for insured patients in rural Nigeria (QUICK-II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Odusola; M. Hendriks; C. Schultsz; K. Stronks; J. Lange; A. Osibogun; T. Akande; S. Alli; P. Adenusi; K. Agbede; J. Haafkens

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Sub Saharan Africa, the incidence of hypertension and other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors is growing rapidly. Poor adherence to prescribed prevention and treatment regimens by patients can compromise treatment outcomes. Patient-centered cardiovascular health education is like

  18. Discovery of an Ultra-Faint Dwarf Galaxy in the Intracluster Field of the Virgo Center : A fossil of the First Galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Jang, In Sung

    2014-01-01

    Ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs) are newcomers among galaxies, and are the faintest galaxies in the observed universe. To date, they have only been found around the Milky Way Galaxy and M31 in the Local Group. We present the discovery of an UFD in the intracluster field in the core of the Virgo cluster (Virgo UFD1), which is far from any massive galaxies. The color-magnitude diagram of the resolved stars in this galaxy shows a narrow red giant branch, similar to those of metal-poor globular clusters in the Milky Way. We estimate its distance by comparing the red giant branch with isochrones, and we obtain a value 16.4 +/- 0.4 Mpc. This shows that it is indeed a member of the Virgo cluster. From the color of the red giants we estimate its mean metallicity to be very low, [Fe/H]= -2.4 +/- 0.4. Its absolute V-band magnitude and effective radius are derived to be M_V = -6.5 +/- 0.2 and r_eff = 81 +/- 7 pc, much fainter and smaller than the classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Its central surface brightness is es...

  19. Beyond Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Steffen; Sassmannshausen, Sean Patrick

    2015-01-01

    as their central concepts and conceptualization of the entrepreneurial function. On this basis we discuss three central themes that cut across the four alternatives: process, uncertainty, and agency. These themes provide new foci for entrepreneurship research and can help to generate new research questions......In this chapter we explore four alternatives to the dominant discovery view of entrepreneurship; the development view, the construction view, the evolutionary view, and the Neo-Austrian view. We outline the main critique points of the discovery presented in these four alternatives, as well...

  20. Discovery of an Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy in the Intracluster Field of the Virgo Center: A Fossil of the First Galaxies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, In Sung; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2014-11-01

    Ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs) are newcomers among galaxies, and are the faintest galaxies in the observed universe. To date, they have only been found around the Milky Way Galaxy and M31 in the Local Group. We present the discovery of a UFD in the intracluster field in the core of the Virgo cluster (Virgo UFD1), which is far from any massive galaxies. The color-magnitude diagram of the resolved stars in this galaxy shows a narrow red giant branch, similar to those of metal-poor globular clusters in the Milky Way. We estimate its distance by comparing the red giant branch with isochrones, and we obtain a value 16.4 ± 0.4 Mpc. This shows that it is indeed a member of the Virgo cluster. From the color of the red giants we estimate its mean metallicity to be very low, [Fe/H] =-2.4 ± 0.4. Its absolute V-band magnitude and effective radius are derived to be MV = -6.5 ± 0.2 and r eff = 81 ± 7 pc, much fainter and smaller than the classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Its central surface brightness is estimated to be as low as μ V, 0 = 26.37 ± 0.05 mag arcsec-2. Its properties are similar to those of the Local Group analogs. No evidence of tidal features are found in this galaxy. Considering its narrow red giant branch with no asymptotic giant branch stars, low metallicity, and location, it may be a fossil remnant of the first galaxies.

  1. DISCOVERY OF AN ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXY IN THE INTRACLUSTER FIELD OF THE VIRGO CENTER: A FOSSIL OF THE FIRST GALAXIES?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, In Sung; Lee, Myung Gyoon, E-mail: isjang@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    Ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs) are newcomers among galaxies, and are the faintest galaxies in the observed universe. To date, they have only been found around the Milky Way Galaxy and M31 in the Local Group. We present the discovery of a UFD in the intracluster field in the core of the Virgo cluster (Virgo UFD1), which is far from any massive galaxies. The color-magnitude diagram of the resolved stars in this galaxy shows a narrow red giant branch, similar to those of metal-poor globular clusters in the Milky Way. We estimate its distance by comparing the red giant branch with isochrones, and we obtain a value 16.4 ± 0.4 Mpc. This shows that it is indeed a member of the Virgo cluster. From the color of the red giants we estimate its mean metallicity to be very low, [Fe/H] =–2.4 ± 0.4. Its absolute V-band magnitude and effective radius are derived to be M{sub V} = –6.5 ± 0.2 and r {sub eff} = 81 ± 7 pc, much fainter and smaller than the classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Its central surface brightness is estimated to be as low as μ {sub V,} {sub 0} = 26.37 ± 0.05 mag arcsec{sup –2}. Its properties are similar to those of the Local Group analogs. No evidence of tidal features are found in this galaxy. Considering its narrow red giant branch with no asymptotic giant branch stars, low metallicity, and location, it may be a fossil remnant of the first galaxies.

  2. Redefiniendo el catálogo: Expectativas de las interfaces de descubrimiento centradas en el usuario Redefining the Catalog: Expectations on User-Centered Discovery Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Luisa Alvite Díez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Los continuos desarrollos de los catálogos en línea (OPAC no han logrado aún conformar una herramienta de búsqueda óptima para el conjunto de los recursos disponibles en una biblioteca universitaria del siglo XXI. La comunidad académica percibe el catálogo como un instrumento ineficaz y alejado de los servicios web que emplea cotidianamente. Se repasan las tentativas de desarrollo de los OPAC y la incorporación de metabuscadores en las sedes web de las bibliotecas académicas. Se indaga en la creciente implementación de interfaces de descubrimiento, revisando los estudios realizados sobre este tipo de plataformas, funcionalidades e implementación, de un lado, y análisis de usabilidad, del otro. Se examina finalmente el estado actual de las herramientas de búsqueda en las bibliotecas universitarias españolas coligiendo de la exploración la tendencia clara hacia la instalación de herramientas de búsqueda única.The continuous developments of OPACs still have not succeeded to constitute an optimal search tool for the overall available resources on a twenty-first century academic library. The academic community perceives OPAC as an ineffective tool and far from the web services that they usually employ. The attempts to develop OPACs and incorporation of metasearch products on the websites of academic libraries are reviewed. The paper explores the increasing implementation of discovery interfaces, reviewing studies on these platforms, its functionality and implementation on one side, and usability analysis on the other. The current state of search tools in the Spanish academic libraries is finally examined, deducing of this exploration the clear trend towards the implementation of single search tools.

  3. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi-center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier;

    2010-01-01

    metabolism. So far, ASL has been restricted mostly to specialist centers due to a generally low SNR of the method and potential issues with user-dependent analysis needed to obtain quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Here, we evaluated a particular implementation of ASL (called...... total of 284 healthy volunteers were scanned. Minimal operator dependence was assured by using an automatic planning tool and its accuracy and potential usefulness in multi-center trials was evaluated as well. Accurate repositioning between sessions was achieved with the automatic planning tool showing...

  4. Dissecting the Moth: Discovery of an off-centered ring in the HD 61005 debris disk with high-resolution imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Buenzli, Esther; Vigan, Arthur; Boccaletti, Anthony; Chauvin, Gael; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Meyer, Michael R; Menard, Francois; Desidera, Silvano; Messina, Sergio; Henning, Thomas; Carson, Joe; Montagnier, Guillaume; Beuzit, Jean-Luc; Bonavita, Mariangela; Eggenberger, Anne; Lagrange, Anne Marie; Mesa, Dino; Mouillet, David; Quanz, Sascha P

    2010-01-01

    The debris disk known as "The Moth" is named after its unusually asymmetric surface brightness distribution. It is located around the ~90 Myr old G8V star HD 61005 at 34.5 pc and has previously been imaged by the HST at 1.1 and 0.6 microns. Polarimetric observations suggested that the circumstellar material consists of two distinct components, a nearly edge-on disk or ring, and a swept-back feature, the result of interaction with the interstellar medium. We resolve both components at unprecedented resolution with VLT/NACO H-band imaging. Using optimized angular differential imaging techniques to remove the light of the star, we reveal the disk component as a distinct narrow ring at inclination i=84.3 \\pm 1.0{\\deg}. We determine a semi-major axis of a=61.25 \\pm 0.85 AU and an eccentricity of e=0.045 \\pm 0.015, assuming that periastron is located along the apparent disk major axis. Therefore, the ring center is offset from the star by at least 2.75 \\pm 0.85 AU. The offset, together with a relatively steep inner...

  5. Discovery of dihydroxylated 2,4-diphenyl-6-thiophen-2-yl-pyridine as a non-intercalative DNA-binding topoisomerase II-specific catalytic inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Kwon, Hanbyeol; Park, So-Eun; Lee, Eunyoung; Karki, Radha; Thapa, Pritam; Lee, Jun-Ho; Lee, Eung-Seok; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2014-06-10

    We describe our rationale for designing specific catalytic inhibitors of topoisomerase II (topo II) over topoisomerase I (topo I). Based on 3D-QSAR studies of previously published dihydroxylated 2,4-diphenyl-6-aryl pyridine derivatives, 9 novel dihydroxylated 2,4-diphenyl-6-thiophen-2-yl pyridine compounds were designed, synthesized, and their biological activities were evaluated. These compounds have 2-thienyl ring substituted on the R(3) group on the pyridine ring and they all showed excellent specificity toward topo II compared to topo I. In vitro experiments were performed for compound 13 to determine the mechanism of action for this series of compounds. Compound 13 inhibited topoisomerase II specifically by non-intercalative binding to DNA and did not stabilize enzyme-cleavable DNA complex. Compound 13 efficiently inhibited cell viability, cell migration, and induced G1 arrest. Also from 3D-QSAR studies, the results were compared with other previously published dihydroxylated 2,4-diphenyl-6-aryl pyridine derivatives to explain the structure-activity relationships.

  6. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest Study

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is a method to measure perfusion using magnetically labeled blood water as an endogenous tracer. Being fully non-invasive, this technique is attractive for longitudinal studies of cerebral blood flow in healthy and diseased individuals, or as a surrogate marker of metabolism. So far, ASL has been restricted mostly to specialist centers due to a generally low SNR of the method and potential issues with user-dependent analysis needed to obtain quantitative measureme...

  7. Antibody informatics for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi;

    2014-01-01

    for antibody rational design using computational approaches to affinity and stability improvement, as well as ab-initio and homology-based antibody modeling; (ii) resources for antibody sequences, structures, and immune epitopes and open drug discovery resources for development of antibody drugs; and (iii...

  8. Development and evaluation of a patient centered cardiovascular health education program for insured patients in rural Nigeria (QUICK - II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osibogun Akin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Sub Saharan Africa, the incidence of hypertension and other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors is growing rapidly. Poor adherence to prescribed prevention and treatment regimens by patients can compromise treatment outcomes. Patient-centered cardiovascular health education is likely to improve shortcomings in adherence. This paper describes a study that aims to develop a cardiovascular health education program for patients participating in a subsidized insurance plan in Nigeria and to evaluate the applicability and effectiveness in patients at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Methods/Design Design: The study has two parts. Part 1 will develop a cardiovascular health education program, using qualitative interviews with stakeholders. Part 2 will evaluate the effectiveness of the program in patients, using a prospective (pre-post observational design. Setting: A rural primary health center in Kwara State, Nigeria. Population: For part 1: 40 patients, 10 healthcare professionals, and 5 insurance managers. For part 2: 150 patients with uncontrolled hypertension or other cardiovascular risk factors after one year of treatment. Intervention: Part 2: patient-centered cardiovascular health education program. Measurements: Part 1: Semi-structured interviews to identify stakeholder perspectives. Part 2: Pre- and post-intervention assessments including patients' demographic and socioeconomic data, blood pressure, body mass index and self-reporting measures on medication adherence and perception of care. Feasibility of the intervention will be measured using process data. Outcomes: For program development (part 1: overview of healthcare professionals' perceptions on barriers and facilitators to care, protocol for patient education, and protocol implementation plan. For program evaluation (part 2: changes in patients' scores on adherence to medication and life style changes, blood pressure, and other physiological and self

  9. Discovery and Distribution of Black Smokers on the Western Galapagos Spreading Center: Implications for Spatial and Temporal Controls on High Temperature Venting at Ridge/Hotspot Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haymon, R. M.; Anderson, P. G.; Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; White, S. M.; MacDonald, K. C.

    2006-12-01

    Though nearly one-fifth of the mid-ocean ridge (MOR) lies on or near hotspots, it has been debated whether hotspots increase or decrease MOR hydrothermal flux, or affect vent biota. Despite hotspot enhancement of melt supply, high-temperature vent plumes are enigmatically sparse along two previously-surveyed ridge- hotspot intersections [Reykjanes Ridge (RR), Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR)]. This has been attributed to crustal thickening by excess volcanism. During the 2005-06 GalAPAGoS expedition, we conducted nested sonar, plume, and camera surveys along a 540 km-long portion of the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) where the ridge intersects the Galapagos hotspot at lon. 94.5 -89.5 deg. W. Although MOR hydrothermal springs were first found along the eastern GSC crest in 1977 near lon. 86 deg. W, the GalAPAGoS smokers are the first active high-temperature vents to be found anywhere along the Cocos-Nazca plate boundary. Active and/or recently-inactive smokers were located beneath plumes at 5 sites on the seafloor between lon. 91 deg. W and 94.5 deg. W (see Anderson et al., this session) during near-bottom, real-time fiber-optic Medea camera surveys. Smokers occur along eruptive seafloor fissures atop axial volcanic ridges near the middles of ridge segments, mainly in areas underlain by relatively shallow, continuous axial magma chamber (AMC) seismic reflectors. These findings (1) support magmatic, rather than tectonic, control of GSC smoker distribution; (2) demonstrate that thick crust at MOR-hotspot intersections does not prevent high-temperature hydrothermal vents from forming; and, (3) appear to be inconsistent with models suggesting that enhanced hydrothermal cooling causes abrupt deepening of the AMC and transition from non-rifted to rifted GSC morphology near lon. 92.7 deg. W. The widely-spaced smoker sites located on different GSC segments exhibit remarkably similar characteristics and seafloor settings. Most sites are mature or extinct, and are on lava

  10. Outcome of patients with stage II and III nonseminomatous germ cell tumors: Results of a single center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ataergin S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prognostic factors in nonseminomatous germ cell tumors have been mainly derived from the analysis of stage I tumors. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate some prognostic factors and the outcome of patients with stage II and III nonseminomatous germ cell tumors according to risk groups treated between 1993 and 2002. Settings and Design: Patients were retrospectively classified as good, intermediate and poor risk groups according to International Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group. Materials and Methods: Biopsy specimens of 58 patients with stage II and III nonseminomatous germ cell tumors were analyzed by means of tumor histopathology, primary localization site of the tumor, relapse sites, initial serum tumor marker levels, the presence of persistent serum tumor marker elevation and the patients′ outcome. Statistical Analysis :0 Kruskall Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to determine the differences between the groups. Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis and log rank test was used to compare the survival probabilities of groups. Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to determine the prognostic factors in univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: Five-year overall and disease-free survival rates were calculated as 85% and 75% in stage II; 44% and 29% in stage III cases, respectively. Fifty-seven percent of patients were classified in good risk, 9% in intermediate risk and 27% in poor risk groups. Five-year overall survival rates were 97%, 75% and 7% ( P < 0.001 and disease-free survival rates were 83%, 34% and 7% ( P < 0.001 in good, intermediate and poor risk groups, respectively. Analysis of the prognostic factors revealed that the localization site of the primary tumor ( P < 0.001, the initial stage of disease ( P < 0.001, the initial serum AFP level (p: 0.001, the initial β -HCG level (p: 0.0048, the presence of yolk sac and choriocarcinoma components in tumor (p: 0.003 and p: 0

  11. Searches for new physics in jet final states in ATLAS at LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Amadio, Brian Thomas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The significant increase of the center-of-mass energy from 8 to 13 TeV at LHC Run II offers a great discovery potential for new physics at high mass, especially for strongly produced high-mass resonances, contact interactions, and TeV-gravity phenomena with high-pT jets. This talk presents the most recent Run II results from ATLAS on new physics searches in jet final states.

  12. 42 CFR 430.86 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Discovery. 430.86 Section 430.86 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... objection to discovery action initiated under this section. The presiding officer also has the power...

  13. Discovery Mondays

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Many people don't realise quite how much is going on at CERN. Would you like to gain first-hand knowledge of CERN's scientific and technological activities and their many applications? Try out some experiments for yourself, or pick the brains of the people in charge? If so, then the «Lundis Découverte» or Discovery Mondays, will be right up your street. Starting on May 5th, on every first Monday of the month you will be introduced to a different facet of the Laboratory. CERN staff, non-scientists, and members of the general public, everyone is welcome. So tell your friends and neighbours and make sure you don't miss this opportunity to satisfy your curiosity and enjoy yourself at the same time. You won't have to listen to a lecture, as the idea is to have open exchange with the expert in question and for each subject to be illustrated with experiments and demonstrations. There's no need to book, as Microcosm, CERN's interactive museum, will be open non-stop from 7.30 p.m. to 9 p.m. On the first Discovery M...

  14. Metal-poor stars observed with the Magellan telescope. II. Discovery of four stars with [Fe/H] ≤ –3.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placco, Vinicius M.; Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Frebel, Anna [Massachussetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Christlieb, Norbert [Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Landessternwarte, Königstuhl 12, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lee, Young Sun [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Kennedy, Catherine R. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Rossi, Silvia; Santucci, Rafael M. [Departamento de Astronomia-Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP 05508-900 (Brazil)

    2014-01-20

    We report on the discovery of seven low-metallicity stars selected from the Hamburg/ESO Survey, six of which are extremely metal-poor (EMP, [Fe/H] ≤ –3.0), with four having [Fe/H] ≤ –3.5. Chemical abundances or upper limits are derived for these stars based on high-resolution (R ∼ 35,000) Magellan/MIKE spectroscopy, and are in general agreement with those of other very and extremely metal-poor stars reported in the literature. Accurate metallicities and abundance patterns for stars in this metallicity range are of particular importance for studies of the shape of the metallicity distribution function of the Milky Way's halo system, in particular for probing the nature of its low-metallicity tail. In addition, taking into account suggested evolutionary mixing effects, we find that six of the program stars (with [Fe/H] ≤ –3.35) possess atmospheres that were likely originally enriched in carbon, relative to iron, during their main-sequence phases. These stars do not exhibit overabundances of their s-process elements, and hence may be, within the error bars, additional examples of the so-called CEMP-no class of objects.

  15. Stellar variability in open clusters . II. Discovery of a new period-luminosity relation in a class of fast-rotating pulsating stars in NGC 3766

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowlavi, N.; Saesen, S.; Semaan, T.; Eggenberger, P.; Barblan, F.; Eyer, L.; Ekström, S.; Georgy, C.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Pulsating stars are windows to the physics of stars enabling us to see glimpses of their interior. Not all stars pulsate, however. On the main sequence, pulsating stars form an almost continuous sequence in brightness, except for a magnitude range between δ Scuti and slowly pulsating B stars. Against all expectations, 36 periodic variables were discovered in 2013 in this luminosity range in the open cluster NGC 3766, the origins of which was a mystery. Aims: We investigate the properties of those new variability class candidates in relation to their stellar rotation rates and stellar multiplicity. Methods: We took multi-epoch spectra over three consecutive nights using ESO's Very Large Telescope. Results: We find that the majority of the new variability class candidates are fast-rotating pulsators that obey a new period-luminosity relation. We argue that the new relation discovered here has a different physical origin to the period-luminosity relations observed for Cepheids. Conclusions: We anticipate that our discovery will boost the relatively new field of stellar pulsation in fast-rotating stars, will open new doors for asteroseismology, and will potentially offer a new tool to estimate stellar ages or cosmic distances. Based on observations made with the FLAMES instruments on the VLT/UT2 telescope at the Paranal Observatory, Chile, under the program ID 69.A-0123(A).

  16. Evaluation of the Performance Characteristics of CGLSS II and U.S. NLDN Using Ground-Truth Dalta from Launch Complex 398, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, C. T.; Mata, A. G.; Rakov, V. A.; Nag, A.; Saul, J.

    2012-01-01

    A new comprehensive lightning instrumentation system has been designed for Launch Complex 39B (LC39B) at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This new instrumentation system includes seven synchronized high-speed video cameras, current sensors installed on the nine downconductors of the new lightning protection system (LPS) for LC39B; four dH/dt, 3-axis measurement stations; and five dE/dt stations composed of two antennas each. The LPS received 8 direct lightning strikes (a total of 19 strokes) from March 31 through December 31 2011. The measured peak currents and locations are compared to those reported by the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS II) and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). Results of comparison are presented and analyzed in this paper.

  17. Involvement of DEG5 and DEG8 proteases in the turnover of the photosystem II reaction center D1 protein under heat stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN XuWu; WANG LiYuan; ZHANG LiXin

    2007-01-01

    Deg5,deg8 and the double mutant,deg5deg8 of Arabidopsis thaliana were used to study the physiological role of the DEG proteases in the repair cycle of photosystem II (PSII) under heat stress. PSII activity in deg mutants showed increased sensitivity to heat stress,and the extent of this effect was greater in the double mutant,deg5deg8,than in the single mutants,deg5 and deg8. Degradation of the D1 protein was slower in the mutants than in the WT plants. Furthermore,the levels of other PSII reaction center proteins tested remained relatively stable in the mutant and WT plants following high-temperature treatment. Thus,our results indicate that DEG5 and DEG8 may have synergistic function in degradation of D1 protein under heat stress.

  18. Great Discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Bette-Lee; Heilbrun, Margaret; Hoffert, Barbara; Katterjohn, Anna; Kuzyk, Raya; Williams, Wilda

    2009-01-01

    What's hot? That's the question everyone asks during BookExpo America (BEA), held this year at New York's Jacob Javits Convention Center May 29-31. This article presents "Library Journal's" ("LJ's") review editors on their personal favorites from the BEA show floor. These include cookbooks, genre-crossers, small presses, romance books, and even a…

  19. NuSTAR Hard X-ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region II: X-ray Point Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, JaeSub; Hailey, Charles J; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Gotthelf, Eric; Fornasini, Francesca M; Krivonos, Roman; Bauer, Franz; Perez, Kerstin; Tomsick, John A; Bodaghee, Arash; Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Clavel, Maïca; Stern, Daniel; Grindlay, Jonathan E; Alexander, David M; Aramaki, Tsuguo; Baganoff, Frederick K; Barret, David; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E; Canipe, Alicia M; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Desai, Meera A; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W; Harrison, Fiona A; Hong, Dooran; Hornstrup, Allan; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason E; Madsen, Kristen K; Mao, Peter H; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Perri, Matteo; Pivovaroff, Michael J; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Westergaard, Niels J; Zhang, William W; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We present the first survey results of hard X-ray point sources in the Galactic Center (GC) region by NuSTAR. We have discovered 70 hard (3-79 keV) X-ray point sources in a 0.6 deg^2 region around Sgr A* with a total exposure of 1.7 Ms, and 7 sources in the Sgr B2 field with 300 ks. We identify clear Chandra counterparts for 58 NuSTAR sources and assign candidate counterparts for the remaining 19. The NuSTAR survey reaches X-ray luminosities of ~4 x and ~8 x 10^32 erg s^-1 at the GC (8 kpc) in the 3-10 and 10-40 keV bands, respectively. The source list includes three persistent luminous X-ray binaries and the likely run-away pulsar called the Cannonball. New source-detection significance maps reveal a cluster of hard (>10 keV) X-ray sources near the Sgr A diffuse complex with no clear soft X-ray counterparts. The severe extinction observed in the Chandra spectra indicates that all the NuSTAR sources are in the central bulge or are of extragalactic origin. Spectral analysis of relatively bright NuSTAR sources ...

  20. Effects of Sesame Oil on Blood Glucose and Lipid Profile in Type II Diabetic Patients Referring to The Yazd Diabetes Research Center.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Hoseini

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Type II Diabetes is one of the most prevalent endocrine diseases in the world that results from a combination of insulin resistance and ß-cell failure. Regarding importance of nutritional factors in management of diabetes, this study was designed to explore the effect of sesame oil on blood glucose and lipid profile in type II diabetic patients at Yazd Diabetes Research Center in 2007. Methods: A quasi-experimental study was conducted on 25 patients with type II diabetes mellitus (age: 51.5±6.28y; BMI:27.3±3kg/m2; disease duration:7.08±5.03y; Fasting blood glucose level: 181±51.9mg/dl. Subjects received 30 g/day sesame oil for 6 weeks. Sesame oil was supplied to the patients, who were instructed to use it in place of other cooking oils for 42 days. Plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, lipid profiles [Total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and triglycerides (TG] were measured at baseline and after 45 days of sesame oil substitution. 24 hours dietary recalls were obtained at the start , middle and end of study. Data was analyzed using analysis of variance with repeated measures and paired t-test. Results: Following 42 days intake of sesame oil, there were significant decrease in FBS (181±51.93 vs 154±39.65 mg/dl, HbA1c (9.64 ± 2 vs 8.4 ± 1.74 percent, TC (226.68 ± 31.4 vs 199.8 ± 37.87 mg/dl, LDL-c (123.9 ± 34.56 vs 95.53 ± 32.54 mg/dl compared to pre-treatment values. (P <0.05 . Blood TG level decreased after intake of sesame oil but this difference was not significant (P=0.2.Also, the changes of HDL-c levels were not significant (P=0.1. Conclusion: Sesame oil consumption results in considerable decrease in blood sugar, HbA1c and blood lipid levels (TC and LDL-C in type II diabetics.

  1. Chemical Feature-Based Molecular Modeling of Urotensin-II Receptor Antagonists: Generation of Predictive Pharmacophore Model for Early Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubhuti Pandey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For a series of 35 piperazino-phthalimide and piperazino-isoindolinone based urotensin-II receptor (UT antagonists, a thoroughly validated 3D pharmacophore model has been developed, consisting of four chemical features: one hydrogen bond acceptor lipid (HBA_L, one hydrophobe (HY, and two ring aromatic (RA. Multiple validation techniques like CatScramble, test set prediction, and mapping analysis of advanced known antagonists have been employed to check the predictive power and robustness of the developed model. The results demonstrate that the best model, Hypo 1, shows a correlation (r of 0.902, a root mean square deviation (RMSD of 0.886, and the cost difference of 39.69 bits. The model obtained is highly predictive with good correlation values for both internal (r2=0.707 as well as external (r2=0.614 test set compounds. Moreover, the pharmacophore model has been used as a 3D query for virtual screening which served to detect prospective new lead compounds which can be further optimized as UT antagonists with potential for treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  2. Changing the PEP-II Center-of-Mass Energy Down to 10 GeV and up to 11 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, M; Bertsche, K.; Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Wienands, U.; /SLAC

    2009-05-20

    PEP-II, the SLAC, LBNL, LLNL B-Factory was designed and optimized to run at the Upsilon 4S resonance (10.580 GeV with an 8.973 GeV e- beam and a 3.119 GeV e+ beam). The interaction region (IR) used permanent magnet dipoles to bring the beams into a head-on collision. The first focusing element for both beams was also a permanent magnet. The IR geometry, masking, beam orbits and beam pipe apertures were designed for 4S running. Even though PEP-II was optimized for the 4S, we successfully changed the center-of-mass energy (E{sub cm}) down to the Upsilon 2S resonance and completed an E{sub cm} scan from the 4S resonance up to 11.2 GeV. The luminosity throughout most of these changes remained near 1 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The E{sub cm} was changed by moving the energy of the high-energy beam (HEB). The beam energy differed by more than 20% which produced significantly different running conditions for the RF system. The energy loss per turn changed 2.5 times over this range. We describe how the beam energy was changed and discuss some of the consequences for the beam orbit in the interaction region. We also describe some of the RF issues that arose and how we solved them as the high-current HEB energy changed.

  3. Calculated Sunspot and Quiet-Sun Mg II Profiles Compared With IRIS DataEugene Avrett and Hui TianHarvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrett, Eugene H.

    2014-06-01

    A new sunpsot model has been derived, consistent with the SUMER atlas data of Curdt, et al. and Mg II profile data from IRIS. Comparisons are made with Quiet-Sun results from both sources. It is necessary to include molecules in the sunspot model not only account for the low brightness temperatures near 1850 /AA but also for the density variations higher in the atmosphere. The minimum temperature is roughly 2500 K in the sunspot model and 4500 K for the quiet Sun. The Mg II H line profile is centrally reversed in both cases, with the peak intensity originating where the temperature rises abruptly from the minimum value. The line center is formed at the top of the chromosphere where the temperature rises abruptly from 10,000 K into the chromosphere-corona transition region. The calculated Mg II line center intensity is much smaller than observed, for models constrained by the EUV continuum data.

  4. Achieving lipid goals with rosuvastatin compared with simvastatin in high risk patients in real clinical practice: a randomized, open-label, parallel-group, multi-center study: the DISCOVERY-Beta study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toivo Laks

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Toivo Laks1, Ester Keba2, Mariann Leiner3, Eero Merilind4, Mall Petersen5, Sirje Reinmets6, Sille Väli7, Terje Sööt8, Karin Otter81Clinic of Internal Medicine, North-Estonia Regional Hospital, Tallinn, Estonia; 2Clinic of Internal Medicine, Viljandi County Hospital, Viljandi, Estonia; 3Mustamäe Family Doctors Centre, Tallinn, Estonia; 4Nõmme Family Doctors Centre, Tallinn, Estonia; 5Saku Health Centre, Saku, Estonia; 6Kristiine Family Doctors, Tallinn, Estonia; 7Family Doctor Sille Väli, Kuressaare, Estonia; 8AstraZeneca, Tallinn, EstoniaAbstract: The aim of this multi-center, open-label, randomized, parallel-group trial was to compare the efficacy of rosuvastatin with that of simvastatin in achieving the 1998 European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS lipid treatment goals. 504 patients (≥18 years with primary hypercholesterolemia and a 10-year cardiovascular (CV risk >20% or history of coronary heart disease (CHD or other established atherosclerotic disease were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive rosuvastatin 10 mg or simvastatin 20 mg once daily for 12 weeks. A significantly higher proportion of patients achieved 1998 EAS low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C goal after 12 weeks of treatment with rosuvastatin 10 mg compared to simvastatin 20 mg (64 vs 51.5%, p < 0.01. Similarly, significantly more patients achieved the 1998 EAS total cholesterol (TC goal and the 2003 EAS LDL-C and TC goals (p < 0.001 with rosuvastatin 10 mg compared with simvastatin 20 mg. The incidence of adverse events and the proportion of patients who discontinued study treatment were similar between treatment groups. In conclusion, in the DISCOVERY-Beta Study in patients with primary hypercholesterolemia greater proportion of patients in the rosuvastatin 10 mg group achieved the EAS LDL-C treatment goal compared with the simvastatin 20 mg group. Drug tolerability was similar across both treatment groups.Keywords: hypercholesterolemia, low-density lipoprotein

  5. Apoptosis and the BCL-2 gene family - patterns of expression and prognostic value in STAGE I and II follicular center lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The prognostic significance of spontaneous levels of apoptosis and Bcl-2, Bax, and Bcl-x protein expression in follicular center lymphoma (FCL) is unknown. The objectives of this retrospective study were (1) to investigate the relationship between pretreatment apoptosis levels and long-term treatment outcome in patients with Stage I and II FCL; (2) to define the incidence and patterns of Bax and Bcl-x protein expression in human FC; and (3) to determine the relationship of Bcl-2, Bax, and Bcl-x expression with spontaneous apoptosis levels and clinical outcome in localized FCL. Methods and Materials: Between 1974 and 1988, 144 patients with Stage I or II FCL were treated. Hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) stained tissue sections of pretreatment specimens were retrieved for 96 patients. Treatment consisted of regional radiation therapy (XRT) for 25 patients, combined modality therapy (CMT) consisting of combination chemotherapy and XRT for 57 patients, and other treatments for 14 patients. Median follow-up for living patients was nearly 12 years. The apoptotic index (AI) was calculated by dividing the number of apoptotic cells by the total number of cells counted and multiplying by 100. Expression of Bcl-2, Bax, and Bcl-x proteins was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Results: The mean and median AI values for the entire group were 0.53 and 0.4, respectively (range: 0-5.2). The AI strongly correlated with cytologic grade, with mean AI values of 0.25 for grade 1, 0.56 for grade 2, and 0.84 for grade 3 (p < 0.0005; Kendall correlation). A positive correlation was present between grouped AI and grouped mitotic index (MI) (p = 0.014). For patients treated with CMT, an AI < 0.4 correlated with improved freedom from relapse (FFR) (p = 0.0145) and overall survival (OS) (p = 0.0081). An AI < 0.4 did not correlate with clinical outcome for the entire cohort or for patients receiving XRT only. Staining of tumor follicles for the Bcl-2 protein was positive, variable

  6. Cytoreductive surgery plus hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy improves survival for patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis from colorectal cancer: a phase II study from a Chinese center.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Qun Huang

    Full Text Available Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC is a difficult clinical challenge in colorectal cancer (CRC because conventional treatment modalities could not produce significant survival benefit, which highlights the acute need for new treatment strategies. Our previous case-control study demonstrated the potential survival advantage of cytoreductive surgery (CRS plus hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC over CRS alone. This phase II study was to further investigate the efficacy and adverse events of CRS+HIPEC for Chinese patients with CRC PC.A total of 60 consecutive CRC PC patients underwent 63 procedures consisting of CRS+HIPEC and postoperative chemotherapy, all by a designated team focusing on this combined treatment modality. All the clinico-pathological information was systematically integrated into a prospective database. The primary end point was disease-specific overall survival (OS, and the secondary end points were perioperative safety profiles.By the most recent database update, the median follow-up was 29.9 (range 3.5-108.9 months. The peritoneal cancer index (PCI ≤20 was in 47.0% of patients, complete cytoreductive surgery (CC0-1 was performed in 53.0% of patients. The median OS was 16.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.2-19.8 months, and the 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 70.5%, 34.2%, 22.0% and 22.0%, respectively. Mortality and grades 3 to 5 morbidity rates in postoperative 30 days were 0.0% and 30.2%, respectively. Univariate analysis identified 3 parameters with significant effects on OS: PCI ≤20, CC0-1 and adjuvant chemotherapy over 6 cycles. On multivariate analysis, however, only CC0-1 and adjuvant chemotherapy ≥6 cycles were found to be independent factors for OS benefit.CRS+HIPEC at a specialized treatment center could improve OS for selected CRC PC patients from China, with acceptable perioperative safety.

  7. Trends in Modern Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Jörg; Herrling, Paul L

    2016-01-01

    Drugs discovered by the pharmaceutical industry over the past 100 years have dramatically changed the practice of medicine and impacted on many aspects of our culture. For many years, drug discovery was a target- and mechanism-agnostic approach that was based on ethnobotanical knowledge often fueled by serendipity. With the advent of modern molecular biology methods and based on knowledge of the human genome, drug discovery has now largely changed into a hypothesis-driven target-based approach, a development which was paralleled by significant environmental changes in the pharmaceutical industry. Laboratories became increasingly computerized and automated, and geographically dispersed research sites are now more and more clustered into large centers to capture technological and biological synergies. Today, academia, the regulatory agencies, and the pharmaceutical industry all contribute to drug discovery, and, in order to translate the basic science into new medical treatments for unmet medical needs, pharmaceutical companies have to have a critical mass of excellent scientists working in many therapeutic fields, disciplines, and technologies. The imperative for the pharmaceutical industry to discover breakthrough medicines is matched by the increasing numbers of first-in-class drugs approved in recent years and reflects the impact of modern drug discovery approaches, technologies, and genomics. PMID:26330257

  8. Trends in Modern Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Jörg; Herrling, Paul L

    2016-01-01

    Drugs discovered by the pharmaceutical industry over the past 100 years have dramatically changed the practice of medicine and impacted on many aspects of our culture. For many years, drug discovery was a target- and mechanism-agnostic approach that was based on ethnobotanical knowledge often fueled by serendipity. With the advent of modern molecular biology methods and based on knowledge of the human genome, drug discovery has now largely changed into a hypothesis-driven target-based approach, a development which was paralleled by significant environmental changes in the pharmaceutical industry. Laboratories became increasingly computerized and automated, and geographically dispersed research sites are now more and more clustered into large centers to capture technological and biological synergies. Today, academia, the regulatory agencies, and the pharmaceutical industry all contribute to drug discovery, and, in order to translate the basic science into new medical treatments for unmet medical needs, pharmaceutical companies have to have a critical mass of excellent scientists working in many therapeutic fields, disciplines, and technologies. The imperative for the pharmaceutical industry to discover breakthrough medicines is matched by the increasing numbers of first-in-class drugs approved in recent years and reflects the impact of modern drug discovery approaches, technologies, and genomics.

  9. Criterion Validity, Severity Cut Scores, and Test-Retest Reliability of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in a University Counseling Center Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkle, Stephen D.; Lurie, Daphne; Insko, Stephanie L.; Atkinson, George; Jones, George L.; Logan, Arthur R.; Bissada, Nancy N.

    2002-01-01

    The criterion validity of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II; A. T. Beck, R. A. Steer, & G. K. Brown, 1996) was investigated by pairing blind BDI-II administrations with the major depressive episode portion of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I; M. B. First, R. L. Spitzer, M. Gibbon, & J. B. W. Williams,…

  10. National Centers for Environmental Prediction-Department of Energy (NCEP-DOE) Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP)-II Reanalysis (Reanalysis-2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NCEP-DOE Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP-II) reanalysis is a follow-on project to the "50-year" (1948-present) NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis Project....

  11. Aztec Mexico: Discovery of Templo Mayor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslav, Marc

    1982-01-01

    Describes the Aztec archaeological artifacts shown in the American Museum of Natural History exhibit: "Aztec Mexico: Discovery of Templo Mayor." More than 100 objects, ranging from human skulls to jewelry, found in the excavation of the Great Temple of Mexico located under the center of Mexico City, were displayed. (AM)

  12. 42 CFR 426.532 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Discovery. 426.532 Section 426.532 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM REVIEW OF NATIONAL COVERAGE DETERMINATIONS AND LOCAL COVERAGE DETERMINATIONS Review of an...

  13. 42 CFR 426.432 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Discovery. 426.432 Section 426.432 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM REVIEW OF NATIONAL COVERAGE DETERMINATIONS AND LOCAL COVERAGE DETERMINATIONS Review of an...

  14. Computational drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si-sheng OU-YANG; Jun-yan LU; Xiang-qian KONG; Zhong-jie LIANG; Cheng LUO; Hualiang JIANG

    2012-01-01

    Computational drug discovery is an effective strategy for accelerating and economizing drug discovery and development process.Because of the dramatic increase in the availability of biological macromolecule and small molecule information,the applicability of computational drug discovery has been extended and broadly applied to nearly every stage in the drug discovery and development workflow,including target identification and validation,lead discovery and optimization and preclinical tests.Over the past decades,computational drug discovery methods such as molecular docking,pharmacophore modeling and mapping,de novo design,molecular similarity calculation and sequence-based virtual screening have been greatly improved.In this review,we present an overview of these important computational methods,platforms and successful applications in this field.

  15. Reliable knowledge discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Honghua; Smirnov, Evgueni

    2012-01-01

    Reliable Knowledge Discovery focuses on theory, methods, and techniques for RKDD, a new sub-field of KDD. It studies the theory and methods to assure the reliability and trustworthiness of discovered knowledge and to maintain the stability and consistency of knowledge discovery processes. RKDD has a broad spectrum of applications, especially in critical domains like medicine, finance, and military. Reliable Knowledge Discovery also presents methods and techniques for designing robust knowledge-discovery processes. Approaches to assessing the reliability of the discovered knowledge are introduc

  16. Data mining and knowledge discovery in predictive toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helma, C

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the knowledge discovery process in predictive toxicology. This process consists of five major steps (i) feature calculation, (ii) feature selection, (iii) model induction, (iv) model validation and (v) interpretation of predictions and models. Data mining is a part of the knowledge discovery process and consists of the application of data analysis and discovery algorithms, which can be useful in all of the above steps. A brief review of suitable algorithms and their advantages and disadvantages is given for each knowledge discovery step, followed by a more detailed description of a problem-specific implementation of the lazar prediction system.

  17. Cyberinfrastructure for Atmospheric Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmson, R.; Moore, C. W.

    2004-12-01

    Each year across the United States, floods, tornadoes, hail, strong winds, lightning, hurricanes, and winter storms cause hundreds of deaths, routinely disrupt transportation and commerce, and result in billions of dollars in annual economic losses . MEAD and LEAD are two recent efforts aimed at developing the cyberinfrastructure for studying and forecasting these events through collection, integration, and analysis of observational data coupled with numerical simulation, data mining, and visualization. MEAD (Modeling Environment for Atmospheric Discovery) has been funded for two years as an NCSA (National Center for Supercomputing Applications) Alliance Expedition. The goal of this expedition has been the development/adaptation of cyberinfrastructure that will enable research simulations, datamining, machine learning and visualization of hurricanes and storms utilizing the high performance computing environments including the TeraGrid. Portal grid and web infrastructure are being tested that will enable launching of hundreds of individual WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) simulations. In a similar way, multiple Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) or WRF/ROMS simulations can be carried out. Metadata and the resulting large volumes of data will then be made available for further study and for educational purposes using analysis, mining, and visualization services. Initial coupling of the ROMS and WRF codes has been completed and parallel I/O is being implemented for these models. Management of these activities (services) are being enabled through Grid workflow technologies (e.g. OGCE). LEAD (Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery) is a recently funded 5-year, large NSF ITR grant that involves 9 institutions who are developing a comprehensive national cyberinfrastructure in mesoscale meteorology, particularly one that can interoperate with others being developed. LEAD is addressing the fundamental information technology (IT) research challenges needed

  18. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary

    OpenAIRE

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Bassett, Bruce A.; Becker, Andrew; Choi, Changsu; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L.; Dilday, Ben; Doi, Mamoru; Garnavich, Peter M.; Hogan, Craig J.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh W.,; Kessler, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5° wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for the discovery of new obj...

  19. Higgs Discovery Movie

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS & CMS Experiments Celebrate the 2nd Anniversary of the Discovery of the Higgs boson. Here, are some images of the path from LHC startup to Nobel Prize, featuring a musical composition by Roger Zare, performed by the Donald Sinta Quartet, called “LHC”. Happy Discovery Day!

  20. Decades of Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    For the past two-and-a-half decades, the Office of Science at the U.S. Department of Energy has been at the forefront of scientific discovery. Over 100 important discoveries supported by the Office of Science are represented in this document.

  1. Academic Drug Discovery Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Henriette Schultz; Valentin, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Academic drug discovery centres (ADDCs) are seen as one of the solutions to fill the innovation gap in early drug discovery, which has proven challenging for previous organisational models. Prior studies of ADDCs have identified the need to analyse them from the angle of their economic...

  2. Service discovery at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sundramoorthy, Vasughi; Scholten, Hans; Jansen, Pierre; Hartel, Pieter

    2003-01-01

    Service discovery is a fairly new field that kicked off since the advent of ubiquitous computing and has been found essential in the making of intelligent networks by implementing automated discovery and remote control between devices. This paper provides an overview and comparison of several promin

  3. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT,J.

    2004-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security.

  4. Quality of Type II Diabetes Care in Primary Health Care Centers in Kuwait: Employment of a Diabetes Quality Indicator Set (DQIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Dalia Badawi; Shadi Saleh; Nabil Natafgi; Yara Mourad; Kazem Behbehani

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is one of the major public health challenges, affecting more than 347 million adults worldwide. The impact of diabetes necessitates assessing the quality of care received by people with diabetes, especially in countries with a significant diabetes burden such as Kuwait. This paper aimed at piloting an approach for measuring Type II diabetes care performance through the use of a diabetes quality indicator set (DQIS) in primary health care. The DQIS for Kuwait was adapted from...

  5. Stroke Statistics in Korea: Part II Stroke Awareness and Acute Stroke Care, A Report from the Korean Stroke Society and Clinical Research Center For Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Bang, Oh Young; Kim, Jong S.; Heo, Ji Hoe; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Bae, Hee-Joon; Kang, Dong-Wha; Lee, Jin Soo; Kwon, Sun U.; Oh, Chang Wan; Lee, Byung-Chul; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current Part II of Stroke Statistics in Korea is to summarize nationally representative data on public awareness, pre-hospital delay, thrombolysis, and quality of acute stroke care in a single document. The public's knowledge of stroke definition, risk factors, warning signs, and act on stroke generally remains low. According to studies using open-ended questions, the correct definition of stroke was recognized in less than 50%, hypertension as a stroke risk factor in less than...

  6. The Greatest Mathematical Discovery?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2010-05-12

    What mathematical discovery more than 1500 years ago: (1) Is one of the greatest, if not the greatest, single discovery in the field of mathematics? (2) Involved three subtle ideas that eluded the greatest minds of antiquity, even geniuses such as Archimedes? (3) Was fiercely resisted in Europe for hundreds of years after its discovery? (4) Even today, in historical treatments of mathematics, is often dismissed with scant mention, or else is ascribed to the wrong source? Answer: Our modern system of positional decimal notation with zero, together with the basic arithmetic computational schemes, which were discovered in India about 500 CE.

  7. How to operate an Energy Advisory Service. Volume II. New York Institute of Technology Energy Information Center and Referral Service resource material. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spak, G.T.

    1978-06-01

    The NYIT Energy Information Center is a comprehensive information service covering every aspect of energy conservation and related technology, including conservation programs and practices, alternative energy systems, energy legislation, and public policy development in the United States and abroad. Materials in the Center can be located through a Card Catalog System and a Vertical File System. The Card Catalog System has entries which organize books and other printed materials according to authors/titles and according to the subject headings developed by the Library of Congress. The Vertical System contains pamphlets, newsclips, reprints, studies, announcements, product specifications and other ephemeral literature, and is organized according to subject headings based on the emerging vocabulary of the energy literature. The key to vertical file resources is the Thesaurus of Descriptors which is given. The Thesaurus includes all subject headings found in the Vertical File as well as other cross referenced terms likely to come to mind when seeking information on a specific energy area.

  8. Comparison between dispersed nuclear power plants and a nuclear energy center at a hypothetical site on Kentucky Lake, Tennessee. Volume II. Transmission of power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison is made among power transmission systems required to serve a single set of load center demands from four modes of siting the generating facilities: a single generation site with an ultimate generation capacity of 48,000 MW; four generation sites each with a generation capacity of 12,000 MW; 10 generation sites each with a generation capacity of 4,800 MW; and a system that resulted when the existing utility plan for future generation was logically expanded. The time period for the study is from the year 1985 to the year 2020, when the full 48,000 MW of new capacity from the single large nuclear energy center is on-line. The load centers served are Huntsville, Alabama; Evansville, Indiana; Paducah, Kentucky; and Chattanooga, Nashville, and Memphis, Tennessee. Generation sites are real locations but are hypothetical in terms of miles of transmission lines, the product of the amount of power transmitted and the distance transmitted (GW-miles), and cost

  9. Toxins and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Alan L

    2014-12-15

    Components from venoms have stimulated many drug discovery projects, with some notable successes. These are briefly reviewed, from captopril to ziconotide. However, there have been many more disappointments on the road from toxin discovery to approval of a new medicine. Drug discovery and development is an inherently risky business, and the main causes of failure during development programmes are outlined in order to highlight steps that might be taken to increase the chances of success with toxin-based drug discovery. These include having a clear focus on unmet therapeutic needs, concentrating on targets that are well-validated in terms of their relevance to the disease in question, making use of phenotypic screening rather than molecular-based assays, and working with development partners with the resources required for the long and expensive development process. PMID:25448391

  10. Leadership and Discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Goethals, George R

    2009-01-01

    This book, a collection of essays from scholars across disciplines, explores leadership of discovery, probing the guided and collaborative exploration and interpretation of the experience of our inner thoughts and feelings, and of our external worlds

  11. Fateful discovery almost forgotten

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    "The discovery of the fission of uranium exactly half a century ago is at risk of passing unremarked because of the general ambivalence towards the consequences of this development. Can that be wise?" (4 pages)

  12. Discovery Driven Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Per Nikolaj

    2009-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Discovery Driven Growh : A breakthrough process to reduce risk and seize opportunity, af Rita G. McGrath & Ian C. MacMillan, Boston: Harvard Business Press. Udgivelsesdato: 14 august......Anmeldelse af Discovery Driven Growh : A breakthrough process to reduce risk and seize opportunity, af Rita G. McGrath & Ian C. MacMillan, Boston: Harvard Business Press. Udgivelsesdato: 14 august...

  13. Leo II PC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — LEO II is a second-generation software system developed for use on the PC, which is designed to convert location references accurately between legal descriptions...

  14. Evaluation of the Performance Characteristics of CGLSS II and U.S. NLDN Using Ground-Truth Data from Launch Complex 398, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.; Rakov, V. A.; Nag, A.; Saul, Jon

    2012-01-01

    A new comprehensive lightning instrumentation system has been designed for Launch Complex 39B (LC39B) at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This new instrumentation system includes six synchronized high-speed video cameras, current sensors installed on the nine downcouductors of the new lightning protection system (LPS) for LC39B; four dH/dt, 3-axis measurement stations; and five dE/dt stations composed of two antennas each. The LPS received 8 direct lightning strikes (a total of 19 strokes) from March 31 through December 31, 2011. The measured peak currents and locations are compared to those reported by the CGLSS 11 and the NLDN. Results of comparison are presented and analyzed in this paper.

  15. A Decade of Discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-01-01

    This book provides a fascinating account of some of the most significant scientific discoveries and technological innovations coming out of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Laboratories. This remarkable book illustrates how the men and women of the National Laboratories are keeping us on the cutting edge. Though few Americans are familiar with the scope and scale of the work conducted at these National Laboratories, their research is literally changing our lives and bettering our planet. The book describes the scientific discoveries and technological advancements "in recognition of the men and women working in DOE's seventeen national laboratories across the country." Through highly vivid and accessible stories, this book details recent breakthroughs in three critical areas: 1) Energy and Environment, 2) National Security and 3) Life and Physical Science. The book illustrates how this government-funded research has resulted in more energy-efficient buildings; new, cleaner alternative fuels that reduce greenhouse gas emissions; safer, more efficient, nuclear power plants; improved responses to disease outbreaks; more secure and streamlined airport security; more effective treatments for cancer and other diseases; and astonishing discoveries that are altering our understanding of the universe and enabling scientific breakthroughs in fields such as nanotechnology and particle physics. Specifically, it contains 37 stories. A Decade of Discovery is truly a recent history of discovery - and a fascinating look at what the next decade holds.

  16. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Bernhard [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudinger Weg 5, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Lecker, Laura S. M.; Zoltner, Martin [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Jaenicke, Elmar [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Jakob Welder Weg 26, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Schnell, Robert [Karolinska Institutet, 17 177 Stockholm (Sweden); Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Brenk, Ruth, E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudinger Weg 5, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-07-28

    Three crystal structures of recombinant P. aeruginosa FabF are reported: the apoenzyme, an active-site mutant and a complex with a fragment of a natural product inhibitor. The characterization provides reagents and new information to support antibacterial drug discovery. Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials.

  17. Chiral hydroxylation at the mononuclear nonheme Fe(II center of 4-(S hydroxymandelate synthase--a structure-activity relationship analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana M L Di Giuro

    Full Text Available (S-Hydroxymandelate synthase (Hms is a nonheme Fe(II dependent dioxygenase that catalyzes the oxidation of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate to (S-4-hydroxymandelate by molecular oxygen. In this work, the substrate promiscuity of Hms is characterized in order to assess its potential for the biosynthesis of chiral α-hydroxy acids. Enzyme kinetic analyses, the characterization of product spectra, quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR analyses and in silico docking studies are used to characterize the impact of substrate properties on particular steps of catalysis. Hms is found to accept a range of α-oxo acids, whereby the presence of an aromatic substituent is crucial for efficient substrate turnover. A hydrophobic substrate binding pocket is identified as the likely determinant of substrate specificity. Upon introduction of a steric barrier, which is suspected to obstruct the accommodation of the aromatic ring in the hydrophobic pocket during the final hydroxylation step, the racemization of product is obtained. A steady state kinetic analysis reveals that the turnover number of Hms strongly correlates with substrate hydrophobicity. The analysis of product spectra demonstrates high regioselectivity of oxygenation and a strong coupling efficiency of C-C bond cleavage and subsequent hydroxylation for the tested substrates. Based on these findings the structural basis of enantioselectivity and enzymatic activity is discussed.

  18. Concerning the electronic coupling of MoMo quadruple bonds linked by 4,4'-azodibenzoate and comparison with t2g 6-Ru(II) centers by 4,4'-azodiphenylcyanamido ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Malcolm H; D'Acchioli, Jason S; Hadad, Christopher M; Patmore, Nathan J

    2006-12-25

    From the reactions between Mo2(O2CtBu)4 and each of terephthalic acid and 4,4'-azodibenzoic acid, the compounds [Mo2(O2CtBu)3]2(mu-O2CC6H4CO2) (1) and [Mo2(O2CtBu)3]2(mu-O2CC6H4N2C6H4CO2) (2) have been made and characterized by spectroscopic and electrochemical methods. Their electronic structures have been examined by computations employing density functional theory on model compounds where HCO2 substitutes for tBuCO2. On the basis of these studies, the two Mo2 units are shown to be only weakly coupled and the mixed-valence ions 1+ and 2+ to be valence-trapped and Class II and I, respectively, on the Robin-Day classification scheme for mixed-valence compounds. These results are compared to t2g6-Ru centers linked by 1,4-dicyanamidobenzene and azo-4,4'-diphenylcyanamido bridges for which the mixed-valence ions [Ru-bridge-Ru]5+ have been previously classified as fully delocalized, Class III [Crutchley et al. Inorg. Chem. 2001, 40, 1189; Inorg. Chem. 2004, 43, 1770], and on the basis of results described herein, it is proposed that the latter complex ion is more likely a mixed-valence organic radical where the bridge is oxidized and not the Ru(2+) centers.

  19. How to Nurture Scientific Discoveries Despite Their Unpredictable Nature

    CERN Document Server

    Loeb, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    The history of science reveals that major discoveries are not predictable. Naively, one might conclude therefore that it is not possible to artificially cultivate an environment that promotes discoveries. I suggest instead that open research without a programmatic agenda establishes a fertile ground for unexpected breakthroughs. Contrary to current practice, funding agencies should allocate a small fraction of their funds to support research in centers of excellence without programmatic reins tied to specific goals.

  20. Evaluating ten discoveries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1973-02-01

    Mexico's state company, Pemex, announces 10 significant oil and gas discoveries in the states of Tamaulipas and Chiapas. Most promising finds are a new oil province in S. Mexico and a deeper pool strike at the offshore Arenque field. The latter seems to point to the existence of an attractive reefal trend extending on shore toward the State of Nuevo Leon.

  1. Discovery of TUG-770

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Elisabeth; Hansen, Steffen V F; Urban, Christian;

    2013-01-01

    Free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1 or GPR40) enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells and currently attracts high interest as a new target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. We here report the discovery of a highly potent FFA1 agonist with favorable physicochemical...

  2. Ayurvedic drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Premalatha; Govindarajan, Rajgopal

    2007-12-01

    Ayurveda is a major traditional system of Indian medicine that is still being successfully used in many countries. Recapitulation and adaptation of the older science to modern drug discovery processes can bring renewed interest to the pharmaceutical world and offer unique therapeutic solutions for a wide range of human disorders. Eventhough time-tested evidences vouch immense therapeutic benefits for ayurvedic herbs and formulations, several important issues are required to be resolved for successful implementation of ayurvedic principles to present drug discovery methodologies. Additionally, clinical examination in the extent of efficacy, safety and drug interactions of newly developed ayurvedic drugs and formulations are required to be carefully evaluated. Ayurvedic experts suggest a reverse-pharmacology approach focusing on the potential targets for which ayurvedic herbs and herbal products could bring tremendous leads to ayurvedic drug discovery. Although several novel leads and drug molecules have already been discovered from ayurvedic medicinal herbs, further scientific explorations in this arena along with customization of present technologies to ayurvedic drug manufacturing principles would greatly facilitate a standardized ayurvedic drug discovery.

  3. Archaeological Discoveries in Liaoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    LIAONING Province, in northeastern China, has been inhabited by many ethnic groups since ancient times. It is one of the sites of China’s earliest civilization. Since the 1950s many archaeological discoveries from periods beginning with the Paleolithic of 200,000 years ago, and through all the following historic periods, have been made in the province.

  4. Prognostic value of the extent of resection in supratentorial WHO grade II astrocytomas stratified for IDH1 mutation status: a single-center volumetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungk, Christine; Scherer, Moritz; Mock, Andreas; Capper, David; Radbruch, Alexander; von Deimling, Andreas; Bendszus, Martin; Herold-Mende, Christel; Unterberg, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Current evidence supports a maximized extent of resection (EOR) in low-grade gliomas (LGG), regardless of different histological subtypes and molecular markers. We therefore evaluated the prognostic impact of extensive, mainly intraoperative (i)MRI-guided surgery in low-grade astrocytomas stratified for IDH1 mutation status. Retrospective assessment of 46 consecutive cases of newly diagnosed supratentorial WHO grade II astrocytomas treated during the last decade was performed. IDH1 mutation status was obtained for all patients. Volumetric analysis of tumor volumes was performed pre-, intra-, early postoperatively and at first follow-up. Survival analysis was conducted with uni-and multivariate regression models implementing clinical parameters and continuous volumetric variables. Median EOR was 90.4 % (range 17.5-100 %) and was increased to 94.9 % (range 34.8-100 %) in iMRI-guided resections (n = 33). A greater EOR was prognostic for increased progression-free survival (HR 0.23, p = 0.031) and time to re-intervention (TTR) (HR 0.23, p = 0.03). In IDH1 mutant patients, smaller residual tumor volumes were associated with increased TTR (HR 1.01, p = 0.03). IDH1 mutation (38/46 cases) was an independent positive prognosticator for overall survival (OS) in multivariate analysis (HR 0.09, p = 0.002), while extensive surgery had limited impact upon OS. In a subgroup of patients with ≥40 % EOR (n = 39), however, initial and residual tumor volumes were prognostic for OS (HR 1.03, p = 0.005 and HR 1.08, p = 0.007, respectively), persistent to adjustment for IDH1. No association between EOR and neurologic morbidity was found. In this analysis of low-grade astrocytomas stratified for IDH1, extensive tumor resections were prognostic for progression and TTR and, in patients with ≥40 % EOR, for OS. PMID:27344556

  5. Scientists Like Me: Faces of Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enevoldsen, A. A. G.; Culp, S.; Trinh, A.

    2010-08-01

    During the International Year of Astronomy, Pacific Science Center is hosting a photography exhibit: Scientists Like Me: Faces of Discovery. The exhibit contains photographs of real, current astronomers and scientists working in astronomy and aerospace-related fields from many races, genders, cultural affiliations and walks of life. The photographs were taken and posters designed by Alyssa Trinh and Sarah Culp, high school interns in Discovery Corps, Pacific Science Center's youth development program. The direct contact between the scientists and the interns helps the intended audience of teachers and families personally connect with scientists. The finished posters from this exhibit are available online (http://pacificsciencecenter.org/scientists) for teachers to use in their classrooms, in addition to being displayed at Pacific Science Center and becoming part of Pacific Science Center's permanent art rotation. The objective of this project was to fill a need for representative photographs of scientists in the world community. It also met two of the goals of International Year of Astronomy: to provide a modern image of science and scientists, and to improve the gender-balanced representation of scientists at all levels and promote greater involvement by all people in scientific and engineering careers. We would like to build on the success of this project and create an annual summer internship, with different interns, focusing on creating posters for different fields of science.

  6. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2005-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include, for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security. To achieve our goals we have established a close alliance with applied mathematicians and computer scientists at Stony Brook and Columbia Universities.

  7. COPD Discovery Might Improve Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158852.html COPD Discovery Might Improve Treatment Study may help pinpoint ... will progress, a discovery they believe could improve COPD treatment. Their research might help doctors determine which ...

  8. Creating A Guided- discovery Lesson

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田枫

    2005-01-01

    In a guided - discovery lesson, students sequentially uncover layers of mathematical information one step at a time and learn new mathematics. We have identified eight critical steps necessary in developing a successful guided- discovery lesson.

  9. Hastings Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Public Events October 19, Hastings Center Seminar, Garrison : Human Genetic Engineering: Wh at Can We Do? What Should We ... Public Events October 19, Hastings Center Seminar, Garrison : Human Genetic Engineering: Wh at Can We Do? What Should We ...

  10. Discovery of a Series of Imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines with Dual Activity at Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-[gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Filzen, Gary F.; Flynn, Declan; Bigge, Christopher F.; Chen, Jing; Davis, Jo Ann; Dudley, Danette A.; Edmunds, Jeremy J.; Esmaeil, Nadia; Geyer, Andrew; Heemstra, Ronald J.; Jalaie, Mehran; Ohren, Jeffrey F.; Ostroski, Robert; Ellis, Teresa; Schaum, Robert P.; Stoner, Chad (Pfizer)

    2013-03-07

    Mining of an in-house collection of angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists to identify compounds with activity at the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) revealed a new series of imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines 2 possessing activity at these two receptors. Early availability of the crystal structure of the lead compound 2a bound to the ligand binding domain of human PPAR{gamma} confirmed the mode of interaction of this scaffold to the nuclear receptor and assisted in the optimization of PPAR{gamma} activity. Among the new compounds, (S)-3-(5-(2-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)phenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl)-2-ethyl-5-isobutyl-7-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (2l) was identified as a potent angiotensin II type I receptor blocker (IC{sub 50} = 1.6 nM) with partial PPAR{gamma} agonism (EC{sub 50} = 212 nM, 31% max) and oral bioavailability in rat. The dual pharmacology of 2l was demonstrated in animal models of hypertension (SHR) and insulin resistance (ZDF rat). In the SHR, 2l was highly efficacious in lowering blood pressure, while robust lowering of glucose and triglycerides was observed in the male ZDF rat.

  11. Discovery of a novel anti-cancer agent targeting both topoisomerase I and II in hepatocellular carcinoma Hep 3B cells in vitro and in vivo: Cinnamomum verum component 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perng, Daw-Shyong; Tsai, Yu-Hsin; Cherng, Jonathan; Kuo, Chih-Wei; Shiao, Chih-Chung; Cherng, Jaw-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Cinnamomum verum has been used as a traditional Chinese herbal medicine. We evaluated the anticancer effect of 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde (2-MCA), a constituent of the bark of the plant, in hepatocellular carcinoma Hep 3B cells. The results show that 2-MCA suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis as indicated by an up-regulation of pro-apoptotic bax and bak genes and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic bcl-2 and bcl-XL genes, mitochondrial membrane potential loss, cytochrome c release, activation of caspase 3 and 9, increase in the DNA content in sub G1, and morphological characteristics of apoptosis. 2-MCA also induced lysosomal vacuolation with increased volume of acidic compartments (VAC), suppressions of nuclear transcription factors NF-κB, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and both topoisomerase I and II activities in a dose-dependent manner. Further study reveals the growth-inhibitory effect of 2-MCA was also evident in a nude mice model. Taken together, the data suggest that the growth-inhibitory effect of 2-MCA against Hep 3B cells is accompanied by downregulations of NF-κB binding activity, inflammatory responses involving COX-2 and PGE2, and proliferative control involving apoptosis, both topoisomerase I and II activities, together with an upregulation of lysosomal vacuolation and VAC. Our data suggest that 2-MCA could be a potential agent for anticancer therapy. PMID:26707867

  12. External validation of the New Orleans Criteria (NOC), the Canadian CT Head Rule (CCHR) and the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study II (NEXUS II) for CT scanning in pediatric patients with minor head injury in a non-trauma center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head CT scans are considered the imaging modality of choice to screen patients with head trauma for neurocranial injuries; however, widespread CT imaging is not recommended and much research has been conducted to establish objective clinical predictors of intracranial injury (ICI) in order to optimize the use of neuroimaging in children with minor head trauma. To evaluate whether a strict application of the New Orleans Criteria (NOC), Canadian CT Head Rule (CCHR) and National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study II (NEXUS II) in pediatric patients with head trauma presenting to a non-trauma center (level II) could reduce the number of cranial CT scans performed without missing clinically significant ICI. We conducted an IRB-approved retrospective analysis of pediatric patients with head trauma who received a cranial CT scan between Jan. 1, 2001, and Sept. 1, 2008, and identified which patients would have required a scan based on the criteria of the above listed decision instruments. We then determined the sensitivities, specificities and negative predictive values of these aids. In our cohort of 2,101 patients, 92 (4.4%) had positive head CT findings. The sensitivities for the NOC, CCHR and NEXUS II were 96.7% (95%CI 93.1-100), 65.2% (95%CI 55.5-74.9) and 78.3% (95%CI 69.9-86.7), respectively, and their negative predictive values were 98.7%, 97.6% and 97.2%, respectively. In contrast, the specificities for these aids were 11.2% (95%CI 9.8-12.6), 64.2% (95%CI 62.1-66.3) and 34.2% (95%CI 32.1-36.3), respectively. Therefore, in our population it would have been possible to scan at least 10.9% fewer patients. The number of cranial CT scans conducted in our pediatric cohort with head trauma would have been reduced had any of the three clinical decision aids been applied. Therefore, we recommend that further validation and adoption of pediatric head CT decision aids in non-trauma centers be considered to ultimately increase patient safety while reducing medical

  13. Excel Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Citigroup,one of the World top 500 companies,has now settled in Excel Center,Financial Street. The opening ceremony of Excel Center and the entry ceremony of Citigroup in the center were held on March 31.Government leaders of Xicheng District,the Excel CEO and the heads of Asia-Pacific Region leaders of Citibank all participated in the ceremony.

  14. Atlas of Astronomical Discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    Schilling, Govert

    2011-01-01

    Four hundred years ago in Middelburg, in the Netherlands, the telescope was invented. The invention unleashed a revolution in the exploration of the universe. Galileo Galilei discovered mountains on the Moon, spots on the Sun, and moons around Jupiter. Christiaan Huygens saw details on Mars and rings around Saturn. William Herschel discovered a new planet and mapped binary stars and nebulae. Other astronomers determined the distances to stars, unraveled the structure of the Milky Way, and discovered the expansion of the universe. And, as telescopes became bigger and more powerful, astronomers delved deeper into the mysteries of the cosmos. In his Atlas of Astronomical Discoveries, astronomy journalist Govert Schilling tells the story of 400 years of telescopic astronomy. He looks at the 100 most important discoveries since the invention of the telescope. In his direct and accessible style, the author takes his readers on an exciting journey encompassing the highlights of four centuries of astronomy. Spectacul...

  15. Opportunistic Adaptation Knowledge Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Badra, Fadi; Cordier, Amélie; Lieber, Jean

    2009-01-01

    The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com International audience Adaptation has long been considered as the Achilles' heel of case-based reasoning since it requires some domain-specific knowledge that is difficult to acquire. In this paper, two strategies are combined in order to reduce the knowledge engineering cost induced by the adaptation knowledge (CA) acquisition task: CA is learned from the case base by the means of knowledge discovery techniques, and the CA a...

  16. Discovery with FAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, P.

    2016-02-01

    FAST offers "transformational" performance well-suited to finding new phenomena - one of which might be polarised spectral transients. But discoveries will only be made if "the system" provides its users with the necessary opportunities. In addition to designing in as much observational flexibility as possible, FAST should be operated with a philosophy which maximises its "human bandwidth". This band includes the astronomers of tomorrow - many of whom not have yet started school or even been born.

  17. Discovery as a process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehle, C.

    1994-05-01

    The three great myths, which form a sort of triumvirate of misunderstanding, are the Eureka! myth, the hypothesis myth, and the measurement myth. These myths are prevalent among scientists as well as among observers of science. The Eureka! myth asserts that discovery occurs as a flash of insight, and as such is not subject to investigation. This leads to the perception that discovery or deriving a hypothesis is a moment or event rather than a process. Events are singular and not subject to description. The hypothesis myth asserts that proper science is motivated by testing hypotheses, and that if something is not experimentally testable then it is not scientific. This myth leads to absurd posturing by some workers conducting empirical descriptive studies, who dress up their study with a ``hypothesis`` to obtain funding or get it published. Methods papers are often rejected because they do not address a specific scientific problem. The fact is that many of the great breakthroughs in silence involve methods and not hypotheses or arise from largely descriptive studies. Those captured by this myth also try to block funding for those developing methods. The third myth is the measurement myth, which holds that determining what to measure is straightforward, so one doesn`t need a lot of introspection to do science. As one ecologist put it to me ``Don`t give me any of that philosophy junk, just let me out in the field. I know what to measure.`` These myths lead to difficulties for scientists who must face peer review to obtain funding and to get published. These myths also inhibit the study of science as a process. Finally, these myths inhibit creativity and suppress innovation. In this paper I first explore these myths in more detail and then propose a new model of discovery that opens the supposedly miraculous process of discovery to doser scrutiny.

  18. Discovery of a novel anticancer agent with both anti-topoisomerase I and II activities in hepatocellular carcinoma SK-Hep-1 cells in vitro and in vivo: Cinnamomum verum component 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perng, Daw-Shyong; Tsai, Yu-Hsin; Cherng, Jonathan; Wang, Jeng-Shing; Chou, Kuo-Shen; Shih, Chia-Wen; Cherng, Jaw-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamomum verum is used to make the spice cinnamon and has been used as a traditional Chinese herbal medicine for various applications. We evaluated the anticancer effect of 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde (2-MCA), a constituent of the bark of the plant, and its underlying molecular biomarkers associated with carcinogenesis in human hepatocellular carcinoma SK-Hep-1 cell line. The results show that 2-MCA suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis as indicated by mitochondrial membrane potential loss, activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, increase in the DNA content in sub-G1, and morphological characteristics of apoptosis, including blebbing of plasma membrane, nuclear condensation, fragmentation, apoptotic body formation, and long comet tail. In addition, 2-MCA also induced lysosomal vacuolation with increased volume of acidic compartments, suppressions of nuclear transcription factors NF-κB, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and both topoisomerase I and II activities in a dose-dependent manner. Further study reveals the growth-inhibitory effect of 2-MCA was also evident in a nude mice model. Taken together, the data suggest that the growth-inhibitory effect of 2-MCA against SK-Hep-1 cells is accompanied by downregulations of NF-κB-binding activity, inflammatory responses involving cyclooxygenase-2 and PGE2, and proliferative control involving apoptosis, both topoisomerase I and II activities, together with an upregulation of lysosomal vacuolation and volume of acidic compartments. Similar effects (including all of the above-mentioned effects) were found in other tested cell lines, including human hepatocellular carcinoma Hep 3B, lung adenocarcinoma A549, squamous cell carcinoma NCI-H520, colorectal adenocarcinoma COLO 205, and T-lymphoblastic MOLT-3 (results not shown). Our data suggest that 2-MCA could be a potential agent for anticancer therapy. PMID:26792981

  19. Job center

    Science.gov (United States)

    To better meet the needs of AGU members, a program has been started to increase the effectiveness of the Job Center activity at the Spring and Fall Meetings. As a result, participation in the Job Center at the 1988 AGU Spring Meeting in Baltimore increased substantially compared to previous Spring Meetings. The number of employers, applicants, and interviews scheduled more than doubled compared to the 1987 Spring Job Center.In order to make the meeting Job Centers even better, a survey is being conducted of employers and applicants who participated in the 1988 Spring Job Center. Evaluation of this survey will be useful in continuing increased participation in and the effectiveness of the Job Center at the 1988 Fall Meeting. Past participants and those interested in the future of the Job Center are encouraged to forward comments and suggestions to AGU, Member Programs Division, 2000 Florida Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20009.

  20. Discovery of Uniformly Expanding Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Saul Perlmutter and the Brian Schmidt – Adam Riess teams reported that their Friedmann-model GR-based analysis of their supernovae magnitude-redshift data re- vealed a new phenomenon of “dark energy” which, it is claimed, forms 73% of the energy / matter density of the present-epoch universe, and which is linked to the further claim of an accelerating expansion of the universe. In 2011 Perlmutter, Schmidt and Riess received the Nobel Prize in Physics “for the discovery of the accelerating ex- pansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae”. Here it is shown that (i a generic model-independent analysis of this data reveals a uniformly expanding universe, (ii their analysis actually used Newtonian gravity, and finally (iii the data, as well as the CMB fluctuation data, does not require “dark energy” nor “dark matter”, but instead reveals the phenomenon of a dynamical space, which is absent from the Friedmann model.

  1. Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (Program website, free access)   Currently there is no database matching your keyword search, but the NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology website may be of interest. The Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology enables science and industry by providing essential measurement methods, instrumentation, and standards to support all phases of nanotechnology development, from discovery to production.

  2. Open access high throughput drug discovery in the public domain: a Mount Everest in the making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anuradha; McDonald, Peter R; Sittampalam, Sitta; Chaguturu, Rathnam

    2010-11-01

    High throughput screening (HTS) facilitates screening large numbers of compounds against a biochemical target of interest using validated biological or biophysical assays. In recent years, a significant number of drugs in clinical trails originated from HTS campaigns, validating HTS as a bona fide mechanism for hit finding. In the current drug discovery landscape, the pharmaceutical industry is embracing open innovation strategies with academia to maximize their research capabilities and to feed their drug discovery pipeline. The goals of academic research have therefore expanded from target identification and validation to probe discovery, chemical genomics, and compound library screening. This trend is reflected in the emergence of HTS centers in the public domain over the past decade, ranging in size from modestly equipped academic screening centers to well endowed Molecular Libraries Probe Centers Network (MLPCN) centers funded by the NIH Roadmap initiative. These centers facilitate a comprehensive approach to probe discovery in academia and utilize both classical and cutting-edge assay technologies for executing primary and secondary screening campaigns. The various facets of academic HTS centers as well as their implications on technology transfer and drug discovery are discussed, and a roadmap for successful drug discovery in the public domain is presented. New lead discovery against therapeutic targets, especially those involving the rare and neglected diseases, is indeed a Mount Everestonian size task, and requires diligent implementation of pharmaceutical industry's best practices for a successful outcome.

  3. Functional Centering

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, M

    1996-01-01

    Based on empirical evidence from a free word order language (German) we propose a fundamental revision of the principles guiding the ordering of discourse entities in the forward-looking centers within the centering model. We claim that grammatical role criteria should be replaced by indicators of the functional information structure of the utterances, i.e., the distinction between context-bound and unbound discourse elements. This claim is backed up by an empirical evaluation of functional centering.

  4. Energia avastuskeskus = Energy discovery center / Margit Aule ; kommenteerinud Kristiina Raid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Aule, Margit, 1981-

    2015-01-01

    Energia avastuskeskuse (Põhja pst 29/31, Tallinn) interjöörist ja ekspositsiooni kujundusest. Autor Margit Argus (KAOS Arhitektid); ekspositsiooni kujundus Margit Argus, Margit Aule; arhitektid Sander Aas, Margit Aule, Pelle Sten Viiburg (KAOS Arhitektid). Eesti Sisearhitektide Liidu aastapreemia 2014/2015 parima ajaloolise interjööri eest

  5. Resultados del Programa de Rehabilitación Cardíaca Fase II, desarrollado por el Centro Nacional de Rehabilitación, Costa Rica Results of the Phase II Cardiac Rehabilitation Programat the National Center of Rehabilitation, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Wong

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Debido a la importancia de la enfermedad cardiovascular en Costa Rica y a la escasa información de los programas de rehabilitación cardiaca a nivel nacional, el presente estudio buscó describir los resultados del Programa de Rehabilitación Cardiaca, Fase II, en el Centro Nacional de Rehabilitación. Métodos: Se trata de un estudio retrospectivo de revisión de expedientes clínicos de pacientes portadores de enfermedad arterial coronaria, remitidos a un programa de rehabilitación cardiaca desde marzo de 2009 a mayo de 2010. De un total de 158 pacientes, 131 finalizaron la fase II. Se comparó la capacidad funcional máxima -estimada mediante una prueba de esfuerzo en banda sin fin- y el perfil de lípidos. Estas pruebas se realizaron al inicio y al final de esta fase II, la cual consta de 10 a 12 semanas de duración. Resultados: Se obtuvo un aumento significativo de la capacidad funcional estimada en Equivalentes Metabólicos (METs, con un promedio equivalente a un 29.7% al finalizar las 10 a 12 semanas (pAim: Due to the importance of the cardiovascular disease in Costa Rica, and the lack of information about Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs in our country, the objective of this study is to determine the results of a phase II Cardiac Rehabilitation program at the National Center of Rehabilitation. Methods: retrospective study based on a review of the clinical records of patients with coronary artery disease referred for the phase II Cardiac Rehabilitation Program from March 2009 to May 2010. Of a total of 158 patients, 131 finished the phase II. We compared the results of maximal functional capacity estimated by a treadmill stress testing, and lipid profile at the beginning and the end of the 10 - 12 week program. Results: we found a significant statistical increase in the functional capacity of Metabolic Equivalents (METs in average of 29,7% at the end of the 10-12 week program (p<0,05 estimated by a treadmill stress testing

  6. Systems Pharmacology in Small Molecular Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhou

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Drug discovery is a risky, costly and time-consuming process depending on multidisciplinary methods to create safe and effective medicines. Although considerable progress has been made by high-throughput screening methods in drug design, the cost of developing contemporary approved drugs did not match that in the past decade. The major reason is the late-stage clinical failures in Phases II and III because of the complicated interactions between drug-specific, human body and environmental aspects affecting the safety and efficacy of a drug. There is a growing hope that systems-level consideration may provide a new perspective to overcome such current difficulties of drug discovery and development. The systems pharmacology method emerged as a holistic approach and has attracted more and more attention recently. The applications of systems pharmacology not only provide the pharmacodynamic evaluation and target identification of drug molecules, but also give a systems-level of understanding the interaction mechanism between drugs and complex disease. Therefore, the present review is an attempt to introduce how holistic systems pharmacology that integrated in silico ADME/T (i.e., absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity, target fishing and network pharmacology facilitates the discovery of small molecular drugs at the system level.

  7. Systems Pharmacology in Small Molecular Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Yonghua; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery is a risky, costly and time-consuming process depending on multidisciplinary methods to create safe and effective medicines. Although considerable progress has been made by high-throughput screening methods in drug design, the cost of developing contemporary approved drugs did not match that in the past decade. The major reason is the late-stage clinical failures in Phases II and III because of the complicated interactions between drug-specific, human body and environmental aspects affecting the safety and efficacy of a drug. There is a growing hope that systems-level consideration may provide a new perspective to overcome such current difficulties of drug discovery and development. The systems pharmacology method emerged as a holistic approach and has attracted more and more attention recently. The applications of systems pharmacology not only provide the pharmacodynamic evaluation and target identification of drug molecules, but also give a systems-level of understanding the interaction mechanism between drugs and complex disease. Therefore, the present review is an attempt to introduce how holistic systems pharmacology that integrated in silico ADME/T (i.e., absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity), target fishing and network pharmacology facilitates the discovery of small molecular drugs at the system level. PMID:26901192

  8. Distribution center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Distribution center is a logistics link fulfill physical distribution as its main functionGenerally speaking, it's a large and hiahly automated center destined to receive goods from various plants and suppliers,take orders,fill them efficiently,and deliver goods to customers as quickly as possible.

  9. Representation Discovery using Harmonic Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Mahadevan, Sridhar

    2008-01-01

    Representations are at the heart of artificial intelligence (AI). This book is devoted to the problem of representation discovery: how can an intelligent system construct representations from its experience? Representation discovery re-parameterizes the state space - prior to the application of information retrieval, machine learning, or optimization techniques - facilitating later inference processes by constructing new task-specific bases adapted to the state space geometry. This book presents a general approach to representation discovery using the framework of harmonic analysis, in particu

  10. Two kinds of knowledge in scientific discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridewell, Will; Langley, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Research on computational models of scientific discovery investigates both the induction of descriptive laws and the construction of explanatory models. Although the work in law discovery centers on knowledge-lean approaches to searching a problem space, research on deeper modeling tasks emphasizes the pivotal role of domain knowledge. As an example, our own research on inductive process modeling uses information about candidate processes to explain why variables change over time. However, our experience with IPM, an artificial intelligence system that implements this approach, suggests that process knowledge is insufficient to avoid consideration of implausible models. To this end, the discovery system needs additional knowledge that constrains the model structures. We report on an extended system, SC-IPM, that uses such information to reduce its search through the space of candidates and to produce models that human scientists find more plausible. We also argue that although people carry out less extensive search than SC-IPM, they rely on the same forms of knowledge--processes and constraints--when constructing explanatory models.

  11. Two kinds of knowledge in scientific discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridewell, Will; Langley, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Research on computational models of scientific discovery investigates both the induction of descriptive laws and the construction of explanatory models. Although the work in law discovery centers on knowledge-lean approaches to searching a problem space, research on deeper modeling tasks emphasizes the pivotal role of domain knowledge. As an example, our own research on inductive process modeling uses information about candidate processes to explain why variables change over time. However, our experience with IPM, an artificial intelligence system that implements this approach, suggests that process knowledge is insufficient to avoid consideration of implausible models. To this end, the discovery system needs additional knowledge that constrains the model structures. We report on an extended system, SC-IPM, that uses such information to reduce its search through the space of candidates and to produce models that human scientists find more plausible. We also argue that although people carry out less extensive search than SC-IPM, they rely on the same forms of knowledge--processes and constraints--when constructing explanatory models. PMID:25163620

  12. Denton Vacuum Discovery-550 Sputterer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: CORAL Name: Sputter 2 Similar to the existing 4-Gun Denton Discovery 22 Sputter system, with the following enhancements: Specifications / Capabilities:...

  13. Optogenetics enlightens neuroscience drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chenchen; Knöpfel, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Optogenetics - the use of light and genetics to manipulate and monitor the activities of defined cell populations - has already had a transformative impact on basic neuroscience research. Now, the conceptual and methodological advances associated with optogenetic approaches are providing fresh momentum to neuroscience drug discovery, particularly in areas that are stalled on the concept of 'fixing the brain chemistry'. Optogenetics is beginning to translate and transit into drug discovery in several key domains, including target discovery, high-throughput screening and novel therapeutic approaches to disease states. Here, we discuss the exciting potential of optogenetic technologies to transform neuroscience drug discovery.

  14. Interpretation of a discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučković Vladan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the development of the theory of asynchronous motors since Tesla’s discovery until the present day. The theory of steady state, as we know it today, was completed already during the first dozen of years. That was followed by a period of stagnation during a number of decades, when the theory of asynchronous motors was developed only in the framework of the general theory of electric machines, which was stimulated by the problems of the development of synchronous generators and big electric networks. It is only in our time that this simple motor, which was used for a long time just to perform crude tasks, became again the inspiration for the researchers and engineers who enabled it, with the help of power electronics and semi-conductor technology, to be used in the finest drives.

  15. Senior Centers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Karen Albers] We provide a wide variety of activities -- physical, health, mental health programs with Senior Plus, cognitive ... of games. [Narrator] Many senior centers also offer exercise programs. [Karen Albers] We offer aerobics, tai chi, ...

  16. Senior Centers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Living independently at home is something many older adults would like to do as long as they can. Senior centers, adult day care, transportation, and meals programs are long- ...

  17. Senior Centers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... variety of social and recreational activities. [Karen Albers] We provide a wide variety of activities -- physical, health, ... senior centers also offer exercise programs. [Karen Albers] We offer aerobics, tai chi, tap dancing, ballroom dancing, ...

  18. Senior Centers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... transportation, and meals programs are long-term care services available in the community which make it easier ... about senior centers and other long-term care services available in your community, contact the Eldercare Locator ...

  19. Senior Centers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of games. [Narrator] Many senior centers also offer exercise programs. [Karen Albers] We offer aerobics, tai chi, ... chi, tap dancing, ballroom dancing, square dancing, chair exercise, arthritis classes, yoga, and lots of dancing. [Narrator] ...

  20. Discovery Learning Strategies in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaravelu, G.

    2012-01-01

    The study substantiates that the effectiveness of Discovery Learning method in learning English Grammar for the learners at standard V. Discovery Learning is particularly beneficial for any student learning a second language. It promotes peer interaction and development of the language and the learning of concepts with content. Reichert and…

  1. Discoveries of isotopes by fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Thoennessen

    2015-09-01

    Of the about 3000 isotopes presently known, about 20% have been discovered in fission. The history of fission as it relates to the discovery of isotopes as well as the various reaction mechanisms leading to isotope discoveries involving fission are presented.

  2. Service discovery using Bloom filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goering, Patrick; Heijenk, Geert; Lelieveldt, B.P.F.; Haverkort, B.R.H.M.; Laat, de C.T.A.M.; Heijnsdijk, J.W.J.

    2006-01-01

    A protocol to perform service discovery in adhoc networks is introduced in this paper. Attenuated Bloom filters are used to distribute services to nodes in the neighborhood and thus enable local service discovery. The protocol has been implemented in a discrete event simulator to investigate the beh

  3. Network-based discovery through mechanistic systems biology. Implications for applications--SMEs and drug discovery: where the action is.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Neil

    2015-08-01

    Phase II attrition remains the most important challenge for drug discovery. Tackling the problem requires improved understanding of the complexity of disease biology. Systems biology approaches to this problem can, in principle, deliver this. This article reviews the reports of the application of mechanistic systems models to drug discovery questions and discusses the added value. Although we are on the journey to the virtual human, the length, path and rate of learning from this remain an open question. Success will be dependent on the will to invest and make the most of the insight generated along the way. PMID:26464089

  4. 29 CFR 2700.56 - Discovery; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...(c) or 111 of the Act has been filed. 30 U.S.C. 815(c) and 821. (e) Completion of discovery... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discovery; general. 2700.56 Section 2700.56 Labor... Hearings § 2700.56 Discovery; general. (a) Discovery methods. Parties may obtain discovery by one or...

  5. Preparation, configurational and DFT-NBO analysis of nickel(II) complexes with edta-type ligands containing six-membered backbone ring : crystal structure of [Ni(H2O)(6)][Ni(1,3-pdta)]center dot 2H(2)O

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belosevic, Svetlana; Vasojevic, Miorad M.; Jeremic, Marija S.; Meetsma, Auke; Matovic, Zoran D.

    2013-01-01

    New hexadentate nickel(II) complex Mg[Ni(1,3-pd3ap)]center dot 10H(2)O containing unsymmetrical edta-type ligand, 1,3-propanediamine-N,N,N '-triacetate-N-3-propionate (1,3-pd3ap), has been prepared, chromatographically separated, and characterized. Only one [trans(O-5)] of the two possible geometric

  6. Discovery and Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Don; Rodger, Caroline

    The uses of Raman spectroscopy in active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) discovery, development and release cover a wide variety of sample types and applications. However, the technique does not have a high prominence in the pharmaceutical industry despite being recognised by regulatory authorities as a suitable methodology for the analysis and release of pharmaceutical API and products. One reason is that other analytical techniques are well established and changing to Raman methods is cost prohibitive considering return on investments (ROI). In addition the technique is often regarded as being one for "experts" and not one for main stream applications. As a consequence Raman spectroscopy is frequently the 2nd or 3rd technique of choice for a specific application. However, due to its unique sampling attributes (e.g. micro and macro measurements direct from the sample, through glass, from well plates or in the presence of water) and selectivity, applications of this technology are found throughout the life cycles of pharmaceutical products. It can therefore be considered to be a spectroscopic common denominator. This chapter highlights a number of routine, specialised and niche Raman spectroscopy applications which have been used in the development of new medicines while detailing some of the limitations of these approaches.

  7. Discovery Mondays: Surveyors' Tools

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Surveyors of all ages, have your rulers and compasses at the ready! This sixth edition of Discovery Monday is your chance to learn about the surveyor's tools - the state of the art in measuring instruments - and see for yourself how they work. With their usual daunting precision, the members of CERN's Surveying Group have prepared some demonstrations and exercises for you to try. Find out the techniques for ensuring accelerator alignment and learn about high-tech metrology systems such as deviation indicators, tracking lasers and total stations. The surveyors will show you how they precisely measure magnet positioning, with accuracy of a few thousandths of a millimetre. You can try your hand at precision measurement using different types of sensor and a modern-day version of the Romans' bubble level, accurate to within a thousandth of a millimetre. You will learn that photogrammetry techniques can transform even a simple digital camera into a remarkable measuring instrument. Finally, you will have a chance t...

  8. Discovery of neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that a number of distinguished scientist, all knowledgeable about the periodic table, irradiated uranium with neutrons during 1934-1938. They observed a number of beta-emitting activities that seemed to be from transuranium elements. discovery of fission and of neptunium was delayed because they assumed that elements 93 and 94 would have chemical properties similar to those of rhenium and osmium, respectively. After fission was finally demonstrated, as new search for element 93 was initiated by McMillan, who showed that when thin films of uranium are exposed to neutrons, high-energy fission products leave the film; 23-min and 2.3-day activities remain. The 23-min activity was known to be an isotope of uranium. In May 1940 Abelson produced conclusive evidence that the 2.3 day activity was from the transuranium element 93. In a reduce state, element 93 coprecipitates with rare earth fluorides. In an oxidized state, the fluoride no longer coprecipitates. Behavior of element 93 was found to resemble that of uranium

  9. A Focus of Discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    Huebener, Rudolf Peter

    2008-01-01

    In 1887, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) was originally founded as the Physikalisch-Technische Reichsanstalt (PTR) in Berlin in order to promote basic research in physics. It subsequently developed into the largest research center worldwide as a place where scientists could concentrate exclusively on their research subject, and served as a model for similar institutes established in other countries.Within a very short time, the PTR produced extremely important scientific results that cemented its international position at the top, such as Max Planck's radiation law and energy q

  10. The discovery of erythropoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erslev, A J

    1993-01-01

    A personal vignette of life as a resident and fellow at the Yale New Haven Hospital in the early 1950s follows. John Peters and his associates created a superb renal center at Yale New Haven, and they instilled in me a respect for quantitative measurements and a love for simple physiologic concepts. The environment was ideal for clinical and laboratory research, and it enabled me to show the existence of a regulatory erythropoietic hormone. I consider it a tribute to Dr. Peters that erythropoietin was later found to be produced by the kidneys and that it, as a recombinant drug, has helped ameliorate the anemia of uremia. PMID:8324267

  11. Coal Discovery Trail officially opens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallinger, C. [Elk Valley Coal Corporation, Sparwood, BC (Canada)

    2004-09-01

    The opening of the 30-kilometre Coal Discovery Trail in August is described. The trail, through a pine, spruce, and larch forest, extends from Sparwood to Fernie and passes through Hosmer, a historic mining site. The trail, part of the Elk Valley Coal Discovery Centre, will be used for hiking, bicycling, horseback riding, and cross-country skiing. The Coal Discovery Centre will provide an interpretive centre that concentrates on history of coal mining and miners, preservation of mining artifacts and sites, and existing technology. 3 figs.

  12. Deep Learning in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawehn, Erik; Hiss, Jan A; Schneider, Gisbert

    2016-01-01

    Artificial neural networks had their first heyday in molecular informatics and drug discovery approximately two decades ago. Currently, we are witnessing renewed interest in adapting advanced neural network architectures for pharmaceutical research by borrowing from the field of "deep learning". Compared with some of the other life sciences, their application in drug discovery is still limited. Here, we provide an overview of this emerging field of molecular informatics, present the basic concepts of prominent deep learning methods and offer motivation to explore these techniques for their usefulness in computer-assisted drug discovery and design. We specifically emphasize deep neural networks, restricted Boltzmann machine networks and convolutional networks.

  13. Deep Learning in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawehn, Erik; Hiss, Jan A; Schneider, Gisbert

    2016-01-01

    Artificial neural networks had their first heyday in molecular informatics and drug discovery approximately two decades ago. Currently, we are witnessing renewed interest in adapting advanced neural network architectures for pharmaceutical research by borrowing from the field of "deep learning". Compared with some of the other life sciences, their application in drug discovery is still limited. Here, we provide an overview of this emerging field of molecular informatics, present the basic concepts of prominent deep learning methods and offer motivation to explore these techniques for their usefulness in computer-assisted drug discovery and design. We specifically emphasize deep neural networks, restricted Boltzmann machine networks and convolutional networks. PMID:27491648

  14. About TTC | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between the NIH research laboratories and external partners, and helping to accelerate development of cutting-edge research by connecting our partners to NIH’s world-class facilities, resources, and discoveries. Contact us to learn more.

  15. Senior Centers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... dancing. [Narrator] These centers can provide entree to new activities and expand a person’s social contacts. [Karen ... meeting all their interests and introducing them to new things; whether it’s an arts and crafts project, ...

  16. Discovery of Lorentz-violating Weyl fermion semimetal state in LaAlGe materials

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Su-Yang; Alidoust, Nasser; Chang, Guoqing; Lu, Hong; Singh, Bahadur; Belopolski, Ilya; Sanchez, Daniel; Zhang, Xiao; Bian, Guang; Zheng, Hao; Husanu, Marius-Adrian; Bian, Yi; Huang, Shin-Ming; Hsu, Chuang-Han; Chang, Tay-Rong

    2016-01-01

    We report theoretical and experimental discovery of Lorentz-violating Weyl fermion semimetal type-II state in the LaAlGe class of materials. Previously type-II Weyl state was predicted in WTe2 materials which remains unrealized in surface experiments. We show theoretically and experimentally that LaAlGe class of materials are the robust platforms for the study of type-II Weyl physics.

  17. Earth System Grid II, Turning Climate Datasets into Community Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middleton, Don

    2006-08-01

    The Earth System Grid (ESG) II project, funded by the Department of Energy’s Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing program, has transformed climate data into community resources. ESG II has accomplished this goal by creating a virtual collaborative environment that links climate centers and users around the world to models and data via a computing Grid, which is based on the Department of Energy’s supercomputing resources and the Internet. Our project’s success stems from partnerships between climate researchers and computer scientists to advance basic and applied research in the terrestrial, atmospheric, and oceanic sciences. By interfacing with other climate science projects, we have learned that commonly used methods to manage and remotely distribute data among related groups lack infrastructure and under-utilize existing technologies. Knowledge and expertise gained from ESG II have helped the climate community plan strategies to manage a rapidly growing data environment more effectively. Moreover, approaches and technologies developed under the ESG project have impacted datasimulation integration in other disciplines, such as astrophysics, molecular biology and materials science.

  18. Serendipity: Accidental Discoveries in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Royston M.

    1989-06-01

    Many of the things discovered by accident are important in our everyday lives: Teflon, Velcro, nylon, x-rays, penicillin, safety glass, sugar substitutes, and polyethylene and other plastics. And we owe a debt to accident for some of our deepest scientific knowledge, including Newton's theory of gravitation, the Big Bang theory of Creation, and the discovery of DNA. Even the Rosetta Stone, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the ruins of Pompeii came to light through chance. This book tells the fascinating stories of these and other discoveries and reveals how the inquisitive human mind turns accident into discovery. Written for the layman, yet scientifically accurate, this illuminating collection of anecdotes portrays invention and discovery as quintessentially human acts, due in part to curiosity, perserverance, and luck.

  19. Discovery of the Arsenic Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, A; Heim, M; Schuh, A; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-nine arsenic isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  20. Discovery of the Scandium Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Meierfrankenfeld, D

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-three scandium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  1. Discovery of the Tungsten Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    A. Fritsch; Ginepro, J. Q.; Heim, M.; Schuh, A.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-five tungsten isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  2. Discovery of the Vanadium Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    SHORE, A.; A. Fritsch; Heim, M.; Schuh, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-four vanadium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  3. Discovery of the Barium Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    SHORE, A.; A. Fritsch; Ginepro, J. Q.; Heim, M.; Schuh, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-eight barium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  4. Discovery of the Silver Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Schuh, A.; A. Fritsch; Ginepro, J. Q.; Heim, M.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-eight silver isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  5. Discovery of the Cadmium Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Amos, S.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-seven cadmium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  6. Discovery of the Krypton Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Heim, M.; A. Fritsch; Schuh, A.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-two krypton isotopes have been observed so far; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  7. Discovery of the Iron Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Schuh, A.; A. Fritsch; Heim, M.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-eight iron isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  8. Discovery of the Gold Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Schuh, A.; A. Fritsch; Ginepro, J. Q.; Heim, M.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-six gold isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  9. Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Szymanski, T; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-six cobalt isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  10. Taxonomy Enabled Discovery (TED) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposal addresses the NASA's need to enable scientific discovery and the topic's requirements for: processing large volumes of data, commonly available on the...

  11. Belle II production system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Hideki; Grzymkowski, Rafal; Ludacka, Radek; Schram, Malachi

    2015-12-01

    The Belle II experiment will record a similar quantity of data to LHC experiments and will acquire it at similar rates. This requires considerable computing, storage and network resources to handle not only data created by the experiment but also considerable amounts of simulated data. Consequently Belle II employs a distributed computing system to provide the resources coordinated by the the DIRAC interware. DIRAC is a general software framework that provides a unified interface among heterogeneous computing resources. In addition to the well proven DIRAC software stack, Belle II is developing its own extension called BelleDIRAC. BelleDIRAC provides a transparent user experience for the Belle II analysis framework (basf2) on various environments and gives access to file information managed by LFC and AMGA metadata catalog. By unifying DIRAC and BelleDIRAC functionalities, Belle II plans to operate an automated mass data processing framework named a “production system”. The Belle II production system enables large-scale raw data transfer from experimental site to raw data centers, followed by massive data processing, and smart data delivery to each remote site. The production system is also utilized for simulated data production and data analysis. Although development of the production system is still on-going, recently Belle II has prepared prototype version and evaluated it with a large scale simulated data production. In this presentation we will report the evaluation of the prototype system and future development plans.

  12. A discovery solution from Ebsco

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Michavila, Mariano

    2009-01-01

    EBSCO offers complementary access tools to gain greater value from the discovery solution: a customizable, versatile knowledgebase and listing service that enhances discovery, brings more visibility to the library’s collection, get users to specific content, and makes it easier for librarians to manage e-resources. It is an effective tool for end users who may gather information by browsing (journal lists, TOC, etc.), alerting (journal alerts, RSS) or known-item searching.

  13. Verbessern Discovery Systeme die Informationskompetenz?

    OpenAIRE

    Dörte Böhner

    2013-01-01

    Mit dem Auftauchen von Discovery Systemen entstand die Hoffnung, dass der Schulungsbedarf und damit der Aufwand für die Vermittlung von Informationskompetenz verringert und durch die Systeme selbst die Informationskompetenz verbessert werden kann. Dieser Beitrag beleuchtet kritisch das Zusam­menspiel von Discovery Systemen und Informationskompetenz anhand von Recherchegewohnheiten eher untrainierter Studierender. Anhand einer kurzen Gegenüberstellung der unterschiedlichen Recherche­konzepte v...

  14. Verbessern Discovery Systeme die Informationskompetenz?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörte Böhner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mit dem Auftauchen von Discovery Systemen entstand die Hoffnung, dass der Schulungsbedarf und damit der Aufwand für die Vermittlung von Informationskompetenz verringert und durch die Systeme selbst die Informationskompetenz verbessert werden kann. Dieser Beitrag beleuchtet kritisch das Zusam­menspiel von Discovery Systemen und Informationskompetenz anhand von Recherchegewohnheiten eher untrainierter Studierender. Anhand einer kurzen Gegenüberstellung der unterschiedlichen Recherche­konzepte von Suchmaschinen und bibliothekarischen Rechercheangeboten werden Rückschlüsse auf die zu fördernden Schwerpunkte bei der Informationskompetenz gezogen und untersucht, welche Schlüsselrolle Discovery Systeme dabei spielen.The dissemination of discovery systems has raised hopes that the need for extensive teaching of information literacy might be reduced in the future. Also, their intuitive approach has been hopefully seen to enable the development of a better information literacy. This article critically focusses on the interaction of discovery systems and information literacy by analysing research behaviours of comparatively untrained students. In order to define which specific themes should be promoted by information literacy education, the author examines various research concepts of search engines as well as research offers of libraries. On this basis the key role of discovery systems will be explored.

  15. Get Involved in Planetary Discoveries through New Worlds, New Discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupla, Christine; Shipp, S. S.; Halligan, E.; Dalton, H.; Boonstra, D.; Buxner, S.; SMD Planetary Forum, NASA

    2013-01-01

    "New Worlds, New Discoveries" is a synthesis of NASA’s 50-year exploration history which provides an integrated picture of our new understanding of our solar system. As NASA spacecraft head to and arrive at key locations in our solar system, "New Worlds, New Discoveries" provides an integrated picture of our new understanding of the solar system to educators and the general public! The site combines the amazing discoveries of past NASA planetary missions with the most recent findings of ongoing missions, and connects them to the related planetary science topics. "New Worlds, New Discoveries," which includes the "Year of the Solar System" and the ongoing celebration of the "50 Years of Exploration," includes 20 topics that share thematic solar system educational resources and activities, tied to the national science standards. This online site and ongoing event offers numerous opportunities for the science community - including researchers and education and public outreach professionals - to raise awareness, build excitement, and make connections with educators, students, and the public about planetary science. Visitors to the site will find valuable hands-on science activities, resources and educational materials, as well as the latest news, to engage audiences in planetary science topics and their related mission discoveries. The topics are tied to the big questions of planetary science: how did the Sun’s family of planets and bodies originate and how have they evolved? How did life begin and evolve on Earth, and has it evolved elsewhere in our solar system? Scientists and educators are encouraged to get involved either directly or by sharing "New Worlds, New Discoveries" and its resources with educators, by conducting presentations and events, sharing their resources and events to add to the site, and adding their own public events to the site’s event calendar! Visit to find quality resources and ideas. Connect with educators, students and the public to

  16. IRASM Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IRASM is a national center for radiation processing developed around an industrial Co60 gamma irradiator. Being a department in an R and D national institute, IRASM Center is dealing with radiation treatment, pre/post microbiological control, validation of irradiation sterilization, detection of irradiated foodstuffs. Training is available for operators of new irradiation facilities focused on radiation technologies, dosimetry, sterilization, food treatment, conservation by irradiation of cultural heritage, quality assurance. Expertise on proper choosing the plastics for packaging versus dose is offered to the potential clients. IRASM Center is also involved in interdisciplinary applied research like chitosan treatment, sterile male technique or implementation of irradiation step in production of pharmaceuticals. All important activities: irradiation treatment, dosimetry, microbiology, detection of irradiated food, radioprotection, nuclear safety, physical protection. are performed in accordance with the proper standards in the frame of a certified quality management system. In this way Co60 industrial sources, a byproduct of certain nuclear power plants like Candu type, appear to be the key of a large technical and R and D domain. (authors)

  17. Universal Knowledge Discovery from Big Data: Towards a Paradigm Shift from 'Knowledge Discovery' to 'Wisdom Discovery'

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Many people hold a vision that big data will provide big insights and have a big impact in the future, and big-data-assisted scientific discovery is seen as an emerging and promising scientific paradigm. However, how to turn big data into deep insights with tremendous value still remains obscure. To meet the challenge, universal knowledge discovery from big data (UKD) is proposed. The new concept focuses on discovering universal knowledge, which exists in the statistical analyses of big data ...

  18. 24 CFR 26.18 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... knowledge of any discoverable matter. For good cause, the hearing officer may order discovery of any matter... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discovery. 26.18 Section 26.18... PROCEDURES Hearings Before Hearing Officers Discovery § 26.18 Discovery. (a) General. The parties...

  19. 43 CFR 4.1130 - Discovery methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Discovery methods. 4.1130 Section 4.1130... Special Rules Applicable to Surface Coal Mining Hearings and Appeals Discovery § 4.1130 Discovery methods. Parties may obtain discovery by one or more of the following methods— (a) Depositions upon...

  20. 42 CFR 405.1037 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... original discovery deadline. (5) If the ALJ grants the extension request, it must impose a new discovery... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Discovery. 405.1037 Section 405.1037 Public Health... Appeals Under Original Medicare (Part A and Part B) Alj Hearings § 405.1037 Discovery. (a) General...

  1. 14 CFR 1264.120 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... PENALTIES ACT OF 1986 § 1264.120 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discovery. 1264.120 Section 1264.120..., discovery is available only as ordered by the presiding officer. The presiding officer shall regulate...

  2. 31 CFR 16.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 § 16.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discovery. 16.21 Section 16.21 Money... to require the creation of a document. (c) Unless mutually agreed to by the parties, discovery...

  3. 38 CFR 42.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTING THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT § 42.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discovery. 42.21 Section... creation of a document. (c) Unless mutually agreed to by the parties, discovery is available only...

  4. The double luminescence of Color Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment on the luminescence of Color Centers (CCs) carried out in 1987 at the ENEA Laboratories in Frascati had a negative result, but subsequent investigations showed that it was not a failure but rather a discovery of a new phenomenon. Since the coming of lasers, CCs in alkali halides have been successfully used as optically active materials, in particular FA Centers. One of these centers, well known for its medium infrared laser emission at 77 K, cooled further to 2 K emitted in the near infrared and without laser effect. Further investigations showed that the double luminescence was a fundamental property unknown until that time. This important discovery was achieved in Frascati because of the existence since 1973 of a solid and extensive expertise in the field of CCs, which continued over time and later on applied to the modern miniaturized photonic devices

  5. The Europa Ocean Discovery mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, B.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chyba, C.F. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Abshire, J.B. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center] [and others

    1997-06-01

    Since it was first proposed that tidal heating of Europa by Jupiter might lead to liquid water oceans below Europa`s ice cover, there has been speculation over the possible exobiological implications of such an ocean. Liquid water is the essential ingredient for life as it is known, and the existence of a second water ocean in the Solar System would be of paramount importance for seeking the origin and existence of life beyond Earth. The authors present here a Discovery-class mission concept (Europa Ocean Discovery) to determine the existence of a liquid water ocean on Europa and to characterize Europa`s surface structure. The technical goal of the Europa Ocean Discovery mission is to study Europa with an orbiting spacecraft. This goal is challenging but entirely feasible within the Discovery envelope. There are four key challenges: entering Europan orbit, generating power, surviving long enough in the radiation environment to return valuable science, and complete the mission within the Discovery program`s launch vehicle and budget constraints. The authors will present here a viable mission that meets these challenges.

  6. A Mars Exploration Discovery Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. J.; Paige, D. A.

    2000-07-01

    The Mars Exploration Program should consider following the Discovery Program model. In the Discovery Program a team of scientists led by a PI develop the science goals of their mission, decide what payload achieves the necessary measurements most effectively, and then choose a spacecraft with the capabilities needed to carry the payload to the desired target body. The primary constraints associated with the Discovery missions are time and money. The proposer must convince reviewers that their mission has scientific merit and is feasible. Every Announcement of Opportunity has resulted in a collection of creative ideas that fit within advertised constraints. Following this model, a "Mars Discovery Program" would issue an Announcement of Opportunity for each launch opportunity with schedule constraints dictated by the launch window and fiscal constraints in accord with the program budget. All else would be left to the proposer to choose, based on the science the team wants to accomplish, consistent with the program theme of "Life, Climate and Resources". A proposer could propose a lander, an orbiter, a fleet of SCOUT vehicles or penetrators, an airplane, a balloon mission, a large rover, a small rover, etc. depending on what made the most sense for the science investigation and payload. As in the Discovery program, overall feasibility relative to cost, schedule and technology readiness would be evaluated and be part of the selection process.

  7. Does Discovery-Based Instruction Enhance Learning?

    OpenAIRE

    Alfieri, L.; Brooks, PJ; Aldrich, NJ; Tenenbaum, HR

    2011-01-01

    Discovery learning approaches to education have recently come under scrutiny (Tobias & Duffy, 2009), with many studies indicating limitations to discovery learning practices. Therefore, 2 meta-analyses were conducted using a sample of 164 studies: The 1st examined the effects of unassisted discovery learning versus explicit instruction, and the 2nd examined the effects of enhanced and/or assisted discovery versus other types of instruction (e.g., explicit, unassisted discovery). Random effect...

  8. Discovery of the higgs boson

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    The recent observation of the Higgs boson has been hailed as the scientific discovery of the century and led to the 2013 Nobel Prize in physics. This book describes the detailed science behind the decades-long search for this elusive particle at the Large Electron Positron Collider at CERN and at the Tevatron at Fermilab and its subsequent discovery and characterization at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Written by physicists who played leading roles in this epic search and discovery, this book is an authoritative and pedagogical exposition of the portrait of the Higgs boson that has emerged from a large number of experimental measurements. As the first of its kind, this book should be of interest to graduate students and researchers in particle physics.

  9. Supporting knowledge discovery in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Dominic; Arthofer, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Our ontology-based benchmarking infrastructure for hospitals, we presented on the eHealth 2012, has meanwhile proven useful. Besides, we gathered manifold experience in supporting knowledge discovery in medicine. This also led to further functions and plans with our software. We could confirm and extent our experience by a literature review on the knowledge discovery process in medicine, visual analytics and data mining and drafted an according approach for extending our software. We validated our approach by exemplarily implementing a parallel-coordinate data visualization into our software and plan to integrate further algorithms for visual analytics and machine learning to support knowledge discovery in medicine in diverse ways. This is very promising but can also fail due to technical or organizational details.

  10. Towards structural web services discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jiang-feng

    2008-01-01

    A syntactic and structural matching mechanism for service discovery was put forward, which tries to exploit the underlying semantics of web services to enhance the traditional syntactic service discovery. We commit WSDL (Web Service Description Language) as service description language. The syntactic matching mechanism is based on the textual similarity among WSDL documents using VSM (Vector Space Model). The structural information is extracted from WSDL document tree or the invocation sequence of a series of services which can be viewed as the problem of graph isomorphism. Then we combine the syntactic and structural similarity linearly to calculate the service similarity. Finally we provide a novel web services discovery framework named SG* to find the exact services meeting the users' goals based on service similarity.

  11. Knowledge discovery from legal databases

    CERN Document Server

    Stranieri, Andrew; Schauer, Frederick

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge Discovery from Legal Databases is the first text to describe data mining techniques as they apply to law. Law students, legal academics and applied information technology specialists are guided thorough all phases of the knowledge discovery from databases process with clear explanations of numerous data mining algorithms including rule induction, neural networks and association rules. Throughout the text, assumptions that make data mining in law quite different to mining other data are made explicit.  Issues such as the selection of commonplace cases, the use of discretion as a form

  12. Visions of Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, Raymond Y.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Leggett, Anthony J.; Phillips, William D.; Harper, Charles L., Jr.

    2010-10-01

    List of contributors; Foreword Charles H. Townes; Editors' preface; Preface Freeman J. Dyson; Laureates' preface: reflections from four physics Nobelists Roy J. Glauber, John L. Hall, Theodore W. Hänsch and Wolfgang Ketterle; Acknowledgments; Part I. Illumination: The History and Future of Physical Science and Technology: 1. A short history of light in the Western world John L. Heilbron; 2. Tools and innovation Peter L. Galison; 3. The future of science Freeman J. Dyson; 4. The end of everything: will AI replace humans? Will everything die when the universe freezes over? Michio Kaku; Part II. Fundamental Physics and Quantum Mechanics: 5. Fundamental constants Frank Wilczek; 6. New insights on time symmetry in quantum mechanics Yakir Aharonov and Jeffrey Tollaksen; 7. The major unknowns in particle physics and cosmology David J. Gross; 8. The major unknown in quantum mechanics: Is it the whole truth? Anthony J. Leggett; 9. Precision cosmology and the landscape Raphael Bousso; 10. Hairy black holes, phase transitions, and AdS/CFT Steven S. Gubser; Part III. Astrophysics and Astronomy: 11. The microwave background: a cosmic time machine Adrian T. Lee; 12. Dark matter and dark energy Marc Kamionkowski; 13. New directions and intersections for observational cosmology: the case of dark energy Saul Perlmutter; 14. Inward bound: high-resolution astronomy and the quest for black holes and extrasolar planets Reinhard Genzel; 15. Searching for signatures of life beyond the solar system: astrophysical interferometry and the 150 km Exo-Earth Imager Antoine Labeyrie; 16. New directions for gravitational wave physics via 'Millikan oil drops' Raymond Y. Chiao; 17. An 'ultrasonic' image of the embryonic universe: CMB polarization tests of the inflationary paradigm Brian G. Keating; Part IV. New Approaches in Technology and Science: 18. Visualizing complexity: development of 4D microscopy and diffraction for imaging in space and time Ahmed H. Zewail; 19. Is life based on laws of

  13. The Biomedical Resource Ontology (BRO) to enable resource discovery in clinical and translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, Jessica D; Whetzel, Patricia L; Anderson, Kent; Borromeo, Charles D; Dinov, Ivo D; Gabriel, Davera; Kirschner, Beth; Mirel, Barbara; Morris, Tim; Noy, Natasha; Nyulas, Csongor; Rubenson, David; Saxman, Paul R; Singh, Harpreet; Whelan, Nancy; Wright, Zach; Athey, Brian D; Becich, Michael J; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Musen, Mark A; Smith, Kevin A; Tarantal, Alice F; Rubin, Daniel L; Lyster, Peter

    2011-02-01

    The biomedical research community relies on a diverse set of resources, both within their own institutions and at other research centers. In addition, an increasing number of shared electronic resources have been developed. Without effective means to locate and query these resources, it is challenging, if not impossible, for investigators to be aware of the myriad resources available, or to effectively perform resource discovery when the need arises. In this paper, we describe the development and use of the Biomedical Resource Ontology (BRO) to enable semantic annotation and discovery of biomedical resources. We also describe the Resource Discovery System (RDS) which is a federated, inter-institutional pilot project that uses the BRO to facilitate resource discovery on the Internet. Through the RDS framework and its associated Biositemaps infrastructure, the BRO facilitates semantic search and discovery of biomedical resources, breaking down barriers and streamlining scientific research that will improve human health. PMID:20955817

  14. Antithrombin Cambridge II(A384S) mutation frequency and antithrombin activity levels in 120 of deep venous thrombosis and 150 of cerebral infarction patients in a single center in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-sen; Tang, Yang-ming; Tang, Mei-qing; Qing, Zi-Ju; Shu, Chang; Tang, Xiang-qi; Deng, Ming-yang; Tan, Li-ming

    2010-09-01

    Antithrombin Cambridge II(A384S) mutation shows a relatively high frequency in western population. Some studies suggest that the mutation is an independent genetic risk factor both for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and for arterial thrombosis, but whether the mutation has racial difference or has a general significance for thrombophilia remains unclear. In this study we performed an analysis of the prevalence of the mutation in Chinese southern population; Also, the antithrombin activity levels were evaluated in each investigated individual. The studies included 120 patients with DVT, 150 patients with cerebral infarction, and 110 controls. The mutation was detected using polymerase chain reaction/PvuII restrictive fragment length polymorphism procedures. Antithrombin activity assay was done using chromogenic substrate method. The results showed that no antithrombin Cambridge II mutation was detected in all three groups (DVT, cerebral infarction and controls), the incidence was 0/380. Plasma antithrombin activity was 91.37% +/- 16.15% in the DVT patients and 102.68% +/- 13.10% in the controls; the antithrombin activity was significantly reduced in the DVT group (P Cambridge II mutation has a racial difference, and may not be a valuable risk factor of thrombophilia in Asian population, and antithrombin deficiency remains a major genetic risk factor for DVT patients in China.

  15. Osteoarthropathy in mucopolysaccharidosis type II

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS type II, Hunter syndrome) is a rare (~ 1/1500.000), X-linked inherited disorder (affects boys) due to deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate sulfatase (Xq.28). The complex clinical picture includes osteoarthropathy with a tendency to flexion stiffness and disability. In our country, the specific diagnosis and enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), are recently available in the Center for Genetic Pathology Cluj. Objectives Assessment of clinical...

  16. Smartphones: A Potential Discovery Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Starkweather, Wendy; Stowers, Eva

    2009-01-01

    The anticipated wide adoption of smartphones by researchers is viewed by the authors as a basis for developing mobile-based services. In response to the UNLV Libraries’ strategic plan’s focus on experimentation and outreach, the authors investigate the current and potential role of smartphones as a valuable discovery tool for library users.

  17. Structural Biology Guides Antibiotic Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyak, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Modern drug discovery programs require the contribution of researchers in a number of specialist areas. One of these areas is structural biology. Using X-ray crystallography, the molecular basis of how a drug binds to its biological target and exerts its mode of action can be defined. For example, a drug that binds into the active site of an…

  18. Macchines per scoprire - Discovery Machines

    CERN Multimedia

    Auditorium, Rome

    2016-01-01

    During the FCC week 2016 a public event entitled “Discovery Machines: The Higgs Boson and the Search for New Physics took place on 14 April at the Auditorium in Rome. The event, brought together physicists and experts from economics to discuss intriguing questions on the origin and evolution of the Universe and the societal impact of large-scale research projects.

  19. Human Collagen Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase Is Activated by Ligands for Its Iron Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasta, James D; Raines, Ronald T

    2016-06-14

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals. The posttranslational hydroxylation of proline residues in collagen contributes greatly to its conformational stability. Deficient hydroxylation is associated with a variety of disease states, including scurvy. The hydroxylation of proline residues in collagen is catalyzed by an Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase (CP4H). CP4H has long been known to suffer oxidative inactivation during catalysis, and the cofactor ascorbate (vitamin C) is required to reactivate the enzyme by reducing its iron center from Fe(III) to Fe(II). Herein, we report on the discovery of the first synthetic activators of CP4H. Specifically, we find that 2,2'-bipyridine-4-carboxylate and 2,2'-bipyridine-5-carboxylate serve as ligands for the iron center in human CP4H that enhance the rate of ascorbate-dependent reactivation. This new mode of CP4H activation is available to other biheteroaryl compounds but does not necessarily extend to other prolyl 4-hydroxylases. As collagen is weakened in many indications, analogous activators of CP4H could have therapeutic benefits. PMID:27183028

  20. Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Among 2011's many accomplishments, we safely retired the Space Shuttle Program after 30 incredible years; completed the International Space Station and are taking steps to enable it to reach its full potential as a multi-purpose laboratory; and helped to expand scientific knowledge with missions like Aquarius, GRAIL, and the Mars Science Laboratory. Responding to national budget challenges, we are prioritizing critical capabilities and divesting ourselves of assets no longer needed for NASA's future exploration programs. Since these facilities do not have to be maintained or demolished, the government saves money. At the same time, our commercial partners save money because they do not have to build new facilities. It is a win-win for everyone. Moving forward, 2012 will be even more historically significant as we celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Kennedy Space Center. In the coming year, KSC will facilitate commercial transportation to low-Earth orbit and support the evolution of the Space Launch System and Orion crew vehicle as they ready for exploration missions, which will shape how human beings view the universe. While NASA's Vision is to lead scientific and technological advances in aeronautics and space for a Nation on the frontier of discovery KSC's vision is to be the world's preeminent launch complex for government and commercial space access, enabling the world to explore and work in space. KSC's Mission is to safely manage, develop, integrate, and sustain space systems through partnerships that enable innovative, diverse access to space and inspires the Nation's future explorers.

  1. The future of crystallography in drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Heping; Hou, Jing; Zimmerman, Matthew D; Wlodawer, Alexander; Minor, Wladek

    2014-01-01

    Introduction X-ray crystallography plays an important role in structure-based drug design (SBDD), and accurate analysis of crystal structures of target macromolecules and macromolecule–ligand complexes is critical at all stages. However, whereas there has been significant progress in improving methods of structural biology, particularly in X-ray crystallography, corresponding progress in the development of computational methods (such as in silico high-throughput screening) is still on the horizon. Crystal structures can be overinterpreted and thus bias hypotheses and follow-up experiments. As in any experimental science, the models of macromolecular structures derived from X-ray diffraction data have their limitations, which need to be critically evaluated and well understood for structure-based drug discovery. Areas covered This review describes how the validity, accuracy and precision of a protein or nucleic acid structure determined by X-ray crystallography can be evaluated from three different perspectives: i) the nature of the diffraction experiment; ii) the interpretation of an electron density map; and iii) the interpretation of the structural model in terms of function and mechanism. The strategies to optimally exploit a macromolecular structure are also discussed in the context of ‘Big Data’ analysis, biochemical experimental design and structure-based drug discovery. Expert opinion Although X-ray crystallography is one of the most detailed ‘microscopes’ available today for examining macromolecular structures, the authors would like to re-emphasize that such structures are only simplified models of the target macromolecules. The authors also wish to reinforce the idea that a structure should not be thought of as a set of precise coordinates but rather as a framework for generating hypotheses to be explored. Numerous biochemical and biophysical experiments, including new diffraction experiments, can and should be performed to verify or falsify

  2. Assessing Latina/o Undergraduates' Depressive Symptomatology: Comparisons of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, and the Self-Report Depression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria, Alberta M.; Castellanos, Jeanett; Kanagui-Munoz, Marlen; Rico, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of depression scales as screening tools at university and college centers is increasing and thus, the question of whether scales are culturally valid for different student groups is increasingly more relevant with increased severity of depression for students and changing student demographics. As such, this study examined the reliability…

  3. Drug discovery for alopecia: gone today, hair tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Zenildo; Avci, Pinar; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hair loss or alopecia affects the majority of the population at some time in their life, and increasingly, sufferers are demanding treatment. Three main types of alopecia (androgenic [AGA], areata [AA] and chemotherapy-induced [CIA]) are very different, and have their own laboratory models and separate drug-discovery efforts. Areas covered In this article, the authors review the biology of hair, hair follicle (HF) cycling, stem cells and signaling pathways. AGA, due to dihydrotesterone, is treated by 5-α reductase inhibitors, androgen receptor blockers and ATP-sensitive potassium channel-openers. AA, which involves attack by CD8+NK group 2D-positive (NKG2D+) T cells, is treated with immunosuppressives, biologics and JAK inhibitors. Meanwhile, CIA is treated by apoptosis inhibitors, cytokines and topical immunotherapy. Expert opinion The desire to treat alopecia with an easy topical preparation is expected to grow with time, particularly with an increasing aging population. The discovery of epidermal stem cells in the HF has given new life to the search for a cure for baldness. Drug discovery efforts are being increasingly centered on these stem cells, boosting the hair cycle and reversing miniaturization of HF. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the immune attack in AA will yield new drugs. New discoveries in HF neogenesis and low-level light therapy will undoubtedly have a role to play. PMID:25662177

  4. High throughput electrophysiology: new perspectives for ion channel drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, Niels J; Bech, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter;

    2003-01-01

    Proper function of ion channels is crucial for all living cells. Ion channel dysfunction may lead to a number of diseases, so-called channelopathies, and a number of common diseases, including epilepsy, arrhythmia, and type II diabetes, are primarily treated by drugs that modulate ion channels. A...... introduction of new powerful HTS electrophysiological techniques is predicted to cause a revolution in ion channel drug discovery....... cornerstone in current drug discovery is high throughput screening assays which allow examination of the activity of specific ion channels though only to a limited extent. Conventional patch clamp remains the sole technique with sufficiently high time resolution and sensitivity required for precise and direct...... characterization of ion channel properties. However, patch clamp is a slow, labor-intensive, and thus expensive, technique. New techniques combining the reliability and high information content of patch clamping with the virtues of high throughput philosophy are emerging and predicted to make a number of ion...

  5. 5 CFR 185.122 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... § 185.122 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of... document or of the truth of any relevant fact; (3) Written interrogatories; and (4) Depositions. (b)...

  6. 24 CFR 26.42 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... subject to a protective order under § 26.44. (c) Authorized discovery. The following types of discovery... or of the truth of any relevant matters of fact. Copies of documents shall be delivered with...

  7. 40 CFR 27.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents for... truth of any relevant fact; (3) Written interrogatories; and (4) Depositions. (b) For the purpose...

  8. 22 CFR 224.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of... document or the truth of any relevant fact; (3) Written interrogatories; and (4) Depositions. (b) For...

  9. 15 CFR 25.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents for... truth of any relevant fact; (3) Written interrogatories; and (4) Depositions. (b) For the purpose...

  10. Discovery of charmed particles : Sam Ting

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The great physics event of the year was the discovery of charmed particles in the USA. One of the co-discoverers, Sam Ting, was at CERN involved in an ISR experiment and described the discovery to a packed auditorium.

  11. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to

  12. The MAGIC Data Center

    CERN Document Server

    Reichardt, Ignasi; Carmona, Emiliano; Contreras, Jose Luis; Cortina, Juan; Firpo, Roger; Font, Lluis; Moralejo, Abelardo; Nieto, Daniel; Oya, Igor; Reyes, Raquel de los

    2009-01-01

    The MAGIC I telescope produces currently around 100TByte of raw data per year that is calibrated and reduced on-site at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (La Palma). Since February 2007 most of the data have been stored and further processed in the Port d'Informacio Cientifica (PIC), Barcelona. This facility, which supports the GRID Tier 1 center for LHC in Spain, provides resources to give the entire MAGIC Collaboration access to the reduced telescope data. It is expected that the data volume will increase by a factor 3 after the start-up of the second telescope, MAGIC II. The project to improve the MAGIC Data Center to meet these requirements is presented. In addition, we discuss the production of high level data products that will allow a more flexible analysis and will contribute to the international network of astronomical data (European Virtual Observatory). For this purpose, we will have to develop a new software able to adapt the analysis process to different data taking conditions, such as ...

  13. Does Discovery-Based Instruction Enhance Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfieri, Louis; Brooks, Patricia J.; Aldrich, Naomi J.; Tenenbaum, Harriet R.

    2011-01-01

    Discovery learning approaches to education have recently come under scrutiny (Tobias & Duffy, 2009), with many studies indicating limitations to discovery learning practices. Therefore, 2 meta-analyses were conducted using a sample of 164 studies: The 1st examined the effects of unassisted discovery learning versus explicit instruction, and the…

  14. 12 CFR 19.170 - Discovery depositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discovery depositions. 19.170 Section 19.170... PROCEDURE Discovery Depositions and Subpoenas § 19.170 Discovery depositions. (a) General rule. In any... deposition of an expert, or of a person, including another party, who has direct knowledge of matters...

  15. 29 CFR 1955.32 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discovery. 1955.32 Section 1955.32 Labor Regulations...) PROCEDURES FOR WITHDRAWAL OF APPROVAL OF STATE PLANS Preliminary Conference and Discovery § 1955.32 Discovery... the remainder. An answering party may not give lack of information or knowledge as the reason...

  16. 29 CFR 18.13 - Discovery methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Discovery methods. 18.13 Section 18.13 Labor Office of the... ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES General § 18.13 Discovery methods. Parties may obtain discovery by one or more of the following methods: Depositions upon oral examination or written questions; written...

  17. 28 CFR 71.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 Implementation for Actions Initiated by the Department of Justice § 71.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents for... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discovery. 71.21 Section 71.21...

  18. 22 CFR 521.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Discovery. 521.21 Section 521.21 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT § 521.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents...

  19. 43 CFR 4.826 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the Interior-Effectuation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 Procedures § 4.826 Discovery. (a) Methods. Parties may obtain discovery as provided in these rules by depositions, written interrogatories... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Discovery. 4.826 Section 4.826...

  20. 7 CFR 1.322 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Under the Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986 § 1.322 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production, inspection and photocopying of documents; (2... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discovery. 1.322 Section 1.322 Agriculture Office...

  1. 29 CFR 1905.25 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ACT OF 1970 Hearings § 1905.25 Discovery. (a) Depositions. (1) For reasons of... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discovery. 1905.25 Section 1905.25 Labor Regulations... discovery. Whenever appropriate to a just disposition of any issue in a hearing, the presiding...

  2. 20 CFR 355.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... UNDER THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 § 355.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents for inspection and copying; (2) Requests... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discovery. 355.21 Section 355.21...

  3. Discovery in Science and in Teaching Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipnis, Nahum

    2007-01-01

    A proper presentation of scientific discoveries may allow science teachers to eliminate certain myths about the nature of science, which originate from an uncertainty among scholars about what constitutes a discovery. It is shown that a disagreement on this matter originates from a confusion of the act of discovery with response to it. It is…

  4. Synthesis and spectral studies of Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, Mn(II, Zn(II and Cd(II complexes of a new macroacyclic ligand N,N’-bis(2-benzothiazolyl-2,6-pyridinedicarboxamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KALAGOUDA B. GUDASI

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available A new macroacyclic amide ligand N,N’-bis(2-benzothiazolyl-2,6-pyridinedicarboxamide (BPD, formed by the condensation of 2,6-pyridinedicarbonyldichloride with 2-aminobenzothiazole, and its Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, Mn(II, Zn(II and Cd(II complexes were synthesized. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of elemental analyses, conductance measurements, magnetic moments, spectral (IR, NMR, UV-Visible, EPR and FAB and thermal studies. The complexes exhibit an octahedral geometry around the metal center. Conductance data of the complexes suggested them to be 1:1 electrolytes. The pentadentate behavior of the ligand was proposed on the basis of spectral studies. The X-band EPR spectra of the Cu(II and Mn(II complexes in the polycrystalline state at room (300 K and liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K were recorded and their salient features are reported.

  5. Glycoscience aids in biomarker discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serenus Hua1,2 & Hyun Joo An1,2,*

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The glycome consists of all glycans (or carbohydrates within abiological system, and modulates a wide range of important biologicalactivities, from protein folding to cellular communications.The mining of the glycome for disease markers representsa new paradigm for biomarker discovery; however, this effortis severely complicated by the vast complexity and structuraldiversity of glycans. This review summarizes recent developmentsin analytical technology and methodology as applied tothe fields of glycomics and glycoproteomics. Mass spectrometricstrategies for glycan compositional profiling are described, as arepotential refinements which allow structure-specific profiling.Analytical methods that can discern protein glycosylation at aspecific site of modification are also discussed in detail.Biomarker discovery applications are shown at each level ofanalysis, highlighting the key role that glycoscience can play inhelping scientists understand disease biology.

  6. Materials discovery via CALYPSO methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanchao; Lv, Jian; Zhu, Li; Lu, Shaohua; Yin, Ketao; Li, Quan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2015-05-01

    The structure prediction at the atomic level is emerging as a state-of-the-art approach to accelerate the functionality-driven discovery of materials. By combining the global swarm optimization algorithm with first-principles thermodynamic calculations, it exploits the power of current supercomputer architectures to robustly predict the ground state and metastable structures of materials with only the given knowledge of chemical composition. In this Review, we provide an overview of the basic theory and main features of our as-developed CALYPSO structure prediction method, as well as its versatile applications to design of a broad range of materials including those of three-dimensional bulks, two-dimensional reconstructed surfaces and layers, and isolated clusters/nanoparticles or molecules with a variety of functional properties. The current challenges faced by structure prediction for materials discovery and future developments of CALYPSO to overcome them are also discussed.

  7. Class Discovery in Galaxy Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Bazell, D; Bazell, David; Miller, David J.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, automated, supervised classification techniques have been fruitfully applied to labeling and organizing large astronomical databases. These methods require off-line classifier training, based on labeled examples from each of the (known) object classes. In practice, only a small batch of labeled examples, hand-labeled by a human expert, may be available for training. Moreover, there may be no labeled examples for some classes present in the data, i.e. the database may contain several unknown classes. Unknown classes may be present due to 1) uncertainty in or lack of knowledge of the measurement process, 2) an inability to adequately ``survey'' a massive database to assess its content (classes), and/or 3) an incomplete scientific hypothesis. In recent work, new class discovery in mixed labeled/unlabeled data was formally posed, with a proposed solution based on mixture models. In this work we investigate this approach, propose a competing technique suitable for class discovery in neural network...

  8. Solar Technology Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Bob

    2011-04-27

    The Department of Energy, Golden Field Office, awarded a grant to the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF) on August 1, 2005 to develop a solar and renewable energy information center. The Solar Technology Center (STC) is to be developed in two phases, with Phase I consisting of all activities necessary to determine feasibility of the project, including design and engineering, identification of land access issues and permitting necessary to determine project viability without permanently disturbing the project site, and completion of a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Assessment. Phase II is the installation of infrastructure and related structures, which leads to commencement of operations of the STC. The STC is located in the Boulder City designated 3,000-acre Eldorado Valley Energy Zone, approximately 15 miles southwest of downtown Boulder City and fronting on Eldorado Valley Drive. The 33-acre vacant parcel has been leased to the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation (NTSDC) by Boulder City to accommodate a planned facility that will be synergistic with present and planned energy projects in the Zone. The parcel will be developed by the UNLVRF. The NTSDC is the economic development arm of the UNLVRF. UNLVRF will be the entity responsible for overseeing the lease and the development project to assure compliance with the lease stipulations established by Boulder City. The STC will be operated and maintained by University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and its Center for Energy Research (UNLV-CER). Land parcels in the Eldorado Valley Energy Zone near the 33-acre lease are committed to the construction and operation of an electrical grid connected solar energy production facility. Other projects supporting renewable and solar technologies have been developed within the energy zone, with several more developments in the horizon.

  9. Metagenomic small molecule discovery methods

    OpenAIRE

    Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Milshteyn, Aleksandr; Brady, Sean F

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches to natural product discovery provide the means of harvesting bioactive small molecules synthesized by environmental bacteria without the requirement of first culturing these organisms. Advances in sequencing technologies and general metagenomic methods are beginning to provide the tools necessary to unlock the unexplored biosynthetic potential encoded by the genomes of uncultured environmental bacteria. Here, we highlight recent advances in sequence- and functional- bas...

  10. Gas reserves, discoveries and production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saniere, A

    2006-07-01

    Between 2000 and 2004, new discoveries, located mostly in the Asia/Pacific region, permitted a 71% produced reserve replacement rate. The Middle East and the offshore sector represent a growing proportion of world gas production Non-conventional gas resources are substantial but are not exploited to any significant extent, except in the United States, where they account for 30% of U.S. gas production. (author)

  11. Towards Discovery of Subgraph Bisociations

    OpenAIRE

    Nagel, Uwe; Thiel, Kilian; Kötter, Tobias; Piatek, Dawid; Berthold, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of surprising relations in large, heterogeneous information repositories is gaining increasing importance in real world data analysis. If these repositories come from diverse origins, forming different domains, domain bridging associations between otherwise weakly connected domains can provide insights into the data that are not accomplished by aggregative approaches. In this paper, we propose a first formalization for the detection of such potentially interesting, domaincrossin...

  12. Optimizing Viral Discovery in Bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Cristin C W; Olival, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Viral discovery studies in bats have increased dramatically over the past decade, yet a rigorous synthesis of the published data is lacking. We extract and analyze data from 93 studies published between 2007-2013 to examine factors that increase success of viral discovery in bats, and specific trends and patterns of infection across host taxa and viral families. Over the study period, 248 novel viruses from 24 viral families have been described. Using generalized linear models, at a study level we show the number of host species and viral families tested best explained number of viruses detected. We demonstrate that prevalence varies significantly across viral family, specimen type, and host taxonomy, and calculate mean PCR prevalence by viral family and specimen type across all studies. Using a logistic model, we additionally identify factors most likely to increase viral detection at an individual level for the entire dataset and by viral families with sufficient sample sizes. Our analysis highlights major taxonomic gaps in recent bat viral discovery efforts and identifies ways to improve future viral pathogen detection through the design of more efficient and targeted sample collection and screening approaches. PMID:26867024

  13. A New Universe of Discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova, France A.

    2016-01-01

    The convergence of emerging advances in astronomical instruments, computational capabilities and talented practitioners (both professional and civilian) is creating an extraordinary new environment for making numerous fundamental discoveries in astronomy, ranging from the nature of exoplanets to understanding the evolution of solar systems and galaxies. The National Science Foundation is playing a critical role in supporting, stimulating, and shaping these advances. NSF is more than an agency of government or a funding mechanism for the infrastructure of science. The work of NSF is a sacred trust that every generation of Americans makes to those of the next generation, that we will build on the body of knowledge we inherit and continue to push forward the frontiers of science. We never lose sight of NSF's obligation to "explore the unexplored" and inspire all of humanity with the wonders of discovery. As the only Federal agency dedicated to the support of basic research and education in all fields of science and engineering, NSF has empowered discoveries across a broad spectrum of scientific inquiry for more than six decades. The result is fundamental scientific research that has had a profound impact on our nation's innovation ecosystem and kept our nation at the very forefront of the world's science-and-engineering enterprise.

  14. Future Mission Proposal Opportunities: Discovery, New Frontiers, and Project Prometheus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebur, S. M.; Morgan, T. H.; Niebur, C. S.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Office of Space Science is expanding opportunities to propose missions to comets, asteroids, and other solar system targets. The Discovery Program continues to be popular, with two sample return missions, Stardust and Genesis, currently in operation. The New Frontiers Program, a new proposal opportunity modeled on the successful Discovery Program, begins this year with the release of its first Announcement of Opportunity. Project Prometheus, a program to develop nuclear electric power and propulsion technology intended to enable a new class of high-power, high-capability investigations, is a third opportunity to propose solar system exploration. All three classes of mission include a commitment to provide data to the Planetary Data System, any samples to the NASA Curatorial Facility at Johnson Space Center, and programs for education and public outreach.

  15. Oxidized Amino Acid Residues in the Vicinity of QA and PheoD1 of the Photosystem II Reaction Center: Putative Generation Sites of Reducing-Side Reactive Oxygen Species

    OpenAIRE

    Frankel, Laurie K.; Sallans, Larry; Limbach, Patrick A.; Terry M Bricker

    2013-01-01

    Under a variety of stress conditions, Photosystem II produces reactive oxygen species on both the reducing and oxidizing sides of the photosystem. A number of different sites including the Mn4O5Ca cluster, P680, PheoD1, QA, QB and cytochrome b559 have been hypothesized to produce reactive oxygen species in the photosystem. In this communication using Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry we have identified several residues on the D1 and D2 proteins from spinach which are...

  16. DISCOVERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    新产品 国际家居品牌石家庄勒泰中心店盛大开幕近日,国际时尚家饰家用品牌HOLA特力和乐石家庄首店盛大开幕,正式入驻位于中山路核心商圈的勒泰购物中心。HOLA将以优质精品家居和贴心的服务,

  17. Method and Application of Comprehensive Knowledge Discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHA Zongyao; BIAN Fuling

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes the principle of comprehensive knowledge discovery. Unlike most of the current knowledge discovery methods, the comprehensive knowledge discovery considers both the spatial relations and attributes of spatial entities or objects. We introduce the theory of spatial knowledge expression system and some concepts including comprehensive knowledge discovery and spatial union information table(SUIT). In theory, SUIT records all information contained in the studied objects, but in reality, because of the complexity and varieties of spatial relations,only those factors of interest to us are selected. In order to find out the comprehensive knowledge from spatial databases, an efficient comprehensive knowledge discovery algorithm called recycled algorithm (RAR) is suggested.

  18. The Discovery of the b Quark at Fermilab in 1977: The Experiment Coordinator's Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoh, J.

    1997-12-01

    I present the history of the discovery of the Upsilon ({Upsilon}) particle (the first member of the b-quark family to be observed) at Fermilab in 1977 by the CFS (Columbia-Fermilab-Stony Brook collaboration) E288 experiment headed by Leon Lederman. We found the first evidence of the {Upsilon} in November 1976 in an early phase of E288. The subsequent discovery in the spring of 1977 resulted from an upgraded E288 the {mu}{mu}II phase, optimized for dimuons, with about 100 times the sensitivity of the previous investigatory dimuon phase (which had been optimized for dielectrons). The events leading to the discovery, the planning of {mu}{mu}II and the running, including a misadventure (the infamous Shunt Fire of May 1977), are described. Some discussions of the aftermath, a summary, and an acknowledgement list end this brief historical note.

  19. The discovery of the b quark at Fermilab in 1977: The experiment coordinator`s story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoh, J.

    1997-12-01

    I present the history of the discovery of the Upsilon ({Upsilon}) particle (the first member of the b-quark family to be observed) at Fermilab in 1977 by the CFS (Columbia-Fermilab-Stony Brook collaboration) E288 experiment headed by Leon Lederman. We found the first evidence of the {Upsilon} in November 1976 in an early phase of E288. The subsequent discovery in the spring of 1977 resulted from an upgraded E288 the {mu}{mu}II phase, optimized for dimuons, with about 100 times the sensitivity of the previous investigatory dimuon phase (which had been optimized for dielectrons). The events leading to the discovery, the planning of {mu}{mu}II and the running, including a misadventure (the infamous Shunt Fire of May 1977), are described. Some discussions of the aftermath, a summary, and an acknowledgement list end this brief historical note.

  20. The discovery of the b quark at Fermilab in 1977: The experiment coordinator's story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I present the history of the discovery of the Upsilon (Υ) particle (the first member of the b-quark family to be observed) at Fermilab in 1977 by the CFS (Columbia-Fermilab-Stony Brook collaboration) E288 experiment headed by Leon Lederman. We found the first evidence of the Υ in November 1976 in an early phase of E288. The subsequent discovery in the spring of 1977 resulted from an upgraded E288 the μμII phase, optimized for dimuons, with about 100 times the sensitivity of the previous investigatory dimuon phase (which had been optimized for dielectrons). The events leading to the discovery, the planning of μμII and the running, including a misadventure (the infamous Shunt Fire of May 1977), are described. Some discussions of the aftermath, a summary, and an acknowledgement list end this brief historical note

  1. Discovery of a peculiar DQ white dwarf

    CERN Document Server

    Carollo, D; Spagna, A; Smart, R L; Lattanzi, M G; McLean, B J; Pinfield, D J

    2002-01-01

    We report the discovery of a new carbon rich white dwarf that was identified during a proper motion survey for cool white dwarfs based on photographic material used for the construction of the Guide Star Catalog II. Its large proper motion (0.48 arcsec/yr) and faint apparent magnitude (V = 18.7) suggest a nearby object of low luminosity. A low-resolution spectrum taken with the William Herschel Telescope clearly shows strong C2 Deslandres-d'Azambuja and Swan bands, which identify the star as a DQ white dwarf. The strength of the Deslandres-d'Azambuja bands and the depression of the continuum in the Swan-band region are signs of enhanced carbon abundance for the given Teff. Comparison of our spectrophotometric data to published synthetic spectra suggests 6000 K < Teff < 8000 K although further analysis with specialized synthetic models appear necessary to derive both Teff and chemical composition. Finally, the range of spatial velocity estimated for this object makes it a likely member of the halo or thi...

  2. FIRE spectroscopy of KAIT discovery PSN J13165936-1637570

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, E. Y.; Prieto, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of KAIT discovery PSN J13165936-1637570 (ATel #5715) using a near-infrared spectrum (range 800-2500 nm) obtained on Jan 2.35 UT with the FoldedPort Infrared Echellette (FIRE) spectrograph on the 6.5-m Magellan Baade Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. Confirming the PESSTO classification with optical spectroscopy (ATel # 5716), the near-infrared spectrum shows that PSN J13165936-1637570 is a type II supernova more than a month past explosion.

  3. Recent advances in flavivirus antiviral drug discovery and vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Debashish; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2006-01-01

    Many flaviviruses, including yellow fever virus, dengue virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, tick-borne encephalitis virus, and West Nile virus, are globally important human pathogens. Despite an emergence and resurgence of flavivirus-mediated disease, specific therapies are not yet available; however, significant progress has been made toward the prevention and treatment of flavivirus infections. In this article we review recent advances made in the areas of (i) flavivirus vaccine development, and (ii) antiflavivirus drug discovery reported in literature and patents, and highlight strategies used in these investigations. PMID:18221133

  4. Improvements in Space Geodesy Data Discovery at the CDDIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, C.; Pollack, N.; Michael, P.

    2011-01-01

    The Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS) supports data archiving and distribution activities for the space geodesy and geodynamics community. The main objectives of the system are to store space geodesy and geodynamics related data products in a central data bank. to maintain information about the archival of these data, and to disseminate these data and information in a timely manner to a global scientific research community. The archive consists of GNSS, laser ranging, VLBI, and DORIS data sets and products derived from these data. The CDDIS is one of NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) distributed data centers; EOSDIS data centers serve a diverse user community and arc tasked to provide facilities to search and access science data and products. Several activities are currently under development at the CDDIS to aid users in data discovery, both within the current community and beyond. The CDDIS is cooperating in the development of Geodetic Seamless Archive Centers (GSAC) with colleagues at UNAVCO and SIO. TIle activity will provide web services to facilitate data discovery within and across participating archives. In addition, the CDDIS is currently implementing modifications to the metadata extracted from incoming data and product files pushed to its archive. These enhancements will permit information about COOlS archive holdings to be made available through other data portals such as Earth Observing System (EOS) Clearinghouse (ECHO) and integration into the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) portal.

  5. AMS gets lift on space shuttle Discovery

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    AMS-02, the CERN-recognized experiment that will seek dark matter, missing matter and antimatter in Space aboard the International Space Station (ISS), has recently got the green light to be part of the STS-134 NASA mission in 2010. Installation of AMS detectors in the Prévessin experiment hall.In a recent press release, NASA announced that the last or last-but-one mission of the Space Shuttle programme would be the one that will deliver AMS, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, to the International Space Station. The Space Shuttle Discovery is due to lift off in July 2010 from Kennedy Space Center and its mission will include the installation of AMS to the exterior of the space station, using both the shuttle and station arms. "It wasn’t easy to get a lift on the Space Shuttle from the Bush administration," says professor Samuel Ting, spokesperson of the experiment, "since during his administration all the funds for space research w...

  6. Nuclear Energy Center: upper St. Lawrence region. Part I. Siting. Part II. Fort Drum surrogate site, description and impact assessment. Part III. Dispersed sites impact assessment and comparison with the NEC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merry, P.A.; Luner, C.; Hong, S.W.; Canham, H.O.; Boggs, J.F.; McCool, T.P.

    1976-12-01

    This report is one of many supporting documents used by the Nuclear Regulatory commission in the preparation of the Nuclear Energy Center Site Survey (NECSS) mandated by Congress. While the overall study focuses on the feasibility and practicability of nuclear energy centers (NECs), this report is directed towards choosing a suitable surrogate site in the upper St. Lawrence region of New York State, assessing the probable impacts associated with construction and operation of the NEC, and comparing these impacts with those associated with small dispersed nuclear power stations. The upper St. Lawrence region is surveyed to identify a specific site that might be suitable for a surrogate NEC. Several assumptions about the basic design of an NEC are delineated, and a general overview of the characteristics of the region is given. The Fort Drum Military Reservation is chosen as a suitable surrogate site. Fort Drum and the surrounding area are described in terms of land use and population patterns, terrestrial and aquatic ecology, water use and quality, meteorology, institutional framework, and socioeconomic structure. The impacts associated with NEC development are assessed. Then the impacts associated with smaller dispersed nuclear power stations located throughout New York State are assessed and compared with the impacts associated with the NEC. Finally, the impacts due to development of the transmission line networks associated with the NEC and with the dispersed power stations are assessed and compared.

  7. Multi-frequency EPR evidence for a binuclear CuA center in cytochrome c oxidase: studies with a 63Cu- and 65Cu-enriched, soluble domain of the cytochrome ba3 subunit II from Thermus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fee, J A; Sanders, D; Slutter, C E; Doan, P E; Aasa, R; Karpefors, M; Vänngård, T

    1995-07-01

    We have recorded multi-frequency EPR spectra of 63Cu- and 65Cu-labeled, water-soluble CuA-protein from the cytochrome ba3 of T. thermophilus. The spectrum taken at the highest frequency (34.03 GHz) shows no hyperfine structure and is nominally axial with apparent gz approximately 2.18 and gxy approximately 2.00. The spectrum taken at the lowest frequency (3.93 GHz) shows a rich hyperfine structure. Analyses of the spectra show that the observed splitting arises from an interaction of the unpaired electron with two Cu nuclei and support the notion that CuA is a mixed-valent [Cu(II)/Cu(I)] complex in which the unpaired electronic spin is distributed evenly over the two Cu ions.

  8. Guided Discovery with Socratic Questioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hakan TURKCAPAR

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available “The Socratic method” is a way of teaching philosophical thinking and knowledge by asking questions. It was first used by in ancient times by the Greek philosopher Socrates who taught his followers by asking questions; these conversations between them are known as “Socratic dialogues”. In this methodology, no new knowledge is taught to the individual; rather, the individual is guided to remember and rediscover what was formerly known through this process. The main method used in cognitive therapy is guided discovery. There are various methods of guided discovery in cognitive therapy. The form of verbal exchange between the therapist and client which is used during the process of cognitive behavioral therapy is known as “socratic questioning”. In this method the goal is to make the client rediscover, with a series of questions, a piece of knowledge which he could otherwise know but is not presently conscious of. The Socratic Questioning consists of several steps, including: identifying the problem by listening to the client and making reflections, finding alternatives by examining and evaluating, reidentification by using the newly rediscovered information and questioning the old distorted belief, and reaching a new conclusion and applying it. Question types used during these procedures are: questions for collecting information, questions revealing meanings, questions revealing beliefs, questions about behaviours during similar past experiences, analytic questions and analytic synthesis questions. In order to make the patient feel understood, it is important to be empathetic and summarize the problem during the interview. In this text, steps of Socratic Questioning-Guided Discovery will be reviewed with sample dialogues provided for each step.

  9. Discovery of a Makemakean Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Alex H.; Buie, Marc W.; Grundy, Will M.; Noll, Keith S.

    2016-07-01

    We describe the discovery of a satellite in orbit about the dwarf planet (136472) Makemake. This satellite, provisionally designated S/2015 (136472) 1, was detected in imaging data collected with the Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3 on UTC 2015 April 27 at 7.80 ± 0.04 mag fainter than Makemake and at a separation of 0.″57. It likely evaded detection in previous satellite searches due to a nearly edge-on orbital configuration, placing it deep within the glare of Makemake during a substantial fraction of its orbital period. This configuration would place Makemake and its satellite near a mutual event season. Insufficient orbital motion was detected to make a detailed characterization of its orbital properties, prohibiting a measurement of the system mass with the discovery data alone. Preliminary analysis indicates that if the orbit is circular, its orbital period must be longer than 12.4 days and must have a semimajor axis ≳21,000 km. We find that the properties of Makemake’s moon suggest that the majority of the dark material detected in the system by thermal observations may not reside on the surface of Makemake, but may instead be attributable to S/2015 (136472) 1 having a uniform dark surface. This “dark moon hypothesis” can be directly tested with future James Webb Space Telescope observations. We discuss the implications of this discovery for the spin state, figure, and thermal properties of Makemake and the apparent ubiquity of trans-Neptunian dwarf planet satellites.

  10. The changing landscape of antiparasitic drug discovery for veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, Timothy G; Conder, George A; Bishop, Bernard

    2004-10-01

    Changes in economic imperatives in the pharmaceutical industry have led to a wave of consolidation, which has had the unintended side effect of shrinking the resource devoted to antiparasitic drug discovery in animal health companies. Scientific changes have altered the way in which drugs could be discovered in the future. New science and business models will need to be implemented to address the demand for innovative antiparasitic drugs in veterinary medicine. Novel drugs are needed to combat drug resistance and for currently non-addressed problems. At the center of the future for this field, however, lies the need for more support into the basic research on the biology of parasites. PMID:15363437

  11. Discovery of Uniformly Expanding Universe

    OpenAIRE

    Cahill R. T.; Rothall D.

    2012-01-01

    Saul Perlmutter and the Brian Schmidt – Adam Riess teams reported that their Friedmann-model GR-based analysis of their supernovae magnitude-redshift data re- vealed a new phenomenon of “dark energy” which, it is claimed, forms 73% of the energy / matter density of the present-epoch universe, and which is linked to the further claim of an accelerating expansion of the universe. In 2011 Perlmutter, Schmidt and Riess received the Nobel Prize in Physics “for the discovery of...

  12. Discovery of Interstellar Heavy Water

    OpenAIRE

    Butner, H. M.; Charnley, S. B.; Ceccarelli, C.; Rodgers, S.D.; Pardo Carrión, Juan Ramón; Parise, B.; Cernicharo, José; Davis, G. R.

    2007-01-01

    We report the discovery of doubly deuterated water (D2O, heavy water) in the interstellar medium. Using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory 10 m telescope, we detected the 1_10–1_01 transition of para-D2O at 316.7998 GHz in both absorption and emission toward the protostellar binary system IRAS 16293-2422. Assuming that the D2O exists primarily in the warm regions where water ices have been evaporated (i.e., in a "hot corino" environment), we determi...

  13. Call Center ist nicht gleich Call Center

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgartner, Marc; Udris, Ivars

    2005-01-01

    Untersuchungen in 14 Schweizer Call Centers erbrachten vier Call Center-Typen, die sich hinsichtlich Arbeitstätigkeiten und Kommunikationsrichtung voneinander unterscheiden: (a) Beratungs- und Beschwerdemanagement, (b) Informationsmanagement, (c) Auftragsmanagement und (d) Kunden- und Kampagnenmanagement. Dies hat auch Auswirkungen auf die Personalstruktur, -selektion und -entwicklung der Call Center. Es wird der Frage nachgegangen, welche Kompetenzanforderungen in den unterschiedlichen Call ...

  14. TBscore II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Frauke; Lemvik, Grethe; Abate, Ebba;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: The TBscore, based on simple signs and symptoms, was introduced to predict unsuccessful outcome in tuberculosis patients on treatment. A recent inter-observer variation study showed profound variation in some variables. Further, some variables depend on a physician assessing...... them, making the score less applicable. The aim of the present study was to simplify the TBscore. Methods: Inter-observer variation assessment and exploratory factor analysis were combined to develop a simplified score, the TBscore II. To validate TBscore II we assessed the association between start...

  15. Installation of a Synchrotron Radiation Beamline Facility at the J. Bennett Johnston Sr. Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices for the Science and Engineering Alliance. Phase I and II. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Johnston Center presents a unique opportunity for scientists and engineers at southern institutions to initiate and carry out original research using synchrotron radiation ranging from visible light to hard x-rays. The Science and Engineering Alliance proposes to carry out a comprehensive new synchrotron radiation research initiative at CAMD in carefully phased steps of increasing risks. (1) materials research on existing CAMD beam lines and end stations; (2) design, construction and installation of end stations on existing CAMD beam lines, and research with this new instrumentation; (3) design, construction and operation of dedicated synchrotron radiation beam lines that covers the full spectral range of the CAMD storage ring and expanded research in the new facility

  16. On The gamma-ray emission from Reticulum II and other dwarf galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim

    2015-09-01

    The recent discovery of ten new dwarf galaxy candidates by the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS) could increase the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope's sensitivity to annihilating dark matter particles, potentially enabling a definitive test of the dark matter interpretation of the long-standing Galactic Center gamma-ray excess. In this paper, we compare the previous analyses of Fermi data from the directions of the new dwarf candidates (including the relatively nearby Reticulum II) and perform our own analysis, with the goal of establishing the statistical significance of any gamma-ray signal from these sources. We confirm the presence of an excess from Reticulum II, with a spectral shape that is compatible with the Galactic Center signal. The significance of this emission is greater than that observed from 99.84% of randomly chosen high-latitude blank-sky locations, corresponding to a local detection significance of 3.2σ. We caution that any dark matter interpretation of this excess must be validated through observations of additional dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and improved calculations of the relative J-factor of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We improve upon the standard blank-sky calibration approach through the use of multi-wavelength catalogs, which allow us to avoid regions that are likely to contain unresolved gamma-ray sources.

  17. Tools for GPCR drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru ZHANG; Xin XIE

    2012-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate many important physiological functions and are considered as one of the most successful therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases.The design and implementation of high-throughput GPCR assays that allow the cost-effective screening of large compound libraries to identify novel drug candidates are critical in early drug discovery.Early functional GPCR assays depend primarily on the measurement of G-protein-mediated 2nd messenger generation.Taking advantage of the continuously deepening understanding of GPCR signal transduction,many G-protein-independent pathways are utilized to detect the activity of GPCRs,and may provide additional information on functional selectivity of candidate compounds.With the combination of automated imaging systems and label-free detection systems,such assays are now suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS).In this review,we summarize the most widely used GPCR assays and recent advances in HTS technologies for GPCR drug discovery.

  18. Knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciatore, Stefano; Luchinat, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo

    2014-04-01

    Here we describe KODAMA (knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization), an unsupervised and semisupervised learning algorithm that performs feature extraction from noisy and high-dimensional data. Unlike other data mining methods, the peculiarity of KODAMA is that it is driven by an integrated procedure of cross-validation of the results. The discovery of a local manifold's topology is led by a classifier through a Monte Carlo procedure of maximization of cross-validated predictive accuracy. Briefly, our approach differs from previous methods in that it has an integrated procedure of validation of the results. In this way, the method ensures the highest robustness of the obtained solution. This robustness is demonstrated on experimental datasets of gene expression and metabolomics, where KODAMA compares favorably with other existing feature extraction methods. KODAMA is then applied to an astronomical dataset, revealing unexpected features. Interesting and not easily predictable features are also found in the analysis of the State of the Union speeches by American presidents: KODAMA reveals an abrupt linguistic transition sharply separating all post-Reagan from all pre-Reagan speeches. The transition occurs during Reagan's presidency and not from its beginning.

  19. Medical knowledge discovery and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Fred

    2009-05-01

    Although the volume of medical information is growing rapidly, the ability to rapidly convert this data into "actionable insights" and new medical knowledge is lagging far behind. The first step in the knowledge discovery process is data management and integration, which logically can be accomplished through the application of data warehouse technologies. A key insight that arises from efforts in biosurveillance and the global scope of military medicine is that information must be integrated over both time (longitudinal health records) and space (spatial localization of health-related events). Once data are compiled and integrated it is essential to encode the semantics and relationships among data elements through the use of ontologies and semantic web technologies to convert data into knowledge. Medical images form a special class of health-related information. Traditionally knowledge has been extracted from images by human observation and encoded via controlled terminologies. This approach is rapidly being replaced by quantitative analyses that more reliably support knowledge extraction. The goals of knowledge discovery are the improvement of both the timeliness and accuracy of medical decision making and the identification of new procedures and therapies.

  20. Discovery of a Makemakean Moon

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Alex H; Grundy, Will M; Noll, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    We describe the discovery of a satellite in orbit about the dwarf planet (136472) Makemake. This satellite, provisionally designated S/2015 (136472) 1, was detected in imaging data collected with the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 on UTC April 27, 2015 at 7.80$\\pm$0.04 magnitudes fainter than Makemake. It likely evaded detection in previous satellite searches due to a nearly edge-on orbital configuration, placing it deep within the glare of Makemake during a substantial fraction of its orbital period. This configuration would place Makemake and its satellite near a mutual event season. Insufficient orbital motion was detected to make a detailed characterization of its orbital properties, prohibiting a measurement of the system mass with the discovery data alone. Preliminary analysis indicates that if the orbit is circular, its orbital period must be longer than 12.4 days, and must have a semi-major axis $\\gtrsim$21,000 km. We find that the properties of Makemake's moon suggest that the majority ...

  1. Children's cancer centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  2. Price Discovery in the Chinese Gold Market

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Muzhao; Li, Youwei; Wang, Jianxin; Yang, Yung Chiang

    2016-01-01

    This study conducts price discovery analysis in the Chinese gold market. Our result indicates that the price discovery in Chinese gold market occurs predominantly in the futures market. The result is robust to the different measures of price discovery, namely information share, component share, and information leadership share. Partitioning the daily trades into three trading sessions, we find that the dominance of the futures market occurs in all trading sessions. We further investigate the ...

  3. MODIS: an audio motif discovery software

    OpenAIRE

    Catanese, Laurence; Souviraà-Labastie, Nathan; Qu, Bingqing; Campion, Sébastien; Gravier, Guillaume; Vincent, Emmanuel; Bimbot, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    International audience MODIS is a free speech and audio motif discovery software developed at IRISA Rennes. Motif discovery is the task of discovering and collecting occurrences of repeating patterns in the absence of prior knowledge, or training material. MODIS is based on a generic approach to mine repeating audio sequences, with tolerance to motif variability. The algorithm implementation allows to process large audio streams at a reasonable speed where motif discovery often requires hu...

  4. Big biomedical data as the key resource for discovery science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toga, Arthur W; Foster, Ian; Kesselman, Carl; Madduri, Ravi; Chard, Kyle; Deutsch, Eric W; Price, Nathan D; Glusman, Gustavo; Heavner, Benjamin D; Dinov, Ivo D; Ames, Joseph; Van Horn, John; Kramer, Roger; Hood, Leroy

    2015-11-01

    Modern biomedical data collection is generating exponentially more data in a multitude of formats. This flood of complex data poses significant opportunities to discover and understand the critical interplay among such diverse domains as genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and phenomics, including imaging, biometrics, and clinical data. The Big Data for Discovery Science Center is taking an "-ome to home" approach to discover linkages between these disparate data sources by mining existing databases of proteomic and genomic data, brain images, and clinical assessments. In support of this work, the authors developed new technological capabilities that make it easy for researchers to manage, aggregate, manipulate, integrate, and model large amounts of distributed data. Guided by biological domain expertise, the Center's computational resources and software will reveal relationships and patterns, aiding researchers in identifying biomarkers for the most confounding conditions and diseases, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.

  5. The Discovery of Raman Scattering in HII Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Dopita, Michael A; Sutherland, Ralph S; Kewley, Lisa J; Groves, Brent A

    2016-01-01

    We report here on the discovery of faint extended wings of H\\alpha\\ observed out to an apparent velocity of ~ 7600 km/s in the Orion Nebula (M42) and in five HII regions in the Large and the Small Magellanic Clouds. We show that, these wings are caused by Raman scattering of both the O I and Si II resonance lines and stellar continuum UV photons with H I followed by radiative decay to the H I n=2 level. The broad wings also seen in H\\beta\\ and in H\\gamma\\ result from Raman scattering of the UV continuum in the H I n=4 and n=5 levels respectively.The Raman scattering fluorescence is correlated with the intensity of the narrow permitted lines of O I and Si II. In the case of Si II, this is explained by radiative pumping of the same 1023.7\\AA\\ resonance line involved in the Raman scattering by the Ly\\beta\\ radiation field. The subsequent radiative cascade produces enhanced Si II 5978.9, 6347.1$ and 6371.4\\AA\\ permitted transitions. Finally we show that in O I, radiative pumping of the 1025.76\\AA\\ resonance line ...

  6. Womens Business Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Women's Business Centers (WBCs) represent a national network of nearly 100 educational centers throughout the United States and its territories, which are designed...

  7. Mammalian RNA polymerase II core promoters: insights from genome-wide studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandelin, Albin; Carninci, Piero; Lenhard, Boris;

    2007-01-01

    The identification and characterization of mammalian core promoters and transcription start sites is a prerequisite to understanding how RNA polymerase II transcription is controlled. New experimental technologies have enabled genome-wide discovery and characterization of core promoters, revealin...

  8. Data center networks and network architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaki, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    This paper discusses and proposes the architectural framework, which is for data center networks. The data center networks require new technical challenges, and it would be good opportunity to change the functions, which are not need in current and future networks. Based on the observation and consideration on data center networks, this paper proposes; (i) Broadcast-free layer 2 network (i.e., emulation of broadcast at the end-node), (ii) Full-mesh point-to-point pipes, and (iii) IRIDES (Invitation Routing aDvertisement for path Engineering System).

  9. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington; Choi, Changsu; /Seoul Natl. U.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, Darren L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Hogan, Craig J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Marshall, Jennifer L.; /Ohio State U.; McGinnis,; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Pennsylvania U.

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.

  10. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary

    CERN Document Server

    Frieman, Joshua A; Becker, A; Choi, C; Cinabro, D; De Jongh, F; Depoy, D L; Dilday, B; Doi, M; Garnavich, P M; Hogan, C J; Holtzman, J; Im, M; Jha, S; Kessler, R; Konishi, K; Lampeitl, H; Marriner, J; Marshall, J L; McGinnis, D; Miknaitis, G; Nichol, R C; Prieto, J L; Riess, A G; Richmond, M W; Romani, R; Sako, M; Schneider, D P; Smith, M; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; van der Heyden, K; Yasuda, N; Zheng, C; Adelman-McCarthy, J; Annis, J; Assef, R J; Barentine, J; Bender, R; Blandford, R D; Boroski, W N; Bremer, M; Brewington, H; Collins, C A; Crotts, A; Dembicky, J; Eastman, J; Edge, A; Edmondson, E; Elson, E; Eyler, M E; Filippenko, A V; Foley, R J; Frank, S; Goobar, A; Gueth, T; Gunn, J E; Harvanek, M; Hopp, U; Ihara, Y; Ivezić, Ž; Kahn, S; Kaplan, J; Kent, S; Ketzeback, W; Kleinman, S J; Kollatschny, W; Kron, R G; Krzesiński, J; Lamenti, D; Leloudas, G; Lin, H; Long, D C; Lucey, J; Lupton, R H; Malanushenko, E; Malanushenko, V; McMillan, R J; Méndez, J; Morgan, C W; Morokuma, T; Nitta, A; Ostman, L; Pan, K; Rockosi, C M; Romer, A K; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Saurage, G; Schlesinger, K; Snedden, S A; Sollerman, J; Stoughton, C; Stritzinger, M; Subba-Rao, M; Tucker, D; Väisänen, P; Watson, L C; Watters, S; Wheeler, J C; Yanny, B; York, D

    2007-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large ...

  11. Positivity-preserving cell-centered Lagrangian schemes for multi-material compressible flows: From first-order to high-orders. Part II: The two-dimensional case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, François; Shu, Chi-Wang; Maire, Pierre-Henri

    2016-05-01

    This paper is the second part of a series of two. It follows [44], in which the positivity-preservation property of methods solving one-dimensional Lagrangian gas dynamics equations, from first-order to high-orders of accuracy, was addressed. This article aims at extending this analysis to the two-dimensional case. This study is performed on a general first-order cell-centered finite volume formulation based on polygonal meshes defined either by straight line edges, conical edges, or any high-order curvilinear edges. Such formulation covers the numerical methods introduced in [6,32,5,41,43]. This positivity study is then extended to high-orders of accuracy. Through this new procedure, scheme robustness is highly improved and hence new problems can be tackled. Numerical results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of these methods. It is important to point out that even if this paper is concerned with purely Lagrangian schemes, the theory developed is of fundamental importance for any methods relying on a purely Lagrangian step, as ALE methods or non-direct Euler schemes.

  12. 77 FR 14707 - Vet Center Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... section 1712A(a)(1)(B)(i)(II). In repeated consultations with DoD over the decades during which we have... Records 64VA15, ``Readjustment Counseling Service Vet Center Program,'' most recently amended at 74 FR... professions, Health records, Homeless, Medical and dental schools, Medical devices, Medical research,...

  13. Automating Spreadsheet Discovery & Risk Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Perry, Eric

    2008-01-01

    There have been many articles and mishaps published about the risks of uncontrolled spreadsheets in today's business environment, including non-compliance, operational risk, errors, and fraud all leading to significant loss events. Spreadsheets fall into the realm of end user developed applications and are often absent the proper safeguards and controls an IT organization would enforce for enterprise applications. There is also an overall lack of software programming discipline enforced in how spreadsheets are developed. However, before an organization can apply proper controls and discipline to critical spreadsheets, an accurate and living inventory of spreadsheets across the enterprise must be created, and all critical spreadsheets must be identified. As such, this paper proposes an automated approach to the initial stages of the spreadsheet management lifecycle - discovery, inventory and risk assessment. Without the use of technology, these phases are often treated as a one-off project. By leveraging techn...

  14. Drug discovery from marine microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwick, William H; Fenner, Amanda M

    2013-05-01

    The marine environment has been a source of more than 20,000 inspirational natural products discovered over the past 50 years. From these efforts, 9 approved drugs and 12 current clinical trial agents have been discovered, either as natural products or as molecules inspired from the natural product structure. To a significant degree, these have come from collections of marine invertebrates largely obtained from shallow-water tropical ecosystems. However, there is a growing recognition that marine invertebrates are oftentimes populated with enormous quantities of "associated" or symbiotic microorganisms and that microorganisms are the true metabolic sources of these most valuable of marine natural products. Also, because of the inherently multidisciplinary nature of this field, a high degree of innovation is characteristic of marine natural product drug discovery efforts.

  15. PORT II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  16. Knowledge Discovery/A Collaborative Approach, an Innovative Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitts, Mary A.

    2009-01-01

    Collaboration between Medical Informatics and Healthcare Systems (MIHCS) at NASA/Johnson Space Center (JSC) and the Texas Medical Center (TMC) Library was established to investigate technologies for facilitating knowledge discovery across multiple life sciences research disciplines in multiple repositories. After reviewing 14 potential Enterprise Search System (ESS) solutions, Collexis was determined to best meet the expressed needs. A three month pilot evaluation of Collexis produced positive reports from multiple scientists across 12 research disciplines. The joint venture and a pilot-phased approach achieved the desired results without the high cost of purchasing software, hardware or additional resources to conduct the task. Medical research is highly compartmentalized by discipline, e.g. cardiology, immunology, neurology. The medical research community at large, as well as at JSC, recognizes the need for cross-referencing relevant information to generate best evidence. Cross-discipline collaboration at JSC is specifically required to close knowledge gaps affecting space exploration. To facilitate knowledge discovery across these communities, MIHCS combined expertise with the TMC library and found Collexis to best fit the needs of our researchers including:

  17. Structural Genomics and Drug Discovery for Infectious Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of structural genomics methods and approaches to proteins from organisms causing infectious diseases is making available the three dimensional structures of many proteins that are potential drug targets and laying the groundwork for structure aided drug discovery efforts. There are a number of structural genomics projects with a focus on pathogens that have been initiated worldwide. The Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID) was recently established to apply state-of-the-art high throughput structural biology technologies to the characterization of proteins from the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) category A-C pathogens and organisms causing emerging, or re-emerging infectious diseases. The target selection process emphasizes potential biomedical benefits. Selected proteins include known drug targets and their homologs, essential enzymes, virulence factors and vaccine candidates. The Center also provides a structure determination service for the infectious disease scientific community. The ultimate goal is to generate a library of structures that are available to the scientific community and can serve as a starting point for further research and structure aided drug discovery for infectious diseases. To achieve this goal, the CSGID will determine protein crystal structures of 400 proteins and protein-ligand complexes using proven, rapid, highly integrated, and cost-effective methods for such determination, primarily by X-ray crystallography. High throughput crystallographic structure determination is greatly aided by frequent, convenient access to high-performance beamlines at third-generation synchrotron X-ray sources.

  18. The Woodlands Metro Center energy study. Case studies of project planning and design for energy conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    Appendix II of The Woodlands Metro Center Energy Study near Houston consists of the following: Metro Center Program, Conventional Plan Building Prototypes and Detail Parcel Analysis, Energy Plan Building Prototypes, and Energy Plan Detail Parcel Analysis.

  19. A Tale of Two Discoveries: Comparing the Usability of Summon and EBSCO Discovery Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Anita K.; MacDonald, Jean B.

    2013-01-01

    Web-scale discovery systems are gaining momentum among academic libraries as libraries seek a means to provide their users with a one-stop searching experience. Illinois State University's Milner Library found itself in the unique position of having access to two distinct discovery products, EBSCO Discovery Service and Serials Solutions' Summon.…

  20. Type-II Weyl semimetals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soluyanov, Alexey A; Gresch, Dominik; Wang, Zhijun; Wu, QuanSheng; Troyer, Matthias; Dai, Xi; Bernevig, B Andrei

    2015-11-26

    Fermions--elementary particles such as electrons--are classified as Dirac, Majorana or Weyl. Majorana and Weyl fermions had not been observed experimentally until the recent discovery of condensed matter systems such as topological superconductors and semimetals, in which they arise as low-energy excitations. Here we propose the existence of a previously overlooked type of Weyl fermion that emerges at the boundary between electron and hole pockets in a new phase of matter. This particle was missed by Weyl because it breaks the stringent Lorentz symmetry in high-energy physics. Lorentz invariance, however, is not present in condensed matter physics, and by generalizing the Dirac equation, we find the new type of Weyl fermion. In particular, whereas Weyl semimetals--materials hosting Weyl fermions--were previously thought to have standard Weyl points with a point-like Fermi surface (which we refer to as type-I), we discover a type-II Weyl point, which is still a protected crossing, but appears at the contact of electron and hole pockets in type-II Weyl semimetals. We predict that WTe2 is an example of a topological semimetal hosting the new particle as a low-energy excitation around such a type-II Weyl point. The existence of type-II Weyl points in WTe2 means that many of its physical properties are very different to those of standard Weyl semimetals with point-like Fermi surfaces.

  1. Student Success Center Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobs For the Future, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Student Success Center Toolkit" is a compilation of materials organized to assist Student Success Center directors as they staff, launch, operate, and sustain Centers. The toolkit features materials created and used by existing Centers, such as staffing and budgeting templates, launch materials, sample meeting agendas, and fundraising…

  2. Collaboration for rare disease drug discovery research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litterman, Nadia K; Rhee, Michele; Swinney, David C; Ekins, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Rare disease research has reached a tipping point, with the confluence of scientific and technologic developments that if appropriately harnessed, could lead to key breakthroughs and treatments for this set of devastating disorders. Industry-wide trends have revealed that the traditional drug discovery research and development (R&D) model is no longer viable, and drug companies are evolving their approach. Rather than only pursue blockbuster therapeutics for heterogeneous, common diseases, drug companies have increasingly begun to shift their focus to rare diseases. In academia, advances in genetics analyses and disease mechanisms have allowed scientific understanding to mature, but the lack of funding and translational capability severely limits the rare disease research that leads to clinical trials. Simultaneously, there is a movement towards increased research collaboration, more data sharing, and heightened engagement and active involvement by patients, advocates, and foundations. The growth in networks and social networking tools presents an opportunity to help reach other patients but also find researchers and build collaborations. The growth of collaborative software that can enable researchers to share their data could also enable rare disease patients and foundations to manage their portfolio of funded projects for developing new therapeutics and suggest drug repurposing opportunities. Still there are many thousands of diseases without treatments and with only fragmented research efforts. We will describe some recent progress in several rare diseases used as examples and propose how collaborations could be facilitated. We propose that the development of a center of excellence that integrates and shares informatics resources for rare diseases sponsored by all of the stakeholders would help foster these initiatives.

  3. Intraday Price Discovery in Fragmented Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.R. Ozturk (Sait); M. van der Wel (Michel); D.J.C. van Dijk (Dick)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractFor many assets, trading is fragmented across multiple exchanges. Price discovery measures summarize the informativeness of trading on each venue for discovering the asset’s true underlying value. We explore intraday variation in price discovery using a structural model with time-varying

  4. 2015 Update of the Discoveries of Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Thoennessen, M

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 update of the discovery of nuclide project is presented. Twenty new nuclides were observed for the first time in 2015. An overall review of all previous assignments was made in order to apply the discovery criteria consistently to all elements. In addition, a list of isotopes published so far only in conference proceedings or internal reports is included.

  5. Service discovery in heterogeneous wireless networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blangé, M.J.; Karkowski, I.P.; Vermeulen, B.C.B.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we describe a possible solution to the problem of service discovery in heterogeneous wireless networks. This solution involves introduction of a network independent service discovery layer, with as main goal the improved robustness of applications running on top of it. A possible imple

  6. Scaling Bayesian network discovery through incremental recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelo, J.R.; Siebes, A.P.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Bayesian networks are a type of graphical models that, e.g., allow one to analyze the interaction among the variables in a database. A well-known problem with the discovery of such models from a database is the ``problem of high-dimensionality''. That is, the discovery of a network from a database w

  7. DISCOVERY OF EVIDENCE IN INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakumenko, V.V.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the different concepts of discovery of evidence, which exist under different legal jurisdictions, with their theoretical analysis to determine the feasibility and rationality of the application of the discovery mechanisms in the frameworks of international commercial arbitration and its fundamental principles.

  8. In silico discoveries for biomedical sciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haagen, Herman van

    2011-01-01

    Text-mining is a challenging field of research initially meant for reading large text collections with a computer. Text-mining is useful in summarizing text, searching for the informative documents, and most important to do knowledge discovery. Knowledge discovery is the main subject of this thesis.

  9. 49 CFR 1121.2 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... procedures set forth at 49 CFR part 1114, subpart B. Discovery may begin upon the filing of the petition for exemption or petition for revocation of an exemption. In petitions to revoke an exemption, a party must... requests at the same time it files its petition to revoke. Discovery shall be completed 30 days after...

  10. Effective Online Group Discovery in Trajectory Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaohui; Ceikute, Vaida; Jensen, Christian S.;

    2013-01-01

    GPS-enabled devices are pervasive nowadays. Finding movement patterns in trajectory data stream is gaining in importance. We propose a group discovery framework that aims to efficiently support the online discovery of moving objects that travel together. The framework adopts a sampling...

  11. A Discovery Chemistry Experiment on Buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulevich, Suzanne E.; Herrick, Richard S.; Mills, Kenneth V.

    2014-01-01

    The Holy Cross Chemistry Department has designed and implemented an experiment on buffers as part of our Discovery Chemistry curriculum. The pedagogical philosophy of Discovery Chemistry is to make the laboratory the focal point of learning for students in their first two years of undergraduate instruction. We first pose questions in prelaboratory…

  12. Proteomics: a new approach for drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-junLI; YangXIANG; Hui-kaiTIAN; BingMA; Xiao-haoYAO; Hong-meiZHANG; He-mingYU

    2004-01-01

    Proteomics is a bridge that crosses genome to drug discovery. Proteomic studies will provide possible targets for therapeutic usage and moreover increase the efficiency of the downstream of drug discovery process. By using the 2-D electrophoresis combining with MS technology, which is most preva-lent techniques of proteome, we have identified more than 20

  13. Discovery of inhibitors of bacterial histidine kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velikova, N.R.

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Inhibitors of Bacterial Histidine Kinases

    Summary

    The thesis is on novel antibacterial drug discovery (http://youtu.be/NRMWOGgeysM). Using structure-based and fragment-based dru

  14. 49 CFR 1503.633 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Rules of Practice in TSA Civil Penalty Actions § 1503.633 Discovery. (a) Initiation of discovery. Any..., TSA may provide SSI to the party when, in the sole discretion of TSA, access to the SSI is necessary for the party to prepare a response to allegations contained the complaint. TSA may provide...

  15. Accounting for discovery bias in genomic prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to evaluate an approach to mitigating discovery bias in genomic prediction. Accuracy may be improved by placing greater emphasis on regions of the genome expected to be more influential on a trait. Methods emphasizing regions result in a phenomenon known as “discovery bias” if info...

  16. 12 CFR 1780.26 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Constitution, any applicable act of Congress, or the principles of common law. (e) Time limits. All discovery... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discovery. 1780.26 Section 1780.26 Banks and... OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Prehearing Proceedings § 1780.26...

  17. Sampling: Making Electronic Discovery More Cost Effective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Luoma

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available With the huge volumes of electronic data subject to discovery in virtually every instance of litigation, time and costs of conducting discovery have become exceedingly important when litigants plan their discovery strategies.  Rather than incurring the costs of having lawyers review every document produced in response to a discovery request in search of relevant evidence, a cost effective strategy for document review planning is to use statistical sampling of the database of documents to determine the likelihood of finding relevant evidence by reviewing additional documents.  This paper reviews and discusses how sampling can be used to make document review more cost effective by considering issues such as an appropriate sample size, how to develop a sampling strategy, and taking into account the potential value of the litigation in relation to the costs of additional discovery efforts. 

  18. Assessment of composite motif discovery methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansen Jostein

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational discovery of regulatory elements is an important area of bioinformatics research and more than a hundred motif discovery methods have been published. Traditionally, most of these methods have addressed the problem of single motif discovery – discovering binding motifs for individual transcription factors. In higher organisms, however, transcription factors usually act in combination with nearby bound factors to induce specific regulatory behaviours. Hence, recent focus has shifted from single motifs to the discovery of sets of motifs bound by multiple cooperating transcription factors, so called composite motifs or cis-regulatory modules. Given the large number and diversity of methods available, independent assessment of methods becomes important. Although there have been several benchmark studies of single motif discovery, no similar studies have previously been conducted concerning composite motif discovery. Results We have developed a benchmarking framework for composite motif discovery and used it to evaluate the performance of eight published module discovery tools. Benchmark datasets were constructed based on real genomic sequences containing experimentally verified regulatory modules, and the module discovery programs were asked to predict both the locations of these modules and to specify the single motifs involved. To aid the programs in their search, we provided position weight matrices corresponding to the binding motifs of the transcription factors involved. In addition, selections of decoy matrices were mixed with the genuine matrices on one dataset to test the response of programs to varying levels of noise. Conclusion Although some of the methods tested tended to score somewhat better than others overall, there were still large variations between individual datasets and no single method performed consistently better than the rest in all situations. The variation in performance on individual

  19. Swift: 10 Years of Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    The conference Swift: 10 years of discovery was held in Roma at La Sapienza University on Dec. 2-5 2014 to celebrate 10 years of Swift successes. Thanks to a large attendance and a lively program, it provided the opportunity to review recent advances of our knowledge of the high-energy transient Universe both from the observational and theoretical sides. When Swift was launched on November 20, 2004, its prime objective was to chase Gamma-Ray Bursts and deepen our knowledge of these cosmic explosions. And so it did, unveiling the secrets of long and short GRBs. However, its multi-wavelength instrumentation and fast scheduling capabilities made it the most versatile mission ever flown. Besides GRBs, Swift has observed, and contributed to our understanding of, an impressive variety of targets including AGNs, supernovae, pulsars, microquasars, novae, variable stars, comets, and much more. Swift is continuously discovering rare and surprising events distributed over a wide range of redshifts, out to the most distant transient objects in the Universe. Such a trove of discoveries has been addressed during the conference with sessions dedicated to each class of events. Indeed, the conference in Rome was a spectacular celebration of the Swift 10th anniversary. It included sessions on all types of transient and steady sources. Top scientists from around the world gave invited and contributed talks. There was a large poster session, sumptuous lunches, news interviews and a glorious banquet with officials attending from INAF and ASI. All the presentations, as well as several conference pictures, can be found in the conference website (http://www.brera.inaf.it/Swift10/Welcome.html). These proceedings have been collected owing to the efforts of Paolo D’Avanzo who has followed each paper from submission to final acceptance. Our warmest thanks to Paolo for all his work. The Conference has been made possible by the support from La Sapienza University as well as from the ARAP

  20. Trauma Center Staffing, Infrastructure, and Patient Characteristics that Influence Trauma Center Need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faul, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most effective use of trauma center resources helps reduce morbidity and mortality, while saving costs. Identifying critical infrastructure characteristics, patient characteristics and staffing components of a trauma center associated with the proportion of patients needing major trauma care will help planners create better systems for patient care.   Methods: We used the 2009 National Trauma Data Bank-Research Dataset to determine the proportion of critically injured patients requiring the resources of a trauma center within each Level I-IV trauma center (n=443. The outcome variable was defined as the portion of treated patients who were critically injured. We defined the need for critical trauma resources and interventions (“trauma center need” as death prior to hospital discharge, admission to the intensive care unit, or admission to the operating room from the emergency department as a result of acute traumatic injury. Generalized Linear Modeling (GLM was used to determine how hospital infrastructure, staffing Levels, and patient characteristics contributed to trauma center need.     Results: Nonprofit Level I and II trauma centers were significantly associated with higher levels of trauma center need. Trauma centers that had a higher percentage of transferred patients or a lower percentage of insured patients were associated with a higher proportion of trauma center need.  Hospital infrastructure characteristics, such as bed capacity and intensive care unit capacity, were not associated with trauma center need. A GLM for Level III and IV trauma centers showed that the number of trauma surgeons on staff was associated with trauma center need. Conclusion: Because the proportion of trauma center need is predominantly influenced by hospital type, transfer frequency, and insurance status, it is important for administrators to consider patient population characteristics of the catchment area when planning the

  1. Materials discovery through crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of new materials and associated desirable properties has been a driving force behind chemical innovation for centuries. When we look at some of the many recent technological advances, and how widespread and significant their impact has been, we appreciate how much they have relied on new materials. The increase in hard drive storage capacity due to new giant magneto-resistive materials, the ever-shrinking cell phone due to improved microwave dielectric materials, the enhancement in lithium battery storage capacity due to new intercalation materials, or the improved capacitor due to new ferroelectric materials are all excellent examples. How were these materials discovered? While there is no single answer, in all cases there was a First-Material, the archetype in which the phenomenon was first observed, the one that led to further investigations and the subsequent preparation of improved 2nd or 3rd generation materials. It is this First-Material, the archetype, that was discovered - often via crystal growth.

  2. Knowledge Discovery from Vibration Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The framework as well as the particular algorithms of pattern recognition process is widely adopted in structural health monitoring (SHM. However, as a part of the overall process of knowledge discovery from data bases (KDD, the results of pattern recognition are only changes and patterns of changes of data features. In this paper, based on the similarity between KDD and SHM and considering the particularity of SHM problems, a four-step framework of SHM is proposed which extends the final goal of SHM from detecting damages to extracting knowledge to facilitate decision making. The purposes and proper methods of each step of this framework are discussed. To demonstrate the proposed SHM framework, a specific SHM method which is composed by the second order structural parameter identification, statistical control chart analysis, and system reliability analysis is then presented. To examine the performance of this SHM method, real sensor data measured from a lab size steel bridge model structure are used. The developed four-step framework of SHM has the potential to clarify the process of SHM to facilitate the further development of SHM techniques.

  3. Mathematical models in biological discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Charles

    1977-01-01

    When I was asked to help organize an American Association for the Advancement of Science symposium about how mathematical models have con­ tributed to biology, I agreed immediately. The subject is of immense importance and wide-spread interest. However, too often it is discussed in biologically sterile environments by "mutual admiration society" groups of "theoreticians", many of whom have never seen, and most of whom have never done, an original scientific experiment with the biolog­ ical materials they attempt to describe in abstract (and often prejudiced) terms. The opportunity to address the topic during an annual meeting of the AAAS was irresistable. In order to try to maintain the integrity ;,f the original intent of the symposium, it was entitled, "Contributions of Mathematical Models to Biological Discovery". This symposium was organized by Daniel Solomon and myself, held during the 141st annual meeting of the AAAS in New York during January, 1975, sponsored by sections G and N (Biological and Medic...

  4. The Discovery of Dabigatran Etexilate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne evan Ryn

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Thromboembolic disease is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the developed world and is caused by an excessive stimulation of coagulation. Thrombin is a key serine protease in the coagulation cascade and numerous efforts have been made to develop safe and effective orally active direct thrombin inhibitors (DTIs. Current anticoagulant therapy includes the use of indirect thrombin inhibitors (e.g. heparins, low-molecular-weight-heparins [LMWHs] and vitamin K antagonists (VKA such as warfarin. However there are several caveats in the clinical use of these agents including narrow therapeutic window, parenteral delivery, and food- and drug-drug interactions. Dabigatran is a synthetic, reversible DTI with high affinity and specificity for its target binding both free and clot-bound thrombin, and offers a favorable pharmacokinetic profile. Large randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that dabigatran provides comparable or superior thromboprophylaxis in multiple thromboembolic disease indications compared to standard of care. This minireview will highlight the discovery and development of dabigatran, the first in a class of new oral anticoagulant (NOAC agents to be licensed worldwide for the prevention of thromboembolism in the setting of orthopedic surgery and stroke prevent in atrial fibrillation.

  5. Knowledge discovery from vibration measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jun; Li, Jian; Wang, Daoyao

    2014-01-01

    The framework as well as the particular algorithms of pattern recognition process is widely adopted in structural health monitoring (SHM). However, as a part of the overall process of knowledge discovery from data bases (KDD), the results of pattern recognition are only changes and patterns of changes of data features. In this paper, based on the similarity between KDD and SHM and considering the particularity of SHM problems, a four-step framework of SHM is proposed which extends the final goal of SHM from detecting damages to extracting knowledge to facilitate decision making. The purposes and proper methods of each step of this framework are discussed. To demonstrate the proposed SHM framework, a specific SHM method which is composed by the second order structural parameter identification, statistical control chart analysis, and system reliability analysis is then presented. To examine the performance of this SHM method, real sensor data measured from a lab size steel bridge model structure are used. The developed four-step framework of SHM has the potential to clarify the process of SHM to facilitate the further development of SHM techniques.

  6. Genetic algorithms for route discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelenbe, Erol; Liu, Peixiang; Lainé, Jeremy

    2006-12-01

    Packet routing in networks requires knowledge about available paths, which can be either acquired dynamically while the traffic is being forwarded, or statically (in advance) based on prior information of a network's topology. This paper describes an experimental investigation of path discovery using genetic algorithms (GAs). We start with the quality-of-service (QoS)-driven routing protocol called "cognitive packet network" (CPN), which uses smart packets (SPs) to dynamically select routes in a distributed autonomic manner based on a user's QoS requirements. We extend it by introducing a GA at the source routers, which modifies and filters the paths discovered by the CPN. The GA can combine the paths that were previously discovered to create new untested but valid source-to-destination paths, which are then selected on the basis of their "fitness." We present an implementation of this approach, where the GA runs in background mode so as not to overload the ingress routers. Measurements conducted on a network test bed indicate that when the background-traffic load of the network is light to medium, the GA can result in improved QoS. When the background-traffic load is high, it appears that the use of the GA may be detrimental to the QoS experienced by users as compared to CPN routing because the GA uses less timely state information in its decision making. PMID:17186801

  7. West Nile Virus Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Pheng Lim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The outbreak of West Nile virus (WNV in 1999 in the USA, and its continued spread throughout the Americas, parts of Europe, the Middle East and Africa, underscored the need for WNV antiviral development. Here, we review the current status of WNV drug discovery. A number of approaches have been used to search for inhibitors of WNV, including viral infection-based screening, enzyme-based screening, structure-based virtual screening, structure-based rationale design, and antibody-based therapy. These efforts have yielded inhibitors of viral or cellular factors that are critical for viral replication. For small molecule inhibitors, no promising preclinical candidate has been developed; most of the inhibitors could not even be advanced to the stage of hit-to-lead optimization due to their poor drug-like properties. However, several inhibitors developed for related members of the family Flaviviridae, such as dengue virus and hepatitis C virus, exhibited cross-inhibition of WNV, suggesting the possibility to re-purpose these antivirals for WNV treatment. Most promisingly, therapeutic antibodies have shown excellent efficacy in mouse model; one of such antibodies has been advanced into clinical trial. The knowledge accumulated during the past fifteen years has provided better rationale for the ongoing WNV and other flavivirus antiviral development.

  8. Genetic algorithms for route discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelenbe, Erol; Liu, Peixiang; Lainé, Jeremy

    2006-12-01

    Packet routing in networks requires knowledge about available paths, which can be either acquired dynamically while the traffic is being forwarded, or statically (in advance) based on prior information of a network's topology. This paper describes an experimental investigation of path discovery using genetic algorithms (GAs). We start with the quality-of-service (QoS)-driven routing protocol called "cognitive packet network" (CPN), which uses smart packets (SPs) to dynamically select routes in a distributed autonomic manner based on a user's QoS requirements. We extend it by introducing a GA at the source routers, which modifies and filters the paths discovered by the CPN. The GA can combine the paths that were previously discovered to create new untested but valid source-to-destination paths, which are then selected on the basis of their "fitness." We present an implementation of this approach, where the GA runs in background mode so as not to overload the ingress routers. Measurements conducted on a network test bed indicate that when the background-traffic load of the network is light to medium, the GA can result in improved QoS. When the background-traffic load is high, it appears that the use of the GA may be detrimental to the QoS experienced by users as compared to CPN routing because the GA uses less timely state information in its decision making.

  9. Discovery Mondays: Zoom on materials

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Following the success of the first Discovery Monday, which had over 100 visitors, the series of evening events in Microcosm continues. On Monday 2nd June, discover the world of materials. Find out how CERN scientists examine, manufacture and study different materials, at different scales. Did you know for example that using electrons you can observe a hair at a scale equivalent to looking at a boat with the naked eye? Also, that using ultrasound, you can measure the thickness of an object that is completely inaccessible? Find out more about these techniques, and also the high-tech machining and soldering that is carried out in CERN's central workshop. Plus, see how engineers can detect tiny leaks through solder points - essential for maintaining the vacuum in the LHC. The evening is open to all, without reservation, suggested age 12 and above. Rendez-vous in Microcosm on Monday 2nd June From 19.30 - 21.00 Free entry For more information : http://www.cern.ch/microcosm Using a scanning microscope, the head o...

  10. Students Excited by Stellar Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    In the constellation of Ophiuchus, above the disk of our Milky Way Galaxy, there lurks a stellar corpse spinning 30 times per second -- an exotic star known as a radio pulsar. This object was unknown until it was discovered last week by three high school students. These students are part of the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) project, run by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, WV, and West Virginia University (WVU). The pulsar, which may be a rare kind of neutron star called a recycled pulsar, was discovered independently by Virginia students Alexander Snider and Casey Thompson, on January 20, and a day later by Kentucky student Hannah Mabry. "Every day, I told myself, 'I have to find a pulsar. I better find a pulsar before this class ends,'" said Mabry. When she actually made the discovery, she could barely contain her excitement. "I started screaming and jumping up and down." Thompson was similarly expressive. "After three years of searching, I hadn't found a single thing," he said, "but when I did, I threw my hands up in the air and said, 'Yes!'." Snider said, "It actually feels really neat to be the first person to ever see something like that. It's an uplifting feeling." As part of the PSC, the students analyze real data from NRAO's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to find pulsars. The students' teachers -- Debra Edwards of Sherando High School, Leah Lorton of James River High School, and Jennifer Carter of Rowan County Senior High School -- all introduced the PSC in their classes, and interested students formed teams to continue the work. Even before the discovery, Mabry simply enjoyed the search. "It just feels like you're actually doing something," she said. "It's a good feeling." Once the pulsar candidate was reported to NRAO, Project Director Rachel Rosen took a look and agreed with the young scientists. A followup observing session was scheduled on the GBT. Snider and Mabry traveled to West Virginia to assist in the

  11. Critical Appraisal of Translational Research Models for Suitability in Performance Assessment of Cancer Centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajan, Abinaya; Sullivan, Richard; Bakker, Suzanne; Harten, van Wim H.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Translational research is a complex cumulative process that takes time. However, the operating environment for cancer centers engaged in translational research is now financially insecure. Centers are challenged to improve results and reduce time from discovery to practice innovations. P

  12. 16 CFR 1025.36 - Motions to compel discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ADJUDICATIVE PROCEEDINGS Discovery, Compulsory Process § 1025.36 Motions to compel discovery. If a party fails... examination to the extent possible with respect to other areas of inquiry before moving to compel discovery....

  13. The Discovery of Sgr A*

    CERN Document Server

    Goss, W M; Brown, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    The compact radio source Sgr A* is associated with a 3.6 million black hole at the center of the Milky Way. The radio source was discovered in February 1974 by Bruce Balick and Robert L.Brown. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Green Bank 35 km radio link interferometer was used. We discuss other observations in the years 1965-1985 as well as early VLBI observations. The name Sgr A* was used for the first time in 1982 by Robert L.Brown and has become the accepted name in the intervening years.

  14. Investigations into Library Web-Scale Discovery Services

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughan, Jason

    2008-01-01

    Web-scale discovery services for libraries provide deep discovery to a library’s local and licensed content, and represent an evolution, perhaps a revolution, for end user information discovery as pertains to library collections.  This article frames the topic of web-scale discovery, and begins by illuminating web-scale discovery from an academic library’s perspective – that is, the internal perspective seeking widespread staff participation in the discovery conversation.  This included the c...

  15. Service Discovery – A Survey and Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendaoud Karim Talal

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing number of services in the internet, companies’ intranets, and home networks: servicediscovery becomes an integral part of modern networked system. This paper provides a comprehensivesurvey of major solutions for service discovery. We cover techniques and features used in existing systems.Although a few survey articles have been published on this object, our contribution focuses on comparingand analyzing surveyed solutions according eight prime criteria, which we have defined before. Thiscomparison will be helpful to determine limits of existing discovery protocols and identify future researchopportunities in service discovery.

  16. Drug Discovery in Academia- the third way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frearson, Julie; Wyatt, Paul

    2010-01-01

    As the pharmaceutical industry continues to re-strategise and focus on low-risk, relatively short term gains for the sake of survival, we need to re-invigorate the early stages of drug discovery and rebalance efforts towards novel modes of action therapeutics and neglected genetic and tropical diseases. Academic drug discovery is one model which offers the promise of new approaches and an alternative organisational culture for drug discovery as it attempts to apply academic innovation and thought processes to the challenge of discovering drugs to address real unmet need. PMID:20922062

  17. Open PHACTS: semantic interoperability for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Antony J; Harland, Lee; Groth, Paul; Pettifer, Stephen; Chichester, Christine; Willighagen, Egon L; Evelo, Chris T; Blomberg, Niklas; Ecker, Gerhard; Goble, Carole; Mons, Barend

    2012-11-01

    Open PHACTS is a public-private partnership between academia, publishers, small and medium sized enterprises and pharmaceutical companies. The goal of the project is to deliver and sustain an 'open pharmacological space' using and enhancing state-of-the-art semantic web standards and technologies. It is focused on practical and robust applications to solve specific questions in drug discovery research. OPS is intended to facilitate improvements in drug discovery in academia and industry and to support open innovation and in-house non-public drug discovery research. This paper lays out the challenges and how the Open PHACTS project is hoping to address these challenges technically and socially. PMID:22683805

  18. Two Kinds of Discovery: An Ontological Account

    CERN Document Server

    Gilead, Amihud

    2014-01-01

    What can we discover? As the discussion in this paper is limited to ontological considerations, it does not deal with the discovery of new concepts. It raises the following question: What are the entities or existents that we can discover? There are two kinds of such entities: (1) actual entities, and (2) possible entities, which are pure possibilities. The paper explains why the first kind of discovery depends primarily on the second kind. The paper illustrates the discoveries of individual pure possibilities by presenting examples such as the Higgs particle, Dirac's positron, and Pauli-Fermi's neutrino.

  19. Anatomy of a Security Operations Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, John

    2010-01-01

    Many agencies and corporations are either contemplating or in the process of building a cyber Security Operations Center (SOC). Those Agencies that have established SOCs are most likely working on major revisions or enhancements to existing capabilities. As principle developers of the NASA SOC; this Presenters' goals are to provide the GFIRST community with examples of some of the key building blocks of an Agency scale cyber Security Operations Center. This presentation viII include the inputs and outputs, the facilities or shell, as well as the internal components and the processes necessary to maintain the SOC's subsistence - in other words, the anatomy of a SOC. Details to be presented include the SOC architecture and its key components: Tier 1 Call Center, data entry, and incident triage; Tier 2 monitoring, incident handling and tracking; Tier 3 computer forensics, malware analysis, and reverse engineering; Incident Management System; Threat Management System; SOC Portal; Log Aggregation and Security Incident Management (SIM) systems; flow monitoring; IDS; etc. Specific processes and methodologies discussed include Incident States and associated Work Elements; the Incident Management Workflow Process; Cyber Threat Risk Assessment methodology; and Incident Taxonomy. The Evolution of the Cyber Security Operations Center viII be discussed; starting from reactive, to proactive, and finally to proactive. Finally, the resources necessary to establish an Agency scale SOC as well as the lessons learned in the process of standing up a SOC viII be presented.

  20. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  1. Poison Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1222 immediately. Name State American Association of Poison Control Centers Address AAPCC Central Office NOT A POISON ... not for emergency use. Arkansas ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Address 1717 S. Philo Road, Suite 36 Urbana, ...

  2. New Mexico Convention Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset provides an initial version of the locations of convention centers in New Mexico, in point form, with limited attributes, compiled using available data...

  3. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education / Safety Education Centers En Español Carbon Monoxide Information Center The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known ... Install one and check its batteries regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips ...

  4. Hydrologic Engineering Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC), an organization within the Institute for Water Resources, is the designated Center of Expertise for the U.S. Army Corps of...

  5. RSW Cell Centered Grids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New cell centered grids are generated to complement the node-centered ones uploaded. Six tarballs containing the coarse, medium, and fine mixed-element and pure...

  6. Tornadoes: A Center Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman-Rothlein, Liz; Meinbach, Anita M.

    1981-01-01

    Information is given on how to put together a learning center. Discusses information and activity packets for a complete learning center on tornadoes including objectives, directions, materials, photographs of physical arrangements, and posttest. (DC)

  7. BKG Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorandt, Volkmar; Wojdziak, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities and background information of the IVS Data Center for the year 2012. Included is information about functions, structure, technical equipment, and staff members of the BKG Data Center.

  8. ACTS data center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Ali; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on ACTS Data Center status report are included. Topics covered include: ACTS Data Center Functions; data flow overview; PPD flow; RAW data flow; data compression; PPD distribution; RAW Data Archival; PPD Audit; and data analysis.

  9. NIH Clinical Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIH Clinical Center consists of two main facilities: The Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, which opened in 2005, houses inpatient units, day hospitals,...

  10. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) explores the unique properties of materials and processes at the nanoscale. The CFN is a user-oriented research center...

  11. Automated Knowledge Discovery From Simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burl, Michael; DeCoste, Dennis; Mazzoni, Dominic; Scharenbroich, Lucas; Enke, Brian; Merline, William

    2007-01-01

    A computational method, SimLearn, has been devised to facilitate efficient knowledge discovery from simulators. Simulators are complex computer programs used in science and engineering to model diverse phenomena such as fluid flow, gravitational interactions, coupled mechanical systems, and nuclear, chemical, and biological processes. SimLearn uses active-learning techniques to efficiently address the "landscape characterization problem." In particular, SimLearn tries to determine which regions in "input space" lead to a given output from the simulator, where "input space" refers to an abstraction of all the variables going into the simulator, e.g., initial conditions, parameters, and interaction equations. Landscape characterization can be viewed as an attempt to invert the forward mapping of the simulator and recover the inputs that produce a particular output. Given that a single simulation run can take days or weeks to complete even on a large computing cluster, SimLearn attempts to reduce costs by reducing the number of simulations needed to effect discoveries. Unlike conventional data-mining methods that are applied to static predefined datasets, SimLearn involves an iterative process in which a most informative dataset is constructed dynamically by using the simulator as an oracle. On each iteration, the algorithm models the knowledge it has gained through previous simulation trials and then chooses which simulation trials to run next. Running these trials through the simulator produces new data in the form of input-output pairs. The overall process is embodied in an algorithm that combines support vector machines (SVMs) with active learning. SVMs use learning from examples (the examples are the input-output pairs generated by running the simulator) and a principle called maximum margin to derive predictors that generalize well to new inputs. In SimLearn, the SVM plays the role of modeling the knowledge that has been gained through previous simulation trials

  12. The discovery of Maxwell's equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, Francis

    2012-02-01

    In January 1865, Maxwell at age 34 wrote a letter to his cousin Charles Cay describing various doings, including his work on the viscosity of gases and a visit from two of the world's leading oculists to inspect the eyes of his dog ``Spice''. He added, ``I have also a paper afloat, with an electromagnetic theory of light, which, till I am convinced to the contrary, I hold to be great guns.'' That paper ``A Dynamical Theory of the Electromagnetic Field'' was his fourth on the subject. It was followed in 1868 by another, and then in 1873 by his massive two volume Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism. Even so, by the time of his death in 1879 as he was beginning a radically revised edition of the Treatise, much remained to be done. We celebrate here the 150^th anniversary of Maxwell's first astonished realization in 1862 of the link between electromagnetism and light. So revolutionary was this that 15 or more years went by before Lorentz, Poynting, FitzGerald, and others came to address it, sometimes with improvements, sometimes not. Not until 1888 did Hertz make the essential experimental discovery of radio waves. What is so remarkable about Maxwell's five papers is that each presents a complete view of the subject radically different from the one before. I shall say something about each, emphasizing in particular Maxwell's most unexpected idea, the displacement current, so vastly more interesting than the accounts of it found in textbooks today. Beyond lie other surprises. The concept of gauge invariance, and the role the vector potential would play in defining the canonical momentum of the electron, both go back to Maxwell. In 1872 came a paper ``On the Mathematical Classification of Physical Quantities'', which stands as an education in itself. Amid much else, there for the first time appears the distinction between axial and polar vectors and those new operational concepts related to quaternion theory: curl, divergence, and gradient.

  13. Network-Assisted Device-to-Device (D2D) Direct Proximity Discovery with Underlay Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pratas, Nuno; Popovski, Petar

    2015-01-01

    Device-to-Device communications are expected to play an important role in current and future cellular generations, by increasing the spatial reuse of spectrum resources and enabling lower latency communication links. This paradigm has two fundamental building blocks: (i) proximity discovery and (ii......) direct communication between proximate devices. While (ii) is treated extensively in the recent literature, (i) has received relatively little attention. In this paper we analyze a network-assisted underlay proximity discovery protocol, where a cellular device can take the role of: announcer (which...... announces its interest in establishing a D2D connection) or monitor (which listens for the transmissions from the announcers). Traditionally, the announcers transmit their messages over dedicated channel resources. In contrast, inspired by recent advances on receivers with multiuser decoding capabilities...

  14. Discovery in the Galactic Bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    In our efforts to map our galaxys structure, one region has remained very difficult to probe: the galactic center. A new survey, however, uses infrared light to peer through the gas and dust in the galactic plane, searching for variable stars in the bulge of the galaxy. This study has discovered a population of very young stars in a thin disk in the galactic center, providing clues to the star formation history of the Milky Way over the last 100 million years.Obscured CenterThe center of the Milky Way is dominated by a region known as the galactic bulge. Efforts to better understand this region in particular, its star formation history have been hindered by the stars, gas, and dust of the galactic disk, which prevent us from viewing the galactic bulge at low latitudes in visible light.The positions of the 35 classical Cepheids discovered in VVV data, projected onto an image of the galactic plane. Click for a better look! The survey area is bounded by the blue lines, and the galactic bar is marked with a red curve. The bottom panel shows the position of the Cepheids overlaid on the VVV bulge extinction map. [Dkny et al. 2015]Infrared light, however, can be used to probe deeper through the dust than visible-light searches. A new survey called VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) uses the VISTA telescope in Chile to search, in infrared, for variable stars in the inner part of the galaxy. The VVV survey area spans the Milky Way bulge and an adjacent section of the mid-plane where star formation activity is high.Led by Istvn Dkny, a researcher at the Millennium Institute of Astrophysics and the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, a team has now used VVV data to specifically identify classical Cepheid variable stars in the bulge. Why? Cepheids are pulsating stars with a very useful relation between their periods and luminosities that allows them to be used as distance indicators. Moreover, classical Cepheids are indicators of young stellar populations which can

  15. Ten years of dengue drug discovery: progress and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Siew Pheng; Wang, Qing-Yin; Noble, Christian G; Chen, Yen-Liang; Dong, Hongping; Zou, Bin; Yokokawa, Fumiaki; Nilar, Shahul; Smith, Paul; Beer, David; Lescar, Julien; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2013-11-01

    To combat neglected diseases, the Novartis Institute of Tropical Diseases (NITD) was founded in 2002 through private-public funding from Novartis and the Singapore Economic Development Board. One of NITD's missions is to develop antivirals for dengue virus (DENV), the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral pathogen. Neither vaccine nor antiviral is currently available for DENV. Here we review the progress in dengue drug discovery made at NITD as well as the major discoveries made by academia and other companies. Four strategies have been pursued to identify inhibitors of DENV through targeting both viral and host proteins: (i) HTS (high-throughput screening) using virus replication assays; (ii) HTS using viral enzyme assays; (iii) structure-based in silico docking and rational design; (iv) repurposing hepatitis C virus inhibitors for DENV. Along the developmental process from hit finding to clinical candidate, many inhibitors did not advance beyond the stage of hit-to-lead optimization, due to their poor selectivity, physiochemical or pharmacokinetic properties. Only a few compounds showed efficacy in the AG129 DENV mouse model. Two nucleoside analogs, NITD-008 and Balapiravir, entered preclinical animal safety study and clinic trial, but both were terminated due to toxicity and lack of potency, respectively. Celgosivir, a host alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, is currently under clinical trial; its clinical efficacy remains to be determined. The knowledge accumulated during the past decade has provided a better rationale for ongoing dengue drug discovery. Though challenging, we are optimistic that this continuous, concerted effort will lead to an effective dengue therapy.

  16. Center of buoyancy definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The center of buoyancy of an arbitrary shaped body is defined in analogy to the center of gravity. The definitions of the buoyant force and center of buoyancy in terms of integrals over the area of the body are converted to volume integrals and shown to have simple intuitive interpretations

  17. Gas hydrate of Lake Baikal: Discovery and varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlystov, Oleg; De Batist, Marc; Shoji, Hitoshi; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Nishio, Shinya; Naudts, Lieven; Poort, Jeffrey; Khabuev, Andrey; Belousov, Oleg; Manakov, Andrey; Kalmychkov, Gennаdy

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of recent gas-hydrate studies in Lake Baikal, the only fresh-water lake in the world containing gas hydrates in its sedimentary infill. We provide a historical overview of the different investigations and discoveries and highlight some recent breakthroughs in our understanding of the Baikal hydrate system. So far, 21 sites of gas hydrate occurrence have been discovered. Gas hydrates are of structures I and II, which are of thermogenic, microbial, and mixed origin. At the 15 sites, gas hydrates were found in mud volcanoes, and the rest six - near gas discharges. Additionally, depending on type of discharge and gas hydrate structure, they were visually different. Investigations using MIR submersibles allowed finding of gas hydrates at the bottom surface of Lake Baikal at the three sites.

  18. First discoveries in the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koter, A.; Sana, H.; Evans, C.; Besthenlehner, J. M.; Taylor, W. D.

    2013-01-01

    The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey is a multi-epoch spectroscopic campaign targeting ˜800 of the most massive stars in the 30 Dor region of the Large Magellanic Cloud. The dataset comprises well over 300 O-type stars, including 20 Of/WN and Wolf-Rayet stars. A survey of this type has a large potential for serendipitous discoveries. We discuss three intriguing findings in the subset of O and WNh stars obtained in the first year of data analysis: (i) VFTS 682, the first ˜150 M⊙ star that is not located in the core of a massive star cluster; (ii) VFTS 102, a near-critically spinning O9 V star, and (iii) R139, found to be the most massive binary system where both components are O supergiants.

  19. Association Rule Discovery and Its Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Data mining, i.e. , mining knowledge from large amounts of data, is a demanding field since huge amounts of data have been collected in various applications. The collected data far exceed peoples ability to analyze it. Thus, some new and efficient methods are needed to discover knowledge from large database. Association rule discovery is an important problem in knowledge discovery and data mining.The association mining task consists of identifying the frequent item sets and then forming conditional implication rule among them. In this paper, we describe and summarize recent work on association rule discovery, offer a new method to association rule mining and point out that association rule discovery can be applied in spatial data mining. It is useful to discover knowledge from remote sensing and geographical information system.``

  20. Indexer Based Dynamic Web Services Discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Bashir, Saba; Javed, M Younus; Khan, Aihab; Khiyal, Malik Sikandar Hayat

    2010-01-01

    Recent advancement in web services plays an important role in business to business and business to consumer interaction. Discovery mechanism is not only used to find a suitable service but also provides collaboration between service providers and consumers by using standard protocols. A static web service discovery mechanism is not only time consuming but requires continuous human interaction. This paper proposed an efficient dynamic web services discovery mechanism that can locate relevant and updated web services from service registries and repositories with timestamp based on indexing value and categorization for faster and efficient discovery of service. The proposed prototype focuses on quality of service issues and introduces concept of local cache, categorization of services, indexing mechanism, CSP (Constraint Satisfaction Problem) solver, aging and usage of translator. Performance of proposed framework is evaluated by implementing the algorithm and correctness of our method is shown. The results of p...

  1. Specification Editing and Discovery Assistant Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The project will prototype a specification editing and discovery tool (SPEEDY) for C/C++ that will assist software developers with modular formal verification tasks...

  2. 6 CFR 13.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) In general. (1) The following types of discovery are authorized: (i) Requests for production of... Document or of the truth of any relevant fact; (iii) Written interrogatories; and (iv) Depositions....

  3. 34 CFR 33.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents for inspection and copying. (2) Requests for admissions of the authenticity of any relevant document or of the truth of...

  4. 22 CFR 35.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents for... truth of any relevant fact; (3) Written interrogatories; and (4) Depositions. (b) For the purpose...

  5. 45 CFR 79.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents for... or of the truth of any revelant fact; (3) Written interrogatories; and (4) Depositions. (b) For...

  6. 12 CFR 308.520 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... PROCEDURE Program Fraud Civil Remedies and Procedures § 308.520 Discovery. (a) The following types of... for admission of the authenticity of any relevant document or of the truth of any relevant fact;...

  7. 10 CFR 1013.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents for inspection and copying; (2) Requests for admissions of the authenticity of any relevant document or of the truth of...

  8. Discovery announced of four new elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) have announced the discovery of four new elements: 113, 115, 117 and 118 - completing the periodic table's seventh row.

  9. DNA Coding Based Knowledge Discovery Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ji-yun; GENG Zhao-feng; SHAO Shi-huang

    2002-01-01

    A novel DNA coding based knowledge discovery algorithm was proposed, an example which verified its validity was given. It is proved that this algorithm can discover new simplified rules from the original rule set efficiently.

  10. Priority of discovery in the life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Ronald D; Hyman, Anthony A

    2016-01-01

    The job of a scientist is to make a discovery and then communicate this new knowledge to others. For a scientist to be successful, he or she needs to be able to claim credit or priority for discoveries throughout their career. However, despite being fundamental to the reward system of science, the principles for establishing the "priority of discovery" are rarely discussed. Here we break down priority into two steps: disclosure, in which the discovery is released to the world-wide community; and validation, in which other scientists assess the accuracy, quality and importance of the work. Currently, in biology, disclosure and an initial validation are combined in a journal publication. Here, we discuss the advantages of separating these steps into disclosure via a preprint, and validation via a combination of peer review at a journal and additional evaluation by the wider scientific community. PMID:27310529

  11. Juvenile Arthritis: Discoveries Lead to Newer Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Juvenile Arthritis: Discoveries Lead to Newer Treatments Share Tweet Linkedin ... back to top Biologics: New Treatments for Juvenile Arthritis “As science at the molecular level has advanced, ...

  12. Anthelmintics – From Discovery to Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian J. Wolstenholme

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The scientific meeting entitled ‘Anthelmintics: From Discovery to Resistance’ was held in San Francisco in February 2014. The themes of the meeting were drug discovery, modes of action and resistance. Both human and veterinary parasites were covered in the oral and poster presentations. The attendees were from both academic and industrial backgrounds. In the present article we introduce a number of the papers that emerged from the meeting. Several of the papers covered current drug discovery efforts underway worldwide, with some specific examples focusing on ion channels, protein kinases and cysteine proteases. These efforts included the repurposing of known drugs as well as the discovery of novel actives. Two papers described recently-developed whole-organism screening techniques. Finally, we introduce several papers looking at mechanisms and management of drug resistance in human and veterinary parasites.

  13. Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters NIH Research Matters January 13, 2014 Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery An international research team ... may play a role in triggering the disease. Genetic factors are also thought to play a role. ...

  14. 29 CFR 1603.210 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE COMPLAINTS OF EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION UNDER SECTION 304 OF THE GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE RIGHTS ACT OF 1991 Hearings § 1603.210 Discovery. (a) Unless otherwise ordered by...

  15. Combinatorial Discovery and Optimization of New Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Chen; Zhang Xinyi; Yan Dongsheng

    2001-01-01

    The concept of the combinatorial discovery and optimization of new materials, and its background,importance, and application, as well as its current status in the world, are briefly reviewed in this paper.

  16. The National Cancer Program: Driving Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    An overview of NCI’s role in driving cancer research discoveries: conducting and funding research in challenging areas and providing resources and leadership to national infrastructures for cancer research.

  17. High throughput electrophysiology: new perspectives for ion channel drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willumsen, Niels J; Bech, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Jensen, Bo Skaaning; Korsgaard, Mads P G; Christophersen, Palle

    2003-01-01

    Proper function of ion channels is crucial for all living cells. Ion channel dysfunction may lead to a number of diseases, so-called channelopathies, and a number of common diseases, including epilepsy, arrhythmia, and type II diabetes, are primarily treated by drugs that modulate ion channels. A cornerstone in current drug discovery is high throughput screening assays which allow examination of the activity of specific ion channels though only to a limited extent. Conventional patch clamp remains the sole technique with sufficiently high time resolution and sensitivity required for precise and direct characterization of ion channel properties. However, patch clamp is a slow, labor-intensive, and thus expensive, technique. New techniques combining the reliability and high information content of patch clamping with the virtues of high throughput philosophy are emerging and predicted to make a number of ion channel targets accessible for drug screening. Specifically, genuine HTS parallel processing techniques based on arrays of planar silicon chips are being developed, but also lower throughput sequential techniques may be of value in compound screening, lead optimization, and safety screening. The introduction of new powerful HTS electrophysiological techniques is predicted to cause a revolution in ion channel drug discovery.

  18. PTF SN discovery report, April 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, I.; Ben-Ami, S.; Yaron, O.; Nugent, P.; Levitam, D.; Simonian, G.; Sesar, B.; Cao, Y.; Horesh, A.; Bellm, E.; Silverman, J.; Miller, A.; Cenko, S. B.; Clubb, K. I.; Filippenko, A. V.; Shivvers, I.; Kasliwal, M.; Parrent, J.; Maguire, K.; Pan, Y.-C.

    2012-05-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 19 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  19. PTF SN discovery report, August 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, A.; Ben-Ami, S.; Yaron, O.; Horesh, P. Nugent A.; Cao, Y.; Bellm, E.; Fynbo, J.; Wiis, J.; Olesen, J.; Engedal, L.; Larsen, A.; Kasliwal, M.; Pan, Y.-C.; Graham, M.; Parrent, J.; Quimby, R.; PTF Team

    2012-08-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 12 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  20. PTF SN discovery report, September 8, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, A.; Nugent, P.; Walker, E.; Cenko, S. B.; Fox, O.

    2012-09-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf ; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 8 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  1. PTF SN discovery report, July 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Arcavi, I.; Yaron, O.; Nugent, Peter; Sesar, B.; Cao, Y.; Silverman, J.; Clubb, K.; Filippenko, A. V.; Cenko, S. B.; Parrent, J.; Maguire, K.; Sullivan, M.

    2012-08-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/ ; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 14 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  2. PTF SN discovery report, March 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, I.; Ben-Ami, S.; Yaron, O.; Nugent, P.; Levitam, D.; Simonian, G.; Sesar, B.; Cao, Y.; Horesh, A.; Bellm, E.; Silverman, J.; Miller, A.; Cenko, S. B.; Clubb, K. I.; Filippenko, A. V.; Shivvers, I.; Kasliwal, M.; Parrent, J.; Maguire, K.; Pan, Y.-C.

    2012-05-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 26 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  3. PTF SN discovery report, October 9, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, A.; Nugent, P.; Cao, Y.; Levitan, D.; Hallinan, G.; Kyne, G.; Silverman, J.; Clubb, K.; Miller, A.; Fox, O.; Suzuki, N.; Quimby, R.

    2012-10-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 9 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  4. Toward discovery science of human brain function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biswal, Bharat B; Mennes, Maarten; Zuo, Xi-Nian;

    2010-01-01

    Although it is being successfully implemented for exploration of the genome, discovery science has eluded the functional neuroimaging community. The core challenge remains the development of common paradigms for interrogating the myriad functional systems in the brain without the constraints...... in the brain. To initiate discovery science of brain function, the 1000 Functional Connectomes Project dataset is freely accessible at www.nitrc.org/projects/fcon_1000/....

  5. Group Evolution Discovery in Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Bródka, Piotr; Saganowski, Stanisław; Kazienko, Przemysław

    2013-01-01

    Group extraction and their evolution are among the topics which arouse the greatest interest in the domain of social network analysis. However, while the grouping methods in social networks are developed very dynamically, the methods of group evolution discovery and analysis are still uncharted territory on the social network analysis map. Therefore the new method for the group evolution discovery called GED is proposed in this paper. Additionally, the results of the first experiments on the ...

  6. Discovery informatics in biological and biomedical sciences: research challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honavar, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    New discoveries in biological, biomedical and health sciences are increasingly being driven by our ability to acquire, share, integrate and analyze, and construct and simulate predictive models of biological systems. While much attention has focused on automating routine aspects of management and analysis of "big data", realizing the full potential of "big data" to accelerate discovery calls for automating many other aspects of the scientific process that have so far largely resisted automation: identifying gaps in the current state of knowledge; generating and prioritizing questions; designing studies; designing, prioritizing, planning, and executing experiments; interpreting results; forming hypotheses; drawing conclusions; replicating studies; validating claims; documenting studies; communicating results; reviewing results; and integrating results into the larger body of knowledge in a discipline. Against this background, the PSB workshop on Discovery Informatics in Biological and Biomedical Sciences explores the opportunities and challenges of automating discovery or assisting humans in discovery through advances (i) Understanding, formalization, and information processing accounts of, the entire scientific process; (ii) Design, development, and evaluation of the computational artifacts (representations, processes) that embody such understanding; and (iii) Application of the resulting artifacts and systems to advance science (by augmenting individual or collective human efforts, or by fully automating science). PMID:25592607

  7. [The response to Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen's discovery in Berlin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüttmann, W

    1995-01-01

    In early January 1896 Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen sent offprints to several colleagues of his to make them acquainted with his discovery of the X-rays. From January 5, 1896 newspapers started reporting on that discovery worldwide from Vienna. In several cities the news immediately set off corresponding scientific activities among specialists. This paper looks into such activities carried out in Berlin to show how promptly Röntgen's discovery was taken up, with a number of priorities having been set in the capital of the German Reich. The X-ray photographs which Röntgen had forwarded together with his offprints were displayed and discussed at a meeting of the Berlin Physical Society as early as on January 4, 1896, making his discovery known to the public for the first time. On January 6, 1896 the discovery and photographs were presented at a session of the Berlin Association of Internal Medicine and its diagnostic application was discussed in the medical community for the first time. A few days after that, the first photographs shot by other authors after Röntgen, and their diagnostic use, were demonstrated in Berlin. Finally, Röntgen's early visit to Emperor William II on January 12, 1896, which led to the speedy introduction of the X-day technique into German military medicine, is discussed in detail.

  8. Discovery informatics in biological and biomedical sciences: research challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honavar, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    New discoveries in biological, biomedical and health sciences are increasingly being driven by our ability to acquire, share, integrate and analyze, and construct and simulate predictive models of biological systems. While much attention has focused on automating routine aspects of management and analysis of "big data", realizing the full potential of "big data" to accelerate discovery calls for automating many other aspects of the scientific process that have so far largely resisted automation: identifying gaps in the current state of knowledge; generating and prioritizing questions; designing studies; designing, prioritizing, planning, and executing experiments; interpreting results; forming hypotheses; drawing conclusions; replicating studies; validating claims; documenting studies; communicating results; reviewing results; and integrating results into the larger body of knowledge in a discipline. Against this background, the PSB workshop on Discovery Informatics in Biological and Biomedical Sciences explores the opportunities and challenges of automating discovery or assisting humans in discovery through advances (i) Understanding, formalization, and information processing accounts of, the entire scientific process; (ii) Design, development, and evaluation of the computational artifacts (representations, processes) that embody such understanding; and (iii) Application of the resulting artifacts and systems to advance science (by augmenting individual or collective human efforts, or by fully automating science).

  9. Television documentaries lifting hospital, medical center profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, T

    2001-01-01

    The nation's hospitals and medical centers are enjoying the legacy of TV audiences' addiction to medical dramas. Cable television has met the challenge with documentary coverage of real live hospitals. The medium offers many benefits and few disadvantages for those marketing managers with the courage to welcome camera crews. Lynn Hopkins Cantwell is director of public relations and marketing for Children's National Medical Center, Washington, D.C., which was covered in a seven-instrument "Lifeline" documentary for the Discovery Channel. James G. Gosky is director of communications for The MetroHealth System, Cleveland, which was the subject of two installments of "Trauma: Life in th ER," produced for the Learning Channel. These marketing pros describe the myriad details they faced when their respective hospitals went "on camera." Among the key factors were good communications with all constituents, attention to detail, and follow-up. PMID:11209289

  10. History of the Discovery of Mira Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffleit, Dorrit

    This year we celebrate the 400th anniversary of Fabricius' discovery of Mira, "The Wonderful," in 1596. But was he the first? Within the first century following Fabricius, four Mira-type variables were discovered, and in all cases it has been found that the stars were suspected of being novae long before their "official" discovery in the Western World. Three of the four had been recorded as novae in early Chinese or Korean records. By 1896, 251 Mira-type variabes had been discovered, most of them after the beginning of photographic experimentation. Now in the year of the fourth centennial, over 6000 Miras are known. Because of their ease of discovery relative to stars of small amplitude, no new Mira stars reaching naked-eye visibility have been discovered since 1899. The history of the discovery of Mira-type variables illustrates that (1) some new discoveries are re-discoveries of objects previously assumed to be novae; and (2) apparently logical deductions that early observations of a guest star correspond to a later discovered Mire-type may nevertheless be wrong.

  11. The Methodological Unboundedness of Limited Discovery Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Benjamin Cassel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Though designers must understand systems, designers work differently than scientists in studying systems.  Design engagements do not discover whole systems, but take calculated risks between discovery and intervention. For this reason, design practices must cope with open systems, and unpacking the tacit guidelines behind these practices is instructive to systems methodology. This paper shows that design practice yields a methodology which applies across forms of design.  Design practice teaches us to generate ideas and gather data longer, but stop when the return on design has diminished past its cost.  Fortunately, we can reason about the unknown by understanding the character of the unbounded.  We suppose that there might as well be an infinite number of factors, but we can reason about their concentration without knowing all of them.  We demonstrate this concept on stakeholder systems, showing how design discovery informs systems methodology. Using this result, we can apply the methods of parametric design when the parameters are not yet known by establishing the concentration of every kind of factor, entailing a discovery rate of diminishing returns over discovery activities, allowing the analysis of discovery-based trade-offs.  Here, we extend a framework for providing metrics to parametric design, allowing it to express the importance of discovery.

  12. Suzaku Discovery of Twin Thermal Plasma from the Tornado Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Sawada, Makoto; Koyama, Katsuji; Oka, Tomoharu

    2011-01-01

    The Tornado nebula (G357.7-0.1) is a mysterious radio source with bright "head" and faint "tail" located in the direction of the Galactic center (GC) region. We here report the discovery of two diffuse X-ray sources at the head and tail of the Tornado with the Suzaku satellite. We found emission lines from highly ionized atoms in the two sources. The spectra are reproduced by an optically thin thermal plasma with a common temperature of 0.6-0.7 keV. The interstellar absorption (NH) of these sources are the same and are slightly larger than that of the GC distance. Since the estimated distance using the NH value is consistent with the radio observation of the Tornado, these X-ray sources are likely associated with the Tornado nebula. The twin-plasma morphology at the both ends of the Tornado suggests that the system is a bipolar/outflow source.

  13. The IRIS Federator: Accessing Seismological Data Across Data Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabant, C. M.; Van Fossen, M.; Ahern, T. K.; Weekly, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    In 2013 the International Federation of Digital Seismograph Networks (FDSN) approved a specification for web service interfaces for accessing seismological station metadata, time series and event parameters. Since then, a number of seismological data centers have implemented FDSN service interfaces, with more implementations in development. We have developed a new system called the IRIS Federator which leverages this standardization and provides the scientific community with a service for easy discovery and access of seismological data across FDSN data centers. These centers are located throughout the world and this work represents one model of a system for data collection across geographic and political boundaries.The main components of the IRIS Federator are a catalog of time series metadata holdings at each data center and a web service interface for searching the catalog. The service interface is designed to support client­-side federated data access, a model in which the client (software run by the user) queries the catalog and then collects the data from each identified center. By default the results are returned in a format suitable for direct submission to those web services, but could also be formatted in a simple text format for general data discovery purposes. The interface will remove any duplication of time series channels between data centers according to a set of business rules by default, however a user may request results with all duplicate time series entries included. We will demonstrate how client­-side federation is being incorporated into some of the DMC's data access tools. We anticipate further enhancement of the IRIS Federator to improve data discovery in various scenarios and to improve usefulness to communities beyond seismology.Data centers with FDSN web services: http://www.fdsn.org/webservices/The IRIS Federator query interface: http://service.iris.edu/irisws/fedcatalog/1/

  14. OntologicalDiscovery.org: A web resource for the empirical discovery of phenotypic relations across species and experimental systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Erich J [Baylor University; Li, Zuopan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Jay, Jeremy J [ORNL; Philip, Vivek M [ORNL; Zhang, Yun [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Langston, Michael A [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The Ontological Discovery Environment ( http://ontologicaldiscovery.org ) is a free, public Internet resource for the storage, sharing, retrieval and analysis of phenotype-centered genomic data sets. The intent of this resource is to allow the creation of user-defined phenotype categories based on naturally and experimentally observed biological networks, pathways and systems rather than on externally manifested constructs and semantics such as disease names and processes. By extracting the relationships of complex processes from the technology that produces those relationships, this resource meets a growing demand for data integration and hypothesis discovery across multiple experimental contexts, including broad species and phenotype domains. At a highly processed level, analyses of set similarity, distance and hierarchical relations are performed through a modular suite of tools. The core pivot point of analysis is the creation of a bipartite network of gene-phenotype relations, a unique discrete graph approach to gene-set analysis which enables set-set matching of non-referential data. The central organizing metaphor of a gene set may be created, stored and curated by individual users, shared among virtual working groups, or made publicly available. Gene sets submission incorporates a variety of accession numbers, microarray feature IDs, and gene symbols from model organisms, allowing integration across experimental platforms, literature reviews and other genomic analyses. The sets themselves are annotated with several levels of metadata which may include an unstructured description, publication information and structured community ontologies for anatomy, process and function. Gene set translation to user chosen reference species through gene homology allows translational comparison of models regardless of the face validity of the experimental systems. In addition, computationally derived gene sets can be integrated into phenome interdependency and similarity

  15. STS-114: Discovery Crew Arrival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    George Diller of NASA Public Affairs narrates the STS-114 Crew arrival at Kennedy Space Center aboard a Gulf Stream aircraft. They were greeted by Center Director Jim Kennedy. Commander Eileen Collins introduced each of her crew members and gave a brief description of their roles in the mission. Mission Specialist 3, Andrew Thomas will be the lead crew member on the inspection on flight day 2; he is the intravehicular (IV) crew member that will help and guide Mission Specialists Souichi Noguchi and Stephen Robinson during their spacewalks. Pilot James Kelly will be operating the shuttle systems in flying the Shuttle; he will be flying the space station robotic arm during the second extravehicular activity and he will be assisting Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence during the other two extravehicular activities; he will be assisting on the rendezvous on flight day three, and landing of the shuttle. Commander Collins also mentioned Pilot Kelly's recent promotion to Colonel by the United States Air Force. Mission Specialist 1, Souichi Noguchi from JAXA (The Japanese Space Agency) will be flying on the flight deck for ascent; he will be doing three spacewalks on day 5, 7, and 9; He will be the photo/TV lead for the different types of cameras on board to document the flight and to send back the information to the ground for both technical and public affairs reasons. Mission Specialist 5, Charles Camada will be doing the inspection on flight day 2 with Mission Specialist Thomas and Pilot Kelly; he will be transferring the logistics off the shuttle and onto the space station and from the space station back to the shuttle; He will help set up eleven lap tops on board. Mission Specialist 4, Wendy Lawrence will lead the transfer of logistics to the space station; she is the space station arm operator during extravehicular activities 1 and 3; she will be carrying the 6,000 pounds of external storage platform from the shuttle payload bay over to the space station; she is also

  16. High-mass star-forming cloud G0.38+0.04 in the Galactic Center Dust Ridge contains H2CO and SiO masers

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsburg, Adam; Henkel, Christian; Jones, Paul A; Cunningham, Maria; Kauffmann, Jens; Pillai, Thushara; Mills, Elisabeth A C; Ott, Juergen; Kruijssen, J M Diederik; Menten, Karl M; Battersby, Cara; Rathborne, Jill; Contreras, Yanett; Longmore, Steven; Walker, Daniel; Dawson, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    We have discovered a new H$_2$CO (formaldehyde) $1_{1,0}-1_{1,1}$ 4.82966 GHz maser in Galactic Center Cloud C, G0.38+0.04. At the time of submission, this is the eighth region containing an H$_2$CO maser detected in the Galaxy. Cloud C is one of only two sites of confirmed high-mass star formation along the Galactic Center Ridge, affirming that H$_2$CO masers are exclusively associated with high-mass star formation. This discovery led us to search for other masers, among which we found new SiO vibrationally excited masers, making this the fourth star-forming region in the Galaxy to exhibit SiO maser emission. Cloud C is also a known source of CH$_3$OH Class-II and OH maser emission. There are now two known SiO and H$_2$CO maser containing regions in the CMZ, compared to two and six respectively in the Galactic disk, while there is a relative dearth of H$_2$O and CH$_3$OH Class-II masers in the CMZ. SiO and H$_2$CO masers may be preferentially excited in the CMZ, perhaps due to higher gas-phase abundances fro...

  17. 18 CFR 385.908 - Discovery (Rule 908).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... conduct discovery where such discovery relates to new facts or issues raised in accordance with Rule 907(b... discovery: (1) Relates to new facts or issues raised in accordance with Rule 907(c) (new facts and issues... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discovery (Rule...

  18. Implementation of a deidentified federated data network for population-based cohort discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Nicholas; Abend, Aaron; Mandel, Aaron; Geraghty, Estella; Gabriel, Davera; Wynden, Rob; Kamerick, Michael; Anderson, Kent; Rainwater, Julie; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Objective The Cross-Institutional Clinical Translational Research project explored a federated query tool and looked at how this tool can facilitate clinical trial cohort discovery by managing access to aggregate patient data located within unaffiliated academic medical centers. Methods The project adapted software from the Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) program to connect three Clinical Translational Research Award sites: University of Washington, Seattle, Univers...

  19. The Biomedical Resource Ontology (BRO) to Enable Resource Discovery in Clinical and Translational Research

    OpenAIRE

    Tenenbaum, Jessica D; Whetzel, Patricia L.; Anderson, Kent; Borromeo, Charles D; Ivo D. Dinov; Gabriel, Davera; Kirschner, Beth; Mirel, Barbara; Morris, Tim; Noy, Natasha; NYULAS, CSONGOR; Rubenson, David; Saxman, Paul R.; Singh, Harpreet; Whelan, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    The biomedical research community relies on a diverse set of resources, both within their own institutions and at other research centers. In addition, an increasing number of shared electronic resources have been developed. Without effective means to locate and query these resources, it is challenging, if not impossible, for investigators to be aware of the myriad resources available, or to effectively perform resource discovery when the need arises. In this paper, we describe the development...

  20. At JSC's MCC, CAPCOMs display score cards rating STS-26 Discovery landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    In JSC's Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30, astronauts and spacecraft communicators (CAPCOMs) L. Blaine Hammond, Jr, John O. Creighton, Frank L. Culbertson, Jr, and an unidentified man display score cards rating the STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, landing at Edwards Air Force Base(EAFB), California. Flight control room (FCR) front visual displays show world tracking map, EAFB post landing activity, and head alignment cone (HAC).

  1. Gun Possession among American Youth: A Discovery-Based Approach to Understand Gun Violence

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly V Ruggles; Sonali Rajan

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To apply discovery-based computational methods to nationally representative data from the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions' Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System to better understand and visualize the behavioral factors associated with gun possession among adolescent youth. RESULTS: Our study uncovered the multidimensional nature of gun possession across nearly five million unique data points over a ten year period (2001-2011). Specifically, we automated odds ratio cal...

  2. Statistical data analytics foundations for data mining, informatics, and knowledge discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Piegorsch, Walter W

    2015-01-01

      A comprehensive introduction to statistical methods for data mining and knowledge discovery.Applications of data mining and 'big data' increasingly take center stage in our modern, knowledge-driven society, supported by advances in computing power, automated data acquisition, social media development and interactive, linkable internet software.  This book presents a coherent, technical introduction to modern statistical learning and analytics, starting from the core foundations of statistics and probability. It includes an overview of probability and statistical distributions, basic

  3. The center-to-limb. [in solar photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Center-to-limb measurements of the Ca I 6573 intercombination line and the Ca II 7324 forbidden line are compared with synthetic profiles based on a simple representation of the non-LTE Ca-Ca(+) ionization equilibrium. The effects of photoionizations from low lying excited states of neutral calcium are found to reduce the sensitivity of the 6573 center-to-limb behavior as a thermal structure diagnostic. The synthetic center-to-limb behavior is also sensitive to uncertainties in the nonthermal broadening. Nevertheless, the measured center-to-limb behavior of 6573 favors a 'cool' photospheric model over hotter models based on the Ca II K wings. The non-LTE calcium abundance obtained from the disk center equivalent widths of 6573 and 7324 using the best fit model is A(Ca) = 2.1 plus or minus 0.2 x 10 to the -6th (by number relative to hydrogen).

  4. Elizabeth II uus kunstigalerii

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    Tähistamaks oma troonile asumise 50. aastapäeva, avab Elizabeth II 6. II 2002 Buckinghami palees uue kunstigalerii, mis ehitatakse palee tiibhoonena. Arhitekt John Simpson. Elizabeth II kunstikogust

  5. Spectroscopy and astronomy: H3+ from the laboratory to the Galactic center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    Since the serendipitous discovery of the Fraunhofer spectrum in the Sun in 1814 which initiated spectroscopy and astrophysics, spectroscopy developed hand in hand with astronomy. I discuss my own work on the infrared spectrum of H3+ from its discovery in the laboratory in 1980, in interstellar space in 1996, to recent studies in the Galactic center as an example of astronomical spectroscopy. Its spin-off, the spectroscopy of simple molecular ions, is also briefly discussed.

  6. NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's Contributions to Space Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, M. L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since the mid-l970's, the Space Plasma Physics Group at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has contributed critical instrumentation to numerous satellite and sounding rocket missions exploring the plasmas of near-Earth space. This talk will review major discoveries in Earth's ionosphere, plasmasphere, and magnetosphere directly attributable to the researchers of the Space Plasma Physics Group and the significance of these discoveries to the field of plasma physics.

  7. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R. B. [PPPL; Gobbin, M. [Euratom-ENEA Association

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  8. What Does Galileo's Discovery of Jupiter's Moons Tell Us about the Process of Scientific Discovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Anton E.

    2002-01-01

    Given that hypothetico-deductive reasoning has played a role in other important scientific discoveries, asks the question whether it plays a role in all important scientific discoveries. Explores and rejects as viable alternatives possible alternative scientific methods such as Baconian induction and combinatorial analysis. Discusses the…

  9. Climate Discovery Online Courses for Educators from NCAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S.; Ward, D. L.; Meymaris, K. K.; Johnson, R. M.; Gardiner, L.; Russell, R.

    2008-12-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has responded to the pressing need for professional development in climate and global change sciences by creating the Climate Discovery online course series. This series was designed with the secondary geoscience educator in mind. The online courses are based on current and credible climate change science. Interactive learning techniques are built into the online course designs with assignments that encourage active participation. A key element of the online courses is the creation of a virtual community of geoscience educators who exchange ideas related to classroom implementation, student assessment, and lessons plans. Geoscience educators from around the country have participated in the online courses. The ongoing interest from geoscience educators strongly suggests that the NCAR Climate Discovery online courses are a timely and needed professional development opportunity. The intent of NCAR Climate Discovery is to positively impact teachers' professional development scientifically authentic information, (2) experiencing guided practice in conducting activities and using ancillary resources in workshop venues, (3) gaining access to standards-aligned lesson plans, kits that promote hands-on learning, and scientific content that are easily implemented in their classrooms, and (4) becoming a part of a community of educators with whom they may continue to discuss the challenges of pedagogy and content comprehension in teaching climate change in the Earth system context. Three courses make up the Climate Discovery series: Introduction to Climate Change; Earth System Science - A Climate Change Perspective; and Understanding Climate Change Today. Each course, instructed by science education specialists, combines geoscience content, information about current climate research, hands-on activities, and group discussion. The online courses use the web-based Moodle courseware system (open- source software similar to

  10. Chemical Security Analysis Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In 2006, by Presidential Directive, DHS established the Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAC) to identify and assess chemical threats and vulnerabilities in the...

  11. Surgery center joint ventures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasa, R J

    1999-01-01

    Surgery centers have been accepted as a cost effective, patient friendly vehicle for delivery of quality ambulatory care. Hospitals and physician groups also have made them the vehicles for coming together. Surgery centers allow hospitals and physicians to align incentives and share benefits. It is one of the few types of health care businesses physicians can own without anti-fraud and abuse violation. As a result, many surgery center ventures are now jointly owned by hospitals and physician groups. This article outlines common structures that have been used successfully to allow both to own and govern surgery centers.

  12. Electron Microscopy Center (EMC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those...

  13. Test Control Center (TCC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Test Control Center (TCC) provides a consolidated facility for planning, coordinating, controlling, monitoring, and analyzing distributed test events. ,The TCC...

  14. Center for Deployment Psychology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Deployment Psychology was developed to promote the education of psychologists and other behavioral health specialists about issues pertaining to the...

  15. Airline Operation Center Workstation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Airline Operation Center Workstation (AOC Workstation) represents equipment available to users of the National Airspace system, outside of the FAA, that enables...

  16. Environmental Modeling Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Modeling Center provides the computational tools to perform geostatistical analysis, to model ground water and atmospheric releases for comparison...

  17. Data Center at NICT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Sekido, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    The Data Center at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) archives and releases the databases and analysis results processed at the Correlator and the Analysis Center at NICT. Regular VLBI sessions of the Key Stone Project VLBI Network were the primary objective of the Data Center. These regular sessions continued until the end of November 2001. In addition to the Key Stone Project VLBI sessions, NICT has been conducting geodetic VLBI sessions for various purposes, and these data are also archived and released by the Data Center.

  18. Small Business Development Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs) provide assistance to small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs throughout the United States and its territories. SBDCs...

  19. Internet Naming and Discovery Architecture and Economics

    CERN Document Server

    Khoury, Joud S

    2013-01-01

    Naming is an integral building block within data networks and systems and is becoming ever more important as complex data-centric usage models emerge. Internet Naming and Discovery is timely in developing a unified model for studying the topic of naming and discovery. It details the architectural and economic tools needed for designing naming and discovery schemes within the broader context of internetwork architecture.   Readers will find in this book a historic overview of the Internet and a comprehensive survey of the literature, followed by and an in-depth examination of naming and discovery. Specific topics covered include: ·         formal definitions of name, address, identifier, locator, binding, routing, discovery, mapping, and resolution; ·         a discussion of the properties of names and bindings, along with illustrative case studies; ·         taxonomy that helps in organizing the solution space, and more importantly in identifying new avenues for contributing to the...

  20. Using C. elegans for antimicrobial drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalermos, Athanasios; Muhammed, Maged; Glavis-Bloom, Justin; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The number of microorganism strains with resistance to known antimicrobials is increasing. Therefore, there is a high demand for new, non-toxic and efficient antimicrobial agents. Research with the microscopic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans can address this high demand for the discovery of new antimicrobial compounds. In particular, C. elegans can be used as a model host for in vivo drug discovery through high-throughput screens of chemical libraries. Areas covered This review introduces the use of substitute model hosts and especially C. elegans in the study of microbial pathogenesis. The authors also highlight recently published literature on the role of C. elegans in drug discovery and outline its use as a promising host with unique advantages in the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. Expert opinion C. elegans can be used, as a model host, to research many diseases, including fungal infections and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, high-throughput techniques, for screening chemical libraries, can also be facilitated. Nevertheless, C. elegans and mammals have significant differences that both limit the use of the nematode in research and the degree by which results can be interpreted. That being said, the use of C. elegans in drug discovery still holds promise and the field continues to grow, with attempts to improve the methodology already underway. PMID:21686092

  1. On reliable discovery of molecular signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björkegren Johan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular signatures are sets of genes, proteins, genetic variants or other variables that can be used as markers for a particular phenotype. Reliable signature discovery methods could yield valuable insight into cell biology and mechanisms of human disease. However, it is currently not clear how to control error rates such as the false discovery rate (FDR in signature discovery. Moreover, signatures for cancer gene expression have been shown to be unstable, that is, difficult to replicate in independent studies, casting doubts on their reliability. Results We demonstrate that with modern prediction methods, signatures that yield accurate predictions may still have a high FDR. Further, we show that even signatures with low FDR may fail to replicate in independent studies due to limited statistical power. Thus, neither stability nor predictive accuracy are relevant when FDR control is the primary goal. We therefore develop a general statistical hypothesis testing framework that for the first time provides FDR control for signature discovery. Our method is demonstrated to be correct in simulation studies. When applied to five cancer data sets, the method was able to discover molecular signatures with 5% FDR in three cases, while two data sets yielded no significant findings. Conclusion Our approach enables reliable discovery of molecular signatures from genome-wide data with current sample sizes. The statistical framework developed herein is potentially applicable to a wide range of prediction problems in bioinformatics.

  2. Facilitating Service Discovery with Semantic Overlay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Jin; Hao Wu; Xiao-Min Ning

    2006-01-01

    Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) and Peer-to-Peer (P2P) computing share many common characteristics.It is believed that the combination of the two emerging techniques is a very promising method in promoting the web services (WS). Because the service discovery plays a key role in the integration, here a P2P-based framework to manage the knowledge of service and locating services is proposed. In this paper, the details of the principle, constructing and maintaining of service semantic overlay architecture have been described, and the way how the semantic overlay facilitates discovery of service resources is illustrated. To enable the semantic web service superiority, Service Ontology, which is considered as the service semantic model, is employed to depict service. The service discovery includes two phases: searching on the service semantic overlay; and local discovery in peer's service repository. Various solutions have been proposed to realize those two phases.Furthermore, tests are carried out to evaluate service discovery on the architecture.

  3. Jail to Job Phase II. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erie City School District, PA.

    Through the Jail to Job Phase II project, the Erie Adult Learning Center provided inmates of the Erie County Prison with employability skills, decision making, problem solving, survival skills, and anger management education. Forty soon-to-be-released inmates participated in 37 hours of class. Prison staff, in concert with the instructor, selected…

  4. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  5. Antifungal drug discovery: the process and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderone, Richard; Sun, Nuo; Gay-Andrieu, Francoise; Groutas, William; Weerawarna, Pathum; Prasad, Sridhar; Alex, Deepu; Li, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    New data suggest that the global incidence of several types of fungal diseases have traditionally been under-documented. Of these, mortality caused by invasive fungal infections remains disturbingly high, equal to or exceeding deaths caused by drug-resistant tuberculosis and malaria. It is clear that basic research on new antifungal drugs, vaccines and diagnostic tools is needed. In this review, we focus upon antifungal drug discovery including in vitro assays, compound libraries and approaches to target identification. Genome mining has made it possible to identify fungal-specific targets; however, new compounds to these targets are apparently not in the antimicrobial pipeline. We suggest that 'repurposing' compounds (off patent) might be a more immediate starting point. Furthermore, we examine the dogma on antifungal discovery and suggest that a major thrust in technologies such as structural biology, homology modeling and virtual imaging is needed to drive discovery. PMID:25046525

  6. Discovery, Characterization, and Dynamics of Transiting Exoplanets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Eylen, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Are we alone in the Universe? So far, the question remains unanswered, but a significant leap forward was achieved two decades ago, with the discovery of the first planets orbiting stars other than our Sun. Almost 2000 exoplanets have now been detected. They are diverse in radius, mass and orbital......, in this thesis I make use of the transit method, which is based on the observed brightness drop of a star as a planet crosses in front of it. This thesis consists of two parts. The first part focuses on the discovery of new planets and the understanding of exoplanet properties. I report the discovery...... results of this study, constraining the masses and bulk compositions of three planets. The second part of this thesis focuses on dynamics of exoplanets. All the solar system planets orbit in nearly the same plane, and that plane is also aligned with the equatorial plane of the Sun. That is not true...

  7. Penicillin: its discovery and early development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligon, B Lee

    2004-01-01

    In August 1928, Alexander Fleming returned from a vacation to his usually messy, disordered laboratory. In one of the Petri dishes that had not been touched by the Lysol, he noticed an unusual phenomenon: separate colonies of staphylococci and, near the dish's edge, a colony of mold approximately 20 mm in diameter. The finding proved to be a watershed in the history of medicine. This discovery lay dormant for some time before other researchers took up the challenge to investigate its clinical possibilities. Two investigators at Oxford, Sir Howard Walter Florey and Ernst Boris Chain, brought penicillin's potential for medical use to fruition and, along with Fleming, shared the 1945 Nobel Prize for Medicine. The discovery and development of penicillin represent one of the most important developments in the annals of medical history. This article presents a brief overview of the events that occurred in the progress from discovery to implementation as a therapeutic agent. PMID:15175995

  8. Virtual drug discovery: beyond computational chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilardoni, Francois; Arvanites, Anthony C

    2010-02-01

    This editorial looks at how a fully integrated structure that performs all aspects in the drug discovery process, under one company, is slowly disappearing. The steps in the drug discovery paradigm have been slowly increasing toward virtuality or outsourcing at various phases of product development in a company's candidate pipeline. Each step in the process, such as target identification and validation and medicinal chemistry, can be managed by scientific teams within a 'virtual' company. Pharmaceutical companies to biotechnology start-ups have been quick in adopting this new research and development business strategy in order to gain flexibility, access the best technologies and technical expertise, and decrease product developmental costs. In today's financial climate, the term virtual drug discovery has an organizational meaning. It represents the next evolutionary step in outsourcing drug development.

  9. Discovery and design of nuclear fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Stan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available To facilitate the discovery and design of innovative nuclear fuels, multi-scale models and simulations are used to predict irradiation effects on properties such as thermal conductivity, oxygen diffusivity, and thermal expansion. The multi-scale approach is illustrated using results on ceramic fuels, with a focus on predictions of point defect concentration, stoichiometry, and phase stability. The high performance computer simulations include coupled heat transport, diffusion, and thermal expansion, and gas bubble formation and evolution in a fuel element consisting of UO2 fuel and metallic cladding. The second part of the paper is dedicated to a discussion of an international strategy for developing advanced, innovative nuclear fuels. Four initiatives are proposed to accelerate the discovery and design of new materials: (a Create Institutes for Materials Discovery and Design, (b Create an International Knowledgebase for experimental data, models (mathematical expressions, and simulations (codes, (c Improve education and (d Set up international collaborations.

  10. Genome-wide SNP discovery in walnut with an AGSNP pipeline updated for SNP discovery in allogamous organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Frank M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A genome-wide set of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs is a valuable resource in genetic research and breeding and is usually developed by re-sequencing a genome. If a genome sequence is not available, an alternative strategy must be used. We previously reported the development of a pipeline (AGSNP for genome-wide SNP discovery in coding sequences and other single-copy DNA without a complete genome sequence in self-pollinating (autogamous plants. Here we updated this pipeline for SNP discovery in outcrossing (allogamous species and demonstrated its efficacy in SNP discovery in walnut (Juglans regia L.. Results The first step in the original implementation of the AGSNP pipeline was the construction of a reference sequence and the identification of single-copy sequences in it. To identify single-copy sequences, multiple genome equivalents of short SOLiD reads of another individual were mapped to shallow genome coverage of long Sanger or Roche 454 reads making up the reference sequence. The relative depth of SOLiD reads was used to filter out repeated sequences from single-copy sequences in the reference sequence. The second step was a search for SNPs between SOLiD reads and the reference sequence. Polymorphism within the mapped SOLiD reads would have precluded SNP discovery; hence both individuals had to be homozygous. The AGSNP pipeline was updated here for using SOLiD or other type of short reads of a heterozygous individual for these two principal steps. A total of 32.6X walnut genome equivalents of SOLiD reads of vegetatively propagated walnut scion cultivar ‘Chandler’ were mapped to 48,661 ‘Chandler’ bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC end sequences (BESs produced by Sanger sequencing during the construction of a walnut physical map. A total of 22,799 putative SNPs were initially identified. A total of 6,000 Infinium II type SNPs evenly distributed along the walnut physical map were selected for the

  11. A national neurological excellence centers network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzi, S; Cristiani, P; Cavallini, A

    1998-02-01

    The most relevant problems related to the management of neurological disorders are (i) the frequent hospitalization in nonspecialist departments, with the need for neurological consultation, and (ii) the frequent requests of GPs for highly specialized investigations that are very expensive and of little value in arriving at a correct diagnosis. In 1996, the Consorzio di Bioingegneria e Informatica Medica in Italy realized the CISNet project (in collaboration with the Consorzio Istituti Scientifici Neuroscienze e Tecnologie Biomediche and funded by the Centro Studi of the National Public Health Council) for the implementation of a national neurological excellence centers network (CISNet). In the CISNet project, neurologists will be able to give on-line interactive consultation and off-line consulting services identifying correct diagnostic/therapeutic procedures, evaluating the need for both examination in specialist centers and admission to specialized centers, and identifying the most appropriate ones.

  12. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Consumers Businesses Contact CPSC Website Design Feedback Consumers: Español Businesses: Español , 中文 , Tiếng Việt Connect with Us : Twitter YouTube ... Safely Home / Safety Education / Safety Education Centers En Español Carbon Monoxide Information Center The Invisible Killer Carbon ...

  13. Technology Information Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Transportation Technology Center (TTC) has been established at Sandia to address the transportation of nuclear waste and spent fuel. The Technology Information Center (TIC) acts as TTC's clearing house for nuclear material transportation information. TIC's activities are divided into three activities: public information, policy information, and technical information. Some of the uses of TIC's activities are briefly outlined

  14. Center for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... VA » Center for Women Veterans (CWV) Center for Women Veterans (CWV) 10/27/2016 #VeteranOfTheDay Army Veteran ... Meet the Veteran of the Day » Employment and Women Veterans An interview with the Women Veteran Program ...

  15. Call Center Capacity Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Bang

    The main topics of the thesis are theoretical and applied queueing theory within a call center setting. Call centers have in recent years become the main means of communication between customers and companies, and between citizens and public institutions. The extensively computerized infrastructu...

  16. NASA propagation information center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1990-07-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  17. Simple Machine Science Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessin, Debby

    2007-01-01

    Science centers can engage students; accommodate different learning styles and individual interests; help students become independent and confident learners; and encourage social skills among students. In this article, the author worked with third-grade students as they completed activities at learning centers during a week-long unit on simple…

  18. Discovery stories in the science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Diana Jaleh

    School science has been criticized for its lack of emphasis on the tentative, dynamic nature of science as a process of learning more about our world. This criticism is the guiding force for this present body of work, which focuses on the question: what are the educational benefits for middle school students of reading texts that highlight the process of science in the form of a discovery narrative? This dissertation traces my journey through a review of theoretical perspectives of narrative, an analysis of first-hand accounts of scientific discovery, the complex process of developing age-appropriate, cohesive and engaging science texts for middle school students, and a comparison study (N=209) that seeks to determine the unique benefits of the scientific discovery narrative for the interest in and retained understanding of conceptual information presented in middle school science texts. A total of 209 middle school participants in nine different classrooms from two different schools participated in the experimental study. Each subject read two science texts that differed in topic (the qualities of and uses for radioactive elements and the use of telescopic technology to see planets in space) and genre (the discovery narrative and the "conceptually known exposition" comparison text). The differences between the SDN and CKE versions for each topic were equivalent in all possible ways (initial introduction, overall conceptual accuracy, elements of human interest, coherence and readability level), save for the unique components of the discovery narrative (i.e., love for their work, acknowledgement of the known, identification of the unknown and the explorative or experimental process to discovery). Participants generally chose the discovery narrative version as the more interesting of the two texts. Additional findings from the experimental study suggest that science texts in the form of SDNs elicit greater long-term retention of key conceptual information, especially

  19. Opportunities for isotope discoveries at FRIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, T.; Hausmann, M.; Sherrill, B. M.; Tarasov, O. B.

    2016-06-01

    Expected production yields of the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) were calculated for a wide range of rare isotopes using the code LISE++ and planned performance parameters (Tarasov and Bazin, 2008; Bollen et al., 2011 [2]). A comparison between isotope discoveries of the last decade and expected particle yields indicates the range of isotopes that can likely be detected at FRIB. This paper will highlight recent isotope discoveries at NSCL's Coupled Cyclotron Facility and deduce how far the limits could be pushed with the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams.

  20. An environment for knowledge discovery in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Junior; Cesar, Roberto M; Ferreira, João E; Gubitoso, Marco D

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes a data mining environment for knowledge discovery in bioinformatics applications. The system has a generic kernel that implements the mining functions to be applied to input primary databases, with a warehouse architecture, of biomedical information. Both supervised and unsupervised classification can be implemented within the kernel and applied to data extracted from the primary database, with the results being suitably stored in a complex object database for knowledge discovery. The kernel also includes a specific high-performance library that allows designing and applying the mining functions in parallel machines. The experimental results obtained by the application of the kernel functions are reported.

  1. On the 1932 Discovery of the Positron.

    OpenAIRE

    Lawncizak, Alexander; Åsbrink, Victor

    2014-01-01

    An experiment on Cosmic rays performed by Carl D Anderson led to the accidental discovery of the positron in 1932. The discovery was a turning point in particle physics which led to numerous other theories and has been discussed by scientists all over the world. Anderson had photographed a 63 MeV, upward moving electron. The possible origin of such a positron has never before been discussed and is what this report will aim to explain. The report will include some evidence that the particle is...

  2. What's new, Voyager: The discoveries continue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Ellis D.

    1995-01-01

    The twin Voyager spacecraft, launched nearly two decades ago, continue to operate and are now searching for the edge of our solar system, the heliopause. Voyager's giant-planet flybys of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune have provided data that are likely to remain the definitive data set for the foreseeable future and have led to many ongoing discoveries. As the spacecraft move toward the heliopause, they are also providing data on the structure of the heliosphere. This article discusses the discoveries resulting from the flyby and heliosphere data that have been made within the past five years.

  3. Stable Feature Selection for Biomarker Discovery

    CERN Document Server

    He, Zengyou

    2010-01-01

    Feature selection techniques have been used as the workhorse in biomarker discovery applications for a long time. Surprisingly, the stability of feature selection with respect to sampling variations has long been under-considered. It is only until recently that this issue has received more and more attention. In this article, we review existing stable feature selection methods for biomarker discovery using a generic hierarchal framework. We have two objectives: (1) providing an overview on this new yet fast growing topic for a convenient reference; (2) categorizing existing methods under an expandable framework for future research and development.

  4. Reclaiming Kindergarten: Part II--Questions about Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullo, Dominic F.; Hughes, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Part II of "Reclaiming Kindergarten" continues the discussion related to responding to the crisis in today's kindergarten. In Part II, two policy questions are posed, the answers to which seek to respond to this continuing crisis. The questions center on issues related to engaging families in kindergarten and the need to consider a new early…

  5. Relative Lyapunov Center Bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Claudia; Schilder, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Relative equilibria (REs) and relative periodic orbits (RPOs) are ubiquitous in symmetric Hamiltonian systems and occur, for example, in celestial mechanics, molecular dynamics, and rigid body motion. REs are equilibria, and RPOs are periodic orbits of the symmetry reduced system. Relative Lyapunov...... center bifurcations are bifurcations of RPOs from REs corresponding to Lyapunov center bifurcations of the symmetry reduced dynamics. In this paper we first prove a relative Lyapunov center theorem by combining recent results on the persistence of RPOs in Hamiltonian systems with a symmetric Lyapunov...... center theorem of Montaldi, Roberts, and Stewart. We then develop numerical methods for the detection of relative Lyapunov center bifurcations along branches of RPOs and for their computation. We apply our methods to Lagrangian REs of the N-body problem....

  6. Levels of Cd (II, Mn (II, Pb (II, Cu (II, and Zn (II in Common Buzzard (Buteo buteo from Sicily (Italy by Derivative Stripping Potentiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Licata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the concentrations of heavy metals (Cd, Pb, Cu, Mn, and Zn in different organs (liver, kidney, muscle, lung, skin, and feathers of buzzards (Buteo buteo, utilized as a “biological indicator” for environmental contamination, from different areas of Sicily and to investigate the relationships between birds sex, age, and weight and metal levels in these samples. All samples of common buzzards were collected at the “Recovery Center of Wild Fauna” of Palermo, through the Zooprophilactic Institute. Potentiometric stripping analysis (PSA was used to determine the content of Cd(II, Cu(II, Mn(II, Pb(II, and Zn(II in bird tissues. For toxic metals, the highest levels of Pb were in liver and those of Cd in lung; Zn levels were higher than Cu and Mn in all tissues analyzed. The concentrations in liver, lung, kidney, and muscle could be considered as an indicative of chronic exposure to metals while the presence of metals in skin could be consequential to storing and elimination processes. The found concentrations of metals in the studied matrices required a highly sensitive method for their determination and a simple sample preparation procedure, and the proposed method was well suited for this purpose.

  7. KCC1: First Nanoparticle developed by KAUST Catalysis Center

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie

    2010-08-01

    KCC1 is the first Nanoparticle developed by KAUST Catalysis Center. Director of KAUST Catalysis Center, Dr. Jean-Marie Basset, Senior Research Scientist at KCC, Dr. Vivek Polshettiwar, and Dr. Dongkyu Cha of the Advanced Nanofabrication Imaging & Characterization Core Laboratory discuss the details of this recent discovery. This video was produced by KAUST Visualization Laboratory and KAUST Technology Transfer and Innovation - Terence McElwee, Director, Technology Transfer and Innovation - IP@kaust.edu.sa This technology is part of KAUST\\'s technology commercialization program that seeks to stimulate development and commercial use of KAUST-developed technologies. For more information email us at ip@kaust.edu.sa.

  8. High-throughput characterization for solar fuels materials discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovic, Slobodan; Becerra, Natalie; Cornell, Earl; Guevarra, Dan; Haber, Joel; Jin, Jian; Jones, Ryan; Kan, Kevin; Marcin, Martin; Newhouse, Paul; Soedarmadji, Edwin; Suram, Santosh; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John; High-Throughput Experimentation Team

    2014-03-01

    In this talk I will present the status of the High-Throughput Experimentation (HTE) project of the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP). JCAP is an Energy Innovation Hub of the U.S. Department of Energy with a mandate to deliver a solar fuel generator based on an integrated photoelectrochemical cell (PEC). However, efficient and commercially viable catalysts or light absorbers for the PEC do not exist. The mission of HTE is to provide the accelerated discovery through combinatorial synthesis and rapid screening of material properties. The HTE pipeline also features high-throughput material characterization using x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). In this talk I present the currently operating pipeline and focus on our combinatorial XPS efforts to build the largest free database of spectra from mixed-metal oxides, nitrides, sulfides and alloys. This work was performed at Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, a DOE Energy Innovation Hub, supported through the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Award No. DE-SC0004993.

  9. Fermi Discovery of Gamma-Ray Emission from NGC 1275

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A; Aller, M F; Kellermann, K I; Kovalev, Y Y; Kovalev, Y A; Lister, M L; Pushkarev, A B

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of high-energy (E>100 MeV) gamma-ray emission from NGC 1275, a giant elliptical galaxy lying at the center of the Perseus cluster of galaxies, based on observations made with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) of the Fermi Gamma ray Space Telescope. The positional center of the gamma-ray source is only ~3' away from the NGC 1275 nucleus, well within the 95% LAT error circle of ~5'.The spatial distribution of gamma-ray photons is consistent with a point source. The average flux and power-law photon index measured with the LAT from 2008 August 4 to 2008 December 5 are F_gamma = (2.10+-0.23)x 10^{-7} ph (>100 MeV) cm^{-2} s^{-1} and Gamma = 2.17+-0.05, respectively. The measurements are statistically consistent with constant flux during the four-month LAT observing period.Previous EGRET observations gave an upper limit of F_gamma 100 MeV) cm^{-2} s^{-1} to the gamma-ray flux from NGC 1275. This indicates that the source is variable on timescales of years to decades, and therefore restricts th...

  10. Archives Library Information Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — ALIC is an online library catalog of books, periodicals, and other materials contained in Archives I and II and book collections located in other facilities.

  11. Computer Center: Software Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhrkopf, Richard, Ed.; Belshe, John F., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews a software package, "Mitosis-Meiosis," available for Apple II or IBM computers with colorgraphics capabilities. Describes the documentation, presentation and flexibility of the program. Rates the program based on graphics and usability in a biology classroom. (CW)

  12. TRUPACT-II procedures and maintenance instructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for operation, inspection and maintenance of a TRUPACT-II Shipping Package and directly related components. This document shall supply the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) and Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9218. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the TRUPACT-II SARP (NRC Certificate of Compliance No. 9218), the TRUPACT-II SARP shall govern. This document details the operations, maintenance, repair, replacement of components, as well as the documentation required and the procedures to be followed to maintain the integrity of the TRUPACT-II container. These procedures may be modified for site use, but as a minimum all parameters and format listed herein must be included in any site modified version. For convenience and where applicable steps may be performed out of sequence. Packaging and payload handling equipment and transport trailers have been specifically designed for use with the TRUPACT-II Packaging. This document discusses the minimum required procedures for use of the adjustable center of gravity lift fixture and the TRUPACT-II transport trailer in conjunction with the TRUPACT-II Packaging

  13. TRUPACT-II procedures and maintenance instructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-01-14

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for operation, inspection and maintenance of a TRUPACT-II Shipping Package and directly related components. This document shall supply the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) and Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9218. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the TRUPACT-II SARP (NRC Certificate of Compliance No. 9218), the TRUPACT-II SARP shall govern. This document details the operations, maintenance, repair, replacement of components, as well as the documentation required and the procedures to be followed to maintain the integrity of the TRUPACT-II container. These procedures may be modified for site use, but as a minimum all parameters and format listed herein must be included in any site modified version. For convenience and where applicable steps may be performed out of sequence. Packaging and payload handling equipment and transport trailers have been specifically designed for use with the TRUPACT-II Packaging. This document discusses the minimum required procedures for use of the adjustable center of gravity lift fixture and the TRUPACT-II transport trailer in conjunction with the TRUPACT-II Packaging.

  14. Energy efficient data centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-03-30

    Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to California's economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to California's industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commission's PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research ''roadmap'' defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency. Although there are many opinions concerning the energy intensity of data centers and the aggregate effect on California's electrical power systems, there is very little publicly available information. Through this project, actual energy consumption at its end use was measured in a number of data centers. This benchmark data was documented in case study reports, along with site-specific energy efficiency recommendations. Additionally, other data center energy benchmarks were obtained through synergistic projects, prior PG&E studies, and industry contacts. In total, energy benchmarks for sixteen data centers were obtained. For this project, a broad definition of ''data center'' was adopted which included internet hosting, corporate, institutional, governmental, educational and other miscellaneous data centers. Typically these facilities require specialized infrastructure to provide high quality power and cooling for IT equipment. All of these data center types were considered in the development of an estimate of the total power consumption in California. Finally, a research ''roadmap'' was developed

  15. ASA's Chandra Neon Discovery Solves Solar Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory survey of nearby sun-like stars suggests there is nearly three times more neon in the sun and local universe than previously believed. If true, this would solve a critical problem with understanding how the sun works. "We use the sun to test how well we understand stars and, to some extent, the rest of the universe," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. "But in order to understand the sun, we need to know exactly what it is made of," he added. It is not well known how much neon the sun contains. This is critical information for creating theoretical models of the sun. Neon atoms, along with carbon, oxygen and nitrogen, play an important role in how quickly energy flows from nuclear reactions in the sun's core to its edge, where it then radiates into space. Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi The rate of this energy flow determines the location and size of a crucial stellar region called the convection zone. The zone extends from near the sun's surface inward approximately 125,000 miles. The zone is where the gas undergoes a rolling, convective motion much like the unstable air in a thunderstorm. "This turbulent gas has an extremely important job, because nearly all of the energy emitted at the surface of the sun is transported there by convection," Drake said. The accepted amount of neon in the sun has led to a paradox. The predicted location and size of the solar convection zone disagree with those deduced from solar oscillations. Solar oscillations is a technique astronomers previously relied on to probe the sun's interior. Several scientists have noted the problem could be fixed if the abundance of neon is in fact about three times larger than currently accepted. Attempts to measure the precise amount of neon in the Sun have been frustrated by a quirk of nature; neon atoms in the Sun give off no signatures in visible light. However, in a gas

  16. Origins of Massive Field Stars in the Galactic Center: a Spectroscopic Study

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Hui; Morris, Mark R; Wang, Q Daniel; Cotera, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Outside of the known star clusters in the Galactic Center, a large number of evolved massive stars have been detected; but their origins remain uncertain. We present a spectroscopic study of eight such stars, based on new Gemini GNIRS and NIFS near-infrared observations. This work has led to the discovery of a new O If+ star. We compare the reddening-corrected J-K vs K diagram for our stars with the massive ones in the Arches cluster and use stellar evolutionary tracks to constrain their ages and masses. The radial velocities of both the stars and their nearby H II regions are also reported. All of the stars are blueshifted relative to the Arches cluster by > 50 km/s. We find that our source P35 has a velocity consistent with that of the surrounding molecular gas. The velocity gradient of nearby ionized gas along the Gemini GNIRS long slit, relative to P35 and the adjacent -30-0 km/s molecular cloud, can best be explained by a pressure-driven flow model. Thus, P35 most likely formed in situ. Three more of our...

  17. User-centered design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simplification philosophy, as an example, that both of EPRI-URD and EUR emphasize is treated mostly for the cost reduction of the nuclear power plants, but not for the simplification of the structure of user's tasks, which is one of the principles of user-centered design. A user-centered design is a philosophy based on the needs and interests of the user, with an emphasis on making products usable and understandable. However, the nuclear power plants offered these days by which the predominant reactor vendors are hardly user-centered but still designer-centered or technology-centered in viewpoint of fulfilling user requirements. The main goal of user-centered design is that user requirements are elicited correctly, reflected properly into the system requirements, and verified thoroughly by the tests. Starting from the user requirements throughout to the final test, each requirement should be traceable. That's why requirement traceability is a key to the user-centered design, and main theme of a requirement management program, which is suggested to be added into EPRI-URD and EUR in the section of Design Process. (author)

  18. Lens auto-centering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamontagne, Frédéric; Desnoyers, Nichola; Doucet, Michel; Côté, Patrice; Gauvin, Jonny; Anctil, Geneviève; Tremblay, Mathieu

    2015-09-01

    In a typical optical system, optical elements usually need to be precisely positioned and aligned to perform the correct optical function. This positioning and alignment involves securing the optical element in a holder or mount. Proper centering of an optical element with respect to the holder is a delicate operation that generally requires tight manufacturing tolerances or active alignment, resulting in costly optical assemblies. To optimize optical performance and minimize manufacturing cost, there is a need for a lens mounting method that could relax manufacturing tolerance, reduce assembly time and provide high centering accuracy. This paper presents a patent pending lens mounting method developed at INO that can be compared to the drop-in technique for its simplicity while providing the level of accuracy close to that achievable with techniques using a centering machine (usually innovative auto-centering method is based on the use of geometrical relationship between the lens diameter, the lens radius of curvature and the thread angle of the retaining ring. The autocentering principle and centering test results performed on real optical assemblies are presented. In addition to the low assembly time, high centering accuracy, and environmental robustness, the INO auto-centering method has the advantage of relaxing lens and barrel bore diameter tolerances as well as lens wedge tolerances. The use of this novel lens mounting method significantly reduces manufacturing and assembly costs for high performance optical systems. Large volume productions would especially benefit from this advancement in precision lens mounting, potentially providing a drastic cost reduction.

  19. Fusion engineering design center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the spring of 1985, the Department of Energy (DOE) directed the Design Center to take a lead responsibility in assessing the engineering feasibility of a very compact tokamak experiment with copper coils. Following this assessment, the Design Center studied the Ignitor concept at the request of DOE and arrived at a design configuration. Many features of this configuration have been incorporated into the national baseline conceptual design for a Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). The Design Center continued to participate in the mirror program by contributing to the Minimars design effort, a two-year program to develop and describe an attractive tandem mirror reactor concept. The Design Center's principal role is in configuration definition of the candidate concepts. The Design Center continues to lead the engineering activities for the International Tokamak Reactor program. Advanced commercial tokamaks were studied by the Design Center as part of the Tokamak Power Systems Studies project coordinated by the DOE Office of Fusion Energy. The Design Center also provided design integration of the US effort. A cost accounting system that is applicable to all magnetic fusion reactor design studies was developed and applied to different confinement concepts and types of projects. The system provides the structure for development of a fusion cost database and validated cost estimating procedures

  20. Microscopy Opening Up New Cancer Discovery Avenues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Today’s high-powered microscopes are allowing researchers to study the fine details of individual cells and to peer into cells, opening up new avenues of discovery about the inner workings of cells, including the events that can cause healthy cells to tra

  1. A classification of service discovery protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin Perianu, Raluca; Hartel, Pieter; Scholten, Hans

    2005-01-01

    Service discovery is an emerging field in the area of ubiquitous computing. There are various techniques and protocols (proposed or/and already implemented) particularly tailored to specific sets of objectives. This paper analyses the current state of the art and presents a taxonomy of service disco

  2. 36 CFR 1150.63 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discovery. 1150.63 Section 1150.63 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD... satisfactory to the judge, the judge may decide the fact or issue relating to the material requested to...

  3. Scheele's Priority for the Discovery of Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassebaum, H.; Schufle, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Concludes that Carl Scheele first observed oxygen and clearly understood what he was observing in June 1771, when he heated manganese dioxide with concentrated sulfuric acid. This was more than three years before Lavoisier or Priestley (who is usually credited with the discovery of oxygen) made similar observations. (Author/MLH)

  4. Discovery – Methotrexate: Chemotherapy Treatment for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to the 1950s, treatment for the majority of cancers was limited to either surgery or the use of radiation. The discovery of the use of methotrexate in curing a rare cancer marked the first time a cancer had been cured. This led to the development of many of today’s common cancer treatments.

  5. OPTIMIZED GATEWAY DISCOVERY IN HYBRID MANETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Triviño

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mobile users are expected to demand access to the Internet anywhere and anytime. In a MANET context,a device which is about to connect to external hosts needs the route to the element which communicatesthe MANET with the Internet. This element is the Internet Gateway. To inform about its presence as wellas about some configuration parameters, the Gateway sends MRA messages. In a similar way to ad hocrouting protocols, the Gateway can generate the messages on demand (reactively, periodically(proactively or combining both previous strategies in a hybrid gateway discovery. Specifically, in thehybrid gateway discovery, the Gateway periodically sends the MRA messages in a restricted area. Thenodes that are outside this area demand the Gateway information reactively. This gateway discoveryrequires the setting of the number of hops that define the proactive area, also called the TTL value.Network performance can be improved when the Gateway uses information such as the position of thesources to adjust the TTL value. In this paper, we transfer the decision about the dimensions of theproactive zone to the mobile nodes so more network conditions are taken into account. Simulation resultsshow that the proposed gateway discovery outperforms other hybrid gateway discovery schemes.

  6. Natural product discovery: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Leonard; Baltz, Richard H

    2016-03-01

    Microorganisms have provided abundant sources of natural products which have been developed as commercial products for human medicine, animal health, and plant crop protection. In the early years of natural product discovery from microorganisms (The Golden Age), new antibiotics were found with relative ease from low-throughput fermentation and whole cell screening methods. Later, molecular genetic and medicinal chemistry approaches were applied to modify and improve the activities of important chemical scaffolds, and more sophisticated screening methods were directed at target disease states. In the 1990s, the pharmaceutical industry moved to high-throughput screening of synthetic chemical libraries against many potential therapeutic targets, including new targets identified from the human genome sequencing project, largely to the exclusion of natural products, and discovery rates dropped dramatically. Nonetheless, natural products continued to provide key scaffolds for drug development. In the current millennium, it was discovered from genome sequencing that microbes with large genomes have the capacity to produce about ten times as many secondary metabolites as was previously recognized. Indeed, the most gifted actinomycetes have the capacity to produce around 30-50 secondary metabolites. With the precipitous drop in cost for genome sequencing, it is now feasible to sequence thousands of actinomycete genomes to identify the "biosynthetic dark matter" as sources for the discovery of new and novel secondary metabolites. Advances in bioinformatics, mass spectrometry, proteomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics and gene expression are driving the new field of microbial genome mining for applications in natural product discovery and development. PMID:26739136

  7. Knowledge Discovery from Communication Network Alarm Databases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The technique of Knowledge Discovery in Databases(KDD) to learn valuable knowledge hidden in network alarm databases is introduced. To get such knowledge, we propose an efficient method based on sliding windows (named as Slidwin) to discover different episode rules from time sequential alarm data. The experimental results show that given different thresholds parameters, large amount of different rules could be discovered quickly.

  8. Milestones in Cancer Research and Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    During the past 250 years, we have witnessed many landmark discoveries in our efforts to make progress against cancer, an affliction known to humanity for thousands of years. This timeline shows a few key milestones in the history of cancer research.

  9. 10 CFR 2.1018 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discovery. 2.1018 Section 2.1018 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... legal theories of an attorney or other representative of a party, potential party, or interested... section does not apply to requests for the testimony of the NRC regulatory staff under § 2.709. (g)...

  10. The Discovery and Progress of AIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ 1 The Discovery It is a modern plague: the first great pandemic ofthe second half of the 20th century. The plat, clinic-sounding name given to the disease by epidemiolo-gists- acquired immune deficiency syndrome- hasbeen shortened to AIDS.

  11. Behind the discovery of "Nissenbaum's fixative".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissenbaum, G

    2001-01-01

    The author describes the serendipitous discovery, conception, development, and history of Nissenbaum's Fixative while an undergraduate biology major in the early 1950s. The subsequent uses, applications, and modifications over the past forty-seven years are also described. Some of the modifications omitted from his short original paper are mentioned. Highlights of his subsequent career in the field of medicine are noted.

  12. Applying genetics in inflammatory disease drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkersen, Lasse; Biswas, Shameek; Frederiksen, Klaus Stensgaard;

    2015-01-01

    , with several notable exceptions, the journey from a small-effect genetic variant to a functional drug has proven arduous, and few examples of actual contributions to drug discovery exist. Here, we discuss novel approaches of overcoming this hurdle by using instead public genetics resources as a pragmatic guide...

  13. Computational approaches to natural product discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, M.H.; Fischbach, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Starting with the earliest Streptomyces genome sequences, the promise of natural product genome mining has been captivating: genomics and bioinformatics would transform compound discovery from an ad hoc pursuit to a high-throughput endeavor. Until recently, however, genome mining has advanced natura

  14. Knowledge discovery data and text mining

    CERN Document Server

    Olmer, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Data mining and text mining refer to techniques, models, algorithms, and processes for knowledge discovery and extraction. Basic de nitions are given together with the description of a standard data mining process. Common models and algorithms are presented. Attention is given to text clustering, how to convert unstructured text to structured data (vectors), and how to compute their importance and position within clusters.

  15. Discovery of the Isotopes with Z <= 10

    OpenAIRE

    Thoennessen, M

    2010-01-01

    A total of 126 isotopes with Z $\\le$ 10 have been identified to date. The discovery of these isotopes which includes the observation of unbound nuclei, is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  16. Data mining and knowledge discovery handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Maimon, Oded

    2010-01-01

    This book organizes key concepts, theories, standards, methodologies, trends, challenges and applications of data mining and knowledge discovery in databases. It first surveys, then provides comprehensive yet concise algorithmic descriptions of methods, including classic methods plus the extensions and novel methods developed recently. It also gives in-depth descriptions of data mining applications in various interdisciplinary industries.

  17. Data mining and knowledge discovery handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Maimon, Oded

    2006-01-01

    Organizes major concepts, theories, methodologies, trends, challenges and applications of data mining (DM) and knowledge discovery in databases (KDD). This book provides algorithmic descriptions of classic methods, and also suitable for professionals in fields such as computing applications, information systems management, and more.

  18. Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF) Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-07-29

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF) is an online collaboration and geospatial analysis tool that allows researchers, policymakers, and investors to explore and engage the latest bioenergy research. This publication describes how the KDF harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that facilitates collaborative production, integration, and analysis of bioenergy-related information.

  19. Toward discovery science of human brain function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biswal, B.B.; Mennes, M.; Zuo, X.N.; Gohel, S.; Kelly, C.; Smith, S.M.; Beckmann, C.F.; Adelstein, J.S.; Buckner, R.L.; Colcombe, S.; Dogonowski, A.M.; Ernst, M.; Fair, D.; Hampson, M.; Hoptman, M.J.; Hyde, J.S.; Kiviniemi, V.J.; Kotter, R.; Li, S.J.; Lin, C.P.; Lowe, M.J.; Mackay, C.; Madden, D.J.; Madsen, K.H.; Margulies, D.S.; Mayberg, H.S.; McMahon, K.; Monk, C.S.; Mostofsky, S.H.; Nagel, B.J.; Pekar, J.J.; Peltier, S.J.; Petersen, S.E.; Riedl, V.; Rombouts, S.A.; Rypma, B.; Schlaggar, B.L.; Schmidt, S.; Seidler, R.D.; Siegle, G.J.; Sorg, C.; Teng, G.J.; Veijola, J.; Villringer, A.; Walter, M.; Wang, L.; Weng, X.C.; Whitfield-Gabrieli, S.; Williamson, P.; Windischberger, C.; Zang, Y.F.; Zhang, H.Y.; Castellanos, F.X.; Milham, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    Although it is being successfully implemented for exploration of the genome, discovery science has eluded the functional neuroimaging community. The core challenge remains the development of common paradigms for interrogating the myriad functional systems in the brain without the constraints of a pr

  20. Neutrino discoveries lead to precision measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Altmann, M

    2002-01-01

    The science of neutrino physics has reached a watershed, with discovery giving way to precision measurements. The author reports from the XXth International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics. Topics covered are low-energy neutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, long-baseline experiments, accelerator experiments, neutrino properties, neutrinos in astrophysics and cosmology, dark matter and neutrino telescopes.